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Sample records for war injuries retrospective

  1. Popliteal artery war injuries.

    PubMed

    Davidovi?, L; Lotina, S; Kosti?, D; Velimirovi?, D; Duki?, P; Cinara, I; Vranes, M; Markovi?, M

    1997-02-01

    The early postoperative results of 44 surgically treated popliteal arterial injuries from the Yugoslav civil war are reported. Of these patients, 41 (93%) were males and three (7%) were females, average age was 28 (range 6-45) years. Twenty patients (45%) had gunshot wounds and 24 (55%) explosive wounds. Twelve (28%) suffered isolated vascular damage, while 32 (72%) suffered concomitant bone fractures. Isolated arterial lesions were found in 24 (55%) cases, and concomitant arterial and venous lesions in 20 (45%). Twenty-four (55%) had primary reconstructions after haemostasis in the initial war hospital, and 20 (45%) secondary reconstructions after inadequate primary reconstruction in a regional war hospital. Artery procedures included 19 reverse saphenous vein graft interpositions, 10 reverse saphenous vein bypasses, 12 'in situ' saphenous vein bypasses and five lateral subcutaneous saphenous vein bypasses. The early graft patency rate was 100%, and limb salvage 72%. Major amputation was performed in 28%. Concomitant bone fractures, secondary reconstructions, secondary haemorrhage from an infected graft, and explosion wounds significantly increased the amputation rate (P < 0.01). Eleven amputations were performed after an anatomic, and only one after an extra-anatomic reconstruction (P < 0.01). The authors recommend an in situ or lateral subcutaneous reconstruction in cases of complicated popliteal artery injuries, such as concomitant bone fractures accompanied by massive soft tissue damage, and this type of reconstruction should also be used if infection is present or the procedure is delayed. PMID:9158121

  2. Penetrating eye injury in war.

    PubMed

    Biehl, J W; Valdez, J; Hemady, R K; Steidl, S M; Bourke, D L

    1999-11-01

    The percentage of penetrating eye injuries in war has increased significantly in this century compared with the total number of combat injuries. With the increasing use of fragmentation weapons and possibly laser weapons on the battle-field in the future, the rate of eye injuries may exceed the 13% of the total military injuries found in Operations Desert Storm/Shield. During the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), eye injuries revealed that retained foreign bodies and posterior segment injuries have an improved prognosis in future military ophthalmic surgery as a result of modern diagnostic and treatment modalities. Compared with the increasing penetrating eye injuries on the battlefield, advances in ophthalmic surgery are insignificant. Eye armor, such as visors that flip up and down and protect the eyes from laser injury, needs to be developed. Similar eye protection is being developed in civilian sportswear. Penetrating eye injury in the civilian sector is becoming much closer to the military model and is now comparable for several reasons. PMID:10578588

  3. War injuries of the talus.

    PubMed

    Davila, S; Mikuli?, D

    2001-08-01

    Twenty-eight patients with war fractures of the talus were reviewed to determine the incidence of infection and late functional results. The average age of our patients was 37.5 years. Twenty-one injuries were explosive fractures that resulted from shell fragments or mines; seven fractures resulted from gunshot missiles. Seven patients had isolated talus injuries, whereas 21 patients had associated fractures of other bones of the foot or lower leg. All patients were initially treated with debridement, tetanus immunization, intravenous antibiotics, and stabilization, either with cast immobilization or an external fixator. Five days after injury, wound cultures were positive in 25 of 28 feet. Infection was eventually eradicated in all patients, allowing for soft tissue coverage. One patient eventually required a below-knee amputation. The patients were reviewed for functional outcome at 36 to 60 months after injury. Most patients reported a certain degree of residual complaints. The overall result can be considered excellent in only one patient. PMID:11515321

  4. Management of war-related vascular injuries: experience from the second gulf war

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aim To study the biomechanism, pattern of injury, management, and outcome of major vascular injuries treated at Mubarak Al-Kabeer Teaching Hospital, Kuwait during the Second Gulf War. Methods This is a descriptive retrospective study. War-related injured patients who had major vascular injuries and were treated at Mubarak Al-Kabeer Teaching Hospital from August 1990 to September 1991 were studied. Studied variables included age, gender, anatomical site of vascular injury, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, type of vascular repair, and clinical outcome. Results 36 patients having a mean (SD) age of 29.8 (10.2) years were studied. 32 (89%) were males and 21 (58%) were civilians. Majority of injuries were caused by bullets (47.2%) and blast injuries (47.2%). Eight patients (22%) presented with shock. There were 31 arterial injuries, common and superficial femoral artery injuries were most common (10/31). Arterial repair included interposition saphenous vein graft in seven patients, thrombectomy with end-to-end / lateral repair in twelve patients, vein patch in two patients, and arterial ligation in four patients. Six patients had arterial ligation as part of primary amputation. 3/21 (14.3%) patients had secondary amputation after attempted arterial vascular repair of an extremity. There were a total of 17 venous injuries, 13 managed by lateral suture repair and 4 by ligation. The median (range) hospital stay was 8 (1–76) days. 5 patients died (14%). Conclusions Major vascular injuries occurred in 10% of hospitalized war-related injured patients. Our secondary amputation rate of extremities was 14%. The presence of a vascular surgeon within a military surgical team is highly recommended. Basic principles and techniques of vascular repair remain an essential part of training general surgeons because it may be needed in unexpected wars. PMID:23816260

  5. Treatment of war injuries of the shoulder with external fixators.

    PubMed

    Davila, Slavko; Mikuli?, Danko; Davila, Neda Jarza; Popovi?, Ljiljana; Zupanci?, Bozidar

    2005-05-01

    In this retrospective study, 18 patients with war injuries of the shoulder were reviewed to evaluate the technical problems associated with external fixation and to analyze the incidence of infection and late functional results. The average patient age was 28.5 years. All patients were male. Thirteen patients had explosive wounds, whereas five wounds were caused by gunshot missiles. All injuries were extensive in terms of bone and soft tissue defects. Six patients presented with complex injuries involving neurovascular structures. Sixteen patients were treated with external fixation. Application of the proximal pins of the external fixator through the humeral head was possible in eight patients, the scapula served as the site of proximal fixation in four patients, only the clavicle was available for placement of pins in two patients, and both the scapula and the clavicle had to be pinned to achieve proximal stabilization in two patients. In two patients, fixation was not possible and early amputation was performed. Infection was eventually eradicated in all patients, allowing for adequate soft tissue coverage of the wounds. Analysis of functional results at an average of 6 years after the injury showed a considerable degree of functional deficit in most patients. PMID:15974209

  6. Treatment of Bone Defects in War Wounds: Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Milicevic, Snjezana; Grubor, Milan; Meccariello, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Results of the treatment of open fractures primarily depend on the treatment of connected soft tissue injuries. Objective: The aim was to present the experience and methods gained during the treatment of diaphyseal bone defects as a consequence of gunshot fracture soft war trauma. Patients and Methods: The study consisted of 116 patients with the diaphyseal bone defect who were treated with the usage of primary and delayed autotransplantation of bones, transplants of the fibula and Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis. Results: The results of compensation of bone defect less than 4 cm and conducted by an early cortico-spongioplastics were as follows: good in 8 respondents (45%), satisfactory in 6 (34%) and poor in 4 respondents (21%). In cases of delayed cortico-spongioplastics, the above mentioned results were: good in 36 (41%) respondents, satisfactory in 24 (34%) and poor in 16 (25%) respondents. The results of compensation of bone defect greater than 4 cm with the usage of fibular transplant were as follows: good in 3 (38%) respondents, satisfactory in 3 (38%) and poor in 2 (24%), and with the usage of using the Ilizarov method, the results were as follows: good in 8 (57%) respondents, satisfactory in 3 (21.5%) and poor in 3(21.5%) respondents. Conclusion: The results showed that, in cases of compensation of bone defects less than 4 cm, the advantage is given to the primary spongioplastics over the delayed one. In cases of compensation of bone defects greater than 4 cm, the advantage is given to the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis when compared to the fibular transplant. PMID:26543315

  7. War injuries of the crural arteries.

    PubMed

    Radonic, V; Baric, D; Petricevic, A; Kovacevic, H; Sapunar, D; Glavina-Durdov, M

    1995-06-01

    Twenty-eight patients with military crural vascular injuries are presented. In the group undergoing immediate repair (21 patients), the time interval between trauma and surgery was 20 min to 30 h (mean 8 h 30 min). In those receiving delayed repair (seven patients), the interval between trauma and surgery was 3-47 (mean 14) days. Hyperbaric oxygenation therapy was used in conjunction with surgery and antibiotic therapy in 13 of the 28 patients. Explosive injuries were found in 14 patients and high-velocity missile injuries in nine; associated fractures were present in 20. Twenty of the 28 patients with crural vascular injuries had combined arterial and venous injuries, while eight had isolated arterial injuries. Twenty-five patients with distal ischaemia required arterial repair; five late amputations resulted. Military crural vascular injuries should be treated with soft tissue debridement, removal of foreign material, and microvascular arterial and concomitant vein reconstruction. This should be followed by external skeletal stabilization for bony and/or soft tissue instability, with fasciotomy for any associated compartment syndrome. The wound should be left open, with delayed closure or split skin grafting. It was felt that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduced the amputation rate following combat-related crural vessel injuries. PMID:7627509

  8. US foreign policy and the CIA: A cold war retrospective

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The document consists of three previously announced reports: The CIA under Truman: CIA Cold War Records (PB94-928005); The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962 (PB92-927906); and Selected Estimates on the Soviet Union (PB93-928112).

  9. [Epidemiology of war injuries, about two conflicts: Iraq and Afghanistan].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, P; de Rudnicki, S; Donat, N; Auroy, Y; Merat, S

    2011-11-01

    Since March 2003, military operations in Iraq "Operation Iraqi Freedom" (OIF) and in Afghanistan "Operation Enduring Freedom" (OEF), have made many wounded and killed in action (KIA). This article proposes to highlight the specific epidemiology of combat casualties, met in these both non-conventional and asymmetric conflicts. Personal protective equipments, Kevlar helmet and body armor, proved their efficiency in changing features of war injuries. Health Force Services organized trauma care system in different levels, with three main objectives: immediate basic medical care in battalion aid station, forward surgery and early aeromedical evacuation. The Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR), a war injury registry, provides medical data, analyzed from the combat theater to the military hospital in United States. This analysis concluded that during modern conflicts, most injuries are caused by explosive devices; injuries are more severe and interestingly more specifically the head region and extremities than the trunk. Hemorrhage is the first cause of death, leading to the concept of avoidable death. Specific databases focused on mechanisms and severity of injuries, diagnostic and treatment difficulties, outcomes can guide research programs to improve war injuries prevention and treatment. PMID:21981845

  10. Extremity War Injuries IX: Reducing Disability Within the Military.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Col Romney C; Schmidt, Andrew H; Fitzgerald, Capt Brian T; Tintle, Lcdr Scott M; Helgeson, Maj Melvin D; Lehman, Ltc Ronald A; Davila, Col Jeffrey N; Potter, Benjamin K; Burns, Maj Travis C; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Ficke, Col James R

    2015-08-01

    Extremity War Injury Symposium IX focused on reducing disability within the military, centering on cartilage defects, amputations, and spinal cord injury. Many areas of upper and lower extremity trauma and disability were discussed, including segmental nerve injuries, upper extremity allotransplantation, and the importance of patient-reported functional outcomes compared with the traditionally reported measures. Strategic planning addressed progression toward clinical solutions by setting clear objectives and goals and outlining pathways to address the "translation gap" that often prevents bridging of basic science to clinical application. PMID:26116849

  11. Eye injuries and ocular protection in the Lebanon War, 1982.

    PubMed

    Belkin, M; Treister, G; Dotan, S

    1984-04-01

    There was a high incidence of ocular trauma (6.8% of all casualties) in the Lebanon War, 1982, which is similar to the rates in previous Arab-Israeli wars. Combat in the Lebanon War consisted of both armored warfare and infantry operations, with much of the fighting taking place in built-up areas. Consequently, there were two main types of ocular injuries: perforating eye injuries caused by the small high-velocity missiles that characterize armored combat, and a wide range of injuries to the eye caused by ricochets during combat in built-up areas. The latter injuries varied in severity from complete destruction of the eye to minor corneal erosions. Not a single eye was injured in soldiers who had ballistic protective goggles properly placed over the eyes at the time of injury. Most of the ocular trauma could have been prevented had the goggles been in universal use. A considerable degree of eye protection is also afforded by ordinary ophthalmic eyeglasses. PMID:6735708

  12. Self-reported postwar injuries among Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed Central

    Zwerling, C; Torner, J C; Clarke, W R; Voelker, M D; Doebbeling, B N; Barrett, D H; Merchant, J A; Woolson, R F; Schwartz, D A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: From September 1995 to May 1996, the authors conducted a telephone survey of Iowa military personnel who had served in the regular military or activated National Guard or Reserve during the Gulf War period. To assess the association between military service in a combat zone and subsequent traumatic injury requiring medical consultation, the authors analyzed veterans' interview responses. METHODS: Using data from the larger survey, the authors compared rates of self-reported postwar injuries requiring medical consultation in a sample of Iowa Gulf War veterans to the rates in a sample of Iowa military personnel who served at the same time, but not in the Persian Gulf. RESULTS: Of 3695 veterans, 605 (16%) reported a traumatic injury in the previous three months requiring medical consultation. Self-reported injuries were associated with service in the Persian Gulf (odds ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.02, 1.55). CONCLUSION: This finding is consistent with the results of earlier studies of traumatic injury mortality rates among war veterans. PMID:11059428

  13. Musculoskeletal injuries in Homer's Iliad: the War of Troy revisited.

    PubMed

    Kmrc, Erkam; Tok, Fatih; Sim?ek, Ay?e; Ozakar, Levent

    2014-04-01

    Homer's Iliad--the most famous and influential epic poem--has been previously reviewed with respect to head, craniomaxillofacial, neck, thoracic, and hand injuries in the literature. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no data regarding musculoskeletal injuries. This article describes the musculoskeletal injuries that had ensued during the war of Troy. The Turkish translation of the original epic poem Iliad was reviewed for musculoskeletal injuries, that is, their descriptions, outcome, the weapons used, and the engaged warriors. Extremity injuries were evaluated as regards the affected bones. The pertinent treatment methods were also recorded. In total, 103 musculoskeletal injuries were detected during 81 combats. The most commonly involved areas were the shoulder (15.5%), the head (14.5%), the cervical vertebrae (14.5%), and the thoracic vertebrae (8.7%). The weapons used were spear (n = 52); sword (n = 9); arrow (n = 9); stone (n = 8); and cane, animal, the hand, Chariot race, and broken yoke (n = 1 for each). Fifty-four combats (66.6%) resulted in death. Therapeutic herbs, compound of milk, and essence of fig were used as treatment alternatives. While providing a historic snapshot on the war of Troy, in this article, the authors have reviewed the musculoskeletal injuries and their management in those ancient times. Despite the long period in between, unfortunately, physicians/surgeons are still faced with war injuries in current medical practice. The authors strongly hope that, at least in the near future, physicians will be left with only natural health problems and without those artificially generated by human beings. PMID:24406735

  14. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  15. Equine-associated maxillofacial injuries: retrospective 5-year analysis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiq; Gupta, Benjamin; Taylor, Christopher J; Chow, Jeffrey; Hoffman, Gary R

    2014-02-01

    We explored the relation between the causes of facial injuries in equestrians and the presence or absence of associated injuries. Over a 5-year period we retrospectively reviewed all patients who presented to the John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales, with facial injuries that had resulted from activity with horses. We analysed the rates of hard and soft tissue injuries, and of associated injuries by sex and mechanism. A total of 85 patients were included (50 female and 35 male) with an age range of 2-88 years. There was a significant difference in the rate of maxillofacial and associated injuries when groups were analysed for sex and mechanism of injury. Facial injuries caused by falling from a horse were more often associated with other injuries in men than in women (p<0.05), and men were 4 times more likely to present with associated injuries than women (OR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1 to 14) We also found significant differences in the rates of facial fracture. Women who had been kicked by a horse were more likely to sustain bony injuries than men (p<0.05). Our data confirm the association between kicks and facial fracture, and this may provide an impetus for the development of appropriate protective equipment. Patients who sustain facial injuries when falling from a horse often present with associated injuries and this has practical implications for clinicians involved in their management. PMID:24168759

  16. Nine year longitudinal retrospective study of Taekwondo injuries.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Chudolinski, Artur; Turgeon, Matt; Simon, Aaron; Ho, Eric; Coombe, Lianne

    2009-12-01

    This retrospective longitudinal study aims to describe reported Taekwondo injuries and to examine associations between competitor experience level, age and gender, and the type, location, and mechanism of injury sustained. Additionally, we examined whether recent rule changes concerning increased point value of head shots in adult Taekwondo competition had affected injury incidence.This study was a summation of 9 years of data of competition injury reports, which included 904 injury reports spanning 58 individual competitions. The data was collected on standardized injury reports at time of injury during competition. Care was provided to the athletes, but the type of care provided was not included in the study. Participants included athletes injured during competition who sought care by the health care team, and for whom an injury report was filled out. The data analysis was performed at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.The three most common locations of presenting injury were the head (19%), foot (16%), and thigh (9%). The most common mechanism of presenting injury was found to be a defensive kick (44%), followed by an offensive kick (35%). The most commonly diagnosed injuries were contusions (36%), sprains (19%), and strains (15%). Coloured belts had a higher incidence of contusions, while black belts sustained more joint irritation injuries. Black belts were more likely to suffer multiple injuries. Colored belts suffered more injuries while receiving a kick, while black belts had a larger influence of past history of injury. We found no significant difference in location or type of injury when comparing pre versus post rule change. The most common locations of injury are head, foot, and thigh respectively, and are areas for concern when considering preventative measures. Colour belt competitors are more likely to sustain contusions, which the authors believe is due to more aggressive tactics and lack of control. Those more likely to be injured tend to be younger than 18 years. Recent rule changes have no significant effect on head injuries. PMID:20037692

  17. Facial injuries in Iranian veterans during the Iraq-Iran war (1980-88): differences from recent conflicts.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, M H; Akhavan, A

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to identify the pattern and mechanism of facial injuries in Iranian veterans during the Iraq-Iran war and to assess the effectiveness of current protective equipment by retrospectively evaluating 100 Iranian veterans of that war. We randomly included veterans with injuries to various parts of the face, with or without injuries to other organs. None died. We recorded anatomical distribution, incidence, and mechanism of injury as well as injury scores using common references scales. Data are expressed as mean (SD) or number. Fragmentation injuries were the most common (n=40) followed by blast (n=37), shock wave (n=18), and gunshots (n=5). Thirty-five patients had mandibular fractures with a mean (SD) score of 3.7 (1.4). Fifteen patients had injuries to the upper face and 79 to the midface. Twenty-four patients had facial lacerations more than 10cm long, with a mean facial injury score of 2.4 (2.0). Nineteen had ocular injuries with a mean (SD) ocular trauma score of 64.9 (12.9). Despite recent developments in protective equipment we have seen no significant reduction in the incidence of facial injuries in battle, which could indicate that we need better facial support equipment and more effective education in its use. However, using protective equipment such as goggles and a mandibular protector is highly recommended. PMID:26187368

  18. Arthroplasty after war injuries to major joints.

    PubMed

    Haspl, M; Pe?ina, M; Orli?, D; Cicak, N

    1999-05-01

    From 1992 to 1995, replacement of the joint with an endoprosthesis after serious wounding and major destruction of joint elements was performed in 10 soldiers. Arthroplasty was performed on five knees, three hips, and two shoulders. The age range of the wounded soldiers was 22 to 55 years (mean, 37.7 years). Six soldiers suffered explosive injuries, and 4 were injured by gunfire. Time elapsed from the moment of wounding to the time of total joint replacement was 9 to 42 months. We decided on arthroplasty as the preferred treatment because of the presence of strong contractures and very painful movement. In 8 patients, the results of the treatment, based on a follow-up time of 36 to 48 months, were good. In 2 patients, early septic arthritis developed after arthroplasty of the knee with concomitant loosening of the endoprosthesis. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in both patients. In those 2 patients, therefore, arthrodesis of the knee with external fixation was performed. PMID:10332176

  19. Degloving injuries. A retrospective study at the University Hospital Rotterdam.

    PubMed

    Minten, L; Hovius, S E; Gilbert, P M

    1992-01-01

    Degloving injuries are severe and frequently underestimated lesions. In a retrospective study, 65 patients treated between 1985 and 1991 were reviewed. Therapy consisted of surgical exploration as soon after injury as possible, with defatting of the avulsed skin and its replacement on the most functionally important sites. The remaining raw areas were covered with split skin grafts (SSG). This technique reduced morbidity, hospital stay and work incapacity, as compared with patients treated by other methods. PMID:1414140

  20. [Eye injuries in 'paintball'; a modern 'war injury'].

    PubMed

    Verburg-van der Marel, E H; ten Napel, J A; de Keizer, R J

    1993-04-17

    Paintball shooting is played with increasing frequency in the Netherlands. A bullet, filled with paint, shot at 60 m/sec can cause serious damage to the eye. All five patients seen in two years showed a hyphaema. Four out of five patients showed damage of the posterior pole, including vitreous haemorrhage, choroidal rupture, retinal detachment, and sub- or intraretinal haemorrhage. Three out of five patients incurred permanent visual loss, varying from 3/60 to 25/100. Adequate instruction of the participants in the game and proper use of the eye protector will be of help in preventing eye injuries. PMID:8487887

  1. Lower extremity injuries in lateral impact: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Banglmaier, R F; Rouhana, S W; Beillas, P; Yang, K H

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A retrospective analysis of the NASS/CDS database from 1993 to 2000 was used to investigate lower extremity injury in lateral impact. The analysis includes the study of the injury patterns, crash characteristics and the interactions between the occupant and the vehicle interior, including injuries to the farside occupants. The findings include significantly different injury patterns for the nearside and farside impacts. In particular, while the proportion of pelvis/hip injuries, with respect to AIS2 and AIS3 lower extremity skeletal injuries and 2-4 and 10-8 o'clock side impacts, was higher in nearside (70.4%) than farside (38.3%), the opposite trend was observed for the thigh (2.8% vs 4.5%), knee (6.2% vs 16.7%), leg (10.1% vs 19.5%) and foot/ankle (5.6% vs 14.7) injuries. Analysis of the PDOF suggested that a large proportion the impacts occurred obliquely, at approximately 10 and 2 o'clock, with a rearward component of force. It is hoped that the findings of the current study can help to investigate injury mechanisms. PMID:12941240

  2. Nonfatal farm injuries in eastern Ontario: a retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    Brison, R J; Pickett, C W

    1991-12-01

    A one-year retrospective survey was conducted to study the incidence of, and potential risk factors for farm-related injuries. One hundred thirteen dairy and beef farms in Eastern Ontario were surveyed using a personal interview. Information was collected on demographic characteristics of the farm owner, workers, and family; characteristics of the farm operation; and information on behaviours potentially affecting injury risk. The crude rate of injury was 9.6 per 100 person years. Significantly higher rates of injury were found for: owner-operators of farms (RR = 2.9; p less than 0.001); male sex (RR = 3.8; p less than 0.001); living/working on a beef as opposed to dairy farm (RR = 2.3; p = 0.01); farm owners in the age groups of less than 30 and greater than 70 years (p = 0.05), full-time as opposed to part-time beef farm owners (RR = 4.2; p = 0.02); and full-time owners of beef as opposed to dairy farms (RR 2.4; p = 0.03). Common patterns of injury included accidental falls (E880-8); lacerations, bruises, and crush injuries from working with cattle (E906) or from agricultural machinery (E919.0); and foreign body injuries to the eye (E914). Few injuries were associated with the use of tractors or power take-offs. 82% of injuries, for which medical treatment was sought, were treated in a hospital-based emergency department. This information would support efforts to establish an emergency-department-based surveillance system for farming injuries in our setting. PMID:1772560

  3. Retrospective evaluation of admission criteria for paediatric electrical injuries.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B H; Cone, J B; Vanderpool, R D; Bond, P J; Russell, J B; Caldwell, F T

    1995-12-01

    In the medical community, the practice of admitting all electrical burns for 24-48 h of observation, monitoring and laboratory evaluation is widespread. This retrospective review of paediatric electrical burns was conducted to determine which patients may safely be treated as outpatients. Retrospective analysis of all paediatric burns admitted between 1980 and 1991 identified 35 patients with electrical injuries. Patients were divided into two groups for analysis: those burned by exposure to household voltages (120-240 V; n = 26) and those exposed to high voltages, in excess of 1000 V (n = 9). The majority of household electrical injuries occurred secondary to contact with the household 120 V (21/26). Contact with an extremity accounted for the largest number of these injuries (18/26). The mouth was the second most frequent site of injury (7/26). Most of these patients (20/26) had < 1 per cent BSA burn. No patient in the household-voltage group had an arrythmia that required treatment, nor were there any identified examples of compartment syndrome or other vascular complications. Seven patients did require minimal skin grafting. No deaths occurred in either group. The patients in the household-voltage group were significantly younger. High-voltage electrical injuries occurred in an older patient population and required more aggressive care and surgical intervention. This was evident at the time of initial evaluation. Based on these data, healthy children with small partial-thickness electrical burns and no initial evidence of cardiac or neurovascular injury do not appear to need hospital admission. PMID:8747731

  4. Tug-of-War Injuries: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chotai, Pranit N.; Abdelgawad, Amr A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 10-year-old boy presenting with radial nerve palsy due to injury during a tug-of-war game. Patient was managed nonoperatively and regained radial nerve function. Tug-of-war is a globally popular noncontact sport. Injuries during this game are inevitable and may range from simple sprains to life and limb threatening trauma. Combined hip and knee injuries and soft-tissue injuries involving the back are most frequent. Most injuries occur when tug-of-war was played in an informal setting and where the tug-of-war International Federation rules were less likely to be followed. Measures should be taken to increase the awareness about these safety rules and prevention of consequent injuries. Sports physicians, pediatricians, orthopedic surgeons, general physicians, and athletic trainers should be aware of potential injuries resulting from this game while caring for these athletes, so as to be well prepared for apt management of the injuries associated with TOW. PMID:25530897

  5. Psychosocial Adjustment in Siblings of Children with War-Related Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khamis, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the prevalence and predictors of post-traumatic symptomatology and emotional and behavioral difficulties in siblings of children who incurred war-related injuries. It was predicted that injury severity, gender and attributional style would account for a significant amount of the variance in post-traumatic stress symptoms and…

  6. War-wounded refugees: the types of injury and influence of disability on well-being and social integration.

    PubMed

    Hermansson, A C; Thyberg, M; Timpka, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the war injuries and investigate the influence of physical disability on well-being and social integration in a group of war-wounded refugees after two years in Sweden. A culturally heterogenous sample of 54 war-wounded refugees was investigated during hospitalization shortly after arrival, and after two years. Quantitative data were covered by physical examinations, interviews and questionnaires. In addition, qualitative data were collected within semi-structured interviews on both occasions. The major types of war injuries were: fractures (22%), traumatic amputations (17%), spinal cord injuries (17%), nerve injuries (11%), combinations of fractures and nerve injuries (9%), bilateral eye injuries (9%), brain injuries (7%), other injuries (7%). Regarding the type of injuries and medical complications, the group studied was representative of small unit operations of war with low access to early medical care. The degree of physical disability was not a salient factor for well-being and social integration after two years in Sweden. The losses and desires to be repatriated were apparent from the qualitative findings, as exemplified by three case reports. The findings of this study are in accordance with previous research on refugees and war-injured ex-combatants, but further multidisciplinary research is needed. The results also imply that resettlement countries should pay continuous attention to the broad needs of their war-wounded refugees. PMID:8953262

  7. Impact of associated injuries in the Floating knee: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rethnam, Ulfin; Yesupalan, Rajam S; Nair, Rajagopalan

    2009-01-01

    Background Floating knee injuries are usually associated with other significant injuries. Do these injuries have implications on the management of the floating knee and the final outcome of patients? Our study aims to assess the implications of associated injuries in the management and final outcome of floating knee. Methods 29 patients with floating knees were assessed in our institution. A retrospective analysis of medical records and radiographs were done and all associated injuries were identified. The impact of associated injuries on delay in initial surgical management, delay in rehabilitation & final outcome of the floating knee were assessed. Results 38 associated injuries were noted. 7 were associated with ipsilateral knee injuries. Lower limb injuries were most commonly associated with the floating knee. Patients with some associated injuries had a delay in surgical management and others a delay in post-operative rehabilitation. Knee ligament and vascular injuries were associated with poor outcome. Conclusion The associated injuries were quite frequent with the floating knee. Some of the associated injuries caused a delay in surgical management and post-operative rehabilitation. In assessment of the final outcome, patients with associated knee and vascular injuries had a poor prognosis. Majority of the patients with associated injuries had a good or excellent outcome. PMID:19144197

  8. Orthopedic injuries experienced by U.S. prisoners of war during Operation Desert Storm: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, R; Baggett, J C; Mitchell, R E

    1995-04-01

    U.S. prisoners of war from Operation Desert Storm suffered significant orthopedic injuries. The repatriated prisoners of war (RPOWs) have been medically evaluated over a 3-year period with orthopedic follow-up. A significant proportion of the musculoskeletal injuries were located around the neck and spine, shoulder, and upper extremity. Aircraft ejection was the cause of the majority of these injuries. Lower extremity injuries after ejection, aside from the knee, were not reported. Flail injuries of the lower extremities were absent as well. These results were examined with reference to Vietnam RPOW data. PMID:7617224

  9. [War injuries of blood vessels of the extremities].

    PubMed

    Radulovi?, Svetozar; Depot, Branko; Papi?, Vladimir; Pusac, Branislava; Trkulja, Nebojsa

    2002-01-01

    Treatment results of 200 injured with the lesions of 282 magistral blood vessels were analyzed. All were combat injuries, and the majority was caused by the fragments of explosive device. The mechanisms of such the injuries produced large defects of soft tissues as well as the high level of the wound contamination, which aggravated reconstructive procedures and increased the risk of infection. In the majority of cases anatomic reconstruction of the artery was performed, and the ligature was used only in the case of graft infection and in the injuries of one artery of the lower leg or the forearm. The majority of injuries was solved by lateral suture or patch plastic, since postoperative constriction caused by those methods did not cause greater hemodynamic disorders due to the size of venous lumen. The duration of ischemic interval was of the utmost importance for the favorable final result of the treatment, as well as the adequate debridement of the wound, good soft-tissue cover of the reconstructed blood vessel and precise atraumatic technique. Total percentage of amputations was 14.5%, and all were involving the lower extremities, and were mostly caused by popliteal artery lesion. PMID:12053468

  10. Urethral and penile war injuries: The experience from civil violence in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Issam S.; Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence, mechanism of injury, wounding pattern and surgical management of urethral and penile injuries sustained in civil violence during the Iraq war. Patients and methods In all, 2800 casualties with penetrating trauma to the abdomen and pelvis were received at the Al-Yarmouk Hospital, Baghdad, from January 2004 to June 2008. Of these casualties 504 (18%) had genitourinary trauma, including 45 (8.9%) with urethral and/or penile injuries. Results Of 45 patients, 29 (64%) were civilians and 16 (36%) were Iraqi military personnel. The injury was caused by an improvised explosive device (IED) in 25 (56%) patients and by individual firearms in 20 (44%). Of the patients, 24 had penile injuries, 15 had an injury to the bulbar urethra and six had an injury to the posterior urethra. Anterior urethral injuries were managed by primary repair, while posterior urethral injuries were managed by primary realignment in five patients and by a suprapubic cystostomy alone in one. An associated injury to major blood vessels was the cause of death in eight of nine patients who died soon after surgery (P < 0.001). Conclusion Urethral and penile injuries were caused by IEDs and individual firearms with a similar frequency. Most of the casualties were civilians and a minority were military personnel. Injuries to the anterior urethra can be managed by primary repair, while injuries to the posterior urethra can be managed by primary realignment. An associated trauma to major blood vessels was the leading cause of death in these casualties. PMID:26019940

  11. Famous head injuries of the first aerial war: deaths of the "Knights of the Air".

    PubMed

    Koul, Prateeka; Mau, Christine; Sabourin, Victor M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    World War I advanced the development of aviation from the concept of flight to the use of aircraft on the battlefield. Fighter planes advanced technologically as the war progressed. Fighter pilot aces Francesco Baracca and Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron) were two of the most famous pilots of this time period. These courageous fighter aces skillfully maneuvered their SPAD and Albatros planes, respectively, while battling enemies and scoring aerial victories that contributed to the course of the war. The media thrilled the public with their depictions of the heroic feats of fighter pilots such as Baracca and the Red Baron. Despite their aerial prowess, both pilots would eventually be shot down in combat. Although the accounts of their deaths are debated, it is undeniable that both were victims of traumatic head injury. PMID:26126404

  12. Hospital Stay as a Proxy Indicator for Severe Injury in Earthquakes: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu-Ping; Gerdin, Martin; Westman, Lina; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose Manuel; Wu, Qi; van den Oever, Barbara; Pan, Liang; Albela, Manuel; Chen, Gao; Zhang, De-Sheng; Guha-Sapir, Debarati; von Schreeb, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Earthquakes are the most violent type of natural disasters and injuries are the dominant medical problem in the early phases after earthquakes. However, likely because of poor data availability, high-quality research on injuries after earthquakes is lacking. Length of hospital stay (LOS) has been validated as a proxy indicator for injury severity in high-income settings and could potentially be used in retrospective research of injuries after earthquakes. In this study, we assessed LOS as an adequate proxy indicator for severe injury in trauma survivors of an earthquake. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using a database of 1,878 injured patients from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Our primary outcome was severe injury, defined as a composite measure of serious injury or resource use. Secondary outcomes were serious injury and resource use, analysed separately. Non-parametric receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and area under the curve (AUC) analysis was used to test the discriminatory accuracy of LOS when used to identify severe injury. An 0.7injury in earthquake survivors. However, LOS was found to be a proxy for major nonorthopaedic surgery and blood transfusion. These findings can be useful for retrospective research on earthquake-injured patients when detailed hospital records are not available. PMID:23585897

  13. [Children after an electric injury. A retrospective 10 year study].

    PubMed

    Krienke, L; Kienast, W

    1990-09-01

    We analysed the clinical and laboratory findings of 31 patients who had undergone electrical injuries and who were treated in our hospital from 1979 to 1988. Only in two out of 30 injuries in the low voltage range we found arrhythmias of the heart caused by the accident. The paraclinical findings did not show any unambiguous pathological values. In accordance with the bibliography we are of opinion that children who underwent low voltage electrical shock may be considered as not endangered, of the case history is known and if clinical status and electrocardiogram are normal, so that they should not stay in hospital. Seldom complications and exeptions are mentioned. Because of the higher incidence in the early childhood and the special risk by nonprotected sockets measures should be propagated to increase the safety in the domestic environment of the children. PMID:2287154

  14. Combination Therapies for Traumatic Brain Injury: Retrospective Considerations.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Susan; Anderson, Gail; Atif, Fahim; Badaut, Jerome; Clark, Robert; Empey, Philip; Guseva, Maria; Hoane, Michael; Huh, Jimmy; Pauly, Jim; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Scheff, Stephen; Stein, Donald; Tang, Huiling; Hicks, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Patients enrolled in clinical trials for traumatic brain injury (TBI) may present with heterogeneous features over a range of injury severity, such as diffuse axonal injury, ischemia, edema, hemorrhage, oxidative damage, mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunction, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and other pathophysiological processes. To determine whether combination therapies might be more effective than monotherapy at attenuating moderate TBI or promoting recovery, the National Institutes of Health funded six preclinical studies in adult and immature male rats to evaluate promising acute treatments alone and in combination. Each of the studies had a solid rationale for its approach based on previous research, but only one reported significant improvements in long-term outcomes across a battery of behavioral tests. Four studies had equivocal results because of a lack of sensitivity of the outcome assessments. One study demonstrated worse results with the combination in comparison with monotherapies. While specific research findings are reported elsewhere, this article provides an overview of the study designs, insights, and recommendations for future research aimed at therapy development for TBI. PMID:25970337

  15. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  16. Early head injury and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the hypothesis that medically attended head injury in young children may be causal in the later development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Health improvement network database (1988-2003), a longitudinal UK general practice dataset. Participants All children registered in the database from birth until their 10th birthday. Main outcome measures Risk of a child with a head injury before age 2 developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder before age 10 compared with children with a burn injury before age 2 and children with neither a burn nor a head injury. Results Of the 62 088 children who comprised the cohort, 2782 (4.5%) had a head injury and 1116 (1.8%) had a burn injury. The risk of diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder before 10 years of age after adjustment for sex, prematurity, socioeconomic status, and practice identification number was similar in the head injury (relative risk 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.5) and burn injury groups (1.7, 1.2 to 2.5) compared with all other children. Discussion Medically attended head injury before 2 years of age does not seem to be causal in the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Medically attended injury before 2 years of age may be a marker for subsequent diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:18988644

  17. Portuguese War Veterans: Moral Injury and Factors Related to Recovery From PTSD.

    PubMed

    Ferrajão, Paulo Correia; Aragão Oliveira, Rui

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the factors to which a sample of Portuguese war veterans attributed their recovery from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants were a sample of veterans (N = 60) with mental sequelae of the Portuguese Colonial War: 30 suffered from chronic PTSD (unrecovered) and 30 veterans with remission from PTSD (recovered). Two semistructured interviews were conducted. Analysis of the interviews was conducted using the Thematic and Categorical Analysis. Results showed that unrecovered participants reported higher postwar betrayal, appraisal of hostile societal homecoming, social stigmatization, lack of personal resources (mental fatigue and restriction of coping strategies), and reduced perceived social support. Recovered participants verbalized some capability for self-awareness of their own mental states and/or awareness of others' mental states (mentalization ability), a wider repertoire of coping strategies, and higher perceived social support. The authors discussed that recovery from PTSD among veterans can be related to the assimilation of moral injury by developing higher mentalization abilities. PMID:25711846

  18. Epidemiology of injuries in elite taekwondo athletes: two Olympic periods cross-sectional retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Altarriba-Bartes, Albert; Drobnic, Franchek; Til, Llus; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Montoro, Jos Bruno; Irurtia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Taekwondo injuries differ according to the characteristics of the athletes and the competition. This analytical cross-sectional retrospective cohort study aimed to describe reported taekwondo injuries and to determine the prevalence, characteristics and possible risk factors for injuries sustained by athletes of the Spanish national team. In addition, we compared each identified risk factorage, weight category, annual quarter, injury timing and competition difficulty levelwith its relation to injury location and type. Settings Injury occurrences in taekwondo athletes of the Spanish national team during two Olympic periods at the High Performance Centre in Barcelona were analysed. Participants 48 taekwondo athletes (22 male, 26 female; age range 1531?years) were studied; 1678 injury episodes occurred. Inclusion criteria were: (1) having trained with the national taekwondo group for a minimum of one sports season; (2) being a member of the Spanish national team. Results Independently of sex or Olympic period, the anatomical sites with most injury episodes were knee (21.3%), foot (17.0%), ankle (12.2%), thigh (11.4%) and lower leg (8.8%). Contusions (29.3%) and cartilage (17.6%) and joint (15.7%) injuries were the prevalent types of injury. Chronological age, weight category and annual quarter can be considered risk factors for sustaining injuries in male and female elite taekwondists according to their location and type (p?0.001). Conclusions This study provides epidemiological information that will help to inform future injury surveillance studies and the development of prevention strategies and recommendations to reduce the number of injuries in taekwondo competition. PMID:24531455

  19. Nursing care of service members with head injury during the Vietnam war.

    PubMed

    Yost, Terri L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe and analyze the nursing management of head-injured soldiers by military nurses serving in the Vietnam War. This study used traditional historical methods and a military history framework. Primary sources included original military reports, letters, and policies from the Vietnam War period (located in the archives of the Army Medical Department, Office of Medical History in Falls Church, VA); journal articles of the time period; and autobiographical texts. Secondary sources consisted of biographical and historical texts and Web sites of historical societies. Findings supported that advances in medicine, nursing, and technology throughout the 1960s have an overall positive impact on patient care in a combat zone. The Vietnam War was a time when new theories in the management of head injuries led directly to overall improvements in survival. In conclusion, nurses were professionally and emotionally challenged on a near daily basis but were able to directly apply new nursing science in a combat environment to help improve survivability for those who may not have previously survived off the battlefield. PMID:22555353

  20. Extremity war injuries: collaborative efforts in research, host nation care, and disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Andrew N; Ficke, Col James R

    2010-01-01

    The fourth annual Extremity War Injuries (EWI) Symposium addressed ongoing challenges and opportunities in the management of combat-related musculoskeletal injury. The symposium, which also examined host-nation care and disaster preparedness and response, defined opportunities for synergy between several organizations with similar missions and goals. Within the Department of Defense, the Orthopaedic Extremity Trauma Research Program (OETRP) has funded basic research related to a series of protocols first identified and validated at prior EWI symposia. A well-funded clinical research arm of OETRP has been developed to help translate and validate research advances from each of the protocols. The Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine, a consortium of academic research institutions, employs a tissue-engineering approach to EWI challenges, particularly with regard to tissue loss. Programs within the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and throughout the National Institutes of Health have also expanded tissue-engineering efforts by emphasizing robust mechanistic basic science programs. Much of the clinical care delivered by US military medical personnel and nongovernmental agencies has been to host-nation populations; coordinating delivery to maximize the number of injured who receive care requires understanding of the breadth and scope of resources available within the war zone. Similarly, providing the most comprehensive care to the greatest number of injured in the context of domestic mass casualty requires discussion and planning by all groups involved. PMID:20044486

  1. Primary surgical treatment of war injuries of major joints of the limbs.

    PubMed

    Nikoli?, D; Jovanovi?, Z; Popovi?, Z; Vulovi?, R; Mladenovi?, M

    1999-03-01

    We present the results of primary surgical treatment of war injuries of major joints in 339 patients, wounded in the territory of the former Yugoslavia in the period June 1991-October 1995. The total number of surgically treated joints was 358. The injuries were inflicted by the fragments of explosive devices in 176 (51.9%) patients and by bullets in 125 (36.9%) patients. A single wound was present in 160 (47.2%) and several wounds in 176 (51.9%) patients; 276 (77.1%) patients had injuries of articular bone. The most frequently injured joints were knee joint 167 (46.6%) and elbow joint 72 (20.1%). Associated neurovascular injuries were present in 68 (18.9%) patients. Postoperative bone fragment stabilization was required in 254 (70.9%) joints. Stabilization was by plaster of Paris in 148 (58.2%) and external fixation in 85 (33.4%) patients. Postoperative course was uneventful in 262 (77.3%) while postoperative complications occurred in 77 (22.7%) patients. Amputations were performed in 15 (4.4%) patients. After the primary surgical treatment 254 (74.9%) patients were discharged and directed to rehabilitation or home care and 81 (23.9%) patients required additional reconstructive surgery for bone and soft tissue defects. PMID:10476282

  2. Severe skiing injuries: a retrospective analysis of 361 patients including mechanism of trauma, severity of injury, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Furrer, M; Erhart, S; Frutiger, A; Bereiter, H; Leutenegger, A; Rüedi, T

    1995-10-01

    All ski accident patients requiring an inhospital treatment at our institute from 1984 to 1992 (n = 2,053) were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence, pattern, and severity of the injuries, as well as the 30-day mortality comparing two time slots (1984 to 1988 and 1989 to 1992) were analyzed for the 361 cases classified as "serious" injuries according to the following definitions and groupings: group 1, multiple trauma (Injury Severity Score > or = 18) and patients with multiple fractures (n = 179; group 2, abdominal or thoracic single trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score > or = 2, n = 58); and group 3, isolated head injuries (AIS score > or = 2, n = 124). Serious injuries were observed in 19% in the first period compared to 16% in the second period (not significant). Two hundred thirty-eight of 361 patients injured themselves by just falling, while 117 collided with some sort of obstacle like other skiers (45), trees or rocks (27), posts, pylons, barriers (20), and moving objects (25) such as piste machines, ski lifts, automobiles, and in one case a helicopter. Six skiers were caught on the ski run by an avalanche. Comparing the two time periods, trauma circumstances did not change significantly. The number of most severe head injuries (AIS score > or = 4) increased from 11.6 to 19.3% (p < 0.05). The overall mortality increased from 2 to 7% (p < 0.05). Group 2 had the best prognosis with no mortality, while group 3 was rated worst with 8%. Skiing remains a major source of serious trauma in winter resort areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7473967

  3. E-bike injuries: experience from an urban emergency department-a retrospective study from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Sylvana; Martinolli, Luca; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2014-01-01

    Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Only six patients underwent surgery (S). Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated. PMID:24778880

  4. E-Bike Injuries: Experience from an Urban Emergency Department—A Retrospective Study from Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Papoutsi, Sylvana; Martinolli, Luca; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Only six patients underwent surgery (S). Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated. PMID:24778880

  5. Retrospective Cohort Analysis of Chest Injury Characteristics and Concurrent Injuries in Patients Admitted to Hospital in the Wenchuan and Lushan Earthquakes in Sichuan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the characteristics of chest injuries and frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients after earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Methods We compared the cause, type, and body location of chest injuries as well as the frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients admitted to our hospital after the Wenchuan and Lushan earthquakes in Sichuan, China. We explored possible relationships between seismic intensity and the causes and types of injuries, and we assessed the ability of the Injury Severity Score, New Injury Severity Score, and Chest Injury Index to predict respiratory failure in chest injury patients. Results The incidence of chest injuries was 9.9% in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake and 22.2% in the less intensive Lushan earthquake. The most frequent cause of chest injuries in both earthquakes was being accidentally struck. Injuries due to falls were less prevalent in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake, while injuries due to burial were more prevalent. The distribution of types of chest injury did not vary significantly between the two earthquakes, with rib fractures and pulmonary contusions the most frequent types. Spinal and head injuries concurrent with chest injuries were more prevalent in the less violent Lushan earthquake. All three trauma scoring systems showed poor ability to predict respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. Conclusions Previous studies may have underestimated the incidence of chest injury in violent earthquakes. The distributions of types of chest injury did not differ between these two earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Earthquake severity and interval between rescue and treatment may influence the prevalence and types of injuries that co-occur with the chest injury. Trauma evaluation scores on their own are inadequate predictors of respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. PMID:24816485

  6. The War of Independence: a surgical algorithm for the treatment of head injury in the continental army.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Victor M; Shah, Manan; Yick, Frederick; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    The American Revolution was a gruesome warthat resulted in the independence of the United States of America from the British crown and countless casualties to both belligerents. However, from these desperate times, the treatment of traumatic head injury was elucidated, as were the origins of American neurosurgery in the 18th century. During the war, the surgical manual used by military field surgeons was titled Plain Concise Practical Remarks on the Treatment of Wounds and Fractures, by Dr. John Jones. This manual explains the different types of cranial injuries understood at that time as well as the relevant surgical treatment. This article seeks to review the surgical treatment of head injury in the Revolutionary War as outlined by Dr. Jones's manual. PMID:26274994

  7. The incidence of post minor traumatic brain injury syndrome: a retrospective survey of treating physicians.

    PubMed

    Jones, J H; Viola, S L; LaBan, M M; Schynoll, W G; Krome, R L

    1992-02-01

    There is a relative lack of information in the literature regarding the epidemiology, functional significance, and clinical resolution of the consequences of minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Most retrospective studies to date have been elicited by direct patient interview. Because it was supposed that a minor, but significant, traumatic brain injury would require continuing medical intervention beyond the emergency room contact, a survey was conducted of primary care physicians who were believed to be providing continuing medical care. Had their patients required reevaluations for symptoms of the post-MTBI syndrome? Two hundred fifty-six patients with traumatic brain injury initially seen in the emergency room of two community hospitals were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two (75%) had MTBIs (Glasgow coma scale more than 12 and a negative head CAT scan). One hundred twenty-two physicians were surveyed by mail; 67 (55%) responded. Twenty-one percent of their patients were experiencing symptoms of the post-MTBI syndrome from two to six months after their injuries. Studies relying on patient interviews have also estimated the post-MTBI syndrome at 20%. This correlation implies that "suggestion" does not bias patient interview style research in evaluating the post-MTBI syndrome. PMID:1543408

  8. Injury-related mortality in South Africa: a retrospective descriptive study of postmortem investigations

    PubMed Central

    Prinsloo, Megan; Pillay-van Wyk, Victoria; Gwebushe, Nomonde; Mathews, Shanaaz; Martin, Lorna J; Laubscher, Ria; Abrahams, Naeemah; Msemburi, William; Lombard, Carl; Bradshaw, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate injury-related mortality in South Africa using a nationally representative sample and compare the results with previous estimates. Methods We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of medico-legal postmortem investigation data from mortuaries using a multistage random sample, stratified by urban and non-urban areas and mortuary size. We calculated age-specific and age-standardized mortality rates for external causes of death. Findings Postmortem reports revealed 52 493 injury-related deaths in 2009 (95% confidence interval, CI: 46 930–58 057). Almost half (25 499) were intentionally inflicted. Age-standardized mortality rates per 100 000 population were as follows: all injuries: 109.0 (95% CI: 97.1–121.0); homicide 38.4 (95% CI: 33.8–43.0; suicide 13.4 (95% CI: 11.6–15.2) and road-traffic injury 36.1 (95% CI: 30.9–41.3). Using postmortem reports, we found more than three times as many deaths from homicide and road-traffic injury than had been recorded by vital registration for this period. The homicide rate was similar to the estimate for South Africa from a global analysis, but road-traffic and suicide rates were almost fourfold higher. Conclusion This is the first nationally representative sample of injury-related mortality in South Africa. It provides more accurate estimates and cause-specific profiles that are not available from other sources. PMID:26229201

  9. A retrospective survey on injuries in Croatian football/soccer referees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury among soccer referees is rarely studied, especially with regard to differences in the quality level of the refereeing. Additionally, we have found no study that has reported injury occurrence during official physical fitness testing for soccer referees. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, type and consequences of match-related and fitness-testing related injuries among soccer referees of different competitive levels. Methods We studied 342 soccer referees (all males; mean age 32.9??5.02?years). The study was retrospective, and a self-administered questionnaire was used. In the first phase of the study, the questionnaire was tested for its reliability and applicability. The questionnaire included morphological/anthropometric data, refereeing variables, and musculoskeletal disorders together with the consequences. Results The sample comprised 157 main referees (MR; mean age 31.4??4.9?years) and 185 assistant referees (AR; mean age 34.1??5.1?years) divided into: international level (Union of European Football Associations-UEFA) referees (N?=?18; 6 MRs; 12 ARs) ; 1st (N?=?78; 31 MRs; 47 ARs), 2nd (N?=?91; 45 MRs; 46 ARs); or 3rd national level referees (N?=?155; 75 MRs; 80 ARs). In total, 29% (95%CI: 0.230.37) of the MRs and 30% (95%CI: 0.220.36) of the ARs had experienced an injury during the previous year, while 13% (95%CI: 0.050.14) of the MRs, and 19% (95%CI: 0.140.25) of the ARs suffered from an injury that occurred during fitness testing. There was an obvious increase in injury severity as the refereeing advanced at the national level, but the UEFA referees were the least injured of all referees. The results showed a relatively high prevalence of injuries to the upper leg (i.e., quadriceps and hamstrings) during physical fitness testing for all but the UEFA referees. During game refereeing, the ankles and lower legs were the most commonly injured regions. The MRs primarily injured their ankles. The ARs experienced lower leg and lower back disorders. However, the overall injury rate was equal for both groups, with 5.29 (95%CI: 2.238.30) and 4.58 (95%CI: 2.636.54) injuries per 1000?hours of refereeing for MRs and ARs, respectively. Conclusion In addition to the reported risk of injury during soccer games, physical fitness testing should be classified as a risk for injury among soccer referees. Special attention should be given to (I) lower leg injuries during games and (II) upper leg injuries during physical fitness tests. A higher physical fitness level and a qualitative approach to training are recognized as protective factors against injury. Subsequent studies should investigate the specific predictors of injuries among referees. PMID:23497316

  10. Epidemiological studies of electrical injuries in Shaanxi province of China: a retrospective report of 383 cases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao-Feng; Lv, Xiao-Xing; Li, Yue-Jun; Li, Wang-Zhou; Jiang, Li; Li, Jing; Feng, Jian; Chen, Shao-Zong; Wu, Fen; Li, Xue-Yong

    2012-06-01

    A statistical survey was conducted at the Burn Unit of the Tangdu Hospital, Shaanxi, China, during the 10-year period from January 2000 to December 2009. In this retrospective study, 383 patients who admitted to our burn unit because of electrical trauma were included. Data including the patient's general condition, clinical presentation, complications and operation times was collected retrospectively and analyzed with epidemiological methods. Subjects in our collective were predominantly male (90.3%, n=346/383) and were composed by those who injured in work-related incidents (78.3%, n=300/383), rural individuals (58.2%, n=223/383) and students (9.4%, n=36/383). High voltage was directly correlated to severity clinical complications, and amputation. The percentage of myocardial impairment was 79.3% (n=92/116) among patients who suffered with electrical current through heart tissue. Along with the more developed east area of China, electrical injuries are becoming a growing concern of the developing West part in China as well. Electrical injuries induce serious tissue damage, need long hospital stay, and result in high rate of permanent disability and economic hardship for the afflicted families. A competent prevention program needs to be developed to address this problem. PMID:22103989

  11. Multiple injuries after earthquakes: a retrospective analysis on 1,871 injured patients from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Multiple injuries have been highlighted as an important clinical dimension of the injury profile following earthquakes, but studies are scarce. We investigated the pattern and combination of injuries among patients with two injuries following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. We also described the general injury profile, causes of injury and socio-demographic characteristics of the injured patients. Methods A retrospective hospital-based analysis of 1,871 earthquake injured patients, totaling 3,177 injuries, admitted between 12 and 31 May 2008 to the People's Hospital of Deyang city (PHDC). An electronic, webserver-based database with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10-based classification of earthquake-related injury diagnoses (IDs), anatomical sites and additional background variables of the inpatients was used. We analyzed this dataset for injury profile and number of injuries per patient. We then included all patients (856) with two injuries for more in-depth analysis. Possible spatial anatomical associations were determined a priori. Cross-tabulation and more complex frequency matrices for combination analyses were used to investigate the injury profile. Results Out of the 1,871 injured patients, 810 (43.3%) presented with a single injury. The rest had multiple injuries; 856 (45.8%) had two, 169 (9.0%) patients had three, 32 (1.7%) presented with four injuries, while only 4 (0.2%) were diagnosed with five injuries. The injury diagnoses of patients presenting with two-injuries showed important anatomical intra-site or neighboring clustering, which explained 49.1% of the combinations. For fractures, the result was even more marked as spatial clustering explained 57.9% of the association pattern. The most frequent combination of IDs was a double-fracture, affecting 20.7% of the two-injury patients (n = 177). Another 108 patients (12.6%) presented with fractures associated with crush injury and organ-soft tissue injury. Of the 3,177 injuries, 1,476 (46.5%) were fractures. Most injuries were located in the head (22.9%) and lower extremities (30.8%). Conclusions Multiple injuries are put forward as an important component of the injury profile after this earthquake. A pattern of injury combinations and spatial aggregation of injuries was also found. Clinical diagnosis and treatment should be adapted to care of these patients. More studies are needed to generalize these findings. PMID:22594875

  12. Injuries and allegations of oral rape: A retrospective review of patients presenting to a London sexual assault referral centre.

    PubMed

    Brew-Graves, Emmeline; Morgan, Louise

    2015-08-01

    A retrospective review was carried out of patients seen at the Haven sexual assault referral centre in South East London between January 2009 and September 2010 to determine the frequency and nature of oral injuries found in people reporting oral rape. Ninety five eligible patients were identified and relevant information was extracted from standardised Haven forms completed during forensic medical examination. The main outcome measures were prevalence, type and location of oral injury. Eighteen (19%) were found to have sustained an oral injury. The most common injury was abrasions, followed by bruising and petechiae. The lips were the most common site of injury followed by the soft palate and the inside of the cheeks. It was concluded that injuries in the mouth were not common after an allegation of oral rape. Injuries were minor and did not require treatment. PMID:26165676

  13. Alpine skiing injuries in Finland a two-year retrospective study based on a questionnaire among Ski racers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alpine skiing is one of the most popular winter sports in the world. Nevertheless, it has always been associated with a high risk of injury. There are however, only a few studies that have examined the risk of injury of competitive skiers, especially of the junior ski racers. Methods The inclusion criterion was an injury in alpine skiing resulting in a pause in training longer than one week. Athletes of all ages were included. The study period was from the start of the season of 20082009 to end of the season of 20092010 (two years). Results The average annual number of ski racers in Finland was 661. There were 61 injuries (36 males with a median age of 14years, 25 females with a median age of 14) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Ligamentous knee injury was the most frequent (17) and lower leg fracture the second common (16) injury, respectively. There was a female dominance in the ACL injuries. Only one major abdominal injury and no major head injuries were observed. The overall training pause was 26weeks after the ACL injury and 17weeks after the lower leg fracture, respectively. Conclusion The most common and most disabling injuries affect the knee and the lower leg. The high number of lower leg and ACL injuries is alarming. A continuous and careful monitoring of injuries needs to be established to assess this trend. A systematic review of injuries is the appropriate way to monitor the effects of changes made in terms of safety. The present retrospective two-year pilot study forms a base for a continuous alpine ski injury survey in Finland. PMID:24565467

  14. Paediatric hanging and strangulation injuries: A 10-year retrospective description of clinical factors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Dawn; Lang, Mia; Watts, Rick

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify early clinical factors that are correlated with death or severe disability in paediatric patients who have sustained an injury by hanging or strangulation. METHODS: A retrospective review of all patient records from January 1, 1997, to September 30, 2007, was conducted. Patient records were identified by International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Canada diagnostic codes for asphyxia, strangulation, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, hanging, hypoxemia, hypoxia or anoxia. RESULTS: A total of 109 records were identified. Of these, 41 met the inclusion criteria for the study. Of 19 (46%) children who were pulse-less and received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 16 died and the survivors were severely disabled. Of the 22 (54%) children who were found with a pulse, 18 made a full recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Children who are pulseless at discovery for hanging injuries are at high risk of death or severe disability. Early clinical and neurophysiological indicators should be applied systematically to best guide clinicians and parents in their decision making. PMID:23204911

  15. Radial nerve injury associated with humeral shaft fracture: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Flvia Pessoni Faleiros Macdo; Barbosa, Rafael Incio; Elui, Valria Meirelles Carril; Barbieri, Cludio Henrique; Mazzer, Nilton; Fonseca, Marisa de Cssia Registro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the profile of patients with humeral diaphyseal fractures in a tertiary hospital. Methods: We conducted a survey from January 2010 to July 2012, including data from patients classified under humeral diaphyseal fracture (S42.3) according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). The variables analyzed were: age, gender, presence of radial nerve injury, causal agent and the type of treatment carried out. Results: The main causes of trauma were car accidents. The radial nerve lesion was present in some cases and was caused by the same trauma that caused the fracture or iatrogenic injury. Most of these fractures occurred in the middle third of humeral diaphysis and was treated conservatively. Conclusion: The profile of patients with fracture of humeral shaft, in this specific sample, was composed mainly of adult men involved in traffic accidents; the associated radial nerve lesion was present in most of these fractures and its cause was strongly related to the trauma mechanism. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:26327789

  16. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  17. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  18. Injury epidemiology after the 2001 Gujarat earthquake in India: a retrospective analysis of injuries treated at a rural hospital in the Kutch district immediately after the disaster

    PubMed Central

    Phalkey, Revati; Reinhardt, Jan D.; Marx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of injured far exceeds those dead and the average injury to mortality ratio in earthquakes stands at 3:1. Immediate effective medical response significantly influences injury outcomes and thus the overall health impact of earthquakes. Inadequate or mismanagement of injuries may lead to disabilities. The lack of precise data from immediate aftermath is seen as a remarkable weak point in disaster epidemiology and warrants evidence generation. Objective To analyze the epidemiology of injuries and the treatment imparted at a secondary rural hospital in the Kutch district, Gujarat, India following the January 26, 2001 earthquake. Design/Methods Discharge reports of patients admitted to the hospital over 10 weeks were analyzed retrospectively for earthquake-related injuries. Results Orthopedic injuries, (particularly fractures of the lower limbs) were predominant and serious injuries like head, chest, abdominal, and crush syndrome were minimal. Wound infections were reported in almost 20% of the admitted cases. Surgical procedures were more common than conservative treatment. The most frequently performed surgical procedures were open reduction with internal fixation and cleaning and debridement of contaminated wounds. Four secondary deaths and 102 transfers to tertiary care due to complications were reported. Conclusion The injury epidemiology reported in this study is in general agreement with most other studies reporting injury epidemiology except higher incidence of distal orthopedic injuries particularly to the lower extremities. We also found that young males were more prone to sustaining injuries. These results warrant further research. Inconsistent data reporting procedures against the backdrop of inherent disaster data incompleteness calls for urgent standardization of reporting earthquake injuries for evidence-based response policy planning. PMID:21799668

  19. Computed tomography of the shoulders in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injuries: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Humphries, Andrea D

    2008-01-01

    Background Scapular hypoplasia, elevation, and rotation (SHEAR) deformity and posterior subluxation of the humeral head are common tertiary sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPI). Interpretations of images from bilateral computed tomography (CT) scans of the upper extremities are critical to the diagnosis and treatment plan for patients with these bony deformities resulting from OBPI. Methods We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the accuracy of radiologic reports in the diagnosis of SHEAR or posterior subluxation of the humeral head in OBPI patients. CT studies from 43 consecutive patients over a 33-month period were used in the study. For each patient, we compared the results from the radiologic report to those from a clinical examination given by the attending surgeon and to measurements taken from the CT studies by biomedical researchers. Results A comparison of SHEAR measured from the 3-D CT images to the diagnoses from the radiologists, revealed that only 40% of the radiological reports were accurate. However, there was a direct correlation between the use of the 3-D CT images and an accurate SHEAR diagnosis by the radiologists (p < 0.0001). When posterior subluxation was measured in the affected and contralateral shoulders, 93% of the patients that had greater than a 10% difference between the two shoulders did not have their deformity diagnosed. The radiological reports diagnosed 17% of these patients with a 'normal' shoulder. Only 5% of the reports were complete, accurately diagnosing SHEAR in addition to posterior subluxation. Conclusion Due to the low incidence rate of OBPI, many radiologists may be unfamiliar with the sequelae of these injuries. It is therefore critical that radiologists are made aware of the importance of an accurate measurement and diagnosis of the SHEAR deformity. Due to their lack of completeness, the radiological reports in this study did not significantly contribute to the clinical care of the patients. In order for OBPI patients to receive the highest standard of care, the final diagnosis from their radiological imaging should be deferred to a brachial plexus specialist who is experienced with these types of injuries. PMID:18992150

  20. Military cold injury during the war in the Falkland Islands 1982: an evaluation of possible risk factors.

    PubMed

    Craig, R P

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the history of war, there have been many instances when the cold has ravaged armies more effectively than their enemies. Delineated risk factors are restricted to negro origins, previous cold injury, moderate but not heavy smoking and the possession of blood group O. No attention has been directed to the possibility that abnormal blood constituents could feasibly predispose to the development of local cold injury. This study considers this possibility and investigates the potential contribution of certain components of the circulating blood which might do so. Three groups of soldiers from two of the battalions who served during the war in the Falklands Islands in 1982 were investigated. The risk factors which were sought included the presence or absence of asymptomatic cryoglobulinaemia, abnormal total protein, albumin, individual gamma globulin or complement C3 or C4 levels, plasma hyperviscosity or evidence of chronic alcoholism manifesting as high haemoglobin, PCV, RBC, MCV or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). No cases of cryoglobulinaemia were isolated and there was no haematological evidence to suggest that any of those men who had developed cold injury, one year before this study was performed, had abnormal circulating proteins, plasma hyperviscosity or indicators of alcohol abuse. Individual blood groups were not incriminated as a predisposing factor although the small numbers of negroes in this series fared badly. Although this investigation has excluded a range of potential risk factors which could contribute to the development of cold injury, the problem persists. Two areas of further study are needed: the first involves research into the production of better protective clothing in the form of effective cold weather boots and gloves and the second requires the delineation of those dietary and ethnic factors which allow certain communities to adapt successfully to the cold. A review of the literature in this latter area is presented. PMID:18214089

  1. A retrospective analysis of maxillofacial injuries in patients reporting to a tertiary care hospital in East Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Pranav; Kalra, Namita

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Maxillofacial trauma is frequently encountered in the Accident and Emergency department of hospitals either as an isolated injury or as a part of multiple injuries to the head, neck, chest, and abdomen. This study aimed to assess retrospectively the profile of maxillofacial injuries in patients reporting to a tertiary care hospital in East Delhi. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Dentistry, UCMS and GTB Hospital, Delhi. Dental case record sheets of 1000 medicolegal cases reporting to the hospital emergency were scrutinized and various demographic and epidemiologic factors, including the patient's age and gender, time and day of reporting, and the etiology and nature of injury were recorded. Results: The peak incidence of maxillofacial injury was observed in the age group of 2130 years, with males outnumbering females in all age groups. Maximum number of trauma cases reported in late evening hours, especially on weekends. Interpersonal assault was the primary etiological factor followed by road traffic accidents. Soft tissue injuries were very common and maxillofacial fractures, when present, were most frequently observed in the mandible followed by the midface. Conclusion: The changing trend of the etiology of maxillofacial injuries in East Delhi necessitates strict legislation against violence and education in alcohol abuse. Periodic review of driving skills and stricter implementation of traffic rules in this area is a must to minimize the physical, psychological, and emotional distress associated with maxillofacial trauma. PMID:22624095

  2. Epidemiology of training injuries in amateur taekwondo athletes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Graham, PL; Poulos, RG

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and describe the pattern and severity of training injuries in taekwondo, and to compare pattern and severity of training injuries with competition injuries. One hundred and fifty-two active Australian amateur taekwondo athletes, aged 12 years or over, completed an online survey comprising questions on training exposure and injury history over the preceding 12 months. The main outcome measures were: overall injury incidence rate per athlete-year; training injury incidence rate per athlete-year, per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and per 1000 athlete-hours of training; injury severity; and injury proportions by anatomical region and by type of injury. Injury incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, while injury proportions were compared using Fisher's exact test. The vast majority (81.5%) of taekwondo injuries in an average athlete-year occurred during training. The training injury incidence rate was estimated to be 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4, 1.9) per athlete-year, 11.8 (95% CI: 10.4, 13.4) per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.1, 7.9) per 1000 athlete-hours of training. Among athletes with five or fewer injuries, the severity and injury pattern of training injuries were, by and large, the same as for competition injuries. Approximately sixty percent (60.3%) of training injuries required treatment by a health professional. Considering the burden of training injuries exceeds that of competition injuries, taekwondo governing bodies and stakeholders are encouraged to devote more efforts towards the identification of risk factors for, and prevention of, training injuries in the sport of taekwondo. PMID:26424924

  3. Epidemiology of training injuries in amateur taekwondo athletes: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lystad, R P; Graham, P L; Poulos, R G

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and describe the pattern and severity of training injuries in taekwondo, and to compare pattern and severity of training injuries with competition injuries. One hundred and fifty-two active Australian amateur taekwondo athletes, aged 12 years or over, completed an online survey comprising questions on training exposure and injury history over the preceding 12 months. The main outcome measures were: overall injury incidence rate per athlete-year; training injury incidence rate per athlete-year, per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and per 1000 athlete-hours of training; injury severity; and injury proportions by anatomical region and by type of injury. Injury incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, while injury proportions were compared using Fisher's exact test. The vast majority (81.5%) of taekwondo injuries in an average athlete-year occurred during training. The training injury incidence rate was estimated to be 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4, 1.9) per athlete-year, 11.8 (95% CI: 10.4, 13.4) per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.1, 7.9) per 1000 athlete-hours of training. Among athletes with five or fewer injuries, the severity and injury pattern of training injuries were, by and large, the same as for competition injuries. Approximately sixty percent (60.3%) of training injuries required treatment by a health professional. Considering the burden of training injuries exceeds that of competition injuries, taekwondo governing bodies and stakeholders are encouraged to devote more efforts towards the identification of risk factors for, and prevention of, training injuries in the sport of taekwondo. PMID:26424924

  4. Incidence, Characteristics and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury among Dengue Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Khan, Amer Hayat; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Sarriff, Azmi; Khan, Yusra Habib; Jummaat, Fauziah

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue induced acute kidney injury (AKI) imposes heavy burden of illness in terms of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate incidence, characteristics, risk factors and clinical outcomes of AKI among dengue patients. Methodology A total 667 dengue patients (2008–2013) were retrospectively evaluated and were stratified into AKI and non-AKI groups by using AKIN criteria. Two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical methods. Results There were 95 patients (14.2%) who had AKI, with AKIN-I, AKIN-II and AKIN-III in 76.8%, 16.8% and 6.4% patients, respectively. Significant differences (P<0.05) in demographics and clinico-laboratory characteristics were observed between patients with and without AKI. Presence of dengue hemorrhagic fever [OR (95% CI): 8.0 (3.64–17.59), P<0.001], rhabdomyolysis [OR (95% CI): 7.9 (3.04–20.49)], multiple organ dysfunction [OR (95% CI): 34.6 (14.14–84.73), P<0.001], diabetes mellitus [OR (95% CI): 4.7 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.034], late hospitalization [OR (95% CI): 2.1 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.033] and use of nephrotoxic drugs [OR (95% CI): 2.9 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.006] were associated with AKI. Longer hospital stay (>3 days) was also observed among AKI patients (OR = 1.3, P = 0.044). Additionally, 48.4% AKI patients had renal insufficiencies at discharge that were signicantly associated with severe dengue, secondary infection and diabetes mellitus. Overall mortality was 1.2% and all fatal cases had AKI. Conclusions The incidence of AKI is high at 14.2% among dengue patients, and those with AKI portended significant morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stay and poor renal outcomes. Our findings suggest that AKI in dengue is likely to increase healthcare burden that underscores the need of clinicians’ alertness to this highly morbid and potentially fatal complication for optimal prevention and management. PMID:26421839

  5. Magnitude of pedestrian head injuries & fatalities in Bangalore, south India: A retrospective study from an apex neurotrauma center

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Nupur; Ashok, M.; Shiva, Kumar V.; Jhavar, Ketaki; Sampath, S.; Devi, B. Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pedestrians contribute to 30-40 per cent of all road traffic injuries in India. However, there is a paucity of literature on pedestrian head injury as compared to two wheeler trauma. The purpose of the present study was to study the pattern of pedestrian injuries and their outcome with a special focus on head injuries. Methods: The study was conducted in two parts in the Trauma Center at National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore. A retrospective study was conducted at the casualty services of the hospital in which 529 consecutive pedestrians who sustained injury in a road traffic accident were studied from June to September 2009. In the second part, records from the hospital mortuary were retrospectively analyzed from 2007 to 2009. An analysis of 326 patients who died as a pedestrian in road accidents during this period was performed. Results: Patients in both paediatric and elderly age groups constituted 47.6 per cent (252/529) of all casualty admissions. Majority of the pedestrian injuries (41.7%, 221/529) occurred between 1600 - 2100 h; 87.1 per cent of all patients received some primary care before admission. The most common offending vehicle was a two wheeler (49.1%, 260/529). At the time of admission, 55.2 per cent (292/529) patients had sustained a moderate or severe head injury (GCS 3-13), and 40.5 per cent (214/529) had an abnormal CT scan. In addition, 90.4 per cent (478/529) patients had also sustained associated injuries. Major thoracoabdominal trauma was seen in 4 per cent and spine injury in 2.3 per cent of the patients. The mortality rate was 6.6 per cent. In the postmortem group, pedestrian deaths constituted 26.2 per cent of all the postmortems conducted. Two wheelers were the offending vehicle in the majority of the fatal crashes (39.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: Pedestrian injuries form a major part of the workload of a neurotrauma emergency. Majority of them sustained moderate to severe head injury. More attention, infrastructure and strict implementation of rules may help reduce this burden. PMID:23391802

  6. Acute Kidney Injury after Major Abdominal Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Catarina; Rosa, Rosrio; Rodrigues, Natacha; Mendes, Ins; Peixoto, Lgia; Dias, Sofia; Melo, Maria Joo; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Lopes, Jos Antnio

    2014-01-01

    Background. We analyzed the incidence, risk factors, and prognosis of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods. A total of 450 patients were retrospectively studied. AKI was defined by an increase in serum creatinine (SCr) ? 0.3?mg/dl or by an increase in SCr ? 50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to 0.5?ml/kg/hour for 6 hours, in the first 48 hours after surgery. Logistic regression method was used to determine predictors of AKI and in-hospital mortality. A two-tailed P value <0.05 was considered significant. Results. One hundred one patients (22.4%) had postoperative AKI. Age (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.011.05), nonrenal Revised Cardiac Risk Index score (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.33.1, P = 0.003), intraoperative erythrocytes transfusions (adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.43.5, P <.0001), and nonrenal Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (adjusted OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.011.06, P = 0.0191) were associated with postoperative AKI. AKI was associated with increased in-hospital mortality (20.8% versus 2.3%, P <.0001; unadjusted OR 11.2, 95% CI 4.826.2, P <.0001; adjusted OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.211.7, P = 0.024). Conclusion. AKI was common in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and was associated with in-hospital mortality. PMID:24719758

  7. Identifying future ‘unexpected’ survivors: a retrospective cohort study of fatal injury patterns in victims of improvised explosive devices

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, James A G; Gibb, Iain E; Hunt, Nicholas C A; Bull, Anthony M J; Clasper, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify potentially fatal injury patterns in explosive blast fatalities in order to focus research and mitigation strategies, to further improve survival rates from blast trauma. Design Retrospective cohort study. Participants UK military personnel killed by improvised explosive device (IED) blasts in Afghanistan, November 2007–August 2010. Setting UK military deployment, through NATO, in support of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission in Afghanistan. Data sources UK military postmortem CT records, UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry and associated incident data. Main outcome measures Potentially fatal injuries attributable to IEDs. Results We identified 121 cases, 42 mounted (in-vehicle) and 79 dismounted (on foot), at a point of wounding. There were 354 potentially fatal injuries in total. Leading causes of death were traumatic brain injury (50%, 62/124 fatal injuries), followed by intracavity haemorrhage (20.2%, 25/124) in the mounted group, and extremity haemorrhage (42.6%, 98/230 fatal injuries), junctional haemorrhage (22.2%, 51/230 fatal injuries) and traumatic brain injury (18.7%, 43/230 fatal injuries) in the dismounted group. Conclusions Head trauma severity in both mounted and dismounted IED fatalities indicated prevention and mitigation as the most effective strategies to decrease resultant mortality. Two-thirds of dismounted fatalities had haemorrhage implicated as a cause of death that may have been anatomically amenable to prehospital intervention. One-fifth of the mounted fatalities had haemorrhagic trauma which currently could only be addressed surgically. Maintaining the drive to improve all haemostatic techniques for blast casualties, from point of wounding to definitive surgical proximal vascular control, alongside the development and application of novel haemostatic interventions could yield a significant survival benefit. Prospective studies in this field are indicated. PMID:23906957

  8. Returning Veterans on Campus with War Related Injuries and the Long Road Back Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the growing numbers of returning military personnel attending higher education based on emerging national trends, including the new GI Educational Bill, amendments to the ADA, and the rising unemployment rate. The trauma of war and the high survival rate have resulted in a high percentage of veterans returning from the Global

  9. Spectrum of ocular firework injuries in children: A 5-year retrospective study during a festive season in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    John, Deepa; Philip, Swetha Sara; Mittal, Rashmi; John, Sheeja Susan; Paul, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Ocular trauma is a major cause of acquired monocular blindness in children. Firework injuries account for 20% of ocular trauma. The purpose of our study was to document the profile of ocular firework injuries in children during the festive season of Diwali and to determine the prevalence of unilateral blindness in them. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of ocular firework injury in children during the festival of Diwali from 2009 to 2013, conducted in a tertiary care eye center in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Children below 18 years of age with ocular firework injuries who presented to the emergency department for 3 consecutive days - the day of Diwali, 1 day before, and 1 day after Diwali - were included in this study. Results: Eighty-four children presented with firework-related ocular injuries during the study period. Male to female ratio was 4:1 with mean age 9.48 ± 4 years. Forty-four percentage required hospitalization. The prevalence of unilateral blindness in children due to fireworks was found to be 8% (95% confidence interval - 2–13%). Conclusion: Vision 2020 gives high priority to avoidable blindness, especially in children. In our study, for every 12 children who presented with firecracker injury, one resulted in unilateral blindness. This is an avoidable cause of blindness. Awareness needs to be created, and changes in policy regarding sales and handling of firecrackers including mandatory use of protective eyewear should be considered. PMID:26669336

  10. [The management in Marseille of facial injuries during the First World War].

    PubMed

    Blanc, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    World War I is still present for its millions of dead and wounded soldiers. New types of wounds came unexpected, and the military services were necessarily unprepared. Wounds in the face were so frequent and awful that new wards had to be organized and new methods to be invented. Among great persalities in the field are to be listed Morestin, Dufourmentel, Ginestet, Gillies, Joseph, and Kazandjian. PMID:21598571

  11. Differences in Injury Pattern and Prevalence of Cartilage Lesions in Knee and Ankle Joints: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  12. A retrospective review of lower extremity fracture care in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Akhigbe, Titilola; Chin, Amy S.; Svircev, Jelena N.; Hoenig, Helen; Burns, Stephen P.; Weaver, Frances M.; Bailey, Lauren; Carbone, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Context/Objective To identify circumstances surrounding incident lower extremity fractures (ILEFs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to describe the impact of these fractures on service needs and provision of pharmacological therapies for osteoporosis. Design Retrospective medical record review. Setting Four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the USA. Participants One hundred and forty patients with traumatic SCI who sustained an ILEF from 2002 to 2007. Outcome measures Fracture circumstances and use of assistive devices were described using percentages, means, and standard deviations. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the relationship between fracture site, and patient age and duration of SCI. Differences in pharmacological provision of therapies for osteoporosis pre- and post-fracture were examined using exact McNemar's test. Results One hundred and fifty-five ILEFs were identified in 140 patients. Tibia/fibula and femur fractures were the most common fractures. Fracture site was not related to patient's age or duration of SCI. Almost one-third of all fractures occurred during transfers to and from wheelchairs. Post-fracture, the provision of new or modified assistive devices, primarily wheelchairs, was frequent, occurring in 83% of patients in the year post-fracture. Few patients transferred residence to a nursing home following the fracture. There was a significant difference in the use of pharmacological therapies for osteoporosis in the first year post-fracture compared with the year prior to the fracture (P<0.01), with significant differences in the volume of prescriptions for calcium supplements (P<0.01) and bisphosphonates (P=0.02). Overall, the amount of prescriptions for osteoporosis increased the year post-fracture (56%) from the year pre-fracture (39%); this increase was secondary to increases in prescriptions for calcium supplements (pre=13%; post=30%) and bisphosphonates (pre=2%; post=7%). Conclusions We have identified that wheelchair and other transfer activities are a key area that could be a focus of fracture prevention in SCI. The need for new or modified assistive devices and/or wheelchair skills retraining post-fracture should be anticipated. Examination of whether treatments for osteoporosis following a fracture can prevent future osteoporotic fractures is warranted. PMID:24621029

  13. Can a Specific Neck Strengthening Program Decrease Cervical Spine Injuries in a Men's Professional Rugby Union Team? A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naish, Robert; Burnett, Angus; Burrows, Sally; Andrews, Warren; Appleby, Brendyn

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union are a concerning issue at all levels of the game. The primary aim of this retrospective analysis conducted in a professional Rugby Union squad was to determine whether a 26-week isometric neck strengthening intervention program (13-week strengthening phase and 13-week maintenance phase) was effective in reducing the number and severity of cervical spine injuries. The secondary aim was to determine whether at week five, where the program had been the similar for all players, there was increased isometric neck strength. All 27 players who were common to both the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons were included in this analysis and data was extracted from a Sports Medicine/Sports Science database which included the squad's injury records. Primary outcome variables included; the number of cervical spine injuries and the severity of these injuries as determined by the total number of days lost from training and competition. Secondary outcome variables included isometric neck strength in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion. Using non-parametric statistical methods, no significant differences were evident for the total number of cervical spine injuries (n = 8 in 2007-2008, n = 6 in 2008-2009) or time loss due to these injuries (100 days in 2007-2008, 40 days in 2008-2009). However, a significant (p = 0.03) reduction in the number of match injuries was evident from 2007-2008 (n = 11) to 2008-09 (n = 2). Non-significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in all directions examined. A significant reduction in the number of match injuries was evident in this study. However, no other significant changes to primary outcome variables were achieved. Further, no significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in this well-trained group of professional athletes. Key Points While many authors have proposed that neck strengthening could be an effective strategy in preventing cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union, there is currently little information in the literature pertaining to how such a study might be conducted. A significant decrease in the number of injuries recorded in matches can be achieved using a specific neck strengthening program at the elite level. In an elite rugby union team as investigated in this study a significant increase in neck strength is difficult to achieve in a short period of time such as five weeks. PMID:24149163

  14. A 2-year retrospective analysis of facial injuries in patients treated at department of oral and maxillofacial surgery, IGGDC, Jammu, India

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Parveen; Singh, Amrit Pal; Kour, Indumeet; Kumar, Misha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of maxillofacial injuries is on the rise due to motor vehicle accidents and increased incidence of violence in recent times. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence, etiology, and the pattern of fractures in the maxillofacial region. Materials and Methods: After obtaining permission from the concerned authorities, a predesigned questionnaire was used to collect the necessary data from the department. A retrospective analysis of 787 patients, who suffered trauma and were managed in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Indira Gandhi Government Dental College (IGGDC), Jammu over a period of 2 years was carried out. Results: Road traffic accident (RTA) was the common cause of maxillofacial injuries. Men sustained more injuries as compared to women. Injuries were most commonly sustained in the age group of 11-40 years, constituting about 76% of all injuries, mandibular fractures were the most common. Conclusion: RTAs were the commonest cause for the maxillofacial injuries. PMID:25937724

  15. Non-minor injuries among children sustained in an outdoor environment--a retrospective register study.

    PubMed

    Gyllencreutz, Lina; Rolfsman, Ewa; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to investigate non-minor injuries sustained during outdoor activities among 0-12 year old children and to explore self-reported circumstances surrounding these incidents. During 2007-2009, the Ume University Hospital injury database (IDB) registered 795 children with moderate (n = 778) and serious (n = 17) injuries, such as fractures. The IDB includes data from a questionnaire completed in the emergency department by the injured child or a parent. The open-ended questions catch the injured child's description of what circumstances precede the injury incident. The most commonly reported activities contributing to injuries were play, sport, and transport. Surface impacts were also reported as contributing factors along with products such as trampolines, bicycles, and downhill skis. By achieving a deeper knowledge about the activities and circumstances that precede non-minor injury incidents, creating safer outdoor environments may be feasible. PMID:24024526

  16. Investigation of characteristics and risk factors of sports injuries in young soccer players: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The participation of children and adolescents in sports has become increasingly frequent, including soccer. This growing involvement gives rise to concerns regarding the risk of sports injuries. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe the musculoskeletal injuries in young soccer players. Methods 301 male soccer players with a mean age 14.67??2.08 years were randomly recruited. The Referred Condition Inquiry was used to collect information on the mechanism of injury and anatomic site affected as well as personal data on the participants. The variables were analyzed based on the degree of association using Goodmans test for contrasts between multinomial populations, with the p?injury. With regard to height, taller individuals reported more injuries than shorter individuals (62.5% and 37.5%, respectively; p?Injuries were more frequent among players with a training duration greater than five years (69.65%) in comparison to those who trained for a shorter duration (30.35%) (p?injury. Conclusion The young practitioners of soccer analyzed had low rates of injury. The main causal mechanism was the impact. A taller height and longer exposure to training were the main risk factors for injury among young soccer players. PMID:23602027

  17. Injury survey in scuba divers of British Sub-Aqua Club: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok; Park, Jung-Min; Cho, Nam-Heung; Cha, Jun-Youl

    2015-01-01

    Scuba diving itself is generally known as a safe sports. However, various injury accidents can happen, and the incidences vary depending on divers’ education grade levels about the risks. Therefore, the study set out to identify and analyze the causes and patterns of injuries depending on the divers’ safety education grade levels through a questionnaire survey targeting ocean divers (n=12), sports divers (n=16), and dive leaders (n=15), all of whom belong to the British Sub-Aqua Club. After conducting a frequency analysis on the collected questionnaires, the conclusions are made as follows. First, in terms of diving depth, the most frequent diving depth was 15–20 m among ocean divers, 20–25 m among sports divers, and 15–20 m in case of dive leaders. Second, with regard to the causes of injuries, the most frequently answered causes are ‘overtension’ and ‘low skill’ among ocean divers; ‘low skill’ among sports divers; ‘overaction’ among dive leaders. Third, in terms of injury patterns, the most frequently answered injury patterns are ‘ear’ injuries among ocean divers; ‘ankle’ injuries among sports divers; ‘ankle’ and ‘calf’ injuries among dive leaders. Fourth, with regard to who performed first-aid when an injury accident happened, the most frequent answers are ‘instructor’ among ocean divers; ‘instructor’ and ‘self’ among sports divers; ‘self’ among dive leaders. We might suggest that more efforts need to be made to improve divers’ low dependence on specialists for treatment and consultation so that we can prevent an injury from leading to the second injury accident. PMID:26730384

  18. Injury survey in scuba divers of British Sub-Aqua Club: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok; Park, Jung-Min; Cho, Nam-Heung; Cha, Jun-Youl

    2015-12-01

    Scuba diving itself is generally known as a safe sports. However, various injury accidents can happen, and the incidences vary depending on divers' education grade levels about the risks. Therefore, the study set out to identify and analyze the causes and patterns of injuries depending on the divers' safety education grade levels through a questionnaire survey targeting ocean divers (n=12), sports divers (n=16), and dive leaders (n=15), all of whom belong to the British Sub-Aqua Club. After conducting a frequency analysis on the collected questionnaires, the conclusions are made as follows. First, in terms of diving depth, the most frequent diving depth was 15-20 m among ocean divers, 20-25 m among sports divers, and 15-20 m in case of dive leaders. Second, with regard to the causes of injuries, the most frequently answered causes are 'overtension' and 'low skill' among ocean divers; 'low skill' among sports divers; 'overaction' among dive leaders. Third, in terms of injury patterns, the most frequently answered injury patterns are 'ear' injuries among ocean divers; 'ankle' injuries among sports divers; 'ankle' and 'calf' injuries among dive leaders. Fourth, with regard to who performed first-aid when an injury accident happened, the most frequent answers are 'instructor' among ocean divers; 'instructor' and 'self' among sports divers; 'self' among dive leaders. We might suggest that more efforts need to be made to improve divers' low dependence on specialists for treatment and consultation so that we can prevent an injury from leading to the second injury accident. PMID:26730384

  19. Childhood casualties during civil war: Syrian experience.

    PubMed

    elikel, Adnan; Karbeyaz, Kenan; Kararslan, Bekir; Arslan, M Mustafa; Zeren, Cem

    2015-08-01

    In war areas a lot of children die as well as adults. According to UNICEF, almost 2 million children have died in the wars took place in the last 10 years. In this study, we aimed to evaluate demographical data and injury characteristics of Syrian children who were wounded in Syria Civil War and died while being treated in Turkey. Postmortem examination and autopsy reports of 985 forensic deaths from Hatay -a Syrian neighborhood city of Turkey-between January 2012 and August 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 763 Syrian people who were wounded in the war and died while being treated in Turkey, 140 cases (18.3%) who were younger than 18 years of age were taken into the scope of this study. Among those cases 77.9% (n=109) were male and 22.1% were female. Median ages of female cases are 14 (min-max: 2-18) and median age of female cases are 9 (min-max: 1-18). Frequency distribution is highest between 13 and 18 years of age (n: 71, 50.7%). In 70% (n: 98) of cases, cause of death is bombing and shrapnel injuries, 13.6% (19) of them were killed by gunshot wounds. According to injury sites most of the injuries were reported to be on multiple body parts (54.3%, n: 76) and only head and neck injuries (%30). Cause of death was intracranial bleeding and cerebral parenchymal injury in most of the cases (n: 66, %47.1) followed by vascular damage with external bleeding (n: 15, %10.7) and internal organ damage with internal bleeding (n: 15, %10.7). The cases had very high level Abbreviated Injury Scales and Injury Severity Sores. In conclusion, a lot of children have died in the Civil War of Syria. Their average abbreviated injury scale and injury severity score values reported very high. Children that we evaluated were mostly died of head and neck injuries predominantly caused by bombing attacks and Autopsies of them revealed fatal intracranial hemorrhages and parenchymal injuries. PMID:26165650

  20. Metals detected by ICP/MS in wound tissue of war injuries without fragments in Gaza

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amount and identity of metals incorporated into "weapons without fragments" remain undisclosed to health personnel. This poses a long-term risk of assumption and contributes to additional hazards for victims because of increased difficulties with clinical management. We assessed if there was evidence that metals are embedded in "wounds without fragments" of victims of the Israeli military operations in Gaza in 2006 and 2009. Methods Biopsies of "wounds without fragments" from clinically classified injuries, amputation (A), charred (C), burns (B), multiple piercing wounds by White Phosphorus (WP) (M), were analyzed by ICP/MS for content in 32 metals. Results Toxic and carcinogenic metals were detected in folds over control tissues in wound tissues from all injuries: in A and C wounds (Al, Ti, Cu, Sr, Ba, Co, Hg, V, Cs and Sn), in M wounds (Al, Ti, Cu, Sr, Ba, Co and Hg) and in B wounds (Co, Hg, Cs, and Sn); Pb and U in wounds of all classes; B, As, Mn, Rb, Cd, Cr, Zn in wounds of all classes, but M; Ni was in wounds of class A. Kind and amounts of metals correlate with clinical classification of injuries, exposing a specific metal signature, similar for 2006 and 2009 samples. Conclusions The presence of toxic and carcinogenic metals in wound tissue is indicative of the presence in weapon inducing the injury. Metal contamination of wounds carries unknown long term risks for survivors, and can imply effects on populations from environmental contamination. We discuss remediation strategies, and believe that these data suggest the need for epidemiological and environmental surveys. PMID:20579349

  1. Autologous Internal Iliac Artery Graft in a Popliteal Artery Injury Defect in War Surgery.

    PubMed

    Noorzai, M Yaqub; Carpp, Nicole; Ertl, Christian W

    2015-12-01

    A 23-year-old Afghan National Policeman sustained a right popliteal artery injury secondary to a ground-based blast. Initial treatment was an application of a tourniquet, and after triage at a local civilian hospital a shunt was placed, 3 hours after the initial injury, and then was transferred to Kabul for definitive care, 24 hours after injury. Extensive trauma to both legs precluded use of greater saphenous vein as a graft. To avoid an above-the-knee amputation, a branch of the internal iliac artery was harvested for grafting. Postoperative computed tomography angiography indicated the presence of excellent flow, and he was discharged fully ambulatory on postoperative day 17. Autologous arterial grafting has only been used infrequently, and in this case represents innovation in a low-resource environment. Surgical training in Afghanistan has seen great strides at the National Hospital. If this patient were treated at any other facility, he likely would have had a high amputation. Without advising or direction of coalition surgeons, the Afghan Trauma Team independently made the decision to harvest the artery and salvage the limb, and this is one example of how coalition support has bolstered the confidence of Afghan surgeons to develop unconventional solutions to conventional problems. PMID:26633676

  2. Work-related burn injuries in Ontario, Canada: A follow-up 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Clouatre, Elsa; Gomez, Manuel; Banfield, Joanne M; Jeschke, Marc G

    2013-09-01

    Work-related burn injuries contribute to a quarter of all burns in the USA. In 2009, the provincial Workplace Safety and Insurance Board reported 64,824 work-related injuries that resulted in time lost, 1188 injuries (2%) were a result of burns. There were two previous studies performed at a regional burn centre (1984-1990 and 1998-2000) that examined incidence and characteristics of work-related burns. There was no significant change between these two groups. The purpose of this study was to identify the recent pattern of work-related burns from 2001 to 2010 and to compare it to the previous studies. During the study period, 1427 patients were admitted for an acute injury to the regional burn centre. Of these, 330 were due to a work-related incident (23%). The mean age of patients was 40.511.9 years, 95% were male. The mean total body surface area burn was 11.916.2%. The most common mechanism of injury was flame (32.7%) followed by electrical (27%) and scald (19.7%), inhalation injury was present in 4.8% of patients and the mortality was 1.8%. Our study shows a significant decrease in the incidence in work-related burns treated at the regional burn centre (23.1% vs. 28.2% vs. 30.2%, p<0.01), flame burns have now become the leading cause of injury, there was a significant reduction in inhalation injury (4.8% vs. 23% vs. 14.8%, p<0.00001), and mortality over time (1.8% vs. 4% vs. 6.7% p=0.02). These findings strongly suggest a change in the cause of work-related burns, improvement in burn care, and that prevention strategies may have been more effective. PMID:23352030

  3. Pattern and epidemiology of pediatric musculoskeletal injuries in Kashmir valley, a retrospective single-center study of 1467 patients.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shahid; Dar, Tahir; Beigh, Asif Qayoom; Dhar, Shabir; Ahad, Humayun; Hussain, Imtiyaz; Ahmad, Sharief

    2015-05-01

    This work aimed to study the pattern and epidemiology of pediatric musculoskeletal trauma and consequent morbidity in Kashmir Valley and compare the results with other studies and to formulate preventive measures and devise management strategies. This was a retrospective study of 1467 pediatric orthopedic trauma patients who presented to our hospital over a 3-year period between September 2005 and August 2008. Information was recorded in a prescribed proforma including the following: age, sex, mode of trauma, type of fracture/injury, radiological study, final diagnosis, intervention performed, and complications. The information was collected from the Medical Records Department of the hospital. The children's ages ranged from 0 to 16 years; there were 996 males and 471 females, with males outnumbering females in every age group (the overall male-to-female ratio was 2.12:1). Most fractures occurred in children aged 7-12 years [n=816 (53.96%)] and decreased in younger and older children beyond this age group. The left side was involved in 762 cases, 612 injuries involved the right side, 24 were bilateral, and 69 patients presented with multiple injuries. In children aged 0-6 years, the most common site of injury was the elbow, whereas in children aged 7-16 years, it was the forearm. In descending order, most injuries were sustained because of fall while playing (34.76%), fall from height (33.74%), road traffic accidents (14.92%), and fall from standing height (7.97%). The majority of injuries were caused by unintentional trauma (94.48 vs. 5.52%). The places where injury occurred were the home [603 (41.10%)], play field and orchards near the home [450 (30.67%)], roads [219 (14.92%)], school [183 (12.47%)], and unknown [12 (0.81%)]. The pattern and epidemiology of pediatric trauma differs from those in adults. The majority of musculoskeletal injuries are because of unintentional trauma in this young age group and hence preventable. Enhanced supervision at home and school is recommended. A safer environment and better playing conditions may decrease the high frequency of trauma in pediatric patients. Dedicated trauma centers with such facilities as orthopedics, neurosurgery, and plastic surgery need to be established for the proper management of pediatric trauma. PMID:25647562

  4. Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. A Spanish retrospective case-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury is among the most serious complications after cardiac surgery and is associated with an impaired outcome. Multiple factors may concur in the development of this disease. Moreover, severe renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) presents a high mortality rate. Consequently, we studied a Spanish cohort of patients to assess the risk factors for RRT in cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI). Methods A retrospective case-cohort study in 24 Spanish hospitals. All cases of RRT after cardiac surgery in 2007 were matched in a crude ratio of 1:4 consecutive patients based on age, sex, treated in the same year, at the same hospital and by the same group of surgeons. Results We analyzed the data from 864 patients enrolled in 2007. In multivariate analysis, severe acute kidney injury requiring postoperative RRT was significantly associated with the following variables: lower glomerular filtration rates, less basal haemoglobin, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, diabetes, prior diuretic treatment, urgent surgery, longer aortic cross clamp times, intraoperative administration of aprotinin, and increased number of packed red blood cells (PRBC) transfused. When we conducted a propensity analysis using best-matched of 137 available pairs of patients, prior diuretic treatment, longer aortic cross clamp times and number of PRBC transfused were significantly associated with CSA-AKI. Patients requiring RRT needed longer hospital stays, and suffered higher mortality rates. Conclusion Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring RRT is associated with worse outcomes. For this reason, modifiable risk factors should be optimised and higher risk patients for acute kidney injury should be identified before undertaking cardiac surgery. PMID:19772621

  5. Blast From the Past: A Retrospective Analysis of Blast-induced Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kristin E; Murphy, Justin M; Tsao, Jack W

    2016-03-01

    Because of the sharp increase in the number of military personnel exposed to explosive blasts in combat, research has been dedicated toward understanding the impact of explosions on the brain. It is important to consider that potential injuries that military personnel sustain may be both in the form of physical injury as well as "invisible" neuronal and psychological damage. Since the inception of the study of blast science in the Medieval and Renaissance eras, significant improvements have been made in the historical record keeping and biomedical analysis of blast injuries. This editorial comments on the evolution of blast science and the recognition of neurological sequelae from both the historical and scientific perspectives. PMID:26926849

  6. Traumatic injury pattern analysis in a light rail transit death: a retrospective case study.

    PubMed

    Kendell, Ashley E; Fleischman, Julie M; Fulginiti, Laura C

    2015-05-01

    Within the context of medical examiner's offices, forensic anthropologists are increasingly being asked to assist with the interpretation of traumatic skeletal injury. This case study presents an example of trauma analysis performed by forensic anthropologists at the Maricopa County Forensic Science Center in Phoenix, Arizona. The primary goal of this study is to document an uncommon pattern of traumatic injury-severe grinding abrasions of the lower appendage that macroscopically resemble sharp force trauma, especially as observed in dismemberment cases-resulting from an individual being dragged beneath a Light Rail train for c. 1.7 miles. The abraded skeletal elements include a femoral shaft fragment, a femoral head portion, and the right foot. Second, this study aims to illustrate the efficacy of forensic anthropological analysis of patterned skeletal trauma. Finally, this study demonstrates the critical importance of analyzing scene information before drawing conclusions as to the etiology of a traumatic injury pattern. PMID:25689938

  7. [Effect of primary and secondary below-knee amputation of war injuries on the length of hospitalization and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Jandri?, Slavica; Topi?, Brano

    2002-01-01

    The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35.42) were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%). Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation) in 30 (83.3%) amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16.7%) average 4.61 +/- 11.67 days after wounding. Reamputation was necessary in 6 cases (16.7%). Time period from the beginning of rehabilitation to the fitting of prosthesis, was 36.25 +/- 14.97 days for primary amputations, 32 +/- 17.8 days for secondary amputations and 68.66 +/- 33.52 days for reamputations. There was no significant correlation between the duration of rehabilitation to prosthetic management and the period between wounding and amputation (r = -0.102). The attempt to save the limb after severe below-knee injuries and the secondary amputation afterwards, did not significantly influence the ensuing rehabilitation and prosthetic works. PMID:12132239

  8. Fatal firearm injuries in autopsy cases at central Bangkok, Thailand: a 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Myint, Sithu; Rerkamnuaychoke, Budsaba; Peonim, Vichan; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Worasuwannarak, Wisarn

    2014-11-01

    Even though there have been previously published reports on firearm injuries in various countries, the incidence and pattern of death from firearm injuries in Thailand have not been studied before. In present study, 149 fatal firearm injuries from 2002 to 2011 were reviewed. At total of 7126 autopsies, fatal firearm injuries comprised of 2.09% (n = 149) of total autopsies cases. Among those victims, 136 were male (91.3%), 13 (8.7%) were female. The youngest age of victim was 10 years and the oldest was 79 years. Mean age of the victims was 33.79 years and median age was 30 years. Outdoor incident was the most common scene of crime. Night time incident (18:00 PM-05:59 AM) was higher than day time one. Most of the cases occurred in week ends (n = 52). Homicide (77.2%) was the most frequent manner of death. Head/face and chest were the most common sites of entrance. The autopsy report also study on entrance wound, range and types of projectiles. Blood alcohol concentration was examined in 122 cases and 38 victims showed positive results, 11 cases revealed using of illegal substances in blood and urine analysis. This study also included the association between manner of death and other factors. Age group, time of incidence, place of incidence, number of entrance wound and range showed statistically significant association with manner of death. PMID:25440139

  9. Accidental cold-related injury leading to hospitalization in northern Sweden: an eight-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cold injuries are rare but important causes of hospitalization. We aimed to identify the magnitude of cold injury hospitalization, and assess causes, associated factors and treatment routines in a subarctic region. Methods In this retrospective analysis of hospital records from the 4 northernmost counties in Sweden, cases from 2000-2007 were identified from the hospital registry by diagnosis codes for accidental hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning. Results were analyzed for pre-hospital site events, clinical events in-hospital, and complications observed with mild (temperature 34.9 - 32C), moderate (31.9 - 28C) and severe (<28C), hypothermia as well as for frostbite and cold-water drowning. Results From the 362 cases, average annual incidences for hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning were estimated to be 3.4/100 000, 1.5/100 000, and 0.8/100 000 inhabitants, respectively. Annual frequencies for hypothermia hospitalizations increased by approximately 3 cases/year during the study period. Twenty percent of the hypothermia cases were mild, 40% moderate, and 24% severe. For 12%, the lowest documented core temperature was 35C or higher, for 4% there was no temperature documented. Body core temperature was seldom measured in pre-hospital locations. Of 362 cold injury admissions, 17 (5%) died in hospital related to their injuries. Associated co-factors and co-morbidities included ethanol consumption, dementia, and psychiatric diagnosis. Conclusions The incidence of accidental hypothermia seems to be increasing in this studied sub-arctic region. Likely associated factors are recognized (ethanol intake, dementia, and psychiatric diagnosis). PMID:24460844

  10. Protective and risk factors in amateur equestrians and description of injury patterns: A retrospective data analysis and a case - control survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Switzerland there are about 150,000 equestrians. Horse related injuries, including head and spinal injuries, are frequently treated at our level I trauma centre. Objectives To analyse injury patterns, protective factors, and risk factors related to horse riding, and to define groups of safer riders and those at greater risk Methods We present a retrospective and a case-control survey at conducted a tertiary trauma centre in Bern, Switzerland. Injured equestrians from July 2000 - June 2006 were retrospectively classified by injury pattern and neurological symptoms. Injured equestrians from July-December 2008 were prospectively collected using a questionnaire with 17 variables. The same questionnaire was applied in non-injured controls. Multiple logistic regression was performed, and combined risk factors were calculated using inference trees. Results Retrospective survey A total of 528 injuries occured in 365 patients. The injury pattern revealed as follows: extremities (32%: upper 17%, lower 15%), head (24%), spine (14%), thorax (9%), face (9%), pelvis (7%) and abdomen (2%). Two injuries were fatal. One case resulted in quadriplegia, one in paraplegia. Case-control survey 61 patients and 102 controls (patients: 72% female, 28% male; controls: 63% female, 37% male) were included. Falls were most frequent (65%), followed by horse kicks (19%) and horse bites (2%). Variables statistically significant for the controls were: Older age (p = 0.015), male gender (p = 0.04) and holding a diploma in horse riding (p = 0.004). Inference trees revealed typical groups less and more likely to suffer injury. Conclusions Experience with riding and having passed a diploma in horse riding seem to be protective factors. Educational levels and injury risk should be graded within an educational level-injury risk index. PMID:21294862

  11. Risk factors of hyperthyroidism with hepatic function injury: a 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Tan, J; Zhang, G; Meng, Z; Wang, R; Li, W; Zheng, W

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic function injury is one of the common complications of hyperthyroidism (mainly Graves' disease), which affects the choice of treatment and the curative rate. Our goal was to describe clinical and biochemical patterns in patients suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and hepatic function injury and to determine the influential factors. A cohort of 1?070 patients who received (131)I treatment were studied. Many examinations were performed before (131)I therapy, such as: the 24-h radioactive iodine uptake of thyroid (RAIU(24?h)) and serum-free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine (FT(4)), sensitive thyroid-stimulating hormone (sTSH), antithyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), serum hepatic function tests, etc. Data were analyzed by the unpaired t-test, the independent samples t-test, the ?(2) test, logistic regression, and Pearson bivariate correlation. Age, course of GD, thyroid's weight, FT(4), TPOAb, and TRAb in GD patients with hepatic function injury were higher than those with normal hepatic function patients. The influential factors were age, hyperthyroidism duration, heart rate, thyroid's weight, FT(4), RAIU(24?h), TgAb, TPOAb, and TRAb. RAIU(24?h) was the protecting factor. Age, course of GD, heart rate, thyroid's weight, FT(4), TRAb, and TPOAb were the risk factors. Patients whose age was higher than 45 years old, heart rate above 90?bpm, thyroid weight more than 35?g, the hyperthyroidism duration more than 3 years, FT(4) higher than 70.5?pmol/l, the level of TPOAb above 360?IU/ml, and the level of TRAb above 15?IU/l have increased risk of hepatic function injury. As treatment (131)I therapy was found to be the best choice. PMID:24867136

  12. Risk factors for acute kidney injury in overweight patients with acute type A aortic dissection: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglei; Pan, Xudong; Gong, Zhizhong; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yongmin; Zhu, Junming

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) in overweight patients who underwent surgery for acute type A aortic dissection (TAAD). Methods A retrospective study including 108 consecutive overweight patients [body mass index (BMI) ?24] between December 2009 and April 2013 in Beijing Anzhen Hospital has been performed. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria, which is based on serum creatinine (sCr) or urine output. Results The mean age of the patients was 43.699.66 years. Seventy-two patients (66.7%) developed AKI during the postoperative period. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify two independent risk factors for AKI: elevated preoperative sCr level and 72-h drainage volume. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was required in 15 patients (13.9%). The overall postoperative mortality rate was 7.4%, 8.3% in AKI group and 5.6% in non-AKI group. There is no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P=0.32). Conclusions A higher incidence of AKI (66.7%) in overweight patients with acute TAAD was confirmed. The logistic regression model identified elevated preoperative sCr level and 72-h drainage volume as independent risk factors for AKI in overweight patients. We should pay more attention to prevent AKI in overweight patients with TAAD. PMID:26380764

  13. Causes and incidence of maxillofacial injuries in India: 12-year retrospective study of 4437 patients in a tertiary hospital in Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Weihsin, Hu; Thadani, Sandeep; Agrawal, Mohit; Tailor, Suket; Sood, Ramita; Langalia, Akshay; Patel, Twinkle

    2014-10-01

    Maxillofacial injuries are unique because of the anatomical complexity of the area and their associated psychological effects. An understanding of the epidemiology of these injuries is important if we are to develop preventive measures, increase the efficiency and delivery of health services, improve the skills of healthcare providers, and better distribute resources. We retrospectively evaluated data on 4455 patients (aged between 3 and 84 years) who presented with maxillofacial injuries to a tertiary referral hospital in Ahmedabad, India, between 1 January 1999 and 31 January 2010. Of these, 18 needed only rest and medication so 4437 were included. Data included patients'characteristics and the cause of injury. Details on the presentation and severity of injury, associated injuries including head injuries, the influence of alcohol and other drugs, treatment, and outcome, were also included. Around one-third were aged between 21and 30 years, and the male to female ratio was 5:1. The main causes of injury were road traffic accidents (n=2347, 53%) and interpersonal violence (n=1041, 23%). Most road traffic accidents involved two-wheeled vehicles. Alcohol was associated with 11% of injuries. A total of 2546 patients (57%) had mandibular fractures. To reduce the number of injuries we need better road safety laws with stringent enforcement, and the public, particularly those between 15 and 45 years of age, must be educated about road safety. PMID:25086833

  14. Risk factors for traumatic blunt cerebrovascular injury diagnosed by computed tomography angiography in the pediatric population: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Sivakumar, Walavan; Metzger, Ryan R; Bollo, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is frequently used to examine patients for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) after cranial trauma, but the pediatric population at risk for BCVI is poorly defined. Although CTA is effective for BCVI screening in adults, the increased lifetime risk for malignant tumors associated with this screening modality warrants efforts to reduce its use in children. The authors' objective was to evaluate the incidence of BCVI diagnosed by CTA in a pediatric patient cohort and to create a prediction model to identify children at high risk for BCVI. METHODS Demographic, clinical, and radiographic data were collected retrospectively for pediatric patients who underwent CTA during examination for traumatic cranial injury from 2003 through 2013. The primary outcome was injury to the carotid or vertebral artery diagnosed by CTA. RESULTS The authors identified 234 patients (mean age 8.3 years, range 0.04-17 years, 150 [64%] boys) who underwent CTA screening for BCVI. Of these, 24 (10.3%) had a focal neurological deficit, and 153 (65.4%) had intracranial hemorrhage on a head CTA. Thirty-seven BCVIs were observed in 36 patients (15.4%), and 16 patients (6.8%) died. Multivariate regression analysis identified fracture through the carotid canal, petrous temporal bone fracture, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 8, focal neurological deficit, and stroke on initial CT scan as independent risk factors for BCVI. A prediction model for identifying children at high risk for BCVI was created. A score of ? 2 yielded a 7.9% probability of BCVI and a score of ? 3 a risk of 39.3% for BCVI. CONCLUSIONS For cranial trauma in children, fracture of the petrous temporal bone or through the carotid canal, focal neurological deficit, stroke, and a GCS score of < 8 are independent risk factors for BCVI. PMID:25745952

  15. Burn Injuries Resulting from Hot Water Bottle Use: A Retrospective Review of Cases Presenting to a Regional Burns Unit in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Hot water bottles are commonly used to relieve pain and for warmth during the colder months of the year. However, they pose a risk of serious burn injuries. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review all burn injuries caused by hot water bottles presenting to our regional burns unit. Methods. Patients with burns injuries resulting from hot water bottle use were identified from our burns database between the periods of January 2004 and March 2013 and their cases notes reviewed retrospectively. Results. Identified cases involved 39 children (aged 17 years or younger) and 46 adults (aged 18 years or older). The majority of burns were scald injuries. The mean %TBSA was 3.07% (SD ± 3.40). Seven patients (8.24%) required debridement and skin grafting while 3 (3.60%) required debridement and application of Biobrane. One patient (1.18%) required local flap reconstruction. Spontaneous rupture accounted for 48.20% of injuries while accidental spilling and contact accounted for 33% and 18.80% of injuries, respectively. The mean time to heal was 28.87 days (SD ± 21.60). Conclusions. This study highlights the typical distribution of hot water bottle burns and the high rate of spontaneous rupture of hot water bottles, which have the potential for significant burn injuries. PMID:24455234

  16. The Effect of Electrical Passive Cycling on Spasticity in War Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Shojaee, Hadi; Sedighipour, Leyla; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Baghbani, Mohammad; Amirani, Omm’ol Banin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Muscle atrophy, spasticity, and deformity are among long term complication of spinal cord injury (SCI) veterans. There are numerous studies evaluating effect of functional electrical stimulation on muscle properties of SCI people, but less research has focused on the benefits of passive cycling in the management of spasticity and improving ROM of lower limbs in individuals with SCI. Aims: To evaluate the effect of electrical passive cycling on passive range of movement spasticity and electrodiagnostic parameters in SCI veterans. Methods: Sixty-four SCI veterans referred to two clinical and research center in Tehran were recruited in this prospective clinical trial. The subjects were divided into two groups according to electrical passive cycling usage: (1) patients who did not use pedal exercise (control group), (2) patients used Electrical passive cycling up to optimal level (intervention group). Main outcome measures included hip, knee, and ankle range of motion, spasticity scale, and electrodiagnostic parameters including F-Wave Consistency, F-Wave Amplitude, H/M Ratio, F/M Ratio, H-Reflex Onset Latency, and H-Reflex Amplitude. Data were recorded at the time of receiving and 1 year after pedal exercise usage. Results: Sixty-four SCI patients including 95.3% male, 4.7% female with mean age 43 years old were included in this study. All patients except one suffered from complete SCI. The involved spinal levels were cervical (17.2%), upper thoracic (34.4%), lower thoracic (45.3%), and lumbar (3.1%). Spasticity scale decreased significantly after passive cycling in group 2. Also hip, knee, and ankle ROM in group 2 were significantly improved after pedal exercise. There was a significant difference in H max/M max (RT<) and F/M ratio after versus before electric passive cycling system in group 2. Conclusion: These findings suggest that passive rhythmic leg exercise can lead to decrease in spasticity, increase in passive ROM of lower limbs and improvement in electrodiagnostic parameters of spasticity in patients with SCI. PMID:21734906

  17. Effects of chronic mild traumatic brain injury on white matter integrity in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

    PubMed

    Morey, Rajendra A; Haswell, Courtney C; Selgrade, Elizabeth S; Massoglia, Dino; Liu, Chunlei; Weiner, Jonathan; Marx, Christine E; Cernak, Ibolja; McCarthy, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common source of morbidity from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. With no overt lesions on structural MRI, diagnosis of chronic mild TBI in military veterans relies on obtaining an accurate history and assessment of behavioral symptoms that are also associated with frequent comorbid disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Military veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan with mild TBI (n = 30) with comorbid PTSD and depression and non-TBI participants from primary (n = 42) and confirmatory (n = 28) control groups were assessed with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). White matter-specific registration followed by whole-brain voxelwise analysis of crossing fibers provided separate partial volume fractions reflecting the integrity of primary fibers and secondary (crossing) fibers. Loss of white matter integrity in primary fibers (P < 0.05; corrected) was associated with chronic mild TBI in a widely distributed pattern of major fiber bundles and smaller peripheral tracts including the corpus callosum (genu, body, and splenium), forceps minor, forceps major, superior and posterior corona radiata, internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and others. Distributed loss of white matter integrity correlated with duration of loss of consciousness and most notably with "feeling dazed or confused," but not diagnosis of PTSD or depressive symptoms. This widespread spatial extent of white matter damage has typically been reported in moderate to severe TBI. The diffuse loss of white matter integrity appears consistent with systemic mechanisms of damage shared by blast- and impact-related mild TBI that involves a cascade of inflammatory and neurochemical events. PMID:22706988

  18. Clinical Risk Scoring Models for Prediction of Acute Kidney Injury after Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seong-Ho; Kim, Chung Su; Gwak, Mi Sook; Kim, Gaab Soo

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of liver transplantation and is associated with increased mortality. We identified the incidence and modifiable risk factors for AKI after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and constructed risk scoring models for AKI prediction. We retrospectively reviewed 538 cases of LDLT. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors for the prediction of AKI as defined by the RIFLE criteria (RIFLE = risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage). Three risk scoring models were developed in the retrospective cohort by including all variables that were significant in univariate analysis, or variables that were significant in multivariate analysis by backward or forward stepwise variable selection. The risk models were validated by way of cross-validation. The incidence of AKI was 27.3% (147/538) and 6.3% (34/538) required postoperative renal replacement therapy. Independent risk factors for AKI by multivariate analysis of forward stepwise variable selection included: body-mass index >27.5 kg/m2 [odds ratio (OR) 2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.324.55], serum albumin <3.5 mg/dl (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.052.94), MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) score >20 (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.173.44), operation time >600 min (OR 1.81, 95%CI 1.073.06), warm ischemic time >40 min (OR 2.61, 95%CI 1.554.38), postreperfusion syndrome (OR 2.96, 95%CI 1.554.38), mean blood glucose during the day of surgery >150 mg/dl (OR 1.66, 95%CI 1.012.70), cryoprecipitate > 6 units (OR 4.96, 95%CI 2.848.64), blood loss/body weight >60 ml/kg (OR 4.05, 95%CI 2.287.21), and calcineurin inhibitor use without combined mycophenolate mofetil (OR 1.87, 95%CI 1.143.06). Our risk models performed better than did a previously reported score by Utsumi et al. in our study cohort. Doses of calcineurin inhibitor should be reduced by combined use of mycophenolate mofetil to decrease postoperative AKI. Prospective randomized trials are required to address whether artificial modification of hypoalbuminemia, hyperglycemia and postreperfusion syndrome would decrease postoperative AKI in LDLT. PMID:26302370

  19. Peculiarities and Patterns of Cervical Spine Injuries in Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Series of 84 Patients from a Single Institute.

    PubMed

    Babu, R Arun; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Devi, B Indira; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Sampath, Somanna; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries occur infrequently in children but are associated with significant disability and mortality. A retrospective analysis was performed of 84 consecutive pediatric spine injuries treated at our institute from January 2002 to December 2011. The mean age was 14.7 years. There were 18 patients (21%) in group A (0-12 years) and 66 patients (79%) in group B (13-18 years). Overall, injury was more common in boys (ratio of 6:1). Trivial fall was the predominant cause in group A and fall from height in group B. There were 30 children (36%) with injuries of the upper cervical spine, 53 (63%) with injuries of the lower cervical spine and 1 patient (1%) with a combined injury of upper cervical spine and thoracic spine. Overall, 22% of the group A children and 67% of the group B patients had more severe injuries (Frankel grades A, B and C); 21% (18/84) were treated by surgical fusion. Where follow-up was available, 17 out of 22 children (77%) had good outcome (Frankel grade >C). In conclusion, mechanisms and patterns of injury in children are age related and the majority of the children had good outcome. PMID:26509260

  20. Acute gastrointestinal injury in the intensive care unit: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, HuaiSheng; Zhang, HuaDong; Li, Wei; Wu, ShengNan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI) is a common problem in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study is a review of the gastrointestinal function of patients in critical care, with the aim to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of grading criteria developed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) Working Group on Abdominal Problems (WGAP). Methods Data of patients who were admitted to the ICU of Shenzhen People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China, from January 2010 to December 2011 were reviewed. A total of 874 patients were included into the current study. Their sex, age, ICU admissive causes, complication of diabetes, AGI grade, primary or secondary AGI, mechanical ventilation (MV), and length of ICU stay (days) were recorded as risk factors of death. These risk factors were studied by unconditioned logistic regression analysis. Results All the risk factors affected mortality rate. Unconditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the mortality rate of secondary AGI was 71 times higher than primary AGI (odds ratio [OR] 4.335, 95% CI [1.652, 11.375]). When the age increased by one year, the mortality probability would increase fourfold. Mortality in patients with MV was 63-fold higher than for patients with non-MV. Mortality rate increased 0.978 times with each additional day of ICU stay. Conclusion Secondary AGI caused by severe systemic conditions can result in worsened clinical outcomes. The 2012 ESICM WGAP AGI recommendations were to some extent feasible and effective in guiding clinical practices, but the grading system lacked the support of objective laboratory outcomes. PMID:26491339

  1. MICROSURGICAL TRANSFER OF THE GRACILIS MUSCLE FOR ELBOW FLEXION IN BRACHIAL PLEXUS INJURY IN ADULTS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF EIGHT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Luiz Koiti; do Nascimento, Alexandre Tadeu; Capócio, Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Torres, Luciano Ruiz; Moya, Fernando Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treating brachial plexus injuries is a major challenge, especially lesions that are presented late, with more than 12 months of evolution. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent one of the possibilities for attempting to restore the function of upper limbs affected under such conditions: microsurgical transfer of the gracilis muscle for elbow flexion. Methods: Eight patients were included, divided into two groups: one in which the procedure consisted of neurorrhaphy of the muscle flap with sural nerve grafting and anastomosis more distally; and the other, in which the neurorrhaphy was performed directly on the spinal accessory nerve, with anastomosis in thoracoacromial vessels. Results: We found a significant difference between the groups. A greater number of satisfactory results (75% M4) were found among patients who underwent direct neurorrhaphy, whereas the procedure using grafts for neurorrhaphy was less successful (25% M4). Conclusion: Patients who underwent microsurgical functional transfer of the gracilis muscle in which vascular anastomoses were performed in thoracoacromial vessels presented better functional outcomes than shown by those whose anastomoses were in the brachial artery with subsequent use of a nerve graft.

  2. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  3. Civil and war peripheral arterial trauma: review of risk factors associated with limb loss.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Lazar B; Cinara, Ilijas S; Ille, Tanja; Kostic, Dusan M; Dragas, Marko V; Markovic, Dragan M

    2005-01-01

    We sought to analyze the early results of civil and war peripheral arterial injury treatment and to identify risk factors associated with limb loss. Between 1992 and 2001, data collected retrospectively and prospectively on 413 patients with 448 peripheral arterial injuries were analyzed. Of these, there were 140 patients with war injuries and 273 patients with civil injuries. The mechanism of injury was gunshot in 40%, blunt injury in 24%, explosive trauma in 20.3%, and stabbing in 15.7% of the cases. The most frequently injured vessels were the femoral arteries (37.3%), followed by the popliteal (27.8%), axillary and brachial (23.5%), and crural arteries (6.5%). Associated injuries, which included bone, nerve, and remote injuries affecting the head, chest, or abdomen, were present in 60.8% of the cases. Surgery was carried out on all patients, with a limb salvage rate of 89.1% and a survival rate of 97.3%. In spite of a rising trend in peripheral arterial injuries, our total and delayed amputation rates remained stable. On statistical analysis, significant risk factors for amputation were found to be failed revascularization, associated injuries, secondary operation, explosive injury, war injury (p < .01) and arterial contusion with consecutive thrombosis, popliteal artery injury, and late surgery (p < .05). Peripheral arterial injuries, if inadequately treated, carry a high amputation rate. Explosive injuries are the most likely to lead to amputations, whereas stab injuries are the least likely to do so. The most significant independent risk factor for limb loss was failed revascularization. PMID:15996371

  4. Does Traumatic Brain Injury Lead to Criminality? A Whole-Population Retrospective Cohort Study Using Linked Data

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Peter W.; Malacova, Eva; Preen, David B.; D’Este, Catherine; Tate, Robyn; Reekie, Joanne; Wand, Handan; Butler, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be a risk factor for criminal behaviour however multiple factors potentially confound the association. Methods Record linkage and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the association between hospital-recorded TBI (n = 7,694) and subsequent first criminal conviction in a retrospective cohort matched 1:3 with 22,905 unaffected community controls and full-sibling controls (n = 2,397). Aboriginality, substance abuse, social disadvantage, and mental illness were included in analyses as potential confounders Results In multivariable models, relative to general population controls, TBI was associated with any conviction (males: Hazard Ratio (HR) = 1·58 (95% CI 1·46 to 1·72); females: HR = 1·52 (95% CI 1·28 to 1·81)); and similar Hazard Ratios were obtained for the sibling analyses in males (HR = 1.68 (95% CI 1.31-2.18)) and females (HR 1.27 (95% CI 0.71-2.29)). TBI was also associated with violent convictions relative to the general population, (males: HR = 1.65 (95% CI 1.42 to 1.92); females HR = 1.73 (95% CI 1.21 to 2.47)), and in analyses with sibling controls in men (HR = 1.89 (95% CI 1.20-3.00)), but not in women (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.29-1.81)). Conclusion The results support a modest causal link between TBI and criminality after comprehensive adjustment for confounding. Reducing the rate of TBI, a major public health imperative, might have benefits in terms of crime reduction. PMID:26172545

  5. A two-year retrospective review of suspected deep tissue injury evolution in adult acute care patients?.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Rhonda

    2013-09-01

    Suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI) was recently defined as a pressure ulcer category, and knowledge about the evolution of these ulcers is limited. The purpose of this single-site, 2-year, retrospective, IRB-approved study was to increase understanding of the evolution and outcomes of sDTI. Inclusion criteria were hospitalized patients, 18 years or older, with a sDTI confirmed by a wound care nurse. Patient charts and WOC nurse notes were examined and patient demographics and DTI variables abstracted. All patients received standardized, comprehensive care for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Seventy-seven (77) patients, average age 67.5 years (range 32-91 years), with 128 sDTIs were identified and included in the study. The majority were men (52, 67.5%) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (68, 88.3%). Twenty-three (23, 31%) were overweight. The most common comorbidities were coronary artery disease (38, 50%) and diabetes mellitus (33, 43%), and the vast majority (67, 88.1%) had altered mobility (67, 88.1%), spent time in the intensive care unit (64, 84.2%), and were incontinent (64, 84.2%). The most common areas involved were the sacrum (51, 39.8%) and the heel/Achilles region (37, 28.9%). Maroon-purple discoloration of intact skin was the most commonly documented presentation (115 ulcers, 89.9%). Average length of follow-up was 6 days (range 1 day to 14 weeks). At the final assessment, 85 sDTIs (66.4%) completely resolved or were progressing toward resolution, 31 remained unchanged and were still documented as purple-maroon discoloration or a blood-filled blister, and deterioration to full-thickness tissue loss occurredin 12 (9.3%). These observations may offer important insights into the evolution of sDTIs. Research is needed to identify sDTI risk factors and most effective protocols of care. PMID:24018390

  6. Does Helicobacter pylori Exacerbate Gastric Mucosal Injury in Users of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs? A Multicenter, Retrospective, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takenaka, Ryuta; Miura, Ko; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Hori, Keisuke; Kita, Masahide; Tsuzuki, Takao; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The interaction between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori remains controversial. We retrospectively investigated whether H. pylori infection exacerbates severe gastric mucosal injury among chronic NSAID users. Methods From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 245 long-term NSAID (including low-dose aspirin) users who had undergone an esophagogastroduodenoscopy and had been evaluated for H. pylori infection were enrolled at Okayama University Hospital and Tsuyama Chuo Hospital. The degree of gastric mucosal injury was assessed according to the modified Lanza score (MLS). Severe gastric mucosal injury was defined as an MLS ≥4. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results In the univariate analysis, age ≥75 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 4.2), H. pylori-positivity (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.5), and the concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.86) were significantly associated with severe gastric mucosal injury. The multivariate analysis was adjusted by age and sex and demonstrated that H. pylori-positivity (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.3) and the concomitant use of PPIs (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.99) significantly contributed to severe gastric mucosal injury. Conclusions H. pylori infection exacerbates severe gastric mucosal injury among chronic NSAID users. PMID:26087789

  7. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future. This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications. A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P?injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes and high-risk groups for the development of pneumonia were identified. Further work is warranted to consider the long-term benefits of analgesia in patients post-blunt thoracic injuries. PMID:26765412

  8. Anti-epileptic prophylaxis in traumatic brain injury: A retrospective analysis of patients undergoing craniotomy versus decompressive craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Vivek; Dahlin, Robert; Hariri, Omid; Quadri, Syed A.; Farr, Saman; Miulli, Dan; Siddiqi, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Seizures account for significant morbidity and mortality early in the course of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although there is sufficient literature suggesting short-term benefits of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in post-TBI patients, there has been no study to suggest a time frame for continuing AEDs in patients who have undergone a decompressive craniectomy for more severe TBI. We examined trends in a level-II trauma center in southern California that may provide guidelines for AED treatment in craniectomy patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed evaluating patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy and those who underwent a standard craniotomy from 2008 to 2012. Results: Out of the 153 patients reviewed, 85 were included in the study with 52 (61%) craniotomy and 33 (39%) craniectomy patients. A total of 78.8% of the craniotomy group used phenytoin (Dilantin), 9.6% used levetiracetam (Keppra), 5.8% used a combination of both, and 3.8% used topiramate (Topamax). The craniectomy group used phenytoin 84.8% and levetiracetam 15.2% of the time without any significant difference between the procedural groups. Craniotomy patients had a 30-day seizure rate of 13.5% compared with 21.2% in craniectomy patients (P = 0.35). Seizure onset averaged on postoperative day 5.86 for the craniotomy group and 8.14 for the craniectomy group. There was no significant difference in the average day of seizure onset between the groups P = 0.642. Conclusion: Our study shows a trend toward increased seizure incidence in craniectomy group, which does not reach significance, but suggests they are at higher risk. Whether this higher risk translates into a benefit on being on AEDs for a longer duration than the current standard of 7 days cannot be concluded as there is no significant difference or trend on the onset date for seizures in either group. Moreover, a prospective study will be necessary to more profoundly evaluate the duration of AED prophylaxis for each one of the stated groups. PMID:25657861

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of NSAID-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Assessed by Capsule Endoscopy in Korea: A Nationwide Multicenter Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ki-Nam; Song, Eun Mi; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Kim, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Seong Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Song, Hyun Joo; Lim, Yun Jeong; Kim, Jin Soo; Ye, Byong Duk; Park, Cheol Hee; Jeon, Seong Woo; Cheon, Jae Hee; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Ji Hyun; Jang, Byung Ik; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chun, Hoon Jae; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the long-term outcome and clinical course of patients of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury by performing capsule endoscopy (CE). Methods A multicenter retrospective study was conducted using data collected from the CE nationwide database registry, which has been established since 2002. Results A total of 140 patients (87 males; mean age, 60.614.8 years) from the CE nationwide database registry (n=2,885) were diagnosed with NSAID-induced small intestinal injury and enrolled in our study. Forty-nine patients (35.0%) presented with a history of aspirin use and an additional 49 (35.0%) were taking NSAIDs without aspirin. The most prominent findings after performing CE were multiple ulcerations (n=82, 58.6%) and erosions or aphthae (n=32, 22.9%). During the follow-up period (mean, 15.919.0 months; range, 0 to 106 months), NSAID-induced small intestinal injury only recurred in six patients (4.3%). Older age and hypertension were positive predictive factors for recurrence. Conclusions These results suggest that the recurrence of NSAID-induced small bowel injury was not frequent in the presence of conservative treatment. Therefore, the initial diagnosis using CE and the medication history are important. PMID:25473079

  10. Risk of Acute Liver Injury Associated with the Use of Moxifloxacin and Other Oral Antimicrobials: A Retrospective, Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, James A; Castellsague, Jordi; Bui, Christine L; Calingaert, Brian; McQuay, Lisa J; Riera-Guardia, Nuria; Saltus, Catherine W; Quinlan, Scott; Holick, Crystal N; Wahl, Peter M; Suzart, Kiliana; Rothman, Kenneth J; Wallander, Mari-Ann; Perez-Gutthann, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To estimate the incidence and relative risk of a hospitalization or emergency visit for noninfectious liver injury in users of eight oral antimicrobialsamoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clarithromycin, cefuroxime, doxycycline, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, telithromycincompared with nonusers of these antimicrobials. Design Retrospective, observational cohort study with a nested case-control analysis. Data Source HealthCore Integrated Research Database. Patients Adults with continuous health plan enrollment for at least 6months before study entry who had a new dispensing of a study antimicrobial between July 1, 2001, and March 31, 2009. Cases had diagnoses indicating noninfectious liver injury during follow-up. To control for potentially confounding risk factors, 10 controls at risk for liver injury during follow-up were matched to each case by age, sex, and event date (liver injury date of the case), and analyses were adjusted for medical history, concomitant drugs, and health care service use. Measurements and Main Results Two physician reviewers (blind to exposure) validated the cases. Among 1.3 million antimicrobial users, we identified 607 cases of liver injury, including 82 cases of severe hepatocellular injury and 11 cases of liver failure. Liver injury incidence in nonusers of study antimicrobials was 35/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 2942/100,000 person-years). For valid cases, the adjusted relative risk among current users of multiple antimicrobials was 3.2 (95% CI 1.66.7). Levofloxacin had the highest relative risk for current single use (3.2, 95% CI 1.85.8). Relative risks were also elevated for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (2.5, 95% CI 1.35.0), doxycycline (2.5, 95% CI 1.25.2), moxifloxacin (2.3, 95% CI 1.14.7), and amoxicillin (2.3, 95% CI 1.14.7). Conclusion The results support a comparatively high adjusted relative risk of liver injury among patients exposed concurrently to multiple antimicrobials and modest elevations in the risk for several antimicrobials used alone; however, we found little evidence of any strong effect of commonly used antimicrobials on the risk of liver injury. PMID:24865821

  11. Exposure to an organophosphate pesticide, individually or in combination with other Gulf War agents, impairs synaptic integrity and neuronal differentiation, and is accompanied by subtle microvascular injury in a mouse model of Gulf War agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Joseph O; Abdullah, Laila; Evans, James; Reed, Jon Mike; Montague, Hannah; Mullan, Michael J; Crawford, Fiona C

    2014-04-01

    Gulf War illness (GWI) is a currently untreatable multi-symptom disorder experienced by 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War (GW) veterans. The characteristic hallmarks of GWI include cognitive dysfunction, tremors, migraine, and psychological disturbances such as depression and anxiety. Meta-analyses of epidemiological studies have consistently linked these symptomatic profiles to the combined exposure of GW agents such as organophosphate-based and pyrethroid-based pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos (CPF) and permethrin (PER) respectively) and the prophylactic use of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) as a treatment against neurotoxins. Due to the multi-symptomatic presentation of this illness and the lack of available autopsy tissue from GWI patients, very little is currently known about the distinct early pathological profile implicated in GWI (including its influence on synaptic function and aspects of neurogenesis). In this study, we used preclinical models of GW agent exposure to investigate whether 6-month-old mice exposed to CPF alone, or a combined dose of CPF, PB and PER daily for 10 days, demonstrate any notable pathological changes in hippocampal, cortical (motor, piriform) or amygdalar morphometry. We report that at an acute post-exposure time point (after 3 days), both exposures resulted in the impairment of synaptic integrity (reducing synaptophysin levels) in the CA3 hippocampal region and altered neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG), demonstrated by a significant reduction in doublecortin positive cells. Both exposures also significantly increased astrocytic GFAP immunoreactivity in the piriform cortex, motor cortex and the basolateral amygdala and this was accompanied by an increase in (basal) brain acetylcholine (ACh) levels. There was no evidence of microglial activation or structural deterioration of principal neurons in these regions following exposure to CPF alone or in combination with PB and PER. Evidence of subtle microvascular injury was demonstrated by the reduction of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 levels in CPF+PB+PER exposed group compared to control. These data support early (subtle) neurotoxic effects on the brain following exposure to GW agents. PMID:24118348

  12. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future.This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications.A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P?injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes and high-risk groups for the development of pneumonia were identified. Further work is warranted to consider the long-term benefits of analgesia in patients post-blunt thoracic injuries. PMID:26765412

  13. Acute paediatric bite injuries treated on inpatient basis: a 10-year retrospective study and criteria for hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Shipkov, Hristo; Stefanova, Penka; Sirakov, Vladimir; Stefanov, Rumen; Dachev, Dimitar; Simeonov, Martin; Ivanov, Biser; Nenov, Momchil

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute bite wounds in children treated on an inpatient basis over a 10-year period and the criteria for inpatient treatment. This study comprised all acute mammalian bite injuries in relation to all paediatric bite injuries seen at the Emergency Surgical Department (ESD). Inclusion criteria were: aged between 0-18 years; acute human or animal bite injuries (presenting for the first time); and inpatient treatment. Exclusion criteria were: bite wounds treated elsewhere and referred for complications; bites treated on an outpatient basis referred for complications; and all insect bites. Over 10 years, 12,948 children were seen at the ESD. There were 167 children (0.77%) with mammalian bite wounds. Twelve of them responded to the inclusion criteria. They presented 7.18% of all mammalian bite injuries and 0.09% of all paediatric emergency visits at the ESD. The average age was 3.82 ± 1.63 years (from 1.3-7 years). The time elapsed between the accident to the wound debridement was 118.64 ± 101.39 minutes. There were 10 dogs, one horse, and one rabbit bite. Surgical treatment comprised debridement, saline irrigation, and primary closure or reconstruction. All patients received antibiotics in the postoperative period. The average hospital stay was 5.92 ± 2.39 days. In one case a partial distal flap necrosis occurred. Animal bite injuries treated on an inpatient basis are predominantly dog bites in young children under 10 years of age, with deep, extended, and commonly multiple injuries. Only 7% of paediatric bite injuries require inpatient treatment. PMID:23586322

  14. Reconstructive challenges in war wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    War wounds are devastating with extensive soft tissue and osseous destruction and heavy contamination. War casualties generally reach the reconstructive surgery centre after a delayed period due to additional injuries to the vital organs. This delay in their transfer to a tertiary care centre is responsible for progressive deterioration in wound conditions. In the prevailing circumstances, a majority of war wounds undergo delayed reconstruction, after a series of debridements. In the recent military conflicts, hydrosurgery jet debridement and negative pressure wound therapy have been successfully used in the preparation of war wounds. In war injuries, due to a heavy casualty load, a faster and reliable method of reconstruction is aimed at. Pedicle flaps in extremities provide rapid and reliable cover in extremity wounds. Large complex defects can be reconstructed using microvascular free flaps in a single stage. This article highlights the peculiarities and the challenges encountered in the reconstruction of these ghastly wounds. PMID:23162233

  15. Epilepsy following non-missile head injury among African people in Dar es Salaam: a retrospective clinical analysis study.

    PubMed

    Matuja, W B

    1990-06-01

    Over a period of 2 years, 26 subjects with epilepsy following non-missile head injury were referred to the neurology clinic at Muhimbili Medical Centre, Dar es Salaam. The mean age was 28.5 yr. Twenty of these subjects were males. Sixteen (62%) were victims of road traffic accidents, six (23%) had direct blows of the head and four (15%) had fallen from heights. The first late seizure occurred 2 weeks after injury in all subjects. Fifty-eight per cent had the first late seizure between the third and seventh month after injury. Only 8% had the first seizure after 1 year of injury. Posttraumatic amnesia of over 24 h was the commonest recorded complication and occurred in 58% of subjects. Other complications were: depressed fracture (31%), acute intracranial haematoma (27%) and early seizures (12%). Twenty per cent of subjects had no complications. The role of the head injury complications as a factor in increasing the risk of late epilepsy as well as individual susceptibility to seizures is discussed. PMID:2115733

  16. Cluster Bomb Ocular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hamade, Haya; Ghaddar, Ayman; Mokadem, Ahmad Samih; El Hajj Ali, Mohamad; Awwad, Shady

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the visual outcomes and ocular sequelae of victims of cluster bombs. Materials and Methods: This retrospective, multicenter case series of ocular injury due to cluster bombs was conducted for 3 years after the war in South Lebanon (July 2006). Data were gathered from the reports to the Information Management System for Mine Action. Results: There were 308 victims of clusters bombs; 36 individuals were killed, of which 2 received ocular lacerations and; 272 individuals were injured with 18 receiving ocular injury. These 18 surviving individuals were assessed by the authors. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% (20/308) of cluster bomb victims. Trauma to multiple organs occurred in 12 of 18 cases (67%) with ocular injury. Ocular findings included corneal or scleral lacerations (16 eyes), corneal foreign bodies (9 eyes), corneal decompensation (2 eyes), ruptured cataract (6 eyes), and intravitreal foreign bodies (10 eyes). The corneas of one patient had extreme attenuation of the endothelium. Conclusions: Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% of cluster bomb victims and 67% of the patients with ocular injury sustained trauma to multiple organs. Visual morbidity in civilians is an additional reason for a global ban on the use of cluster bombs. PMID:22346132

  17. Neuroimaging, behavioral, and psychological sequelae of repetitive combined blast/impact mild traumatic brain injury in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Eric C; Cross, Donna J; Yarnykh, Vasily L; Richards, Todd; Martin, Nathalie M; Pagulayan, Kathleen; Hoff, David; Hart, Kim; Mayer, Cynthia; Tarabochia, Matthew; Raskind, Murray A; Minoshima, Satoshi; Peskind, Elaine R

    2014-03-01

    Abstract Whether persisting cognitive complaints and postconcussive symptoms (PCS) reported by Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with blast- and/or combined blast/impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) are associated with enduring structural and/or functional brain abnormalities versus comorbid depression or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains unclear. We sought to characterize relationships among these variables in a convenience sample of Iraq and Afghanistan-deployed veterans with (n=34) and without (n=18) a history of one or more combined blast/impact-related mTBIs. Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of fractional anisotropy (FA) and macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) to assess brain white matter (WM) integrity; [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging of cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu); structured clinical assessments of blast exposure, psychiatric diagnoses, and PTSD symptoms; neurologic evaluations; and self-report scales of PCS, combat exposure, depression, sleep quality, and alcohol use. Veterans with versus without blast/impact-mTBIs exhibited reduced FA in the corpus callosum; reduced MPF values in subgyral, longitudinal, and cortical/subcortical WM tracts and gray matter (GM)/WM border regions (with a possible threshold effect beginning at 20 blast-mTBIs); reduced CMRglu in parietal, somatosensory, and visual cortices; and higher scores on measures of PCS, PTSD, combat exposure, depression, sleep disturbance, and alcohol use. Neuroimaging metrics did not differ between participants with versus without PTSD. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with one or more blast-related mTBIs exhibit abnormalities of brain WM structural integrity and macromolecular organization and CMRglu that are not related to comorbid PTSD. These findings are congruent with recent neuropathological evidence of chronic brain injury in this cohort of veterans. PMID:24102309

  18. Neuroimaging, Behavioral, and Psychological Sequelae of Repetitive Combined Blast/Impact Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Yarnykh, Vasily L.; Richards, Todd; Martin, Nathalie M.; Pagulayan, Kathleen; Hoff, David; Hart, Kim; Mayer, Cynthia; Tarabochia, Matthew; Raskind, Murray A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Whether persisting cognitive complaints and postconcussive symptoms (PCS) reported by Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with blast- and/or combined blast/impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) are associated with enduring structural and/or functional brain abnormalities versus comorbid depression or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains unclear. We sought to characterize relationships among these variables in a convenience sample of Iraq and Afghanistan-deployed veterans with (n=34) and without (n=18) a history of one or more combined blast/impact-related mTBIs. Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of fractional anisotropy (FA) and macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) to assess brain white matter (WM) integrity; [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging of cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu); structured clinical assessments of blast exposure, psychiatric diagnoses, and PTSD symptoms; neurologic evaluations; and self-report scales of PCS, combat exposure, depression, sleep quality, and alcohol use. Veterans with versus without blast/impact-mTBIs exhibited reduced FA in the corpus callosum; reduced MPF values in subgyral, longitudinal, and cortical/subcortical WM tracts and gray matter (GM)/WM border regions (with a possible threshold effect beginning at 20 blast-mTBIs); reduced CMRglu in parietal, somatosensory, and visual cortices; and higher scores on measures of PCS, PTSD, combat exposure, depression, sleep disturbance, and alcohol use. Neuroimaging metrics did not differ between participants with versus without PTSD. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with one or more blast-related mTBIs exhibit abnormalities of brain WM structural integrity and macromolecular organization and CMRglu that are not related to comorbid PTSD. These findings are congruent with recent neuropathological evidence of chronic brain injury in this cohort of veterans. PMID:24102309

  19. Traumatic brain injury produced by exposure to blasts, a critical problem in current wars: biomarkers, clinical studies, and animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, C. Edward

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) resulting from exposure to blast energy released by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) has been recognized as the "signature injury" of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Repeated exposure to mild blasts may produce subtle deficits that are difficult to detect and quantify. Several techniques have been used to detect subtle brain dysfunction including neuropsychological assessments, computerized function testing and neuroimaging. Another approach is based on measurement of biologic substances (e.g. proteins) that are released into the body after a TBI. Recent studies measuring biomarkers in CSF and serum from patients with severe TBI have demonstrated the diagnostic, prognostic, and monitoring potential. Advancement of the field will require 1) biochemical mining for new biomarker candidates, 2) clinical validation of utility, 3) technical advances for more sensitive, portable detectors, 4) novel statistical approach to evaluate multiple biomarkers, and 5) commercialization. Animal models have been developed to simulate elements of blast-relevant TBI including gas-driven shock tubes to generate pressure waves similar to those produced by explosives. These models can reproduce hallmark clinical neuropathological responses such as neuronal degeneration and inflammation, as well as behavioral impairments. An important application of these models is to screen novel therapies and conduct proteomic, genomic, and lipodomic studies to mine for new biomarker candidates specific to blast relevant TBI.

  20. The association between brain injury, perioperative anesthetic exposure, and 12-month neurodevelopmental outcomes after neonatal cardiac surgery: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Ahmad, Hasan B.; Haq, Taha; Brady, Ken; Stayer, Stephen A.; Meador, Marcie R.; Hunter, Jill V.; Rivera, Carlos; Voigt, Robert G.; Turcich, Marie; He, Cathy Q.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Dickerson, Heather A.; Fraser, Charles D.; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Easley, R. Blaine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes are observed in up to 50% of infants after complex cardiac surgery. We sought to determine the association of perioperative anesthetic exposure with neurodevelopmental outcomes at age 12 months in neonates undergoing complex cardiac surgery and to determine the effect of brain injury determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Retrospective cohort study of neonates undergoing complex cardiac surgery who had preoperative and 7-day postoperative brain MRI and 12-month neurodevelopmental testing with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III). Doses of volatile anesthetics (VAA), benzodiazepines, and opioids were determined during the first 12 months of life. Results From a database of 97 infants, 59 met inclusion criteria. Mean sd composite standard scores were as follows: cognitive = 102.1 13.3, language = 87.8 12.5, and motor = 89.6 14.1. After forward stepwise multivariable analysis, new postoperative MRI injury (P = 0.039) and higher VAA exposure (P = 0.028) were associated with lower cognitive scores. ICU length of stay (independent of brain injury) was associated with lower performance on all categories of the Bayley-III (P < 0.02). Conclusions After adjustment for multiple relevant covariates, we demonstrated an association between VAA exposure, brain injury, ICU length of stay, and lower neurodevelopmental outcome scores at 12 months of age. These findings support the need for further studies to identify potential modifiable factors in the perioperative care of neonates with CHD to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:24467569

  1. Wars, disasters and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Lameire, N

    2014-12-01

    This paper summarizes the impact that wars had on the history of nephrology, both worldwide and in the Ghent Medical Faculty notably on the definition, research and clinical aspects of acute kidney injury. The paper briefly describes the role of 'trench nephritis' as observed both during World War I and II, supporting the hypothesis that many of the clinical cases could have been due to Hantavirus nephropathy. The lessons learned from the experience with crush syndrome first observed in World War II and subsequently investigated over many decades form the basis for the creation of the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force of the International Society of Nephrology. Over the last 15 years, this Task Force has successfully intervened both in the prevention and management of crush syndrome in numerous disaster situations like major earthquakes. PMID:25409904

  2. Injury severity and serum amyloid A correlate with plasma oxidation-reduction potential in multi-trauma patients: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In critical injury, the occurrence of increased oxidative stress or a reduced antioxidant status has been observed. The purpose of this study was to correlate the degree of oxidative stress, by measuring the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of plasma in the critically injured, with injury severity and serum amyloid A (SAA) levels. Methods A total of 140 subjects were included in this retrospective study comprising 3 groups: healthy volunteers (N = 21), mild to moderate trauma (ISS < 16, N = 41), and severe trauma (ISS ? 16, N = 78). For the trauma groups, plasma was collected on an almost daily basis during the course of hospitalization. ORP analysis was performed using a microelectrode, and ORP maxima were recorded for the trauma groups. SAA, a sensitive marker of inflammation in critical injury, was measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results ORP maxima were reached on day 3 ( 0.4 SEM) and day 5 ( 0.5 SEM) for the ISS < 16 and ISS ? 16 groups, respectively. ORP maxima were significantly higher in the ISS < 16 (-14.5 mV 2.5 SEM) and ISS ? 16 groups (-1.1 mV 2.3 SEM) compared to controls (-34.2 mV 2.6 SEM). Also, ORP maxima were significantly different between the trauma groups. SAA was significantly elevated in the ISS ? 16 group on the ORP maxima day compared to controls and the ISS < 16 group. Conclusion The results suggest the presence of an oxidative environment in the plasma of the critically injured as measured by ORP. More importantly, ORP can differentiate the degree of oxidative stress based on the severity of the trauma and degree of inflammation. PMID:19925664

  3. Outcome of occupational electrical injuries among French electric company workers: a retrospective report of 311 cases, 1996-2005.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Aleksandra; Fillet, Anne-Marie; Perez, Philippe; Walkowiak, Philippe; Simon, Denis; Corniere, Marie-Jean; Cabanes, Pierre-Andr; Lambrozo, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    This study reviewed records of all electrical incidents involving work-related injury to employees Electricit de France (EDF) from 1996 through 2005 and analysed data for 311 incidents. The results are compared with 1231 electrical incidents that occurred during 1970-1979 and 996 incidents during 1980-1989. A total of 311 electrical incidents were observed. The medical consequences of electrical incident remain severe and particularly, the current fatality rate (3.2%) is similar to that recorded in the 1980s (2.7%) and 1970s (3.3%). Among individuals with non-fatal incidents, any change has occurred in the prevalence of permanent functional sequelae (23.6% in the 1970s vs. 27.6% in the 1980s and 32.5% currently). An increase in the incidence of neuropsychiatric sequelae (5.4% in the 1980s vs. 13% currently) has been observed and they are now the second most common type of sequelae after those directly related to burns. Among the neurological sequelae, peripheral nervous system disorders are the most common, as observed in the 1980s. Since the definition of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has changed between the two periods, we can only report that the current prevalence of PTSD is 7.6%. This study emphasises the need for specific management of neurological and psychological impairments after electrical injuries, including especially early recognition and initiation of effective treatment. PMID:24028742

  4. Dixie's War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrell, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that World War II brought profound social and economic change to the southern United States. Discusses the impact of a total war on demography, women in the work force, and the regional economy. Includes six photographs of wartime life in the South. (CFR)

  5. Acute Kidney Injury and Rhabdomyolysis After Protobothrops flavoviridis Bite: A Retrospective Survey of 86 Patients in a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroaki; Enokida, Hideki; Kawahira, Shuichirou; Kagara, Ichiro; Hayami, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the main cause of death for victims of hematoxic snakebites. A few studies have described improvement in AKI rates in snakebite cases, but the reasons for the improvement have not been investigated. Eighty-six patients with Protobothrops flavoviridis bites admitted to a single center from January 2003 through March 2014 were included in the study. Clinical variables, including age, sex, blood pressure (BP), and serum creatinine (S-Cre), on admission were compared between patients with and without AKI. One patient died of disseminated intravascular coagulation following AKI (mortality rate 1.1%). Six patients developed AKI with rhabdomyolysis. Systolic BP, S-Cre, serum creatine kinase, white blood cell count, and platelet count differed significantly between the AKI and non-AKI groups (P = 0.01). Three of the six patients were physically challenged to a degree that made it difficult for them to move or communicate, and these difficulties likely exacerbated the severity of snakebite complications. Our study demonstrated that the risk of snakebite-induced AKI for physically challenged patients was high. To further reduce mortality due to snakebite-induced AKI, we need to make it possible for physically challenged patients to receive first aid sooner. PMID:26643529

  6. Risk factors and prognostic factors of acute kidney injury in children: A retrospective study between 2003 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Mei; Yin, Xiao-Ling; Huang, Zhi-Bin; He, Yong-Hua; Qiu, Li-Ru; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Recent report on epidemiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) is lacking for Chinese children. We aimed to investigate the risk factors for stage and prognostic factors for renal recovery in hospitalized children. Pediatric patients (?18 years old) admitted during 2003 to 2013 were enrolled in this study. AKI was defined and staged using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors and prognostic factors. The morbidity of pediatric AKI was 0.31% (205/65 237). There were 45 (22.0%) cases in stage III, 30 (14.6%) cases in stage II and 130 (63.4%) cases in stage III. The majority of etiologies were intrinsic renal defects (85.4%). Age, weight, vomit, etiology, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) at admission and several blood gas measurements were associated with AKI stage III. Age (OR=0.894; 95% CI, 0.832-0.962; P=0.003), vomit (OR=2.375; 95% CI, 1.058-5.333; P=0.036) and BUN at admission (OR=1.135; 95% CI, 1.085-1.187; P<0.001) were identified as independent risk factors for AKI stage III. After treatment, 172 (83.9%) patients achieved complete or partial recovery. The mortality was 3.9%. Variables were found as prognostic factors for renal recovery, such as age, stage, hospital stay, BUN at discharge, white blood cells, red blood cells, platelets (PLTs), blood pH and urine blood. Among them, AKI stage (stage III vs. stage I; OR, 6.506; 95% CI, 1.640-25.816; P=0.008), BUN at discharge (OR, 0.918; 95% CI, 0.856-0.984; P=0.016) and PLTs (OR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.001-1.013; P=0.027) were identified as independent prognostic factors. AKI is still common in Chinese hospitalized children. Identified risk factors and prognostic factors provide guiding information for clinical management of AKI. PMID:26670426

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of injuries to the head and orofacial region in physically abused children and adolescents--a retrospective study in a city of the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of injuries to the head and orofacial region in physically abused children and adolescents from a city of the Northeast of Brazil, based on the review of forensic medical reports. This retrospective study was undertaken by the analysis of expert medical reports derived from medical forensic exams performed at the Department of Forensic Medicine of the city of Campina Grande, PB, Brazil, between January 2003 and December 2006. From a universe of 11 624 reports issued in this time span, the study sample consisted of 1070 reports referring to children and adolescents aged 0-17 years that were confirmedly victims of physical abuse. Male children (52.8%) in the 13- to 17-year-old range (72.4%) were the most frequent victims, with an association between gender and age group (P = 0.039). Most children (58.2%) presented a single type of injury, with a statistically significant association between number of injuries and gender (P = 0.040), but no significant association between number of injuries and age (P = 0.163). The percentage of victims injured in the head and face corresponded to 56.3%, with a statistically significant association between the presence of injury in the head and face and gender (P = 0.046). As much as 12.4% of the children and adolescents presented intraoral injuries, with no significant difference between genders (P = 0.543). However, a statistically significant association was observed between the number of existing injuries and the presence of oral injuries (P = 0.005). The maxilla was predominantly affected (55.6%), most injuries (94.8%) being soft-tissue lacerations located mainly in the upper lip (46.4%). The findings of this survey revealed a high prevalence of injuries to the head and orofacial region of physically abused children and adolescents. PMID:20070347

  8. Risk Factors for the Failure of Spinal Burst Fractures Treated Conservatively According to the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS): A Retrospective Cohort Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Linfei; Zhang, Baolong; Hu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of thoracolumbar (TL) burst fractures is still controversial. The thoracolumbar injury classification and severity score (TLICS) algorithm is now widely used to guide clinical decision making, however, in clinical practice, we come to realize that TLICS also has its limitations for treating patients with total scores less than 4, for which conservative treatment may not be optimal in all cases. Purpose The aim of this study is to identify several risk factors for the failure of conservative treatment of TL burst fractures according to TLICS algorithm. Methods From June 2008 to December 2013, a cohort of 129 patients with T10-l2 TL burst fractures with a TLISC score ?3 treated non-operatively were identified and included into this retrospective study. Age, sex, pain intensity, interpedicular distance (IPD), canal compromise, loss of vertebral body height and kyphotic angle (KA) were selected as potential risk factors and compared between the non-operative success group and the non-operative failure group. Results One hundred and four patients successfully completed non-operative treatment, the other 25 patients were converted to surgical treatment because of persistent local back pain or progressive neurological deficits during follow-up. Our results showed that age, visual analogue scale (VAS) score and IPD, KA were significantly different between the two groups. Furthermore, regression analysis indicated that VAS score and IPD could be considered as significant predictors for the failure of conservative treatment. Conclusion The recommendation of non-operative treatment for TLICS score ?3 has limitations in some patients, and VAS score and IPD could be considered as risk factors for the failure of conservative treatment. Thus, conservative treatment should be decided with caution in patients with greater VAS scores or IPD. If non-operative management is decided, a close follow-up is necessary. PMID:26284373

  9. Management of Fall-Related Injuries in the Elderly: A Retrospective Chart Review of Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department of a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Elizabeth; Rumbolt, Karla; McConnell, Sara; Berg, Katherine; Devereaux, Moira; Campbell, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify current practice for elderly individuals who have sustained a fall-related injury and subsequently presented to the emergency department (ED) of a community-based hospital in Toronto, Ontario. Methods: A retrospective longitudinal chart review was conducted for 300 persons, 65 years of age and older, who presented to the ED of a community-based teaching hospital with a fall from June 2004 through May 2005. Data were collected using a tool created by the investigators (based on information gathered through a literature review) to capture information related to risk factors for falling. Results: Our study sample was demographically similar to elderly individuals in other fall-related studies. Most patients discharged directly from the ED did not receive multidisciplinary care. In the ED, all patients saw a nurse or physician, while only 1.3% (n?=?4) saw a physical therapist, 3.0% (n?=?9) saw an occupational therapist, and 5.3% (n?=?16) saw a social worker. At discharge, 62% (n?=?152) had no documented referral for follow-up care. Abilities related to falls in elderly individuals were not consistently assessed in the ED. Frequency of assessment for these abilities was as follows: (1) gait, 10.2%; (2) balance, 4.1%; (3) lower-extremity range of motion, 4.9%; (4) lower-extremity strength, 2.0%; (5) cognition, 26.1%; (6) vision, 2.0%; (7) ability to perform activities of daily living, 7.3%. In the 6 months following the index fall, 8.3% of patients returned to the ED of the same hospital because of a subsequent fall. Conclusions: In the ED, fall-related risk factors were not consistently assessed or documented, and few patients received multidisciplinary management. Since elderly individuals who fall commonly present to the ED, the implementation of evidence-based strategies aimed at preventing repeat falls should be considered. PMID:20145749

  10. Rutherford's war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2016-02-01

    Seagulls, sea lions and the comic-book hero Professor Radium were all recruited to fight the threat of submarines during the First World War. But as John Campbell explains, it was Ernest Rutherford who led the way a century ago in using acoustics to deter these deadly craft.

  11. Unruly Bodies: The Rhetorical Domestication of Twenty-First-Century Veterans of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Veterans of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with visually identifiable injuries possess "unruly" bodies that render the story of war in efficient, emotional terms. The injured veteran's explicit connection of war with injury motivates state and mainstream news discourse that domesticates veterans' bodies, managing representations of injured veterans…

  12. Unruly Bodies: The Rhetorical Domestication of Twenty-First-Century Veterans of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Veterans of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with visually identifiable injuries possess "unruly" bodies that render the story of war in efficient, emotional terms. The injured veteran's explicit connection of war with injury motivates state and mainstream news discourse that domesticates veterans' bodies, managing representations of injured veterans

  13. Water Wars

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder roles and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.

  14. Water Wars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder rolesmore » and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.« less

  15. Lower jaw reconstruction and dental rehabilitation after war injuries: The experience of Paul Tessier in Iran in the late 1980s.

    PubMed

    Simon, Franois; Ketoff, Serge; Guichard, Benjamin; Wolfe, S Anthony; Tulasne, Jean-Franois; Bertolus, Chlo; Khonsari, Roman Hossein

    2015-06-01

    Iraq-Iran war resulted in more than 400,000 people requiring prolonged medical care in Iran. An international team of prominent reconstructive surgeons led by Paul Tessier, the founder of craniofacial surgery, was invited to Iran during the war by official organizations entitled to support war victims. This team provided up-to-date oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation to patients with severe trauma defects in the lower third of the face. We collected the medical notes of 43 patients operated on by the Tessier team in Iran in the 1980s (files property of AFCF). The parameters we collected were: age of the patient, nature of the trauma (when available), previous procedures, number of implants placed (mandibular and maxillary), associated procedures (bone grafts, soft-tissue procedures, orthognathic surgery). A protocol based on soft-tissue rehabilitation using local flaps, parietal or iliac bone grafts and implant placement 6 months later was used in all patients. Paul Tessier's approach emphasizes the importance of keeping high standards of care in difficult situations and maintaining standard protocols. PMID:25887424

  16. [Endovascular surgery in the war].

    PubMed

    Reva, V A; Samokhvalov, I M

    2015-01-01

    Rapid growth of medical technologies has led to implementation of endovascular methods of diagnosis and treatment into rapidly developing battlefield surgery. This work based on analysing all available current publications generalizes the data on using endovascular surgery in combat vascular injury. During the Korean war (1950-1953) American surgeons for the first time performed endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta - the first intravascular intervention carried out in a zone of combat operations. Half a century thereafter, with the beginning of the war in Afghanistan (2001) and in Iraq (2003) surgeons of central hospitals of the USA Armed Forces began performing delayed endovascular operations to the wounded. The development of technologies, advent of mobile angiographs made it possible to later on implement high-tech endovascular interventions in a zone of combat operations. At first, more often they performed implantation of cava filters, somewhat afterward - angioembolization of damaged accessory vessels, stenting and endovascular repair of major arteries. The first in the theatre of war endovascular prosthetic repair of the thoracic aorta for severe closed injury was performed in 2008. Russian experience of using endovascular surgery in combat injuries is limited to diagnostic angiography and regional intraarterial perfusion. Despite the advent of stationary angiographs in large hospitals of the RF Ministry of Defence in the early 1990s, endovascular operations for combat vascular injury are casuistic. Foreign experience in active implementation of endovascular technologies to treatment of war-time injuries has substantiated feasibility of using intravascular interventions in tertiary care military hospitals. Carrying out basic training courses on endovascular surgery should become an organic part of preparing multimodality general battlefield surgeons rendering care on the theatre of combat operations. PMID:26035580

  17. Retrospective Evaluation of Canine and Feline Maxillomandibular Trauma Cases; Comparison of Lunar Cycle and Seasonality with Non-maxillomandibular Traumatic Injuries (2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Mulherin, Brenda L.; Soukup, Jason W.; Hetzel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To determine relationships between seasonality and lunar cycle and the frequency of maxillomandibular (MM) and non-maxillomandibular (non-MM) injury in canine and feline trauma patients. Methods A medical records database was searched to identify all MM trauma patients (67) and a random sample of non-MM trauma patients (129) according to search criteria. Season of injury, moon phase and moon luminosity were calculated for the date of injury. Results MM injury occurred predominately in the spring and decreased through winter while non-MM injury occurred more frequently in the summer and fall. The difference in the frequency of MM and non-MM injuries during different seasons was not significant (p=0.071). When comparing injuries occurring in the quarters following the full moon and leading up to the full moon, a difference (p=0.007) was noted with an increased percentage of moon was illuminated at the time injuries occurred following a full moon as compared to leading up to the full moon. Clinical Significance These results may guide clinicians to closely evaluate trauma patients that are presented on emergency during a particular season or lunar phase. Based on the season at the time of injury, close evaluation for MM versus non-MM trauma may be appropriate. PMID:24569925

  18. Injuries from antipersonnel mines: the experience of the International Committee of the Red Cross.

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, R M; Korver, A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe and quantify patterns of injury from antipersonnel mines in terms of distribution of injury, drain on surgical resources, and residual disability. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis. SETTING--Two hospitals for patients injured in war. SUBJECTS--757 patients with injuries from antipersonnel mines. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Distribution and number of injuries; number of blood transfusions; number of operations; disability. RESULTS--Pattern 1 injury results from standing on a buried mine. These patients usually sustain traumatic amputation of the foot or leg; they use most surgical time and blood and invariably require surgical amputation of one or both lower limbs. Pattern 2 injury is a more random collection of penetrating injuries caused by multiple fragments from a mine triggered near the victim. The lower limb is injured but there is less chance of traumatic amputation or subsequent surgical amputation. Injuries to the head, neck, chest, or abdomen are common. Pattern 3 injury results from handling a mine: the victim sustains severe upper limb injuries with associated face injuries. Eye injuries are common in all groups. CONCLUSIONS--Patients who survive standing on a buried mine have greatest disability. Non-combatants are at risk from these weapons; in developing countries their social and economic prospects after recovery from amputation are poor. Images FIG 1 FIG 2-(a) FIG 2-(b) FIG 3 PMID:1838290

  19. Retrospective Evaluation of Canine and Feline Maxillomandibular Trauma Cases; A Comparison of Signalment with Non-Maxillomandibular Traumatic Injuries (2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Mulherin, Brenda L.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Soukup, Jason W.; Hetzel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To determine differences in signalment between maxillomandibular (MM) and non maxillomandibular (non-MM) trauma patients to help predict the type of injury sustained. Methods A medical records database was searched from December 2003-September 2012 to identify all MM trauma patients, and also a random sample of non-MM trauma patients was generated. Patient species, age, sex, weight, and injury aetiology were recorded for both populations. Results Sixty-seven MM trauma patients and 129 non-MM trauma patients were identified. Feline patients were almost twice as likely to be presented for MM trauma compared with non-MM trauma. The median weight of canine patients suffering MM injury was significantly less than that of non-MM patients (p=0.025). A significant association existed between the causes of injuries associated with MM and non-MM trauma populations (p=0.000023). The MM trauma patients were more likely to sustain injury as a result of an animal altercation (Bonferroni p=0.001) while non-MM injuries were more likely to result from motor vehicle accidents (Bonferroni p=0.001). Overall animals <1yr of age with traumatic injuries were overrepresented (65/196) in comparison to entire patient population. Clinical Significance The results of this study may help guide clinicians in the evaluation and screening of trauma patients that are presented as an emergency. Cats, small dogs and animals suffering from animal altercations should all be closely evaluated for maxillomandibular injury. PMID:24569903

  20. Gender Differences in Sport Injury Risk and Types of Inju-Ries: A Retrospective Twelve-Month Study on Cross-Country Skiers, Swimmers, Long-Distance Runners and Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Ristolainen, Leena; Heinonen, Ari; Waller, Benjamin; Kujala, Urho M.; Kettunen, Jyrki A.

    2009-01-01

    This twelve months survey compared injury risk and injury types by genders (312 females, 262 males) in 15- to 35-year-old cross-country skiers, swimmers, long- distance runners and soccer players. More male than female athletes reported at least one acute injury (44% vs. 35%, p < 0.05), and more male than female runners reported at least one overuse injury (69% vs. 51%, p < 0.05). When the incidence of acute and overuse injuries both separately and combined was calculated per 1000 training hours, per 1000 competition hours and all exposure hours combined we found no gender differences in either of these comparisons. After adjustment for sport event males were at increased risk for posterior thigh overuse injuries compared to females (relative risk (RR) 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 26.4, p < 0.05) while females were at increased risk for overuse injuries in the ankle compared to males (RR 3.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 9.3, p < 0.05). After adjustment for exposure time (injuries/1000 exposure hours) significance of the difference between the sexes in overuse injury to the ankle persisted (female 0.11 vs. male 0.02 injuries/1000 exposure hours, p < 0.05). Six athletes had an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, of whom four were female soccer players. After combining all reported acute and overuse ankle and knee injuries, the proportion of athletes with such injury was higher in the female compared to male soccer players (75% and 54% respectively; p < 0.05), but no difference was found in such injuries when calculated per 1000 exposure hours. In conclusion, we found some gender differences in sport-related injuries, but most of these differences seemed to be explained at least in part by differences in the amount of training. Key points Only a few sport injury studies have compared in-jury rates between the sexes Overall gender-related risk for acute and overuse injuries in top-level athletes between the sexes was small Some gender differences in the specific anatomical locations of injuries as well as in specific injuries in sports were found Some of these differences seem to be explained by the differences in the amount of training PMID:24150009

  1. Radiation combined injury: overview of NIAID research.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, Andrea L; Ramakrishnan, Narayani; Hatchett, Richard J

    2010-06-01

    The term "radiation combined injury" (RCI) is used to describe conditions where radiation injury is coupled with other insults such as burns, wounds, infection, or blunt trauma. A retrospective account of injuries sustained following the atomic bombing of Hiroshima estimates that RCI comprised approximately 65% of all injuries observed. Much of the research that has been performed on RCI was carried out during the Cold War and our understanding of the clinical problem RCI presents does not reflect the latest advances in medicine or science. Because concerns have increased that terrorists might employ radiological or nuclear weapons, and because of the likelihood that victims of such terrorism would experience RCI, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health sponsored a meeting in 2007 to explore the state of the research in this area, identify programmatic gaps, and establish priorities for future research. As a follow-up to that meeting, in 2008 NIAID sponsored an initiative on RCI, leading to the award of several exploratory/developmental grants, the goals of which are to better understand biological synergy involved in RCI-induced damage, develop improved animal models for various type of RCI, and advance identification and testing of potential countermeasures to treat injuries that would be expected following a radiological or nuclear event. This program has already yielded new insight into the nature of combined injuries and has identified a number of novel and existing compounds that may be effective treatments for this condition. PMID:20445395

  2. War, what is it good for? Historical contribution of the military and war to occupational therapy and hand therapy.

    PubMed

    Yakobina, Sheila Catherine; Yakobina, Stephanie Robin; Harrison-Weaver, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    War has negative connotations; nevertheless, this article aims to highlight some of the positive outcomes that have occurred in the fields of occupational therapy (OT) and hand therapy due to war and war-related injuries. From the military background of one of OT's founders, Thomas Kidner, to the valiant efforts of the reconstruction aides, to the origin of hand therapy during the Vietnam War, the military influence has been a powerful force in furthering our profession. This article reviews the unique history of war, the establishment and development of OT and hand therapy, and the contributions from military service members. PMID:18436131

  3. Adverse health consequences of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2015-01-01

    The 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War is a useful time to review the adverse health consequences of that war and to identify and address serious problems related to armed conflict, such as the protection of noncombatant civilians. More than 58,000 U.S. servicemembers died during the war and more than 150,000 were wounded. Many suffered from posttraumatic stress disorders and other mental disorders and from the long-term consequences of physical injuries. However, morbidity and mortality, although difficult to determine precisely, was substantially higher among the Vietnamese people, with at least two million of them dying during the course of the war. In addition, more than one million Vietnamese were forced to migrate during the war and its aftermath, including many "boat people" who died at sea during attempts to flee. Wars continue to kill and injure large numbers of noncombatant civilians and continue to damage the health-supporting infrastructure of society, expose civilians to toxic chemicals, forcibly displace many people, and divert resources away from services to benefit noncombatant civilians. Health professionals can play important roles in promoting the protection of noncombatant civilians during war and helping to prevent war and create a culture of peace. PMID:26754766

  4. Vietnam: Historians at War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyar, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Although the Vietnam War ended more than thirty years ago, historians remain as divided on what happened as the American people were during the war. Mark Moyar maps the ongoing battle between "orthodox" and "revisionist" Vietnam War historians: the first group, those who depict Vietnam as a bad war that the United States should not have fought,…

  5. Vietnam: Historians at War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyar, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Although the Vietnam War ended more than thirty years ago, historians remain as divided on what happened as the American people were during the war. Mark Moyar maps the ongoing battle between "orthodox" and "revisionist" Vietnam War historians: the first group, those who depict Vietnam as a bad war that the United States should not have fought,

  6. War and Children's Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton-Ford, Steve; Houston, Paula; Hamill, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Examines impact of war on young children's mortality in 137 countries. Finds that years recently at war (1990-5) interact with years previously at war (1946-89) to elevate mortality rates. Religious composition interacts with years recently at war to reduce effect. Controlling for women's literacy and access to safe water eliminates effect for

  7. Non-suicidal self-injury as a predictor of active and passive suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Morissette, Sandra B; Meyer, Eric C; DeBeer, Bryann B; Silvia, Paul J; Calhoun, Patrick C; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-06-30

    The present study examined the association between lifetime non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and current suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans. NSSI was positively associated with passive, active, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation at the bivariate level. NSSI remained a predictor of active, OR=5.15, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation, OR=7.01, when other risk factors were considered. These findings suggest that NSSI may be a particularly useful marker of active suicidal ideation among veterans. PMID:25858799

  8. Injuries in combat from 1982-2005 with particular reference to those to the head and neck: A review.

    PubMed

    Rustemeyer, Jan; Kranz, Volker; Bremerich, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the range of combat injuries with particular reference to those of the head and neck. We evaluated 10 retrospective studies selected from the period 1982-2005 that covered war injuries from Vietnam, Lebanon, Slovenia, Croatia, Iraq, Somalia, and Afghanistan. We found differences in the causes of injuries. Injuries from fragments were more common during the 90s than during the Vietnam War, where shooting injuries predominated. Injuries to the trunk were reduced in conflicts from 1991 onwards as military personal armour systems including protective vests were used. However, the mortality of wounded soldiers in all conflicts was consistently between 10% and 14%. There was a high incidence of injuries to the head and neck (up to 40%) though they affected only 12% of the body surface area. Though the data from the different military conflicts are not totally comparable, there are trends in the type of injuries and mortality, which may lead to changes in existing systems of medical care. PMID:17316932

  9. The War of Jenkins Ear

    PubMed Central

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Methods Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Results Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. Methods for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Conclusion Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable due to their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. PMID:23444484

  10. Increasing paintball related eye trauma reported to a state eye injury registry

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, J.; Danis, R.

    1999-01-01

    MethodsA retrospective review of cases reported to the database is reported, with representative case histories. ResultsNo injuries from paintball were reported during the period June 1992 to June 1996. Over the next two years 11 injuries were reported, representing 4% of all ocular trauma reports over this period. Visual outcome is poor in many of these eyes and more than one half present with posterior segment ocular injury. ConclusionsSevere ocular trauma results from impacts from paintball pellets, and the occurrence of injuries appears to be increasing due to growth in popularity of this war game. Diligent use of eye protection by all participants is necessary to prevent a continuing rise in ocular trauma prevalence from this activity. PMID:10628923

  11. Maxillofacial trauma at RAF War Hospital, Wroughton.

    PubMed

    Godden, D R; Hall, I S

    1996-03-23

    The following article is a historic look at maxillofacial trauma at the Royal Air Force War Hospital at Wroughton from D-Day to VE Day. The article describes the pattern of injury and the management of personnel injured on the Continent and evacuated to Wroughton by air ambulance. PMID:8996929

  12. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  13. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  14. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  15. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  16. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  17. The unfought chemical war

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, K. )

    1991-12-01

    In December 1943, in the middle of the scorching northern Australia summer, a young Australian commando, Tom Mitchell, sweated in his respirator and gas-protective clothing as he got ready to take part in a mustard-gas experiment. He grimly watched six US aircraft, B-24 Liberators, drop bombs filled with mustard gas on Brook Island, near Innisfail in the state of Queensland. Ten minutes later, Mitchell was rushing around the island to tend sampling equipment. But a few hours later, he and another Australian soldier were ordered back onto the island - this time, stripped of their respirators and protective clothing. They were forced to camp on the island from dusk to dawn in ordinary clothing without any safety equipment. Mitchell now suffers from lung and heart disease. Last year, nearly 47 years after he was burned, Mitchell settled with the Australian government for $25,000 (Australian). Publicity over his lawsuit, filed in 1981, along with revelations made in a documentary film broadcast in Australia in 1989, has prompted thousands of other Australian survivors of chemical-warfare tests to ask the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs for disability benefits. Veterans of chemical-warfare tests are also breaking their silence in the United States and Canada, stepping forward to seek compensation for their injuries. The impetus behind the US revelations came from a campaign begun in 1989 by Cong. Porter Goss, a Florida Republican, to win benefits for four participants in US Navy mustard-gas tests. During a flurry of publicity in mid-June 1991, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced that it was relaxing its rules to make it easier for World War 2 mustard-gas victims to collect benefits. In Canada, an information hot line run by the Department of National Defense in 1988 and a 1989 book by John Bryden, Deadly Allies: Canada's Secret War 1937-1947, brought the tests to national attention.

  18. Bohler’s angle’s role in assessing the injury severity and functional outcome of internal fixation for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Controversy exits over the role of Böhler’s angle in assessing the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures and predicting the functional outcome following internal fixation. This study aims to investigate whether a correlation exists between Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced calcaneal fractures, and between surgical improvement of Böhler’s angle and functional outcome. Methods Patients treated operatively for unilateral closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from January 1, 2004 to March 31, 2008 were identified. The Böhler’s angles of both calcaneus were measured, and the measurement of the uninjured foot was used as its normal control. The difference in the value of Böhler’s angle measured preoperatively or postoperatively between the angle of the injured foot and that of the contralateral calcaneus were calculated, respectively. The change in Böhler’s angle by ratio was calculated by dividing the difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus by its normal control. The injury severity was assessed according to Sanders classification. The functional outcomes were assessed using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores. Results 274 patients were included into the study with a mean follow-up duration of 71 months. According to Sanders classification, the fracture pattern included 105 type II, 121 type III and 48 type IV fractures. According to American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scoring system, the excellent, good, fair and poor results were achieved in 104, 132, 27, and 11 patients, respectively. The preoperative Böhler’s angle, difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus, and change in Böhler’s angle by ratio each has a significant correlation with Sanders classification (rs=−0.178, P=0.003; rs=−0.174, P=0.004; rs=−0.172, P=0.005, respectively), however, is not correlated with functional outcome individually. The three postoperative measurements were all found to have a significant correlation with American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores (rs=0.223, P<0.001; rs=0.224, P<0.001; rs=0.220, P<0.001, respectively). However, these correlations were all weak to low. Conclusions There was a significant correlation between preoperative Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, but only postoperative Böhler’s angle parameters were found to have a significant correlation with the functional recovery. PMID:24330592

  19. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  20. Science and War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Alex

    1985-01-01

    Provides a wide-ranging survey of relations between war, science, and technology from the days of the American colonies to the Vietnam War, indicating that the overall impact of science and technology on war has been overstated by historians in many fields. Includes military histories that science/technology historians have not used. (JN)

  1. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M.A.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Harwell, C.C.; Grover, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book addresses the ecological, agricultural, and human effects of nuclear war. The topics covered include: Ecological principles relevant to nuclear war; Vulnerability of ecological systems to climatic effects on nuclear war; Additional potential effects of nuclear war on ecological systems; Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity; Food availability after nuclear war; and Experiences and extrapolations from Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  2. Bony destructive injuries of the calcaneus: long-term results of a minimally invasive procedure followed by early functional exercise: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bony destructive injury of the calcaneus (BDIC) represents one of the most severe comminuted fractures of the calcaneus in which soft tissue coverage remains intact. The features of this injury include a collapsed articular surface, significant widening, severe loss of height and an unrecognisable outline of the calcaneus. This study aims to present the long-term outcomes of BDIC treated in a minimally invasive fashion followed by supervised early exercise. Methods Twelve patients with unilateral BDICs were treated at our institution. The main surgical procedures included percutaneous traction and leverage reduction and internal compression fixation with anatomic plates and compression bolts. Early functional exercise was encouraged to mould the subtalar joint. The height, length and width of the calcaneus; Böhler’s and Gissane’s angles; reduction of the articular surfaces; and functional recovery of the affected feet were assessed. Results The height, length and width of the calcaneus were substantially restored. The mean Böhler’s and Gissane’s angles of the affected calcaneus were 24.5 and 122.8 degrees, respectively. Five patients regained anatomical or nearly anatomical reduction of their posterior facets. Residual articular displacement of more than 3 mm was noted in three patients. Patients were followed for a mean of 93.9 months. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 83.8. Nine patients showed excellent or good results. Radiographic evidence of post-traumatic subtalar arthritis was observed in four cases. However, no subtalar arthrodesis was required. Conclusions BDICs can be treated effectively with percutaneous reduction and internal compression fixation followed by early active exercise. This protocol resulted in satisfactory radiological and functional outcomes. PMID:24725606

  3. [Psychosocial research during the war in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Loga, S; Ceri?, I; Stojak, R; Kantardzi?, D; Danes, V; Trogranci?, Z; Fisekovi?, S; Stani?, D; Termiz, D; Kulenovi?, F; Licanin, I; Papovi?, S; Resi?, D

    1999-01-01

    War in Bosnia and Herzegovina has caused many psychic and social breakdowns. The consequences on mental health of the war which caused stress are of importance, as well as influences on psychic functioning of individuals are caused by changes in social structure of population and economic potential of the society. Project "Psycho-social aspects of war in BiH" carried out within the frame of the Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Department of Psychiatry of Clinical Center of Sarajevo University. In this article are given the results of the Project, but only partially. The investigations showed that the number of patients visiting hospitals during the war was greatly increased in the field of stress reactions and reactive psychoses. But incidence and prevalence of alcohol psychoses decreased. Findings are the same for out patient clinics. The field investigation on the free territories of Sarajevo s communities shows enormous increase of mental disorders among the citizens: neurotic over 40%, psychotic about 20% and that is, together, more than 60% of the population of the town Sarajevo were disturbed at that time. Among the children and adolescents there was an increase of neurotic and psychotic disorders in the very beginning of the first year of the war, and decrease of the same diagnoses during the second year. This might be explained by particular adaptation of the youngsters to war conditions. When we are talking about invalidity of neurological and psychiatric disorders, the investigations showed that illness is the mostly caused by invalidity (85.1%) among the global invalidity during the war in Sarajevo. Injuries before the war were at 3%, during the war are 11% of cases. But, all those shows temporary, because war caused invalidity more and we are expecting to registration later. Our investigation among the refugee camps and population in Sarajevo shows that "life equipment" among the displaced persons was lower than domestic people. That shows that after the phase of surviving this part of the population was at risk of many psycho-social problems. Also, our investigation shows that very low socio-economical level of inhabitants of Sarajevo leads to the potential of absolutely poverty. The indicators of this trend are: low level of education, very low life standard, unemployment, bad health conditions etc. Among refugees all those indicators are worse. Criminality in Sarajevo during the war has been increased, particularly among adolescents. One fifth of contents of daily newspaper "Oslobodenje" has been during the war oriented to the health system problems. PMID:10546447

  4. The Effects of World War II on Economic and Health Outcomes across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kesternich, Iris; Siflinger, Bettina; Smith, James P.; Winter, Joachim K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate long-run effects of World War II on socio-economic status and health of older individuals in Europe. We analyze data from SHARELIFE, a retrospective survey conducted as part of SHARE in Europe in 2009. SHARELIFE provides detailed data on events in childhood during and after the war for over 20,000 individuals in 13 European countries. We construct several measures of war exposure—experience of dispossession, persecution, combat in local areas, and hunger periods. Exposure to war and more importantly to individual-level shocks caused by the war significantly predicts economic and health outcomes at older ages. PMID:24850973

  5. To Win a Nuclear War: The Pentagon's secret war plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, M.; Axelrod, D.

    1986-01-01

    Kaku and Axelrod trace the evolution of the strategies and technologies of nuclear war planning, and the personalities of the planners, through post-war foreign policy from the Berlin Crisis to Star Wars. To Win a Nuclear War takes readers beyond the details of the costs of nuclear attack into the attitudes of war planners and Presidents from Eisenhower to Reagan.

  6. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars. PMID:23499043

  7. Healthcare utilization and mortality among veterans of the Gulf War

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Gregory C; Kang, Han K

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted an extensive search for published works concerning healthcare utilization and mortality among Gulf War veterans of the Coalition forces who served during the1990–1991 Gulf War. Reports concerning the health experience of US, UK, Canadian, Saudi and Australian veterans were reviewed. This report summarizes 15 years of observations and research in four categories: Gulf War veteran healthcare registry studies, hospitalization studies, outpatient studies and mortality studies. A total of 149 728 (19.8%) of 756 373 US, UK, Canadian and Australian Gulf War veterans received health registry evaluations revealing a vast number of symptoms and clinical conditions but no suggestion that a new unique illness was associated with service during the Gulf War. Additionally, no Gulf War exposure was uniquely implicated as a cause for post-war morbidity. Numerous large, controlled studies of US Gulf War veterans' hospitalizations, often involving more than a million veterans, have been conducted. They revealed an increased post-war risk for mental health diagnoses, multi-symptom conditions and musculoskeletal disorders. Again, these data failed to demonstrate that Gulf War veterans suffered from a unique Gulf War-related illness. The sparsely available ambulatory care reports documented that respiratory and gastrointestinal complaints were quite common during deployment. Using perhaps the most reliable data, controlled mortality studies have revealed that Gulf War veterans were at increased risk of injuries, especially those due to vehicular accidents. In general, healthcare utilization data are now exhausted. These findings have now been incorporated into preventive measures in support of current military forces. With a few diagnostic exceptions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mental disorders and cancer, it now seems time to cease examining Gulf War veteran morbidity and to direct future research efforts to preventing illness among current and future military personnel. PMID:16687261

  8. When Kids Lose Parents in Our War in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    As of July, more than 1,200 children had lost parents in the war in Iraq, and thousands more had parents with serious injuries, according to the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress at the Uniform Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. The war, which began three and a half years ago, has resulted in the deaths of more than 2,600 U.S.

  9. Causes of Death of Prisoners of War during the Korean War (1950-1953)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Soon; Kang, Min-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed at analyzing the causes of death of prisoners of war (POWs) during the Korean War (1950-1953) who fought for the Communist side (North Korea and the People's Republic of China). In 1998, the United States Department of Defense released new information about the prisoners including, 7,614 deaths of the POW during the Korean War. The data on the causes of death of the POWs during the Korean War provides valuable information on the both the public health and history of the conflict. Materials and Methods To analyze the causes of death of the POWs, we classified the clinical diagnosis and findings on 7,614 deaths into 22 chapters, as outlined in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-10th Revision (ICD-10). Second, we traced changes in the monthly death totals of POWs as well as deaths caused by common infectious diseases and external causes of death including injury over time from August 1950 to September 1953. Results The most common category of causes of deaths of POWs was infectious disease, 5,013 (65.8%) out of 7,614 deaths, followed by external causes including injury, 817 (10.7%). Overall, tuberculosis and dysentery/diarrhea were the most common causes of death. Deaths caused by acute and chronic infection, or external causes showed different patterns of increases and decline over time during the Korean War. Conclusion The information and data on POWs' deaths during the Korean War reflects the critical impact of the POWs' living conditions and the effect of public health measures implemented in POW camps during the war. PMID:23364985

  10. In Time of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Patti Clayton

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of libraries, particularly public libraries, in times of war. Discusses similarities between responses after World War Two and the September 11, 2001 attacks; government restrictions on information; American Library Association responses, including propaganda and libraries; and the library and the community. (LRW)

  11. Who Shall Declare War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melinda; And Others

    1984-01-01

    All fighting does not have the legal and constitutional dimensions of a war. Presented is an activity to help secondary students learn about the constitutional and historical underpinnings involved in the age-old yet still current controversy concerning the war powers vested in the executive and legislative branches of government. (RM)

  12. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  13. War Literature. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Stephen Crane's poems about war and his novel "The Red Badge of Courage," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Crane examined war-related themes in prose and poetry; that close study of a poem for oral presentation helps readers see meaning or techniques not noted earlier; and that not all readers

  14. Economics of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The author describes and elaborates on how to use his public-television reports on the costs of the war in Iraq to teach economics. He shows how the Iraq war can provide economics instructors with an example for discussing cost-benefit analysis and opportunity costs in class. (Contains 4 notes.)

  15. Revealing latent value of clinically acquired CTs of traumatic brain injury through multi-atlas segmentation in a retrospective study of 1,003 with external cross-validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Kelly, Patrick D.; Asman, Andrew J.; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a "big data" paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold crossvalidation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R2 to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients.

  16. Revealing Latent Value of Clinically Acquired CTs of Traumatic Brain Injury Through Multi-Atlas Segmentation in a Retrospective Study of 1,003 with External Cross-Validation

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patrick D.; Asman, Andrew J.; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a big data paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold cross-validation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R2 to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients. PMID:25914504

  17. Afghan war wounded: experience with 200 cases.

    PubMed

    Rautio, J; Paavolainen, P

    1988-04-01

    The injuries seen in 200 Afghan war wounded in the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) hospital in Quetta are reported. Evacuation took several days and no proper initial first aid was available. Therefore few of those reaching us had serious multiple injuries. The anatomic distribution of wounds was remarkably similar to that seen in other conflicts: 38% of the injuries were caused by bullets, 50% by fragmentation weapons, and 10% by mines. Two thirds of the patients had limb injuries. Of all wounded, patients with fractures of long bones needed the greatest number of repeated operations and the longest hospitalization time. Twenty-five patients had abdominal or perineal wounds and 12 needed laparotomy. Of 25 with head injuries 14 had penetrating brain trauma. Thoracic, vascular, and burn injuries were rare. The eight patients with spinal cord injury could fortunately be referred to the ICRC rehabilitation center in Peshawar within a week. Wound sepsis was the major problem due to the extraordinarly long delay in the initiation of treatment. In spite of the often grossly infected wounds, radical debridement usually led to good recovery for most patients, with a hospital mortality rate of only 2.5%. PMID:3280819

  18. Predictors of displacement behaviour during the 2006 Lebanon war.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Marwan; Assaf, Shireen; Yamout, Rouham

    2011-01-01

    The July 2006 war in Lebanon was one of the country's shortest wars. Yet perhaps it was also the worst interstate war in the history of Lebanon. Over the course of 33 days, the war resulted in over 1000 deaths, thousands of injuries, large-scale destruction of infrastructure and properties, as well as massive population displacements. Approximately a third of the Lebanese population was displaced during the war. Population-based survey data collected in early 2007 and logistic regression models were used to examine the effects of some demographic and socio-economic factors on displacement, stratified by war-affected and non-affected areas. The sample was restricted to adults who were at least 18 years old. We found that the intensity of the conflict as captured by the region of residence was understandably the most important variable in predicting displacement. The odds of displacement were higher for those who were younger in age, married or who had obtained a higher education. Females and those of Lebanese nationality had higher odds of displacement than their male and non-Lebanese counterparts, but only in war-damaged areas. Interestingly, household composition and size, economic standing and car ownership were not related to the odds of displacement. Findings from the present study may help policy-makers and humanitarian agencies in their planning efforts during emergencies, including wars. PMID:21331966

  19. War Experiences and War-related Distress in Bosnia and Herzegovina Eight Years after War

    PubMed Central

    Ringdal, Gerd Inger; Ringdal, Kristen; Simkus, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Aim To examine the relationship between war experiences and war-related distress in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods The survey was performed in the late 2003 on a representative sample of 3313 respondents. The face-to-face interviews included 15 items on war-related distress and 24 items on war experiences. From these items we developed the War-related Distress Scale, the Direct War Experiences Scale, and the Indirect War Experiences Scale. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between war-related distress symptoms and war experiences variables, controlling for a range of other variables. Results Almost half of the respondents did not report any war-related distress symptoms, while about 13% reported 7 or more symptoms. Direct war experiences had a significant effect on war-related distress even eight years after the war, while indirect war experiences showed no significant effect on war-related distress. We found that marital status weakly decreased war-related distress, while household size increased it. Conclusion Direct war experiences seem to have a long-lasting traumatic effect on a substantial number of residents of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:18293460

  20. Thinking About Preventing Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ground Zero, Washington, DC.

    Potential paths to nuclear war and the available means of prevention of nuclear war are discussed. Presented is a detailed description of six nuclear war scenarios, and brief examples of types of potential deterrents to nuclear war (firebreaks) which are relevant for each. To be effective, the right combination of firebreaks must be used, the…

  1. Children of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Roger

    1984-01-01

    Reflects upon two attributes common to children from many countries who have known nothing but war--the absence of revenge and the belief in God. Considers how they differ from the older generation in these respects. (CMG)

  2. Israeli ED experience during the Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Z; Noy, S; Gabbay, U

    1994-01-01

    The experience in an emergency department (ED) during the Gulf War in treating casualties referred to the ED soon after each missile attack is reported. Data were gathered within an 8-hour period of each nationwide alert on all patients who presented to the ED with injuries or complaints directly related to the missile attacks of the Tel Aviv area. One hundred three patients presented with symptoms directly related to the missile attacks. Of 103, 70 suffered from acute psychological reaction, 19 from false autoinjection of atropine, and nine from physical injuries from the explosion. Of the remainder, four had mild symptoms of smoke inhalation, and one had intercurrent myocardial infarction. The missile attacks resulted in a relatively small number of serious injuries. Most of the patients who presented to the ED soon after the missile attacks suffered from either anxiety reaction or false atropin injection. PMID:8285957

  3. [The war victim].

    PubMed

    Hugeux, P; Barouti, H

    1994-10-01

    Just as the concept of war itself, the concept of the war victim is progressive, necessitating legal, economic, social, sanitary, ethical and political adaptations. In France, the laws of 1919, effective from 2nd August 1914, brought radical reform as laws of public solidarity, which guaranteed by the nation, the support of invalids of the most savage war in history. The collective nature of this new social risk obliged the state to replace a purely financial compensation by a solution of rehabilitation. The "Office National des Mutils et Rforms", created in March 1916, was put in charge of the organisation of professional reeducation. The "war invalids" category was being transform a logic of assistance into one of social action. Later, the legislative structure made extensions, enlarging the beneficiaries in the "war victim" category. The "Service de Sant des Armes" in its basic mission of support to the armed forces covers many areas. The "Anciens Combattants et Victimes de Guerre" administration disposes of specific instruments, such as the "Institution Nationale des Invalides", the "Centre d'Etudes et de Recherche sur l'Appareillage des Handicaps", the "Office National des Anciens Combatants". These joint actions, added to the ones of very influential autonomous associations, contribute to give handicapped war victims an honourable citizenship. PMID:7895110

  4. Americans as Warriors: "Doughboys" in Battle during the First World War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Jennifer D.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the experience of U.S. soldiers during World War I. Addresses topics, such as the difficulties and horrors the soldiers dealt with in the trenches, the problems with untrained soldiers, the sickness and injuries that affected soldiers, and heroes of the war. (CMK)

  5. Life without war.

    PubMed

    Fry, Douglas P

    2012-05-18

    An emerging evolutionary perspective suggests that nature and human nature are less "red in tooth and claw" than generally acknowledged by a competition-based view of the biological world. War is not always present in human societies. Peace systems, defined as groups of neighboring societies that do not make war on each other, exist on different continents. A comparison of three peace systems--the Upper Xingu River basin tribes of Brazil, the Iroquois Confederacy of upper New York State, and the European Union--highlight six features hypothesized to be important in the creation and maintenance of intersocietal peace: (i) an overarching social identity, (ii) interconnections among subgroups, (iii) interdependence, (iv) nonwarring values, (v) symbolism and ceremonies that reinforce peace, and (vi) superordinate institutions for conflict management. The existence of peace systems demonstrates that it is possible to create social systems free of war. PMID:22605769

  6. Battlefield trauma, traumatic shock and consequences: war-related advances in critical care.

    PubMed

    Allison, Carrie E; Trunkey, Donald D

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of history, while the underlying causes for wars have remained few, mechanisms of inflicting injury and our ability to treat the consequent wounds have dramatically changed. Success rates in treating war-related injuries have improved greatly, although the course of progress has not proceeded linearly. From Homer's Iliad to the Civil War to Vietnam, there have been significant improvements in mortality, despite a concurrent increase in the lethality of weapons. These improvements have occurred primarily as a result of progress in three key areas: management of wounds, treatment of shock, and systems of organization. PMID:19268793

  7. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  8. War Sailor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Askevold, F

    One third of the Norwegian sailors in the merchant navy, who survived World War II, are today disabled and on invalid pension. The majority suffer from a syndrome which is very similar to that present in the concentration camp survivors. The syndrome falls into two parts, the one consisting of non-neurotic anxiety repeating the terrors of war time, the other being a brain-organic one. This last part has in a few cases been confirmed by neuroradiology and neuropsychology. This is taken as an indicator that prolonged stress, as constant fear of death, may cause brain damage without physical trauma. PMID:1052273

  9. United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War: Nuclear War Course Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Briefly describes 46 courses on nuclear war available from United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War (UCAM). These courses are currently being or have been taught at colleges/universities, addressing effects of nuclear war, arms race history, new weapons, and past arms control efforts. Syllabi (with assignments/reading lists) are available from UCAM.

  10. U.S. War Costs: Two Parts Temporary, One Part Permanent

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Military spending, fatalities, and the destruction of capital, all of which are immediately felt and are often large, are the most overt costs of war. They are also relatively short-lived. But the costs of war borne by combatants and their caretakers, which includes families, communities, and the modern welfare state, tend instead to be lifelong. In this paper I show that a significant component of the budgetary costs associated with U.S. wars is long-lived. One third to one half of the total present value of historical war costs are benefits distributed over the remaining life spans of veterans and their dependents. Even thirty years after the end of hostilities, typically half of all benefits remain to be paid. Estimates of the costs of injuries and deaths suggest that the private burden of war borne by survivors, namely the uncompensated costs of service-related injuries, are also large and long-lived. PMID:25221367

  11. Radiological Effects of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Charles S.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the global effects of nuclear war. Discussed are radiation dosages, limited nuclear attacks, strategic arms reductions, and other results reported at the workshop on nuclear war issues in Moscow in March 1988. (CW)

  12. Education and War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Elizabeth E., Ed.; Miller, Rebecca B., Ed.; Tieken, Mara Casey, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This book examines the complex and varied relations between educational institutions and societies at war. Drawn from the pages of the "Harvard Educational Review," the essays provide multiple perspectives on how educational institutions support and oppose wartime efforts. As the editors of the volume note, the book reveals how people swept up in…

  13. Cold War Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discusses the development of Cold War propaganda in the United States, Canada, and the USSR after 1947. Presents two movie reviews and a Canadian magazine advertisement of the period which illustrate the harshness of propaganda used by both sides in the immediate postwar years. (GEA)

  14. End the Math Wars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Matt; Dempsey, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, Richard Lee Colvin published an article in "The School Administrator" titled "Math Wars: Tradition vs. Real-World Applications" that described the pendulum swing of mathematics education reform. On one side are those who advocate for computational fluency, with a step-by-step emphasis on numbers and skills and the…

  15. Medicalized weapons & modern war.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    "Medicalized" weapons--those that rely on advances in neuroscience, physiology, and pharmacology--offer the prospect of reducing casualties and protecting civilians. They could be especially useful in modern asymmetric wars in which conventional states are pitted against guerrilla or insurgent forces. But may physicians and other medical workers participate in their development? PMID:20166514

  16. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become

  17. Stabilizing Star Wars

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.; Barkenbus, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    An orderly replacement of offensive with defensive nuclear weapons is part of the defense-protected build-down (DPB) strategy described by Weinberg and Barkenbus. Differing from the administration's Star Wars approach by relying on interceptor missiles rather than costly and unproven lasers and particle beams, the plan also calls for a simultaneous freeze on offensive weapons. (DCK)

  18. Education and War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Elizabeth E., Ed.; Miller, Rebecca B., Ed.; Tieken, Mara Casey, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This book examines the complex and varied relations between educational institutions and societies at war. Drawn from the pages of the "Harvard Educational Review," the essays provide multiple perspectives on how educational institutions support and oppose wartime efforts. As the editors of the volume note, the book reveals how people swept up in

  19. Waging War on Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Closing the Gap, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Focusing on the theme of violence, this newsletter issue includes information about resources for violence information, a list of funding and grant agencies, conference information, and the following brief articles: (1) Waging War on Violence; (2) Minority Health Perspective (Clay Simpson); (3) Inmates Learn Alternatives to Violence; (4) National

  20. Grading the War Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdick, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the emotional and psychological complexities of responding to personal narratives when the focus is war. The author teaches at a community college and she always begins her semester with a narrative assignment for the usual reasons: students write better when they write what they know; teachers should scaffold writing

  1. The War Against Pests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ray F.

    1973-01-01

    Insecticides should not be the only weapons of war used against pests; in addition to them, a strategy aimed at winning the millenial warfare should combine the tactical use of natural plant enemies, reinforced plant genetic qualities, and the application of adequate ecological techniques. (BL)

  2. War, Terrorism, and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRanieri, Joseph T.; Clements, Paul T.; Clark, Kathleen; Kuhn, Douglas Wolcik; Manno, Martin S.

    2004-01-01

    Many caregivers are encountering the issue of communicating with children and adolescents about current world events, specifically war and terrorism. As health care providers, it is important to raise awareness of how children may understand, interpret, and respond to related fears and concerns. Although honesty and reassurance are clearly the

  3. The Great War: Online Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncanson, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of Web sites about World War I. Includes: (1) general Web sites; (2) Web sites with information during the war; (3) Web sites with information about post-World War I; (4) Web sites that provide photos, sound files of speeches, and propaganda posters; and (5) Web sites with lesson plans. (CMK)

  4. The Technological Culture of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, Joelien

    2008-01-01

    The article proceeds from the argument that war is a social institution and not a historical inevitability of human interaction, that is, war can be "unlearned." This process involves deconstructing/dismantling war as an institution in society. An important step in this process is to understand the philosophical and cultural bases on which…

  5. The Technological Culture of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, Joelien

    2008-01-01

    The article proceeds from the argument that war is a social institution and not a historical inevitability of human interaction, that is, war can be "unlearned." This process involves deconstructing/dismantling war as an institution in society. An important step in this process is to understand the philosophical and cultural bases on which

  6. Nuclear War and Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that science-related material on nuclear war be included in introductory courses. Lists nuclear war topics for physics, psychology, sociology, biology/ecology, chemistry, geography, geology/meteorology, mathematics, and medical science. Also lists 11 lectures on nuclear physics which include nuclear war topics. (JN)

  7. War Finance: Economic and Historic Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, David J.; Kassis, Mary Mathewes

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a historical review of how the U.S. government has funded its participation in major wars during the past 150 years. They focus attention on five conflicts--the Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Those conflicts were funded in different ways, with each funding method

  8. Penile injuries: A 10-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Reddy, S.V.; Shaik, Ahammad Basha; Sreenivas, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report our 10-year experience with penile injuries. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 156 cases of male external genitalia injuries between May 2002 and December 2012. Of these, only 26 patients presented without urethral injuries and were included in this study. Patients were divided into 4 groups: Group 1 (n = 12) with patients with penile fractures injuries; Group 2 (n = 5) with patients with penile amputation injuries; Group 3 (n = 2) with patients with penile penetrating injuries; and Group 4 (n = 7) with patients with penile soft tissue injuries. Grading of injury was done using the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST)-Organ injury scale of penile injury. Penile injuries without urethral injuries are urological emergencies which require immediate attention. PMID:25295134

  9. Ear Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Video) Rotator Cuff Injury Additional Content Medical News Ear Injury By Sam P. Most, MD NOTE: This ... Professional Version Facial Injuries Introduction to Facial Injuries Ear Injury Fractures of the Nose Fractures of the ...

  10. WAR & Military Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

  11. War on fear

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the processes through which civilian fear was turned into a practicable investigative object in the inter-war period and the opening stages of the Second World War, and how it was invested with significance at the level of science and of public policy. Its focus is on a single historical actor, Solly Zuckerman, and on his early war work for the Ministry of Home Security-funded Extra Mural Unit based in Oxford’s Department of Anatomy (OEMU). It examines the process by which Zuckerman forged a working relationship with fear in the 1930s, and how he translated this work to questions of home front anxiety in his role as an operational research officer. In doing so it demonstrates the persistent work applied to the problem: by highlighting it as an ongoing research project, and suggesting links between seemingly disparate research objects (e.g. the phenomenon of ‘blast’ exposure as physical and physiological trauma), the article aims to show how civilian ‘nerve’ emerged from within a highly specific analytical and operational matrix which itself had complex foundations. PMID:23626409

  12. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  13. In Flanders fields: the Great War, Antoine Depage, and the resurgence of débridement.

    PubMed Central

    Helling, T S; Daon, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The care of traumatic wounds has evolved over hundreds of years, largely as a result of armed conflicts. The lessons learned during World War I in the treatment of extensive soft-tissue injuries proved invaluable in reducing infection and preventing loss of limb and life. Foremost among these was the use of debridement. This report reviews the development of debridement as standard treatment of war wounds and highlights the surgeon largely responsible for its resurgence during one of this century's saddest chapters. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Before World War I, the care of wounds consisted of minimal exploration and liberal use of then-new antiseptics. For limited injuries, this approach appeared adequate. World War I saw the introduction of devastating weapons that produced injuries that caused extensive devitalization of tissue. Standard treatment of these patients proved woefully inadequate to prevent life-threatening infections. METHODS: This is a historical review of the conditions that occurred during World War I that prompted a change in wound management. One of those responsible for this change was the Belgian surgeon Antoine Depage. His life and contributions to the care of war wounds are profiled. Depage reintroduced the discarded French practice of wound incision and exploration (debridement) and combined it with excision of devitalized tissue. RESULTS: Through the use of debridement, excision, and delayed wound closure based on bacteriologic survey, Depage was able to reduce the incidence of infectious complications of soft-tissue injuries, particularly those involving fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Through his experiences in the Great War, Antoine Depage was able to formulate a treatment plan for wounds of war. All such injuries were assumed to be contaminated and, as such, they required early and careful debridement. Depage thought that wound closure should often be delayed and based his decision to close on the bacteriologic status of the wound. To him, we owe our current management of traumatic wounds. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9712561

  14. Wars long shadow: masculinity, medicine, and the gendered politics of trauma, 1914-1939.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Mark

    2010-01-01

    War is an inherently traumatizing experience, and during the First World War more than 15,000 Canadian soldiers were diagnosed with some form of war-related psychological wounds. Many more went unrecognized. Yet the very act of seeking an escape from the battlefield or applying for a postwar pension for psychological traumas transgressed masculine norms that required men to be aggressive, self-reliant, and un-emotional. Using newly available archival records, contemporary medical periodicals, doctors' notes, and patient interview transcripts, this paper examines two crises that arose from this conflict between idealized masculinity and the emotional reality of war trauma. The first came on the battlefield in 1916 when, in some cases, almost half the soldiers evacuated from the front were said to be suffering from emotional breakdowns. The second came later, during the Great Depression, when a significant number of veterans began to seek compensation for their psychological injuries. In both crises, doctors working in the service of the state constructed trauma as evidence of deviance, in order to parry a larger challenge to masculine ideals. In creating this link between war trauma and deviance, they reinforced a residual conception of welfare that used tests of morals and means to determine who was deserving or undeserving of state assistance. At a time when the Canadian welfare state was being transformed in response to the needs of veterans and their families, doctors' denial that "real men" could legitimately exhibit psychosomatic symptoms in combat meant that thousands of legitimately traumatized veterans were left uncompensated by the state and were constructed as inferior, feminized men. PMID:20857589

  15. Empirically derived injury prevention rules.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Schick, B

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a set of empirically derived safety rules that if followed, would have prevented the occurrence of minor injuries. Epidemiologists have criticized behavioral interventions as increasing "safe" behavior but failing to demonstrate a decrease in injury. The present study documents retrospectively the link between safe behavior and injury. It demonstrates that these empirically derived rules are very similar to rules for the prevention of serious injury. The study also shows that these rules are not widely accepted and implemented by parents. Suggestions for future research in this area are advanced. PMID:8307829

  16. World War II: A War on All Fronts. Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This teaching unit, one of a series of eight, reviews business's overall response to World War II, and specifically one company's involvement in the nationwide call to mobilize. Learning activities consist of class discussion and small group participation focusing on activities undertaken by businesses on behalf of U.S. war efforts. Materials from

  17. Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury: mechanisms of injury and impact on clinical care.

    PubMed

    Elder, Gregory A; Cristian, Adrian

    2009-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury has been called the signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In both theaters of operation, traumatic brain injury has been a significant cause of mortality and morbidity, with blast-related injury the most common cause. Improvised explosive devices have been the major cause of blast injuries. It is estimated that 10% to 20% of veterans returning from these operations have suffered a traumatic brain injury, and there is concern that blast-related injury may produce adverse long-term health affects and affect the resilience and in-theater performance of troops. Blast-related injury occurs through several mechanisms related to the nature of the blast overpressure wave itself as well as secondary and tertiary injuries. Animal studies clearly show that blast overpressure waves are transmitted to the brain and can cause changes that neuropathologically are most similar to diffuse axonal injury. One striking feature of the mild traumatic brain injury cases being seen in veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is the high association of mild traumatic brain injury with posttraumatic stress disorder. The overlap in symptoms between the disorders has made distinguishing them clinically challenging. The high rates of mild traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder in the current operations are of significant concern for the long-term health of US veterans with associated economic implications. PMID:19306373

  18. Suicide among War Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Vsevolod; Carli, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation and suffer from mental health problems. Suicides are more frequent in those who develop PTSD, depression and comorbid states due to war exposure. Combat stress and its’ frequency may be an important factor leading to suicide within the frame of the stress-vulnerability model. According to this model, the effects of stress may interact with social factors, interpersonal relations and psychological variables producing suicidal tendencies. Modern understanding of stress-vulnerability mechanisms based on genetic predispositions, early life development, level of exposure to stress and stress-reactivity together with interpersonal aspects may help to build more effective suicide prevention programs based on universal/selective/indicated prevention principles. PMID:22851956

  19. Head Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of head injuries include bicycle or motorcycle wrecks, sports injuries, falls from windows (especially among children who live ... to watch for? When can I start playing sports again after a head injury? How can brain damage from a head injury ...

  20. Head Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  1. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of hemoperitoneum in war casualties.

    PubMed

    Mileti?, D; Fuckar, Z; Mraovi?, B; Dimec, D; Mozetic, V

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the detection of hemoperitoneum among war casualties, and to compare the results of this method in a specific war situation and civil conditions. Ninety-four wounded individuals with suspected blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma were treated at a level I war hospital (group W), and 242 civilians with multiple injuries with suspected blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated at the emergency center of a university hospital (group C). All examinations were performed in less than 5 minutes with a portable ultrasonographic scanner, and typical points were scanned (Morison's pouch, Douglas and perisplenic spaces, paracolic gutter). In group W, hemoperitoneum was identified correctly in 19 patients, with three false-negative and no false-positive findings, whereas group C presented 98 true-positive results, 13 false-negative results, and again no false-positive results. We observed that ultrasonography in specific war conditions showed sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 100%, accuracy as high as 97%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 96%, whereas in civil conditions the corresponding values were 88%, 100%, 95%, 100%, and 91%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of emergent ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of hemoperitoneum are approximately equal in war and civil conditions. PMID:10459274

  2. Education and the Threat of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markusen, Eric

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the role of education in preventing nuclear war. Includes information on projects and organizations involved in educating children and youth about nuclear war and profiles of organizations that have been promoting nuclear war education at colleges and universities. (JN)

  3. War, Peace, and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Barrie, Ed.

    Written for editors, reporters, and researchers, this publication contains background information on war and peace. Included are newspaper articles, essays, and excerpts from radio commentaries. The information is intended to help journalists provide more accurate coverage of war-and-peace issues, in particular more accurate coverage of the Soviet

  4. Primary Sources Enliven Civil War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Today, a growing number of teachers are moving beyond the textbook in teaching about the war, and U.S. history more broadly. Teachers are digging directly into primary sources and harnessing technology, all in an attempt to help students better understand the past and bring it to life. Doing so may be especially important with the Civil War,…

  5. Teaching War Literature, Teaching Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Janet M.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores literature taught in three different courses and the peace education approaches used for each, including epics in literature courses, Vietnam War literature, and literature of anger and hope. The author recommends the teaching of war literature as an essential part of a peace education curriculum. Devastating events such as

  6. War, Peace, and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Barrie, Ed.

    Written for editors, reporters, and researchers, this publication contains background information on war and peace. Included are newspaper articles, essays, and excerpts from radio commentaries. The information is intended to help journalists provide more accurate coverage of war-and-peace issues, in particular more accurate coverage of the Soviet…

  7. Getting the Civil War Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, James W.

    2011-01-01

    William Faulkner famously wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." He would not be surprised to learn that Americans, 150 years after the Civil War began, are still getting it wrong. Did America's most divisive war start over slavery or states' rights? The author says that too many people--including educators--get it wrong. The author…

  8. Getting the Civil War Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, James W.

    2011-01-01

    William Faulkner famously wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." He would not be surprised to learn that Americans, 150 years after the Civil War began, are still getting it wrong. Did America's most divisive war start over slavery or states' rights? The author says that too many people--including educators--get it wrong. The author

  9. Primary Sources Enliven Civil War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Today, a growing number of teachers are moving beyond the textbook in teaching about the war, and U.S. history more broadly. Teachers are digging directly into primary sources and harnessing technology, all in an attempt to help students better understand the past and bring it to life. Doing so may be especially important with the Civil War,

  10. The elephant in the room: critical reflections on militarism, war, and their health contingencies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sharon; Boyle, Joyceen

    2008-01-01

    This philosophical analysis critically explores an archeology of militarism as an underpinning to multiple forms of violence, especially war. Deconstructing militarism and its discourses reveal it as a pervasive geographical, cultural, political, and psychological presence. New war technologies, related health and environmental problems, injuries, social suffering, and disproportionality in military spending as a threat to health are uncovered. Continuing the dialogue in formal nursing associations, critiquing media complicity in securing consent for war, and reconstructing a nonviolent, healthier world through nonviolent resistance are advocated. PMID:18497589

  11. Children and war.

    PubMed

    Barnett, L

    1999-01-01

    Millions of children are not merely bystanders but targets of war. Many are killed by bombs, bullets and landmines, many more are severely traumatized, though there is disagreement among carers as to how far the resulting symptoms should be managed as conventional psychiatric illness. Although a clear breach of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, large numbers of boys become active combatants, particularly in conflicts in Africa. The background factors to this and the rehabilitation of the boy soldiers at the end of the conflicts are discussed. A recent report to the United Nations proposes that the age limit of 15 for child soldiers under the Convention should be raised to 18. Governments should set up official machinery for implementing and monitoring the Convention. PMID:10605381

  12. Women and War

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Maureen; Bradley, Arlene; Mather, Susan H; Klein, Robert E; Turner, Carole L; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2006-01-01

    Most of today's 1.7 million women veterans obtain all or most of their medical care outside the VA health care system, where their veteran status is rarely recognized or acknowledged. Several aspects of women's military service have been associated with adverse psychologic and physical outcomes, and failure to assess women's veteran status, their deployment status, and military trauma history could delay identifying or treating such conditions. Yet few clinicians know of women's military history—or of military service's impact on women's subsequent health and well being. Because an individual's military service may be best understood within the historical context in which it occurred, we provide a focused historical overview of women's military contributions and their steady integration into the Armed Forces since the War for Independence. We then describe some of the medical and psychiatric conditions associated with military service. PMID:16637946

  13. Kepler's "War on Mars"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, William; Orchiston, W.; Stephenson, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an interpretation of how Johannes Kepler changed the study of astronomy. We propose that in his metaphorical "War on Mars,” the Astronomia Nova, Kepler used a revolutionary rhetoric to bring about the usurpation of seventeenth-century astronomy. We discuss how Kepler approached the well-established conceptual framework within which the hypotheses of Ptolemy, Copernicus and Tycho Brahe functioned, and how he sought comprehensive physical principles that could determine the true cause and form of the known Universe. We examine Kepler's need to redefine reality and his use of rhetoric in shaping his astronomical argument for a new astronomy, and we show that his new `laws’ represent a fusion of physics and geometry based upon astronomical observations. We suggest that although Kepler may have believed in and defended some Copernican ideas, his innovative Astronomia Nova opened up a whole new vista for international astronomy.

  14. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Asia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Guang-Zhi; Wu, Qiang; Li, Yu-Lin; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Study design A systematic review. Background The number of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) reports grows annually, especially in China and Korea. The epidemiological characteristics of TSCI in Asia differ from those in other countries. Thus, we compiled epidemiological factors from Asia to compare with those from other countries. Method We searched articles published in any language between January 1980 to December 2011 using the terms “spinal cord injury”, “traumatic spinal cord injury”, “epidemiology”, and “Asia”. The articles were reviewed for information regarding TSCI incidence, total cases, case criteria, case source, causes of injury, male/female ratio, mean age, prospective or retrospective, neurological level of injury, extent of injury, and America Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS)/grade. Results Epidemiological data were extracted from 39 reports in the published literature that met the inclusion criteria. Only two studies reported prevalence rates. Incidence rates ranged from 12.06 to 61.6 per million. The average age ranged from 26.8 to 56.6 years old. Men were at higher risk than women. Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) and falls were the main causes of TSCI. However, several countries reported war wounds as the major cause. The neurological level and extent of injury were mixed, and most patients were categorized as AIS/Frankel grade A. Conclusion TSCI is an important public health problem and a major cause of paralysis. We must understand the epidemiology to implement appropriate preventative measures. Asian epidemiology is different from that in other regions, so intervention measures must be established according to population-specific characteristics. PMID:22925749

  15. Pathology of blast-related brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Jeffery D; Tessler, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Blasts are responsible for about two-thirds of the combat injuries in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, which include at least 1,200 traumatic brain injuries. Blasts inflict damage to the brain directly and by causing injuries to other organs, resulting in air emboli, hypoxia, and shock. Direct injuries to the brain result from rapid shifts in air pressure (primary blast injury), from impacts with munitions fragments and other objects propelled by the explosion (secondary blast injury), and from collisions with objects and rapid acceleration of individuals propelled by the explosion (tertiary blast injury). Tertiary injury can occur from a building or other structure collapsing and from an individual being thrown by the blast wind. The pathological consequences of secondary and tertiary blast injuries are very likely to be similar to those of other types of mechanical trauma seen in civilian life. The damage attributable to the specific effects of a blast, however, has received little study, although it has been assumed to include the focal and diffuse lesions characteristic of closed head injuries. Available clinical studies of blast injuries show focal damage similar to that found in other types of closed head injuries but have not determined whether diffuse axonal injury also occurs. In this article, we will try to reach a better understanding of the specific pathology of blast-related brain injury by reviewing the available experimental studies and the autopsy reports of victims of terrorist attacks and military casualties dating back to World War I. PMID:20104396

  16. The Impact of War on Vaccine Preventable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Zarema; Balta, Snjezana; Obradovic, Amina; Mesic, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which lasted from 1992-1995, the functioning of all sectors was disturbed, including the health sector. The priority of the heath sector was treatment and less attention was paid to prevention, and this applies also to the Program of implementation of obligatory immunization, as one of the most important prevention measures. This program was conducted with difficulty and sometimes was completely interrupted because of the lack of necessary vaccines and the inability of adequate maintenance of the cold chain. It was difficult and sometimes completely impossible to bring children to vaccination. Because of these problems, a great number of children stayed unvaccinated so they suffered from vaccine-preventable diseases several years after the war. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective epidemiological study. We analyzed data from January 1994 to July 2014 in Canton Sarajevo, and data about measles outbreak in 2014. Results: In the period from January 1994 to July 2014, 3897 vaccine-preventable diseases were registered in Canton Sarajevo. Among them measles, rubella and mumps were the most frequent. In March 2014, measles outbreak was registered. Almost all cases are unvaccinated (99%) and 43% of all cases are connected with failure of vaccination during the war. Conclusion: During the war, routine immunization program was disrupted in Bosnia and Herzegovina (also in Canton Sarajevo). The consequences are presented as vaccine preventable diseases cases. PMID:25685082

  17. World War I psychoneuroses: hysteria goes to war.

    PubMed

    Tatu, Laurent; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2014-01-01

    During the First World War, military physicians from the belligerent countries were faced with soldiers suffering from psychotrauma with often unheard of clinical signs, such as camptocormia. These varied clinical presentations took the form of abnormal movements, deaf-mutism, mental confusion, and delusional disorders. In Anglo-Saxon countries, the term 'shell shock' was used to define these disorders. The debate on whether the war was responsible for these disorders divided mobilized neuropsychiatrists. In psychological theories, war is seen as the principal causal factor. In hystero-pithiatism, developed by Joseph Babinski (1857-1932), trauma was not directly caused by the war. It was rather due to the unwillingness of the soldier to take part in the war. Permanent suspicion of malingering resulted in the establishment of a wide range of medical experiments. Many doctors used aggressive treatment methods to force the soldiers exhibiting war neuroses to return to the front as quickly as possible. Medicomilitary collusion ensued. Electrotherapy became the basis of repressive psychotherapy, such as 'torpillage', which was developed by Clovis Vincent (1879-1947), or psychofaradism, which was established by Gustave Roussy (1874-1948). Some soldiers refused such treatments, considering them a form of torture, and were brought before courts-martial. Famous cases, such as that of Baptiste Deschamps (1881-1953), raised the question of the rights of the wounded. Soldiers suffering from psychotrauma, ignored and regarded as malingerers or deserters, were sentenced to death by the courts-martial. Trials of soldiers or doctors were also held in Germany and Austria. After the war, psychoneurotics long haunted asylums and rehabilitation centers. Abuses related to the treatment of the Great War psychoneuroses nevertheless significantly changed medical concepts, leading to the modern definition of 'posttraumatic stress disorder'. PMID:25273498

  18. Henry's Law: A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.; Peticolas, Warner L.

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective view of Henry's law and its applicability in any specific system at a finite concentration is tested. It can be concluded that Henry's law is only a limiting law and is adequate at low mole fractions but is useful for practical purposes where high precision is not required.

  19. Parental involvement in the war in Croatia 1991-1995 and suicidality in Croatian male adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Franić, Tomislav; Kardum, Goran; Marin Prižmić, Iris; Pavletić, Nevia; Marčinko, Darko

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association between parental war involvement and different indicators of psychosocial distress in a community sample of early adolescents ten years after the war in Croatia 1991-1995. Methods A total of 695 adolescents were screened with a self-report questionnaire assessing parental war involvement, sociodemographic characteristics, and alcohol and drug consumption. Personality traits were assessed with the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire; depressive symptoms with the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI); and unintentional injuries, physical fighting, and bullying with the World Health Organization survey Health Behavior in School-aged Children. Suicidal ideation was assessed with three dichotomous items. Suicidal attempts were assessed with one dichotomous item. Results Out of 348 boys and 347 girls who were included in the analysis, 57.7% had at least one veteran parent. Male children of war veterans had higher rates of unintentional injuries (odds ratio [OR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56 to 2.63) and more frequent affirmative responses across the full suicidal spectrum (thoughts about death – OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.02 to 4.3; thoughts about suicide – OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.72 to 14.66; suicide attempts – OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.03 to 12.67). In boys, thoughts about suicide and unintentional injuries were associated with parental war involvement even after logistic regression. However, girls were less likely to be affected by parental war involvement, and only exhibited signs of psychopathology on the CDI total score. Conclusion Parental war involvement was associated with negative psychosocial sequels for male children. This relationship is possibly mediated by some kind of identification or secondary traumatization. Suicidality and unintentional injuries are nonspecific markers for a broad range of psychosocial distresses, which is why the suggested target group for preventive interventions should be veteran parents as vectors of this distress. PMID:22661138

  20. Modern sports eye injuries

    PubMed Central

    Capo Filipe, J A; Rocha-Sousa, A; Falco-Reis, F; Castro-Correia, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To determine the severity and long term sequelae of eye injuries caused by modern sports that could be responsible for significant ocular trauma in the future. Methods: Prospective observational study of 24 (25 eyes) athletes with sports related ocular injuries from health clubs, war games, adventure, radical and new types of soccer, presenting to an eye emergency department between 1992 and 2002 (10 years). Results: Modern sports were responsible for 8.3% of the 288 total sports eye injuries reported. Squash (29.2%) was the most common cause, followed by paintball (20.8%) and motocross (16.6%). The most common diagnosis during the follow up period was retinal breaks (20%). 18 (75%) patients sustained a severe injury. The final visual acuity remained <20/100 in two paintball players. Conclusions: Ocular injuries resulting from modern sports are often severe. Adequate instruction of the participants in the games, proper use of eye protectors, and a routine complete ophthalmological examination after an eye trauma should be mandatory. PMID:14609827

  1. American Women and the Great War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumenil, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on the idealized images of women during World War I. Features the use of posters and propaganda during the war. Focuses on voluntary activities in which women participated, the fight for women's suffrage during the war, and the effect of the war on women working. Includes poster reproductions. (CMK)

  2. Contributions of Psychology to War and Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Daniel J.; Montiel, Cristina J.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years

  3. Contributions of Psychology to War and Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Daniel J.; Montiel, Cristina J.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years…

  4. The Lessons of the Vietnam War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Jerold M., Ed.

    This text book on the Vietnam War is to be used in teaching high students. Each of the volume's 12 chapters is a self-contained unit on an aspect of the War. The chapters are: (1) Introduction to Vietnam: land, history, and culture; (2) America at war in Vietnam: decisions and consequences; (3) Was the Vietnam War legal? (4) who fought for the

  5. Injuries in Competitive Dragon Boating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Swarup; Leong, Hin Fong; Chen, Simin; Foo, Yong Xiang Wayne; Pek, Hong Kiat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dragon boating is a fast-growing team water sport and involves forceful repetitive motions that predispose athletes to overuse injuries. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is a lack of studies on injury epidemiology in dragon boating. Purpose: To investigate the injury epidemiology in competitive dragon boating athletes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A total of 95 dragon boaters (49 males, 46 females) representing their respective universities took part in this study. Data were collected retrospectively using a reliable and valid self-report questionnaire. The study period was from August 2012 to July 2013. Results: A total of 104 musculoskeletal injuries were reported (3.82 injuries/1000 athlete-exposures), 99% of which occurred during training. The most commonly injured regions were the lower back (22.1%), shoulder (21.1%), and wrist (17.3%). The majority of injuries were due to overuse (56.3%), and incomplete muscle-tendon strain was the most prevalent type of injury (50.5%). The time loss from injuries varied. In addition, a significant majority of the dragon boating athletes incurred nonmusculoskeletal injuries, with abrasions (90.5%), blisters (78.9%), and sunburns (72.6%) being the most common. Conclusion: Competitive dragon boating has a moderately high injury incidence, and there seems to be a direct relationship between exposure time and injury rate. A majority of the injuries are overuse in nature, and the body parts most actively involved in paddling movement are at higher risk of injuries. The high incidence of nonmusculoskeletal injuries in dragon boaters suggested that these injuries are likely outcomes of participation in the sport. PMID:26535280

  6. Women, Gender, and the War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffords, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Examines the representation of women in Vietnam War literature and films within a context of changing gender relationships in American society. Argues that critical attention needs to be given to the structure of masculinity and its relationship to warfare. (MS)

  7. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, Owen B.; Robock, Alan; Turco, Richard P.

    2014-05-09

    A regional war involving 100 Hiroshima-sized weapons would pose a worldwide threat due to ozone destruction and climate change. A superpower confrontation with a few thousand weapons would be catastrophic.

  8. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Robock, Alan; Turco, Richard P.

    2014-05-01

    A regional war involving 100 Hiroshima-sized weapons would pose a worldwide threat due to ozone destruction and climate change. A superpower confrontation with a few thousand weapons would be catastrophic.

  9. Rockets in World War I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  10. Blood transfusion between the wars.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2003-04-01

    This article examines the introduction of blood transfusion into general practice from the end of the First World War to the Second World War. Developments during most of this period were not the result of new discoveries but rather the spread of ideas and the establishment of donor organizations to secure an adequate blood supply. The identification, testing, and organization of potential donors were done in a wide variety of settings that reflected differences in political and cultural experiences. At the end of the 1930s, with war approaching, the resolution of problems with storage of blood and the discovery of new techniques for separating and storing plasma dramatically changed transfusion practice. Thus, the innovations of the Second World War were very much based on the development of broad donor organizations plus the new technical discoveries that had occurred during the interwar period. PMID:12776438

  11. Hand infections: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capdarest-Arest, Nicole; Bertoch, Spencer T.; Bakken, Erik C.; Hoover, Susan E.; Zou, Jiyao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Hand infections are common, usually resulting from an untreated injury. In this retrospective study, we report on hand infection cases needing surgical drainage in order to assess patient demographics, causation of infection, clinical course, and clinical management. Methods. Medical records of patients presenting with hand infections, excluding post-surgical infections, treated with incision and debridement over a one-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics; past medical history; infection site(s) and causation; intervals between onset of infection, hospital admission, surgical intervention and days of hospitalization; gram stains and cultures; choice of antibiotics; complications; and outcomes were reviewed. Results. Most infections were caused by laceration and the most common site of infection was the palm or dorsum of the hand. Mean length of hospitalization was 6 days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly cultured microorganisms. Cephalosporins, clindamycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, penicillin, vancomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were major antibiotic choices. Amputations and contracture were the primary complications. Conclusions. Surgery along with medical management were key to treatment and most soft tissue infections resolved without further complications. With prompt and appropriate care, most hand infection patients can achieve full resolution of their infection. PMID:25210653

  12. Prevention of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Lifton, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    Physicians are exercising their responsibility as healers in their efforts to prevent nuclear war. Death for Hiroshima survivors was experienced in four stages: the immediate impact of destruction, the acute impact of radiation, delayed radiation effects, and later identification as an atomic bomb survivor. Each phase had its physical and psychological impacts and negates Hiroshima as a model for rational behavior despite those who claim survival is possible for those who are prepared. The psychic effects of modern nuclear, chemical, and germ warfare need to be challenged with a symbolization of life and immortality. Studies of psychological reactions to the terror children felt during practice air-raid drills indicate that the fears can be surpressed and re-emerge in adult life as a linking of death with collective annihilation. Other themes which emerge are feelings of impermanence, craziness, identification with the bomb, and a double existence. Psychic numbing and the religion of nuclearism cause dangerous conflicts with the anxieties caused by increasing awareness of death. (DCK)

  13. Post-war trauma.

    PubMed

    Hogan, C

    1995-12-01

    One of the great delights of general practice is the way we are allowed to share people's lives. Another facet is the humbling experience of having a patient intuitively grasp a concept that you have found difficult to understand. As regular readers of these pages are aware, I am no stranger to emergencies and trauma. Consequently I see and experience critical incident stress at first hand. This gives me some understanding of others' experiences and, I hope, might help me prevent critical incident stress developing into the more severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in those under my care. How well I recall that it was only the fall of a marble that prevented me from being conscripted for service in Vietnam. Kerry is a long-standing patient and an old friend (in a small community, if your patients aren't your friends, you do not have too many patients!). He was seeing me for something or other when he told me the following story. I was so impressed that I asked him to write it down. It speaks eloquently of the aftermath of war and how mates help each other deal with it. It also reminds us that there continue to be new crops of returned service-men who need our help. PMID:8588756

  14. Star Wars software debate

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.

    1986-02-01

    David L. Parnas, Landsdowne Professor of Computer Science at the University of Victoria resigned from the SDI Organization's Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management on June 28, 1985. Parnas, with 20 years of research on software engineering plus 8 years of work on military aircraft real-time software, says the software portion of SDI cannot be built error-free and he doesn't expect the next 20 years of research to change that fact. Since Parnas resigned, there have been several public debates on Star Wars software questions. In November 1985 the SDIO panel from which Parnas resigned released a draft of its report, reflecting its effort to critics of the project. While one might think that errors could be entirely eliminated with enough care and checking, most software professionals believe there will always be some residue of errors in a system of this size and complexity. The general line of the critics' argument is that the larger the amount of software in a single, unified system, the higher the percentage of errors it will contain. Proponents counter that the one very large system can be divided into a number of smaller, relatively independent pieces, thus reducing the proportionate number of errors in each separate piece. This approach is in turn countered by those who point to the intricate relations between these pieces, which themselves contribute to error.

  15. Psychological aspects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Exploring the nature of nuclear war, this treatise examines human reaction to nuclear disaster and accidental explosions. The discussion is based on evidence of human fallibility that has emerged from the psychology of accidents and from research into decision-making in military and political contexts. The book draws on the psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution to suggest ways in which the threat of nuclear war might be reduced.

  16. A TODAY VICTIM OF SECOND WORLD WAR.

    PubMed

    H?isan, Anca; Dumea, Mihaela; Ursaru, Manuela; Bulat, C; Cimpoe?u, Diana Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine as a medical specialty has to deal with all kind of emergency situations, from medical to post traumatic acute eyents and from new born to the elderly persons, but also with particular situations like explosions. In Romania nowadays these are accidental explosions and rare like frequency, but may be dramatic due to numbers of victims and multisystem injury that may occur. We present a case of a single victim of accidental detonated bomb, a projectile from the Second World War, which unfortunately still may be found in some areas. The management of the case from first call to 112 until the victim is discharge-involves high professional team work. We use these opportunity to make a brief review of the mechanism through the lesions may appear and also to renew the fact that the most impressive lesion may not be the most severe, and we have to examine carefully in order to find the real life threatening injury of the patient. PMID:26204649

  17. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  18. Back Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains and strains Herniated disks Fractured vertebrae These injuries can cause pain and limit your movement. Treatments vary but might ...

  19. Head Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  20. Knee injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, M R; Ireland, M L

    1995-04-01

    Female athletes are at increased risk for certain sports-related injuries, particularly those involving the knee. Factors that contribute to this increased risk are the differences in sports undertaken and in gender anatomy and structure. Gender differences include baseline level of conditioning, lower extremity alignment, physiological laxity, pelvis width, tibial rotation and foot alignment. Sports like gymnastics and cheerleading create a noncontact environment, but can result in significant knee injuries. In quick stopping and cutting sports, females have an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury by noncontact mechanisms. Patellofemoral (PF) disorders are also very common in female athletes. Awareness of these facts helps the sports medicine professional make an accurate diagnosis and institute earlier treatment-focused rehabilitation with or without surgery. Further prospective and retrospective research is needed in areas of epidemiology, mechanisms, severity and types of knee injuries. The goal is to lessen the severity of certain knee injuries and to prevent others. PMID:7604201

  1. Surgical advances during the First World War: the birth of modern orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Arul; Eardley, W G P; Edwards, D S; Clasper, J C; Stewart, M P M

    2016-02-01

    The First World War (1914-1918) was the first truly industrial conflict in human history. Never before had rifle fire and artillery barrage been employed on a global scale. It was a conflict that over 4?years would leave over 750?000 British troops dead with a further 1.6 million injured, the majority with orthopaedic injuries. Against this backdrop, the skills of the orthopaedic surgeon were brought to the fore. Many of those techniques and systems form the foundation of modern orthopaedic trauma management. On the centenary of 'the War to end all Wars', we review the significant advances in wound management, fracture treatment, nerve injury and rehabilitation that were developed during that conflict. PMID:25512441

  2. Hecamede: Homeric nurse of the battle-wounded in the Trojan War.

    PubMed

    Balanika, Alexia P; Baltas, Christos S

    2014-02-01

    The Homeric epics present the 10-year lasting Trojan War, offering the description of battle wounds and medical care of injuries. Hecamede is referred by the Homer as a battlefield nurse who had knowledge of the treatment of bleeding battle wounds. PMID:24585844

  3. Astronomers in the Chemist's War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-01-01

    World War II, with radar, rockets, and "atomic" bombs was the physicists' war. And many of us know, or think we know, what our more senior colleagues did during it, with Hubble and Hoffleit at Aberdeen; M. Schwarzschild on active duty in Italy; Bondi, Gold, and Hoyle hunkered down in Dunsfeld, Surrey, talking about radar, and perhaps steady state; Greenstein and Henyey designing all-sky cameras; and many astronomers teaching navigation. World War I was The Chemists' War, featuring poison gases, the need to produce liquid fuels from coal on one side of the English Channel and to replace previously-imported dyesstuffs on the other. The talke will focus on what astronomers did and had done to them between 1914 and 1919, from Freundlich (taken prisoner on an eclipse expedition days after the outbreak of hostilities) to Edwin Hubble, returning from France without ever having quite reached the front lines. Other events bore richer fruit (Hale and the National Research Council), but very few of the stories are happy ones. Most of us have neither first nor second hand memories of The Chemists' War, but I had the pleasure of dining with a former Freundlich student a couple of weeks ago.

  4. Critical concerns in Iraq/Afghanistan war veteran-forensic interface: combat-related postdeployment criminal violence.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Shoba; Garrick, Thomas; McGuire, James; Smee, Daniel E; Dow, Daniel; Woehl, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Identifying whether there is a nexus between Iraq and Afghanistan combat injuries and civilian violence on return from deployment is complicated by differences in reactions of individuals to combat exposure, the overlapping effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the low base rate of civilian violence after combat exposure. Moreover, the overall prevalence of violence among returning Iraq and Afghanistan combat war veterans has not been well documented. Malingered symptoms and either exaggeration or outright fabrication of war zone exposure are challenges to rendering forensic opinions, with the risk reduced by accessing military documents that corroborate war zone duties and exposure. This article serves as a first step toward understanding what may potentiate violence among returning Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. We offer a systematic approach toward the purpose of forensic case formulation that addresses whether combat duty/war zone exposure and associated clinical conditions are linked to criminal violence on return to civilian life. PMID:23771940

  5. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy. PMID:24343140

  6. War rape, natality and genocide.

    PubMed

    Schott, Robin May

    2011-01-01

    Feminist philosophy can make an important contribution to the field of genocide studies, and issues relating to gender and war are gaining new attention. In this article I trace legal and philosophical analyses of sexual violence against women in war. I analyze the strengths and limitations of the concept of social death—introduced into this field by Claudia Card—for understanding the genocidal features of war rape, and draw on the work of Hannah Arendt to understand the central harm of genocide as an assault on natality. The threat to natality posed by the harms of rape, forced pregnancy and forced maternity lie in the potential expulsion from the public world of certain groups—including women who are victims, members of the 'enemy' group, and children born of forced birth. PMID:21941691

  7. Nuclear War. The moral dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Child, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    U.S. nuclear policy has become the target of increasing criticism during the past decade. Critics often argue that the use of nuclear weapons would be irrational, would destroy humankind, and thus could not serve any rational policy goal. Other critics point to the immortality of the use of nuclear weapons. Both groups condemn U.S. military policy. In Nuclear War, James Child considers and rejects both these lines of criticism. He argues that a policy of deterrence can be both rational and moral; that U.S. nuclear policy is, on balance, based on rational and moral foundations. Child examines near-term consequences of a nuclear war and finds them ghastly but not unthinkable or incomparable to the havoc produced by previous wars. He also analyzes long-term consequences, such as those proposed by the ''nuclear winter'' theory, and finds the fear of total annihilation of humankind to be unfounded.

  8. Rethinking the war on cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanahan, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    Some 40 years ago a metaphor was posed that cancer was such an insidious adversary that a declaration of war on the disease was justified. Although this statement was a useful inspiration for enlistment of resources, despite extraordinary progress in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, in most cases and for most forms of cancer this war has not been won. A second metaphor was about magic bullets--targeted therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms that were envisaged to strike with devastating consequences for the disease. The reality, however, is that targeted therapies are generally not curative or even enduringly effective, because of the adaptive and evasive resistance strategies developed by cancers under attack. In this Series paper, I suggest that, much like in modern warfare, the war on cancer needs to have a battlespace vision. PMID:24351321

  9. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V530) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS530) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dosevolume parameters with Grade ?2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ?2 RILI (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ?2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.1020.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ?2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm3; sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ?2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ?564.9 cm3 than with AVS5 < 564.9 cm3 (P = 0.008). Low-dose irradiation relative volumes and MLD of the bilateral or ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ?2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ?2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  10. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ?2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ?2 RILI (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ?2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ?2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ?2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ?564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 < 564.9 cm(3) (P = 0.008). Low-dose irradiation relative volumes and MLD of the bilateral or ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ?2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ?2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  11. Injury risk of nonpowder guns.

    PubMed

    Laraque, Danielle

    2004-11-01

    Nonpowder guns (ball-bearing [BB] guns, pellet guns, air rifles, paintball guns) continue to cause serious injuries to children and adolescents. The muzzle velocity of these guns can range from approximately 150 ft/second to 1200 ft/second (the muzzle velocities of traditional firearm pistols are 750 ft/second to 1450 ft/second). Both low- and high-velocity nonpowder guns are associated with serious injuries, and fatalities can result from high-velocity guns. A persisting problem is the lack of medical recognition of the severity of injuries that can result from these guns, including penetration of the eye, skin, internal organs, and bone. Nationally, in 2000, there were an estimated 21840 (coefficient of variation: 0.0821) injuries related to nonpowder guns, with approximately 4% resulting in hospitalization. Between 1990 and 2000, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 39 nonpowder gun-related deaths, of which 32 were children younger than 15 years. The introduction of high-powered air rifles in the 1970s has been associated with approximately 4 deaths per year. The advent of war games and the use of paintball guns have resulted in a number of reports of injuries, especially to the eye. Injuries associated with nonpowder guns should receive prompt medical management similar to the management of firearm-related injuries, and nonpowder guns should never be characterized as toys. PMID:15520121

  12. Student injuries in the dissecting room.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Jon; Davies, Tilman M; Lees, David

    2013-01-01

    Cadaver dissection is the first opportunity for many students to practice handling human tissue and is their first exposure to the occupational hazards involved with this task. Few studies examine dissection room injuries to ascertain the dangers associated with dissecting. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of dissection room injuries from four student cohorts over an eleven-year period (2001-2011), including second-year medical students, third-year medical students, second-year dental students, and third-year science students. Injury data included activity causing injury, object responsible, and injury site. A total of 163 injuries during 70,039 hours of dissection were recorded, with 66 in third-year medical students, 42 in second-year medical students, 36 in third-year science students, and 16 in second-year dental students. The overall rate was 2.87 injuries per 1,000 dissection hours, with second-year medical students most frequently injured (5.5 injuries per 1,000 hours); third-year medical students were least frequently injured (1.3 injuries per 1,000 hours). A significant difference in injury rates between student groups indicated a higher than expected injury rate to second-year medical students and lower than expected rates to third-year medical students. Injury rates increased for most groups between 2001-2006 and 2007-2011 periods. Most injuries (79%) were from scalpel cuts to the finger or thumb. This study provides injury rates for dissection room injuries to students, indicating differences in injury frequency between cohorts and an increase in injury rate over time. As scalpel cuts were the most likely injury mechanism, targeting scalpel handling with preventative strategies may reduce future injury risk. PMID:23536433

  13. Neurologic injury in snowmobiling

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Pierre, Clifford A.; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. Methods: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. Results: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 0.56 days. Disposition was home (78%), home with services (12%), rehabilitation placement (9%), and one death. Details regarding other systemic injuries will also be reviewed. Conclusions: Snowmobiles are a significant source of multi-trauma, particularly neurological injury. Neurosurgeons can play key roles in advocating for neurological safety in snowmobiling. PMID:25024887

  14. The MMPI Profile of Prisoners of War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonoff, Harry; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Examines the profiles of Canadian prisoners of war who were interned in Japanese and German camps during World War II in order to determine whether the MMPI yielded a profile characteristic of internees. (Author)

  15. Children and Nuclear War. Reviews of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallinga, Charlotte; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews research on children's and adolescents' knowledge, feelings, and fears about nuclear war. Offers suggestions for teachers who wish to address children's and adolescents' concerns about nuclear war. (Author/BB)

  16. Patterns of scald injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, C; Nixon, J W; Dickson, W; Kemp, A; Sibert, J R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To describe common patterns of bath water scald injuries in children, to examine differences between accidental and non-accidental bath water scalds in children, and to examine potential for prevention. DESIGN--A two year six month retrospective analysis of admissions to a specialist burns unit. SETTING--The Burns Unit, St Lawrence Hospital, Chepstow serving children from south and west Wales. SUBJECTS--Sixty eight children attending the Burns Unit for treatment of bath related scald injuries. RESULTS--Bath scalds in children under 5 years of age was the cause of 14.7 per 100,000 children being admitted to the specialist burns unit in a year. The majority of the children were injured by falling in the bath but the tap was turned on by seven children themselves and by 10 siblings. Six children put hands in the hot water and two children were accidentally put into bath water that was too hot and were quickly withdrawn. Four children suffered probably non-accidental immersion scald injuries from hot water. They were characterised by a clear tide mark, a story that did not fit the injuries, associated injuries, and by symmetrical lesions. Accidental scalds were irregular geographical injuries and were asymmetrical. CONCLUSIONS--Bath scalds are a significant problem in children under 5 years. Their prevention should be part of an injury control programme on a local and national level. The best way to achieve this would be by reducing the temperature in domestic hot water tanks. The recognition of non-accidental bath scalds can be assisted by the pointers outlined and should be done in a multidisciplinary way with plastic surgeons, paediatricians, and social workers working together. PMID:7944540

  17. War, peace, and international politics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.W. )

    1987-01-01

    We must conclude that war remains a major problem in the last quarter of the twentieth century. My intention in this book is to introduce you to international relations by focusing on this problem. War is not the only problem of international relations, and so this book does not exhaust the field. But war is a central problem, and the possibility of resort to war affects other aspects of international relations. Whatever else we may look at, we cannot avoid looking at war. In fact, in looking at war, we will touch on most of the other subjects important in international relations. War is conflict among states carried on by their armed forces. To distinguish war from border skirmishes and other minor incidents we usually say it must reach a certain magnitude (for example, at least 1,000 soldiers killed in battle over a year). It would be ideal if we could systematically study all the wars in the last hundred years, but such an exhaustive study would be out of place here. At the same time we cannot discuss such subjects as the cause of war or proposals for preventing it without some knowledge about actual wars. We must test theories against historical facts. What follows in Part I is a somewhat detailed history of seven wars (or groups of wars) fought in the last hundred years. These include the most destructive of the wars World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953). By way of background to World War I, we will look at the wars of German unification (1864-1871), which preceded and in some ways prepared the way for it. To balance our account, we will also look at several recent wars India and Pakistan (1971), Uganda and Tanzania (1978-1979), and Cambodia, Vietnam, and China (1978-1980). After looking at some of the major wars of the last hundred years, we will look at what people have the about the causes of war in general.

  18. Space technologies and the war in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getsov, Petar

    The paper presents a description of the application of aerospace technologies during the war in Iraq. The specific instrumentation used by the USA and its allies in the field of communication, navigation, and control of weapons and ammunition to schedule war activities is presented. Conclusions are made on the ever growing application of space technologies in modern wars and their impact on the efficiency of decision-making at war times.

  19. United States Historians, Cold War Rhetoric, and The Finnish Winter War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Keith W.

    The U.S. attitude toward Finland during the Cold War years reveals much about U.S. society and politics. In particular, the war between Finland and the Soviet Union during 1939 and 1940 (Finnish Winter War) and the way in which the United States reacted to it at the time and in the years following World War II has relevance for better

  20. Women and War, Children and War: Stretching the Bonds of Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail S.

    Many things stretch the bonds between caregiver and child, such as war, stress, and trauma. This paper reviews the literature on children who are in direct contact with war or indirect contact with war through television or others' conversations. It also describes the effects of war on children and their families, and children's psychological

  1. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  2. Ain't Gonna Study War No More? Explorations of War through Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Patricia A.; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    2009-01-01

    At the height of the Vietnam War, Down by the Riverside was transformed from a traditional folk song to a popular anti-war anthem. The raucous and repetitive chorus, "I ain't gonna study war no more ...," became a rallying cry for those who wanted nothing to do with the war and the pain and controversy that surrounded it. Although it seems…

  3. Ain't Gonna Study War No More? Explorations of War through Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Patricia A.; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    2009-01-01

    At the height of the Vietnam War, Down by the Riverside was transformed from a traditional folk song to a popular anti-war anthem. The raucous and repetitive chorus, "I ain't gonna study war no more ...," became a rallying cry for those who wanted nothing to do with the war and the pain and controversy that surrounded it. Although it seems

  4. The Revolutionary War. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchberg, Wendy

    Based on James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier's novel "My Brother Sam Is Dead," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that one way to learn about the past is to read historical novels; and that some people take one side or another in a war or other conflict, and some find themselves caught in the

  5. The Politics of Star Wars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Lee

    George Lucas's Star Wars trilogy is used as the basis for the creation of a political subtext arising from one of America's most enduring literary myths--the American Adam. That subtext, when translated into a modern political context, pinpoints two central issues to face this democracy in the coming years, as well as a national ambivalence about

  6. Images of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The conventional U.S. picture traces the Cold War to Soviet violation of wartime agreements, while the U.S.S.R. defends its actions as responses to American violations and foreign adventurism. An understanding of how ideology is shaped by national self-interest will help students see beyond propaganda and myth in interpreting past and current

  7. War Is Not the Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besteman, Karst J.

    1989-01-01

    Concludes that a war on drugs is not the answer to the problem of drug abuse in the United States. Stresses that the hostile atmosphere generated by the overemphasis upon interdiction and enforcement of penalties undermines the healing and restoring efforts needed in reducing the individual's demand for drugs. (KO)

  8. War Nurseries: Lessons in Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Sally C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes development of the Kaiser Child Service Centers at the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company (Portland, Oregon) during World War II, child-care centers created through the Lanham Act. Describes staff recruitment and the services provided. Maintains that the Kaiser Center set a new standard for child care and helped to shape the field of early

  9. The Civil War and Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Deborah, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This journal issue explores Iowa's participation in the U.S. Civil War and primarily focuses on what happened to the men, women, and children who remained at home. A number of social, political, and economic changes are examined, including: (1) the increased responsibilities of women and children; (2) the growth of abolitionism; (3) the role of…

  10. Cold War Geopolitics: Embassy Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogeler, Ingolf

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the geopolitics of the Cold War can be illustrated by the diplomatic ties among countries, particularly the superpowers and their respective allies. Describes a classroom project in which global patterns of embassy locations are examined and compared. Includes five maps and a chart indicating types of embassy locations. (CFR)

  11. Factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in war-survivors displaced in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Letica-Crepulja, Marina; Salcioglu, Ebru; Fran?ikovi?, Tanja; Basoglu, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Aim To examine the role of perceived stressfulness of trauma exposure and economic, social, occupational, educational, and familial adaptation after trauma in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression in displaced war survivors. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted between March 2000 and July 2002 with a sample of 173 internally displaced persons or refugees and 167 matched controls in Croatia. Clinical measures included Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. Results Displaced war survivors reported the exposure to a mean??standard deviation of 13.1??8.3 war stressors, including combat, torture, serious injury, death of close persons, and loss of property. Compared to controls, they reported higher rates of marked to severe impact of war on family (16.2% vs 51.6%), social (7.2% vs 43.5%), economic (12.6% vs 55.4%), occupational (1.8% vs 15.9%), and educational (2.4% vs 8.8%) adaptation. In two logistic regression analyses, the strongest predictor of PTSD and depression was high level of perceived distress during trauma exposure. PTSD but not depression was associated with economic, social, occupational, educational, and familial adaptation after trauma. Conclusion Displaced survivors who experienced multiple war events perceived greater negative impact of war on their life domains compared to individuals who lived in a war setting but had no trauma exposure. The most important determinant of psychological outcomes was perceived stressfulness of war stressors. Although post-trauma adaptation in different life spheres had an impact, its effect was not robust and consistent across disorders. These findings suggest that it would be effective to use a trauma-focused approach in rehabilitation of war survivors. PMID:22180270

  12. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June 1940";

  13. Fighting the War on Academic Terrorism. Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2005-01-01

    While the attention of the country is focused on the global and national war on terrorism, the war on academic terrorism is being waged in classrooms, infiltrating the gifted programs, and altering the outcomes derived for students participating in gifted programs. The war on academic terrorism is related to the broad areas of curriculum and…

  14. World War II Homefront: A Historiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Allan M.

    2002-01-01

    Highlights the scholarship that exists on the World War II homefront covering topics such as World War II as a good war, Franklin D. Roosevelt, economic policy, propaganda, status of women and women's employment, the role of African Americans, racial violence, and the Japanese American experience. (CMK)

  15. Peace-keeping Forces: YA War Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe Chris

    2000-01-01

    Argues that good young adult books about war can help teenagers appreciate the blessings of peace and the horrors of war, and perhaps may inspire them to do what they can to preserve peace. Describes briefly 71 young adult war books worth reading. (SR)

  16. The Conceptualization of War in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asprea, Anna Maria; And Others

    Three procedures were used to elicit information from children 9-10 and 13-14 years old on their conceptions of war: (1) children were asked to give at least 10 answers to the question, "What is war?"; (2) each child was interviewed individually; and (3) children were asked to respond to magazine pictures of war scenes. The detailed and complex…

  17. The Civil War in Literature: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Dave

    The Civil War in Literature is a course in which investigation is made into the legacy that this war left to humanity. Through the reading and discussion of literary works written during or about the Civil War, including "Jubilee,""Gone with the Wind,""Red Badge of Courage," poetry by Walt Whitman, and the essays of Frederick Douglass, students…

  18. Children and War. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallinga, Charlotte; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses young children's conceptions of war, reviewing literature on children's attitudes and feelings about war and studies of parents' responses to children's feelings. Concludes that between ages four and seven, children develop a sense of war and peace. Considers implications for parents and teachers. (GLR)

  19. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  20. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum. PMID:2377116

  1. Complications and risk factors for mortality in penetrating abdominal firearm injuries: analysis of 120 cases.

    PubMed

    Iflazoglu, Nidal; Ureyen, Orhan; Oner, Osman Z; Tusat, Mustafa; Akcal, Mehmet A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high kinetic energy, of bullets and explosive gun particles, their paths through the abdomen (permanent cavity effect), and the blast effect (temporary cavity effect), firearm injuries (FAI) can produce damage not only in the organ they enter, but in the surrounding tissues as well. Since they change route after entering the body they may cause organ damage in locations other than those at the path of entry. For example, as a result of the crushing onto bone tissues, bullet particles or broken bone fragments may cause further damage outside of the path of travel, For these reasons it is very difficult to predict the possible complications from the size of the actual injury in patients with penetrating abdominal firearm injuries. The factors affecting the mortality and morbidity from firearm injuries have been evaluated in various studies. Insufficient blood transfusion, long duration of time until presenting to a hospital and the presence of colon injuries are common factors that cause the high complication rates and mortality. A total of 120 cases injured in the civil war at Turkey's southern neighbouring countries were admitted to our hospital and evaluated in terms of: development of complications and factors affecting mortality; age, gender, time of presentation to the hospital, number of injured organs, the type of injuring weapon, the entrance site of the bullet, the presence of accompanying chest trauma, the amount of administered blood, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI) and the injury severity score (ISS) scores were determined and evaluated retrospectively. The most significant factors for the development of complications and mortality include: accompanying clinical shock, high number of injured organs, numerous blood transfusions administered and accompanying thoracic trauma. It has also been observed that the PATI and ISS scoring systems can be used in predicting the complication and mortality rates in firearm injuries. Consequently, reducing the mortality and complication rates from firearm injuries is still a serious problem. Despite all of these efforts, there is still a need to determine the optimum treatment strategy to achieve this end goal. PMID:26131219

  2. Complications and risk factors for mortality in penetrating abdominal firearm injuries: analysis of 120 cases

    PubMed Central

    Iflazoglu, Nidal; Ureyen, Orhan; Oner, Osman Z; Tusat, Mustafa; Akcal, Mehmet A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high kinetic energy, of bullets and explosive gun particles, their paths through the abdomen (permanent cavity effect), and the blast effect (temporary cavity effect), firearm injuries (FAI) can produce damage not only in the organ they enter, but in the surrounding tissues as well. Since they change route after entering the body they may cause organ damage in locations other than those at the path of entry. For example, as a result of the crushing onto bone tissues, bullet particles or broken bone fragments may cause further damage outside of the path of travel, For these reasons it is very difficult to predict the possible complications from the size of the actual injury in patients with penetrating abdominal firearm injuries. The factors affecting the mortality and morbidity from firearm injuries have been evaluated in various studies. Insufficient blood transfusion, long duration of time until presenting to a hospital and the presence of colon injuries are common factors that cause the high complication rates and mortality. A total of 120 cases injured in the civil war at Turkey’s southern neighbouring countries were admitted to our hospital and evaluated in terms of: development of complications and factors affecting mortality; age, gender, time of presentation to the hospital, number of injured organs, the type of injuring weapon, the entrance site of the bullet, the presence of accompanying chest trauma, the amount of administered blood, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI) and the injury severity score (ISS) scores were determined and evaluated retrospectively. The most significant factors for the development of complications and mortality include: accompanying clinical shock, high number of injured organs, numerous blood transfusions administered and accompanying thoracic trauma. It has also been observed that the PATI and ISS scoring systems can be used in predicting the complication and mortality rates in firearm injuries. Consequently, reducing the mortality and complication rates from firearm injuries is still a serious problem. Despite all of these efforts, there is still a need to determine the optimum treatment strategy to achieve this end goal. PMID:26131219

  3. Trauma in the Afghan guerrilla war: effects of lack of access to care.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M K; Smith, G S

    1989-06-01

    Little or no acute medical care or evacuation capability was available to resistance forces in the Afghanistan War. We examined the effects of these constraints through a review of 1373 patients admitted to a Pakistani border hospital from 1985 to 1987. Most wounds were to the extremities (92%). Serious complications from injuries were found in 41% of cases, of which the leading causes were soft-tissue infections (36%), chronic osteomyelitis (25%), and marked restriction of joint movement (18%). For 201 patients with known cause of injury, the distribution of responsible weapons was similar to the wars in Korea, Vietnam, and the Falkland Islands. The ratio of critical-area wounds (trunk, head and neck)/extremity wounds was low (0.07) compared with most other wars (about 0.50), indicating that the most seriously injured patients died before treatment was obtained. These early deaths and the many complications from injuries reflect the lack of appropriate surgical attention and evacuation facilities in the field. It is proposed that the ratio of wounds in critical areas to wounds in the extremities might be useful in monitoring the efficiency of evacuation in similar conflicts. Early surgical management and evacuation of battle casualties could have greatly reduced mortality from the war and subsequent disabilities. PMID:2727898

  4. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that makes them more prone to injury. Growth plates—the areas of developing cartilage where bone growth ... an adult can be a potentially serious growth-plate injury in a child. Also, a trauma that ...

  5. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work in certain jobs, you may need protection. The most common type of injury happens when something irritates the outer surface of ...

  6. Injury Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury School sports Injuries can land students in the ER. Text Messaging: Emergency Physicians ... For You American College of Emergency Phycisians Copyright © American College of Emergency ...

  7. Injury Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for scientific studies. Amusement Rides March 09, 2015 Estimated Number of Injuries and Reported Deaths Associated with Inflatable Amusements, 2003–2013 July 10, 2009 Estimated Number of Injuries and Reported Deaths Associated with ...

  8. Corneal injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  9. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your knee, like keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your ... Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Osgood-Schlatter Disease Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Bones, Muscles, and Joints Meniscus Tears ...

  10. Reconstruction of blast injuries of the hand and upper limb.

    PubMed

    Bakhach, Joseph; Abu-Sitta, Ghassan; Dibo, Saad

    2013-03-01

    Over recent years, hand surgeons in the Middle East and Arabic region have particularly had to deal with an increasing number of war blast injuries to the upper extremity, in the acute, subacute and chronic phases. Many have been referred from War Zone countries such as Iraq and, more recently, Syria, where the resources to treat such complex injuries are scarce. The present article is a comprehensive review of the basic principles of management of blast injuries based on the available literature merged with the authors' personal experience of these injuries. The state of the art in treatment of blast injuries to the hand, from ammunition physics and wound ballistics to radiological investigation and, ultimately, the principles of surgical management are discussed. PMID:23357578

  11. Battlefield euthanasia - courageous compassion or war crime?

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2011-03-21

    Issues relating to voluntary euthanasia that are currently being debated by Australian society are distinctly different from those encountered by battlefield doctors. Doctors in war undertake to treat those affected by conflict; their participation in euthanasia challenges the profession's definition of "duty of care". Euthanasia must be distinguished from "triage" and medical withdrawal of care (which are decided within a medical facility where, although resources may be limited, comfort care can be provided in the face of treatment futility). Battlefield euthanasia is a decision made, often immediately after hostile action, in the face of apparently overwhelming injuries; there is often limited availability of pain relief, support systems or palliation that would be available in a civilian environment. The battlefield situation is further complicated by issues of personal danger, the immediacy of decision making and difficulties with distinguishing civilians from combatants. Regardless of the circumstances on a battlefield, doctors, whether they are civilians or members of a defence force, are subject to the laws of armed conflict, the special provisions of the Geneva Conventions and the ethical codes of the medical profession. PMID:21426286

  12. Pediatric Genital Injury: An Analysis of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jessica T.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Cheng, Earl Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of pediatric genital injuries presenting to United States emergency departments (EDs). Methods A retrospective cohort study utilizing the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) from 1991-2010 to evaluate pediatric genital injuries was performed. Results Pediatric genital injuries represented 0.6% of all pediatric injuries with the incidence of injuries rising through the period studied, 1991-2010. The mean age at injury was 7.1 years old and was distributed 56.6% girls and 43.4% boys. A total of 43.3% had lacerations and 42.2% had contusions/abrasions. The majority of injuries occurred at home (65.9%), and the majority of patients (94.7%) were treated and released from the hospital. The most common consumer products associated with pediatric genital trauma were: bicycles (14.7% of all pediatric genital injuries), bathtubs (5.8%), daywear (5.6%), monkey bars (5.4%), and toilets (4.0%). Conclusion Although pediatric genital injuries represent a small proportion of overall injuries presenting to the ED, genital injuries continue to rise despite public health measures targeted to decrease childhood injury. Our results can be used to guide further prevention strategies for pediatric genital injury. PMID:23953603

  13. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  14. The past and present of blast injury research in hina.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing incidence of blast injury, the research on its mechanisms and protective measures draws more and more attention. Blast injury has many characteristics different from general war injuries or trauma. For example, soldiers often have various degrees of visceral injury without significant surface damage, combined injuries and arterial air embolism. Researchers in China began to investigate blast injury later than the United States and Sweden, but the development is so fast that lots of achievements have been gained, including the development of biological shock tube, the mechanisms and characteristics of blast injury in various organs, as well as protective measures under special environments. This article reviews the past and current situation of blast injury research in China. PMID:26764539

  15. [Muscle crush injury and crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reingardien?, Dagmara; Jodi?nien?, Liucija; Laauskas, Robertas

    2010-01-01

    Crush injury is defined as compression of extremities or other parts of the body that causes muscle breakdown (traumatic rhabdomyolysis). Systemic consequences of crush injuries are as follows: rhabdomyolysis, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities, hypovolemia, and acute renal failure. Crush injuries are important injuries in disaster situations: earthquakes, hurricanes, mining and road traffic accidents, war, collapse of buildings, etc. In this review article, there are discussed about epidemiology of crush syndrome, risk factors, pathophysiology (mechanisms of muscle cell injury, release of substances from injured muscles, other consequences of reperfusion), clinical features, differential diagnosis, investigations, complications (acute renal failure, hypovolemic shock, hyperkalemia, infection, compartment syndrome), approach to treatment (adequate rehydration, a forced mannitol-alkaline diuresis, intravenous fluids, management of hyperkalemia, wound care, hyperbaric oxygen, etc.), prognosis, the mortality rate and prevention (timely support may reduce morbidity and mortality). PMID:20944453

  16. Injury risk evaluation in sport climbing.

    PubMed

    Neuhof, A; Hennig, F F; Schöffl, I; Schöffl, V

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and rate acute sport climbing injuries. Acute sport climbing injuries occurring from 2002 to 2006 were retrospectively assessed with a standardized web based questionnaire. A total number of 1962 climbers reported 699 injuries, which is equivalent to 0.2 injuries per 1 000 h of sport participation. Most (74.4%) of the injuries were of minor severity rated NACA I or NACA II. Injury distribution between the upper (42.6%) and lower extremities (41.3%) was similar, with ligament injuries, contusions and fractures being the most common injury types. Years of climbing experience (p<0.01), difficulty level (p<0.01), climbing time per week during summer (p<0.01) and winter (p<0.01) months were correlated with the injury rate. Age (p<0.05 (p=0.034)), years of climbing experience (p<0.01) and average climbing level (p<0.01) were correlated to the injury severity rated through NACA scores. The risk of acute injuries per 1 000 h of sport participation in sport climbing was lower than in previous studies on general rock climbing and higher than in studies on indoor climbing. In order to perform inter-study comparisons of future studies on climbing injuries, the use of a systematic and standardized scoring system (UIAA score) is essential. PMID:21913158

  17. Contributions of psychology to war and peace.

    PubMed

    Christie, Daniel J; Montiel, Cristina J

    2013-10-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years ago, largely in reaction to the threat of nuclear war, some psychologists in the United States and around the world broke with the tradition of supporting war and began focusing their scholarship and activism on the prevention of war and promotion of peace. Today, peace psychology is a vibrant area of psychology, with theory and practice aimed at understanding, preventing, and mitigating both episodes of organized violence and the pernicious worldwide problem of structural violence. The growth, scope, and content of peace psychology are reviewed along with contributions to policies that promote peace, social justice, and human well-being. PMID:24128314

  18. Causal Inference in Retrospective Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Paul W.; Rubin, Donald B.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of drawing causal inferences from retrospective case-controlled studies is considered. A model for causal inference in prospective studies is applied to retrospective studies. Limitations of case-controlled studies are formulated concerning relevant parameters that can be estimated in such studies. A coffee-drinking/myocardial

  19. Causal Inference in Retrospective Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Paul W.; Rubin, Donald B.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of drawing causal inferences from retrospective case-controlled studies is considered. A model for causal inference in prospective studies is applied to retrospective studies. Limitations of case-controlled studies are formulated concerning relevant parameters that can be estimated in such studies. A coffee-drinking/myocardial…

  20. The evolving war on cancer.

    PubMed

    Haber, Daniel A; Gray, Nathanael S; Baselga, Jose

    2011-04-01

    Building on years of basic scientific discovery, recent advances in the fields of cancer genetics and medicinal chemistry are now converging to revolutionize the treatment of cancer. Starting with serendipitous observations in rare subsets of cancer, a paradigm shift in clinical research is poised to ensure that new molecular insights are rapidly applied to shape emerging cancer therapies. Could this mark a turning point in the "War on Cancer"? PMID:21458664

  1. Hockey Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sproule, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Hockey, Canada's national sport, is probably the world's fastest team sport. The nature of the game makes injuries a common occurence. This article reviews the literature on hockey injuries and identifies some of the changing trends over the past 15 years. Severity and incidence of injuries increase with the age and skill level of the player. There are fewer lacerations, eye injuries, and head injuries since helmets and facial protectors have become mandatory in minor hockey. However, there has been an increase in spinal cord injuries. Physicians who provide medical coverage for older adolescent and adult competitive lite hockey players should be proficient at assessment and acute care of patients with life-threatening injuries. PMID:21264029

  2. [Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in handball playing. Mechanisms and incidence of injuries].

    PubMed

    Strand, T; Tvedte, R; Engebretsen, L; Tegnander, A

    1990-06-30

    A retrospective study was performed on 144 anterior cruciate ligament injuries sustained while playing team handball. The incidence of this severe injury was 1.8% per year or 0.82 injuries per 1,000 playing hours in female athletes playing at a high division level, mainly on synthetic surfaces. The risk in other groups, and when playing on parquet, was considerably lower. The injury mechanisms indicate that a major risk factor was too good friction between shoes and playing surface. 2/3 of the injuries were non-contact injuries, and only 1/10 were caused by foul play. Cutting and jumping were the most common causes of injury. Further research on friction between shoe and playing surface is recommended. PMID:2375011

  3. [Rendering surgical care for the wounded presenting with injuries to limb vessels].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Kokhan, E P; Galik, N I

    2008-01-01

    The proffered paper provides the information about rendering surgical care for the wounded presenting with vascular injuries inflicted and sustained during wars Russia was engaged in, to be followed by a detailed description of the haemorrhage-arresting methods and techniques used in N. I. Pirogov's time, during World War I, the Great Patriotic War, as well as in local military conflicts and combat operations. Also depicted herein is the role surgeons of Russia have played in the development of vascular surgery, and, finally, due coverage is given to the statistical data concerning the methods of rendering care for those having suffered firearm wounds and injuries involving vascular lesions. PMID:19791564

  4. An historical context of modern principles in the management of intracranial injury from projectiles.

    PubMed

    Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Dunn, Gavin P; Laws, Edward R

    2010-05-01

    The contemporary management of projectile head injuries owes much to the lessons neurosurgeons have distilled from their experiences in war. Through early investigation and an increasingly detailed account of wartime clinical experience, neurosurgeons--including the field's early giants--began to gain a greater understanding not only of intracranial missile pathophysiology but also of appropriate management. In this paper, the authors trace the development of the principles of managing intracranial projectile injury from the Crimean War in the 19th century through the Vietnam War to provide a context that frames a summary of today's core management principles. PMID:20568940

  5. Science, ethics and war: a pacifist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    This article considers the ethical aspects of the question: should a scientist engage in war-related research, particularly use-inspired or applied research directed at the development of the means for the better waging of war? Because scientists are simultaneously professionals, citizens of a particular country, and human beings, they are subject to conflicting moral and practical demands. There are three major philosophical views concerning the morality of war that are relevant to this discussion: realism, just war theory and pacifism. In addition, the requirements of professional codes of ethics and common morality contribute to an ethical analysis of the involvement of scientists and engineers in war-related research and technology. Because modern total warfare, which is facilitated by the work of scientists and engineers, results in the inevitable killing of innocents, it follows that most, if not all, war-related research should be considered at least as morally suspect and probably as morally prohibited. PMID:22371032

  6. Risk of Early Childhood Injuries in Twins and Singletons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roudsari, Bahman S.; Utter, Garth H.; Kernic, Mary A.; Mueller, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of twin births in the United States (US) has increased more than 65 per cent since 1980. However, the risk of injury to multiple-birth children is unknown. We sought to compare the risk of injury-related hospitalization and death between multiples and singletons. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using linked birth…

  7. Risk of Early Childhood Injuries in Twins and Singletons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roudsari, Bahman S.; Utter, Garth H.; Kernic, Mary A.; Mueller, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of twin births in the United States (US) has increased more than 65 per cent since 1980. However, the risk of injury to multiple-birth children is unknown. We sought to compare the risk of injury-related hospitalization and death between multiples and singletons. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using linked birth

  8. RETROSPECTIVE MONITORING OF INORGANIC MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of chronological reference points to which present levels of inorganic pollutants can be compared is increasingly needed. The requirements for retrospective monitoring methods are discussed in relation to their attainability. The literature has been reviewed for b...

  9. Medical costs of war in 2035: long-term care challenges for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Geiling, James; Rosen, Joseph M; Edwards, Ryan D

    2012-11-01

    War-related medical costs for U.S. veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan may be enormous because of differences between these wars and previous conflicts: (1) Many veterans survive injuries that would have killed them in past wars, and (2) improvised explosive device attacks have caused "polytraumatic" injuries (multiple amputations; brain injury; severe facial trauma or blindness) that require decades of costly rehabilitation. In 2035, today's veterans will be middle-aged, with health issues like those seen in aging Vietnam veterans, complicated by comorbidities of posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and polytrauma. This article cites emerging knowledge about best practices that have demonstrated cost-effectiveness in mitigating the medical costs of war. We propose that clinicians employ early interventions (trauma care, physical therapy, early post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis) and preventive health programs (smoking cessation, alcohol-abuse counseling, weight control, stress reduction) to treat primary medical conditions now so that we can avoid treating costly secondary and tertiary complications in 2035. (We should help an amputee reduce his cholesterol and maintain his weight at age 30, rather than treating his heart disease or diabetes at age 50.) Appropriate early interventions for primary illness should preserve veterans' functional status, ensure quality clinical care, and reduce the potentially enormous cost burden of their future health care. PMID:23198496

  10. Blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephen J; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Bonnett, Carl J; Pons, Peter T; Cantrill, Stephen V

    2009-08-01

    Health-care providers are increasingly faced with the possibility of needing to care for people injured in explosions, but can often, however, feel undertrained for the unique aspects of the patient's presentation and management. Although most blast-related injuries (eg, fragmentation injuries from improvised explosive devices and standard military explosives) can be managed in a similar manner to typical penetrating or blunt traumatic injuries, injuries caused by the blast pressure wave itself cannot. The blast pressure wave exerts forces mainly at air-tissue interfaces within the body, and the pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and auditory systems are at greatest risk. Arterial air emboli arising from severe pulmonary injury can cause ischaemic complications-especially in the brain, heart, and intestinal tract. Attributable, in part, to the scene chaos that undoubtedly exists, poor triage and missed diagnosis of blast injuries are substantial concerns because injuries can be subtle or their presentation can be delayed. Management of these injuries can be a challenge, compounded by potentially conflicting treatment goals. This Seminar aims to provide a thorough overview of these unique primary blast injuries and their management. PMID:19631372

  11. Environmental injuries.

    PubMed

    Leikin, J B; Aks, S E; Andrews, S; Auerbach, P S; Cooper, M A; Jacobsen, T D; Krenzelok, E P; Shicker, L; Weiner, S L

    1997-12-01

    Environmental injuries and illnesses can happen in home, work, or recreational settings. The variety and severity of these injuries might require the clinician to call on skills from internal medicine, emergency medicine, and toxicology. Diseases of thermoregulation are hypothermia and hyperthermia. In each instance, treatment is based on the need to restore the patient's core temperature to normal and on monitoring for complications. The victim of a fire might suffer inhalation injury in addition to burns, and it is more likely that the inhalation injury will be fatal. Oxygen deprivation and inhalation of irritant or asphyxiant chemicals contribute to injury. Toxic plants can be the source of poisoning emergencies, especially in children. Misinformation and myths that surround common plants can create diagnostic problems (i.e., which plants really are toxic and require emergency measures). Venomous marine organisms can cause a wide range of injury, from cutaneous eruption to fatal envenomation. Most are encountered in a recreational setting, such as water sports, but keepers of home aquariums are subject to stings from venomous fish. Lightning injury can present many diagnostic and treatment dilemmas. An important point in this regard is that lightning injury and high-voltage electrical injury are different in pathology and require different approaches for treatment. A discussion of electrical, chemical, and thermal burns makes such differences apparent. PMID:9442757

  12. Skurfing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Liver, J. A.; Wiley, J. J.

    1965-01-01

    Skurfboarding is currently enjoying a phase of popularity, but it is not without hazards. Among 75 consecutive cases of skurfboard injuries seen in an emergency department, 29 fractures were encountered, 16 of which were in the region of the ankle and foot. The majority of injuries, however, consisted of sprains, contusions and abrasions. Six patients required hospital admission, three for operative management of fractures and three because of head injuries. The concrete playground, the instability of the board, the lack of protective clothing and the exhibitionist instincts of the teen-age enthusiast are suggested as factors responsible, at least in part, for the injuries sustained on skurfboards. PMID:14348550

  13. Gulf war depleted uranium risks.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    US and British forces used depleted uranium (DU) in armor-piercing rounds to disable enemy tanks during the Gulf and Balkan Wars. Uranium particulate is generated by DU shell impact and particulate entrained in air may be inhaled or ingested by troops and nearby civilian populations. As uranium is slightly radioactive and chemically toxic, a number of critics have asserted that DU exposure has resulted in a variety of adverse health effects for exposed veterans and nearby civilian populations. The study described in this paper used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to DU during the 1991 Gulf War for both US troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. The analysis indicated that only a few ( approximately 5) US veterans in vehicles accidentally targeted by US tanks received significant exposure levels, resulting in about a 1.4% lifetime risk of DU radiation-induced fatal cancer (compared with about a 24% risk of a fatal cancer from all other causes). These veterans may have also experienced temporary kidney damage. Iraqi children playing for 500 h in DU-destroyed vehicles are predicted to incur a cancer risk of about 0.4%. In vitro and animal tests suggest the possibility of chemically induced health effects from DU internalization, such as immune system impairment. Further study is needed to determine the applicability of these findings for Gulf War exposure to DU. Veterans and civilians who did not occupy DU-contaminated vehicles are unlikely to have internalized quantities of DU significantly in excess of normal internalization of natural uranium from the environment. PMID:17299528

  14. To win a nuclear war: The Pentagon's secret strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, M.; Axelrod, D.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a survey of U.S. plans concerning nuclear war from 1945 through the present. The authors explain U.S. nuclear war plans and contingencies. They also trace the evolution of the strategies and technologies of nuclear war planning, and the personalities of the planners, through post-war foreign policy from the Berlin Crisis to Star wars.

  15. Physicians, triage, and nuclear war.

    PubMed

    Leaning, J

    1988-07-30

    Difficult ethical choices imposed by triage, the process of sorting casualties according to severity of illness (need) and priority for treatment (allocation), are discussed in the context of recent disasters such as an Amtrak collision and the Mexico city earthquake. The question of medical response to nuclear war raises issues of professional duty to assist in making plans for morally repugnant events such as mass destruction; the feasibility of triage, as a conscious professional act, during a time of extreme stress and carnage; and fundamental differences among physicians in their beliefs about themselves, their roles, and their moral obligation to the world. PMID:2899247

  16. Firecracker eye injuries during Deepavali festival: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Puttanna, Manohar; Sriprakash, K S; Sujatha Rathod, B L; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C

    2010-01-01

    We report a large series of ocular injuries caused by fire-crackers. This study was a hospital-based, singlecenter, retrospective case series in which the records of 51 patients with ocular injuries were analyzed. Injuries were classified according to Birmingham eye trauma terminology system (BETTS). Visual outcomes before and after the intervention were recorded. Ten patients were admitted for further management. As ocular firecracker injuries result in significant morbidity, public education regarding proper use of firecrackers may help in reducing the incidence of ocular injuries. PMID:20195044

  17. Firecracker eye injuries during Deepavali festival: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Puttanna, Manohar; Sriprakash, K S; Sujatha Rathod, B L; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C

    2010-01-01

    We report a large series of ocular injuries caused by fire-crackers. This study was a hospital-based, singlecenter, retrospective case series in which the records of 51 patients with ocular injuries were analyzed. Injuries were classified according to Birmingham eye trauma terminology system (BETTS). Visual outcomes before and after the intervention were recorded. Ten patients were admitted for further management. As ocular firecracker injuries result in significant morbidity, public education regarding proper use of firecrackers may help in reducing the incidence of ocular injuries. PMID:20195044

  18. Propaganda, Effect, and the Cold War: Gauging the Status of America's "War of Words."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Giles, Shawn J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the interrelationship among propaganda, effect, and the Cold War during congressional debates over America's first peacetime propaganda program. Argues that the "war of words" metaphor further heightened the need for empirical proof of America's status in that conflict. Suggests that the Cold War helped to ensure the institutionalization

  19. Civil War Preservation Trust Two Week Curriculum for Teaching the Civil War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil War Preservation Trust, Washington, DC.

    The Civil War was perhaps the greatest turning point in U.S. history. The dual themes of slavery and power deeply divided the growing nation during the first half of the 19th century. The mission of the Civil War Preservation Trust (CWPT) is to preserve the significant Civil War battlefields by protecting the land and educating the public about…

  20. Winning the War: A Historical Analysis of the FFA during World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Connors, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States' participation in World War II affected millions of men, women, and children, both at home and around the world. The war effort also affected the Future Farmers of America (FFA). FFA members, agriculture teachers, and national FFA officers all volunteered to serve their country during the war. Local FFA chapters and individual…

  1. The neurological manifestations of trauma: lessons from World War I.

    PubMed

    Linden, Stefanie C; Hess, Volker; Jones, Edgar

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the clinical presentation of functional disorders and the influence of social and cultural factors can be investigated through the historical case notes from mental hospitals. World War I (WWI) was a potent trigger of functional disorders with neurological or psychiatric symptoms. We analysed 100 randomly selected case files of German servicemen admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of the Charit Medical School of Berlin University during WWI and classified them according to contemporaneous and retrospective modern diagnoses. We compared the clinical presentations with accounts in the German and British medical literature of the time. Most patients obtained the contemporaneous diagnosis of 'psychopathic constitution' or hysteria reflecting the general view of German psychiatrists that not the war but an individual predisposition was the basis for the development of symptoms. The clinical picture was dominated by pseudoneurological motor or sensory symptoms as well as pseudoseizures. Some soldiers relived combat experiences in dream-like dissociative states that partly resemble modern-day post-traumatic stress disorder. Most servicemen were classified as unfit for military service but very few of them were granted compensation. Severe functional disorders of a neurological character could develop even without traumatic exposure in combat, which is of interest for the current debate on triggers of stress disorders. The high incidence of pseudoseizures accords with the psychiatric literature of the time and contrasts with accounts of war-related disorders in Britain. The tendency of German psychiatrists not to send traumatised servicemen back to active duty also distinguished between German and British practice. Our data contribute to the debate on the changing patterns of human responses to traumatic experience and their historical and social context. PMID:22065177

  2. Eye injuries in Canadian hockey.

    PubMed Central

    Pashby, T. J.; Pashby, R. C.; Chisholm, L. D.; Crawford, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing public concern led the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, in January 1974, to form a committee to study the incidence, types and causes of hockey eye injuries and to devise means of reducing such injuries. Retrospective and current studies were undertaken, and face protectors were tested. In both pilot studies, sticks were the commonest cause and the highest number of eye injuries was in players 11-15 years old. An average of 15% of all injured eyes were rendered legally blind. Cooperation with hockey authorities has resulted in changed rules and their sticter enforcement, and formulation of standards for face protection approved by the Canadian Standards Association. In this interim report the committee recommends that all amateur hockey players wear eye protectors and urges ophthalmologists to participate in efforts to improve the design of protective equipment. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1181024

  3. Relationship of sharp force injuries to motivation.

    PubMed

    Kitulwatte, Idg; Edirisinghe, Pas

    2015-09-01

    Forensic pathologists are often expected to provide an opinion on the intention of the assailant in sharp force fatalities. A retrospective study was carried out on reports of post-mortems of victims of sharp force trauma over five years. The position and type of injuries were recorded and related to the known motivation for murder. Victims of different motives of killing had an almost similar injury pattern. There is no significant association of the pathology of sharp force injuries with the motive of killing. PMID:25926324

  4. Pregnancy following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, L. L.; Meythaler, J. M.; Tuel, S. M.; Cross, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    Each year about 2,000 women of childbearing age in the United States have a spinal cord injury. Only a few mostly anecdotal reports describe pregnancy after such an injury. In a retrospective study of 16 women with a spinal cord injury, half of whom have a complete injury and about half quadriplegia, 25 pregnancies occurred, with 21 carried to full term. The women delayed pregnancy an average of 6.5 years after their injury, with an average age at first pregnancy of 26.8 years. Cesarean section was necessary in 4 patients because of inadequate progress of labor. In 5 deliveries an episiotomy and local anesthesia were required, 7 required epidural anesthesia, including all cesarean sections, and 10 did not require anesthesia. Several complications have been identified in the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods including autonomic hyperreflexia, premature labor, pressure sores, urinary tract infections, abnormal presentation, and failure to progress. Ultrasonography and amniocentesis were used selectively. Women with spinal cord injuries can have healthy children, although there are significant risks and these women have special needs. PMID:1866960

  5. 36 CFR 1229.12 - What are the requirements during a state of war or threatened war?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... during a state of war or threatened war? 1229.12 Section 1229.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... § 1229.12 What are the requirements during a state of war or threatened war? (a) Destruction of records... war between the United States and any other nation or when hostile action appears imminent, the...

  6. CAN A SINGLE INJURY CAUSE CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Hedge, Arden R.

    1959-01-01

    In the absence of positive evidence that a single injury can cause cancer, the tendency is growing to award compensation to persons (particularly employees) with cancers alleged to have originated in trauma, even cancers which are generally conceded to be congenital in origin. Experimental attempts to induce cancer through trauma have been unsuccessful or doubtful in result. War-wounded persons, boxers and railroad accident victims have no higher incidence of cancer than other groups. Physicians and others in a position to educate the public should strive to dispel the error that cancer following injury is demonstrably or even probably the cause. PMID:13618747

  7. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  8. Public health, epidemiology and war.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J; Simmonds, S

    1995-06-01

    The delivery of humanitarian aid in wartime is difficult. However, it is essential that aid is provided in the most effective manner possible, targeted on those most in need whilst minimizing waste. Furthermore the delivery of aid should be sensitive to the future needs of the communities in conflict. This requires information on the needs of the vulnerable population. There is little experience of collecting data on the impact of war on a civilian population. The war in Bosnia disrupted surveillance of communicable disease. The local authorities were assisted by the World Health Organization in re-establishing surveillance. The data generated was valuable in planning interventions to minimise the possibility of major outbreaks of infection, reduce the impact of infectious disease and in guiding the humanitarian aid effort. The experience described suggests that public health surveillance of the civilian population in wartime is possible and useful. Besides the need for planning, the public health doctor in wartime has a role as an advocate for those suffering; this function can be carried out much more effectively if it is based on objective data collection rather than hearsay. PMID:7660179

  9. When Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury Become Students: Methods to Advance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Kimberly Turner; Libertz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain which evidence-based interventions in study strategies have been successful in helping soldiers and veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) return to the classroom. Military leaders have specifically identified TBI as one of the signature injuries of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with over a quarter of

  10. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... concussion recover completely with little or no intervention. After an injury event, and once they have had a medical ... depends on the nature and severity of the injury. A medical provider will determine ... Symptoms after a concussion can affect performance and place the ...

  11. Epidemiology of injuries in Hong Kong elite badminton athletes.

    PubMed

    Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Romy Hing-Kwan; Wong, Fiona Chui-Yan; Cheuk, Phoebe Wai-Ling; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui

    2007-01-01

    This study retrospectively reviewed the injury epidemiology on 44 Hong Kong elite badminton players in 2003. Team training records were reviewed to retrieve the training and competition hours, while the medical records from the physiotherapy department were reviewed to obtain information regarding injuries. A total of 253 injuries (128 recurrent and 125 new injuries) were recorded, which accounted for an overall incidence rate of 5.04 per 1,000 player hours. Elite senior athletes had a higher incidence rate of recurrent injuries, while elite junior and potential athletes had a higher incidence rate of new injuries. A total of 1,219 visits (4.82 per athlete) to the physiotherapy department were recorded, which cost HK$487,600 (HK$1,928 per injury). Most new injuries were strain (80 injuries), and the most frequently injured body sites were the back (17 injuries), the shoulder (15 injuries), the thigh (15 injuries), and the knee (15 injuries). One-sided exact test showed that a previous injury experience significantly associated with the occurrence of new injury. PMID:17578753

  12. [The open femoral fracture in war--173 external fixators applied to the femur (Afghanistan war)].

    PubMed

    Oberli, H; Frick, T

    1992-03-01

    During the three years 1988 through 1990, more than 700 external skeletal fixations (AO/ASIF Tubular System) were utilized at the ICRC Hospital for Afghan War Wounded in Peshawar, Pakistan, 173 of which were for femoral fractures. 13% of the fractures were open grade II, and 71% open grade III, mostly due to high velocity gunshot or shrapnel injuries. Usually, the external fixator was left in place until consolidation of the fracture. The average time of external fixation was 128 days. Three major groups of complications have been observed: fracture complications, implant complications, and residual loss of function of the knee joint, probably the most significant permanent complication to the patient. In order to improve the functional results in treating open fractures of the femur, three measures are recommended: unilateral frame with posterolateral insertion of Schanz screws, postoperative positioning of the patient with 90 degrees of flexion of hip and knee joints and mobilization of the patient as soon as possible (on the first or second postoperative day). PMID:1592638

  13. Skateboarding injuries.

    PubMed

    Fountain, J L; Meyers, M C

    1996-12-01

    Skateboarding has experienced intermittent periods of popularity since the 1960s. Along with this popularity, there have been concomitant increases in numerous types of injuries. Most documented cases occur in boys aged from 10 to 14 years, with injuries ranging from minor cuts and abrasions to multiple fractures and, in some cases, even death. Although head injuries account for approximately 3.5 to 9% of all skateboarding injuries, fractures of both upper and lower extremities account for 50% of all musculoskeletal trauma. Not surprising is the fact that 33% of those injured on skateboards are injured within the first week of skateboarding. Most individuals experience some form of trauma during the initial attempt at skateboarding. Because of the nature of skateboarding, encompassing both high speed and extreme manoeuvres, injuries often occur when the skateboarder collides with an immovable object, falls from the skateboard or is involved in vehicular traffic. Most injuries occur when the skateboard strikes an irregularity in the riding surface, projecting the skateboarder in the direction of travel. Despite traffic legislation, 65% of injured adolescent skateboarders sustain injuries on public roads, on footpaths, and in parking lots. Several organisations have recommended safety guidelines and restrictions based on age and common sense. Use of a helmet, knee and elbow pads, and wrist guards should be required of all skateboarders, as well as some type of formal education. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under 5 years of age should not be allowed to ride skateboards. At an early age, injuries occur due to several reasons. These include high centre of mass, immature skeletal development, an undeveloped neuromuscular system, and simply poor judgement. Skateboarding injuries are expected to rise with the increasing number of participants, high-tech equipment development and renewed advertising. Although limited preventative measures exist which will totally eradicate skateboarding trauma, some thought to actual restrictions may decrease the incidence and severity of injuries. PMID:8969014

  14. From Combat to Legacies: Novels of the Vietnam War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, Larry R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses novels of the Vietnam War, their usefulness, and the interest they hold for students. Considers four categories of Vietnam novels: the Vietnam experience, the war at home, the refugee experience, and the war's effect on the next generation. (SR)

  15. How Could a Beaver Start a War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Students gain a better understanding of war and economics when the variables come alive through stories, artifacts, and paintings. In this article, the author describes a short story about the fur trade which can generate lots of student questions about the fur economics, the Eastern Woodland Indians, trade artifacts, and war. The author also…

  16. World War II: A Technology Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, Suzy

    1990-01-01

    Presents a class activity on the history, causes, and consequences of World War II. Focuses on the development and deployment of the atomic bomb. Utilizes a Video Encyclopedia Program for historical background. Divides the class into groups that are responsible for researching and preparing a videotape on a World War II topic. (RW)

  17. "War of the Worlds" and the Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, G. Joseph

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of 1938 newspaper editorials about Orson Welles' notorious "War of the Worlds" broadcast reveals that they explained audience reaction on the grounds of gullibility, the ominous threat of war, and the technique of the broadcast, and that they offered radio a rather stern lecture on the relationship between freedom and responsibility.

  18. Health and Civil War in Rural Burundi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundervoet, Tom; Verwimp, Philip; Akresh, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We combine household survey data with event data on the timing and location of armed conflicts to examine the impact of Burundi's civil war on children's health status. The identification strategy exploits exogenous variation in the war's timing across provinces and the exposure of children's birth cohorts to the fighting. After controlling for

  19. Telling War Stories: The Things They Carry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Paige; Warren, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This webtext reveals two modern-day methods for soldiers to share their war stories: 1) soldiers sharing their stories with cadets from West Point through a project linking veterans from the Global War on Terror with composition students; and 2) soldiers learning in online composition classrooms designed specifically for them.

  20. How Could a Beaver Start a War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Students gain a better understanding of war and economics when the variables come alive through stories, artifacts, and paintings. In this article, the author describes a short story about the fur trade which can generate lots of student questions about the fur economics, the Eastern Woodland Indians, trade artifacts, and war. The author also

  1. Girl's Schooling in War-Torn Somalia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A civil war has raged in Somalia since 1991. The civil war was the final blow to an already collapsed education system. Somalia has received little research and policy attention yet children, especially girls, are very vulnerable during times of conflict. The different gender roles, activities, and status in society create gender differentiated

  2. The Life of a Civil War Soldier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that is based on the Gettysburg National Military Park's "Life of a Civil War Soldier" traveling trunk program. Explains that this lesson offers a recipe for using a trunk to present the life of a Civil War soldier in the classroom. Includes activities and learning stations. (CMK)

  3. Women at the Heart of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne

    This unit of study explores the experiences and the role of women during World War II. The unit can serve as an introduction or supplement to commonly taught topics such as Nazism in Germany, the Holocaust, the "home front," the USSR's Great Patriotic War, and the struggle between Nationalists and Communists in China. It begins with an overview

  4. War on Rats, 1972 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Dept. of Environmental Services, Washington, DC.

    The City of Washington, D.C., with federal funding, declared war on one of the city's most pressing problems--rats. The War on Rats Program, in conjunction with Operation Clean Sweep, made a city-wide survey of rat infestations and recorded the areas of heavy rat infestation. After the problem areas had been identified, community organizations…

  5. Representations of War in Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Philip K.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes ethical dilemmas in war-related literature as a vehicle for ethics instruction. Describes key books focusing on such issues as whether all is fair in war, racism, sexism, military training, intelligence operations, conflicting ethical systems, whether anything is worth killing for, and the situation of returned veterans. (30 citations)…

  6. World War Two and the Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boas, Jacob

    This resource book presents readings that could be used to teach about the Holocaust. The readings are brief and could be appropriate for middle school and high school students. Several photographs accompany the text. The volume has the following chapters: (1) "From War to War" (history of Germany from late 19th Century through the end of World…

  7. Creative Chaos: Learning from the Yugoslavian War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to understand more about the continued learning process of those who have experienced negative life experiences. This paper focuses on the various issues of learning and living through war, specifically encounters from the war in former Yugoslavia. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to understand lessons learned by

  8. Comprehending Peace as Well as War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Children are profoundly affected by the threat of a nuclear holocaust, and parents and educators ought to address their fears in a structured way. Specific classes on war and peace should be taught, and parents should take advantage of opportunities at home to discuss war and peace. (RM)

  9. Representations of War in Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Philip K.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes ethical dilemmas in war-related literature as a vehicle for ethics instruction. Describes key books focusing on such issues as whether all is fair in war, racism, sexism, military training, intelligence operations, conflicting ethical systems, whether anything is worth killing for, and the situation of returned veterans. (30 citations)

  10. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI? Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  11. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to injuries. The most common sports injuries are: Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen muscles Achilles tendon ... injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising. Sprained ankles, strained backs, and fractured hands are acute injuries. ...

  12. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Mller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  13. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed

    Krner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Mller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-09-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  14. Air bags and ocular injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J D; Jaeger, E A; Jeffers, J B

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. METHODS: Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. RESULTS: Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. CONCLUSION: Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 2D FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:10703118

  15. Moral Injury, Soul Repair, and Creating a Place for Grace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Chris J.; Winings, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Our returning veterans face many challenges from loss of limb and physical disabilities to posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, substance abuse, homelessness, family problems, and unemployment. The greater challenge, though, for returning veterans is the injury to their soul due to the war and violence they have experienced. Our challenge is

  16. Moral Injury, Soul Repair, and Creating a Place for Grace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Chris J.; Winings, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Our returning veterans face many challenges from loss of limb and physical disabilities to posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, substance abuse, homelessness, family problems, and unemployment. The greater challenge, though, for returning veterans is the injury to their soul due to the war and violence they have experienced. Our challenge is…

  17. Assessment of Vascular Injuries and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baghi, Iraj; Herfatkar, Mohammad Rasool; Shokrgozar, Leila; Poor-Rasuli, Zahra; Aghajani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trauma is the third leading cause of death. In this regard, vascular injury plays a leading role in of morbidity and mortality rates. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of vascular injuries and results of vascular reconstruction at a referral hospital in northern Iran. Patients and Methods: A retrospective observational study assessed 88 consecutive patients with vascular injury admitted to Poursina Hospital, Rasht in northern Iran, from October 2007 to October 2009. All study information was collected retrospectively from hospital charts. Results: Most of the affected patients (87/88) were male with a mean age of 29.12 11.20 years. The mechanism of injury in 39.8% was blunt trauma and penetrating trauma in the rest. Of the 53 injured by penetrating trauma (60.2%), the most common cause was stabbing (94.3%). The most common cause of blunt trauma was road traffic accidents (93.1%). The most common mechanism for vascular injuries in upper extremities was penetrating trauma (86.0%) and in lower extremities was blunt trauma (60.0%). Fasciotomy was performed in 16 patients (18.2%) mostly in the lower extremities. Major amputation was required in 10% of the patients. In upper extremities, the most common type of revascularization was end to end anastomosis, followed by inter-position graft. The most common type of reconstruction in the lower extremity was bypass graft. All patients who underwent major amputation were admitted to the center with a delay of more than 6 hours after injury. Conclusions: Major vascular injuries in our center occurred in young men, frequently because of stab wounds. Popliteal injuries mostly caused by motor vehicle accidents was the second most common arterial injury, followed by combined ulnar and radial injuries. Vascular reconstruction in the first hours after trauma may prevent many unnecessary and preventable amputation procedures. PMID:26839869

  18. Nursing and en route care: history in time of war.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Scott; Connelly, Linda K

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the en route caregiver is to provide critical care in military helicopters for wounded Warriors. This care minimizes the effects of the wounds and injuries, and improves morbidity and mortality. This article will focus on the history of Army Nursing en route care. From World War II through Vietnam, and continuing through the War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan, Army nurses served in providing en route care in military airplanes and helicopters for patients being transported to higher echelons of care. From aid stations on the battlefield to forward surgical teams which provide life, limb, and eyesight saving care, to the next higher level of care in combat support hospitals, these missions require specialized nursing skills to safely care for the high acuity patients. Before the en route care concept existed, there was not a program to train nurses in these critical skills. There was also a void of information about patient outcomes associated with the nursing assessment and care provided during helicopter medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) of such unstable patients, and the consequent impact on the patient's condition after transport. The role of critical care nurses has proven to be essential and irreplaceable in providing full-spectrum care to casualties of war, in particular, the postsurgical patients transferred from one surgical facility to another in theatre. However, we have only recently developed the concepts over the required skill set, training, equipment, functionality, evidenced-based care, and sustainability of nursing in the en route care role. Much of the work to quantify and qualify nursing care has been done by individuals and individual units whose lessons-learned have only recently been captured. PMID:22124872

  19. Crisis stability and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The authors summarize their viewpoint on and recommendations for strategic command and forces, and arms control and crisis stability. They pressent a study of the paths which might lead the superpowers from a crisis to nuclear war. This book examines the various arenas in which superpower crises may occur. The authors describe the strategies, command structures, and forces of NATO and the Warsaw Pact, paying particular attention to the ladder of alert postures and operations that their forces might mount as a crisis intensifies. They address the Middle East, with special emphasis on the confrontation between Syria and Israel, and the dangers posed by locally-owned chemical and nuclear weapons. The authors also consider the oceans and space.

  20. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-07-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants. PMID:12117658

  1. Propeller injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, R J

    1976-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, and pleasure boat cruising are increasing in popularity. As a result the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. In a ten-year period from 1963 to 1973, I collected a total of nine cases. In some amputations were necessary, and in other cases amputations occurred at the time of injury. Problems with bacterial flora occurring in open sea water versus salt water enclosed near docks and fresh lake water are discussed. A review of the orthopedic literature revealed sparse information regarding propeller injuries. PMID:818713

  2. Years of life lost among Iranian people killed in the Iraq-Iran war: the 25-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Batool; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Karbakhsh, Mojgan; Soroush, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the years of life lost (YLL), registered deaths due to Iraq-Iran war (1980-2005) were identified considering ICD10 codes of Y36.0 to Y36.9. Estimated YLL was calculated by taking age-weighting options and discount rates. Population life expectancy in each corresponding year was retrieved from the national health database. During 1980-2005, 178,298 Iranian men and 5325 Iranian women died in war. The mean death age was 22.8 ± 9 years, 96.6% occurred during the years of war (September 1980-August 1988). In the years after the war (1988-2005) 6243 (3.4%) of deaths occurred as the result of complication of the war-related injuries or implanted landmines/unexploded ordnances (ICD10 code: Y36.8). YLL in Iraq-Iran war among Iranian victims were calculated as 10,479,405.0 years considering the age weighting and discount rate equal to 0. Age-adjusted YLL were estimated as 10,169,546.2 years in males. Female cases that comprised 2.9% of total victims lost 309,858.8 years. The mean YLL was calculated as 57.1 years for each Iranian victim killed in Iraq-Iran war. The war-related YLL was estimated more than 10 million years that comprised a majority of young men. This study is the first step in estimation of disability adjusted life year (DALY) of Iraq-Iran war on Iranian side. PMID:24344985

  3. Carnosine Treatment for Gulf War Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James Nicholas; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib; Timbol, Christian

    2014-01-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (?-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  4. Boarding injuries: the long and the short of it.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Leslie A; Thygerson, Steven M; Merrill, Ray M

    2014-01-01

    As the popularity of longboarding increases, trauma centers are treating an increased number of high severity injuries. Current literature lacks descriptions of the types of injuries experienced by longboarders, a distinct subset of the skateboarding culture. A retrospective review of longboarding and skateboarding injury cases was conducted at a level II trauma center from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2011. Specific injuries in addition to high injury severity factors (hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), patient treatment options, disposition, and outcome) were calculated to compare longboarder to skateboarder injuries. A total of 824 patients met the inclusion criteria. Skull fractures, traumatic brain injuries (TBI), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were significantly more common among longboard patients than skateboarders (P < 0.0001). All patients with an ISS above 15 were longboarders. Hospital and ICU LOS in days was also significantly greater for longboarders compared with skateboarders (P < 0.0001). Of the three patients that died, each was a longboarder and each experienced a head injury. Longboard injuries account for a higher incidence rate of severe head injuries compared to skateboard injuries. Our data show that further, prospective investigation into the longboarding population demographics and injury patterns is necessary to contribute to effective injury prevention in this population. PMID:24660063

  5. Boarding Injuries: The Long and the Short of It

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Leslie A.; Thygerson, Steven M.; Merrill, Ray M.

    2014-01-01

    As the popularity of longboarding increases, trauma centers are treating an increased number of high severity injuries. Current literature lacks descriptions of the types of injuries experienced by longboarders, a distinct subset of the skateboarding culture. A retrospective review of longboarding and skateboarding injury cases was conducted at a level II trauma center from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2011. Specific injuries in addition to high injury severity factors (hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), patient treatment options, disposition, and outcome) were calculated to compare longboarder to skateboarder injuries. A total of 824 patients met the inclusion criteria. Skull fractures, traumatic brain injuries (TBI), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were significantly more common among longboard patients than skateboarders (P < 0.0001). All patients with an ISS above 15 were longboarders. Hospital and ICU LOS in days was also significantly greater for longboarders compared with skateboarders (P < 0.0001). Of the three patients that died, each was a longboarder and each experienced a head injury. Longboard injuries account for a higher incidence rate of severe head injuries compared to skateboard injuries. Our data show that further, prospective investigation into the longboarding population demographics and injury patterns is necessary to contribute to effective injury prevention in this population. PMID:24660063

  6. The hazard of sharp force injuries: Factors influencing outcome.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Stine; Normann, Stig-Andr; Morild, Inge; Lilleng, Peer Kre; Heltne, Jon-Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The risk of dying from sharp force injury is difficult to ascertain. To the best of our knowledge, no study has been performed in Norway regarding mortality due to sharp force injury or factors that impact survival. Thus, the objective of the present study was to investigate and assess mortality in subjects with sharp force injury. This retrospective study comprises data on 136 subjects (34 female, 102 male) with suspected severe sharp force injury (self-inflicted or inflicted by others) admitted to Haukeland University Hospital between 2001 and 2010. The majority of subjects were intoxicated, and the injury was most often inflicted by a knife. The incidence of sharp force injury in Western Norway is similar to the incidence in other European countries. Almost half of the subjects with self-inflicted injury died. In cases with injury inflicted by another individual, one in five died. Mortality rates were higher in those with penetrating chest injuries than those with penetrating abdominal injuries and higher in cases with cardiac injury compared to pleural or lung injury. Sharp force injury can be fatal, but the overall mortality rate in this study was 29%. Factors influencing mortality rate were the number of injuries, the topographic regions of the body injured, the anatomical organs/structures inflicted, and emergency measures performed. PMID:26599374

  7. Risk factors for injuries during airborne static line operations.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Steelman, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    US Army airborne operations began in World War II. Continuous improvements in parachute technology, aircraft exit procedures, and ground landing techniques have reduced the number of injuries over time from 27 per 1,000 descents to about 6 per 1,000 jumps. Studies have identified a number of factors that put parachutists at higher injury risk, including high wind speeds, night jumps, combat loads, higher temperatures, lower fitness, heavier body weight, and older age. Airborne injuries can be reduced by limiting risker training (higher wind speeds, night jumps, combat load) to the minimum necessary for tactical and operational proficiency. Wearing a parachute ankle brace (PAB) will reduce ankle injuries without increasing other injuries and should be considered by all parachutists, especially those with prior ankle problems. A high level of upper body muscular endurance and aerobic fitness is not only beneficial for general health but also associated with lower injury risk during airborne training. PMID:25344715

  8. Patterns in Blast Injuries to the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Buntic, Rudolf F.; Brooks, Darrell

    2008-01-01

    Blast injuries to the hand are not just a wartime phenomenon but also quite common in rural communities throughout northern California. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with blast injuries in the community and review the most common patterns in an attempt to identify the pathomechanics of the hand injury and the reconstructive procedures that are required. This is a retrospective study of blast injuries to the hand treated between 1978 and 2006. Medical records, X-rays, and photos were reviewed to compile standard patient demographics and characterize the injury pattern. Explosives were classified based on their rate of decomposition. Reconstructive solutions were reviewed and characterized based on whether damaged tissues were repaired or replaced. Sixty-two patients were identified with blast injuries to their hand. Patients were predominantly male (92%) with an average age of 27 years. Firecrackers were the most commonly encountered explosives. Thirty-seven patients were identified as holding a low explosive in their dominant hand and were used for characterization of the injury pattern. The apparent pattern of injury was hyperextension and hyperabduction of the hand and digits. Common injuries were metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint hyperextension with associated soft tissue avulsion, hyperabduction at the web spaces with associated palmar soft tissue tears, and finger disarticulation amputations worse at radial digits. Given the mechanisms of injury with tissue loss, surgical intervention generally involved tissue replacement rather than tissue repair. Blast injuries to the hand represent a broad spectrum of injuries that are associated with the magnitude of explosion and probably, the proximity to the hand. We were able to identify a repetitive pattern of injury and demonstrate the predominant use for delayed tissue replacement rather than microsurgical repair at the acute setting. PMID:18780004

  9. [Possibilities of videothoracoscopy for penetrating thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Voskresenskiĭ, O V; Radchenko, Iu A; Abakumov, M M

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the medical reports of 596 victims with thoracic injuries including 360 cases with following conventional therapeutic approach and 236 patients who underwent videothoracoscopy. We estimated condition severity in case of injuries of thoracic wall, lungs, pericardium and heart. Hemodynamic disorders were estimated according to Allgower-Burri shock index. Intrapleural bleeding was calculated using volume of hemothorax and time before injury and operation. Severity of physiological damages was determined using RTS criterion, anatomic--using ISS criterion. We estimated possibility for videothoracoscopy in patients with conventional therapeutic approach comparing severity of injuries, severity of condition in both groups and volume of surgery. Retrospective analysis revealed possibility of videothoracoscopy in 86.7% of victims with pulmonary injury, in 83.3% with bleeding at the muscular vessels of thoracic wall, in 40.3% with intercostal vessels injury, in 31.2% with heart injury, in 27.3% with damage of pericardium and in 18.8% with internal thoracic vessels injury. Our investigation revealed that videothoracoscopy may be used more widely in case of thoracic injury. PMID:26271560

  10. Birth Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cesarean delivery may be done in certain circumstances. Did You Know... Serious birth injuries are now quite ... are typically not needed. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Sidebar 1 ...

  11. Ocular Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment to prevent long-term complications such as double vision, loss of vision, and abnormal appearance. What ... play. Wearing approved and tested eye and face protection is essential for preventing these injuries during sports. ...

  12. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... devastating types of trauma resulting from exposure to fire and smoke. PREVENT you and your loved ones! ... people die annually in the United States from fire injuries. Over half of these deaths result from ...

  13. Golf Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... main causes of these injuries include: Lack of flexibility Poor conditioning Excessive play or practice Poor swing mechanics Ground impact forces Intermittent play Poor flexibility is a key risk factor for a golf ...

  14. Influence of war on quantitative and qualitative changes in drug-induced mortality in Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana; Definis Gojanović, Marija; Vodopija, Davor; Čapkun, Vesna; Smoljanović, Ankica

    2011-01-01

    Aim To study drug-induced mortality and characteristics of overdose deaths in the war (1991-1995), pre-war (1986-1990), and post-war period (1996-2000) in Split-Dalmatia County. Methods We retrospectively searched through Databases of the Department of Forensic Medicine, University Hospital Split, the national register of death records, the archives of the Split-Dalmatia County Police, and the Register of Treated Drug Addicts of the Croatian National Institute of Public Health, covering the period from 1986 to 2000, according to drug poisoning codes IX and X of the International Classification of Diseases. The indicators were statistically analyzed. Results There were 146 registered drug-induced deaths, with 136 (93%) deceased being men. The median age of all cases was 27 years (interquartile range 8). Most of them were single (70.6%), unemployed (44.6%), and secondary school graduates (69.2%). In the war period, there were 4.8 times more deaths than in the pre-war period (P = 0.014), and in the post-war period there were 5.2 times more deaths than in the pre-war period (P = 0.008). The most common site of death was the deceased person’s home. The toxicological analyses showed that 59 (61%) deaths were heroin related, alcohol use was found in 62 cases (42.5%), and multi-substance use was found in more than a half of the cases. In 133 (91.1%) cases, deaths were classified as unintentional, whereas 13 (8.9%) were classified as suicides. Conclusion The war, along with other risk factors, contributed to unfavorable developments related to drug abuse in Split-Dalmatia County, including the increase in the drug-induced mortality rate. PMID:21990081

  15. Retrospective Conversion of Bibliographic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Explores methods and costs of the retrospective conversion process, i.e., converting card catalog records into machine readable form to create an automated catalog. Data conversion standards, methods, search strategy, databases, verification and editing, costs, and products of conversion are noted. Thirty-two references are cited. (EJS)

  16. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

  17. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  18. Misinformation, disinformation, and violent conflict: from Iraq and the "War on Terror" to future threats to peace.

    PubMed

    Lewandowsky, Stephan; Stritzke, Werner G K; Freund, Alexandra M; Oberauer, Klaus; Krueger, Joachim I

    2013-10-01

    The dissemination and control of information are indispensable ingredients of violent conflict, with all parties involved in a conflict or at war seeking to frame the discussion on their own terms. Those attempts at information control often involve the dissemination of misinformation or disinformation (i.e., information that is incorrect by accident or intent, respectively). We review the way in which misinformation can facilitate violent conflicts and, conversely, how the successful refutation of misinformation can contribute to peace. We illustrate the relevant cognitive principles by examining two case studies. The first, a retrospective case, involves the Iraq War of 2003 and the "War on Terror." The second, a prospective case, points to likely future sources of conflict arising from climate change and its likely consequences. PMID:24128313

  19. Preventing Nuclear War: What Physicians Can Achieve

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Don G.

    1986-01-01

    On its fifth anniversary, the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The organization was conceived by two Boston cardiologists who joined with some Soviet colleagues to create an international forum for considering the medical consequences of and means for preventing nuclear war. This article by the organization's archivist documents its difficult progress yet remarkable growth. Overcoming serious obstacles has added to its strength and credibility: now involving organizations with 145,000 members in 41 countries, IPPNW has become the international voice of medicine's concern about nuclear war. PMID:21274253

  20. War casualties on the home front

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda J. Flinn

    2005-11-01

    On May 12, 1942, at Christopher coal mine No. 3 in Osage, West Virginia, a continent away from the frontlines of World War II, Superintendent Ed O'Neil saw the mine ventilation fan suddenly run backwards, propelled by a strong gust of air that tore the belt off the huge blower. The second shift mantrip of 115 coal miners, traversing the drift mouth for the 3:00 p.m. shift, ground to an uneasy halt. The article recounts the tragic consequences of this incident. It also tells of other events affecting coal miners during World War I and World War II.

  1. The causes and prevention of war

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book seeks to answer what has become a species-survival question: how can humankind reduce the role of large-scale violence in society. Based partially on the serious thought of past scholars and statesmen on the determinants of war and the conditions for peace, but mainly on the author's own studies and observations of world politics, a wide-ranging examination of both small-scale and international acts of violence are provided. The author realistically appraises the efforts and means of reducing the role of war in international relations and concludes by offering an integrated strategy to prevent and control war.

  2. Intercomparison of Retrospective Radon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R W.; Steck, D J.; Parkhurst, Maryann ); Mahaffey, Judith A. ); Alavanja, M C.

    1998-11-01

    We performed both a laboratory and field intercomparison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, Pb-210, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the alpha emission of a Pb-210 decay product, Po-210. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks cm{sup -2} hr{sup -1}) is proportional to the surface alpha activity. In the absence of other strong sources of alpha emission in the glass, the implanted surface alpha activity should be proportional to the accumulated Po-210 and hence, the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to: (1) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, (2) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass implanted polonium activities, and (3) examine the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials and methods used by the studies produced similar track densities in detectors exposed to the same implanted Po-210 activity. The field phase of the intercomparison found excellent agreement between the track density rates for the two types of retrospective detectors. The correlation between the track density rates and direct contemporary radon concentration measurements was relatively high, considering that no adjustments were performed to account for either the residential depositional environment or glass surface type.

  3. "Doomed to go in company with miserable pain": surgical recognition and treatment of amputation-related pain on the Western Front during World War 1.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Dafydd S; Mayhew, Emily R; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-11-01

    The principal feature of injuries from World War 1 was musculoskeletal trauma and injury to peripheral nerves as a result of damage to the upper and lower limbs caused by gunshot wounds and fragments of artillery munitions. Amputation was used as a treatment in field hospitals to save lives; limb conservation was a secondary consideration. A century later, the principal feature of injuries to soldiers in today's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is also musculoskeletal trauma and injury to the peripheral nerves caused by improvised explosive devices. Common to both types of injury is postamputation pain. We searched The Lancet's archives in this Series paper to show the efforts of surgeons in World War 1 to understand and treat postamputation pain in its own right both during and immediately after the war. Despite unprecedented patient numbers and levels of civilian medical expertise, little progress was made in providing relief from this type of pain, a grave concern to the surgeons treating these soldiers. Today postamputation pain is understood beyond a surgical context but remains a complex and poorly understood condition with few effective treatments. PMID:25441202

  4. Challenges in definitive fracture management of blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wade; Kuhn, Kevin; Staeheli, Greg; Dromsky, David

    2015-09-01

    The United States military remains engaged in the longest armed conflict in this nation's history. The majority of casualties in the global war on terror come from blast-related injuries. Multiple centers have published their experience and outcomes with these complex patients. Findings from the study of injured military personnel have implications for mass casualty events resulting from industrial accidents or terrorism in the civilian sector. This article will review the pathophysiology of blast-related injury. The authors will summarize treatment considerations, priorities, and techniques that have proven successful. Finally, the authors will discuss the incidence and management of common complications after blast-related injuries. PMID:26104316

  5. The Effect on Fertility of the 20032011 War in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Cetorelli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    This article provides the first detailed account of recent fertility trends in Iraq, with a particular focus on the changes resulting from the 20032011 war and the factors underlying them. The study is based on retrospective birth history data from the 2006 and 2011 Iraq Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (I-MICS). Estimates from the two surveys indicate that total fertility remained stable from 1997 to 2010, at about 4.5 children per woman. However, examination of the age patterns of fertility reveals an abrupt shift in the timing of births, with adolescent fertility rising by over 30 percent soon after the onset of the war. A decomposition analysis shows that the rise in early childbearing is due to an increased prevalence of early marriage among less-educated women. The prevalence of early marriage and childbearing among women with secondary or higher education is relatively low and has not increased after 2003. PMID:26300572

  6. Samuel A Levine's first world war encounters with Mackenzie and Lewis.

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, C F; Stang, J M

    1990-01-01

    Samuel Albert Levine was a key figure in modern cardiology in the United States. During the first world war he was one of a select group of United States medical officers assigned to the British Military Heart Hospital where he encountered the "British medical giants"--Clifford Allbutt, William Osler, James Mackenzie, and Thomas Lewis. Levine's diary, written when he was a young medical officer during the first world war, presents crisp character sketches of James Mackenzie and Thomas Lewis. The autobiographical vignettes he wrote later in life were more gracious and polished retrospectives. The Levine perspectives, separated by a half century, contribute to our understanding of the developing fabric of Anglo-American cardiology. Images PMID:2203398

  7. [War trauma and PTSD among German war survivors. A comparison of former soldiers and women of World War II].

    PubMed

    Nandi, C; Weierstall, R; Huth, S; Knecht, J; Elbert, T

    2014-03-01

    Stressful war experiences can cause posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in survivors. To what extent were the soldiers and young women of World War II affected by PTSD symptoms over the course of their lives? Do these men and women differ in the traumatic experiences and PTSD symptom severity? To investigate these questions 52 male and 20 female Germans aged 81-95 years were recruited through newspaper advertisements and notices and interviewed regarding war experiences and PTSD symptoms. Of the men 2% and 7% met the criteria for current and lifetime PTSD diagnoses, respectively, as compared to 10% and 30% of the women, respectively. Using multiple linear regression a dose-response relationship between the number of trauma types experienced and PTSD symptom severity could be demonstrated. The slope of the regression curve was steeper for women than for men. When controlling for the number of different traumatic experiences women reported a significantly higher severity of PTSD symptoms than men. It is presumed that this difference in severity of symptoms can be attributed to qualitative differences in the type of traumatic stress factors during the war. The present study provides evidence that even today people continue to be affected by PTSD symptoms due to events which occurred during World War II; therefore, during patient contact with this age group the war experiences specific to each individual need to be considered as potential moderators of symptoms. PMID:23695004

  8. Occupational Injury Patterns of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and aim Each year, a significant number of people die or become handicapped due to preventable occupational accidents or occupational diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate socio-demographic features, mechanism, causes, injury area, and sectoral features of occupational accidents in patients presented to our department. Materials and methods The study was carried out retrospectively after local ethics committee approval. Age and sex of the patients, mechanism of injury, type and exact location of injuries were all evaluated. The groups were compared using Chi-Square test, Students T test and Kruskall-Wallis test. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Results Totally 654 patients were included in the study. 93.4% of patients were male, and mean age was 32.96??5.97 (1873) years. Sectoral distribution of accidents was statistically significant and mostly occurred in industrial and construction workers (p?injuries (36.4%), the least was due to multiple traumas (0.5%). Distribution of occupational accidents according to injury type was statistically significant (p?Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 9.79??8.1. The mean cost of occupational injury was $1729.57??8178.3. There was statistically significant difference between the sectors with respect to cost. Seventy-one patients (10.9%) recovered with permanent sequel and two (0.3%) died in hospital. Conclusion Occupational accidents are most commonly seen in young males, especially in primary school graduated workers, and during daytime period. PMID:24373156

  9. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Apostolaki, Georgia; Apostolaki, Mary; Chorti, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield. PMID:21087529

  10. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield. PMID:21087529

  11. Studying America's Struggle against War: An Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlett, Charles F.

    2003-01-01

    American history surveys and monographs have been dominated by discourses on war. The vocabulary itself--the inter-war period, postwar planning, the prewar economy, the revolutionary war generation, the irrepressible conflict--strongly suggests that the United States has been in a virtual state of war throughout its history. Ironically, this

  12. 46 CFR 308.107 - War risk hull insurance policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false War risk hull insurance policy. 308.107 Section 308.107 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.107 War risk hull insurance policy. Standard Form...

  13. 48 CFR 225.7402-4 - Law of war training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Law of war training. 225... States 225.7402-4 Law of war training. (a) Basic training. Basic law of war training is required for all...= en-US. (b) Advanced law of war training. (1) The types of personnel that must obtain advanced law...

  14. 38 CFR 3.2 - Periods of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periods of war. 3.2..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.2 Periods of war. This section sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each war period beginning with the Indian wars. Note that the...

  15. 46 CFR 308.107 - War risk hull insurance policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false War risk hull insurance policy. 308.107 Section 308.107 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.107 War risk hull insurance policy. Standard Form...

  16. 46 CFR 308.107 - War risk hull insurance policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false War risk hull insurance policy. 308.107 Section 308.107 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.107 War risk hull insurance policy. Standard Form...

  17. 46 CFR 308.107 - War risk hull insurance policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false War risk hull insurance policy. 308.107 Section 308.107 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.107 War risk hull insurance policy. Standard Form...

  18. 38 CFR 3.2 - Periods of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Periods of war. 3.2..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.2 Periods of war. This section sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each war period beginning with the Indian wars. Note that the...

  19. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  20. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  1. 38 CFR 3.2 - Periods of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Periods of war. 3.2..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.2 Periods of war. This section sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each war period beginning with the Indian wars. Note that the...

  2. 48 CFR 225.7402-4 - Law of war training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Law of war training. 225... States 225.7402-4 Law of war training. (a) Basic training. Basic law of war training is required for all...= en-US. (b) Advanced law of war training. (1) The types of personnel that must obtain advanced law...

  3. 48 CFR 225.7402-4 - Law of war training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Law of war training. 225... States 225.7402-4 Law of war training. (a) Basic training. Basic law of war training is required for all...=en-US. (b) Advanced law of war training. (1) The types of personnel that must obtain advanced law...

  4. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  5. 38 CFR 3.2 - Periods of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periods of war. 3.2..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.2 Periods of war. This section sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each war period beginning with the Indian wars. Note that the...

  6. 38 CFR 3.2 - Periods of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periods of war. 3.2..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.2 Periods of war. This section sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each war period beginning with the Indian wars. Note that the...

  7. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  8. 48 CFR 225.7402-4 - Law of war training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Law of war training. 225... States 225.7402-4 Law of war training. (a) Basic training. Basic law of war training is required for all...=en-US. (b) Advanced law of war training. (1) The types of personnel that must obtain advanced law...

  9. 46 CFR 308.107 - War risk hull insurance policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false War risk hull insurance policy. 308.107 Section 308.107 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.107 War risk hull insurance policy. Standard Form...

  10. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  11. Middle School Students, Science Textbooks, Television and Nuclear War Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary

    The extent to which the issue of nuclear war technology is treated in middle-school science texts, and how students learn about nuclear war and war technology were studied. Five raters compared the most widely used textbooks for grades 6 and 7 to determine the amount of content on: (1) population growth; (2) world hunger; (3) war technology; (4)

  12. The World War II Era and Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Stewart; Russell, William B., III

    2012-01-01

    International revulsion at the violation of human rights during World War II helped spark a global movement to define and protect individual human rights. Starting with the creation of war crimes tribunals after the war, this newfound awareness stimulated a concerted international effort to establish human rights for all, both in periods of war

  13. Teaching a Course on World War III: An Introductory Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Glenn

    1987-01-01

    Provides a description of an upper division college course on nuclear war. The course, which used an interdisciplinary approach and many resource speakers, was divided into three components: the consequences of World War III, the causes of World War III, and the prevention of World War III. Includes a detailed course outline along with required…

  14. Middle School Students, Science Textbooks, Television and Nuclear War Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary

    The extent to which the issue of nuclear war technology is treated in middle-school science texts, and how students learn about nuclear war and war technology were studied. Five raters compared the most widely used textbooks for grades 6 and 7 to determine the amount of content on: (1) population growth; (2) world hunger; (3) war technology; (4)…

  15. A REMF's View of Viet Nam War Literature Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willson, David A.

    An academic librarian who is a Vietnam War veteran was inspired by the exemplary collection of Vietnam War literature at the Colorado State University Library to begin his own personal collection of mass market paperbacks dealing with the Vietnam War. Although Vietnam War fiction was common on the mass market racks in the mid 1980s, it has been…

  16. Matricides in South Australia - a 20-year retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Wick, Regula; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Gilbert, John D; Byard, Roger W

    2008-04-01

    A 20-year retrospective review of files at Forensic Science SA, Adelaide, Australia was undertaken for cases of matricide occurring between the years 1985 and 2004. A total of 11 cases were identified: 10 males and 1 female. The victims were aged between 42 and 83 years (mean=61 years) and the perpetrators were aged between 15 and 53 years (mean=28.7 years). In all 11 cases weapons such as blunt objects (N=5), knives (N=5), firearms (N=3), or ligatures (N=1) were involved in the assaults, with injuries inflicted by the weapons causing death in 10 cases. In five cases trauma was caused by more than one injurious agent/action; e.g. there was evidence of immersion and burning in two cases. In four cases there were multiple (>10) significant injuries inflicted by perpetrators suffering from schizophrenia (N=2), 'mental impairment' (N=1) and a 'combination of psychiatric disorders' (N=1). One perpetrator committed suicide after killing his mother. Six of the ten surviving perpetrators were found not guilty of murder on the grounds of mental illness or impairment, and one perpetrator had the charge reduced from murder to manslaughter due to underlying mental conditions that included previous brain injury. Matricides are uncommon forms of homicide that have similar features in most communities studied. Intra-familial tensions with underlying psychiatric illness in the perpetrator are common findings. PMID:18313012

  17. The Portable War Room Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govers, Francis X., III; Fry, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The Portable War Room is an internal TASC project to research and develop a visualization and simulation environment to provide for decision makers the power to review the past, understand the present, and peer into the future.

  18. The anthropology of war and peace

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P.R.; Pitt, D.

    1989-01-01

    Drawing parallels between tribal behavior and international relations to demonstrate that societies are not inherently aggressive but are led into conflict when pride or in-group pressures push people to fight, this profound look at the chilling reality of cold war and its arsenal of nuclear destruction offers valuable new insights into how prejudices and stereotypes contribute to what may seem like an inexorable drift to war. Yet the authors conclude that war is not inevitable, as they offer suggestions for an end to the arms race in, the nuclear age. Based on original research, this is a long overdue contribution to the study of war and peace in our time and a text for newly emerging courses on the subject.

  19. Cold-War Echoes in American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Ira Jay

    1984-01-01

    The author believes a cold war ideology permeates our culture and poisons the minds of youth. The challenge to education is to awaken people to a historical and global perspective and raise public consciousness of the necessity for peace. (MD)

  20. Climatic and biological consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, H.D.

    1984-05-01

    Projecting comprehensively the climatic and biological consequences of nuclear war brings into question the perceived security ascribed to policies of deterrence, as well as the efficacy of civil preparedness measures, particularly relocation plans. It is presumed the probability that nuclear war will occur is low, but the potential consequences are so great that the issue must be given full attention. Nuclear war is the greatest environmental threat we face. Yet the problem should be solvable. It is especially important that environmentally concerned citizens and scientists apply their knowledge and understanding to the problem because many of the changes in environmental quality that concerns us today, such as air and water pollution by a host of organic and inorganic agents, represent the principle mechanism whereby life could be threatened in the aftermath of nuclear war. 29 references.

  1. War, terrorism and the public's health.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W

    2008-01-01

    War and terrorism, which are inseparable, cause death and disability, profound psychological damage, environmental destruction, disruption of the health infrastructure, refugee crises, and increased interpersonal, self-directed and collective violence. Weapons systems such as weapons of mass destruction and landmines have their own specific devastating effects. Preparation for war and preparedness for terrorism bring constraints on civil liberties and human rights, increase militarism, and divert resources from health care and from other needed services. War and terrorism may be best prevented through addressing their causes, which include limited resources, injustice, poverty and ethnic and religious enmity, and through strengthening the United Nations and the treaties controlling specific weapons systems, particularly weapons of mass destruction. In particular, the United States should cease its interference in the internal affairs of other nations and its advocacy of unilateral pre-emptive war. PMID:18771191

  2. The Mounting Prospects of Nuclear War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnaby, Frank

    1977-01-01

    Postulates that the probability of a nuclear world war is steadily increasing due to the aims race escalation, the spread of nuclear technology, the international trade in arms, and the failure of arms controls. (SL)

  3. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood vessels in the feet, is observed in shipwreck survivors or in soldiers whose feet have been wet, but not freezing, for long periods. Patients with frostbite frequently present with multisystem injuries (e.g., systemic hypothermia, blunt trauma, substance abuse). The freezing of the corneas has been reported to occur in individuals who keep their eyes open in high wind-chill situations without protective goggles (e.g., snowmobilers, cross-country skiers). PMID:15715518

  4. A Retrospective Case Series of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Placement at the Afghan National Police Hospital, Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Arzoiey, Humayoon Abdul; Shefa, Azizullah; Sultani, Salim; Mosafa, Mohammed Omar; Sadat, Safiullah; Zirkle, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    In Afghanistan, adequate and cost-effective medical care for even routine conditions is lacking; especially for complex injuries like long-bone fractures. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) intramedullary nail is used for treatment of long-bone fractures from blunt injuries and does not require imaging. We are reporting for the first time results of the SIGN intramedullary nail at the Afghan National Police Hospital, a tertiary care facility in Kabul. 71 records from the SIGN Online Surgical Database were reviewed for gender, age, date of injury, implant date, patient's home of record, and type/ mechanism of injury. Mean age was 26.7 years, all but one being male; time from injury to implant ranged 1 to 401 days, with mean of 40.6 days. Long-bone fractures from motor vehicle accidents remained constant, and war injuries peaked in summer. Follow-up is limited because of security and financial burdens of travel. However, personal communication with Afghan National Police Hospital surgeons suggests that patients included in the current study have not experienced any adverse outcomes. While it remains to be seen if the SIGN Online Surgical Database will facilitate more comprehensive outcome studies, our results provide support for the efficacy of SIGN nails in treating long-bone fractures from war injuries. PMID:26741473

  5. Health and the war. Changing schemes and health conditions during the Spanish civil war.

    PubMed

    Barona, Josep L; Perdiguero-Gil, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the health reforms during the republican Spain (1931-1939) and the crisis derived from the three-year of civil war. It considers how the war affected the health system and the impairment of health conditions of the population during the late 1930s, considering the changing conditions caused by the conflict. Some of the specific topics analysed are the changing healthcare system, the adaptation of health organization after the outbreak of the war, the impact of the war on the health of the population and epidemiological changes, the problem of the refugees and the clinical studies by experts, mainly on undernourishment. PMID:19230336

  6. Gulf War Illness: Challenges Persist

    PubMed Central

    Nettleman, Mary

    2015-01-01

    It has been more than 20 years since the United States and coalition forces entered Kuwait and Iraq. Actual combat was of remarkably short duration: less than 1 week of sustained ground activity and 6 weeks of air missions. Thus, it was surprising when approximately 200,000 returning US veterans were affected by a chronic multi-symptom illness that came to be known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). There were many challenges in investigating GWI, not least of which was that it took several years before the condition was officially taken seriously. There were multiple exposures to potentially causal agents on and off the battlefield, but these exposures were documented incompletely if at all, leaving epidemiologists to rely on self-report for information. In the past 2 years, significant controversy has arisen over the future directions of the field. Despite these challenges, several studies have implicated exposure to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as pyridostigmine bromide in the genesis of the condition. The story of GWI can inform research into other conditions and guide future work on veterans' health. PMID:26330683

  7. Just war theory in the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.D.; Griesbach, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear deterrence. Topics considered include the morality of war, the normative alternatives to war, national defense in the nuclear age, the environment of nuclear deterrence (empirical factors and moral judgments), morality and nuclear weaponry, the morality of nuclear deterrence and national defense in a changing strategic environment, alternatives to nuclear deterrence, and strengthening broadcasting capabilities into the USSR (e.g., Radio Liberty and Voice of America).

  8. War Peace Film Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John

    This filmography is a selective listing of 287 films dealing with the topics of war and peace for use with K-12 and college students and with adults. The annotated guide will be of use to anyone planning a world affairs program and of special value to those interested in the problem of war. A wide variety of subject areas are treated in the films.

  9. Retrospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Anthony

    1971-01-01

    A collection of essays on education printed in The New Era during the 1920-1930 era and written by: Beatrice Ensor, A. S. Neill, G. Bernard Shaw, Adolphe Ferriere, C. G. Jung, Martin Buber, Alfred Adler, Harold Rugg, Ovide Decroly, and Paul Langevin. (SE)

  10. Retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David A.

    Charting a course toward an uncertain future is always a risky business, especially among shoals of fiscal restraint or national tragedy, and the prudent navigator is well advised to remember where he's been as he looks ahead. The ocean and space sciences are poised for grand joint adventures, but shrinking budgets and the lingering Challenger numbness are restrictive lee shores that must be considered when laying plans. To sharpen the focus on future choices, it may be helpful to glance in the geophysical rearview mirror and remember some of the challenges and opportunities of a different era.A quarter century is a long time, but many images from 25 years ago can still be recalled in crisp detail, like photographs in a scrapbook. In 1961, results from the International Geophysical Year (IGY) filled the pages of the Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, and the U.S. program of space exploration finally was underway with conviction. The Indian Ocean Expedition, conceived during the IGY, ushered in a new era of international oceanography. The TIROS III satellite beamed to earth fuzzy pictures of tropical storms and revealed the intricate writhings of the Gulf Stream. Forecasters and fluid dynamicists suddenly saw new horizons, and geophysical turbulence became a major topic at the IUGG Symposium in Marseilles, France. Papers with prescient themes were presented at the AGU Ocean Section meeting: June Pattullo (then at Oregon State College, Corvallis) on heat storage in the Pacific; Ferris Webster (then at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.) on Gulf Stream meanders. Polar oceanography was well represented in AGU journals: Kenneth Hunkins (at what was then called the Lamont Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.) described the Alpha Rise, discovered from a drifting Arctic ice island, and Edward Thiel (then at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and his co-workers discussed open ocean tides, gravimetrically measured from Antarctic ice shelves.

  11. [Wars in the history of rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2007-01-01

    Some important discoveries in the history of rheumatology happened during war periods. It is well known that arthritis associated with conjunctivitis and urethritis, following dysenteric episodes, has been described during the First World War from the German Hans Reiter and, nearly contemporarily, from the French Nel Fiessinger and Edgar Leroy. Less known is instead the fact that the first cases of sympathetic algoneurodystrophy have been reported by the American Silas Weir Mitchell in soldiers wounded by fire-arms, during the Civil War of Secession. Other war episodes have been crucial for the development of some drugs now abundantly applied to the care of rheumatic diseases. The discovery of therapeutic effects of immunosuppressive agents, in fact, happened as an indirect consequence of the use of poison gas, already during the First World War (mustard gas), but above all after an episode in the port of Bari in 1943, where an American cargo boat was sunk. It had been loaded with a quantity of cylinders containing a nitrogenous mustard, whose diffusion in the environment provoked more than 80 deaths owing to bone marrow aplasia.Moreover, the history of the cortisone shows a strict link to the Second World War, when Germany imported large quantities of bovine adrenal glands from Argentina, with the purpose of producing some gland extracts for the Luftwaffe aviators, in order to increase their performance ability. PMID:18157291

  12. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey. PMID:474867

  13. Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Candole, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  14. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  15. Long-term clinical outcomes of war-related bilateral lower extremities amputations.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Moradi, Ali; Khorasani, Mohammad Reza; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-02-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 291 out of 500 veterans with war-related bilateral lower limb amputations from Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) accepted to participate in our study. Information related to amputees and amputated limbs were gathered and a Persian version of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) was filled. To evaluate the effect of amputation level on health related quality of life, we classified patients to seven types according to the functional remainder of major joints (ankles, knees, hips). 97% of patients were male and the average age at the time of injury was 20 years. The major cause of war injury was shells in 50. 54% of amputees were involved in sport activities. The most common amputation level was transtibial (48%).The major stump complaint was muscle spasm. History of being hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder was reported in 5.6%. The average SF-36 score in type 2 to type 6 were 68, 60, 60, 56, and 62, respectively. Except Energy/Fatigue domain, all the other domains were different from normal population. There was not any significant statistical correlation between amputation type and any domain of the SF-36. Type 6 amputees showed an increase in physical health domains compared with former types. PMID:25530410

  16. Wrestling injuries.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    The sport of wrestling has a history dating back to ancient times as one of the original Olympic sports. It particularly appeals to adolescents as equally matched opponents engage in competition. There can be no argument that participation in sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity, those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. This article will discuss wrestling injuries and recommend prevention strategies to keep athletes safe. PMID:18521035

  17. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Sun Eye Health News Consumer Alerts Preventing Eye Injuries Tweet Protecting your eyes from injury is ... as possible, even if the injury seems minor. Eye Injury Facts and Myths Men are more likely ...

  18. Injury rates and injury risk factors among federal bureau of investigation new agent trainees

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A one-year prospective examination of injury rates and injury risk factors was conducted in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) new agent training. Methods Injury incidents were obtained from medical records and injury compensation forms. Potential injury risk factors were acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire and existing data at the FBI Academy. Results A total of 426 men and 105 women participated in the project. Thirty-five percent of men and 42% of women experienced one or more injuries during training. The injury incidence rate was 2.5 and 3.2 injuries/1,000 person-days for men and women, respectively (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-1.7). The activities most commonly associated with injuries (% of total) were defensive tactics training (58%), physical fitness training (20%), physical fitness testing (5%), and firearms training (3%). Among the men, higher injury risk was associated with older age, slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the physical fitness test (PFT), lower self-rated physical activity, lower frequency of aerobic exercise, a prior upper or lower limb injury, and prior foot or knee pain that limited activity. Among the women higher injury risk was associated with slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the PFT, and prior back pain that limited activity. Conclusion The results of this investigation supported those of a previous retrospective investigation emphasizing that lower fitness and self-reported pain limiting activity were associated with higher injury risk among FBI new agents. PMID:22166096

  19. Immediate surgical management of combat-related injury to the external genitalia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Davendra M; Bowley, D M

    2013-03-01

    Patterns of survivable injury after combat injury have changed during recent years as wounding mechanisms have altered, ballistic protection has improved and the military chain of trauma care has evolved. Combat casualties now survive injuries that would have been fatal in previous wars and service personnel can be left with injuries that have significantly detrimental effects on their quality of life. Severe, destructive injuries to the external genitalia are rarely life-threatening, but can be profoundly life altering and the immediate management of these injuries deserves special scrutiny. The general principles of haemorrhage control, wound debridement, urinary diversion, and organ preservation should be observed. An up-to-date review of the management of these relative rare injuries is based on recent, albeit scanty literature and the experiences of managing casualties in the medical evacuation chain of the United Kingdom Defence Medical Services. The rationale behind the current emphasis on post-injury fertility preservation is also discussed. PMID:23631321

  20. Cross-border firing and injury patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nital; Hackla, Shafiq; Bhagat, Virendar; Singh, Satvir; Hussain, Farid; Gupta, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cross-border firing are increasingly being common in the modern era. The injuries resulting from these low intensity conflicts are a source of anxiety among treating physicians and their respective governments. The provisions are required to minimise the suffering of the victims viz. Mode of injuries, mortality patterns, adequacy of treatment at pre-hospital and tertiary care hospital and provisions to decrease morbidity and mortality for the people living in these areas. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in GMCH, Jammu who suffered injuries due to cross border firing in the month of October, 2014. 68 patients were reported in the causality wing. All the patients were referred from level 2 trauma centre. There were 51 males and 17 females out of which 5 were children. The cause of injury, involvement of organ system, cause of mortality and morbidity and loopholes in prehospital management were identified. Results: Sharpnel were the most common cause of injury followed by indirect trauma. The common cause of mortality was abdominal and thoracic injuries. There were 4 deaths at hospital 2 of which were brought dead and 2 died during the course of treatment. There were twenty patients with extremity injuries, fourteen with chest trauma, eleven with abdomen including parineal injuries, three with head injuries, eight with ENT injuries, three with eye injuries and nine with splinters in the back out of which two were in the spinal canal. Conclusion: Prehospital stabilisation, early transport, in-transit resuscitation, immediate surgery if required and implementation of triage model and ATLS protocol has been the key to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26957821

  1. Student attitudes toward the threat of nuclear war: Friends as influential reference persons

    SciTech Connect

    Marasch, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    A renewed interest in research into the psychology of the threat of nuclear war occurred in the past decade as national attention focused increasingly on the arms race between the US and the USSR. Some of this research began the task of exploring the social influences upon attitudes and responses to the nuclear threat. Research on friends as potential influences upon nuclear attitudes was minimal. The present study investigated the role of college friends as potential reference persons in the formation of nuclear attitudes. A battery of questionnaires addressing various nuclear war and non-nuclear war attitudes was completed by 200 student-friend dyads from introductory psychology and sociology courses at the University of North Dakota. Three hypotheses were presented in this study. One hypothesis was that students would perceive their friends as having similar attitudes toward the threat of nuclear war. A second hypothesis was that the actual attitudes between pairs of students and friends would be similar. The third hypothesis was that the attitudes would have become more similar over the course of the development of the friendship (as measured retrospectively). The first hypothesis was borne out by the data. The second and third hypotheses were not supported. There are several implications of the findings. One implication is that the nuclear issue may not be as salient to college students as other, more immediate, issues. Another implication is that a relative lack of communication between college students on political issues precludes more effective mutual influence upon the development and change of such attitudes. A false consensus bias appeared to be operative when the students perceived that their attitudes were similar. Further discussion is presented in regard to past and future psychological research upon nuclear war attitudes.

  2. Electrical injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest due to the electrical effect on the heart Muscle, nerve, and tissue destruction from a current passing through the body Thermal burns from contact ...

  3. Testicular Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Espaol Making a Change Your Personal Plan Hot ... > Testicular Injuries Print A A A Text Size ...

  4. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get worse. The best way to prevent inhalation injuries is to limit your exposure. If you smell or see smoke, or know that fires are nearby, you should leave the area if you are at greater risk from breathing smoke. Environmental Protection Agency

  5. Triage and Management of the Injured in World War I: The Diuturnity of Antoine De Page and a Belgian Colleague

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    A system of orderly triage of the injured in World War I and a protocol for early wound management of war injuries were introduced by Antoine De Page in 1914 at the beginning of World War I. The five steps of the De Page protocol (coined by the author as Ordre de Triage) were to be followed in detail by the French and Belgian armies. A younger Belgian colleague, Robert Danis, was recruited to aid in the management of the ambulance corps to transport the injured from dressing (clearing) stations to centers of more advanced care, away from the Franco-Belgian front. Danis, also from Brussels, introduced the principles of osteosynthesis of bone a little over a decade later. De Page and Danis, both surgeons, tendered immense carry-forwards for future generations. PMID:22110790

  6. Psychological Consequences of the World War II Prisoner of War Experience: Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engdahl, Brian E.

    The Former Prisoners of War Act (1981) mandated complete health examinations for all interested prisoners of war (POWs). This paper reports on examinations of more than two-thirds of the POWs in the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center catchment area under the established POW protocol and special psychiatric examinations. The…

  7. Dialectical Disorientation in Vietnam War Films: Subversion of the Mythology of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Karen; Downey, Sharon D.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the dynamics of "dialectical disorientation," a rhetorical form that creates ambiguity through confrontation between competitive but complementary orientations. Applies the form to the Vietnam War movies "The Deer Hunter,""Apocalypse Now,""Platoon," and "Full Metal Jacket." Observes that the films portray the war as destructive and

  8. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  9. War and Peace in Literature. Prose, Drama and Poetry Which Illuminate the Problem of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougall, Lucy, Comp.

    Literary works that will help teachers of humanities and conflict resolution courses lead their students to a better understanding of the problems of war and peace are summarized. The document is based on two premises: (1) literature that captures the experience and the meaning of war leads to an understanding of that phenomenon, and (2) the…

  10. War and Peace in Literature. Prose, Drama and Poetry Which Illuminate the Problem of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougall, Lucy, Comp.

    Literary works that will help teachers of humanities and conflict resolution courses lead their students to a better understanding of the problems of war and peace are summarized. The document is based on two premises: (1) literature that captures the experience and the meaning of war leads to an understanding of that phenomenon, and (2) the

  11. The War and Post-War Impact on the Educational System of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreso, Adila Pasalic

    2008-01-01

    Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), much like other eastern-European countries, has faced a brief period of transition from the socialist system to capitalism. However, this was interrupted in BiH by a brutal war lasting four years. Social systems and infrastructure were damaged or destroyed, including education, which was harnessed during the war to…

  12. Teaching about the Period between World War I and World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents a teaching guide to accompany a forthcoming Mobil Showcase television series, "Between the Wars." The series chronicles events between the end of World War I and the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. The guide contains background information, discussion questions, and activities for each of the 16 programs in the series. (Author/AV)

  13. Researching the Viet Nam War inside Viet Nam: U.S. Student Teachers Explore War Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadas, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The author asserts that it is time for social studies teachers to engage students in a review of the rift between historical reality and mythology about Viet Nam, especially in light of recent comparisons that many have made between the Viet Nam War and the current situation in Iraq. Few teachers dealt with Viet Nam at the time of the war, and

  14. War: The dynamics of vicious civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispolatov, I.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    1996-08-01

    The dynamics of ``vicious,'' continuously growing civilizations (domains), which engage in ``war'' whenever two domains meet, is investigated. In the war event, the smaller domain is annihilated, while the larger domain is reduced in size by a fraction ? of the casualties of the loser. Here ? quantifies the fairness of the war, with ?=1 corresponding to a fair war with equal casualties on both sides and ?=0 corresponding to a completely unfair war where the winner suffers no casualties. In the heterogeneous version of the model, evolution begins from a specified initial distribution of domains, while in the homogeneous system, there is a continuous and spatially uniform input of point domains, in addition to the growth and warfare. For the heterogeneous case, the rate equations are derived and solved and comparisons with numerical simulations are made. An exact solution is also derived for the case of equal-size domains in one dimension. The heterogeneous system is found to coarsen, with the typical cluster size growing linearly in time t and the number density of domains decreases as 1/t. For the homogeneous system, two different long-time behaviors arise as a function of ?. When 1/2wars), a steady state arises that is characterized by egalitarian competition between domains of comparable size. In the limiting case of ?=1, rate equations that simultaneously account for the distribution of domains and that of the intervening gaps are derived and solved. The steady state is characterized by domains whose age is typically much larger than their size. When 0<=?<1/2 (unfair wars), a few ``superpowers'' ultimately dominate. Simulations indicate that this coarsening process is characterized by power-law temporal behavior, with nonuniversal ?-dependent exponents. Some of these features are captured by a deterministic self-similar model, for which the characteristic exponents can be computed easily. The transition point ?=?c=1/2 is characterized by slower than power-law coarsening.

  15. Refining the focus of construction injury surveillance.

    PubMed

    Glazner, Judith; Lipscomb, Hester; Bondy, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    We conducted two studies of construction injury occurring at Denver International Airport (DL4), whose construction required 31 million work hours. Initially we conducted a retrospective cohort study that allowed estimation of injury and workers' compensation (WC) payment rates for strata such as size of employer and type of work; risk factors were also estimated. The second study examined written injury reports for 4,000 injuries at DIA. We modified Haddon's matrix to classify factors contributing to injury. We identified 108 factors within 4 broad categories: human, object, environment and organization. This approach provided information on rates at which each factor contributed to injury and the WC payment rates for each factor. A study shortcoming was that injury reports varied in completeness and quality. In a third ongoing study, to compensate for the shortcomings of injury reports, particularly to improve consistency and completeness of data, we designed a worker questionnaire completed immediately after injury, which included questions specific to hazards associated with each type of injury. Upon completion, the interviewer (a safety professional) uses the modified Haddon's matrix to note contributors to the injury and explain briefly the reasons for each notation. This requires the interviewer to consider a full set of possible factors and determine whether they contributed to injury. This process elicits richer data and places specific factors within the four higher-level categories. This process confer advantages on both contractors and researchers. Contractors can become immediately aware of contributing factors and ameliorate them quickly. The data can also be used in post hoc analysis of injury etiology. Moreover, the data are sufficiently flexible and complete that they can be coded into schemes describing sequences of events leading to injury, as well as those simply identifying factors contributing to injury. Haddon's matrix is invaluable in such analysis because it leads to a fuller understanding of the origins of the most proximate contributors to injury than would otherwise occur. Particularly for contractors and owners with significant safety infrastructures, this approach may be attractive, because it allows for more complete and quicker correction of specific hazards and, with systematic evaluation, recognition of more general safety concerns present on many construction sites. PMID:17017349

  16. Proportionality, just war theory and weapons innovation.

    PubMed

    Forge, John

    2009-03-01

    Just wars are supposed to be proportional responses to aggression: the costs of war must not greatly exceed the benefits. This proportionality principle raises a corresponding 'interpretation problem': what are the costs and benefits of war, how are they to be determined, and a 'measurement problem': how are costs and benefits to be balanced? And it raises a problem about scope: how far into the future do the states of affairs to be measured stretch? It is argued here that weapons innovation always introduces costs, and that these costs cannot be determined in advance of going to war. Three examples, the atomic bomb, the AK-47 and the ancient Greek catapult, are given as examples. It is therefore argued that the proportionality principle is inapplicable prospectively. Some replies to the argument are discussed and rejected. Some more general defences of the proportionality principle are considered and also rejected. Finally, the significance of the argument for Just War Theory as a whole is discussed. PMID:18802788

  17. Physics in WWI: Fighting the Acoustic War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevles, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    World War I was the first high-technology war, and when the United States began to prepare for it in 1915 the federal government turned to the storied inventor Thomas Edison. Edison formed a board that included industrial executives and engineers but only one physicist, its members holding that they wanted people who would do things and not just talk about them. However, in 1916, the nation's scientists managed to create a place for themselves in the preparedness effort by organizing the National Research Council under the National Academy of Sciences. Once the United States went to war, in April 1917, the NRC brought academic and industrial physicists together in efforts to detect incoming aircraft, submerged submarines, and the location of long-range artillery. The efforts employed devices that relied in the main on the detection and identification of sound waves from these weapons. The devices were passive responders, but they were marked by increasing sophistication and enabled the United States and its allies to prosecute an acoustic war. That branch of the war was militarily effective, overshadowed the work of Edison's group, and gained physicists high standing among leaders in both the military and industry.

  18. Mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katz, Douglas I; Cohen, Sara I; Alexander, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but accurate diagnosis and defining criteria for mild TBI and its clinical consequences have been problematic. Mild TBI causes transient neurophysiologic brain dysfunction, sometimes with structural axonal and neuronal damage. Biomarkers, such as newer imaging technologies and protein markers, are promising indicators of brain injury but are not ready for clinical use. Diagnosis relies on clinical criteria regarding depth and duration of impaired consciousness and amnesia. These criteria are particularly difficult to confirm at the least severe end of the mild TBI continuum, especially when relying on subjective, retrospective accounts. The postconcussive syndrome is a controversial concept because of varying criteria, inconsistent symptom clusters and the evidence that similar symptom profiles occur with other disorders, and even in a proportion of healthy individuals. The clinical consequences of mild TBI can be conceptualized as two multidimensional disorders: (1) a constellation of acute symptoms that might be termed early phase post-traumatic disorder (e.g., headache, dizziness, imbalance, fatigue, sleep disruption, impaired cognition), that typically resolve in days to weeks and are largely related to brain trauma and concomitant injuries; (2) a later set of symptoms, a late phase post-traumatic disorder, evolving out of the early phase in a minority of patients, with a more prolonged (months to years), sometimes worsening set of somatic, emotional, and cognitive symptoms. The later phase disorder is highly influenced by a variety of psychosocial factors and has little specificity for brain injury, although a history of multiple concussions seems to increase the risk of more severe and longer duration symptoms. Effective early phase management may prevent or limit the later phase disorder and should include education about symptoms and expectations for recovery, as well as recommendations for activity modifications. Later phase treatment should be informed by thoughtful differential diagnosis and the multiplicity of premorbid and comorbid conditions that may influence symptoms. Treatment should incorporate a hierarchical, sequential approach to symptom management, prioritizing problems with significant functional impact and effective, available interventions (e.g., headache, depression, anxiety, insomnia, vertigo). PMID:25702214

  19. Pediatric hand injuries due to home exercycles.

    PubMed

    Benson, L S; Waters, P M; Meier, S W; Visotsky, J L; Williams, C S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical presentation and management of 19 children who sustained injuries by stationary exercise bicycles were reviewed retrospectively. These injuries represented 32 traumatized digits with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The index and long fingers were most commonly involved. Wheel-spoke injuries typically produced repairable nerve and tendon lacerations, and full functional recovery in these cases was common. The chain/sprocket injury involved a crushing mechanism and frequently produced severe injury including amputations that were not salvageable. Stationary exercise bicycles represented a predictable source of severe hand injury in children between the ages of 18 months and 5 years. Adult supervision was not reliable in preventing contact between an operating exercycle and a child's hand. We recommend that children not be allowed access to any stationary exercycle machinery, whether it is in use or not. Safety design considerations should focus on not only shielding the wheel spokes, but also (and perhaps even more important) on enclosing the entire chain axis and gear interface. In addition to these design considerations, public education will be critical in reducing the incidence of injury. PMID:10641685

  20. Traumatic injury rates in meatpacking plant workers.

    PubMed

    Culp, Kennith; Brooks, Mary; Rupe, Kerri; Zwerling, Craig

    2008-01-01

    This was a 3-year retrospective cohort study of traumatic injuries in a midwestern pork meatpacking plant. Based on n = 5410 workers, this was a diverse workforce: Caucasian (56.6%), Hispanic (38.9%), African American (2.7%), Asian (1.1%) and Native American (0.8%). There were n = 1655 employees with traumatic injuries during this period. At 6 months of employment, the probability of injury was 33% in the harvest workers who were responsible for slaughter operations. The overall incidence injury rate was 22.76 per 100 full-time employees per year. Women experienced a higher incidence for injury than men. The risk ratio (RR) for traumatic injury was significantly lower in Hispanic workers compared to Caucasians (RR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.49-0.60) and nonsignificantly higher in African American and Native American workers after adjusting for age, gender, work section assignment, and experience (RR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.21-1.47). These findings suggest that either Hispanics are very safe employees or they underreport injuries. We make the case for the latter in the discussion. PMID:19042688

  1. [Patterns and causes of injuries in a contemporary combat environment].

    PubMed

    Lechner, R; Achatz, G; Hauer, T; Palm, H-G; Lieber, A; Willy, C

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological analyses of injury patterns and mechanisms help to identify the expertise military surgeons need in a combat setting and accordingly help to adjust infrastructure and training requirements. Therefore, a MEDLINE search (1949-2009), World Wide Web search (keywords "combat, casualties, war, military, wounded and neurosurgery") and an analysis of deaths among allied war casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq were performed. Up to 10th December 2009 there had been 4,688 allied military deaths in Iraq and 1,538 in Afghanistan. Of these 22% died in non-hostile action, 33% in direct combat situations and the majority of 45% in indirect combat actions. The leading causes of injury were explosive devices (70%) and gunshot wounds. Chest or abdominal injuries (40%) and traumatic brain injuries (35%) were the main causes of death for soldiers killed in action. The case fatality rate in Iraq is approximately half that of the Vietnam War, whereas the killed-in-action rate in Afghanistan (18.7%) is similar to the Vietnam War (20%); however, the amputation rate is twice as high in modern conflicts. Approximately 8-15% of the fatal injuries seem to be potentially survivable.Military surgeons must have an excellent expertise in a wide variety of surgical specialties. Life saving emergency care, especially in the fields of thoracic, visceral and vascular surgery as well as practical skills in the fields of neurosurgery and oral and maxillofacial surgery are required. Additionally, it is of vital importance to ensure the availability of sufficient tactical and strategic medical evacuation capabilities for the wounded. PMID:20101383

  2. Wars and Suicides in Israel, 1948–2006

    PubMed Central

    Oron (Ostre), Israel

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the characteristics of suicides which occurred during the existential and the non-existential wars in Israel. It provides a first approximation of whether the suicide patterns in each war are consistent with the findings of Morselli and Durkheim, and whether their theoretical interpretations can serve as a preliminary guideline to explaining the Israeli case, which is characterized by short periods of war, social integration during some of the non-existential wars, and a sharp rise in post-war male suicide rates following all of the existential wars. Implications for further studies on the subject in Israel and elsewhere are discussed. PMID:22754482

  3. [Surgical strategy for iatrogenic injuries of the spleen].

    PubMed

    Masliakov, V V; Barsukov, V G; Dmitriev, N V

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective investigation of 1226 case histories of patients operated on the stomach and duodenum was made. Organ-saving operations using laser technique were assessed. The main cause of injuries to the spleen during operation was traction of the stomach when mobilizing it. The performance of organ-saving operations for such injuries using laser technique is possible in 76% of cases. PMID:20552799

  4. Nuclear war: the facts on our survival

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.

    1981-01-01

    Unless we reject the premise that a nuclear war can be waged rationally and one side can emerge victorious, a nuclear war could happen. Goodwin describes what will happen during and after a nuclear exchange. He describes the effects of heat and blast, and the effects and treatment of radiation exposure, then outlines simple protective steps individuals can take to improve their margin of safety. He describes a variety of civil defense and individual shelters that can be built, but questions how many will go to the necessary trouble. Photographs of Hiroshima and nuclear test sites illustrate the text. Public policy should focus first on sustaining deterrence and preventing war, according to Goodwin. 36 references, 40 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  5. The Public Health Implications of Resource Wars

    PubMed Central

    Klare, Michael T.; Sidel, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    Competition for resources between or within nations is likely to become an increasingly common cause of armed conflict. Competition for petroleum is especially likely to trigger armed conflict because petroleum is a highly valuable resource whose supply is destined to contract. Wars fought over petroleum and other resources can create public health concerns by causing morbidity and mortality, damaging societal infrastructure, diverting resources, uprooting people, and violating human rights. Public health workers and the organizations with which they are affiliated can help prevent resource wars and minimize their consequences by (1) promoting renewable energy and conservation, (2) documenting the impact of past and potential future resource wars, (3) protecting the human rights of affected noncombatant civilian populations during armed conflict, and (4) developing and advocating for policies that promote peaceful dispute resolution. PMID:21778501

  6. War and deforestation in Sierra Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Robin; Miguel, Edward; Stanton, Charlotte

    2015-09-01

    The impact of armed conflict on the environment is of major public policy importance. We use a geographically disaggregated dataset of civil war violence together with satellite imagery of land cover to test whether war facilitated or prevented forest loss in Sierra Leone. The conflict data set allows us to establish where rebel groups were stationed and where battles and attacks occurred. The satellite data enables to us to monitor the change in forest cover (total, primary, and secondary) in all of Sierra Leone’s 151 chiefdoms, between 1990 (prior to the war) and 2000 (just prior to its end). The results suggest that conflict in Sierra Leone acted as a brake on local deforestation: conflict-ridden areas experienced significantly less forest loss relative to their more conflict-free counterparts.

  7. The public health implications of resource wars.

    PubMed

    Klare, Michael T; Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2011-09-01

    Competition for resources between or within nations is likely to become an increasingly common cause of armed conflict. Competition for petroleum is especially likely to trigger armed conflict because petroleum is a highly valuable resource whose supply is destined to contract. Wars fought over petroleum and other resources can create public health concerns by causing morbidity and mortality, damaging societal infrastructure, diverting resources, uprooting people, and violating human rights. Public health workers and the organizations with which they are affiliated can help prevent resource wars and minimize their consequences by (1) promoting renewable energy and conservation, (2) documenting the impact of past and potential future resource wars, (3) protecting the human rights of affected noncombatant civilian populations during armed conflict, and (4) developing and advocating for policies that promote peaceful dispute resolution. PMID:21778501

  8. Extravasation injuries.

    PubMed

    Gault, D T

    1993-03-01

    The leakage of cytotoxic drugs, intravenous nutrition, solutions of calcium, potassium, bicarbonate and even 10% dextrose outside the vein into which they are delivered is known not only to cause skin necrosis but also to precipitate significant scarring around tendons, nerves and joints. In this review of 96 patients with extravasation injuries seen between 1987 and 1992 at St Thomas' Hospital, Mount Vernon Hospital and The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, several patients required extensive reconstruction and in some, despite this, extravasation injury has rendered a limb virtually useless. Two techniques, liposuction and saline flushout, are described to remove extravasated material while conserving the overlying skin. Analysis of flushout material confirmed that the extravasated material was actually being removed. Forty four of the study group in whom noxious materials were known to have extravasated underwent such early treatment. The results in this group were quite striking--the majority (86%) healed without any soft tissue loss at all. The early referral and treatment of extravasation injuries is, therefore, recommended. PMID:8461914

  9. Impact of World War I on Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2015-01-01

    Mention chemistry and the Great "War to End all Wars" in the same sentence, and nearly everybody who ever had a history class will nod sorrowfully and say,"Yes, poison gases." True enough, and Fritz Haber, who led the development of them for the Central Powers, was the one German scientist whom Rutherford never forgave or spoke to again. Such substances (not all really gaseous, and something like 50 have been tried) were used by both sides from 1915 onward, killed about 90,000 people (about 1% of the total), maimed many more, and arguably loosened constraints on future uses of chemical weapons in other wars, prison camps, and terrorist actions. But the war was not determined by them and could have been fought without them. On the other hand, the sudden blockading of ports and termination of most international trade forced Germany (etc) to expand very quickly processes for fixing nitrogen for explosives and for fertilizers in lieu of Chilean guano (yes there is also a Haber process for that). They needed in addition to find domestic replacements for rubber (for tires, hoses, and gas masks) and liquid fuels for tanks and aircraft. The Allies, for their part, had been heavily dependent on German dyestuffs, optical-quality glass for binoculars, and phosphates (fertilizer again). Production facilities for derivatives of coal tars, cottonseed oil, etc. were of necessity scaled up rapidly. And once people have learned to do these things, there is no way to have them be forgotten. The same is, of course, true of the nuclear weapons of World War II and of whatever biological and/or cybernetic entities prove to be essential in the next war.

  10. Concomitant Vascular War Trauma Saturating a French Forward Surgical Team Deployed to Support the Victims of the Syrian War (2013). Interest of the Vascular Damage Control.

    PubMed

    Hornez, Emmanuel; Boddaert, Guillaume; Baudoin, Yoann; Daban, Jean Louis; Ollat, Didier; Ramiara, Patrice; Bonnet, Stphane

    2015-11-01

    Vascular injuries from war require an emergency treatment whose objective is to quickly obtain hemostasis and the restoration of arterial flow. In this context of heavy trauma and limited means, damage control surgery is recommended and is based on the use of temporary vascular shunts (TVSs). We report the management of the simultaneous arrival of 2 vascular injuries of war in a field hospital. Patient 1 presented a ballistic trauma of the elbow with a section of the humeral artery (Gustillo IIIC). A TVS was set up during the external fixation of the elbow. Final revascularization was carried out and aponevrotomies of the forearm were performed. Patient 2 had a riddled knee with an open fracture of the femur, an avulsion of the popliteal artery, and a hemorrhagic shock. A strategy of damage control surgery was carried out with placing an arterial and venous shunt. Aponevrotomies of the leg were carried out before casting. For the traumatisms of the arteries of the members, the use of shunts is reserved for the lesions of the proximal vessels. Many vascular shunts available have the same performances to restore the arterial flow and prevent secondary thrombosis. The time before the final revascularization depends on the clinical condition of the patient. The value of anticoagulation in these cases was not shown. PMID:26362619

  11. Neurologic running injuries.

    PubMed

    McKean, Kelly A

    2009-02-01

    Neurologic running injuries account for a small number of running injuries. This may be caused by misdiagnosis or underdiagnosis. Nerve injuries that have been reported in runners include injuries to the interdigital nerves and the tibial, peroneal, and sural nerves. In this article, the etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of these injuries are reviewed. Differences between nerve injury and more common musculoskeletal injury have been presented to aid in differential diagnosis. PMID:19084775

  12. Alcohol-Related Fracture Admissions: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, G; Thompson, NW

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In April 2011 the NI public health agency estimated that alcohol misuse generates overall annual healthcare costs of £122.2m. There is currently a paucity of data regarding the burden of alcohol-related fractures on the provinces Trauma and Orthopaedic service. Patients and Methods A retrospective review of 104 patients over a 12 month period was performed. Data collected using the Fractures Outcomes and Research Database included: age, gender, smoking status, weekly alcohol intake, mechanism of injury and subsequent treatment. Results Alcohol related fractures accounted for 6.1% of all acute fractures admissions in the 12 month period. 73% were male, with a bimodal age distribution. The majority of patients were classed as social drinkers; however a significant proportion (23.1%) were alcohol dependent. 62.5% of patients were smokers at the time of admission. 95% of patients suffered a single injury which was commonly secondary to a simple mechanical fall (53.8%). The majority of patients sustained lower limb injuries, with 30.8% of these being ankle fractures. Conclusion In conclusion, our study has identified that alcohol-related trauma creates a significant financial burden on the NHS. It is likely that the incidence of alcohol related fracture is higher than documented in this study. We advocate the assessment of patients using the AUDIT-C score to assess for at risk drinking behaviour in those presenting with an alcohol related fracture. PMID:26170483

  13. Injury rates and risk-factors associated with eventing: a total cohort study of injury events among adult Swedish eventing athletes.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Joakim; Timpka, Toomas; Ramel, Henrik; Valter, Lars

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine injury events and risk-factors among Swedish adult eventing athletes. A cross-sectional study design with retrospective recording of 1-year sports-specific exposure and injury data was used. The invited study population consisted of all members of the Swedish Equestrian Federation with eventing as their primary discipline (n = 513). The participation rate was 70.0%. The total 1-year injury prevalence was 26.6%; the specific 1-year prevalence of traumatic injury was 19.3% and of overuse injury 10.9%. The incidence of traumatic injury events was 0.54 injury events/1000 eventing hours (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35-0.73 injury events/1000 eventing hours) for novices and 0.35 injury events/1000 eventing hours for qualified riders (95% CI, 0.21-0.49 injury events/1000 eventing hours). A total of 27.9% of the traumatic injury events led to severe injuries (causing more than 3 weeks absence from riding). Attitude to risk-taking was the only factor predicting an athlete becoming injured (p = 0.023), and qualification level was the only risk factor for additional injuries among injured riders (p = 0.003). Our results suggest that injury prevention programs in eventing should also give attention to overuse injuries and that care should be taken when eventing athletes are licensed into higher qualification groups. PMID:21512929

  14. Alpine skiing injuries. A nine-year study.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, T M; Laliotis, A T

    1996-01-01

    Injury patterns in alpine skiing have changed over time as ski, boot, binding, and slope-grooming technologies have evolved. We retrospectively examined injury patterns in alpine skiers over a 9-year period at the Mammoth and June mountains (California) ski area. A total of 24,340 injuries were reported for the 9 seasons studied, and total lift tickets sold numbered 9,201,486. The overall injury rate was 2.6 injuries per 1,000 skier days and increased slowly over the period studied. The knee was the most frequently injured area at 35% of all injuries. Increasing trends (P < .05) were noted for the rates of lower extremity injuries (37%) and knee injuries (45%). A decreasing trend was noted for the rate of lacerations (31% decrease). Slight increases were noted in upper extremity and axial injury rates. Skiing injuries continue to be a worrisome recreational problem despite improvements in ski equipment and slope-grooming techniques. The increasing trend in lower extremity, particularly knee, injury rates highlights the need for continued skier education and equipment innovation. PMID:8732730

  15. [Physicians and the danger of nuclear war].

    PubMed

    Firket, H; Loute, J; de Salle, P

    2006-01-01

    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize winners, are active in some sixty different countries. Their action is based on the outlook that any nuclear war would cause not only millions of deaths, but also millions of severely injured or burnt victims for whom the medical profession, decimated as well, would be most helpless. They strive to obtain that governments, in agreement with treaties that almost all countries have signed, ascertain that nuclear weapons, which are internationally illegal, be globally abolished. The impact on political authorities would undoubtedly be reinforced if the number of physicians supporting the action of IPPNW was increased. PMID:17020232

  16. The environmental effects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1988-09-01

    Substantial environmental disruption will significantly add to the disastrous consequences caused by the direct thermal, blast, and radiological effects brought on by a major nuclear war. Local fallout could cover several percent of the Northern Hemisphere with potentially lethal doses. Smoke from post-nuclear fires could darken the skies and induce temperature decreases of tens of degrees in continental interiors. Stratospheric ozone could be significantly reduced due to nitric oxide injections and smoke-induced circulation changes. The environmental effects spread the consequences of a nuclear war to the world population, adding to the potentially large disruptive effects a further reason to avoid such a catastrophe. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Vannevar Bush and the war against disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, K.I.

    1995-12-31

    War against disease has been a major rationale for funding support for post-war science. The author cites statistics for significant increases in life expectancy in recent decades through improved science and technology. Special problems are addressed that health scientists face in policy and planning. Four general categories are presented in some detail: education and training, intellectual development, funding, and ethical and social issues. The delima faced by health management organizations, industry, insurance companies and government agencies due to funding limitations and rapidly escalating costs is examined.

  18. The environmental effects of nuclear war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCracken, Michael C.

    1988-12-01

    Substantial environmental disruption will significantly add to the disastrous consequences caused by the direct thermal, blast, and radiological effects brought on by a major nuclear war. Local fallout could cover several per cent of the Northern Hemisphere with potentially lethal doses. Smoke from post-nuclear fires could darken the skies and induce temperature decreases of tens of degrees in continental interiors. Stratospheric ozone could be significantly reduced due to nitric oxide injections and smoke-induced circulation changes. The environmental effects spread the consequences of a nuclear war to the world population, adding to the potentially large disruptive effects a further reason to avoid such a catastrophe.

  19. Retrospective analysis of wound characteristics and tetanus development in captive macaques.

    PubMed

    Springer, Danielle A; Phillippi-Falkenstein, Kathrine; Smith, Gary

    2009-03-01

    Traumatic wounds and access to outdoor enclosures containing soil contribute to development of tetanus in nonhuman primates. A retrospective, matched case-control study was conducted at a primate center to evaluate these factors by analysis of medical records of animals sustaining traumatic injuries during a 3-yr study period. Thirty-one macaques with traumatic injuries and a clinical diagnosis of tetanus were selected as cases, and 62 macaques with traumatic injuries and no diagnosis of tetanus were selected as controls. For an animal with injuries to the digits, the odds of developing tetanus were 9.6 times those of a similar animal without injuries to the digits (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.55, 95% CI = 1.56-58.59); with injuries to the tail, the odds of developing tetanus were 8.0 times those of a similar animal without injuries to the tail (OR = 7.95, 95% CI = 0.82-77.04); and with injuries in more than one location, the odds of developing tetanus were 8.5 times those for a similar animal with injuries in just one location (OR = 8.45, 95% CI = 1.01-70.46). A nonhuman primate with injuries to the leg was less likely to develop tetanus than a similar nonhuman primate without injuries to the leg (OR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.03-1.2). Results indicated that wound location is associated with development of tetanus infection in rhesus macaques. Identification of high-risk trauma cases will allow better allocation of wound management and tetanus prophylaxis in institutions, especially in those housing nonhuman primates outdoors. PMID:19368246

  20. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with Reintegration Problems: Differences by Veterans Affairs Healthcare User Status.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Nina A; Orazem, Robert J; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Gravely, Amy; Frazier, Patricia; Carlson, Kathleen F; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather

    2015-07-01

    We studied 1,292 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who participated in a clinical trial of expressive writing to estimate the prevalence of perceived reintegration difficulty and compare Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare users to nonusers in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. About half of participants perceived reintegration difficulty. VA users and nonusers differed in age and military background. Levels of mental and physical problems were higher in VA users. In multivariate analysis, military service variables and probable traumatic brain injury independently predicted VA use. Findings demonstrate the importance of research comparing VA users to nonusers to understand veteran healthcare needs. PMID:24913102