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1

Ward off?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earlier this month, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released its long-awaited report on Ward Valley in California's eastern Mojave Desert. The report probably did as little to settle the dispute over the scientific and technical safety issues related to the low-level radioactive waste site as it did to settle the debate over whether NAS panels are biased. The NAS committee found that groundwater contamination at the proposed site “appears to be highly unlikely,” but pointed out the shortcomings of several currently available data sets, explains Scott W. Tyler, a hydrologist at the Desert Research Institute at the University of Nevada, Reno, and a member the NRC's Ward panel. The panel determined that even if plutonium expected at the waste site reached the Colorado River at the same rate that it was disposed of, effects on river water quality would be “insignficant” relative to background radiation levels now in the river.

2

Dr. G. Ward Wilson 1 Mine ARD G. Ward Wilson  

E-print Network

With Acid Rock Drainage #12;Dr. G. Ward Wilson 2 Mine ARD #12;Dr. G. Ward Wilson 3 Mine ARD #12;Dr. G. Ward Drainage" ARD OR an older term is "Acid Mine Drainage" AMD #12;Dr. G. Ward Wilson 16 Mine ARD General ARD Example of Mine Waste Potential For Acid Rock Drainage Operation: Typical copper/zinc mine

Boisvert, Jeff

3

Bruce R. Ward Fisheries Scientist  

E-print Network

1 Bruce R. Ward Fisheries Scientist Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, 2204 Main Mall 4714 Cell Phone 604 556 WARD Fax 604 660 1849 Bruce.Ward@gems8.gov.bc.ca Bruce Ward is a Fisheries Section (the previous Fisheries Research and Development Section), at the Fisheries Centre on the campus

4

Christmas in the ward.  

PubMed

For most people Christmas is traditionally a home-centred celebration, but for many nurses Christmas Day is spent at work. How do those nurses combine family commitments and professional ones? Is working on Christmas Day a joy or a chore? The Lamp spoke to a number of nurses who are veterans of a Christmas in the ward to find out. PMID:9313522

5

Teaching a 'good' ward round.  

PubMed

Ward rounds are a vital part of hospital medicine and junior doctors play a key role in their delivery. Despite the importance of ward rounds to patient care and experience, we believe that junior doctors may lack the training and skills to carry them out most effectively. We designed a simulation-based training session focusing on ward round skills themed to key patient safety issues and have delivered the training to over 100 learners (medical students and foundation year one doctors). Few learners had any prior training in ward rounds. The session was highly valued by all participants and surveys completed both before and after the session showed statistically significant improvements in confidence in leading and documenting ward rounds. In addition, 94% of final year medical students and 93% of doctors felt such training should be included in the undergraduate curriculum. We believe there is a current gap in training around ward round skills and would strongly encourage simulation-based ward round training to be developed for undergraduates. Further sessions following qualification may then consolidate and develop ward round skills adapted to the level of the doctor. PMID:25824064

Powell, Natalie; Bruce, Christopher G; Redfern, Oliver

2015-04-01

6

Ward staffing. Finding your form.  

PubMed

Ward staffing is the largest single component of acute trusts' budgets and should attract the attention of senior managers. Many trusts have inflexible arrangements which do not take account of patient dependency and skill mix. Trusts should consider employing more part-time staff and introducing more flexible working for ward clerks. PMID:12449677

Hansed, Karen

2002-11-01

7

Ward identities for Hall transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive quantum field theory Ward identities based on linear area preserving and conformal transformations in 2+1 dimensions. The identities relate Hall viscosities, Hall conductivities and the angular momentum. They apply both for relativistic and non relativistic systems, at zero and at finite temperature. We consider systems with or without translation invariance, and introduce an external magnetic field and viscous drag terms. A special case of the identities yields the well known relation between the Hall conductivity and half the angular momentum density.

Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

2014-10-01

8

Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.  

PubMed

The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. PMID:23548577

Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

2013-07-01

9

SUSY Ward identities, Superamplitudes, and Counterterms  

E-print Network

Ward identities of SUSY and R-symmetry relate n-point amplitudes in supersymmetric theories. We review recent work in which theseWard identities are solved in N = 4 SYM and N = 8 supergravity. The solution, valid at both ...

Elvang, Henriette

10

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section 117.23 Indians...117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any...

2010-04-01

11

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARDJH. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARD-J-H. FLOOR, FOUNDATION AND FRAMING PLANS." OCTOBER 31, 1942. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

12

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward  

E-print Network

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward #12;In 1925. Labconco CorporationLabconco Corporation #12;Laboratory VentilationLaboratory Ventilation #12;Laboratory Ventilation ProductsLaboratory Ventilation Products #12;History of Fume HoodsHistory of Fume Hoods Thomas

Farritor, Shane

13

Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

O'Nell, Robert M.

2006-01-01

14

"Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

2014-01-01

15

Formal Transformations and WSL Martin Ward  

E-print Network

Formal Transformations and WSL Part Two Martin Ward STRL Senior Research Fellow Royal Society of Transformations #12;Types of Transformations A Syntactic Transformation changes the syntax of the program but preserves the exact sequence of operations carried out by the program. Many restructuring transformations

Singer, Jeremy

16

Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Philip S. Ward  

E-print Network

Chapter 1 Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Evolution Philip S. Ward 1.1 Introduction Since their origin features of evolutionary history. Species-level taxonomy has advanced more fitfully than ant phylogenetics and features of their biology are dis- cussed. The state of species-level taxonomy is eval- uated

Ward, Philip S.

17

Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

Chandler, Daniel Ross

18

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

19

Standardization of Bone Mineral Density at Femoral Neck, Trochanter and Ward’s Triangle  

Microsoft Academic Search

:   The International Committee for Standards in Bone Measurement (ICSBM) has published standardization formulas for total hip\\u000a bone mineral density (BMD). In many applications, however, BMD of hip subregions, such as femoral neck (FN), trochanter (TR),\\u000a and Ward’s triangle (WT), are commonly measured. This paper addresses whether the standardization formulas for total hip BMD\\u000a can be adequately used for hip

Y. Lu; T. Fuerst; S. Hui; H. K. Genant

2001-01-01

20

34 CFR 300.45 - Ward of the State.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ward of the State. 300.45 Section 300...Definitions Used in This Part § 300.45 Ward of the State. (a) General. Subject to paragraph (b) of this section, ward of the State means a child who, as...

2010-07-01

21

Incorporation of Linearized Sensitivities in the Ward Method of Equivalencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In system planning, engineers specify an area of interest within an interconnected power network. Utilities often use the Ward equivalent to reduce external areas to a minimal representation. However, the industry has reported poor results using Ward equivalents in approximate contingency analysis. This paper proposes a simple method of updating the Ward equivalent using linearized sensitivities. The technique is computationally

R. D. Shultz; R. A. Smith; R. A. Stevens

1983-01-01

22

Incorporation of Linearized Sensitivities in the Ward Method of Equivalencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In system planning, engineers specify an area of interest within an interconnected power network Utilities often use the Ward equivalent to reduce external areas to a minimal representation. However, the industry has reported poor results using Ward equivalents in approximate contingency analysis This paper proposes a simple method of updating the Ward equivalent using linearized sensitivities. The technique is computationally

R. D. Shultz; R. A. Smith; R. A. Stevens

1983-01-01

23

Lessons Learned Conducting User Studies in a Dialysis Ward  

E-print Network

Lessons Learned Conducting User Studies in a Dialysis Ward Abstract In this paper, we describe lessons learned while conducting user studies in a dialysis ward. We learned that we must be more aware ward to develop DIMA and lessons learned along the way. We begin with a description of the user study

Connelly, Kay

24

Artemas Ward House and Its Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, the General Artemas Ward House was the home of General Artemas Ward, who was the first commander-in-chief of the patriot forces in the American Revolution. His descendants lived in the property until 1909, and then it became a house museum until 1925. This digital collection from Harvard University gives the public access to over 6000 images of the house, furnishings, manuscripts, photographs, and related published sources. It's an amazing way to learn about this important historical figure and about the world of a prominent 19th century farm family. Visitors can use the subject index to look around for particular items of note, and they will find some excellent contemporary views of the home's interiors and grounds photographed in 2007. Additionally, visitors can view a number of papers that deal with various renovations performed on the house over the past century.

25

Barriers to nursing care in emergency wards  

PubMed Central

Background: Caring is the essence of nursing. Since care is influenced by cultural, economic, and social factors, various diverse barriers exist in the realization of care. The aim of the study was to clarify barriers to caring in emergency patients based on experiences of nurses and patients and their relatives. Materials and Methods: A qualitative design of content analysis was used to identify the barriers to caring in emergency patients. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 Iranian nurses working in a university hospital emergency ward and with seven patients. Participants were selected purposefully. Data were analyzed according to qualitative content analysis. Results: After the classification analyses and integration of codes, seven categories were acquired. Finally, following three themes were extracted: Identified barriers to nursing care in emergency wards – the nature of critical ward, performance weakness of nurses, and deficiency in clinical management. Conclusions: According to the results of this study fundamental and management education for nurses, empowerment of nurses, principle and scientific triage, effective supervision, nurses’ support, wage increase, and motivation in nurses are important to achieve the research purpose. PMID:23983745

Mahmoudi, Hosein; Mohmmadi, Eesa; Ebadi, Abbas

2013-01-01

26

Entanglement Entropy Flow and the Ward Identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive differential equations for the flow of entanglement entropy as a function of the metric and the couplings of the theory. The variation of the universal part of entanglement entropy under a local Weyl transformation is related to the variation under a local change in the couplings. We show that this relation is, in fact, equivalent to the trace Ward identity. As a concrete application of our formalism, we express the entanglement entropy for massive free fields as a two-point function of the energy-momentum tensor.

Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Smolkin, Michael

2014-12-01

27

Entanglement entropy flow and the Ward identity.  

PubMed

We derive differential equations for the flow of entanglement entropy as a function of the metric and the couplings of the theory. The variation of the universal part of entanglement entropy under a local Weyl transformation is related to the variation under a local change in the couplings. We show that this relation is, in fact, equivalent to the trace Ward identity. As a concrete application of our formalism, we express the entanglement entropy for massive free fields as a two-point function of the energy-momentum tensor. PMID:25615303

Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Smolkin, Michael

2014-12-31

28

The role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety.  

PubMed

In this article the role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety is explored. The background to the development of the patient safety agenda is briefly discussed and the relationship between quality and safety is illustrated. The pivotal importance of the role of the ward manager in delivering services to patients is underlined and literature on patient safety is examined to identify what a ward manager can do to make care safer. Possible actions of the ward manager to improve safety discussed in the literature are structured around the Leadership Framework. This framework identifies seven domains for the leadership of service delivery. Ward managers use their personal qualities, and network and work within teams, while managing performance and facilitating innovation, change and measurement for improvement. The challenge of promoting patient safety for ward managers is briefly explored and recommendations for further research are made. PMID:23123893

Pinnock, David

29

Harrisburg’s Old 8th Ward  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A great deal of ink has been spilled telling the stories of the urban renewal process in the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. Of course, large-scale demolition and redevelopment projects were not without precedent, as proven by the experience of Harrisburg’s 8th Ward in the second decade of the twentieth century. The area was definitely a bit of hardscrabble by the early 1910s, and it seemed to offend the more genteel sentiments of some of Harrisburg’s important civic leaders and their kind. Much of the area was completely razed over the next few years, and by the early 1920s, the old neighborhood was largely gone. This story is told most effectively in this website, which was a creation of Professor Michael Barton at Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg along with some of his students, who worked together to locate primary research materials (such as photographs) that could be used to create a documentary history of the area. Visitors to the site can take a virtual walking tour of the old 8th Ward, peruse a resident directory from the period, and also view historic maps and a view of the area. For those who are interested in learning about how the site was created, there is also a document available here that discusses how it all came to fruition.

Barton, Michael

30

2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4. ON LEFT IS BUILDING NO. 9952-B, FOLLOWED BY THE B (NORTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9953-9958. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

31

1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4 ON WEST SIDE OF COMPLEX. CAMERA IS POINTED NORTHWEST. IN RIGHT FOREGROUND IN BUILDING NO. 9930-A, FOLLOWED BY THE A (SOUTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9931-9937. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

32

Mobile Task Management for Medical Ward Rounds -The MEDo Approach  

E-print Network

and paper, and their later processing is prone to errors. Furthermore, medical sta must keep trackMobile Task Management for Medical Ward Rounds - The MEDo Approach Rüdiger Pryss, David Langer. In the course of a ward round, new tasks are dened and allocated to physicians and nurses. In clinical practice

Ulm, Universität

33

Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity.  

SciTech Connect

The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

Chang, L.; Liu, Y.-X.; Roberts, C. D.; Shi, Y.-M.; Sun, W.-M.; Zong, H.-S.; Physics; Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics; Peking Univ.; National Lab. of Heavy Ion Accelerator; Univ. of New South Wales; Nanjing Univ.; Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology

2009-03-01

34

Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity  

SciTech Connect

The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

Chang Lei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Liu Yuxin [Department of Physics and the State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Roberts, Craig D. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Shi Yuanmei [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2009-03-15

35

Surface mass balance of the Ward Hunt Ice Rise and Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada  

E-print Network

Surface mass balance of the Ward Hunt Ice Rise and Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, located on Ellesmere Island, Canada, are two of the northernmost land ice masses on the North American, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D22110, doi:10.1029/2004JD004560. 1. Introduction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

36

Ward Identity Implies Recursion Relation at Tree and Loop Level  

E-print Network

In this article, we use Ward identity to calculate tree and one loop level off shell amplitudes in pure Yang-Mills theory with a pair of external lines complexified. We explicitly prove Ward identity at tree and one loop level using Feynman rules, and then give recursion relations for the off shell amplitudes. We find that the cancellation details in the proof of Ward identity simplifies our derivation of the recursion relations. Then we calculate three and four point one loop off shell amplitudes as examples of our method.

Yun Zhang; Gang Chen

2013-02-09

37

Environmentalism in American Pedagogy: The Legacy of Lester Ward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review is presented of the legacy of Lester Frank Ward, widely recognized as the architect of environmentalism in American pedagogy and the creator of some of the most fundamental ideas about American curriculum. (CB)

Tanner, Laurel N.; Tanner, Daniel

1987-01-01

38

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

39

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

40

Aspirin May Help Ward Off Gastro Cancers, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Aspirin May Help Ward Off Gastro Cancers, Study Finds ... Relievers SUNDAY, April 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin regularly over several years may help prevent gastrointestinal ...

41

Elevation of north facades of #156158 (triple wards) National ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Elevation of north facades of #156-158 (triple wards) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

42

Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

2011-01-01

43

Strongly Lacunary Ward Continuity in 2-Normed Spaces  

PubMed Central

A function f defined on a subset E of a 2-normed space X is strongly lacunary ward continuous if it preserves strongly lacunary quasi-Cauchy sequences of points in E; that is, (f(xk)) is a strongly lacunary quasi-Cauchy sequence whenever (xk) is strongly lacunary quasi-Cauchy. In this paper, not only strongly lacunary ward continuity, but also some other kinds of continuities are investigated in 2-normed spaces. PMID:25050397

Çakalli, Hüseyin; Ersan, Sibel

2014-01-01

44

Exploring the experiences of young people nursed on adult wards.  

PubMed

This paper reports on a study of experiences of young people aged 14 to 18 years who were nursed on acute adult hospital wards in NHS hospitals in England. In spite of British government guidelines, young people from 14 years of age continue to be admitted to adult wards in the UK. Although much has been written about the transition of the young person to adult services, there is little research about the experiences of young people who are nursed on adult wards. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of eight young people who had been nursed on adult wards between 2004 and 2010. Data were collected in 2010. In-depth interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework ( Colaizzi, 1978 ). Themes explored included expectations of what the experience may be like, young people's first impressions of the ward environment, the feelings of the young person while in hospital, the attitudes of people towards them including, both staff and other patients, and future admissions and how they would cope with readmissions. Better provision needs to be made for young people including appropriately trained staff, adolescent-friendly environments and areas in adult wards that are dedicated to adolescents. PMID:25723268

Dean, Linda; Black, Sharon

2015-02-26

45

The Ventilation, Heating and Lighting of Hospital Wards  

PubMed Central

History of ventilation in last 100 years, showing reversal of ideas and influence of sanatorium idea. Physiology of cool moving air. How it affects metabolism, heat-loss and heat-production. Relation to sunlight. Reactive capacity of the individual. Practice of these teachings, as illustrated by sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis and by open-air schools. Exposure to cooling air a powerful therapeutic agent. Infrequent occurrence in sanatoria of diseases or complications often ascribed to cold. Dilution of infection. Applicability to diseases other than tuberculosis. Shock and old age. Perflation and diffusion, their relative values. Uniformity or variability of effect desirable? Incompatibility of good ventilation and ordinary standards of heating. Former the more important. Conclusion that ward temperatures may be lowered without harm. Measures necessary to compensate, clothing, classification of patients, small wards. Changing standards of comfort. Psychological effects. Systems of ventilation in hospital wards. Mechanical by propulsion or extraction being displaced by natural system, usually by cross-window ventilation. Supplementary ventilators. Objection to heating of incoming air. Fallibility of human factor in management. Sash versus casement windows. Hoppers. Austral window. Orientation and exposure of wards. Ventilation of small wards. Proportion of window space to solid wall. Balconies. Floor space. Heating of wards. Heating of air or floor or walls. Open fires. Value of radiant heat. Steam or water under low or high pressure. Radiators or pipes. Lighting. Avoidance of glare from windows. Arrangement of beds in wards. Colour of walls. Blinds and curtains. Artificial lighting. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:19989481

Watt, James

1933-01-01

46

Hospital admission avoidance through the introduction of a virtual ward.  

PubMed

The ageing British population is placing increased demands on the delivery of care in mainstream health-care institutions. While people are living longer, a significant percentage is also living with one or more long-term conditions. These issues, alongside continuing financial austerity measures, require a radical improvement in the care of patients away from hospitals. The Wyre Forest Clinical Commissioning Group introduced a virtual ward model for two main purposes: to save on spiralling costs of hospital admissions, and, secondly, to ensure the preferred wishes of most patients to be cared for and even die at home were achieved. This commentary describes how the virtual ward model was implemented and the impact of preventing unplanned emergency admissions to hospitals. The setting up of enhanced care services and virtual wards in one county is discussed, aiming to highlight success points and potential pitfalls to avoid. The results from the implementation of the virtual ward model show a significant reduction in emergency and avoidable patient admissions to hospital. The success of virtual wards is dependent on integrated working between different health-care disciplines. PMID:25039341

Jones, Joanne; Carroll, Andrea

2014-07-01

47

Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs in two UK oncology wards  

PubMed Central

Aims: To investigate the potential exposure to cytotoxic drugs of staff on two oncology wards in a large district, UK hospital under normal working conditions. Methods: Cytotoxic drug exposure was monitored in urine samples, surface wipes, and on disposable gloves by using a number of commonly used marker drugs, namely cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, methotrexate, and the platino coordinated drugs. Questionnaire data on their work practices, potential exposure, use of protective personal equipment, and relevant training were collected from nursing, domestic, and clerical staff on two oncology wards. Results: The majority of staff were female with a mean age of 31 years. Roughly half of the staff studied were specifically trained nurses with an average of 3.5 years experience of administering cytotoxic drugs. No cytotoxic drug preparation or reconstitution was carried out on the wards. Disposable gloves, plastic armlets and aprons, but not eye protection, were invariably worn where there was potential exposure to cytotoxics. No cytotoxic drug was detected in any of the staff's urine samples. Isolated disposable latex gloves from nurses administering drugs showed some contamination, as did some surfaces within the wards' sluice rooms, but not in the ward areas where the drugs were stored and checked prior to administration. Conclusions: The risk management strategies in place, including use of personal protective equipment, staff training, and other organisational measures, have ensured that internal exposure is lower than the detection limits for the current biological monitoring methods. Levels of contamination appear significantly lower than earlier, non-UK published studies where different risk management strategies were in place and, in particular, ward staff may have been involved in some degree of cytotoxic drug reconstitution. PMID:12205233

Ziegler, E; Mason, H; Baxter, P

2002-01-01

48

14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

49

Power Systems Engineering Research Center Dennis Ray Ward Jewell  

E-print Network

Power Systems Engineering Research Center Dennis Ray Ward Jewell Executive Director, Power Systems-Learjet Fellow Madison, WI 53706-1691 Director, Power Quality Laboratory djray@engr.wisc.edu Wichita State an overview of the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC), a National Science Foundation Industry

50

18. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North Dart Street, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

51

7. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South Coweta Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

52

3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between North Coweta Avenue and Dewey Avenue. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

53

5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and Dewey Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

54

16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

55

12. View of south side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. View of south side of East Ward Street west of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

56

19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

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1. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of north side of East Ward Street west of North Coweta Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

58

15. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

59

13. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. View of south side of East Ward Street east of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

60

6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South Coweta Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

61

14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

62

10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey Avenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

63

17. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North McDonald Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

64

11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey AVenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

65

2. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North Coweta Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

66

8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South Coweta Avenue and Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

67

20. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

68

4. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. View of north side of East Ward Street west of Dewey Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

69

21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South McDonald Avenue and Fales Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

70

JOURNAL OF CONFLICT RESOLUTIONShin, Ward / POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY Lost in Space  

E-print Network

capabilities of the United States and its European allies were brought to light during the war in Kosovo growth in geographic regions such as Europe (e.g., Avramides 1997), the Middle East (e.g., Ward and Cohen performance to global levels. We contend that a geographic perspective that acknowledges the importance

71

Upgrading the Ward Beecher Planetarium for the 21st Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on recent progress and future public outreach plans in light of a significant upgrade of the Ward Beecher Planetarium at Youngstown State University. Over a period of 40 years, the facility has been a first-rate 150 seat planetarium and introductory astronomy classroom, and in its history has seen over 50 000 undergraduate students and over 750 000 visits

P. R. Durrell; W. Young; R. Pirko; S. L. Shanks; J. Neiheisel; M. E. Dean; R. Kotel; S. Schaefer; R. Morlan; A. Wilson; J. J. Feldmeier

2005-01-01

72

TILTING SATURN. I. ANALYTIC MODEL William R. Ward  

E-print Network

TILTING SATURN. I. ANALYTIC MODEL William R. Ward Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research@astro.umd.edu Receivved 2003 December 30; accepted 2004 July 15 ABSTRACT The tilt of Saturn's spin axis to its orbit plane to gravitational perturbations of Saturn by the planet Neptune. A similarity between the precession period

Hamilton, Douglas P.

73

Counselling problem drinkers in medical wards: a controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven hundred and thirty one men admitted to medical wards were interviewed to identify problem drinkers who had not received previous treatment for alcoholism and who had some social support. One hundred and sixty one met the diagnostic criteria; 156 agreed to a follow up interview and were allocated to one of two groups. One group received a session of

J Chick; G Lloyd; E Crombie

1985-01-01

74

Ward identities, two photon decays and off-shell corrections  

SciTech Connect

Off-shell corrections are considered in the low energy theorems for ..pi../sup 0/, eta, eta' and iota ..-->.. 2..gamma.. decays to solve the anomalous Ward identities. The iota ..-->.. 2..gamma.. prove to be sensitive to both SU(3) breaking and off-shell corrections.

Bagchi, B.; Debnath, S.

1988-03-01

75

How many species of prokaryotes are there? Bess B. Ward*  

E-print Network

Commentary How many species of prokaryotes are there? Bess B. Ward* Geosciences Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 The microorganisms classified in the two prokaryotic domains of prokaryotes. Less than 30 years ago, the answer to the even more fundamental question ``How many individuals

Ward, Bess

76

Informed Switching Strongly Decreases the Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Hospital Wards  

E-print Network

Informed Switching Strongly Decreases the Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Hospital Wards, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract Antibiotic resistant nosocomial infections are an important cause of antibiotic resistance in the hospital ward. We assume that information on resistance frequencies stems from

Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

77

78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...9788-2; CERCLA-04-2013-3754] Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County...entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh...Submit your comments by Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the...

2013-03-06

78

75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EPA-RO4-SFUND-2010-1053, FRL-9243-2] Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County...past response costs concerning the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh...SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the...

2010-12-27

79

Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

2009-01-01

80

42 CFR 70.7 - Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. 70.7 Section 70.7 Public...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. A parent, guardian, physician...transportation for any minor child or ward, patient or other such person who is in the...

2010-10-01

81

Youth Health Coordinating Council Ward 8 Secret Health Clinic Shopper Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are over 70,000 residents in Ward 8, the poorest area of Washington, DC and along with Ward 7, it's most geographically remote. Approximately 36% of the Ward 8 population consists of children and youth, 18 years or younger. Children in the District of Columbia are at greater risk for poorer health and life outcomes than children in other…

Behrens, Donna

2010-01-01

82

Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n????=0, n2?0, where ??? is the physical gravition field and n? is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n? dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a "pincer" Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All aixal-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

Capper, D. M.; Leibbrandt, George

1982-02-01

83

Slavnov-Taylor and ward identities in the electroweak theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of the electroweak theory, we discuss a class of gauge-fixing choices suitable for calculating electromagnetic processes. In particular, we show that with our choices, in addition to the basic Slavnov-Taylor identities guaranteeing that physical results are independent of the choice of the gauge fixing, we also have the standard Ward identities in quantum electrodynamics, which play a well-known crucial role in calculating electromagnetic processes and, specifically, in analyzing the electromagnetic radiative corrections.

Becchi, C.

2015-01-01

84

Ward Morgan Photography, Southwest Michigan 1939-1980  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ward Morgan spent decades documenting life in and around Kalamazoo, Michigan. He went into interiors of women's shoe stores, took photos of students in classrooms, and photographed folks gathering for a society meeting. Most of his work took place in the middle decades of the 20th century, and these everyday photos eventually found their way to Western Michigan University. Visitors can browse these 500 photos randomly or look through the list of available topics, which include Advertising, Religious, Education, and Business Scenes.

85

Boxer blurring the lines in Ward Valley debate  

SciTech Connect

This article concerns the controversy over the siting of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level nuclear waste depository in California. The author contends that certain politicians and environmental groups have misrepresented the facts in their opposition to the site. In particular, an accusation about withholding information about the amount of Pu-239 to be stored at the site is false, since that information is available in the public record. Other misrepresentations are presented and discussed.

Newman, P.

1994-04-05

86

Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee  

E-print Network

Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

Walter, Frederick M.

87

Controlling working time in the ward and on the line  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to assess whether tele-nursing in Scotland (NHS24), when compared with traditional face-to-face nursing, facilitates greater employee control over working time and therefore a potentially better work-life balance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The article draws on evidence from two independent research projects; a survey of 64 ward nurses and midwives, which involved face-to-face interviews; and

Sarah Wise; Chris Smith; Raffaella Valsecchi; Frank Mueller; Jonathan Gabe

2007-01-01

88

Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model  

Microsoft Academic Search

How many beds must be allocated to a specific clinical ward to meet production targets? When budgets get tight, what are the\\u000a effects of downsizing a nursing unit? These questions are often discussed by medical professionals, hospital consultants,\\u000a and managers. In these discussions the occupancy rate is of great importance and often used as an input parameter. Most hospitals\\u000a use

A. M. de Bruin; René Bekker; L. van Zanten; G. M. Koole

2010-01-01

89

Linearized self-consistent GW approach satisfying the Ward identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a linearized self-consistent GW approach satisfying the Ward identity. The vertex function derived from the Ward-Takahashi identity in the limit of q =0 and ? -?'=0 is included in the self-energy and the polarization function as a consequence of the linearization of the quasiparticle equation. Due to the energy dependence of the self-energy, the Hamiltonian is a non-Hermitian operator and quasiparticle states are nonorthonormal and linearly dependent. However, the linearized quasiparticle states recover orthonormality and fulfill the completeness condition. This approach is very efficient, and the resulting quasiparticle energies are greatly improved compared to the nonlinearized self-consistent GW approach, although its computational cost is not much increased. We show the results for atoms and dimers of Li and Na compared with other approaches. We also propose convenient ways to calculate the Luttinger-Ward functional ? based on a plasmon-pole model and calculate the total energy for the ground state. As a result, we conclude that the linearization improves overall behaviors in the self-consistent GW approach.

Kuwahara, Riichi; Ohno, Kaoru

2014-09-01

90

Surgical ward rounds in England: a trainee-led multi-centre study of current practice  

PubMed Central

Background Recent guidance advocates daily consultant-led ward rounds, conducted in the morning with the presence of senior nursing staff and minimising patients on outlying wards. These recommendations aim to improve patient management through timely investigations, treatment and discharge. This study sought to evaluate the current surgical ward round practices in England. Methods Information regarding timing and staffing levels of surgical ward rounds was collected prospectively over a one-week period. The location of each patient was also documented. Two surgical trainee research collaboratives coordinated data collection from 19 hospitals and 13 surgical subspecialties. Results Data from 471 ward rounds involving 5622 patient encounters was obtained. 367 (77.9%) ward rounds commenced before 9am. Of 422 weekday rounds, 190 (45%) were consultant-led compared with 33 of the 49 (67%) weekend rounds. 2474 (44%) patients were seen with a nurse present. 1518 patients (27%) were classified as outliers, with 361 ward rounds (67%) reporting at least one outlying patient. Conclusion Recommendations for daily consultant-led multi disciplinary ward rounds are poorly implemented in surgical practice, and patients continue to be managed on outlying wards. Although strategies may be employed to improve nursing attendance on ward rounds, substantial changes to workforce planning would be required to deliver daily consultant-led care. An increasing political focus on patient outcomes at weekends may prompt changes in these areas. PMID:24581228

2014-01-01

91

Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains  

SciTech Connect

Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

Costa, L. C. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André (Brazil)] [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André (Brazil); Ferraz, A. [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, International Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59012-970 Natal (Brazil)] [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, International Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59012-970 Natal (Brazil); Mastropietro, Vieri [Dipartimento di Matematica F. Enriques, Universitá di Milano, Via C. Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Matematica F. Enriques, Universitá di Milano, Via C. Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2013-12-15

92

Compactified Twistor Fibration and Topology of Ward Unitons  

E-print Network

We use the compactified twistor correspondence for the (2+1)-dimensional integrable chiral model to prove a conjecture of Ward. In particular, we construct the correspondence space of a compactified twistor fibration and use it to prove that the second Chern numbers of the holomorphic vector bundles, corresponding to the uniton solutions of the integrable chiral model, equal the third homotopy classes of the restricted extended solutions of the unitons. Therefore we deduce that the total energy of a time-dependent uniton is proportional to the second Chern number.

Plansangkate, Prim

2015-01-01

93

360° Tool assessing ability of specialist registrar to lead ward rounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionWard rounds offer a wide range of training opportunities. The common criticism is that ward rounds are now business oriented and the teaching element of ward rounds has been squeezed out due to service pressures. Assessment drives learning, hence by developing an assessment tool structured feedback and reflection is facilitated.ResultsKey attributes (in descending order of importance)Average rating (1- not important,

I Lakshminarayana; D Wall

2011-01-01

94

The type, level, and distribution of microorganisms within the ward environment: a zonal analysis of an intensive care unit and a gastrointestinal surgical ward.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE.?To investigate the distribution of hospital pathogens within general and critical care ward environments and to determine the most significant bacterial reservoirs within each ward type. DESIGN.?Prospective 4-month microbiological survey. SETTING.?The intensive care unit (ICU) and gastrointestinal (GI) surgical ward of a London teaching hospital. PATIENTS.?Sampling was conducted in and around the bed space of 166 different patients (99 in the ICU and 67 in the GI ward). METHODS.?Conventional agar contact methodology was used to sample 123 predetermined sites twice a week for 17 weeks. Sixty-one surfaces were located within the ICU, and 62 were located within the GI ward. Each surface was located within a theoretical zone of increasing distance from the patient. Aerobic colony counts were determined, and confirmatory testing was conducted on all presumptive pathogens. RESULTS.?Regardless of ward type, surfaces located closest to the patient, specifically those associated with the bed (side rails, bed control, and call button), were the most heavily contaminated. Elsewhere, the type of surfaces contaminated differed with ward type. In the ICU, bacteria were most likely to be on surfaces that were regularly touched by healthcare workers (e.g., telephones and computer keyboards). In the GI ward, where the patients were mobile, the highest numbers of bacteria (including potential nosocomial pathogens) were on surfaces that were mainly touched by patients, particularly their toilet and shower facilities. CONCLUSIONS.?In terms of cleaning, a hospital should not be considered a single entity. Different ward types should be treated as separate environments, and cleaning protocols should be adjusted accordingly. PMID:23571367

Moore, Ginny; Muzslay, Monika; Wilson, A Peter R

2013-05-01

95

Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

2014-06-01

96

Upgrading the Ward Beecher Planetarium for the 21st Century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on recent progress and future public outreach plans in light of a significant upgrade of the Ward Beecher Planetarium at Youngstown State University. Over a period of 40 years, the facility has been a first-rate 150 seat planetarium and introductory astronomy classroom, and in its history has seen over 50 000 undergraduate students and over 750 000 visits from people in the surrounding area and beyond. Through a recent generous donation from the Ward Beecher Foundation, we have added the SciDome full-dome visualization system, and soon will be replacing our Spitz A3P planetarium star projector. These upgrades, in addition to new digital video projectors and a complete overhaul of our roof-top observatory, are being done in order to further enhance both the education of YSU students and our ability to continue numerous public outreach programs, including full-dome digital planetarium shows, public observing, shows for both elementary and high school students, and home-schooling programs.

Durrell, P. R.; Young, W.; Pirko, R.; Shanks, S. L.; Neiheisel, J.; Dean, M. E.; Kotel, R.; Schaefer, S.; Morlan, R.; Wilson, A.; Feldmeier, J. J.

2005-12-01

97

[Is drug use in maternity wards baby-friendly enough?].  

PubMed

Quality assurance in the care of breast-feeding women and their nursing infants also applies to drugs administered during delivery and puerperium. Large variations among hospitals may indicate that drug use is irrational. A survey comparing the extent of drug sales from the hospital pharmacy to maternity wards in eight Norwegian hospitals was performed in 1992 and the results were compared with data from 1988. The purpose was to examine whether the drug use was "baby-friendly" with regard to the following criteria; proven efficacy for the indication; no effect on milk ejection, milk production and interaction with infant; minimal transfer of drug to milk. Large variations were found among hospitals in the case of some oxytocic drugs. High use of oxytocin as nasal spray and metylergometrine as tablets may indicate unnecessary use of drugs. A large decrease (89%) in the use of hypnotics was found from 1988 to 1992, which may indicate previous irrational use of these drugs. Pethidine as pain relief during delivery remained stable during this period, and was received by 40-60% of women giving birth. None of the drugs given to the mothers was assessed to represent a risk to the breast-fed infant. In general, drug use in maternity wards had decreased during the last four years and, with some exceptions, appeared to be more baby-friendly. PMID:7491609

Handal, M; Matheson, I

1995-11-20

98

Impact of Moving Objects on Contaminant Concentration Distributions in an Inpatient Ward with  

E-print Network

Moving objects can disturb stratified flow and contaminant concentration gradient in an inpatient ward1 Impact of Moving Objects on Contaminant Concentration Distributions in an Inpatient Ward's bed, and the swinging of the entrance door for up to four seconds, on the contaminant concentration

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

99

The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines.  

PubMed

Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. PMID:13687726

BATE, J G

1961-01-01

100

The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed.

J. G. Bate

1961-01-01

101

Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

2013-01-01

102

Creating Readers: Vonda Ward--Broward County Library, Fort Lauderdale, FL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article details the work of Vonda Ward--a middle-school teacher turned librarian. When Vonda Ward was a middle-school teacher, she could not get her students to share her excitement about history because they could not read its stories. That is when she realized how much subject mastery depended on the basics. Broward County Library's leaders…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

103

The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines  

PubMed Central

Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. Images PMID:13687726

Bate, J. G.

1961-01-01

104

Application of the Weka Machine Learning Library to Hospital Ward Occupancy Problems  

E-print Network

, reduce errors in treatment, and increase a patient's satisfaction with his/her visit to the hospital and rapidly changing ward conditions. Because of this, hospitals tend to be reactive when dealing with ward, we discuss the process of cleaning and preparing the data for mining, and the state of the data after

Denzinger, Jörg

105

WARD: an exploratory study of an affective sociotechnical framework for addressing medical errors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aiming to reduce medical errors by 50% by 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has identified information technology (IT) as an important tool. One potential application of IT would be communicating with clinicians using affective multimodal interfaces. In this paper, we propose an Augmented Cognition (AugCog) related framework, Wearable Avatar Risk Display (WARD), for addressing medical errors. WARD is a

William Lee; Woodrow W. Winchester III; Tonya L. Smith-jackson

2006-01-01

106

Ward Morgan Photography, Southwest Michigan 1939-1980  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ward Morgan spent almost fifty years of his life chronicling the people, places, and activities he knew best around southwestern Michigan in the 20th century. He documented industry rise and fall, weddings galore, company Christmas parties, and the streetscapes of Kalamazoo. This digital collection of almost 1,000 images is culled from a 27,000 item negative collection given to the Western Michigan University Libraries. On the homepage, visitors can use a scrollbar to move through a nice sampling of the collection, including a night scene in Kalamazoo and several industrial machine shops. Visitors can look at the Recent Additions area as well, and if interested, they can sign up to receive the RSS feed offered here. Finally, the site also has some Suggested Topics for casual browsing including residential scenes and people working.

Morgan, Ward

107

The critical Ising model via Kac-Ward matrices  

E-print Network

The Kac-Ward formula allows to compute the Ising partition function on any finite graph G from the determinant of 2^{2g} matrices, where g is the genus of a surface in which G embeds. We show that in the case of isoradially embedded graphs with critical weights, these determinants have quite remarkable properties. First of all, they satisfy some generalized Kramers-Wannier duality: there is an explicit equality relating the determinants associated to a graph and to its dual graph. Also, they are proportional to the determinants of the discrete critical Laplacians on the graph G, exactly when the genus g is zero or one. Finally, they share several formal properties with the Ray-Singer \\bar\\partial-torsions of the Riemann surface in which G embeds.

David Cimasoni

2012-08-08

108

Prevention of measles spread on a paediatric ward.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Since measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant airborne transmission risk in hospitals, effective prevention measures are crucial. After a mother accompanying her child on a paediatric ward lacking a negative pressure room was diagnosed with measles, exposed persons without evidence of immunity (documentary evidence of receiving two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine) were treated with vaccination or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The interruption of transmission with these treatments was evaluated. There were 44 children and 101 adults exposed to the index patient. Twenty-five children and 88 adults were considered immune, providing evidence of immunity. Nineteen children and 13 adults were either given vaccination or IVIG for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). There were no additional cases of measles after 3 weeks follow-up. We conclude that measles is highly preventable by adequate PEP with vaccination or IVIG in a healthcare setting that lacks the benefit of a negative pressure room. PMID:24877882

Tapisiz, A; Polat, M; Kara, S S; Tezer, H; Simsek, H; Aktas, F

2015-03-01

109

Room for improvement: noise on a maternity ward.  

PubMed

BackgroundFor mothers who have just given birth, the postpartum hospital stay is meant to promote an environment where resting, healing and bonding can take place. New mothers, however, face many interruptions throughout the day including multiple visitors and noise caused by medical equipment, corridor conversations and intercom announcements. This paper argues that disruptions and noise on a maternity ward are detrimental to the healing process for new mothers and their newborns and healthcare decision-makers need to act to improve the environment for these patients. This paper also provides recommendations on how to reduce the noise levels, or at least control the noise on a maternity ward, through the implementation of a daily quiet time.DiscussionHospital disruptions and its negative health effects in particular for new mothers and their children are illustrated in this paper. Hospital noise and interruptions act as a stressor for both new mothers and staff, and can lead to sleep deprivation and detrimental cardiovascular health effects. Sleep deprivation is associated with a number of negative mental and physical health consequences such as decreased immune function, vascular dysfunction and increased sympathetic cardiovascular modulation. Sleep deprivation can also increase the risk of postpartum mental health disorders in new mothers. Some efforts have been made to reduce the disruptions experienced by these patients within a hospital setting. For example, the introduction of a daily quiet time is one way of controlling noise levels and interruptions, however, these have mostly been implemented in intensive care units.SummaryNoise and disruptions are a significant problem during postpartum hospital stay. Healthcare institutions are responsible for patient-centered care; a quiet time intervention promises to contribute to a safe, healing environment in hospitals. PMID:25432130

Adatia, Safina; Law, Susan; Haggerty, Jeannie

2014-11-29

110

Variability in Costs across Hospital Wards. A Study of Chinese Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Introduction Analysts estimating the costs or cost-effectiveness of health interventions requiring hospitalization often cut corners because they lack data and the costs of undertaking full step-down costing studies are high. They sometimes use the costs taken from a single hospital, sometimes use simple rules of thumb for allocating total hospital costs between general inpatient care and the outpatient department, and sometimes use the average cost of an inpatient bed-day instead of a ward-specific cost. Purpose In this paper we explore for the first time the extent and the causes of variation in ward-specific costs across hospitals, using data from China. We then use the resulting model to show how ward-specific costs for hospitals outside the data set could be estimated using information on the determinants identified in the paper. Methodology Ward-specific costs estimated using step-down costing methods from 41 hospitals in 12 provinces of China were used. We used seemingly unrelated regressions to identify the determinants of variability in the ratio of the costs of specific wards to that of the outpatient department, and explain how this can be used to generate ward-specific unit costs. Findings Ward-specific unit costs varied considerably across hospitals, ranging from 1 to 24 times the unit cost in the outpatient department — average unit costs are not a good proxy for costs at specialty wards in general. The most important sources of variability were the number of staff and the level of capacity utilization. Practice Implications More careful hospital costing studies are clearly needed. In the meantime, we have shown that in China it is possible to estimate ward-specific unit costs taking into account key determinants of variability in costs across wards. This might well be a better alternative than using simple rules of thumb or using estimates from a single study. PMID:24874566

Adam, Taghreed; Evans, David B.; Ying, Bian; Murray, Christopher J. L.

2014-01-01

111

PUBLICATIONS [1] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, NASEC-  

E-print Network

PUBLICATIONS [1] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, NASEC­400. [4] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, SIAM J. Appl. Math

Jellinek, Mark

112

Ward identities for charge and heat currents of particle-particle and particle-hole pairs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ward identities for the charge and heat currents are derived for particle-particle and particle-hole pairs. They are the exact constraints on the current-vertex functions imposed by conservation laws and should be satisfied by consistent theories. While the Ward identity for the charge current of electrons is well established, that for the heat current is not understood correctly. Thus the correct interpretation is presented. On this firm basis the Ward identities for pairs are discussed. As the application of the identity we criticize some inconsistent results in the studies of the superconducting fluctuation transport and the transport anomaly in the normal state of high-Tc superconductors.

Narikiyo, Osamu

2014-07-01

113

Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.  

PubMed

This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of 11 interrelated concepts emerged from an analysis of the data, and a synthesis of the main themes. This paper focuses on the results and recommendations that emerged from the quantitative and qualitative patient data. A further paper will focus on nurses' perceptions of the same topics. PMID:16965473

Alexander, J

2006-10-01

114

Ward identities and gauge independence in general chiral gauge theories  

E-print Network

Using the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, we study the Ward identities and the equations of gauge dependence in potentially anomalous general gauge theories, renormalizable or not. A crucial new term, absent in manifestly nonanomalous theories, is responsible for interesting effects. We prove that gauge invariance always implies gauge independence, which in turn ensures perturbative unitarity. Precisely, we consider potentially anomalous theories that are actually free of gauge anomalies thanks to the Adler-Bardeen theorem. We show that when we make a canonical transformation on the tree-level action, it is always possible to re-renormalize the divergences and re-fine-tune the finite local counterterms, so that the renormalized $\\Gamma $ functional of the transformed theory is also free of gauge anomalies, and is related to the renormalized $\\Gamma $ functional of the starting theory by a canonical transformation. An unexpected consequence of our results is that the beta functions of the couplings may depend on the gauge-fixing parameters, although the physical quantities remain gauge independent. We discuss nontrivial checks of high-order calculations based on gauge independence and determine how powerful they are.

Damiano Anselmi

2015-01-29

115

Food work and feeding assistance on hospital wards.  

PubMed

Approximately 60 per cent of UK patients aged 65 years or older are at risk of malnutrition or their situation worsening while in hospital. We report the results of a qualitative study embedded in research to prevent malnutrition in older people in hospital (the mappmal study). Our aim was to understand and describe processes that promote or inhibit nutrition in hospital. Throughout 2009 we examined meal services at four UK hospital sites across two regional locations, focusing on older patients admitted with dementia, for stroke or for fractured neck of femur. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with National Health Service staff (n = 54), stakeholders (n = 6), and a focus group with former patients and carers (n = 5). We identified ward-based food work as a technical and interpersonal challenge in narratives around malnutrition. Food work constituted two overlapping spheres of activity: interpersonal engagement through feeding assistance and reassurance and the arrangement of resources that facilitate meals such as the preparation of food trolleys. Our analysis is framed by the literature on emotional labour, dirty work and the professionalisation of nursing. We demonstrate how food work is overlooked by being conceptualised as common sense and as one of the most mundane and elementary tasks in hospitals. PMID:23009613

Heaven, Ben; Bamford, Claire; May, Carl; Moynihan, Paula

2013-05-01

116

[Electronic data processing in ward management--possibilities for rationalization and cost control].  

PubMed

Electronic data processing in ward management increases cost and time efficiency. Nurses and doctors will have more time to concentrate their genuine rather than administrative duties. Therefore the presented model has gained high acceptance. PMID:9574273

Klein, P; Göhl, J; Tischler, K; Hohenberger, W

1997-01-01

117

View of compartment C110, senior officers ward room from port ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of compartment C-110, senior officers ward room from port to starboard, showing wooden furnishings, deck stanchions and the olympia's piano. (084) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

118

The Fermionic Observable in the Ising Model and the Inverse Kac-Ward Operator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that the critical Kac-Ward operator on isoradial graphs acts in a certain sense as the operator of s-holomorphicity, and we identify the fermionic observable for the spin Ising model as the inverse of this operator. This result is partially a consequence of a more general observation that the inverse Kac-Ward operator for any planar graph is given by what we call a fermionic generating function. Furthermore, using bounds for the spectral radius and operator norm of the Kac-Ward transition matrix, we provide a general picture of the non-backtracking walk representation of the critical and supercritical inverse Kac-Ward operators on isoradial graphs.

Lis, Marcin

2014-10-01

119

Folic Acid May Help Ward Off Stroke in People with High Blood Pressure  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folic Acid May Help Ward Off Stroke in People With ... Monday, March 16, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Folic Acid High Blood Pressure Stroke SUNDAY, March 15, 2015 ( ...

120

Plant Science Bulletin 55(2) 2009 The Biology of Deserts. Ward, David. 2008. ISBN-  

E-print Network

usuallythinkofdesertorotherterrestrialecosystems as closed systems, but Ward cautions us that in coastal deserts, especially west coasts, such as terrestrial invertebrates feeding on marine algae or terrestrial mammals feeding on marine mammal carcasses

Gorelick, Root

121

The Loreto basin formed by rapid west-ward tilting and asymmetric subsidence with-  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT The Loreto basin formed by rapid west- ward tilting and asymmetric subsidence with that are capped by transgres- sive marine shell concentrations and flooding surfaces.The sequence 2­3 boundary

Dorsey, Becky

122

Ward Solutions, Ltd Page 1 of 12 EICT Architecture 2009-2013  

E-print Network

Ward Solutions, Ltd Page 1 of 12 EICT Architecture 2009-2013 UCD EICT Architecture 2009 ­ 2013 Architecture 2009-2013 Table of Contents 1 Introduction ..............................................................................................................3 2 Approach to Architecture Development 2009 - 2013 ...........................................4

123

Survey of unlicensed and off label drug use in paediatric wards in European countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjective: To determine the extent of use of unlicensed and off label drugs in children in hospital in five European countries.Design: Prospective study of drugs administered to children in general paediatric medical wards over four weeks.Setting: Children's wards in five hospitals (one each in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands).Subjects: Children aged 4 days to 16 years

Sharon Conroy; Imti Choonara; Piero Impicciatore; Angelika Mohn; Henrik Arnell; Anders Rane; Carmen Knoeppel; Hannsjoerg Seyberth; Chiara Pandolfini; Maria Pia Raffaelli; Francesca Rocchi; Maurizio Bonati; Geertt Jong; Matthijs de Hoog; John van den Anker

2000-01-01

124

Optimization of bathroom ventilation design for an ISO Class 5 clean ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ventilation is a main method to control the contaminant dispersion within clean wards. In this paper, we investigated the\\u000a effects of various ventilation designs of the bathroom in an ISO Class 5 clean ward. Specifically, the contaminant dispersion\\u000a and particle concentrations corresponding to three different ventilation design schemes were characterized and compared using\\u000a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. For each

Caiqing Yang; Xudong Yang; Tengfang Xu; Luchun Sun; Wei Gong

2009-01-01

125

Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. Purpose To provide insights into students’ experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. Methods A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. Results The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students’ anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. Conclusion On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students’ support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians. PMID:25278789

Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

2014-01-01

126

User Interface Design for PDAs: Lessons and Experience with the WARD-IN-HAND Prototype  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the process and outcomes of the evaluation of a user interface prototype running on a Personal Digital\\u000a Assistant (PDA). The prototype was developed in the context of the IST-funded project WARD-INHAND and implements a PDA version\\u000a of a ward information system. The evaluation, carried out by the IS4ALL project, was based on a usage scenario comprising\\u000a mock-ups

Panagiotis Karampelas; Demosthenes Akoumianakis; Constantine Stephanidis

2002-01-01

127

The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Design Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Setting Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Participants Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Intervention Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Main outcome measure Median survival time of a chocolate. Results 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R2=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). Conclusions From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors. Further practical studies are needed. PMID:24333986

2013-01-01

128

The role of the ward manager in creating a conducive clinical learning environment for nursing students.  

PubMed

Ward sisters/managers are without doubt the professional gate keepers of the ward environment yet there are activities in that environment for which they do not seem to take full responsibility, namely that of the clinical learning of nursing students. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the ward manager in creating a conducive clinical learning environment for nursing students. An explorative descriptive research method was employed. Findings reveal that the ward managers are generally satisfied with the way in which they handle the important role they play in facilitating teaching and learning for nursing students. They feel strongly, however, that the nursing students themselves need to be active in the learning process. While acknowledging the efforts of the ward managers in creating and maintaining the learning environment, nursing students were dissatisfied about several aspects that appeared to be lacking in the clinical environment, such as good interpersonal relations, support, exposure to practice administrative skills (for example, problem-solving and decision-making) and lack of feedback about their performance. There appears to be a need to develop more effective support structures within the learning environment so that nursing students can obtain sufficient exposure to learning opportunities. PMID:11040628

Bezuidenhout, M C; Koch, S; Netshandama, V O

1999-09-01

129

Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.  

PubMed

This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

2014-05-01

130

Wireless technology in the evolution of patient monitoring on general hospital wards.  

PubMed

The evolution of patient monitoring on general hospital wards is discussed. Patients on general wards are monitored according to the severity of their conditions, which can be subjective at best. A report by the Commission for Healthcare Audit and Inspection in 2008 indicated dissatisfaction with patient monitoring. Commitment to providing quality health service by healthcare organizations encourages the implementation of other mechanisms for patient care. Remote patient monitoring (RPM), by supplementing the role of nurses, can improve efficiency and patient care on general wards. Developments in technology made it possible for wireless sensors to measure and transmit physiological data from patients to a control room for monitoring and recording. Two approaches in the application of wireless ZigBee sensor networks are discussed and their performances compared in a simulation environment. The role of RPM in early detection of deteriorating patients' conditions, reducing morbidity and mortality rates are also discussed. PMID:19929237

Sahandi, R; Noroozi, S; Roushan, G; Heaslip, V; Liu, Y

2010-01-01

131

Incidence and management of infections in patients with acute leukemia following chemotherapy in general wards  

PubMed Central

We hypothesise that treating patients with acute leukaemia in general wards, with proper hygienic and sanitary practices, would result in the minimum utilisation of resources as compared with the corresponding patients receiving ICU support. For this study, the acute leukaemia patients on induction chemotherapy were kept in general wards and observed for the incidence of neutropenia, resultant neutropenic febriles, the causative organism, and the effect of empirical antimicrobial treatment protocol on the outcome of such infections. Prophylactic anti-fungal therapy and cotrimoxazole therapy improved the outcome of infections. The therapy of neutropenic fever and infections must be adapted according to the risk factors and should include early empiric antifungal therapy. It was observed that the treatment of such patients in general wards could be managed effectively, with the added advantage of optimum utilisation of resources and in a patient-friendly environment, at a reasonable cost to the patients. PMID:23634180

Biswal, Sasmita; Godnaik, Chaitali

2013-01-01

132

Perceived noise in surgical wards and an intensive care area: an objective analysis.  

PubMed Central

An investigation of noise levels in a hospital ward, a cubicle off the ward, and an intensive therapy unit (ITU) showed that the noise levels in all three areas were higher than internationally recommended levels at all times of day. Loud noises above 70 dB(A) were common in all areas but especially the ITU. The noise pollution levels reached annoying values during the day in the ward and cubicle and during both the day and the night in the ITU. Equipment and conversations among the staff were the main causes of noise in the ITU. These noisy environments are unlikely to help patients recover. Although measures designed to eliminate noisy surfaces will help, making staff aware of the noise they create and the effects it has may be much more effective in reducing noise pollution. PMID:589305

Bentley, S; Murphy, F; Dudley, H

1977-01-01

133

The ethics of space, design and color in an oncology ward.  

PubMed

Change affects all areas of healthcare organizations and none more so than each aspect of the oncology ward, beginning with the patient's room. It is there that the issues faced by the major players in healing environments - administrator, caregiver, family member, and, most importantly, the patient - come sharply into focus. Hospitals are building new facilities or renovating old ones in order to adapt to new environmental demands of patient care and security. Driven by ethical and professional responsibility, the oncological team headed by Professor Hellmut Samonigg of Graz Medical University Graz pursued a vision of designing a model oncology ward unique in Europe. Friedensreich Hundertwasser, the world-famous artist, was the creative force behind the design. The oncology ward became a place of healing, permeated with a colorful sense of life and harmonious holistic care. The successful outcome was confirmed by the extraordinarily positive feedback by patients, families, and healthcare staff. PMID:22883931

Andritsch, Elisabeth; Stöger, Herbert; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Andritsch, Hans; Kasparek, Anne-Katrin; Schaberl-Moser, Renate; Ploner, Ferdinand; Samonigg, Hellmut

2013-06-01

134

‘Safety by DEFAULT’: introduction and impact of a paediatric ward round checklist  

PubMed Central

Introduction Poor communication is a source of risk. This can be particularly significant in areas of high clinical acuity such as intensive care. Ward rounds are points where large amounts of information must be communicated in a time-limited environment with many competing interests. This has the potential to reduce effective communication and risk patient safety. Checklists have been used in many industries to improve communication and mitigate risk. We describe the introduction of a ward round safety checklist ‘DEFAULT’ on a paediatric intensive care unit. Methods A non-blinded, pre- and post-intervention observational study was undertaken in a 12-bedded Level 3 tertiary PICU between July 2009 and December 2011. Results Ward round stakeholders subjectively liked the checklist and felt it improved communication. Introduction of the ward round checklist was associated with an increase in median days between accidental extubations from 14 (range 2 to 86) to 150 (56 to 365) (Mann–Whitney P <0.0001). The ward round checklist was also associated with an increase in the proportion of invasively ventilated patients with target tidal volumes of <8 ml/kg, which increased from 35 of 71 patients at 08.00 representing a proportion of 0.49 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.60) to 23 of 38 (0.61, 0.45 to 0.74). This represented a trend towards an increased proportion of cases in the target range (z = 1.68, P = 0.09). Conclusions The introduction of a ward round safety checklist was associated with improved communication and patient safety. PMID:24479381

2013-01-01

135

Phase Transition Free Regions in the Ising Model via the Kac-Ward Operator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide an upper bound on the spectral radius of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for a general planar graph. Combined with the Kac-Ward formula for the partition function of the planar Ising model, this allows us to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e., it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

Lis, Marcin

2014-11-01

136

Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology (1995)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The full text of the 1995 book Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology can be viewed online at the National Academies Press Website. The book contains information on the geology, hydrogeology, and ecology of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal site in the Mojave Desert. The format is Open Book, a "browsable, nonproprietary, fully and deeply searchable version of the publication." The National Academies Press notes that it is not intended to replace printed books.

137

Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.  

PubMed

Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. PMID:25457434

Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

2014-12-01

138

Inscribing Memories on Dead Bodies: Sex, Gender, and State Power in the Julie Ward Death in Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines speculations on the circumstances surrounding the 1988 murder of the 28-year-old British tourist Julie Ward in Kenya, with a particular focus on how circulating discourses in Kenyan and British social imaginaries shaped these speculations. The article suggests that Ward's death took place in a discursive landscape marked by deeply layered and intermeshed contours of British and Kenyan

Grace Musila

2008-01-01

139

Evaluation of risk factor management of patients treated on an internal nephrology ward: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate treatment quality for the risk factors of hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia as well as the overall treatment quality for patients on an internal nephrology ward. This evaluation included the collection of data concerning the quality of therapeutic drug monitoring, drug use and potential drug-drug interactions. Establishing such baseline information highlights

Gunar Stemer; Sonja Zehetmayer; Rosa Lemmens-Gruber

2009-01-01

140

As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

Schmidt, Peter

2009-01-01

141

Scalable Web server cluster design with workload-aware request distribution strategy WARD  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a Web cluster in which the content-aware distribution is performed by each of the nodes in a Web cluster. Each server in the cluster may forward a request to another node based on the requested content. We propose a new workload-aware request distribution strategy WARD, that assigns a small set of most frequent files, called core, to be

Ludmila Cherkasova; Magnus Karlsson

2001-01-01

142

Unlicensed and off label drug use in paediatric wards: prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjective: To determine the extent of use in children in hospital of drugs that are not specifically licensed for use in children (unlicensed) and of drugs that are used outside the terms of their product licence that apply to indication, age, dose, or route of administration (off label).Design: Prospective study of drugs administered on paediatric medical and surgical wards for

Sean Turner; Alexandra Longworth; Anthony J Nunn; Imti Choonara

1998-01-01

143

SINCE AGE 13 PARENTS DECEASED, FOSTER CARE, OR WARD/DEPENDENT OF THE COURT  

E-print Network

SINCE AGE 13 PARENTS DECEASED, FOSTER CARE, OR WARD/DEPENDENT OF THE COURT Student Name (please" to the following question: At any time since you turned age 13, were both your parents deceased, were you that applies to you since you turned the age of 13: Both of my parents are deceased, even if I am now adopted

144

Astronaut Jack Lousma looks at map of Earth in ward room of Skylab cluster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, looks at a map of Earth at the food table in the ward room of the Orbital Workshop (OWS). In this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit.

1973-01-01

145

Melatonin and light treatment of ewes for autumn lambing H. WILLIAMS Sandra WARD  

E-print Network

Melatonin and light treatment of ewes for autumn lambing H. WILLIAMS Sandra WARD Kim CAIRNS Jackie II and III were group fed a diet containing melatonin and providing 3 mg/ewe at 16.00 hrs daily practised over several years in some large flocks. In assessing the role of melatonin as a replacement

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Is Clinical Competence Perceived Differently for Student Daily Performance on the Wards versus Clerkship Grading?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical teachers…

Wimmers, Paul F.; Kanter, Steven L.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Schmidt, Henk G.

2008-01-01

147

Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward  

E-print Network

Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The flux of fixed nitrogen into the marine environment is increasing as a direct result of anthropogenic nitrogen loading, but the controls on the mechanisms

Ward, Bess

148

HDR IMAGE CONSTRUCTION FROM MULTI-EXPOSED STEREO LDR IMAGES Ning Sun, Hassan Mansour, Rabab Ward  

E-print Network

HDR IMAGE CONSTRUCTION FROM MULTI-EXPOSED STEREO LDR IMAGES Ning Sun, Hassan Mansour, Rabab Ward}@ece.ubc.ca ABSTRACT In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates high dynamic range (HDR) images from multi artifacts in the final HDR image. Existing methods generate HDR images of good qual- ity for still or slow

Mansour, Hassan

149

Patients would prefer ward to emergency department boarding while awaiting an inpatient bed.  

PubMed

Boarding of admitted patients in the Emergency Department (ED), rather than in inpatient care areas, is widespread. We surveyed boarded patients, patients without a disposition, and visitors at a county hospital ED serving a mixed urban and rural population. Subjects were asked "If you needed to be admitted to the hospital but no inpatient bed is available, would you prefer to be kept in an ER hallway or a hallway on an inpatient ward?" Boarded patients said they would prefer ward to ED boarding, 117/213 (54.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 48.0%-61.7%). Patients without a disposition 314/477 (65.8%; 95% CI 61.4%-70.0%) and visitors 370/532 (69.5%; 95% CI 65.4%-73.4%) stated a preference for ward boarding in 314/477 (65.8%; 95% CI 61.4%-70.0%) and in 370/532 (69.5%; 95% CI 65.4%-73.4%), respectively. Common reasons for preferring inpatient ward boarding were privacy concerns and reduced noise levels. Those preferring ED boarding valued easy access to a doctor. PMID:17976825

Walsh, Paul; Cortez, Valarie; Bhakta, Himanshu

2008-02-01

150

Dietary Lipids and Blood Cholesterol: Quantitative Meta-Analysis of Metabolic Ward Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the quantitative importance of dietary fatty acids and dietary cholesterol to blood concentrations of total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Design: Meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies of solid food diets in healthy volunteers. Subjects: 395 dietary experiments (median duration 1 month) among 129 groups of individuals. Results: Isocaloric replacement of saturated fats by complex

Robert Clarke; Chris Frost; Rory Collins; Paul Appleby; Richard Peto

1997-01-01

151

"Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

Byrd, Jodi A.

2007-01-01

152

Heterotic massive Einstein-Yang-Mills-type symmetry and Ward identity  

E-print Network

We show that there exist spontaneously broken symmetries for massive modes with transformation parameters containing both Einstein and E8xE8 (or SO(32)) Yang-Mills indices in the 10D Heterotic string. The corresponding on-shell Ward identities are also constructed.

Jen-Chi Lee

2005-05-09

153

Light-front Ward-Takahashi identity for two-fermion systems  

SciTech Connect

We propose a three-dimensional electromagnetic current operator within light-front dynamics that satisfies a light-front Ward-Takahashi identity for two-fermion systems. The light-front current operator is obtained by a quasipotential reduction of the four-dimensional current operator and acts on the light-front valence component of bound or scattering states. A relation between the light-front valence wave function and the four-dimensional Bethe-Salpeter amplitude both for bound or scattering states is also derived, such that the matrix elements of the four-dimensional current operator can be fully recovered from the corresponding light-front ones. The light-front current operator can be perturbatively calculated through a quasipotential expansion, and the divergence of the proposed current satisfies a Ward-Takahashi identity at any given order of the expansion. In the quasipotential expansion the instantaneous terms of the fermion propagator are accounted for by the effective interaction and two-body currents. We exemplify our theoretical construction in the Yukawa model in the ladder approximation, investigating in detail the current operator at the lowest nontrivial order of the quasipotential expansion of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The explicit realization of the light-front form of the Ward-Takahashi identity is verified. We also show the relevance of instantaneous terms and of the pair contribution to the two-body current and the Ward-Takahashi identity.

Marinho, J. A. O.; Frederico, T. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pace, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salme, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma I, Piazzale A. Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Sauer, P. U. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Leibniz University, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

2008-06-01

154

DELANEY AND WARD Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory: An Overview of the First Fifty Years  

E-print Network

· DELANEY AND WARD Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory: An Overview of the First Fifty Years VOLUME 12, NUMBER 2, 2000 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL 147 Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory of the first fifty years of radar development at Lincoln Laboratory. It begins by reviewing early Laboratory

Reuter, Martin

155

76 FR 37002 - Safety Zone; Central Astoria Independence Celebration Fireworks Event, Wards Island, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...this rule until after 30 days have elapsed...pyrotechnics used in the fireworks display...15 p.m. on June 30, 2011 and will last approximately 25 minutes. This event poses...of the East River in the vicinity of Wards...150 yards south of Hells Gate Bridge....

2011-06-24

156

Evaluation of physiological work demands and low back neuromuscular fatigue on nurses working in geriatric wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the physiological demands and low back neuromuscular fatigue patterns following a daytime work shift of 21 female nurses working in geriatric wards. Subjects’ heart rate (HR) at work was monitored for 8h and surface electromyogram (EMG) of their back muscle was recorded during a 1-minute horizontal trunk holding test before and after work. Results showed that the

Ling Hui; Gabriel Y. F. Ng; Simon S. M. Yeung; Christina W. Y. Hui-Chan

2001-01-01

157

Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz  

E-print Network

Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz 10th June 2010 1 #12;CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Using Blowfish-ROOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.4 The ROOT Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.5 The Main

Saskatchewan, University of

158

Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward  

E-print Network

Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward Evaluation Study is on the situation awareness task, and more spec as being able to per- ceive their environment, being aware of the presence of people and other agents

Langseth, Helge

159

Pain in the Nursing Home: Assessment and Treatment on Different Types of Care Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment and management of pain in nursing homes have been shown to be suboptimal, but no study has evaluated differences in clinical setting within these homes. The prevalence and management of pain on different care wards (psychogeriatric, somatic, and rehabilitation) was studied on 562 newly admitted Dutch nursing home residents. Pain was measured according to the Nottingham Health Profile

Wilco P. Achterberg; Anne Margriet Pot; Erik J. Scherder; Miel W. Ribbe

2007-01-01

160

Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation  

PubMed Central

Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms. PMID:21510852

2011-01-01

161

Labor ward workload waxes and wanes with the lunar cycle, myth or reality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To test the validity of the statement “We are busy because it is getting close to the full moon” often heard on labor ward, by analysis of birth statistics in relation to lunar cycles.Method: Data for births from spontaneous onset labors for 12 lunar cycles from January 1 to December 31, 1994 was analyzed. Births resulting from induced labors

Raksha Joshi; Anoopendra Bharadwaj; Spiro Gallousis; Ronald Matthews

1998-01-01

162

Safewards: a new model of conflict and containment on psychiatric wards  

PubMed Central

Accessible summary Rates of violence, self-harm, absconding and other incidents threatening patients and staff safety vary a great deal by hospital ward. Some wards have high rates, other low. The same goes for the actions of staff to prevent and contain such incidents, such as manual restraint, coerced medication, etc. The Safewards Model provides a simple and yet powerful explanation as to why these differences in rates occur. Six features of the inpatient psychiatric system have the capacity to give rise to flashpoints from which adverse incidents may follow. The Safewards Model makes it easy to generate ideas for changes that will make psychiatric wards safer for patients and staff. Abstract Conflict (aggression, self-harm, suicide, absconding, substance/alcohol use and medication refusal) and containment (as required medication, coerced intramuscular medication, seclusion, manual restraint, special observation, etc.) place patients and staff at risk of serious harm. The frequency of these events varies between wards, but there are few explanations as to why this is so, and a coherent model is lacking. This paper proposes a comprehensive explanatory model of these differences, and sketches the implications on methods for reducing risk and coercion in inpatient wards. This Safewards Model depicts six domains of originating factors: the staff team, the physical environment, outside hospital, the patient community, patient characteristics and the regulatory framework. These domains give risk to flashpoints, which have the capacity to trigger conflict and/or containment. Staff interventions can modify these processes by reducing the conflict-originating factors, preventing flashpoints from arising, cutting the link between flashpoint and conflict, choosing not to use containment, and ensuring that containment use does not lead to further conflict. We describe this model systematically and in detail, and show how this can be used to devise strategies for promoting the safety of patients and staff. PMID:24548312

Bowers, L

2014-01-01

163

Psychological Evaluation of Patients in Critical Care/Intensive Care Unit and Patients Admitted in Wards  

PubMed Central

Background: Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire. Aim: To assess and compare the depression, anxiety and stress Scores from the patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those admitted to ward. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients admitted to hospital, 40 from ICU and 40 admitted to ward were recruited. They were explained the procedure and after taking an informed consent, they were administered Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) Questionnaire, which contains 42-item questionnaire which includes three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress. The responses were computed and tabulated. We analysed the responses with Student’s t-test and Chi-square test, p<0.05 accepted as statistically significant. Results: The results revealed significantly elevated stress, depression and anxiety among the ICU patients when compared to those in the ward (p<0.001). Above normal anxiety and stress levels were also seen in the ward patients, compared to the scores in normal range. 50% and 25% respectively showed mild and normal depression scores in ward patients, compared to 12% and 5% in those admitted to ICU. This trend was also true for Anxiety and stress scores. Conclusion: From the results we found that there were elevated depression, anxiety and stress levels among the patients and this was significantly higher in ICU patients. Various factors could influence the psychological wellbeing of the patients, including the hospital environment, care givers, presence of family members nearby apart from the seriousness of illness, apprehensions about possibility of death. Such studies were rare among Indian patients. The findings of this study could be useful in incorporating suitable psychological help to the patients in hospitals to improve their recovery and wellbeing. PMID:25654014

Sharma B, Gaurav; EVS, Maben; MS, Kotian

2014-01-01

164

Ward-Green-Takahashi identities and the axial-vector vertex  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The colour-singlet axial-vector vertex plays a pivotal role in understanding dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and numerous hadronic weak interactions, yet scant model-independent information is available. We therefore use longitudinal and transverse Ward-Green-Takahashi (WGT) identities, together with kinematic constraints, in order to ameliorate this situation and expose novel features of the axial vertex: amongst them, Ward-like identities for elements in the transverse piece of the vertex, which complement and shed new light on identities determined previously for components in its longitudinal part. Such algebraic results are verified via solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the axial vertex obtained using two materially different kernels for the relevant Dyson-Schwinger equations. The solutions also provide insights that suggest a practical Ansatz for the axial-vector vertex.

Qin, Si-Xue; Roberts, Craig D.; Schmidt, Sebastian M.

2014-06-01

165

Ward identities in a general axial gauge. I. Yang-Mills theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ward identities are derived in a general axial gauge by considering three distinct expressions for the gauge-breaking part of the Yang-Mills Lagrangian. The Ward identities are verified by calculating the one-loop self-energies in the appropriate axial gauge. It is shown, in particular, that one of the three gauge-breaking terms, namely (2?n2)-1(n.Aa)?2(n.Aa), gives rise to a self-energy which is nontransverse. The latter gauge includes the planar gauge (?=-1). The effect of the general axial gauge on the Yang-Mills counterterms is analyzed and the implications for quantum gravity are briefly discussed.

Capper, D. M.; Leibbrandt, George

1982-02-01

166

Subjective Follow-up of Patients from a Surgical Intensive Therapy Ward  

PubMed Central

One-hundred consecutive patients who had been treated in the surgical intensive therapy ward completed a form recording their impressions of their stay. Most patients had a reasonable idea of how long they had spent in the ward and few remembered being in pain or excessively worried by any of the procedures carried out. Those who had been artificially ventilated had little recollection of this period; most either did not realize that their breathing had been artificially maintained or had no idea of the duration of ventilatory support. Very few of the patients who had tracheal suction via endotracheal or tracheostomy tubes were unduly worried by this, but 60% of the patients who needed nasopharyngeal suction to help sputum clearance had been considerably worried by this. Most of the patients were very pleased with the medical and nursing attention they had received and did not find the “intensive” nature of their care unduly disturbing. PMID:4098972

Hewitt, P. B.

1970-01-01

167

Tracheostomy patients on the ward: multiple benefits from a multidisciplinary team?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients requiring tracheostomies tend to have a longer length of stay due to their underlying disease. After a thorough literature\\u000a search, Garrubba and colleagues found only three studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) on tracheostomy\\u000a patients on the ward. One consistent observation was the decreased time to decannulation after institution of MDT care when\\u000a compared with historical controls.

Mihae Yu

2010-01-01

168

Randomized prospective study on prophylactic antibiotics in clean orthopedic surgery in one ward for 1 year  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  At present in Japan, there are neither reports on antibiotic prophylaxis regardless of underlying diseases nor precise guidelines\\u000a on prophylactic antibiotics in orthopedic surgery. Therefore, the preventive effect of antimicrobial agents on surgical site\\u000a infection (SSI) after clean orthopedic surgery was studied to control the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in our ward and to reduce SSI caused by

Daisuke Kato; Katsuhiko Maezawa; Ikuho Yonezawa; Yoshiyuki Iwase; Hiroshi Ikeda; Masahiko Nozawa; Hisashi Kurosawa

2006-01-01

169

Collective Modes in Multiband Superconductors: Rigorous Study Based on the Ward–Takahashi Relations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rigorous theory based on the Ward–Takahashi (WT) relations originating from U(1) gauge symmetry is presented for the collective phase oscillation modes in multiband superconductors. The existence of the massless Nambu–Goldstone mode in the superconducting state including the time-reversal-symmetry-breaking phase can be rigorously proved by using the WT relations. We also discuss the approximations in calculating the phase oscillation modes in systems with an interaction causing the gap renormalization.

Koyama, Tomio

2014-07-01

170

Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however. Objective To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist) using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs). Results A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3%) were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7%) interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%); needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8%) and noncompliance, 29(19.5%). The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%). Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9%) and 25(26.6%) had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusions Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This approach can likely be generalized to other health care settings in the country to improve medication outcomes. PMID:24155850

Mekonnen, Alemayehu B.; Yesuf, Elias A.; Odegard, Peggy S.; Wega, Sultan S.

171

A review of "The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America." by Lee Ward  

E-print Network

REVIEWS 183 Lee Ward. The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. x + 459 pp. $90.00. Review by GEOFFREY M. VAUGHAN, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY. This is first... colonies. Thus the second paradox is resolved: the radical Whigs in the colonies and the moder- ate Whigs in Britain had become two great nations divided by a common philosophy. Perhaps as a coda, Lee explains in Part III that the arguments of Sidney were...

Geoffrey M. Vaughan

2005-01-01

172

Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality  

E-print Network

tx H2O | pg. 24 A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January... 1991, a committee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (now Texas AgriLife Extension Service) and Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District person- nel met on the development of a 4-H water camp educating youth on water issues...

Supercinski, Danielle

2008-01-01

173

Drinking Water Quality Surveillance in a Vulnerable Urban Ward of Ahmedabad  

PubMed Central

The World Bank estimates that 21% of all communicable diseases in India are related to unsafe water with diarrhoea alone causing more than 0.1 million deaths annually. The WHO drinking water surveillance parameters of quality, quantity, accessibility, affordability and continuity were assessed in one vulnerable ward of Ahmedabad—a fast growing city in Western India. Interviews with key informants of the ward office, health centre and water supply department, secondary analysis and mapping of field test reports and a questionnaire-based survey of different household types were conducted. We found that Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) supplies water to the ward intermittently for two hours during the day. Housing society clusters supplement their AMC water supply with untested bore-well water. The water quality surveillance system is designed for a twenty-four-hour piped distribution of treated surface water. However, in order to maintain surveillance over an intermittent supply that includes ground water, the sampling process should include periodic surveys of water actually consumed by the citizens. The laboratory capacity of the Central Water Testing Laboratory should expand to include more refined tests for microbial and chemical contamination. PMID:25254083

Iyer, Veena; Choudhury, Nandini; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Somvanshi, Bhushan

2014-01-01

174

Ramond-Ramond S-matrix elements from the T-dual Ward identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently it has been speculated that the Ward identities associated with the string dualities and the gauge symmetries can be used as guiding principles to find all components of the scattering amplitude of n supergravitons from a given component of the S matrix. In this paper, we apply the Ward identities associated with the T duality and the gauge symmetries on the disk-level S-matrix element of one Ramond-Ramond (RR) (p-3) form, one Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz (NSNS), and one Neveu-Schwarz (NS) state to find the corresponding S-matrix elements of the RR (p-1) form, (p+1) form, or the RR (p+3) form on the world volume of a Dp-brane. Moreover, we apply these Ward identities on the S-matrix element of one RR (p -3) form and two NSNS states to find the corresponding S-matrix elements of the RR (p-1) form, (p+1) form, (p+3) form, or the RR (p+5) form.

Babaei Velni, Komeil; Garousi, Mohammad R.

2014-05-01

175

Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N?=?181, n?=?146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p?=?0.021), support for innovation (p?=?0.042) and task orientation (p?=?0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

2015-01-01

176

OnWARD: ontology-driven web-based framework for multi-center clinical studies.  

PubMed

With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. PMID:21924379

Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

2011-12-01

177

Tuning of entertainment robots for RAA\\/RAT application based on fieldworks at aged people's home and pediatrics ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes possibility of robot assisted activity, RAA, and robot assisted therapy, RAT, through the fieldwork in the aged persons' home and the pediatrics ward using several kinds of robots on the market.

T. Sasaki; T. Negishi; M. Shioya; A. Sawanobori; H. Umino; E. Ohkubo; R. Kimura; M. Naganuma

2004-01-01

178

Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward  

PubMed Central

Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. Methods and analysis The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2?months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. Ethics and dissemination A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. PMID:25273812

Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

2014-01-01

179

Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?  

PubMed Central

Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

2014-01-01

180

Outcomes of early switching from intravenous to oral antibiotics on medical wards  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate outcomes following implementation of a checklist with criteria for switching from intravenous (iv) to oral antibiotics on unselected patients on two general medical wards. Methods During a 12 month intervention study, a printed checklist of criteria for switching on the third day of iv treatment was placed in the medical charts. The decision to switch was left to the discretion of the attending physician. Outcome parameters of a 4 month control phase before intervention were compared with the equivalent 4 month period during the intervention phase to control for seasonal confounding (before–after study; April to July of 2006 and 2007, respectively): 250 episodes (215 patients) during the intervention period were compared with the control group of 176 episodes (162 patients). The main outcome measure was the duration of iv therapy. Additionally, safety, adherence to the checklist, reasons against switching patients and antibiotic cost were analysed during the whole year of the intervention (n = 698 episodes). Results In 38% (246/646) of episodes of continued iv antibiotic therapy, patients met all criteria for switching to oral antibiotics on the third day, and 151/246 (61.4%) were switched. The number of days of iv antibiotic treatment were reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 9%–29%, P = 0.001; 6.0–5.0 days in median) with no increase in complications. The main reasons against switching were persisting fever (41%, n = 187) and absence of clinical improvement (41%, n = 185). Conclusions On general medical wards, a checklist with bedside criteria for switching to oral antibiotics can shorten the duration of iv therapy without any negative effect on treatment outcome. The criteria were successfully applied to all patients on the wards, independently of the indication (empirical or directed treatment), the type of (presumed) infection, the underlying disease or the group of antibiotics being used. PMID:19401304

Mertz, Dominik; Koller, Michael; Haller, Patricia; Lampert, Markus L.; Plagge, Herbert; Hug, Balthasar; Koch, Gian; Battegay, Manuel; Flückiger, Ursula; Bassetti, Stefano

2009-01-01

181

[Mother/child affective bond at the unit of the pediatric ward].  

PubMed

This study presents the importance of the mother-son relationship in the child physical and emotional development. It aims at contributing to the construction of knowledge in nursing, by rescuing the importance of the mothers' stay in the units of the pediatric ward. It is a bibliographical research using as sources: books, scientific articles, journals, magazines, encyclopedias and the Internet. By reading and analyzing the texts it is possible to identify how the consolidation of the mother and son affective bond is processed and to point out the positive aspects of the mother's stay with the hospitalized son. PMID:15083788

Faquinello, Paula; Collet, Neusa

2003-12-01

182

S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 PRECISION CALCULATIONS OF W AND Z PRODUCTION  

E-print Network

S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 PRECISION CALCULATIONS OF W AND Z PRODUCTION AT THE LHC: PROGRESS IN PRECISION LUMINOSITY STUDIES S.A. YOST, C. GLOSSER AND B.F.L. WARD DEPARTMENT grant pst.clg.980342. 1 #12;S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 2 Yennie

Yost, Scott

183

Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students  

PubMed Central

The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students’ educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student “teams” leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the “inner circle”, or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38), students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students’ clinical learning and preparation for practice. PMID:25028569

Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana; Sandry, Kate

2014-01-01

184

Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students.  

PubMed

The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38), students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice. PMID:25028569

Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana; Sandry, Kate

2014-01-01

185

Capturing students' learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward.  

PubMed

An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students' learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students' experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts. PMID:23043548

Lachmann, Hanna; Ponzer, Sari; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Benson, Lina; Karlgren, Klas

2013-03-01

186

Patient risk factors for developing a drug-related problem in a cardiology ward  

PubMed Central

Background Because of the high incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs) among hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases and their potential impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify the most susceptible patients, who therefore require closer monitoring of drug therapy. Purpose To identify the profile of patients at higher risk of developing at least one DRP during hospitalization in a cardiology ward. Method We consecutively included all patients hospitalized in the cardiology ward of a teaching hospital in 2009. DRPs were identified through a computerized warning system designed by the pharmacy department and integrated into the electronic medical record. Results A total of 964 admissions were included, and at least one DRP was detected in 29.8%. The variables associated with a higher risk of these events were polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR]=1.228; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.153–1.308), female sex (OR=1.496; 95% CI=1.026–2.180), and first admission (OR=1.494; 95% CI=1.005–2.221). Conclusion Monitoring patients through a computerized warning system allowed the detection of at least one DRP in one-third of the patients. Knowledge of the risk factors for developing these problems in patients admitted to hospital for cardiovascular problems helps in identifying the most susceptible patients. PMID:25565852

Urbina, Olatz; Ferrández, Olivia; Luque, Sònia; Grau, Santiago; Mojal, Sergi; Pellicer, Rosa; Riu, Marta; Salas, Esther; Comin-Colet, Josep

2015-01-01

187

Outbreak of multiresistant OXA-24- and OXA-51-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in an internal medicine ward.  

PubMed

Here we describe the clinical, microbiological, epidemiological, and molecular characterization of an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) involving 5 patients admitted to the internal medicine ward of our hospital. Over a 6-week period, 5 MRAB isolates were recovered from 5 patients, including 1 with fatal meningitis, 3 with skin and soft tissue infections, and 1 with respiratory colonization. One sample obtained during environmental monitoring in the ward was A. baumannii-positive. According to the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing results, the strains isolated from all patients and the environmental sample belonged to a single clone, identified as ST79 by multilocus sequence typing. The blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-51 carbapenemases were detected in all isolates. Four patients died, but only the death of the meningitis patient was probably related to the A. baumannii infection. The infection source was probably the hands of the healthcare workers because the outbreak strain was isolated from the surface of a serum container. The results of the present study revealed the importance of strict adherence to control measures by all healthcare workers because the consequences of noncompliance can be very serious. PMID:23883845

Tena, Daniel; Martínez, Nora Mariela; Oteo, Jesús; Sáez, David; Vindel, Ana; Azañedo, María Luisa; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Espinosa, Alfredo; Cobos, Juan; Sánchez, Rosario; Otero, Ignacio; Bisquert, Julia

2013-01-01

188

The cost of a hospital ward in Europe: is there a methodology available to accurately measure the costs?  

PubMed

Costing health care services has become a major requirement due to an increase in demand for health care and technological advances. Several studies have been published describing the computation of the costs of hospital wards. The objective of this article is to examine the methodologies utilised to try to describe the basic components of a standardised method, which could be applied throughout Europe. Cost measurement however is a complex matter and a lack of clarity exists in the terminology and the cost concepts utilised. The methods discussed in this review make it evident that there is a lack of standardized methodologies for the determination of accurate costs of hospital wards. A standardized costing methodology would facilitate comparisons, encourage economic evaluation within the ward and hence assist in the decision-making process with regard to the efficient allocation of resources. PMID:15366283

Negrini, D; Kettle, A; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Edbrooke, D L

2004-01-01

189

Hospital Acquired Infections Among Patients Admitted in the Medical and Surgical Wards of a Non-Teaching Secondary Care Hospital in Northern India  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the incidence of Nosocomial Infection (NI) and type of bacteriological isolates among the patients admitted in the medical and surgical wards of a non-teaching secondary care hospital in north India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional hospital based study conducted in the Wards of General Medicine, General Surgery and Orthopaedic of the hospital. The patient were admitted in the department for various surgical procedures, without evidence of initial infection, were included in the study. Results: A total of 176 patients were included in the study of which 82 were from Medical and 94 from Surgical ward. Overall incidence of NI was found to be 26.1% (Medical ward=28%, Surgical ward=24.5%., p=0.58). The isolation rate of Acinetobacter baumanii was (p=0.15) higher among the patients of medical ward (95.7%) than surgical ward (82.6). Escherichia coli was isolated in 89.1% and no significant difference was observed between medical and surgical wards. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated in 50% patients and was almost similar (p=0.37) in medical surgical wards. The isolation rate of Pseudomonos aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase negative staphylococci were 43.5%, 73.9%, 34.8% and 17.4% respectively. A significant difference was observed in the isolation rate of Enterococcus faecalis (p=0.007) and Coagulase negative staphylococci (p=0.002) between medical and surgical wards. Overall, among the patients who developed NI, 27.2% patient’s bacterial isolates were Gram positive (Surgical=64.1, Medical=80%). Conclusion: The incidence of NI is increasing in the hospitals, so extensive that more care has to be taken in cleaning the wards of the hospitals. PMID:24701489

Ginawi, I.; Saleem, Mohd; Sigh, Mastan; Vaish, A.K.; Ahmad, I.; Srivastava, V.K.; Abdullah, A. Fahad M.

2014-01-01

190

Predictive factors of adrenal insufficiency in patients admitted to acute medical wards: a case control study  

PubMed Central

Background Adrenal insufficiency is a rare and potentially lethal disease if untreated. Several clinical signs and biological markers are associated with glucocorticoid failure but the importance of these factors for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency is not known. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with adrenal insufficiency among patients admitted to an acute internal medicine ward. Methods Retrospective, case-control study including all patients with high-dose (250 ?g) ACTH-stimulation tests for suspected adrenal insufficiency performed between 2008 and 2010 in an acute internal medicine ward (n?=?281). Cortisol values <550 nmol/l upon ACTH-stimulation test were considered diagnostic for adrenal insufficiency. Area under the ROC curve (AROC), sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values for adrenal insufficiency were assessed for thirteen symptoms, signs and biological variables. Results 32 patients (11.4%) presented adrenal insufficiency; the others served as controls. Among all clinical and biological parameters studied, history of glucocorticoid withdrawal was the only independent factor significantly associated with patients with adrenal insufficiency (Odds Ratio: 6.71, 95% CI: 3.08 –14.62). Using a logistic regression, a model with four significant and independent variable was obtained, regrouping history of glucocorticoid withdrawal (OR 7.38, 95% CI [3.18 ; 17.11], p-value <0.001), nausea (OR 3.37, 95% CI [1.03 ; 11.00], p-value 0.044), eosinophilia (OR 17.6, 95% CI [1.02; 302.3], p-value 0.048) and hyperkalemia (OR 2.41, 95% CI [0.87; 6.69], p-value 0.092). The AROC (95% CI) was 0.75 (0.70; 0.80) for this model, with 6.3 (0.8 – 20.8) for sensitivity and 99.2 (97.1 – 99.9) for specificity. Conclusions 11.4% of patients with suspected adrenal insufficient admitted to acute medical ward actually do present with adrenal insufficiency, defined by an abnormal response to high-dose (250 ?g) ACTH-stimulation test. A history of glucocorticoid withdrawal was the strongest factor predicting the potential adrenal failure. The combination of a history of glucocorticoid withdrawal, nausea, eosinophilia and hyperkaliemia might be of interest to suspect adrenal insufficiency. PMID:23351185

2013-01-01

191

[Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward].  

PubMed

The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors. PMID:25474845

Somense, Carolina Bueno; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco

2014-09-01

192

Chiral Ward identities for the pseudoscalar mesons including the gluonic bound state G(1440)  

SciTech Connect

We reanalyze the chiral Ward identities for the pseudoscalar mesons including the recently identified glueball state G(1440), in the hope that the solution for the decay constants will shed light on the interpretation of G(1440) as a gluonic bound state. Even when supplemented with experimental rates for (psi..-->..eta'..gamma..)/(psi..-->..eta..gamma..) and (eta'..--> gamma gamma..)/(eta..--> gamma gamma..)/(..pi../sup 0/+..gamma gamma..) we cannot obtain definite predictions for the pseudoscalar decay constants and for G..--> gamma gamma.., because the solutions are exceedingly sensitive to poorly known parameters. Classes of solutions are presented, which are functions of B(G..-->..KK-bar..pi..); a solution is only possible if B(G..-->..KK-bar..pi..)< or =30%. A typical value of GAMMA(G..--> gamma gamma..) is 5 keV, although much smaller values are quite reasonable.

Milton, K.A.; Palmer, W.F.; Pinsky, S.S.

1983-01-01

193

[Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward].  

PubMed

The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors. PMID:25508624

Somense, Carolina Bueno; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco

2014-09-01

194

A survey of psychiatric nursing practice in two inner city acute admission wards.  

PubMed

In response to the British government's Review of Mental Health Nursing this paper reports on a study which examined nursing practice in two inner city acute admission wards. Eight nursing staff maintained a record of their activities over a 7-day period according to four operationalized variables. Qualitative detail was also collected to enable the specification of activities. The amount of time available for patient contact work is calculated and those activities which currently restrict opportunities for experienced nursing staff to have therapeutic interactions with their patients are identified. The findings do not differ markedly from earlier studies and some tentative conclusions are drawn concerning the therapeutic milieu within an inner city psychiatric in-patient facility. PMID:9578218

Ryrie, I; Agunbiade, D; Brannock, L; Maris-Shaw, A

1998-04-01

195

Comparison of automatic oscillometric arterial pressure measurement with conventional auscultatory measurement in the labour ward.  

PubMed

We have compared two non-invasive methods of arterial pressure (AP) measurement used in labour wards: an automatic oscillometric measurement obtained by Dinamap 1846, and a conventional auscultatory measurement obtained by midwives. A total of 369 AP measurements were recorded, involving 28 normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women during labour, with or without extradural analgesia. Compared with the midwife group, the Dinamap group had a greater systolic AP, by 2.7 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and smaller diastolic AP, by 9.8 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The correlations between the two methods were highly significant, but the limits of agreement were relatively wide for both systolic and diastolic AP measurements. We conclude that a clinically important difference exists in diastolic AP measurements. Dinamap diastolic AP must be corrected using a regression equation, or simply by adding 10 mm Hg, before being compared with the available normal and hypertensive AP values. PMID:8435255

Hasan, M A; Thomas, T A; Prys-Roberts, C

1993-02-01

196

Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.  

PubMed

The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children's ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children's service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved. PMID:25200240

Ennis, Linda

2014-09-01

197

Activity sampling of nurses of a sub-acute ward of a large hospital.  

PubMed

A study was conducted in a 43 bedded subacute family ward of a large hospital to find out the adequacy and efficiency of its nursing service. Activity analysis in respect of nurses was carried out by Activity Sampling Technique. The study revealed that out of 334 activities, observed, 78 (23.3%) were non-productive, whereas 256 (76.7%) were productive. Out of the productive activities, 148 (44.3%) were for direct patient care mainly comprising of 46 (31.1% for carrying out technical procedures, 36 (24.32%) for determining patients' needs, 20 (13.15%) for preparing patients for various procedures and 15 (10.14%) for assisting in technical procedures. Number wise the nurses were found to be adequate. PMID:10130935

Bobdey, C S; Sandhu, M S; Urmil, A C; Dayakar, T

1992-07-01

198

Evaluation of Potential Drug - Drug Interactions in General Medicine Ward of Teaching Hospital in Southern India  

PubMed Central

Background: Polypharmacy is considered as one of the major risk factors in precipitation of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Patient population at high risk include the elderly and patients with co morbidities as they are usually prescribed with more number of drugs. Critical evaluation of such prescriptions by pharmacist could result in identification and reduction of such problems. Objective: The study aims to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of potential DDI (pDDI) in general medicine wards of South Indian tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Method: A prospective observational study was conducted in a general medicine ward for a period of six months (September 2012 to February 2013). The socio-demographic, clinical characteristics and medication prescribed was documented in a specially designed form. Analysis was carried out to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of identified pDDIs using Micromedex. Descriptive and Univariate analysis were used to report the findings. Results: A total of 404 case records reviewed, 78 (19.3%) patients had pDDIs. A total of 139 (34.4%) pDDIs were reported during the study period. Majority (53.95%, n=75) of the interactions were moderate in intensity and significant in nature (53.23%, n=74). Positive association between number of pDDIs and age was observed. Conclusion: The prevalence of pDDIs was 19.3% which is lesser then previously reported studies from India. Patient with more co-morbidities and elders were observed with more pDDIs. The study highlighted the need to effectively monitor and patients prevent pDDIs to improve patient safety.

Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ivan, Rahul; Dasari, Ram; Revanker, Megha; Pravina, A.; Kuriakose, Sheetal

2015-01-01

199

The Ethnomedicine of the Haya people of Bugabo ward, Kagera Region, north western Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The Kagera region, in north western Tanzania, is endowed with a strong culture of traditional medicine that is well supported by a rich diversity of medicinal plants. However, most of the plants in this region have not been documented nor evaluated for safety and efficacy. As an initiative in that direction, this study documented the knowledge on medicinal plant use by traditional healers of Bugabo Ward in Bukoba District. Methods Key informants were selected with the help of local government officials and information on their knowledge and use of plants for therapeutic purposes was gathered using a semi-structured interview format. Results In this study 94 plant species representing 84 genera and 43 families were found to be commonly used in the treatment of a variety of human ailments. The family Asteraceae had the highest number of species being used as traditional medicines. The study revealed that Malaria is treated using the highest number of different medicinal species (30), followed by skin conditions (19), maternal illnesses and sexually transmitted diseases (14), respiratory diseases (11) and yellow fever, Herpes simplex and peptic ulcers (10). Majority of the species are used to treat less than five different diseases/conditions each and leaves were the most commonly used part, comprising 40% of all the reports on use of plant parts. Trees comprised the most dominant growth form among all plants used for medicinal purposes in the study area. Conclusion Bugabo Ward has a rich repository of medicinal plants and this reinforces the need for an extensive and comprehensive documentation of medicinal plants in the area and a concomitant evaluation of their biological activity as a basis for developing future medicines. PMID:19715617

Moshi, Mainen J; Otieno, Donald F; Mbabazi, Pamela K; Weisheit, Anke

2009-01-01

200

Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the

Andrea Ballerini; Roberto M Boccalon; Giancarlo Boncompagni; Massimo Casacchia; Francesco Margari; Lina Minervini; Roberto Righi; Federico Russo; Andrea Salteri; Sonia Frediani; Andrea Rossi; Marco Scatigna

2007-01-01

201

The Association of Drug Use and Post-Traumatic Stress Reactions Due to Hurricane Ike Among Fifth Ward Houstonian Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study shows the important link between higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. The study offers secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected on 170 predominately African American males through the Fifth Ward Enrichment program (FWEP) in Houston, Texas, between November and December 2009. Men who stated that in the last

Ronald J. Peters Jr; Angela Meshack; Charles Amos; Kathy Scott-Gurnell; Charles Savage; Kentya Ford

2010-01-01

202

METAWSL and Meta-Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan  

E-print Network

METAWSL and Meta-Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan the transformations ap- plicability conditions) and returns a semantically equiva- lent program. In the FermaT to be a domain-specific language for writing program transformations. As a result, FermaT is capable

Singer, Jeremy

203

METAWSL and MetaTransformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan  

E-print Network

METAWSL and Meta­Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan the transformations ap­ plicability conditions) and returns a semantically equiva­ lent program. In the FermaT to be a domain­specific language for writing program transformations. As a result, FermaT is capable

Singer, Jeremy

204

Deriving a Slicing Algorithm via FermaT Transformations M. P. Ward and H. Zedan Software Technology Research Lab  

E-print Network

Deriving a Slicing Algorithm via FermaT Transformations M. P. Ward and H. Zedan Software Technology specification via FermaT transformations. The general method (which is presented in a separate paper. The FermaT transformation theory, [49,63] which is based on WSL, is therefore capable of deriving complex

Singer, Jeremy

205

Utilization of Norway’s Emergency Wards: The Second 5 Years after the Introduction of the Patient List System  

PubMed Central

Utilization of services is an important indicator for estimating access to healthcare. In Norway, the General Practitioner Scheme, a patient list system, was established in 2001 to enable a stable doctor-patient relationship. Although satisfaction with the system is generally high, people often choose a more accessible but inferior solution for routine care: emergency wards. The aim of the article is to investigate contact patterns in primary health care situations for the total population in urban and remote areas of Norway and for major immigrant groups in Oslo. The primary regression model had a cross-sectional study design analyzing 2,609,107 consultations in representative municipalities across Norway, estimating the probability of choosing the emergency ward in substitution to a general practitioner. In a second regression model comprising 625,590 consultations in Oslo, we calculated this likelihood for immigrants from the 14 largest groups. We noted substantial differences in emergency ward utilization between ethnic Norwegians both in rural and remote areas and among the various immigrant groups residing in Oslo. Oslo utilization of emergency ward services for the whole population declined, and so did this use among all immigrant groups after 2009. Other municipalities, while overwhelmingly ethnically Norwegian, showed diverse patterns including an increase in some and a decrease in others, results which we were unable to explain. PMID:24662997

Goth, Ursula S.; Hammer, Hugo L.; Claussen, Bjørgulf

2014-01-01

206

Utilization of Norway's emergency wards: the second 5 years after the introduction of the patient list system.  

PubMed

Utilization of services is an important indicator for estimating access to healthcare. In Norway, the General Practitioner Scheme, a patient list system, was established in 2001 to enable a stable doctor-patient relationship. Although satisfaction with the system is generally high, people often choose a more accessible but inferior solution for routine care: emergency wards. The aim of the article is to investigate contact patterns in primary health care situations for the total population in urban and remote areas of Norway and for major immigrant groups in Oslo. The primary regression model had a cross-sectional study design analyzing 2,609,107 consultations in representative municipalities across Norway, estimating the probability of choosing the emergency ward in substitution to a general practitioner. In a second regression model comprising 625,590 consultations in Oslo, we calculated this likelihood for immigrants from the 14 largest groups. We noted substantial differences in emergency ward utilization between ethnic Norwegians both in rural and remote areas and among the various immigrant groups residing in Oslo. Oslo utilization of emergency ward services for the whole population declined, and so did this use among all immigrant groups after 2009. Other municipalities, while overwhelmingly ethnically Norwegian, showed diverse patterns including an increase in some and a decrease in others, results which we were unable to explain. PMID:24662997

Goth, Ursula S; Hammer, Hugo L; Claussen, Bjørgulf

2014-03-01

207

Patient Autonomy versus Risk Management: A Case Study of Change in a High Security Forensic Psychiatric Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased attention to the civil rights of general psychiatric patients has been an issue for over 30 years. Similar processes in forensic settings have been slower, because of safety and security needs. This paper explores the development of patient autonomy, as well as rates of violence and escape incidents, in a Norwegian high-security forensic psychiatric ward over an 18-year period.

Ragnar Urheim; Knut Rypdal; Tom Palmstierna; Arnstein Mykletun

2011-01-01

208

M. Kovari, R. Kemp, H. Lux, P. Knight, J. Morris, D.J. Ward CCFE-PR(14)12  

E-print Network

.kovari@ccfe.ac.uk Abstract PROCESS is a reactor systems code ­ it assesses the engineering and economic viability physics and magnetic field calculations. The capabilities of PROCESS in plasma physics are limited, as itsM. Kovari, R. Kemp, H. Lux, P. Knight, J. Morris, D.J. Ward CCFE-PR(14)12 "PROCESS": a Systems Code

209

District Youth in Brief: Perceived Risk in Binge Drinking In Which Wards Were DC Youth More Likely to Binge  

E-print Network

one-third of DC youth age 12 to 17 in Ward 3 perceived weekly binge drinking a great risk, compared-2008 NSDUH surveys. Key = Perceived Great Risk of Weekly Binge Drinking (Ages 12-17) = Past Month Binge Drinking (Ages 12-17) #12;

Milchberg, Howard

210

"Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the…

Beasley, James P.

2007-01-01

211

Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the wetland because it had been platted with large areas privately owned. A self-published workshop report was produced each of the first three years. Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle with downtown New Orleans in the background. Photo by Travis Scott, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007.

Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

2010-12-01

212

Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study  

PubMed Central

Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients actively participating in students’ learning and they both experience it as a joint action. An attending relationship is based on a one-way relationship between patients and students resulting in patients passively participating by letting students to practice on their bodies but without engaging in a learning dialogue with the students. PMID:24989155

2014-01-01

213

Workplace Learning: An analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background: Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students’ ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students’ expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Methods: Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. Results: We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. Conclusion: For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a longitudinal manner. The data suggest that the development and establishment of guidelines for medical teachers associated with clearly defined learning objectives for the students’ internships are urgently needed. Based on our findings, we provide first recommendations and suggest possible solutions. PMID:25489343

Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

2014-01-01

214

Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards  

PubMed Central

Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

2014-01-01

215

[Enhancing the capability of medical team to manage aggressive events in acute psychiatric wards].  

PubMed

Incidences of violence in acute psychiatric ward can lead to not only facility destructions, but also mental, physical injuries and even medical disputes. As part of efforts to enhance medical team abilities to manage aggressive events, this study aimed to provide references for reducing both aggressive events and resultant damage. Over two-thirds (69%) of all unanticipated occurrences registered by our unit in 2003-2004 were classed as "aggressive events", i.e. there were 27 occurrences (0.09%) in which 0.04% resulted in staff injury. Events were mainly attributable to psychiatric symptoms, poor impulse control and interpersonal conflicts. For this study, we used several intervention methods, including categorizing patients by "risk of violence" rank, revising the hospital's standard operation processes for handling violence and revising the nursing rules to enhance nurse skills at managing violent events, countering patient violence, helping patients safely vent their anger and physical force, listening to relax music and conducting behavior modification. As a result, aggressive event prediction sensitivity increased from 56% to 100%, with successful prevention rates reaching 80%. The rate of aggressive event occurrence reduced from 0.09% to 0.06% and staff injuries decreased from 0.04% to 0.02%. Intervention methods employed were shown to be quite effective. If medical teams elsewhere enhanced their sensitivity and abilities to avoid aggressive events, injury and damages could be prevented and medical care quality enhanced. PMID:18393210

Chi, Mei-Ting; Jeang, Shiow-Rong; Pan, Chih-Chuan; Leu, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Ching-Mo

2008-04-01

216

[Patients with drug dependence can be treated in a ward for alcohol dependence on certain conditions].  

PubMed

The treatment for drug dependence in Japan only focuses on detoxification and psychotic disorders, treatment facilities for this study are limited. My proposal for this problem is to improve this situation by having the alcohol treatment ward accept the drug dependency patients. However, drug dependency in-patient treatment has the following concerns, 1. Most patients have tendencies of violence. 2. Motivation and continuation of treatment by the patient is difficult. 3. Breaking rules and deviational conduct. 4. Disintegration of conduct. 5. Disorder of uniformity of group treatment. 6. Lack of specialized resources. In a response to these problems, I am presenting some techniques now on practice at Saitama Prefecture Psychiatric Hospital. Some of these important points are, 1. Building a treatment relationship before admission. 2. Establishing motivation before admission. 3. Stabilization of mental condition before admission. 4. Establishing an explanation and consensus about admission treatment. 5. Knowledge of the craving phase stage and its effects. 6. Devise the program to focus on recovery.7. Create an atmosphere to encourage participation in alcohol and drug dependency groups. 8. Preserve the balance of the program which respects the originality of both groups. I sincerely hope that the above devises will allow the opportunity for the alcohol treatment facilities to open up to the drug dependent patients in the future. PMID:19489443

Naruse, Nobuya

2009-04-01

217

Dietary lipids and blood cholesterol: quantitative meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the quantitative importance of dietary fatty acids and dietary cholesterol to blood concentrations of total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies of solid food diets in healthy volunteers. SUBJECTS: 395 dietary experiments (median duration 1 month) among 129 groups of individuals. RESULTS: Isocaloric replacement of saturated fats by complex carbohydrates for 10% of dietary calories resulted in blood total cholesterol falling by 0.52 (SE 0.03) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.36 (0.05) mmol/l. Isocaloric replacement of complex carbohydrates by polyunsaturated fats for 5% of dietary calories resulted in total cholesterol falling by a further 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.11 (0.02) mmol/l. Similar replacement of carbohydrates by monounsaturated fats produced no significant effect on total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Avoiding 200 mg/day dietary cholesterol further decreased blood total cholesterol by 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 0.10 (0.02) mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: In typical British diets replacing 60% of saturated fats by other fats and avoiding 60% of dietary cholesterol would reduce blood total cholesterol by about 0.8 mmol/l (that is, by 10-15%), with four fifths of this reduction being in low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:9006469

Clarke, R.; Frost, C.; Collins, R.; Appleby, P.; Peto, R.

1997-01-01

218

Added value of pharmacist-acquired drug histories in an orthopaedic ward.  

PubMed

In Belgian hospitals, drug histories of patients taken on admission are generally collected by medical trainees, physicians and nurses. As errors in drug histories may lead to medication errors and adverse drug events, we aimed at comparing the data obtained by a clinical pharmacist with those obtained by the nurses in a surgical orthopaedic ward. In this four months study, 50 patients, with a mean age of 66 years, were included. Out of these 50 drug histories, 107 differences were found when comparing the data gathered by the nurses with the data of the pharmacist. On average, there were 2.1 discrepancies per patient. Omission of a drug and incorrect or unknown dose accounted for 80.3% of the discrepancies, while allergy and/or intolerance, incorrect frequency and addition of a drug accounted for respectively 11.2%, 4.8% and 3.7%. Interestingly, six drug categories represented almost 55% of the drug-related discrepancies.These were, in order of importance: anxiolytic and neuroleptics, antacids and proton pump inhibitors (PPI's), painkillers, antidepressants, aspirin and eye drops. Finally, 27% of the discrepancies concerned "over the counter" drugs. From this study we were able to conclude that the clinical pharmacist performed more complete and more accurate drug histories than nurses in the surgical orthopaedic care unit, especially in patients taking multiple drugs. These results suggest that drug histories taken by a pharmacist may lead to a reduction of potential adverse drug events during hospitalisation. PMID:21837927

Quennery, S; Cornu, O; Sneyers, B; Yombi, J C

2011-01-01

219

Ward-Takahashi identity, soft photon theorem and the magnetic moment of the $?$ resonance  

E-print Network

Starting from the Ward-Takahashi identity for the radiative $\\pi N$ scattering amplitude a generalization of the soft photon theorem approach is obtained for an arbitrary energy of an emitted photon. The external particle radiation part of the $\\pi N\\to\\gamma'\\pi'N' $ amplitude is analytically reduced to the double $\\Delta$ exchange amplitude with the $\\Delta\\to\\gamma'\\Delta'$ vertex function. We have shown, that the double $\\Delta$ exchange amplitudes with internal $\\Delta$ radiation is connected by current conservation with the corresponding part of the external particle radiation terms. Moreover according to the current conservation the internal and external particle radiation terms with the $\\Delta-\\gamma'\\Delta'$ vertex have a opposite sign i.e. they must cancel each other. Therefore we have a screening of the internal double $\\Delta$ exchange diagram with the $\\Delta-\\gamma' \\Delta'$ vertex by the external particle radiation. This enables us to obtain a model independent estimation of the dipole magnetic moment of $\\Delta^+$ and $\\Delta^{++}$ resonances $\\mu_{\\Delta}$ through the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton $\\mu_p$ as $\\mu_{\\Delta^+}={{M_{\\Delta}}\\over {m_p}} \\mu_p$ and $\\mu_{\\Delta^{++}}={3\\over 2}\\mu_{\\Delta^+}$ in agreement with the values obtained from the fit of the experimental cross section of the $\\pi^+ p\\to\\gamma'\\pi^+ p$ reaction.

A. I. Machavariani; Amand Faessler

2007-03-27

220

Measuring ward-based multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning: a validation study of the Team Functioning Assessment Tool (TFAT).  

PubMed

The team functioning assessment tool (TFAT) has been shown to be a reliable behavioral marker tool for assessing nontechnical skills that are critical to the success of ward-based healthcare teams. This paper aims to refine and shorten the length of the TFAT to improve usability, and establish its reliability and construct validity. Psychometric testing based on 110 multidisciplinary healthcare teams demonstrated that the TFAT is a reliable and valid tool for measuring team members' nontechnical skills in regards to Clinical Planning, Executive Tasks, and Team Functioning. Providing support for concurrent validity, high TFAT ratings were predicted by low levels of organizational constraints and high levels of group potency. There was also partial support for the negative relationships between time pressure, leadership ambiguity, and TFAT ratings. The paper provides a discussion on the applicability of the tool for assessing multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning in the context of improving team effectiveness and patient safety for ward-based hospital teams. PMID:23551303

Sutton, Gigi; Liao, Jenny; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Restubog, Simon L D

2013-01-01

221

Analysis of the interface and data transfer from ICU to normal wards in a German University Hospital.  

PubMed

Typically general wards and intensive care units (ICU) have very different labor organizations, structures and IT-systems in Germany. There is a need for coordination, because of the different working arrangements. Our team investigated the interface between ICU and general ward and especially the respective information transfer in the University hospital in Erlangen (Bavaria, Germany). The research team used a combination of interviews, observations and the analysis of transfer records and forms as part of a methodical triangulation. We identified 41 topics, which are discussed or presented in writing during the handover. In a second step, we investigate the requirements of data transmission in expert interviews. A data transfer concept from the perspective of the nurses and physicians was developed and we formulated recommendations for improvements of process and communication for this interface. Finally the data transfer concept was evaluated by the respondents. PMID:23920878

Vollmer, Anne-Maria; Skonetzki-Cheng, Stefan; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

2013-01-01

222

Adverse Drug Reactions to Off-label Drugs on a Paediatric Ward: an Italian Prospective Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently published studies examining the extent of off-label drug prescribing in various European paediatric wards have reported that off-label use is widespread and particularly high in Italy. So far, however, no studies have investigated the extent to which adverse drug reactions (ADRs) due to off-label drug use occur in Italy. To evaluate the risk associated with off-label drug use in

Piero Impicciatore; Angelika Mohn; F Chiarelli; Chiara Pandolfini; Maurizio Bonati

2002-01-01

223

Identification and characterisation of a novel KCNQ1 mutation in a family with Romano–Ward syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Romano–Ward syndrome (RWS), the autosomal dominant form of the congenital long QT syndrome, is characterised by prolongation of the cardiac repolarisation process associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias of the torsades de pointes type. Genetic studies have identified mutations in six ion channel genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1 and KCNE2 and the accessory protein Ankyrin-B gene, to be responsible for this disorder.

J. Zehelein; D. Thomas; M. Khalil; A.-B. Wimmer; M. Koenen; M. Licka; K. Wu; J. Kiehn; K. Brockmeier; V. A. W. Kreye; C. A. Karle; H. A. Katus; H. E. Ulmer; W. Schoels

2004-01-01

224

Clinical predictive values of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase carriage in patients admitted to medical wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

We aimed to reassess, through clinical items, populations at risk for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) carriage at admission to hospital and to assess the risk of further positive clinical culture of ESBL-E among carriers.\\u000a We performed a 5-month cohort study in a medicine ward of a 500-bed university teaching hospital in the Parisian area of France.\\u000a All admitted patients were

E. Ruppé; A. Pitsch; F. Tubach; V. de Lastours; F. Chau; B. Pasquet; J.-C. Lucet; A. Andremont; B. Fantin

225

Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital. Method A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors. Result In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications. Conclusion We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions. PMID:25183081

Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Berhanie, Alemayehu; Tigistu, Habtamu; Abraham, Yishak; Getachew, Yosheph; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Unakal, Chandrashekhar

2014-01-01

226

Antibiotic resistance and OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wards.  

PubMed

The study was conducted to investigate drug resistance, OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and genetic diversity in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) in burn wards. Airborne A. baumannii were collected in burn wards and their corridors using Andersen 6-stage air sampler from January to June 2011. The isolates susceptibility to 13 commonly used antibiotics was examined according to the CLSI guidelines; OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and molecular diversity of isolates were analyzed, respectively. A total of 16 non-repetitive A. baumannii were isolated, with 10 strains having a resistance rate of greater than 50% against the 13 antibiotics. The resistance rate against ceftriaxone, cyclophosvnamide, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem was 93.75% (15/16), but no isolate observed to be resistant to cefoperazone/sulbactam. Resistance gene analyses showed that all 16 isolates carried OXA-51, and 15 isolates carried OXA-23 except No.15; but OXA-24 and OXA-58 resistance genes not detected. The isolates were classified into 13 genotypes (A-M) according to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) results and only six isolates had a homology ?90%. In conclusion, airborne A. baumannii in the burn wards had multidrug resistance and complex molecular diversity, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were dominant mechanisms for resisting carbapenems. PMID:23886986

Gao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaonan; Bao, Ying; Ma, Ruihua; Zhou, Yufa; Li, Xinxian; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

2014-03-01

227

Integrating care for high-risk patients in England using the virtual ward model: lessons in the process of care integration from three case sites  

PubMed Central

Background Patients at high risk of emergency hospitalisation are particularly likely to experience fragmentation in care. The virtual ward model attempts to integrate health and social care by offering multidisciplinary case management to people at high predicted risk of unplanned hospitalisation. Objective To describe the care practice in three virtual ward sites in England and to explore how well each site had achieved meaningful integration. Method Case studies conducted in Croydon, Devon and Wandsworth during 2011–2012, consisting of semi-structured interviews, workshops, and site visits. Results Different versions of the virtual wards intervention had been implemented in each site. In Croydon, multidisciplinary care had reverted back to one-to-one case management. Conclusions To integrate successfully, virtual ward projects should safeguard the multidisciplinary nature of the intervention, ensure the active involvement of General Practitioners, and establish feedback processes to monitor performance such as the number of professions represented at each team meeting. PMID:24250284

Lewis, Geraint; Vaithianathan, Rhema; Wright, Lorraine; Brice, Mary R; Lovell, Paul; Rankin, Seth; Bardsley, Martin

2013-01-01

228

Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Frail older people experience frequent care transitions and an integrated healthcare system could reduce barriers to transitions between different settings. The study aimed to investigate care transitions of frail older people from acute hospital wards to community healthcare or community hospital wards, within a system that had vertically integrated acute hospital and community healthcare services. Theory and methods The research design was a multimethod, qualitative case study of one healthcare system in England; four acute hospital wards and two community hospital wards were studied in depth. The data were collected through: interviews with key staff (n = 17); focus groups (n = 9) with ward staff (n = 36); interviews with frail older people (n = 4). The data were analysed using the framework approach. Findings Three themes are presented: Care transitions within a vertically integrated healthcare system, Interprofessional communication and relationships; Patient and family involvement in care transitions. Discussion and conclusions A vertically integrated healthcare system supported care transitions from acute hospital wards through removal of organisational boundaries. However, boundaries between staff in different settings remained a barrier to transitions, as did capacity issues in community healthcare and social care. Staff in acute and community settings need opportunities to gain better understanding of each other's roles and build relationships and trust. PMID:24868193

Baillie, Lesley; Gallini, Andrew; Corser, Rachael; Elworthy, Gina; Scotcher, Ann; Barrand, Annabelle

2014-01-01

229

Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Non-ICU Inpatient Wards: A 2-Year Analysis.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Little is known about patient-specific factors contributing to central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) outside of the intensive care unit (ICU). We sought to describe these factors and hypothesized that dialysis patients would comprise a significant proportion of this cohort. DESIGN Retrospective observational study from January 2010 to December 2011 SETTING An 880-bed tertiary teaching hospital PATIENTS Patients with CLABSI in non-ICU wards METHODS CLABSI patients were identified from existing infection-control databases and primary chart review was conducted. National Health and Safety Network (NHSN) definitions were utilized for CLABSI and pathogen classification. CLABSI rates were calculated per patient day. Total mortality rates were inclusive of hospice patients. RESULTS Over a 2-year period, 104 patients incurred 113 CLABSIs for an infection rate of 0.35 per 1,000 patient days. The mean length of hospital stay prior to CLABSI was 16±13.3 days, which was nearly 3 times that of hospital-wide non-ICU length of stay. Only 11 patients (10.6%) received dialysis within 48 hours of CLABSI. However, 67% of patients had a hematologic malignancy, and 91.8% of those admitted with a malignant hematologic diagnosis were neutropenic at the time of CLABSI. Enterococcus spp. was the most common organism recovered, and half of all central venous catheters (CVCs) present were peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC lines). Mortality rates were 18.3% overall and 27.3% among dialysis patients. CONCLUSIONS In patients with CLABSIs outside of the ICU, only 10.6% received dialysis prior to infection. However, underlying hematologic malignancy, neutropenia, and PICC lines were highly prevalent in this population. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0):1-7. PMID:25782897

Rhee, Yoona; Heung, Michael; Chen, Benrong; Chenoweth, Carol E

2015-04-01

230

Treatment in a ward for elderly patients with dementia in Japan  

PubMed Central

Background Japan has become the world’s most aged country. The percentage of elderly people in Japan is estimated to reach 25.2% in 2013, and the number of patients with dementia is estimated to reach 2.5 million in 2015. In addition to its deterioration of physical function and activities of daily living (ADL), behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) often become major clinical problems, greatly annoying patients and their caregivers. In Japan, we utilize wards for elderly patients with dementia (WEDs) for BPSD treatment. However, there are few studies investigating the effectiveness of treatment in a WED. In such treatment, physical complications are a challenge physicians must overcome while treating BPSD and safely returning patients home or to the institutions in which they live. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of treatment in a WED, focusing on physical complications. Methods The subjects were 88 patients who were admitted to and discharged from a WED. Severity of dementia, basic ADL, and BPSD were investigated using the Clinical Dementia Rating, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), and Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Differences in characteristics between patients discharged from the WED because of physical complications and all other patients were also examined. Results: We found significant improvements in the PSMS score and decreases in delusions and sleep disturbances in all patients. Patients discharged from the WED because of physical complications had significantly greater severity of dementia at discharge compared to all other patients. Conclusion: Treatment in a WED seems to be effective for BPSD and ADL, but care should be taken regarding physical complications, especially in patients with advanced dementia. PMID:23494174

Taniguchi, Shogo; Narumoto, Jin; Shibata, Keisuke; Ayani, Nobutaka; Matsuoka, Teruyuki; Okamura, Aiko; Nakamura, Kaeko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Fukui, Kenji

2013-01-01

231

Review of nursing documentation in nursing home wards - changes after intervention for individualized care.  

PubMed

Using standardized assessment instruments may help staff identify needs, problems and resources which could be a basis for nursing care, and facilitate and improve the quality of documentation. The Resident Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS) especially developed for the care of elderly people, was used as a basis for individualized and documented nursing care. This study was carried out to compare nursing documentation in three nursing home wards in Sweden, before and after a one-year period of supervised intervention. The review of documentation focused on structure and content in both nursing care plans and daily notes. The greatest change seen after intervention was the writing of care plans for the individual patients. Daily notes increased both in total and within parts of the nursing process used, but reflected mostly temporary situations. Even though the documentation of nursing care increased the most, it was the theme medical treatment which was the most extensive overall. A difference was seen between computer-triggered Resident Assessment Protocol (RAP) items, obtained from the RAI/MDS assessments, and items in the nursing care plans; the former could be regarded as a means of quality assurance and of making staff aware of the need for further discussions. The RAI/MDS instrument seems to be a useful tool for the dynamic process in nursing care delivered and as a basis for documentation. The documentation should communicate a patient's situation and progress, and if staff are to be able to use it in their everyday nursing care activity, it must be well-structured and freely available. The importance of continuing education and supervision in nursing documentation for development of a reliable source of information was confirmed by the present study. PMID:10354242

Hansebo, G; Kihlgren, M; Ljunggren, G

1999-06-01

232

Kubo formulas for viscosity: Hall viscosity, Ward identities, and the relation with conductivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by recent work on Hall viscosity, we derive from first principles the Kubo formulas for the stress-stress response function at zero wave vector that can be used to define the full complex frequency-dependent viscosity tensor, both with and without a uniform magnetic field. The formulas in the existing literature are frequently incomplete, incorrect, or lack a derivation; in particular, Hall viscosity is overlooked. Our approach begins from the response to a uniform external strain field, which is an active time-dependent coordinate transformation in d space dimensions. These transformations form the group GL(d,R) of invertible matrices, and the infinitesimal generators are called strain generators. These enable us to express the Kubo formula in different ways, related by Ward identities; some of these make contact with the adiabatic transport approach. The importance of retaining contact terms, analogous to the diamagnetic term in the familiar Kubo formula for conductivity, is emphasized. For Galilean-invariant systems, we derive a relation between the stress response tensor and the conductivity tensor that is valid at all frequencies and in both the presence and absence of a magnetic field. In the presence of a magnetic field and at low frequency, this yields a relation between the Hall viscosity, the q2 part of the Hall conductivity, the inverse compressibility (suitably defined), and the diverging part of the shear viscosity (if any); this relation generalizes a result found recently by others. We show that the correct value of the Hall viscosity at zero frequency can be obtained (at least in the absence of low-frequency bulk and shear viscosity) by assuming that there is an orbital spin per particle that couples to a perturbing electromagnetic field as a magnetization per particle. We study several examples as checks on our formulation. We also present formulas for the stress response that directly generalize the Berry (adiabatic) curvature expressions for zero-frequency Hall conductivity or viscosity to the full tensors at all frequencies.

Bradlyn, Barry; Goldstein, Moshe; Read, N.

2012-12-01

233

The Relationship between Therapeutic Alliance and Service User Satisfaction in Mental Health Inpatient Wards and Crisis House Alternatives: A Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Methods and Findings Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. Results We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. Conclusions and Implications We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute ward service users experience a lack of compassion and humanity from ward staff and how this could be changed. PMID:25010773

Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

2014-01-01

234

Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study  

PubMed Central

Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved significantly from admission to discharge both for FPA and non-FPA patients. PMID:17239235

Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

2007-01-01

235

IR system to provide effective IR countermeasure (IRCM) capability to ward off threats posed by shoulder-fired missiles (SFMs)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper present an unique IR sensor technology capable of providing effective deception and noise jamming IReM capability to ward off threats posed by SFMs or STINGER missiles operated by various terrorist groups and Islamic radicals. More than 60,000 such missiles are currently in the hands of Islamic radicals and terrorist groups. Even one such missile can bring down a commercial jet transport carrying more than 350 passengers. The proposed IReM system deploys innovative jamming technique to confuse the missile seeker receiver by introducing sharp FM-modulated noise spikes in the receiver bandwidth, thereby preventing the detection and tracking of aircraft.

Jha, A. R.

2007-10-01

236

Bäcklund Transformations and the Atiyah-Ward ansatz for Noncommutative Anti-Self-Dual Yang-Mills Equations  

E-print Network

We present Backlund transformations for the noncommutative anti-self-dual Yang-Mills equation where the gauge group is G=GL(2) and use it to generate a series of exact solutions from a simple seed solution. The solutions generated by this approach are represented in terms of quasideterminants. We also explain the origins of all of the ingredients of the Backlund transformations within the framework of noncommutative twistor theory. In particular we show that the generated solutions belong to a noncommutative version of the Atiyah-Ward ansatz.

Claire R. Gilson; Masashi Hamanaka; Jonathan J. C. Nimmo

2009-09-17

237

Exilic effects of illness and pain in Solzhenitsyn's Cancer Ward: how sharpening the moral imagination can facilitate repatriation.  

PubMed

This essay uses Solzhenitsyn's Cancer Ward to explore the exilic effects of illness and pain. The novel is uniquely suited for such an analysis given the theme of exile that predominates both in the narrative and in the composition of multiple characters within that narrative. I argue that illness, and in particular pain, is a liminal state, an existential hinterlands. The ethical approach to literature and medicine may suggest, as a response to these exilic effects, the need to cultivate connection and empathy by sharpening the moral imagination. If pain and illness exile the sufferer, the imperative to reach out takes on ethical content. PMID:18946635

Goldberg, Daniel S

2009-03-01

238

[Patient record based ward rounds as an example of coordination between doctors and nurses "courses of action"].  

PubMed

Working in the hospital field is characterized by collective work that requires collaboration and coordination. Characterizing the way, in which individual activities contribute to the construction of a collective activity, is an important issue to better understand teamwork. A phenomenological research approach was applied to analyze the situated activity of nurses and physicians during patient record based ward rounds, according to the theoretical and methodological frame of "course of action" Our findings revealed ward rounds comprising not only an information exchange but a privileged space and moment of construction of knowledge and coordination. Two processes were derived from the actors' commitments and concerns, and from their articulation: "seeking to contribute to a shared interpretation of the situation" and "seeking to develop a precise working knowledge of the situation". These processes contribute to characterize the coordination between the professionals involved in hospital care. Future educational activities for health care professionals should consider the importance of the perception of and meanings for the involved professionals and consider training actions to foster reflecting on and during action. PMID:23923739

Nadot Ghanem, Nicole

2013-06-01

239

Preliminary study of the fungal ecology at the haematology and medical-oncology ward in Bamako, Mali.  

PubMed

Data on fungal epidemiology in sub-Saharan African countries are scarce. This exploratory study aimed to characterize the fungal flora at the Onco-Haematology ward of the National Teaching Hospital of Point G in Bamako, Mali. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the dry and in the rainy seasons. Nasal swab and sputum samples were collected from the hospitalized patients while airborne fungal spores were collected using electrostatic dust-fall collectors. Fungi were identified by their morphological characteristics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Candida albicans was the most frequent yeast species colonizing patients; Aspergillus species were isolated in 86 % of the patients and were the main airborne environmental contaminants. Overall, airborne fungal contamination rates increased from 33.8 % in the dry to 66.2 % in the rainy season (p < 0.001). The most frequent Aspergillus species were Aspergillus niger (36.6 %) and Aspergillus flavus (32.92 %). In contrast, Aspergillus fumigatus (5.43 %) was relatively rare. This high level of fungal exposure raises concern regarding the management of at-risk patients in this Onco-Haematology ward and stresses the need for strengthening the mycological diagnostic capacities to accompany the implementation of adapted fungal infection prevention and management policies. PMID:24889723

Niaré-Doumbo, Safiatou; Normand, Anne Cécile; Diallo, Yacouba Lazarre; Dembelé, Abdoul Karim; Thera, Mahamadou A; Diallo, Dapa; Piarroux, Renaud; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ranque, Stéphane

2014-08-01

240

A Study on the Magnitude and the Effectiveness of the Observation Ward of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Background: The observation ward (OW) allows patients to be reassessed and monitored before deciding either to admit or to discharge them. This is a six-month descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in the observation ward of the Emergency Department (ED) of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan. The objective of this study was to examine the demographic characteristics and clinical profiles of adult observed patients and to determine the effectiveness of OW management. Methods: Patients were selected randomly by convenience sampling. One hundred and twenty-four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 40.3 ± 18.5 years (95% CI: 37.2 to 43.8). Results: Among the common clinical problems were abdominal discomfort (23%), diarrhoea and vomiting (13%) and fever (13%). Reasons for OW admission included diagnostic uncertainty (63%) and short course of treatment (33%). The mean length of stay was 4.1 ± 1.8 hours (95% CI=3.8 to 4.4 hours). Most of the patients (85%) were discharged. Conclusions: The OW of HUSM is effective in managing adult patients as determined by the hospitalisation rate and the length of stay. PMID:22135524

Ahmad, Rashidi; Nik Abdul Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Mohd Noh, Abu Yazid; Nik Abdul Rahman, Nik Ariff; Mohamad, Nasir; Baharudin, Kamarul Aryffin

2010-01-01

241

The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience  

PubMed Central

To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

2014-01-01

242

Genetic diversity in sugarcane varieties in Brazil based on the Ward-Modified Location Model clustering strategy.  

PubMed

We evaluated the genetic diversity of 77 clones of sugarcane used in crosses made by the Brazilian interuniversity network for the development of the sugar/energy sector (RIDESA) breeding program. Characterization of the genotypes was carried out at the ratoon stage, based on eight morphological traits and seven agronomic traits. Diversity analysis was carried out beginning with the Ward-Modified Location Model. The ideal number of groups was three. Groups 1, 2, and 3 were composed of 37, 21, and 19 accessions, respectively. Group 1 was formed entirely of commercial varieties (hybrids of advanced generations) and elite clones, with the exception of the old varieties 'Caiana Fita' and 'Cana Blanca' (hybrids of Saccharum officinarum). In general, group 2 had more divergent accessions regarding origin, including L60-14, NG57-6, TUC77-42, IN84-105 (hybrid of S. officinarum), and 28NG289 (species of S. robustum). Group 3 was formed entirely of commercial varieties and elite clones from the RIDESA program, with the exception of genotypes Co285 (India), Q124 (Australia) and VAT90-212 (unknown origin). The analysis based on the Ward-Modified Location Model procedure resulted in an adequate and clearly discriminating grouping of sugarcane accessions, allowing the use of all the available information about the genotypes, in a mix of continuous and categorical variables. PMID:24535897

Brasileiro, B P; Marinho, C D; Costa, P M A; Moreira, E F A; Peternelli, L A; Barbosa, M H P

2014-01-01

243

A cost-benefit analysis of twice-daily consultant ward rounds and clinical input on investigation and pharmacy costs in a major teaching hospital in the UK  

PubMed Central

Objectives Misuse of investigations, medications and hospital beds is costing the National Health Service (NHS) billions of pounds with little evidence that approaches centred on reducing overuse are sustainable. Our previous study demonstrated that twice-daily consultant ward rounds reduce inpatient length of stay and suggested a reduction in overuse of investigations and medications. This study aims to assess the impact of daily consultant ward rounds on the use of investigations and medications and estimate the potential cost benefit. Settings The study was performed on two medical wards in a major city university teaching hospital in Liverpool, UK, receiving acute admissions from medical assessment and emergency departments. Participants and intervention The total number of patients admitted, investigations performed and pharmacy costs incurred were collected for 2?years before and following a change in the working practice of consultants from twice-weekly to twice-daily consultant ward rounds on the two medical wards. Outcome measures We performed a cost-benefit analysis to assess the net amount of money saved by reducing inappropriate investigations and pharmacy drug use following the intervention. Results Despite a 70% increase in patient throughput (p<0.01) the investigations and pharmacy, costs per patient reduced by 50% over a 12-month period (p<0.01) and were sustained for the next 12?months. The reduction in investigations and medication use did not have any effect on the readmission or mortality rate (p=NS), whereas, the length of stay was almost halved (p<0.01). Daily senior clinician input resulted in a net cost saving of £336?528 per year following the intervention. Conclusions Daily consultant input has a significant impact on reducing the inappropriate use of investigations and pharmacy costs saving the NHS more than £650K on the two wards over a 2-year period. PMID:25854972

Ahmad, Aftab; Weston, Philip J; Ahmad, Mahin; Sharma, Dushyant; Purewal, Tejpal

2015-01-01

244

Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward  

PubMed Central

Background Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches such as the Health Workers for Change initiative have been successful in improving provider-client relationships in various developing country settings, but have not yet been reported in the complex environment of hospital wards. We evaluated the HWC approach for improving the relationship between nurses and parents on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. Methods The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after the workshops, by means of an adapted Picker questionnaire. Two focus-group discussions were held with the workshop participants six months after the intervention. Results During the workshops, nurses demonstrated awareness of poor relationships between themselves and mothers. To tackle this, they proposed measures including weekly meetings to solve problems, maintain respect and increase cooperation, and representation to administrative forces to request better working conditions such as equipment, salaries and staff numbers. The results of the parent satisfaction questionnaire showed some improvement in responsiveness of nurses to client needs, but overall the mean percentage of parents reporting each of 20 problems was not statistically significantly different after the intervention, compared to before it (38.9% versus 41.2%). Post-workshop focus-group discussions with nursing staff suggested that nurses felt more empathic towards mothers and perceived an improvement in the relationship, but that this was hindered by persisting problems in their working environment, including poor relationships with other staff and a lack of response from hospital administration to their needs. Conclusion The intended outcome of the intervention was not met. The priorities of the intervention – to improve nurse-parent relationships – did not match the priorities of the nursing staff. Development of awareness and empathy was not enough to provide care that was satisfactory to clients in the context of working conditions that were unsatisfactory to nurses. PMID:19549319

Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose; Reyburn, Hugh; Poulsen, Anja; Chandler, Clare IR

2009-01-01

245

Disengaged: a qualitative study of communication and collaboration between physicians and other professions on general internal medicine wards  

PubMed Central

Background Poor interprofessional communication in hospital is deemed to cause significant patient harm. Although recognition of this issue is growing, protocols are being implemented to solve this problem without empirical research on the interprofessional communication interactions that directly underpin patient care. We report here the first large qualitative study of directly-observed talk amongst professions in general internal medicine wards, describing the content and usual conversation partners, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms by which current patterns of interprofessional communications may impact on patient care. Methods Qualitative study with 155 hours of data-collection, including observation and one-on-one shadowing, ethnographic and semi-structured interviews with physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) wards of two urban teaching hospitals in Canada. Data were coded and analysed thematically with a focus on collaborative interactions between health professionals in both interprofessional and intraprofesional contexts. Results Physicians in GIM wards communicated with other professions mainly in structured rounds. Physicians’ communications were terse, consisting of reports, requests for information, or patient-related orders. Non-physician observations were often overlooked and interprofessional discussion was rare. Intraprofessional interactions among allied health professions, and between nursing, as well as interprofessional interactions between nursing and allied health were frequent and deliberative in character, but very few such discussions involved physicians, whose deliberative interactions were almost entirely with other physicians. Conclusion Without interprofessional problem identification and discussion, physician decisions take place in isolation. While this might be suited to protocol-driven care for patients whose conditions were simple and courses predictable, it may fail complex patients in GIM who often need tailored, interprofessional decisions on their care. Interpersonal communication training to increase interprofessional deliberation may improve efficiency, patient-centredness and outcomes of care in hospitals. Also, electronic communications tools which reduce cognitive burden and facilitate the sharing of clinical observations and orders could help physicians to engage more in non-medical deliberation. Such interventions should take into account real-world power differentials between physicians and other health professions. PMID:24274052

2013-01-01

246

W.Fundamenski, T.Eich, D.Moulton, F.Militello, C.Lowry, G.Maddison, E.Havlickova, D.Ward, R.Kemp, M.Wischmeier and D.C.McDonald  

E-print Network

W.Fundamenski, T.Eich, D.Moulton, F.Militello, C.Lowry, G.Maddison, E.Havlickova, D.Ward, R.Kemp, M.Maddison 1 , E.Havlickova 1 , D.Ward 1 , R.Kemp 1 , M.Wischmeier 2 and D.C.McDonald 1 1 EURATOM/CCFE Fusion

247

The application of heat pipe heat exchangers to improve the air quality and reduce the energy consumption of the air conditioning system in a hospital ward—A full year model simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to study the effect of heat pipe heat exchangers on the existing air conditioning system of a hospital ward located in Malaysia, a tropical region. The present research employs the transient system simulation software (TRNSYS) to study the hour-by-hour performance of the system in terms of supply duct air and indoor air conditions in the ward space.

M. Ahmadzadehtalatapeh; Y. H. Yau

2011-01-01

248

[The treatment of thyroid diseases using 131I in a special ward with a liquid waste storage plant].  

PubMed

This paper deals with the calculation of doses for organs of special interest under 131I treatment of thyroid diseases. Also the effective dose equivalent to the body of the patient, exclusive of the thyroid, is given. The ratio between the exposure by self-irradiation and the exposure from another patient in 2 m distance both having undergone 131I treatment with 50% uptake, is about 1000:1. Therefore positioning of a lead shield between two such patients in the same room is, from the point of view of radiation protection, unnecessary. A complete mathematical description of iodine distribution in a nuclear medicine ward and its liquid waste storage plant is given. The use in the authors' own department of these equations is demonstrated. Computer programs for additional calculations are available. PMID:8327334

Wellner, U; Schicha, H

1993-06-01

249

The development and implementation of an inter-professional simulation based pediatric acute care curriculum for ward health care providers.  

PubMed

Abstract An interprofessional, simulation based, acute care course for ward health care providers was developed and implemented with the objectives of teaching identification of deteriorating patients, practicing crisis resource management and basic life support skills, and using the SBAR (Situation Background Assessment Recommendation) communication tool. Thirty-eight physicians and 51 nurses attended the four separate courses. Nine questions on a 5-point Likert scale and two open-ended questions revealed that over 95% of respondents strongly agreed/agreed that facilitators encouraged active participation, lectures were presented in an interesting manner, and that simulations were useful for practical skills and for practicing communication. Open-ended questions revealed that participants felt more confident, understood the importance of communication, roles, teamwork and valued the day. Based on this evaluation, the program was regarded as feasible and acceptable to all health care providers. PMID:25421455

Kotsakis, Afrothite; Mercer, Karen; Mohseni-Bod, Hadi; Gaiteiro, Rose; Agbeko, Rachel

2014-11-25

250

Nurses' experience of using electronic patient records in everyday practice in acute/inpatient ward settings: A literature review.  

PubMed

Electronic patient record (EPR) systems have a huge impact on nursing documentation. Although the largest group of end-users of EPRs, nurses have had minimal input in their design. This study aimed to review current research on how nurses experience using the EPR for documentation. A literature search was conducted in Medline and Cinahl of original, peer-reviewed articles from 2000 to 2009, focusing on nurses in acute/ inpatient ward settings. After critical assessment, two quantitative and three qualitative articles were included in the study. Results showed that nurses experience widespread dissatisfaction with systems. Current systems are not designed to meet the needs of clinical practice as they are not user-friendly, resulting in a potentially negative impact on individualized care and patient safety. There is an urgent need for nurses to be directly involved in software design to ensure that the essence and complexity of nursing is not lost in the system. PMID:20413414

Stevenson, Jean E; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Johansson, Pauline E

2010-03-01

251

Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to-Face Proximity and Mixing Patterns with Wearable Sensors  

PubMed Central

Background Nosocomial infections place a substantial burden on health care systems and represent one of the major issues in current public health, requiring notable efforts for its prevention. Understanding the dynamics of infection transmission in a hospital setting is essential for tailoring interventions and predicting the spread among individuals. Mathematical models need to be informed with accurate data on contacts among individuals. Methods and Findings We used wearable active Radio-Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) to detect face-to-face contacts among individuals with a spatial resolution of about 1.5 meters, and a time resolution of 20 seconds. The study was conducted in a general pediatrics hospital ward, during a one-week period, and included 119 participants, with 51 health care workers, 37 patients, and 31 caregivers. Nearly 16,000 contacts were recorded during the study period, with a median of approximately 20 contacts per participants per day. Overall, 25% of the contacts involved a ward assistant, 23% a nurse, 22% a patient, 22% a caregiver, and 8% a physician. The majority of contacts were of brief duration, but long and frequent contacts especially between patients and caregivers were also found. In the setting under study, caregivers do not represent a significant potential for infection spread to a large number of individuals, as their interactions mainly involve the corresponding patient. Nurses would deserve priority in prevention strategies due to their central role in the potential propagation paths of infections. Conclusions Our study shows the feasibility of accurate and reproducible measures of the pattern of contacts in a hospital setting. The obtained results are particularly useful for the study of the spread of respiratory infections, for monitoring critical patterns, and for setting up tailored prevention strategies. Proximity-sensing technology should be considered as a valuable tool for measuring such patterns and evaluating nosocomial prevention strategies in specific settings. PMID:21386902

Isella, Lorenzo; Romano, Mariateresa; Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro; Colizza, Vittoria; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Gesualdo, Francesco; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Ravà, Lucilla; Rizzo, Caterina; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio

2011-01-01

252

Specific character of anaerobic bacterial infections in patients treated in transplantation wards at one of the clinical hospitals in Warsaw.  

PubMed

Immunocompromised patients and patients undergoing invasive procedures are predisposed to bacterial infections, due to the possibility of micro-organism translocation from their physiological habitat. Infectious complications may occur both in the early and late post-transplantation periods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proportion as well as susceptibility profiles of obligatory anaerobes in the etiology of infections in patients hospitalized at transplantation wards of a large clinical hospital in Warsaw. A total of 104 strains of obligatory anaerobes derived from patients hospitalized in two transplantation clinics at a clinical hospital in Warsaw were evaluated. The strains were isolated from 87 clinical samples collected from 84 patients of two transplantation wards between 2007 and 2012. A total of 104 obligatory anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated and identified, with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria constituting 60.6% and 39.4% of the isolates, respectively. Almost exclusively non-spore-forming anaerobes were detected in evaluated samples. The present study showed all isolated Gram-positive bacteria to be susceptible to ß-lactam antibiotics. Metronidazole-resistant bacteria were found among the genera Propionibacterium and Actinomyces. All Gram-negative rods were susceptible to imipenem and metronidazole. Among them, Bacteroides spp. and Parabacteroides distasonis showed resistance to penicillin G (100%). Because of their pathogenicity and altered antibiotic susceptibility profiles, the bacteria of the genera Bacteroides and Parabacteroides are of greatest clinical importance. Approximately 25% of isolates exhibit also resistance to clindamycin. Because of the growing rates of clindamycin resistance, the role of metronidazole in the treatment of Bacteroides spp. is of increasing importance. PMID:25380872

Kierzkowska, M; Majewska, A; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Mlynarczyk, A; Chmura, A; Durlik, M; Deborska-Materkowska, D; Paczek, L; Mlynarczyk, G

2014-10-01

253

The Association between Pain and Depression, Anxiety, and Cognitive Function among Advanced Cancer Patients in the Hospice Ward  

PubMed Central

Background Pain is the most common but severe physical symptom among cancer patients. This study aimed to identify correlation between pain and psychological symptoms for terminal cancer patients. Methods The total sample consisted of 69 subjects who were recruited through two hospice wards, limited to patients who were mentally alert and had no psychiatric diseases. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the numerical rating scale: the pain-free group, 0 to 3 points; and the pain group, 4 to 10 points. We used the Beck depression inventory (BDI), Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), mini-mental status examination-Korea (MMSE-K), and short form 36 health survey (SF-36). Logistic regression analysis was performed to verify the correlation between pain and other psychosocial disorders. Results The mean scores of BDI in the pain-free and pain groups were 25.7 and 31.5; mean BAI scores were 23.4 and 34.7; mean MMSE-K scores were 25.7 and 21.8, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in SF-36 score except scores of body pain. The results of logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, types of cancer, history of chemotherapy, or radiotherapy showed significant correlation between pain and depression (BDI ? 24; odds ratio [OR], 4.199; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.171 to 15.060), and pain and cognitive impairment (MMSE < 24; OR, 5.495; 95% CI, 1.449 to 20.843); but not between pain and anxiety (BAI ? 22; OR, 3.011; 95% CI, 0.907 to 9.997). Conclusion Pain significantly affects depression and cognitive impairment among advanced cancer patients in the hospice ward. Accordingly, more aggressive treatment of pain is required to reduce not only physical suffering but also physiological distress. PMID:24106587

Ko, Hae Jin; Seo, Se Jung; Kim, Hyo Min; Chung, Seung Eun

2013-01-01

254

Assessment of selected quality fields of nursing care in neurosurgical wards: a prospective study of 530 people – multicenter studies  

PubMed Central

Background One of the elements influencing the assessment of nursing care quality is the assessment of the nurse’s functions that determine the nurse’s particular tasks. The aim of this work was to assess selected tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality on neurosurgical wards, on the basis of patients’ and nursing staff’s opinions. Materials and methods The research was carried out on neurosurgical wards in Poland on a group of 455 patients and 75 nurses. In order to assess nursing care quality, an author’s original questionnaire (Questionnaire – Patient Satisfaction) was used. Results Statistically significant differences concerned particular groups (both patients and nurses) in the assessment of selected issues: providing information about performed activities and operations (P=0.000 and P=0.040), respecting personal dignity and assuring discretion during the operations (P=0.000 and P=0.001), speed of response to patient’s requests (P=0.000 and P=0.000), time availability of nurses for the patient (P=0.000 and P=0.000), providing information about further self-care at home (P=0.032, P=0.008), and nurses’ attitude (kindness, courtesy, tenderness, care) to patients (patient’s assessment only P=0.000). Conclusion Selected tasks in the field of the caring function of nurses were assessed differently by particular groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the assessment of particular tasks in the opinions of patients and nurses, which means that both examined groups similarly assessed tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality. PMID:25170257

Œlusarz, Robert; Biercewicz, Monika; Barczykowska, Ewa; Haor, Beata; G?owacka, Mariola

2014-01-01

255

Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden, Steven Smith, Bruce McNamara, Edgar Buck  

E-print Network

Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden Chemical fingerprinting of anthropogenic and mineral uranium leading to chemical age dating of reactive uranium samples Develop x-ray and/or electron microscopy protocol for non- destructive uranium sample

256

A Prospective Study on Malnutrition and Duration of Hospitalisation among Hospitalised Geriatric Patients Admitted to Surgical and Medical Wards of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elderly people are known to be at a greater risk of malnutrition, particularly those having diseases or illnesses. A prospective study was undertaken on 92 hospitalised geriatric patients (45.6% males), aged 60 to 89 years old, admitted to surgical and medical wards at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM). The study aimed to assess malnutrition at admission, day 3 and day

Suzana Shahar; Wong Sun Fun; Wan Chak; Pa' Wan Chik

257

Resisting the overplot: Intertextual interventions and generic interplays in the writings of Margaret Fuller, Elizabeth Stoddard, Lydia Maria Child, and Julia Ward Howe  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project examines Margaret Fuller's Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Elizabeth Stoddard's The Morgesons and Two Men, Lydia Maria Child's Philothea, and Julia Ward Howe's The Hermaphrodite. These texts that have troubled critical paradigms because they do not adhere to mainstream nineteenth-century models of women's writing that celebrate the trials and rewards resulting from a heroine's relegation to the domestic

Nicole C Livengood

2007-01-01

258

Evaluating alternative hypotheses for the early evolution and diversification of ants Sen G. Brady, Ted R. Schultz, Brian L. Fisher, and Philip S. Ward  

E-print Network

Evaluating alternative hypotheses for the early evolution and diversification of ants Seán G. Brady and diversification of ants Sea´n G. Brady* , Ted R. Schultz*, Brian L. Fisher , and Philip S. Ward§¶ *Department September 28, 2006 (received for review July 12, 2006) Ants are the world's most diverse and ecologically

Villemant, Claire

259

Governing patient safety: lessons learned from a mixed methods evaluation of implementing a ward-level medication safety scorecard in two English NHS hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Relatively little is known about how scorecards presenting performance indicators influence medication safety. We evaluated the effects of implementing a ward-level medication safety scorecard piloted in two English NHS hospitals and factors influencing these. Methods We used a mixed methods, controlled before and after design. At baseline, wards were audited on medication safety indicators; during the ‘feedback’ phase scorecard results were presented to intervention wards on a weekly basis over 7?weeks. We interviewed 49 staff, including clinicians and managers, about scorecard implementation. Results At baseline, 18.7% of patients (total n=630) had incomplete allergy documentation; 53.4% of patients (n=574) experienced a drug omission in the preceding 24?h; 22.5% of omitted doses were classified as ‘critical’; 22.1% of patients (n=482) either had ID wristbands not reflecting their allergy status or no ID wristband; and 45.3% of patients (n=237) had drugs that were either unlabelled or labelled for another patient in their drug lockers. The quantitative analysis found no significant improvement in intervention wards following scorecard feedback. Interviews suggested staff were interested in scorecard feedback and described process and culture changes. Factors influencing scorecard implementation included ‘normalisation’ of errors, study duration, ward leadership, capacity to engage and learning preferences. Discussion Presenting evidence-based performance indicators may potentially influence staff behaviour. Several practical and cultural factors may limit feedback effectiveness and should be considered when developing improvement interventions. Quality scorecards should be designed with care, attending to evidence of indicators’ effectiveness and how indicators and overall scorecard composition fit the intended audience. PMID:24029440

Ramsay, Angus I G; Turner, Simon; Cavell, Gillian; Oborne, C Alice; Thomas, Rebecca E; Cookson, Graham; Fulop, Naomi J

2014-01-01

260

A survey of the quality of nursing services for brain trauma patients in the emergency wards of hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran (2012)  

PubMed Central

Background: Head trauma is the main cause of disabilities and death among young people, and the side effects of head trauma pose some of the greatest medical challenges. Rapid diagnosis and the use of proper treatments can prevent more severe brain damage. The purpose of this research was to determine the quality of nursing services provided to brain trauma patients in hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive, cross-sectional study in the emergency wards of selected hospitals in Guilan in 2012. The research population was comprised of all the brain trauma patients in these hospitals. We developed a two-section questionnaire, ascertained its validity, and determined that it had a reliability of 88% (Cronbach’s alpha). Subsequently, we used the questionnaire for gathering data. The data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software, and descriptive analysis tests (frequency rate and average) and deductive analyses tests (chi-squared) also were used. Results: The results showed that the quality of health services provided to brain-trauma patients in the emergency ward was at the moderate level of 58.8% of the cases and at a low level in 41.2% of the cases. Conclusion: Based on the results that showed that the services were of moderate quality, the staff members in the emergency ward were required to update their knowledge and use the required measures to minimize or prevent side effects in brain-trauma patients; clearly, mastery of such measures was a real need among the emergency ward’s staff.

Majidi, Seyed Ali; Ayoubian, Ali; Mardani, Sheida; Hashemidehaghi, Zahra

2014-01-01

261

The Effect of Additional Training on Motor Outcomes at Discharge from Recovery Phase Rehabilitation Wards: A Survey from Multi-Center Stroke Data Bank in Japan  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential benefits of additional training in patients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation ward using the data bank of post-stroke patient registry. Subjects and Methods Subjects were 2507 inpatients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation wards between November 2004 and November 2010. Participants were retrospectively divided into four groups based upon chart review; patients who received no additional rehabilitation, patients who were added with self-initiated off hours training, patients who were added with off hours training by ward staff, patients who received both self-initiated training and training by ward staff. Parameters for assessing outcomes included length of stay, motor/cognitive subscales of functional independent measures (FIM) and motor benefit of FIM calculated by subtracting the score at admission from that at discharge. Results Participants were stratified into three groups depending on the motor FIM at admission (?28, 29?56, 57?) for comparison. Regarding outcome variables, significant inter-group differences were observed in all items examined within the subgroup who scored 28 or less and between 29 and 56. Meanwhile no such trends were observed in the group who scored 57 or more compared with those who scored less. In a decision tree created based upon Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection method, variables chosen were the motor FIM at admission (the first node) additional training (the second node), the cognitive FIM at admission(the third node). Conclusions Overall the results suggest that additional training can compensate for the shortage of regular rehabilitation implemented in recovery phase rehabilitation ward, thus may contribute to improved outcomes assessed by motor FIM at discharge. PMID:24626224

Shiraishi, Nariaki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Jeong, Seungwon; Sugiyama, Motoya; Kondo, Katsunori; Kuzuya, Masafumi

2014-01-01

262

Spatial variation of heart failure and air pollution in Warwickshire, UK: an investigation of small scale variation at the ward-level  

PubMed Central

Objectives To map using geospatial modelling techniques the morbidity and mortality caused by heart failure within Warwickshire to characterise and quantify any influence of air pollution on these risks. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Warwickshire, UK. Participants Data from all of the 105 current Warwickshire County wards were collected on hospital admissions and deaths due to heart failure. Results In multivariate analyses, the presence of higher mono-nitrogen oxide (NOx) in a ward (3.35:1.89, 4.99), benzene (Ben) (31.9:8.36, 55.85) and index of multiple deprivation (IMD; 0.02: 0.01, 0.03), were consistently associated with a higher risk of heart failure morbidity. Particulate matter (Pm; ?12.93: ?20.41, ?6.54) was negatively associated with the risk of heart failure morbidity. No association was found between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and heart failure morbidity. The risk of heart failure mortality was higher in wards with a higher NOx (4.30: 1.68, 7.37) and wards with more inhabitants 50+ years old (1.60: 0.47, 2.92). Pm was negatively associated (?14.69: ?23.46, ?6.50) with heart failure mortality. SO2, Ben and IMD scores were not associated with heart failure mortality. There was a prominent variation in heart failure morbidity and mortality risk across wards, the highest risk being in the regions around Nuneaton and Bedworth. Conclusions This study showed distinct spatial patterns in heart failure morbidity and mortality, suggesting the potential role of environmental factors beyond individual-level risk factors. Air pollution levels should therefore be taken into account when considering the wider determinants of public health and the impact that changes in air pollution might have on the health of a population. PMID:25468504

Bennett, Oscar; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Ji, Chen; Linnane, John; Clarke, Aileen

2014-01-01

263

Microbial Contamination on Used Surgical Masks among Hospital Personnel and Microbial Air Quality in their Working Wards: A Hospital in Bangkok  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the relationship of bacterial and fungal contamination on used surgical masks worn by the hospital personnel and microbial air quality in their working wards. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 230 used surgical masks collected from 214 hospital personnel, and 215 indoor air samples collected from their working wards to culture for bacterial and fungal counts. This study was carried out at the hospital in Bangkok. Group or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lacto-phenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient at the significant level of p<0.050. Results Means and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal contamination on inside area of the used masks were 47 ± 56 and 15 ± 9 cfu/ml/piece, and on outside area were 166 ± 199 and 34 ± 18 cfu/ml/piece, respectively, p<0.001. The bacterial and fungal contamination on used masks from hospital personnel working in the male and female medical wards and out-patient department, as well as the bacterial and fungal counts of the indoor air sample collected from the same area were relatively higher than the other wards. The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi contaminated on inside and outside areas of the used masks and air samples were similar (Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp.; respectively). For its relationship, results found that bacterial and fungal counts in air samples showed significantly positive correlation with the bacterial contamination load on outside area of the used masks, r=0.16, p=0.018 and r=0.21, p=0.003, respectively. Conclusion High bacterial contamination on outside area of the used masks was demonstrated, and it showed a significant correlation with microbial air quality of working wards. PMID:25337311

Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Aiempradit, Natkitta; Vatanasomboon, Pisit

2014-01-01

264

Temporal monitoring and rapid disappearance of perennial ice-cover on Canada's northernmost lake: Ward Hunt Lake, Nunavut  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent environmental changes in the High Arctic have had a striking impact on surface cryospheric features such as lake ice, glaciers and pack ice. Recent reports of changes on Ellesmere Island's north coast have included the breakup of Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, the loss of epishelf lakes and the thinning of land fast ice. On arctic lakes, perennial ice cover has become less common and lake phenology is shifting as a consequence of warmer waters and decreased albedo. A GEOEYE satellite image acquired in late August 2011 revealed a complete absence of ice-cover on Ward Hunt Lake (WHL), Canada's northernmost lake, while lake ice thickness was reported to be around four meters July 1958 and August 2003. Using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and oblique photographs of the lake, we conducted a yearly ice-cover monitoring of WHL since 1995 and confirmed the presence of perennial ice-cover throughout this period, with cover ranging from 63% to 85% (mean= 76%) of the lake's surface between 1995 and 2008. Climatic data was obtained from previous studies and from the SILA weather station network on Ward Hunt Island and nearby Lake A on Ellesmere Island. In 2008, a very warm summer melted 52% of the lake ice-cover, and a complete loss of ice-cover was observed in 2011. Early and/or late summer ice thickness measurements over the last ten years and reported measurements from the literature have indicated a rapid decline from around 4 m in the 1950's, early and late 1990's and early 2000's down to 3m in 2008 and 1.6m in 2010. During a field survey in late June and early July 2011, less than half the lake (48%) was covered by perennial ice, which was split in two rafts no thicker than two meters. A field visit in 2012 revealed a seasonal candle ice cover thickness of 1.76m on July 1st, which is similar to the 2011 status (1.9m). Overall, climate data showed a general warming trend in the last 50 years, with declining freezing degree days and increasing melting degree days. This warming resulted in a lack of recovery of perennial ice cover after warmer summers and a positive feedback effect clearly shown by an increase in the water column temperature profiles collected since 2010. Overall, possible effects of the warming temperature are the lowering of the lake and the ice-cover albedo by ponding and moating and by changing ice-type from multi-year to candle ice. This in turn delays ice formation during freeze-back and reduces perennial lake ice thickness in a positive feedback effect. Candle ice is also more fragile and more sensitive to mechanical fractures than perennial ice and these disturbances can accelerate lake ice cover destruction in summer. The implications of a reduced ice cover include an accelerating effect on lake phenology with water column mixing occurring earlier in the melt season in 2011 and 2012 than in 2010.

Paquette, M.; Fortier, D.; Mueller, D.; Sarrazin, D.; Vincent, W. F.

2012-12-01

265

Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District  

PubMed Central

Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33) plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies) while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies). Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species) followed by roots (13 species) while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further enhances the validity of plants used in traditional medicine in this region as resources that can be relied on to provide effective, accessible and affordable basic healthcare to the local communities. The plants documented also have the potential of being used in drug development and on farm domestication initiatives. PMID:20663166

2010-01-01

266

The effect of a virtual ward program on emergency services utilization and quality of life in frail elderly patients after discharge: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Attendance at emergency departments and unplanned hospital readmissions are common for frail older patients after discharge from hospitals. A virtual ward service was piloted to deliver “hospital-at-home” services by community nurses and geriatricians to frail older patients immediately after their discharge from hospital to reduce emergency services utilization. Objectives This study examined the impacts of the virtual ward service on changes in the patients’ emergency attendance and medical readmissions, and their quality of life (QOL). Methods A matched-control quasi-experimental study was conducted at four hospitals, with three providing the virtual ward service (intervention) and one providing the usual community nursing care (control). Subjects in the intervention group were those who are at high risk of readmission and who are supported by home carers recruited from the three hospitals providing the virtual ward service. Matched control patients were those recruited from the hospital providing usual care. Outcome measures include emergency attendance and medical readmission in the past 90 days as identified from medical records, and patient-reported QOL as measured by the modified Quality-of-Life Concerns in the End of Life Questionnaire (Chinese version). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared the changes in the outcome variables between groups. Results A total of 39 patients in each of the two groups were recruited. The virtual ward group showed a greater significant reduction in the number of unplanned emergency hospital readmissions (?1.41±1.23 versus ?0.77±1.31; P=0.049) and a significant improvement in their overall QOL (n=18; 0.60±0.56 versus 0.07±0.56; P=0.02), but there was no significant difference in the number of emergency attendances (?1.51±1.25 versus ?1.08±1.48; P=0.29). Conclusion The study results support the effectiveness of the virtual ward service in reducing unplanned emergency medical readmissions and in improving the QOL in frail older patients after discharge. PMID:25678782

Leung, Doris YP; Lee, Diana Tze-Fan; Lee, Iris FK; Lam, Lai-Wah; Lee, Susanna WY; Chan, May WM; Lam, Yin-Ming; Leung, Siu-Hung; Chiu, Pui-Chi; Ho, Nelly KF; Ip, Ming-Fai; Hui, May MY

2015-01-01

267

Infant feeding policies in maternity wards and their effect on breast-feeding success: an analytical overview.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this review is to examine the plausibility of a causal relationship between maternity ward practices and lactation success. METHODS. Studies were located with MEDLINE, from our personal files, and by contacting researchers working in this field. Of the 65 studies originally reviewed, 18 met our inclusion criteria (i.e., hospital-based intervention, experimental design with randomization procedures, or quasi-experimental design with adequate documentation). RESULTS. Meta-analysis indicated that commercial discharge packs had an adverse effect on lactation performance. The impact of early mother-infant contact on lactation success was unclear. Rooming-in and breast-feeding guidance in a rooming-in context had a beneficial impact on breast-feeding among primiparae. Breast-feeding on demand was positively associated with lactation success. In-hospital formula supplementation of 48 mL per day was not associated with poor breast-feeding performance. CONCLUSIONS. Hospital-based breast-feeding interventions can have a beneficial effect on lactation success, particularly among primiparous women. PMID:8279619

Pérez-Escamilla, R; Pollitt, E; Lönnerdal, B; Dewey, K G

1994-01-01

268

The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

1993-06-01

269

The association of drug use and post-traumatic stress reactions due to Hurricane Ike among Fifth Ward Houstonian youth.  

PubMed

This study shows the important link between higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. The study offers secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected on 170 predominately African American males through the Fifth Ward Enrichment program (FWEP) in Houston, Texas, between November and December 2009. Men who stated that in the last week they tried to keep from thinking or talking about the hurricane or things that remind them of what happen were significantly more likely to use alcohol (p < .05), marijuana (p < .01), codeine cough syrup (p < .00), anti-energy drinks (p < .00), crystal methamphetamines (p < .00), and Viagra (p < .00). Unadjusted logistic regression showed that they also experienced over twice the odds of reporting past 30 day use of alcohol (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = .98, 6.8), marijuana (OR = 4.31, 95% CI = 1.2, 15.3), codeine cough syrup (OR = 5.22, 95% CI = 1.4, 19.5), and anti-energy drinks (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.4). Adjusted logistic regression revealed that male youth post-traumatic stress reaction is a significant predictor of marijuana use (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.0, 16.5). This study shows the important link of higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. PMID:20509087

Peters, Ronald J; Meshack, Angela; Amos, Charles; Scott-Gurnell, Kathy; Savage, Charles; Ford, Kentya

2010-01-01

270

Sauti Za Wananchi “voice of the people”: patient satisfaction on the medical wards at a Kenyan Referral Hospital  

PubMed Central

Introduction Patient satisfaction is one indicator of healthcare quality. Few studies have examined the inpatient experiences in resource-scarce environments in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods To examine patient satisfaction on the public medical wards at a Kenyan referral hospital, we performed a cross-sectional survey focused on patients’ satisfaction with medical information and their relationship with staffing and hospital routine. Ratings of communication with providers, efforts to protect privacy, information about costs, food, and hospital environment were also elicited. Results Overall, the average patient satisfaction rating was 64.7, nearly midway between “average” and “good” Higher rated satisfaction was associated with higher self-rated general health scores and self-rated health gains during the hospitalization (p = 0.023 and p = 0.001). Women who shared a hospital bed found privacy to be “below average” to “poor” Most men (72.7%) felt information about costs was insufficient. Patients rated food and environmental quality favorably while also frequently suggesting these areas could be improved. Conclusion Overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the care provided. These ratings may reflect modest patients’ expectations as well as acceptable circumstances and performance. Women expressed concern about privacy while men expressed a desire for more information on costs. Inconsistencies were noted between patient ratings and free response answers. PMID:25469201

Stone, Geren Starr; Jerotich, Tecla Sum; Cheriro, Betsy Rono; Kiptoo, Robert Sitienei; Crowe, Susie Joanne; Koros, Elijah Kipkorir; Muthoni, Doreen Mutegi; Onalo, Paul Theodore

2014-01-01

271

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Contamination in Bedside Surfaces of a Hospital Ward and the Potential Effectiveness of Enhanced Disinfection with an Antimicrobial Polymer Surfactant.  

PubMed

The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced from 4.4 ± 8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07 ± 0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards. PMID:25768241

Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

2015-01-01

272

Identification, investigation and management of patient-to-patient hepatitis B transmission within an inpatient renal ward in North West England  

PubMed Central

Background Transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is rare within healthcare settings in developed countries. The aim of the article is to outline the process of identification and management of transmission of acute hepatitis B in a renal inpatient ward. Methods The case was identified through routine reporting to public health specialists, and epidemiological, virological and environmental assessment was undertaken to investigate the source of infection. An audit of HBV vaccination in patients with chronic kidney disease was undertaken. Results Investigations identified inpatient admission to a renal ward as the only risk factor and confirmed a source patient with clear epidemiological, virological and environmental links to the case. Multiple failures in infection control leading to a contaminated environment and blood glucose testing equipment, failure to isolate a non-compliant, high-risk patient and incomplete vaccination for patients with chronic kidney disease may have contributed to the transmission. Conclusions Patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis B was shown to have occurred in a renal ward in the UK, due to multiple failures in infection control. A number of policy changes led to improvements in infection control, including reducing multi-function use of wards, developing policies for non-compliant patients, improving cleaning policies and implementing competency assessment for glucometer use and decontamination. HBV vaccination of renal patients may prevent patient-to-patient transmission of HBV. Consistent national guidance should be available, and clear pathways should be in place between primary and secondary care to ensure appropriate hepatitis B vaccination and follow-up testing. PMID:25713718

Kliner, Merav; Dardamissis, Evdokia; Abraham, K. Abraham; Sen, Rachel; Lal, Pankaj; Pandya, Bhavna; Mutton, Ken J.; Wong, Christopher

2015-01-01

273

Is a mandatory intensive care unit stay needed after liver transplantation? Feasibility of fast-tracking to the surgical ward after liver transplantation.  

PubMed

The continuation of hemodynamic, respiratory, and metabolic support for a variable period after liver transplantation (LT) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is considered routine by many transplant programs. However, some LT recipients may be liberated from mechanical ventilation shortly after the discontinuation of anesthesia. These patients might be appropriately discharged from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) to the surgical ward and bypass the ICU entirely. In 2002, our program started a fast-tracking program: select LT recipients are transferred from the operating room to the PACU for recovery and tracheal extubation with a subsequent transfer to the ward, and the ICU stay is completely eliminated. Between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007, 1045 patients underwent LT at our transplant program; 175 patients were excluded from the study. Five hundred twenty-three of the remaining 870 patients (60.10%) were fast-tracked to the surgical ward, and 347 (39.90%) were admitted to the ICU after LT. The failure rate after fast-tracking to the surgical ward was 1.90%. The groups were significantly different with respect to the recipient age, the raw Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score at the time of LT, the recipient body mass index (BMI), the retransplantation status, the operative time, the warm ischemia time, and the intraoperative transfusion requirements. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the raw MELD score at the time of LT, the operative time, the intraoperative transfusion requirements, the recipient age, the recipient BMI, and the absence of hepatocellular cancer/cholangiocarcinoma were significant predictors of ICU admission. In conclusion, we are reporting the largest single-center experience demonstrating the feasibility of bypassing an ICU stay after LT. PMID:22140001

Taner, C Burcin; Willingham, Darrin L; Bulatao, Ilynn G; Shine, Timothy S; Peiris, Prith; Torp, Klaus D; Canabal, Juan; Nguyen, Justin H; Kramer, David J

2012-03-01

274

Localization of Romano-Ward long QT syndrome gene, LQTI, to the interval between tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and D11S1349  

SciTech Connect

The Romano-Ward long-QT syndrome (RWLQTS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by heritable prolongation of the QT interval, syncope, and sudden death. Identification of the gene responsible for this syndrome may aid the diagnosis, management, and treatment of patients with this disease. Furthermore, it may lead to improved understanding of and therapy for other sympathetic-dependent ventricular arrhythmias. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Russell, M.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)]|[National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hulse, J.E.; Campbell, R.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01

275

Patient characteristics of women and men cared for during the first 10 years at an inpatient hospice ward in Sweden.  

PubMed

The hospice philosophy with focus on the patient's autonomy and the ideal of a good death are the overall objectives of palliative care. Often-raised questions, when discussing hospice, are for which of the incurable ill inpatient hospice is the most optimal care alternative together with who are making use of hospice. The aim of the present study was to describe patient characteristics such as age, marital status, diagnosis, referral source and length of stay (LoS) in relation to gender, during the first decade at an inpatient hospice ward (1992-2001). Data, obtained from medical register, were analysed by using descriptive statistics and the chi-square test. The number of patients was 666 women and 555 men, and most of them were elderly. In some respects significant differences were observed between women and men. More women than men were single, had cancer with relatively rapid trajectory and were referred from the oncology department. Men, more often than women, were diagnosed with cancers with a somewhat longer trajectory. Despite the longer trajectory, the LoS was shorter for men (median =13 days) than for women (median = 17 days). The most frequent referral source was hospital, though men, younger men in particular, were more often referred from home-based hospice care than women. During the last 3 years self-referrals were documented. Self-referrals can be seen as one distinct expression from a standpoint of one's own active choice compared with other referrals. Altogether, self-referrals were less frequent among women than men but in relation to age, self-referrals were more common among the youngest (<60 years) and the oldest women (>85 years) than men in the same age groups. Further studies illuminating a gender perspective can broaden the understanding of what these differences may imply for women and men. PMID:16756516

Karlsson, Inga Lill Källström; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

2006-06-01

276

Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions among Renal Failure Patients of Nephrology Ward in a South Indian Tertiary Care Hospital.  

PubMed

Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010) was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%), clonidine and metoprolol (3.80%) respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%), decreased drug efficacy (29.11%) and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%), were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52%) constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic. PMID:23204624

Rama, Mylapuram; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Acharya, Leelavathi D; Attur, R P; Reddy, P N; Raghavan, S V

2012-01-01

277

Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions among Renal Failure Patients of Nephrology Ward in a South Indian Tertiary Care Hospital  

PubMed Central

Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010) was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%), clonidine and metoprolol (3.80%) respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%), decreased drug efficacy (29.11%) and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%), were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52%) constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic. PMID:23204624

Rama, Mylapuram; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Acharya, Leelavathi D; Attur, R. P.; Reddy, P. N.; Raghavan, S. V.

2012-01-01

278

The completeness of medication histories in hospital medical records of patients admitted to general internal medicine wards  

PubMed Central

Aims Accurate recording of medication histories in hospital medical records (HMR) is important when patients are admitted to the hospital. Lack of registration of drugs can lead to unintended discontinuation of drugs and failure to detect drug related problems. We investigated the comprehensiveness of medication histories in HMR with regard to prescription drugs by comparing the registration of drugs in HMR with computerized pharmacy records obtained from the community pharmacy. Methods Patients admitted to the general ward of two acute care hospitals were included in the study after obtaining informed consent. We conducted an interview on drugs used just prior to hospitalization and extracted the medication history from the HMR. Pharmacy records were collected from the community pharmacists over a 1 year period before the admission. Drugs in the pharmacy records were defined as possibly used (PU-drugs) when they were dispensed before the admission date and had a theoretical enddate of 7 days before the admission date or later. If any PU-drug was not recorded in the HMR, we asked the patient whether they were using that drug or not. Results Data were obtained from 304 patients who had an average age of 71 (range 40–92) years. The total number of drugs according to the HMR was 1239, 43 of which were not used. When compared with the pharmacy records we found an extra 518 drugs that were not recorded in the HMR but were possibly in use. After verification with the patients, 410 of these were indeed in use bringing the total number of drugs in use to 1606. The type of drugs in use but not recorded in the HMR covered a broad spectrum and included many drugs considered to be important such as cardiovascular drugs (n = 67) and NSAIDs (n = 31). The percentages of patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5–11 drugs not recorded in the HMR were 39, 28, 16, 8, 3.6 and 5.5, respectively. Of the 1606 drugs in use according to information from all sources, only 38 (2.4%) were not retrievable in the pharmacy records when the complete year prior to hospitalization was evaluated. Conclusions The medication history in the hospital medical record is often incomplete, as 25% of the prescription drugs in use is not recorded and 61% of all patients has one of more drugs not registered. Pharmacy records from the community pharmacist can be used to obtain more complete information on the medication history of patients admitted to the hospital. PMID:10848724

Lau, Hong Sang; Florax, Christa; Porsius, Arijan J; de Boer, Anthonius

2000-01-01

279

Prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens in Canadian hospitals: results of the Canadian Ward Surveillance Study (CANWARD 2008).  

PubMed

A total of 5,282 bacterial isolates obtained between 1 January and 31 December 31 2008, inclusive, from patients in 10 hospitals across Canada as part of the Canadian Ward Surveillance Study (CANWARD 2008) underwent susceptibility testing. The 10 most common organisms, representing 78.8% of all clinical specimens, were as follows: Escherichia coli (21.4%), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; 13.9%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (10.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7.1%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.0%), coagulase-negative staphylococci/Staphylococcus epidermidis (5.4%), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; 5.1%), Haemophilus influenzae (4.1%), Enterococcus spp. (3.3%), Enterobacter cloacae (2.2%). MRSA comprised 27.0% (272/1,007) of all S. aureus isolates (genotypically, 68.8% of MRSA were health care associated [HA-MRSA] and 27.6% were community associated [CA-MRSA]). Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli occurred in 4.9% of E. coli isolates. The CTX-M type was the predominant ESBL, with CTX-M-15 the most prevalent genotype. MRSA demonstrated no resistance to ceftobiprole, daptomycin, linezolid, telavancin, tigecycline, or vancomycin (0.4% intermediate intermediate resistance). E. coli demonstrated no resistance to ertapenem, meropenem, or tigecycline. Resistance rates with P. aeruginosa were as follows: colistin (polymyxin E), 0.8%; amikacin, 3.5%; cefepime, 7.2%; gentamicin, 12.3%; fluoroquinolones, 19.0 to 24.1%; meropenem, 5.6%; piperacillin-tazobactam, 8.0%. A multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype occurred frequently in P. aeruginosa (5.9%) but uncommonly in E. coli (1.2%) and K. pneumoniae (0.9%). In conclusion, E. coli, S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA), P. aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, K. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and Enterococcus spp. are the most common isolates recovered from clinical specimens in Canadian hospitals. The prevalence of MRSA was 27.0% (of which genotypically 27.6% were CA-MRSA), while ESBL-producing E. coli occurred in 4.9% of isolates. An MDR phenotype was common in P. aeruginosa. PMID:20805395

Zhanel, George G; DeCorby, Melanie; Adam, Heather; Mulvey, Michael R; McCracken, Melissa; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Nichol, Kimberly A; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Baudry, Patricia J; Tailor, Franil; Karlowsky, James A; Walkty, Andrew; Schweizer, Frank; Johnson, Jack; Hoban, Daryl J

2010-11-01

280

Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction) with care was experienced by carers from MMHU compared with standard care wards. PMID:24362015

Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

2013-01-01

281

Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address psychosocial needs of HCR patients, assist with triage in a system where both medical inpatient beds and psychiatric services are scarce commodities, and help ensure appropriate follow up. PMID:23088583

2012-01-01

282

Perennial water stratification and the role of basal freshwater flow in the mass balance of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, Canadian High Arctic  

SciTech Connect

A pronounced perennial water stratification in Disraeli Fjord behind the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf on the north coast of Ellesmere Island is described. The ice shelf acts as a hanging dam at the mouth of the fjord and minimizes mixing between inflowing meltwater runoff and the seawater. Consequently, a 4 1 -m-deep layer of low salinity water, interposed between a 2- to 3-m-thick fjord surface ice layer and deeper seawater, is impounded behind the ice shelf. Highly negative delta 18O Values and high tritium activity in the low salinity water indicate it is derived primarily from snow-meltwater. Highly negative delta 18O values and high tritium values in a 5-m-thick basal ice layer in Hobson's Choice Ice Island, which broke off the East Ward Hunt Ice Shelf in 1982-83, might be evidence that basal accretion from freshwater flowing out of Disraeli Fjord below the ice shelf occurred prior to the calving. Using the known chronology of tritium occurrence in precipitation since 1952 and the measured levels in the basal ice, mean basal accretion rates of 96-141 mm yr-1 (water equivalent, w.e.) are calculated. The record of ablation and accumulation at the surface of the East Ward Hunt Ice Shelf for the period 1966-1982 shows an accumulated loss at the surface of 1.26 m (w.e.) at a mean annual rate of 74 mm yr-1. Therefore, despite many consecutive warm summers with considerable surface melting and runoff, the calculated basal accretion exceeds the surface loss and the ice shelf has increased, or at least maintained, its thickness. The thickening has been possible because of the feedback system created by the location of the ice shelf across the mouth of the fjord, the resultant water stratification and the outflow of freshwater below the ice shelf.

Jefferies, M.O.

1992-03-01

283

Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences  

PubMed Central

Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions. PMID:24556792

Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

2014-01-01

284

[Epidemiological study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the urology ward in 2003--nosocomial infection and community-acquired infection].  

PubMed

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with the exception of urinary strains were isolated from the inpatients in urology ward hospitalized in 2003 and medical workers. Biotype according to the production of coagulase, enterotoxin and mupirocin sensitivity, and genotype by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and clinical background were determined for the MRSA strains to analyze the transmission route of the infection. In 34 medical workers in urology ward, MRSA were isolated in 6 (17.6%) workers from the nasal cavity, and the rate of colonization in doctors was higher than in nurses. Furthermore, mupirocin-resistant strains were isolated from two medical workers. 18 MRSA strains were isolated in 2003 and the accounting was 8 strains from wounds, 6 strains from sputum or nasal cavity, 3 strains from blood, and 2 strains from urinary tract. Most of the patients with MRSA had operations under general anesthesia or were under severe conditions with malignant tumors. No MRSA was detected at the same time from the same rooms. There were some rooms in which the MRSA detected rate was high, however no MRSA was isolated from hospital environments and dumping bacteria. These results suggest that the involvement of the medical workers and the spread of MRSA in the society might be important as infection source and for transmission of MRSA in hospital. PMID:15508720

Ishikawa, Kihohito; Miyakawa, Shinzaburo; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka

2004-09-01

285

'It makes me want to run away to Saudi Arabia': management and implementation challenges for public financing reforms from a maternity ward perspective.  

PubMed

Poor practice by health care workers has been identified as contributing to high levels of maternal mortality in South Africa. The country is undergoing substantial structural and financial reforms, yet the impact of these on health care workers performance and practice has not been studied. This study, which consisted of an ethnography of two labour wards (one rural and one urban), aimed to look at the factors that shaped everyday practice of midwives working in district hospitals in South Africa during the implementation of a public sector reform to improve financial management. The study found that the Public Financing Management Act, that aimed to improve the efficiency and accountability of public finance management, had the unintended consequence of causing the quality of maternal health services to deteriorate in the hospital wards studied. The article supports the need for increased dialogue between those working in the sexual and reproductive health and health systems policy arenas, and the importance of giving a voice to front-line health workers who implement systems changes. However, it cautions that there are no simple answers to how health systems should be organized in order to better provide sexual and reproductive health services, and suggests instead that more attention in the debate needs to be paid to the challenges of policy implementation and the socio-political context and process issues which affect the success or failure of the implementation. PMID:15452017

Penn-Kekana, Loveday; Blaauw, Duane; Schneider, Helen

2004-10-01

286

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).  

PubMed

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

287

Limits of patient isolation measures to control extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae: model-based analysis of clinical data in a pediatric ward  

PubMed Central

Background Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are a growing concern in hospitals and the community. How to control the nosocomial ESBL-E transmission is a matter of debate. Contact isolation of patients has been recommended but evidence supporting it in non-outbreak settings has been inconclusive. Methods We used stochastic transmission models to analyze retrospective observational data from a two-phase intervention in a pediatric ward, successively implementing single-room isolation and patient cohorting in an isolation ward, combined with active ESBL-E screening. Results For both periods, model estimates suggested reduced transmission from isolated/cohorted patients. However, most of the incidence originated from sporadic sources (i.e. independent of cross-transmission), unaffected by the isolation measures. When sporadic sources are high, our model predicted that even substantial efforts to prevent transmission from carriers would have limited impact on ESBL-E rates. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that, considering the importance of sporadic acquisition, e.g. endogenous selection of resistant strains following antibiotic treatment, contact-isolation measures alone might not suffice to control ESBL-E. They also support the view that estimating cross-transmission extent is key to predicting the relative success of contact-isolation measures. Mathematical models could prove useful for those estimations and guide decisions concerning the most effective control strategy. PMID:23618041

2013-01-01

288

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients)  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65–101). Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

289

Neuroscience nurses caring for family members of patients with acquired brain injury in acute ward settings: nursing defensively in a double bind.  

PubMed

This article presents the findings from a doctoral research study that led to the development of an inductively derived substantive theory, "Nursing Defensively". This theory describes the process of coping used by staff nurses when caring for family members of acquired brain injury (ABI) patients. This study was conducted in two acute care teaching and one non-teaching neuroscience wards in Toronto, Canada, using grounded theory method. A total of 20 registered nurses participated in the study. Supporting data are presented to permit the reader to "hear" the voices of the nurses caring for families of ABI patients in today's clinical environments. In addition, the author's interpretation of the significance of the findings for nursing is offered for the reader's reflection for applicability to relevant clinical environments and a call for clinical leadership in practice, education and research. PMID:19146205

Yetman, Linda

2008-01-01

290

Clinical and Organizational Factors Related to the Reduction of Mechanical Restraint Application in an Acute Ward: An 8-Year Retrospective Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of mechanical restraint use in an acute psychiatric ward and to analyze which variables may have significantly influenced the use of this procedure. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in the Servizio Psichiatrico di Diagnosi e Cura (SPDC) of Modena Centro. The following variables of our sample, represented by all restrained patients admitted from 1-1-2005 to 31-12-2012, were analyzed: age, gender, nationality, psychiatric diagnoses, organic comorbidity, state and duration of admission, motivation and duration of restraints, nursing shift and hospitalization day of restraint, number of patients admitted at the time of restraint and institutional changes during the observation period. The above variables were statistically compared with those of all other non-restrained patients admitted to our ward in the same period. Results: Mechanical restraints were primarily used as a safety procedure to manage aggressive behavior of male patients, during the first days of hospitalization and night shifts. Neurocognitive disorders, organic comorbidity, compulsory state and long duration of admission were statistically significantly related to the increase of restraint use (p<.001, multivariate logistic regression). Institutional changes, especially more restricted guidelines concerning restraint application, were statistically significantly related to restraint use reduction (p<.001, chi2 test, multivariate logistic regression). Conclusion: The data obtained highlight that mechanical restraint use was influenced not only by clinical factors, but mainly by staff and policy factors, which have permitted a gradual but significant reduction in the use of this procedure through a multidimensional approach. PMID:25320635

Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Miani, Fiorenza; Formicola, Vitantonio; Ferri, Paola

2014-01-01

291

Evaluation of the Use and Reasons for Not Using a Helmet by Motorcyclists Admitted to the Emergency Ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital in Kerman  

PubMed Central

Background: Motorcycle crashes are the cause of severe morbidity and mortality especially because of head injuries. It seems that wearing a helmet has an effective role in protection against head injuries. Nevertheless, motorcyclists usually have no tendency to wear a helmet when driving in cities and have several reasons for this behavior. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the use and reasons for not using a helmet by motorcyclists admitted to an emergency ward of a trauma hospital due to accident in Kerman, Iran. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out by recoding the opinions of motorcyclists who had been transferred to the emergency ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital (Kerman/Iran). Since no data was available on the frequency of the use of helmets, a pilot study was carried out and a sample size of 377 was determined for the main study. Then a researcher-made questionnaire was used to investigate the motorcyclists’ reasons for not using a helmet. Results: Only 21.5% of the motorcyclists had been wearing helmets at the time of the accident. The most frequent reasons for not using a helmet were the heavy weight of the helmet (77%), feeling of heat (71.4%), pain in the neck (69.4%), feeling of suffocation (67.7%), limitation of head and neck movements (59.6%) and all together, physical discomfort was the main cause of not wearing a helmet during motorcycle rides. Conclusions: In general, it appears that it is possible to increase the use of helmets by eliminating its physical problems, and increasing the knowledge of community members in relation to the advantages of helmet use, which will result in a significant decrease in traumas resulting from motorcycle accidents. PMID:25599066

Faryabi, Javad; Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Alirezaee, Shahin

2014-01-01

292

Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.  

PubMed

From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (P<0.05), and most of these isolates were isolated during a later year than cluster E isolates (P<0.05). By MLST analysis, 94% of cluster E and G isolates (29/31) were ST68. Although no time or space clustering could be identified by the conventional hospital-acquired infection monitoring system, E. coli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (P<0.05). Isolates obtained from patients who had stayed in the respiratory care ward had a significantly higher rate of aac(6')-Ib-cr and blaCTX-M-14 positivity, and were more likely to belong to ST68/S68-like (all P<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report of prolonged clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period. PMID:25168964

Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

2014-11-01

293

A program of professional accreditation of hospital wards by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI): self- versus peer-evaluation.  

PubMed

The Italian Society of Internal Medicine has developed a voluntary program of professional accreditation of the medical units run by its constituency. Participation in the program, which is meant to foster staff involvement in clinical governance, includes all the medical personnel and nurses. Accreditation is awarded provided the candidate unit is able to adhere to a pre-established set of quality standards, meet a number of clinical and organizational requirements and monitor specific indicators. Self-evaluation is the first step in the program, followed by a site visit by a team of peer internists experienced in quality auditing. The program, which has involved so far 19 units, has considered a number of clinical requirements related to the three most frequent diseases in Italian internal medicine wards: chronic heart failure (CHF), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hepatic cirrhosis with ascites (HCA). The comparison between self- and peer-evaluation witnessed less discrepancies for disease-related than for organizational requirements, the latter being met to a smaller degree by most units. In particular, concordance was higher for requirements and indicators pertaining to CHF and HCA than to COPD. This program of professional accreditation developed by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine has the potential to describe, monitor and improve clinical and organizational performances in internal medicine. It should also be seen as a contribution to implement the strategy of professional governance in hospitals. PMID:21833771

Vanoli, Massimo; Traisci, Giancarlo; Franchini, Alberto; Benetti, Gianpiero; Serra, Pietro; Monti, Maria Alice

2012-02-01

294

Nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and skills in these areas-a viewpoint: case of health centre wards in Finland.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating-were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic-to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

Vesterinen, Soili; Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

2013-01-01

295

Anammox moving bed biofilm reactor pilot at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plants in Brooklyn, New York: start-up, biofilm population diversity and performance optimization.  

PubMed

New York City Environmental Protection in conjunction with City College of New York assessed the application of the anammox process in the reject water treatment using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) located at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plant, in Brooklyn, NY. The single-stage nitritation/anammox MBBR was seeded with activated sludge and consequently was enriched with its own 'homegrown' anammox bacteria (AMX). Objectives of this study included collection of additional process kinetic and operating data and assessment of the effect of nitrogen loading rates on process performance. The initial target total inorganic nitrogen removal of 70% was limited by the low alkalinity concentration available in the influent reject water. Higher removals were achieved after supplementing the alkalinity by adding sodium hydroxide. Throughout startup and process optimization, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were used for monitoring the relevant species enriched in the biofilm and in the suspension. Maximum nitrogen removal rate was achieved by stimulating the growth of a thick biofilm on the carriers, and controlling the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the bulk flow and the nitrogen loading rates per surface area; all three appear to have contributed in suppressing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria activity while enriching AMX density within the biofilm. PMID:25401307

Mehrdad, M; Park, H; Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Chandran, K

2014-01-01

296

Isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of Pantoea (Enterobacter) agglomerans isolated from consumed powdered infant formula milk (PIF) in NICU ward: First report from Iran  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives Pantoea agglomerans is a Gram-negative rod in the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is reported as both commensal and opportunistic pathogen of animals and humans. This organism is potential candidates as powdered infant milk formula-borne opportunistic pathogen. The aim of our study was to perform isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Pantoea (Enterobacter) agglomerans strains isolated from consumed powdered infant formula milk (PIF) in NICU ward. Materials and Methods A of total 125 powdered infant formula milk (PIF) samples were purchased from hospital drug stores between June 2011 to March 2012. P. agglomerans was isolated according to FDA method. For final confirmation, biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system were used. The drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Results Out of the 125 samples investigated, 8 (6.4%) samples were positive for P. agglomerans and these were uniformly susceptible to tigecycline, chloramphenicol, cefepime, levofloxacin, minocycline and colistin. Fifty percent of isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, moxifloxacin, cotrimoxazole and ticarcillin. Conclusion Controlling the primary populations of P. agglomerans during the PIF production process and preventing post processing contamination, by using suitable microbiological guidelines, is accessible. Sanitary practices for the preparation of infant formula in both the home and hospitals should be carefully controlled. PMID:24475334

Mardaneh, Jalal; Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi Soltan

2013-01-01

297

Cellular mechanisms of mutations in Kv7.1: auditory functions in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome vs. Romano-Ward syndrome.  

PubMed

As a result of cell-specific functions of voltage-activated K(+) channels, such as Kv7.1, mutations in this channel produce profound cardiac and auditory defects. At the same time, the massive diversity of K(+) channels allows for compensatory substitution of mutant channels by other functional channels of their type to minimize defective phenotypes. Kv7.1 represents a clear example of such functional dichotomy. While several point mutations in the channel result in a cardio-auditory syndrome called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), about 100-fold mutations result in long QT syndrome (LQTS) denoted as Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS), which has an intact auditory phenotype. To determine whether the cellular mechanisms for the diverse phenotypic outcome of Kv7.1 mutations, are dependent on the tissue-specific function of the channel and/or specialized functions of the channel, we made series of point mutations in hKv7.1 ascribed to JLNS and RWS. For JLNS mutations, all except W248F yielded non-functional channels when expressed alone. Although W248F at the end of the S4 domain yielded a functional current, it underwent marked inactivation at positive voltages, rendering the channel non-functional. We demonstrate that by definition, none of the JLNS mutants operated in a dominant negative (DN) fashion. Instead, the JLNS mutants have impaired membrane trafficking, trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Cis-Golgi. The RWS mutants exhibited varied functional phenotypes. However, they can be summed up as exhibiting DN effects. Phenotypic differences between JLNS and RWS may stem from tissue-specific functional requirements of cardiac vs. inner ear non-sensory cells. PMID:25705178

Mousavi Nik, Atefeh; Gharaie, Somayeh; Jeong Kim, Hyo

2015-01-01

298

Prescribing patterns of antibiotics and sensitivity patterns of common microorganisms in the Internal Medicine ward of a teaching hospital in Western Nepal: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Information about antibiotic use and resistance patterns of common microorganisms are lacking in hospitals in Western Nepal. Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. The parameter: Defined daily dose/100 bed-days, provides an estimate of consumption of drugs among hospital in-patients. This study was carried out to collect relevant demographic information, antibiotic prescribing patterns and the common organisms isolated including their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Methods The study was carried out over a 3-month period (01.04.2002 to 30.06.2002) at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Western Nepal. The median number of days of hospitalization and mean ± SD cost of antibiotics prescribed during hospital stay were calculated. The use of antibiotics was classified for prophylaxis, bacteriologically proven infection or non-bacteriologically proven infection. Sensitivity patterns of the common organisms were determined. Defined daily dose/100 bed-days of the ten most commonly prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Results 203 patients were prescribed antibiotics; 112 were male. Median duration of hospitalization was 5 days. 347 antibiotics were prescribed. The most common were ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and benzylpenicillin. Mean ± SD cost of antibiotics was 16.5 ± 13.4 US$. Culture and sensitivity testing was carried out in 141 patients. The common organisms isolated were H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem in the Internal Medicine ward. Formulation of a policy for hospital antibiotic use and an educational programme especially for junior doctors is required. PMID:12904265

Shankar, Ravi Pathiyil; Partha, Praveen; Shenoy, Nagesh Kumar; Easow, Joshy Maducolil; Brahmadathan, Kottallur Narayanan

2003-01-01

299

The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is…

Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

1983-01-01

300

CURRICULUM VITAE GEOFF K. WARD  

E-print Network

of California, Irvine; Irvine, CA (2008-12) Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice. Northeastern University; Boston, MA (2003-8) Post-doctoral Fellow (Vera Institute of Justice) and Visiting Scholar Democracy and Juvenile Justice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Journal Articles, Book Chapters

Brody, James P.

301

CURRICULUM VITAE GEOFF K. WARD  

E-print Network

; Irvine, CA (2008-12) Assistant Professor, College of Criminal Justice of Justice) and Visiting Scholar (Columbia University, Institute for Research in African Savers: Racial Democracy and Juvenile Justice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Brody, James P.

302

Application of a trigger tool in near real time to inform quality improvement activities: a prospective study in a general medicine ward  

PubMed Central

Background Retrospective record review using trigger tools remains the most widely used method for measuring adverse events (AEs) to identify targets for improvement and measure temporal trends. However, medical records often contain limited information about factors contributing to AEs. We implemented an augmented trigger tool that supplemented record review with debriefing front-line staff to obtain details not included in the medical record. We hypothesised that this would foster the identification of factors contributing to AEs that could inform improvement initiatives. Method A trained observer prospectively identified events in consecutive patients admitted to a general medical ward in a tertiary care academic medical centre (November 2010 to February 2011 inclusive), gathering information from record review and debriefing front-line staff in near real time. An interprofessional team reviewed events to identify preventable and potential AEs and characterised contributing factors using a previously published taxonomy. Results Among 141 patients, 14 (10%; 95% CI 5% to 15%) experienced at least one preventable AE; 32 patients (23%; 95% CI 16% to 30%) experienced at least one potential AE. The most common contributing factors included policy and procedural problems (eg, routine protocol violations, conflicting policies; 37%), communication and teamwork problems (34%), and medication process problems (23%). However, these broad categories each included distinct subcategories that seemed to require different interventions. For instance, the 32 identified communication and teamwork problems comprised 7 distinct subcategories (eg, ineffective intraprofessional handovers, poor interprofessional communication, lacking a shared patient care, paging problems). Thus, even the major categories of contributing factors consisted of subcategories that individually related to a much smaller subset of AEs. Conclusions Prospective application of an augmented trigger tool identified a wide range of factors contributing to AEs. However, the majority of contributing factors accounted for a small number of AEs, and more general categories were too heterogeneous to inform specific interventions. Successfully using trigger tools to stimulate quality improvement activities may require development of a framework that better classifies events that share contributing factors amenable to the same intervention. PMID:25749028

Wong, Brian M; Dyal, Sonia; Etchells, Edward E; Knowles, Sandra; Gerard, Lauren; Diamantouros, Artemis; Mehta, Rajin; Liu, Barbara; Baker, G Ross; Shojania, Kaveh G

2015-01-01

303

Kinematic history of the retroarc thrust belt in the central Andes of Argentina at 24-25°S: significant Andean shortening and sporadic foreland-ward deformation propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The southward along-strike transition from major thin-skinned shortening of Bolivia to the significantly lower magnitude of thick-skinned shortening in northwestern Argentina has often been attributed to the presence of a thick mid to late Paleozoic section in Bolivia relative to a thin group of correlative rocks in northwestern Argentina that were affected by significant Cretaceous rifting. Despite the Andes being regarded as an archetype of ocean-continent convergence, the northwestern Argentine Andes have remained enigmatic in a structural and tectonic context. This study integrates regional geological mapping, structural analysis, and geo- and thermochronology from the Salta province of northwestern Argentina. Geological mapping in the Cachi range at ~25° S latitude revealed the presence of an ~60° west-dipping package of rocks, passing from low grade phyllites in the eastern part of the range into cordierite-bearing, anatectic and arc-related rocks in the core of the range (one anatectic pluton yielded a U/Pb zircon age of 488 ± 10 Ma). Detrital zircons record U-Pb ages demonstrating that the highest-grade, structurally highest rocks are the oldest (maximum depositional age (MDA) ~548 Ma), rocks at structurally lower levels are younger (MDA ~538 Ma), whereas the structurally lowest rocks are the youngest (MDA ~523 Ma). Double dating some of these same zircons using the low temperature U-Th/He system indicates that at least 6-8 km of Miocene (15.7 ± 0.4 Ma) exhumation occurred in the core of the range at this time, yet exhumation at the eastern range margin was insufficient to reset zircons. U/Pb zircon ages from a tuff within growth strata in the footwall of a major thrust fault ~50 km east of Cachi demonstrate that shortening was ongoing there at 9.4 ± 0.4 Ma, yielding a propagation rate of the thrust belt of ~8 km/Ma. Since ~9 Ma, deformation has jumped ~150 km eastward to the Santa Barbara ranges, yielding an average rate of >30 km/Ma. Many thrust belts are thought to behave in a simple, foreland-propagating manner, with deformation accommodated on faults progressively farther into the retroarc through time, responding to conditions imposed by a critical or supercritical orogenic wedge. Deviations in behavior from this simple model may reflect fundamental processes influencing the orogenic system. These preliminary data from northwestern Argentina suggest that in this region, the Cenozoic thrust belt is not simply a gradual, eastward-propagating system, but rather jumps sporadically, possibly due to feedback among geologic processes elsewhere in the orogen that perturb the orogenic wedge into a supercritical state of taper, promoting rapid foreland-ward propagation of the thrust front.

Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; Decelles, P. G.; Reiners, P. W.

2009-12-01

304

An assessment of the efficacy of searching in biomedical databases beyond MEDLINE in identifying studies for a systematic review on ward closures as an infection control intervention to control outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of our study is to determine the value and efficacy of searching biomedical databases beyond MEDLINE for systematic reviews. Methods We analyzed the results from a systematic review conducted by the authors and others on ward closure as an infection control practice. Ovid MEDLINE including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, CINAHL Plus, LILACS, and IndMED were systematically searched for articles of any study type discussing ward closure, as were bibliographies of selected articles and recent infection control conference abstracts. Search results were tracked, recorded, and analyzed using a relative recall method. The sensitivity of searching in each database was calculated. Results Two thousand ninety-five unique citations were identified and screened for inclusion in the systematic review: 2,060 from database searching and 35 from hand searching and other sources. Ninety-seven citations were included in the final review. MEDLINE and Embase searches each retrieved 80 of the 97 articles included, only 4 articles from each database were unique. The CINAHL search retrieved 35 included articles, and 4 were unique. The IndMED and LILACS searches did not retrieve any included articles, although 75 of the included articles were indexed in LILACS. The true value of using regional databases, particularly LILACS, may lie with the ability to search in the language spoken in the region. Eight articles were found only through hand searching. Conclusions Identifying studies for a systematic review where the research is observational is complex. The value each individual study contributes to the review cannot be accurately measured. Consequently, we could not determine the value of results found from searching beyond MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL with accuracy. However, hand searching for serendipitous retrieval remains an important aspect due to indexing and keyword challenges inherent in this literature. PMID:25387523

2014-01-01

305

Impact of conversion from an open ward design paediatric intensive care unit environment to all isolated rooms environment on incidence of bloodstream infections and antibiotic resistance in Southern Israel (2000 to 2008).  

PubMed

We studied the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical aspects and outcome of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit. All BSI episodes were prospectively identified and analysed. The paediatric intensive care unit moved in 2006 from an open-plan unit to a new (all single room) unit. Three hundred and fifty-three BSI episodes occurred in 299 of 4162 patients. Overall, BSI incidence was 85 per 1000 hospitalised children. Fewer BSI episodes occurred during the last two years of the study (2007 to 2008), compared with 2000 to 2006 (70 of 1061 admissions, 6.5% versus 283 of 3101 admissions, 9.1%, respectively, P=0.01). There were 127 of 340 (37.4%) community-acquired and 213 of 340 (62.6%) nosocomial BSI episodes (31 of 1000 and 51 of 1000, respectively). Nosocomial BSI episodes decreased during 2007 to 2008 versus 2000 to 2006 (37.7% versus 55.8%, P=0.03). In 448 instances, pathogens were isolated, 231 (52%) Gram-positive and 188 (42%) Gram-negative. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (41.1%, 19.9% and 11.7%, respectively) were the most common Gram-positive and Enterobacteriaceae spp. the most frequent Gram-negative organisms (45.2%, of them Klebsiella spp. and E. coli 40% and 29.4%, respectively). A significant decrease was recorded during 2007 to 2008 in Enterobacteriaceae resistance to piperacillin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Thirty of 299 (10%, 9 with S. pneumoniae-BSI) patients died. A significant decrease in BSI and nosocomial incidence and Enterobacteriaceae spp. antibiotic resistance was recorded following the conversion of the paediatric intensive care unit from an open ward to an all isolated rooms environment. PMID:25579287

Lazar, I; Abukaf, H; Sofer, S; Peled, N; Leibovitz, E

2015-01-01

306

Cruelty in Maternity Wards: Fifty Years Later  

PubMed Central

Fifty years have passed since a scandal broke over inhumane treatment of laboring women in U.S. hospitals, yet first-person and eyewitness reports document that medical care providers continue to subject childbearing women to verbal and physical abuse and even to what would constitute sexual assault in any other context. Women frequently are denied their right to make informed decisions about care and may be punished for attempting to assert their right to refusal. Mistreatment is not uncommon and persists because of factors inherent to hospital social culture. Concerted action on the part of all stakeholders will be required to bring about systemic reform. PMID:21629381

Goer, Henci

2010-01-01

307

Using Exercise to Ward Off Depression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exercise can be as effective as psychotherapy and antidepressant therapy in treating mild-to-moderate depression, and even more effective when used in conjunction with them. Exercise can also be preventive therapy for those not clinically depressed. The paper explains how best to work exercise into a depressed patient's therapy. (Author/SM)

Nicoloff, George; Schwenk, Thomas L.

1995-01-01

308

Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... flow of ions between cells. A disruption in ion transport alters the way the heart beats, leading to ... cell ; cell membrane ; channel ; fainting ; gene ; inherited ; ions ; ion transport ; long QT syndrome ; LQTS ; mutation ; potassium ; protein ; sodium ; ...

309

Ward Doesn't Live Here Anymore.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, reproduced from a speech given before the Communications Network in Philanthropy, the author uses television as a metaphor to explain the role of the family in the United States, focusing on the "Leave It to Beaver" series. An oral picture is used to discuss the changing nature of the family and divorce. First the family life of the…

Coleman, Marion Tolbert

310

Methods of Transposition of Nurses between Wards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a computer-implemented method for automating the transposition of a hospital’s nursing staff is proposed. The model is applied to the real case example ‘O’ hospital, which performs a transposition of its nursing staff once a year. Results are compared with real data obtained from this hospital’s current manual transposition system. The proposed method not only significantly reduces the time taken to construct the transposition, thereby significantly reducing management labor costs, but also is demonstrated to increase nurses’ levels of satisfaction with the process.

Miyazaki, Shigeji; Masuda, Masakazu

311

Ward management: education for senior staff nurses.  

PubMed

The key professional challenges for senior staff nurses relate to managerial rather than clinical issues, but there appears to be a lack of educational preparation for the managerial roles expected of them. An educational service was developed, implemented and evaluated in a specialist paediatric unit to address senior staff nurses' concerns related to managerial aspects of their role. An organisational development model was used to negotiate a work-based learning programme that incorporated practice competencies. This was undertaken at an Agenda for Change implementation site, which enabled the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) to be trialled in practice. The educational programme was evaluated positively and practice competency evaluations highlighted how the KSF dimensions provided a usable and relevant breakdown of managerial and leadership issues. The framework provided a professional development tool for staff wishing to progress their managerial knowledge and skills while under supervision. PMID:18500139

Reed, Sarah

2008-04-01

312

Chinese medical ward: an American's observations.  

PubMed

Physicians base their practices on scientific knowledge that varies little from one country to another, but their experience and their careers are shaped by the culture in which they live and work. This essay casts light on medical practice in mainland China, based on three months of field work with an elite group of physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in summer 2009. It is a story of a diverse group of Chinese professionals navigating a demanding profession, and of the foreign college student on whom they left an indelible impact. Many of the normative features of the Chinese medical profession-its chain of command, commitment to medical ethics, and scientific orientation-are highly comparable to the working lives of American physicians. PMID:22643766

Leonard, Ryan A

2012-01-01

313

Applications of Text Analysis Kenneth Ward Church  

E-print Network

­one­L) Character of o{ Recognition form farm _____________________________________ Spelling government goverment Mwords) (per Mwords) _______________________________________________ 2.4 0.7 goverment government 1.6 1 _______________________________________________ 13.6 5.5 The typo goverment is more common than many correctly spelled words: extinct, pellets

Church, Kenneth W.

314

Duplex ultrasound, clinical score, thrombotic risk, and D-dimer testing for evidence based diagnosis and management of deep vein thrombosis and alternative diagnoses in the primary care setting and outpatient ward.  

PubMed

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has an annual incidence of 0.2% in the urban population. First episodes of calf vein thrombosis (CVT) and proximal DVT are frequently elicited by risk factors, including varicose veins, cancer, pregnancy/postpartum, oral contraceptives below the age of 50 years, immobility or surgery. Leg pain and tenderness in the calf and popliteal fossa on physical examination may result from other conditions than DVT labeled as alternative diagnosis (AD) Congenital venous thrombophilia is present in every third first DVT, increased FVIII in every fourth first DVT, and FV Leiden/FII mutation in 40% of women on oral anticonceptive pill before reaching the menopause. Routine thrombophilia testing for FV Leiden/prothrombin mutation and FVIII as main risk factor for venous thrombosis is recommended. Primary superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) and DVT patients with a autosomal dominant family history of DVT are candidates for thrombophilia testing for congenital AT, PC and PS deficiency. The requirement for a safe diagnostic strategy of CVT and DVT should be based on an objective post-test incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) of less than 0.1% with a negative predictive value for exclusion of DVT of 99.9% during 3 months follow-up. Modification of the Wells score by elimination of the "minus 2 points" for AD is mandatory and will improve the diagnostic accuracy of CVT/DVT suspicion in the primary care setting and outpatient ward. The sequential use of complete DUS, ELISA D-dimer testing and modified clinical Wells' score assessment is safe and effective for the exclusion and diagnosis of CVT, DVT and AD. About 10% to 20% of patients with DVT develop overt post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) at one year post-DVT, and both PTS and DVT recurrences further increase to about 30% during long-term follow-up. Objective risk stratification of PTS complications using DUS for recanalization and reflux and D-dimer testing will become an integral part in routine clinical practice to assess the optimal duration of wearing medical elastic stockings and anticoagulation for the prevention DVT recurrence as the best option to reduce the incidence and costs of suffering from irreversible PTS. PMID:24452081

Michiels, J J; Moosdorff, W; Maasland, H; Michiels, J M; Lao, M U; Neumann, H A; Dulicek, P; Stvrtinova, V; Barth, J; Palareti, G

2014-02-01

315

Reservoir characterization of Yates Formation (Permian, Guadalupian), South Ward field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

, with pyrite and salt pits; (6) dolostones with predominantly mudstones and wackestones. Sandstones are sub-arkosic and differ in matrix and cement composition. Depositional environments of the clastics facies vary from shallow marine to continental, eolian...

Dronamraju, Sharma

1997-01-01

316

The pain-free ward: myth or reality.  

PubMed

Over the last 25 years, pediatric care has changed dramatically with increased survival after premature birth, more complex care, better outcomes, and reduced mortality. There is a better understanding of how pain pathways and receptor systems develop and also how to assess pain at different stages of development. The myth that children do not feel pain has been comprehensively dispelled. Safe analgesic dose regimens for neonates, infants, and children have been developed based upon a better understanding of developmental pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is a myth that pain in children cannot be prevented or treated safely and effectively because of the risks of adverse effects and addiction. Large-scale prospective audits have clarified the safety profile and risk-benefit balance for different techniques. There is now a substantial evidence base supporting many techniques of postoperative and procedural pain management for all age-groups of children. Guidelines based upon systematic review of this evidence have been published and updated, but the real challenge is in implementation of accurate pain assessment and safe, effective pain management comprehensively to all children whatever the procedure, clinical setting, developmental stage of the child, or comorbidities. In developed countries, these are core topics in the education of all doctors and nurses who care for children, and they are integrated into clinical practice by acute pediatric pain teams for most hospitals. However, it is disappointing that many country's healthcare systems do not give pediatric pain management a priority and in many parts of the world there are no analgesics available. So pain-free healthcare is sadly lacking in many hospitals. My hope is that the current knowledge can be used more effectively to relieve the unnecessary suffering of children in the 21st century. PMID:22594405

Morton, Neil S

2012-06-01

317

Superconformal invariance from N=2 supersymmetry Ward identities  

E-print Network

We algebraically prove the cancellation of the beta function at all order of perturbation theory of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories with a vanishing one-loop beta function. The proof generalises that recently given for the N=4 case. It uses the consistent Slavnov-Taylor identities of the shadow dependent formulation. We also demonstrate the cancellation at all orders of the anomalous dimensions of vector and hypermultiplet one half BPS operators.

Laurent Baulieu; Guillaume Bossard

2008-02-04

318

daoRsorenraCsoL WardMemorialBlvd  

E-print Network

to general public) Parking Dispensers Parking Enforced by Radar SPEED LIMIT Emergency · For fire, police Parking Services Storke ApartmentsSanta Catalina Residence Hall Police/Fire Central Stores, Receiving or medical emergency assistance call 9-911 or use emergency phones (in red boxes). · UCSB Police Department

Ahlers, Guenter

319

Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Microphalloidea Ward, 1901 (Trematoda: Digenea).  

PubMed

Phylogenetic interrelationships of 32 species belonging to 18 genera and four families of the superfamily Microphalloidea were studied using partial sequences of nuclear lsrDNA analysed by Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony. The resulting trees were well resolved at most nodes and demonstrated that the Microphalloidea, as represented by the present data-set, consists of three main clades corresponding to the families Lecithodendriidae, Microphallidae and Pleurogenidae + Prosthogonimidae. Interrelationships of taxa within each clade are considered; as a result of analysis of molecular and morphological data, Floridatrema Kinsella & Deblock, 1994 is synonymised with Maritrema Nicoll, 1907, Candidotrema Dollfus, 1951 with Pleurogenes Looss, 1896, and Schistogonimus Lühe, 1909 with Prosthogonimus Lühe, 1899. The taxonomic value of some morphological features, used traditionally for the differentiation of genera within the Lecithodendriidae and Prosthogonimidae, is reconsidered. Previous systematic schemes are discussed from the viewpoint of present results, and perspectives of future studies are outlined. PMID:12975618

Tkach, Vasyl V; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Olson, Peter D; Kinsella, J Mike; Swiderski, Zdzislaw

2003-09-01

320

Walter Russell Mead: Power, Terror, Peace, and Ward: Study Guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Walter Russell Mead places this volume (which builds on Special Providence) into the context of the ideological and theological debates that have shaped American history. Like Michael Oakeshott and various conservatives, Mead depicts the contemporary world as the outworking of a “modern temper” or an “Enlightenment project,” two phases of which he focuses on: Fordism (resembling Lewis Mumford’s modern megamachine)

Steven Alan Samson

2008-01-01

321

Get out of the office and on to the ward.  

PubMed

The draft NMC code spells out what is expected of nurses in leadership roles, including ensuring concerns are listened to and putting patient care first. Managers must also ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and competence for safe practice. PMID:25005391

Keogh, Kat

2014-07-15

322

Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

Barber, William H.

1985-01-01

323

Word Association Norms, Mutual Information, and Lexicography Kenneth Ward Church  

E-print Network

computer readable corpora, making it possible to estimate norms for tens of thousands of words. 1. Meaning hand, bank co­occurs with words and expression such as money, notes, loan, account, investment, clerk). What is new is that facilities for the computational storage and analysis of large bodies of natural

Church, Kenneth W.

324

Significance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the Bess B. Ward  

E-print Network

, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA A missing link in the nitrogen cycle has recently been found recently discovered metabolism in bacteria, this time in the nitrogen (N) cycle. The anammox bacterium has nitrogen cycle must be evaluated to answer two questions: Does it change the overall magnitude of the flux

Ward, Bess

325

10 grant and contract aWards Awards Received  

E-print Network

/ MonroeClarkMiddleSchool,"$9,600·San Diego State University: "City Heights Educational Collaborative in the Park," $115,828·San Diego Unified School District: "Monroe Clark School Community Policing Project," $39,774 dr. Mary ann Lyman-hager California State University San Francisco: "Foreign

Ponce, V. Miguel

326

Dr. G. Ward Wilson 1 Tailings Stability TAILINGS DAM STABILITY  

E-print Network

: Traits that increase mating success in males may come at a cost, such as an increased risk of predation them in flight and removing the wings prior to consumption. Using geometric morphometric techniques, we improve mating success, they may also entail costs, * Corresponding author; e-mail: kuchta@ohio.edu. Am

Boisvert, Jeff

327

1 | P a g e Faculty name: Adam Ward  

E-print Network

: Performance of Multiple Wind Turbine Configurations Project Description: Within a wind farm, the wind placement on aerodynamic performance of wind turbines in a wind tunnel. A single model wind turbine velocities experienced by a single wind turbine, and thus the aerodynamic loads and power output of that wind

Casavant, Tom

328

Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward  

PubMed Central

AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

2011-01-01

329

The Challenge of Modeling Dialog Dynamics Nigel G. Ward  

E-print Network

, gesture, tone of voice and so on, adapted moment by moment to be effective and appropriate for the user relation management, and affect expression; and largely independently of semantic content. The paper also that feeling. On the activation level, the student seeming to be losing interest, C shows that this topic is

Ward, Nigel

330

A Logical levothyroxine dose Individualization: Optimization Approach at discharge from Radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up in patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Balancing the Risk based strategy and the practical issues and challenges: Experience and Views of a large volume referral centre in India.  

PubMed

In this communication, the authors discuss the issue of individualization of thyrotropin suppressive therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients and share their views with respect to optimizing the dose of levothyroxine (LT) prescription both during discharge from radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up. The changing management paradigm at our Institute during post-thyroidectomy period and during the preparation for radioiodine scan is also briefly highlighted. Five factors can be identified as important determinants for the dose individualization approach: (1) Persistence or absence of metastatic disease, (2) the risk characteristics of the patient and the tumor (3) patient's clinical profile, symptomatology, and contraindications (4) the feasibility to ensure a proper thyroid stimulating hormone TSH suppression level (depends on patient's socio-economic and educational background, the connectivity with the local physician and his expertise) (5) time period elapsed since initial diagnosis. While discussing each individual case scenario, the authors, based upon their experience in one of the busiest thyroid cancer referral centers in the country, discuss certain unaddressed points in the current guideline recommendations, deviations made and some challenges toward employing them into practice, which could be situation and center specific. In addition to these, the value of clinical examination, patient profile and detailed enquiry about clinical symptomatology by the attending physician in each follow-up visit cannot be overemphasized. According to the authors, this aspect, quite important for dose determination in an individual, is relatively underrepresented in the present guidelines. It would also be worthwhile to follow a conservative approach (till clear data emerges) in patients who have characteristics of "high-risk" disease, but are clinically and biochemically disease free, if no medical contraindications exist and patient tolerates the suppressive therapy well. This would be particularly applicable in the presence of aggressive histopathological variants, where, in the event of recurrence/metastasis, the disease demonstrates adverse prognosis and higher incidence of radioiodine refractoriness. At the end, certain important and noteworthy concepts pertaining to LT prescription that has definitive practical implications for the suppressive therapy in DTC patients are described. PMID:24019666

Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit; Asopa, Ramesh; Chaukar, Devendra; Dcruz, Anil K

2013-01-01

331

Characterization of a recombination event excluding the Harvey-ras-1 (H-ras-1) locus in a Ramano-Ward Long QT syndrome family linked to Chromosome 11q15 and isolation of a polymorphic repeat telomeric to H-ras-1  

SciTech Connect

The Romano-Ward Long QT syndrome (RWLQTS) has been linked to 11p15.5 in several large families but demonstrates genetic heterogeneity, since in other families the RWLQTS phenotype is not linked to 11p15. To date, no recombinants between the H-Ras-1 locus and RWLQTS in families linked to 11p15 have been published. In a large family, we demonstrate linkage of RWLQTS to marker D11S932 on chromosome 11p15.4 with a LOD score of 3.14 ({theta}=0;90% penetrance). An unaffected individual and her two unaffected offspring inherited the affected haplotype for the H-ras-1 region telomeric to D11S932. All three have QTc measurements of {le} 0.40 seconds and no history of syncope, making the diagnosis of RWLQTS extremely unlikely. This suggests that, although the gene for the RWlQTS is linked to 11p15 in this family, a recombination event may have occurred that separated the RWLQTS gene from the affected H-ras-1 region haplotype. To investigate a possible telomeric recombination event, cosmids telomeric to H-ras-1 were isolated. A highly polymorphic, complex CA/CT repeat marker (78% heterozygosity) was characterized and its location telomeric to H-ras-1 verified by interphase FISH. The same three unaffected individuals had the affected allele for this marker, ruling our recombination telomeric to H-ras-1 but proximal to the new marker. As the most telemeric marker on 11p to date, this marker will aid the physical and genetic mapping of the 11p telomere. The potential recombination event in this family apparently excludes H-ras-1 as a candidate gene and may aid the localization of the RWLQTS gene linked to 11p15.5. However, it remains a possibility that another genetic locus on 11p15, in addition to the one near the H-ras-1 gene, can cause the RWLQTS phenotype. This is the first report of recombination between H-ras-1 and RWLQTS in a family linked to 11p15.

Russell, M.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Brody, L.C. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Munroe, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

332

42 ward rounds sesquicentennial 2009 ward rounds sesquicentennial 2009 43 Significant events in the history of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine have  

E-print Network

is instituted at the stock yards. 1869 Board of Health initiates vaccination of all children. 1876 City is reversed. 1895 Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovers X-rays. 1898 Sir Almroth Edward Wright develops vaccines for typhoid. 1899 Felix Hoffmann and Heinrich Dreser develop new method and preparation for aspirin. 1899

Engman, David M.

333

SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET Michael D. Adams and Rabab Ward  

E-print Network

SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET TRANSFORMS Michael D. Adams and Rabab of symmetry-preserving re- versible integer-to-integer wavelet transforms. The transforms from both. INTRODUCTION Lifting-based reversible integer-to-integer wavelet transforms [1, 2] have become a popular tool

Adams, Michael D.

334

Learning clinical communication on ward-rounds: an ethnographic case study  

E-print Network

to an 88-year-old gentleman who has been admitted following a cerebral vascular accident illustrates this. C1: Hello P: Oh we’re having this meeting are? (something missing?) C1: Yes it’s a grand meeting (bends down and leans on the patient’s bed and smiles...

Quilligan, Sally

2014-08-26

335

77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COTP) or the COTP's designated on- scene representative. DATES: This rule is effective...authorization from the COTP or the designated on-scene representative to transit the zone. Small...zone from the COTP or the designated on-scene representative. Additionally,...

2012-02-24

336

Kendall H. Cortelyou-Ward, PhD University of Central Florida  

E-print Network

Administration (2012), Department of Health Management & Informatics, College of Health and Public Affairs Informatics, Department of Health Management & Informatics, College of Health and Public Affairs, University of Health Management & Informatics, College of Health and Public Affairs, University of Central Florida

Wu, Shin-Tson

337

3D Shape Analysis of the Supraspinatus Muscle Aaron D. Ward1  

E-print Network

of several muscles making up the rotator cuff in the shoulder (figure 1). Disorders of the supraspinatus for the evaluation of the rotator cuff, MR has an exceptionally high accuracy which has been accepted as a standard.ashry@gmail.com, mark.schweitzer@nyumc.org Abstract. Pathology of the supraspinatus muscle can involve tearing, which

Hamarneh, Ghassan

338

From Classroom to Boardroom and Ward: Developing Generic Intercultural Skills in Diverse Disciplines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A strategic approach to internationalize learning in higher education institutions is to use the curriculum and classroom cultural diversity to create opportunities to broaden students' intercultural perspectives, appreciate sociocultural variability in professional practice, and improve their intercultural interaction skills. There is no…

Barker, Michelle C.; Mak, Anita S.

2013-01-01

339

The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness  

MedlinePLUS

... shows that meditation bolsters immune function by reducing stress hormones that dampen immune cells' ability to fight infection," she says. Exercise is a great way to improve your mood, and it changes the body's stress response, she says. If starting an exercise program ...

340

Breach in the 9th Ward Levee, New Orleans August 2005 GettyImages  

E-print Network

* · Planned obsolescence of cell phones, computers... · Global warming heating up while we build more bigger is not failure but an opportunity for deeper inquiry, discussion and better learning? · Can our teaching model;Elements of an E3 engineering education: · A curriculum of fundamentals structured from distilled

Womeldorf, Carole

341

Facilitating the transition from physiology to hospital wards through an interdisciplinary case study of septic shock  

PubMed Central

Background In order to develop clinical reasoning, medical students must be able to integrate knowledge across traditional subject boundaries and multiple disciplines. At least two dimensions of integration have been identified: horizontal integration, bringing together different disciplines in considering a topic; and vertical integration, bridging basic science and clinical practice. Much attention has been focused on curriculum overhauls, but our approach is to facilitate horizontal and vertical integration on a smaller scale through an interdisciplinary case study discussion and then to assess its utility. Methods An interdisciplinary case study discussion about a critically ill patient was implemented at the end of an organ system-based, basic sciences module at New York University School of Medicine. Three clinical specialists—a cardiologist, a pulmonologist, and a nephrologist—jointly led a discussion about a complex patient in the intensive care unit with multiple medical problems secondary to septic shock. The discussion emphasized the physiologic underpinnings behind the patient’s presentation and the physiologic considerations across the various systems in determining proper treatment. The discussion also highlighted the interdependence between the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, which were initially presented in separate units. After the session students were given a brief, anonymous three-question free-response questionnaire in which they were asked to evaluate and freely comment on the exercise. Results Students not only took away physiological principles but also gained an appreciation for various thematic lessons for bringing basic science to the bedside, especially horizontal and vertical integration. The response of the participants was overwhelmingly positive with many indicating that the exercise integrated the material across organ systems, and strengthened their appreciation of the role of physiology in understanding disease presentations and guiding appropriate therapy. Conclusions Horizontal and vertical integration can be presented effectively through a single-session case study, with complex patient cases involving multiple organ systems providing students opportunities to integrate their knowledge across organ systems while emphasizing the importance of physiology in clinical reasoning. Furthermore, having several clinicians from different specialties discuss the case together can reinforce the matter of integration across multiple organ systems and disciplines in students’ minds. PMID:24725336

2014-01-01

342

CMOS devices have scaled down-ward aggressively in each technology genera-  

E-print Network

higher integration density and performance. However, leakage current has increased drastically in an increase in the total leakage current. The increase in different leakage compo- nents with technology components play a major role in low-leakage logic design.3 In the nanometer regime, leakage currents make up

Kim, Chris H.

343

The art of (re)learning to walk: trust on the rehabilitation ward.  

PubMed

Although trust has significant implications for health outcomes, the mechanisms by which its presence or absence influences these outcomes require elucidation. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in southeast Australia, we explore the tasks of rehabilitation for people who lost a limb because of vascular disease, and the importance of trust in the relationships of patients with their health professionals. Trust underpins procedures and practices designed to minimize problems that might delay rehabilitation or result in the continuing need for medical support and surveillance. Patients develop trust in the rehabilitation team based on three factors: competence, agency, and caring. Our findings emphasize how social skills, as well as technical competence, enable health professionals to gain and maintain their patients' trust. PMID:20555012

Manderson, Lenore; Warren, Narelle

2010-10-01

344

MAPO index for risk assessment of patient manual handling in hospital wards: a validation study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manual handling of disabled patients – as regards movement – is one of the major factors affecting acute low back pain of exposed nursing staff. In the absence of quantitative methods assessing this kind of risk, the Research Unit Ergonomics of Posture and Movement of Milan developed in 1997 a risk assessment method called Movement and Assistance of Hospital Patients (MAPO), which is applicable

N. Battevi; O. Menoni; M. Grazia Ricci; S. Cairoli

2006-01-01

345

Prevalence and treatment of cancer pain in Italian oncological wards centres: a cross-sectional survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The aim of this national cross-sectional survey was to draw information on pain prevalence and intensity from a large sample\\u000a of patients who were admitted to oncologic centres for different reasons and to evaluate the pain treatment and possible influencing\\u000a factors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A total of 2,655 patients completed the study. Nine hundred and one patients (34%) reported pain.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results

Sebastiano Mercadante; Fausto Roila; Oscar Berretto; Roberto Labianca; Stefania Casilini

2008-01-01

346

Compassionate containment? Balancing technical safety and therapy in the design of psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

This paper contributes to the international literature examining design of inpatient settings for mental health care. Theoretically, it elaborates the connections between conceptual frameworks from different strands of literature relating to therapeutic landscapes, social control and the social construction of risk. It does so through a discussion of the substantive example of research to evaluate the design of a purpose built inpatient psychiatric health care facility, opened in 2010 as part of the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Findings are reported from interviews or discussion groups with staff, patients and their family and friends. This paper demonstrates a strong, and often critical awareness among members of staff and other participants about how responsibilities for risk governance of 'persons' are exercised through 'technical safety' measures and the implications for therapeutic settings. Our participants often emphasised how responsibility for technical safety was being invested in the physical infrastructure of certain 'places' within the hospital where risks are seen to be 'located'. This illuminates how the spatial dimensions of social constructions of risk are incorporated into understandings about therapeutic landscapes. There were also more subtle implications, partly relating to 'Panopticist' theories about how the institution uses technical safety to supervise its own mechanisms, through the observation of staff behaviour as well as patients and visitors. Furthermore, staff seemed to feel that in relying on technical safety measures they were, to a degree, divesting themselves of human responsibility for risks they are required to manage. However, their critical assessment showed their concerns about how this might conflict with a more therapeutic approach and they contemplated ways that they might be able to engage more effectively with patients without the imposition of technical safety measures. These findings advance our thinking about the construction of therapeutic landscapes in theory and in practice. PMID:23916450

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wilbert; Wood, Victoria; Spencer, Ian; Mason, James; Close, Helen; Reilly, Joseph

2013-11-01

347

LWG Intergenerational Community Center 1100 Ward Street College of Human Ecology 328-5800  

E-print Network

Library Science Program (MLS), Ragsdale 104-B 328-4373 Fax 252-328-4368 Mail Stop 172 Library, Health - Departmental Phone Directory - L #12;Library Copy Center Joyner 1st Floor 328-2326 Mail Stop 215 Library Science, Dept of (LS) Certificate in Virtual Reality in Education & Training 328-4373 Fax 252

348

Navigating the Wards: Teaching Medical Students to Use Their Moral Compasses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper argues that medical ethics education relies too much on strategies that target ethical thinking and should focus more on students as ethical actors in specific clinical contexts, responding to ethical dilemmas. Traditional approaches may not offer the skills students need to learn norms of ethical behavior. Strategies for encouraging…

Swensen, Sara L.; Rothstein, Julie A.

1996-01-01

349

Malondialdehyde-Deoxyguanosine Adduct Formation in Workers of Pathology Wards. The Role of Air Formaldehyde Exposure  

PubMed Central

Background Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are exposed. Pathologists can experience high formaldehyde exposure levels. Formaldehyde – among other properties – induce oxidative stress and free radicals, which react with DNA and lipids, leading to oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation, respectively. We measured the levels of air-formaldehyde exposure in a group of Italian pathologists and controls. We analyzed the effect of formaldehyde exposure on leukocyte malondialdehyde-deoxyguanosine adducts (M1-dG), a biomarker of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. We studied the relationship between air-formaldehyde and M1-dG adducts. Methods Air-formaldehyde levels were measured by personal air samplers. M1-dG adducts were analyzed by 32P-postlabelling assay. Results Reduction rooms pathologists were significantly exposed to air-formaldehyde in respect to controls and to the pathologists working in other laboratory areas (p<0.001). A significant difference for M1-dG adducts between exposed pathologists and controls was found (p=0.045). The effect becomes stronger when the evaluation of air-formaldehyde exposure was based on personal samplers (p=0.018). Increased M1dG adduct levels were only found in individuals exposed to air-formaldehyde concentrations higher than 66 ?g/m3. When the exposed workers and controls were subgrouped according to smoking, M1-dG tended to increase in all the subjects but a significant association between M1-dG and air-formaldehyde was only found in not smokers (p= 0.009). Air formaldehyde played a role positive but not significant (r = 0.355, p = 0.075, Pearson correlation) in the formation of M1-dG, only in not smokers. Conclusions Working in the reduction rooms and to be exposed to air-formaldehyde concentrations higher than 66 ?g/m3 is associated with increased levels of M1-dG adducts. PMID:20707408

Romanazzi, Valeria; Munnia, Armelle; Piro, Sara; Allione, Alessandra; Ricceri, Fulvio; Guarrera, Simonetta; Pignata, Cristina; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W.; Peluso, Marco

2010-01-01

350

When Enrollment Strategies Cross Traditional Boundaries: Opportunities and By: Janet Ward  

E-print Network

include: What students will come (yield) and stay (persist) until their educational goal is attained with specialized areas of expertise across the institution to pull together. By sharing ideas, energy and resources should lead to ⦠Stabilizing revenue streams. Enrollment management is as much about achieving head

Nelson, Tim

351

Relationship between resident workload and self-perceived learning on inpatient medicine wards: a longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite recent residency workload and hour limitations, little research on the relationship between workload and learning has been done. We sought to define residents' perceptions of the optimal patient workload for learning, and to determine how certain variables contribute to those perceptions. Our hypothesis was that the relationship between perceived workload and learning has a maximum point (forming a parabolic curve): that either too many or too few patients results in sub-optimal learning. Methods Residents on inpatient services at two academic teaching hospitals reported their team and individual patient censuses, and rated their perception of their learning; the patient acuity; case variety; and how challenged they felt. To estimate maximum learning scores, linear regression models with quadratic terms were fit on learning score. Results Resident self-perceived learning correlated with higher acuity and greater heterogeneity of case variety. The equation of census versus learning score, adjusted for perception of acuity and case mix scores, showed a parabolic curve in some cases but not in others. Conclusion These data suggest that perceived resident workload is complex, and impacted by additional variables including patient acuity and heterogeneity of case variety. Parabolic curves exist for interns with regard to overall census and for senior residents with regard to new admissions on long call days. PMID:16824224

Haney, Elizabeth M; Nicolaidis, Christina; Hunter, Alan; Chan, Benjamin KS; Cooney, Thomas G; Bowen, Judith L

2006-01-01

352

Implementation of a microprocessor-based overcurrent relay / by Ernie Ward McWilliams  

E-print Network

provided by Dow Chemical 10 Company, the current transformer is located on a 15 KV distribution line, and has a ratio of 3000/5, or a line current of 3000 amperes will produce a current in the current transformer of 5 amperes. The relay is placed...

McWilliams, Ernie Ward

1979-01-01

353

Transcultural encounters in a medical ward in Sweden: experiences of health care practitioners.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore the approach adopted by health care practitioners when handling transcultural encounters. The study was performed by means of action research, a reflective process led by practitioners and researchers working together to improve practice and solve problems. Data were collected through participant observations at a coronary unit in Sweden and group discussions with the health care professionals and were analyzed and interpreted using a hermeneutic approach. The narratives in the interview text illustrated a switch between three levels of understanding human behavior: the individual level (personality), the collective or group level (what is termed culture), and the universal level (human nature), focusing on differences in the first two and similarities in the third. This study highlights the importance of practitioners comprehending the complex relationship between individuality and cultural context and understanding cultural identity as being fluid and coexisting with other differences, such as class, education, gender, and age. PMID:22802303

Dellenborg, Lisen; Skott, Carola; Jakobsson, Eva

2012-10-01

354

Psychiatry Ward Specialist, 10-12. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, is designed to train students to perform as assistants to professional personnel in the care and treatment of patients in mental health units. It includes basic concepts of human behavior, the aspects of atypical adjustive reactions, the…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

355

Model Determination of Delayed Causes of Analgesics Prescription in the Emergency Ward in Arak, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background According to the reports of the World Health Organization 20% of world population suffer from pain and 33% of them suffer to some extent that they cannot live independently. Methods This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of Valiasr Hospital of Arak, Iran, in order to determine the causes of delay in prescription of analgesics and to construct a model for prediction of circumstances that aggravate oligoanalgesia. Data were collected during a period of 7 days. Results Totally, 952 patients participated in this study. In order to reduce their pain intensity, 392 patients (42%) were treated. Physicians and nurses recorded the intensity of pain for 66.3% and 41.37% of patients, respectively. The mean (SD) of pain intensity according to visual analogue scale (VAS) was 8.7 (1.5) which reached to 4.4 (2.3) thirty minutes after analgesics prescription. Median and mean (SD) of delay time in injection of analgesics after the physician's order were 60.0 and 45.6 (63.35) minutes, respectively. The linear regression model suggested that when the attending physician was male or intern and patient was from rural areas the delay was longer. Conclusions We propose further studies about analgesics administration based on medical guidelines in the shortest possible time and also to train physicians and nurses about pain assessment methods and analgesic prescription. PMID:24748944

Cyrus, Ali; Moghimi, Mehrdad; Jokar, Abolfazle; Rafeie, Mohammad; Moradi, Ali; Ghasemi, Parisa; Shahamat, Hanieh

2014-01-01

356

CL for CALL in the Primary School Katrina Keogh, Thomas Koller, Monica Ward,  

E-print Network

Linguistics (CL) and Natural Language Processing (NLP) resources can be deployed in Computer- Assisted and NLP technology and briefly review the use of CL/NLP in e-Learning in general, how it has been deployed in CALL to date and specifically in the primary school context. We outline how CL/NLP resources can

van Genabith, Josef

357

Adaptive Grouping and Subdivision for Simulating Hair Dynamics Kelly Ward Ming C. Lin  

E-print Network

Strands, Hair Clusters, and Hair Strips. plied to modeling the motion of long animal hair and manes of Computer Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill {wardk,lin}@cs.unc.edu http and continuous hair LOD representations based on the mo- tion, the visibility, and the viewing distance

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

358

Adaptive Grouping and Subdivision for Simulating Hair Dynamics Kelly Ward Ming C. Lin  

E-print Network

Strands, Hair Clusters, and Hair Strips. plied to modeling the motion of long animal hair and manes of Computer Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill {wardk,lin}@cs.unc.edu http and continuous hair LOD representations based on the mo­ tion, the visibility, and the viewing distance

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

359

Rachel A. Ward Department of Mathematics and ICES, University of Texas at Austin  

E-print Network

Fellowship 2005-2008 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship 2004-2005 National Merit Finalist 2001 1 #12;PhD Students Student Mentoring Shubhodeep Mukherji (UT Austin) Spr.-Summer 2012 Jacob Carruth (Courant Institute, NYU

Pillow, Jonathan

360

VISUALIZING CHANGES IN 2D AND 3D SHAPES John Rasku Jr. and Matthew O. Ward (*)  

E-print Network

, highlighting anomalies, trends, similarities, and differences prior to performing detailed analysis. This paper of Information Technology, Can­ berra, Australia ABSTRACT Approximate shape comparison involves comparing two, are explored for relating shape change using Correlation Images. In addition, a method to extend the technique

Ward, Matthew

361

New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. II: The Central Region and the Lower Ninth Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The failure of the New Orleans regional flood protection systems, and the resultant catastrophic flooding of much of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, represents the most costly failure of an engineered system in U.S. history. This paper presents an overview of the principal events that unfolded in the central portion of the New Orleans metropolitan region during this hurricane, and

R. B. Seed; R. G. Bea; A. Athanasopoulos-Zekkos; G. P. Boutwell; J. D. Bray; C. Cheung; D. Cobos-Roa; L. Ehrensing; L. F. Harder Jr.; J. M. Pestana; M. F. Riemer; J. D. Rogers

2008-01-01

362

Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities  

E-print Network

in "New Journal of Physics 11 (2009) 095011" #12;Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene 2 1. Introduction In the past decades, Raman spectroscopy [1] techniques were successfully applied], Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful and non-destructive tool to identify the number of layers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Complicated malaria and other severe febrile illness in a pediatric ward in Libreville, Gabon  

PubMed Central

Background Although a substantial decline of Plasmodium falciparum infection is observed in Africa following implementation of new control strategies, malaria is still considered as the major cause of febrile illness in hospitalized African children. The present study was designed to assess the management of febrile illness and to determine the proportion of children with febrile illness hospitalized for primary diagnosis of malaria who had confirmed complicated malaria after implementation of new malaria control strategies in Libreville, Gabon. Methods Demographic, clinical and biological data from hospitalized children with fever or a history of fever, with a primary diagnosis of clinical malaria, aged less than 18?years old, who benefited from hematological measurements and microscopic malaria diagnosis, were recorded and analyzed during a prospective and observational study conducted in 2008 in the Centre Hospitalier de Libreville. Results A total of 418 febrile children were admitted at hospital as malaria cases. Majority of them (79.4%) were aged below five years. After medical examination, 168 were diagnosed and treated as clinical malaria and, among them, only 56.7% (n?=?95) had Plasmodium falciparum positive blood smears. Age above five years, pallor, Blantyre Coma Score ?2 and thrombocytopenia were predictive of malaria infection. Respiratory tract infections were the first leading cause of hospitalization (41.1%), followed by malaria (22.7%); co-morbidities were frequent (22%). Less than 5% of suspected bacterial infections were confirmed by culture. Global case fatality rate was 2.1% and 1% for malaria. Almost half (46%) of the children who received antimalarial therapy had negative blood smears. Likewise, antibiotics were frequently prescribed without bacteriological confirmation. Conclusions The use of clinical symptoms for the management of children febrile illness is frequent in Gabon. Information, training of health workers and strengthening of diagnosis tools are necessary to improve febrile children care. PMID:22973831

2012-01-01

364

Introducing an osteopathic approach into neonatology ward: the NE-O model  

PubMed Central

Background Several studies showed the effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment on neonatal care in reducing length of stay in hospital, gastrointestinal problems, clubfoot complications and improving cranial asymmetry of infants affected by plagiocephaly. Despite several results obtained, there is still a lack of standardized osteopathic evaluation and treatment procedures for newborns recovered in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this paper is to suggest a protocol on osteopathic approach (NE-O model) in treating hospitalized newborns. Methods The NE-O model is composed by specific evaluation tests and treatments to tailor osteopathic method according to preterm and term infants’ needs, NICU environment, medical and paramedical assistance. This model was developed to maximize the effectiveness and the clinical use of osteopathy into NICU. Results The NE-O model was adopted in 2006 to evaluate the efficacy of OMT in neonatology. Results from research showed the effectiveness of this osteopathic model in reducing preterms’ length of stay and hospital costs. Additionally the present model was demonstrated to be safe. Conclusion The present paper defines the key steps for a rigorous and effective osteopathic approach into NICU setting, providing a scientific and methodological example of integrated medicine and complex intervention. PMID:24904746

2014-01-01

365

WA-RD 474.1 January 2000 CONTAMINANT DETENTION IN  

E-print Network

discharge over the duration of the study. Metal concentration data yielded anomalous results increase from the filter strip influent to the discharge was the result of the slot drain collection system inadvertently trapping sediment. This resulted in low suspended solids and metal concentration in the aqueous

366

Dermatologists in Hospital Wards: An 8Year Study of Dermatology Consultations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The value of dermatologists as consultants is increasing. Objective: To evaluate the activity of dermatologists as inpatient consultants. Methods: Retrospective study of consultations to Dermatology of inpatients, visits per consultation, referral service, procedures performed, delay until visit and diagnoses based on ICD-9. Results: 3,144 requests generated 4,824 visits, 200 biopsies, 107 cultures and other procedures. The mean delay between

Yeray Peñate; Noemi Guillermo; Priti Melwani; Rosa Martel; Leopoldo Borrego

2009-01-01

367

An elasmobranch maternity ward: female round stingrays Urobatis halleri use warm, restored estuarine habitat during gestation.  

PubMed

The habitat use and movements of the round stingray Urobatis halleri were compared between shallow restored and natural habitats of the Anaheim Bay Estuary (CA, U.S.A.) in relation to water temperature. Restored habitat remained significantly warmer than natural habitat from spring through to autumn. Strong sexual segregation occurred in the restored habitat with mature female U. halleri forming large unisex aggregations in summer, during months of peak seasonal water temperatures, and males only present during spring. Most mature females collected from restored habitat during months of high abundance were determined to be pregnant using non-invasive field ultrasonography. Tagged females typically spent <14 days in the restored habitat, using the habitat less as seasonal water temperatures decreased. Females tended to emigrate from the estuary by mid-August, coinciding with the time of year for parturition. The elevated water temperatures of the restored habitat may confer an energetic cost to male U. halleri, but females (particularly pregnant females) may derive a thermal reproductive benefit by using warm, shallow habitats for short periods of time during months of peak water temperatures. These findings have management implications for the design of coastal habitat restoration projects and marine protected areas that incorporate thermal environments preferred by aggregating female elasmobranchs. PMID:22497381

Jirik, K E; Lowe, C G

2012-04-01

368

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Ward  

E-print Network

Consumption Snapshot: Green College PLAN 597 October 10, 2014 1145 1682 University of British Columbia Consumption Snapshot: Green College Source: Green College, UBC website. I. Summary Green College-September 2014. Good to know ! "1ASSIGNMENT #1 · Green College houses approximately 100 graduate students

369

Calcrete profiles and porosity development in the Wagon Wheel (Pennsylvanian) field, Ward County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Cisco and Canyon formations in the Wagon Wheel field, located on the western edge of the Central Basin platform, contain 10-15 previously unrecognized calcrete profiles, providing excellent evidence of repeated Late Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure. Evidence for calcretes includes (1) rhizoliths, (2) alveolar texture, (3) circumgranular cracking, (4) tangential needle fibers, (5) calcrete glaebules, (6) light shifts in {delta}{sup 13}C profiles, (7) autobrecciation, and (8) laminated crusts. Extreme lateral variability of calcrete profiles makes correlation of subaerial exposure surfaces difficult. Porosity within calcrete profiles is occluded, providing a seal for underlying reservoir facies. Porosity in the Wagon Wheel field is strongly facies dependent. Porous intervals consist of lenticular skeletal grainstone-packstone facies, typically capped by calcrete profiles. Repeated meteoric phreatic lenses established during Late Pennsylvanian exposure events are interpreted to have formed moldic porosity through selective dissolution in strata containing mineralogically metastable allochems. Secondary porosity development, however, is often balanced by precipitation of eogenetic calcite cement. Therefore, meteoric diagenesis associated with Wagon Wheel calcrete development commonly occludes and only rarely enhances primary porosity. Two stages of calcite cementation are recognized: (1) an early pore-rimming nonferroan nonluminescent calcite cement with thin moderate to brightly luminescent microzones, and (2) a later ferroan, dully luminescent calcite cement with broad, indistinct zones. Truncated cements in Cisco- and Canyon-derived lithoclasts indicate nonluminescent cement was precipitated from oxidizing meteoric phreatic waters. Microzones were precipitated during brief periods of stagnation in the phreatic lenses.

Abegg, F.E. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (USA)); Grover, G.A. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., La Habra, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

370

Constraints on the IR behaviour of gluon and ghost propagator from Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identities  

E-print Network

We consider the constraints of the Slavnov-Taylor identity of the IR behaviour of gluon and ghost propagators and their compatibility with solutions of the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation and with the lattice picture.

Ph. Boucaud; J. P. Leroy; A. Le Yaouanc; J. Micheli; O. Pène; A. Y. Lokhov; J. Rodríguez-Quintero; C. Roiesnel

2007-01-15

371

Script for the Minor Third video, Feb 10, 2014, Nigel Ward (title side)  

E-print Network

people respond so quickly? There's really no time to think how to respond. But it's okay, because> I've got to get that." The prosody is important: a high pitch, then a low pitch: "hang on". It-knock joke. [tell the joke] ha-ha-ha. It's a pun: "Doris" for "door is

Ward, Nigel

372

John P. Ward John R. King Adrian J. Koerber Julie M. Croft R. Elizabeth Sockett Paul Williams  

E-print Network

models to examine the formation, growth and quorum sensing activity of bacterial biofilms. The growth aspects of the model are based on the assumption of a con- tinuum of bacterial cells whose growth Williams Early development and quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms Abstract: We develop mathematical

373

A Decolonizing Encounter: Ward Churchill and Antonia Darder in Dialogue. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 430  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"A Decolonizing Encounter" examines the effects of western colonialism on historically marginalized and colonized populations living both in the West and the "third world". Specifically, it explores crucial issues such as the decolonizing of schools and communities of color; the decentralization of power of the capitalist and colonial state;…

Orelus, Pierre W., Ed.

2012-01-01

374

Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study  

PubMed Central

Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (? = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (? = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

2015-01-01

375

Unlicensed and off-label drug use in a paediatric ward of a general hospital in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Many drugs used in paediatric care are not licensed for that use or are prescribed outside the terms of the product license (off-label). Studies in the UK and Europe showed a large number of unlicensed and off-label drug prescription in specialised paediatric health care centres. We determined the extent and nature of use of unlicensed drugs and off-label prescriptions

G.'t Jong; P. van der Linden; E. Bakker; N. van der Lely; I. Eland; B. Stricker; J. van den Anker

2002-01-01

376

Terahertz Multiplier Circuits I. Mehdi, G. Chattopadhyay, E. Schlecht, J. Ward, J. Gill, F. Maiwald, and A. Maestrini*  

E-print Network

in the 1-2 THz band will be summarized. II. ADVANCES IN PLANAR SCHOTTKY DIODE TECHNOLOGY At the heart making them a feasible approach for terahertz circuits/packaging. Meanwhile, Ka and W-band power of milliwatts of power in the W-band range. And finally, semiconductor device processing tools have been

Chattopadhyay, Goutam

377

Signal Versus Noise on the Wards: What “Messages” from the Hidden Curriculum Do Medical Students Perceive to Be Importantly Meaningful?  

PubMed Central

Interested in the hidden curriculum and the learning environment for professionalism at our school, a group of educators called the RIPPLE Team (Relationships in Positive Professional Learning Environments) created The Professionalism Journal for use by third-year medical students during their Internal Medicine and Psychiatry clerkships. The students are introduced to the online journal and encouraged to use it as a means to pause, reflect on the events of the day, and write about episodes or exchanges they find personally important and meaningful. They are informed that their journal entries will be de-identified and used as the triggers for a facilitated and confidential discussion among their peers at the end of the clerkship. This article will report on the themes of the journal entries made by Internal Medicine clerks during one academic year. PMID:23874008

Shorey, Jeannette M.

2013-01-01

378

Accounting for the Unity of Experience in Dilthey, Rickert, Bradley and Ward Christopher Pincock, Department of Philosophy, Purdue University  

E-print Network

Century, if progress [in philosophy] is to be made, there must at some point emerge a clear demarcation, but in history for its own sake. The aim of my volumes was to contribute to making that demarcation (Soames 2006 problem and that we can better understand the distinction by seeing both how various ways of drawing

Pincock, Chris

379

A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: An observational study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients.

Wendy Chaboyer; Marianne Wallis; Christine Duffield; Mary Courtney; Philippa Seaton; Kerri Holzhauser; Jessica Schluter; Nerolie Bost

2008-01-01

380

An analysis of the controversy caused by Mary Ward's Institute in the 1620s. by Laurence Lux-Sterritt.  

E-print Network

of a recusant household and evolved in a world where housewives and women in general played crucial roles the commandment to "Take the Same of the Society" as an exhortation to start a Society of women, formed by the recusant background where, from a child, she had seen daily proof of women's aptitude to keep English

Boyer, Edmond

381

Antibiotics Use Patterns for Surgical Prophylaxis Site Infection in Different Surgical Wards of a Teaching Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Despite the effectiveness of prophylactic antimicrobials to prevent surgical site infection the use of antibiotic prophylaxis is often inappropriate. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the pattern of prophylactic antibiotic use in a teaching hospital affiliated to Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran. Patients and Methods: The current descriptive study included 8586 patients who received prophylactic antibiotics before surgery from April 2011 to March 2012, in Razi Hospital affiliated to Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Indications for antibiotic use, proper or inappropriate antibiotics, an antibiotic or combination of antibiotics, dosage and length of treatment for each patient based on the infectious disease textbook (Mandel's Principle and practice of infectious diseases) definitions were administrated. Results: Of the total 8586 patients who took antibiotics for preventive purposes, 4815 (56%) required antimicrobial prophylaxis, and 3771 (44%) patients did not. Of the 4815 patients who received prophylaxis, 86.9% received it appropriately, 13.1% received it inappropriately; 8.2% received inappropriate dosage, and 9.5% received antibiotic longer than 24 hours. Conclusions: The current study revealed that 44% of those who received prophylaxis did not need it. In the patients who received antibiotics, the most common mistakes were antibiotic selection followed by prolonged prophylaxis (> 24 hours) and excess dose. PMID:25774270

Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Roozbeh, Fatemeh; Behmanesh, Farzaneh; Alavi, Leila

2014-01-01

382

Prescribing oxygen therapy. An audit of oxygen prescribing practices on medical wards at North Shore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To assess the frequency and accuracy of inpatient oxygen prescription at North Shore Hospital, Auckland. Method Between 14 April 2005 and 14 May 2005, 100 medical inpatients receiving oxygen therapy were randomly selected for chart review. For each patient, the clinical diagnosis, oxygen prescription (if present), and initial medical plan were analysed in conjunction with the oxygen flow rate

Matthew Boyle; Janice Wong

2006-01-01

383

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Bell Canyon sandstones, Scott field, Ward and Reeves counties, Texas  

E-print Network

interlaminated, very fine- grained sandstone and shale. These incomplete AE turbidite bedsets comprise the majority of the cored section. Basinal deposits of bioturbated sandstones (F units) are rarely interbedded with the laminated deposits. The massive A... sea level and deposited in the basin as extensive units of sandstone, siltstone, and organic shale (Payne, 1976). During normal sea level cond1tions, shelf margin reefs and banks formed near sea level. The resultant back reef lagoon was shallow...

Kashatus, Gerard Paul

1986-01-01

384

Submicron Streptavidin Patterns for Protein Assembly Karen L. Christman,, Michael V. Requa, Vanessa D. Enriquez-Rios, Sabrina C. Ward,|  

E-print Network

, 2006 Micron and submicron-scale features of aldehyde functionality were fabricated in polymer films and hydrolysis of acetals, aldehyde groups formed. After the films were incubated with a biotinylated aldehyde. For example, carboxylic acid-3,4 and aldehyde-terminated3 patterns have been grafted into methyl

385

Contaminated handwashing sinks as the source of a clonal outbreak of KPC-2-producing Klebsiella oxytoca on a hematology ward.  

PubMed

We investigated sinks as possible sources of a prolonged Klebsiella pneumonia carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella oxytoca outbreak. Seven carbapenem-resistant K. oxytoca isolates were identified in sink drains in 4 patient rooms and in the medication room. Investigations for resistance genes and genetic relatedness of patient and environmental isolates revealed that all the isolates harbored the blaKPC-2 and blaTEM-1 genes and were genetically indistinguishable. We describe here a clonal outbreak caused by KPC-2-producing K. oxytoca, and handwashing sinks were a possible reservoir. PMID:25348541

Leitner, Eva; Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Herzog, Kathrin; Pekard-Amenitsch, Shiva; Hoenigl, Martin; Valentin, Thomas; Feierl, Gebhard; Grisold, Andrea J; Högenauer, Christoph; Sill, Heinz; Krause, Robert; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

2015-01-01

386

Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals  

PubMed Central

Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

2014-01-01

387

Effect of Frailty on Functional Gain, Resource Utilisation, and Discharge Destination: An Observational Prospective Study in a GEM Ward  

PubMed Central

Background. A geriatric evaluation and management unit (GEM) manages elderly inpatients with functional impairments. There is a paucity of literature on frailty and whether this impacts on rehabilitation outcomes. Objectives. To examine frailty score (FS) as a predictor of functional gain, resource utilisation, and destinations for GEM patients. Methods. A single centre prospective case study design. Participants (n = 136) were ?65 years old and admitted to a tertiary hospital GEM. Five patients were excluded by the preset exclusion criteria, that is, medically unstable, severe dementia or communication difficulties after stroke. Core data included demographics, frailty score (FS), and functional independence. Results. The mean functional improvement (FIM) from admission to discharge was 11.26 (95% CI 8.87, 13.66; P < 0.001). Discharge FIM was positively correlated with admission FIM (? = 0.748; P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with frailty score (? = ?1.151; P = 0.014). The majority of the patients were in the “frail” group. “Frail” and “severely frail” subgroups improved more on mean FIM scores at discharge, relative to that experienced by the “pre-frail” group. Conclusion. All patients experienced functional improvement. Frailer patients improved more on their FIM and improved relatively more than their prefrail counterparts. Higher frailty correlated with reduced independence and greater resource utilisation. This study demonstrates that FS could be a prognostic indicator of physical independence and resource utilisation. PMID:24695584

Kawryshanker, Sujatha; Raymond, Warren; Inderjeeth, Charles A.

2014-01-01

388

Modeling Hair Using Level-of-Detail Representations Kelly Ward Ming C. Lin Joohi Lee Susan Fisher Dean Macri  

E-print Network

in virtual environments, vir- tual humans in computer games, and human characters in animated films. A human. Modeling, styling, simulating and animating hair remains a slow, tedious and often painful process rendering of animated hair. It also offers flexibility to balance between the overall performance and visual

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

389

Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.  

PubMed

Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (? = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (? = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

2015-04-01

390

Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif Qingzhou Cui, Michelle M. Ward Muscatello and Sanford A. Asher*  

E-print Network

Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif Qingzhou Cui, Michelle M crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol- hydrates.8 Determination of carbohydrates is important in applications such as controlling glycemia

Asher, Sanford A.

391

The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: Effects on Certified Nurse Assistants  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTo improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents.

Renate Verkaik; Anneke L. Francke; Berno van Meijel; Peter M. M. Spreeuwenberg; Miel W. Ribbe; Jozien M. Bensing

2011-01-01

392

Over the last 3 years,extensive fractures have appeared in the ~3000-yr-old Ward Hunt Ice  

E-print Network

with respect to Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. Fig.2.This image shows microbial mats on the Markham Ice Shelf,one of the last remaining ice shelf ecosystems at the northern coast of Ellesmere Island

Vincent, Warwick F.

393

Rafia R1; Ward S1; Scope A1; Wyld L2 1 The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom,  

E-print Network

, J., Kim, W. et al. Gene expression and benefit of chemotherapy in women with node-negative, estrogen (assuming predictive benefit of chemotherapy for OncotypeDX in the basecase analysis2). Patients are able OncotypeDX is predictive of the benefit of chemotherapy (i.e. patients classified at high risk derive

Oakley, Jeremy

394

Maximizing teaching on the wards: review and application of the One-Minute Preceptor and SNAPPS models.  

PubMed

Hospitalist educators face a number of challenges in teaching clinical reasoning to residents and medical students. Helping to develop trainees' clinical acumen is an essential and highly nuanced process, yet complex patients, documentation requirements, and productivity goals compete with teaching time. Workplace-based assessment is particularly important for residents with the institution of the developmental milestones for meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. Two frameworks for facilitating the clinical reasoning discussion-the One-Minute Preceptor preceptor and SNAPPS-have been well studied in the outpatient setting with positive results. Both models show promise for use in the inpatient teaching environment with little modification. This narrative review compares and contrasts these 2 teaching frameworks and discusses their application to the inpatient teaching environment. These models can provide opportunities for hospitalist educators to better assess trainees, integrate regular feedback, and encourage self-directed learning. These teaching frameworks can also allow hospitalists to provide more focused education to trainees without taking additional valuable time. PMID:25627348

Pascoe, Jennifer M; Nixon, James; Lang, Valerie J

2015-02-01

395

Remarks Following the City of Charlottesville's 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony Hon. S. Ward Casscells III, M.D.  

E-print Network

as well. Dr. Saathoff has mentioned UVA's 8th Evacuation Hospital of Operation Torch, the tip of the US spear in WWII, in which my father served in North Africa and Italy. The hospital served for 3 1/2 years, the longest of any US field hospital, and won many awards and made many innovations. UVA's Critical Incident

Acton, Scott

396

Clui: A Platform for Handles to Rich Objects Hubert Pham, Justin Mazzola Paluska, Robert C. Miller, and Steve Ward  

E-print Network

flights (e.g., on kayak.com), along with related services, like hotel rooms (e.g., on hotels.com) and car use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial

397

Child Deaths From Injury in the Special Wards of Tokyo, Japan (2006–2010): A Descriptive Study  

PubMed Central

Background There has been increasing interest in the formal review of child deaths in Japan. In this study we examined the causes and scene information regarding child deaths from injury in Tokyo, the capital of Japan, as preparation for implementation of a full-scale review of child deaths. Methods Documents on deaths from injury (excluding homicides) investigated by the Tokyo Medical Examiner’s Office during the period from 2006 through 2010 were reviewed. Deaths of children younger than 18 years (N = 217) were selected as the study sample. We examined the cause of and information on the death and were particularly interested in whether a case had preventable factors. Results Overall, 67% of the cases were deaths from unintentional injury. The main cause of death among children younger than 1 year was asphyxia, and the proportions of deaths from traffic accidents were higher in older age groups. Thirty percent of deaths from injury were due to suicide, and all cases of suicide were among children older than 10 years. Although analysis of preventable factors was difficult in some cases, owing to limited information on the death scene, 87% of deaths from unintentional injury, excluding those involving traffic accidents, had preventable factors. Conclusions Most unintentional child deaths from injury appear to be preventable. Development of a system to collect detailed information on the scene at the time of death will help decrease child deaths in Japan. PMID:24705644

Suzuki, Hideto; Hikiji, Wakako; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

2014-01-01

398

Search for steady and transient radio pulses to-wards two new Fermi-LAT sources with GMRT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Large Area Telescope aboard Fermi spacecraft has discovered many new pulsars at high energies (Abdo et al. 2009). Sixteen of the 46 sources in this first catalog were discovered at positions of bright gamma-ray sources with no known radio counterparts, suggesting a large radio-quiet pulsar population. The non-detections of radio pulsars in these sources suggest an outer gap origin of the high energy emission and strict upper limits with radio observations of these sources are required. On the other hand, the detection of radio pulsation is useful for an improved timing solution and an estimate of distance. Two of these, PSRs J2238+59 and J1958+2846, without radio counterparts, lie in a region of sky, which was surveyed using GMRT at 610 MHz in a recently concluded radio pulsar survey (Joshi et al. 2009). We present upper limits on pulsed radio emission from our survey for these two sources and the results of a transient search to detect isolated bursts from these sources using the same data.

Joshi, Bhal Chandra; McLaughlin, Maura; Lorimer, Duncan; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew

399

Petrophysical evaluation of a slope fan/basin-floor fan complex: Cherry Canyon Formation, Ward County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Cherry Canyon Formation consists of a 925-ft (280-m) thick section of up to 25 different sandstone and siltstone units that were deposited in deep water in the Delaware basin. Lowstand sedimentation by fluid density currents with periodic turbidity currents resulted in a broad migrating channelized slope fan/basin-floor fan complex exhibiting a complex depositional architecture of reservoir sandstones. Original depositional fabric modified by diagenetic cements and authigenic clays create a range of petrophysical rock types. Type 1 reservoirs are found in channel sandstones; beds of lesser reservoir quality (type 2) are present in laminated overbank/interchannel sandstones. A practical pore geometry classification scheme based on pore/grain shapes and pore throat radii is used to understand fluid saturations and predict well performance within the context of the depositional framework and structural relief.

Spain, D.R. (Amoco Production Research, Tulsa, OK (United States))

1992-06-01

400

Reservoir characterization of a Permian Slope Fan/basin-floor fan complex: Cherry Canyon Formation, Ward County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Cherry Canyon Formation consists of a 925-ft- (280-m) thick section of up to 25 different sandstone and siltstone units that were deposited in a deep-water environment in the Delaware basin. Lowstand sedimentation by fluid density currents with periodic turbidity currents resulted in a broad-migrating channelized slope fan/basin-floor fan complex interpreted to exhibit an intricate reservoir geometry. Thirteen lithofacies are identified. Primary reservoirs are found in massive channel sandstones, and beds of lesser reservoir quality are present in laminated overbank/interchannel sandstones. Original depositional fabric modified by diagenetic cements and authigenic clays created three petrophysical rock types. Type I reservoirs contain intergranular macroporosity relatively free of carbonate cement and authigenic clay. Types II and III reservoirs contain mesoporosity and abundant microporosity created by moderate to abundant carbonate cementation and plugging of pore throats by authigenic grain-coating chlorite and pore-bridging fibrous illite. Depositional and diagenetic factors combine with insufficient oil column height to yield low initial oil saturations that decrease with depth in a hydrocarbon-water transition zone. Mercury injection capillary pressure measurements illustrate the vertical stratification of petrophysical rock types that exist in the section; reservoirs which contain all water are interbedded with reservoirs containing mostly oil. Subsequently, a slight change in height above free water can drive production from all water to all oil. Hydrocarbon column heights greater than 60 ft are required to establish water-free oil production. Accurate reservoir water saturations can be derived using Archie's equation; when combined with a movable oil analysis and drainage relative permeability/fractional flow curves, initial water cuts can be predicted to maximize deliverability.

Spain, D.R. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01

401

Detailed Protocol for "Impressions of Dialog Behaviors across Cultures" March 8, 2007, Yaffa Al Bayyari and Nigel Ward  

E-print Network

responses differ too. It's subtle. Okay, now let's do it for real. Please listen to the short samples with the modified audio, although sometimes it's hard. In any case, please just do your best." 4. Tell them "For "In this room it's easy to be distracted, but we'd like you to focus on the sounds. It may help

Ward, Nigel

402

Mathematical models for assessing the role of airflow on the risk of airborne infection in hospital wards  

PubMed Central

Understanding the risk of airborne transmission can provide important information for designing safe healthcare environments with an appropriate level of environmental control for mitigating risks. The most common approach for assessing risk is to use the Wells–Riley equation to relate infectious cases to human and environmental parameters. While it is a simple model that can yield valuable information, the model used as in its original presentation has a number of limitations. This paper reviews recent developments addressing some of the limitations including coupling with epidemic models to evaluate the wider impact of control measures on disease progression, linking with zonal ventilation or computational fluid dynamics simulations to deal with imperfect mixing in real environments and recent work on dose–response modelling to simulate the interaction between pathogens and the host. A stochastic version of the Wells–Riley model is presented that allows consideration of the effects of small populations relevant in healthcare settings and it is demonstrated how this can be linked to a simple zonal ventilation model to simulate the influence of proximity to an infector. The results show how neglecting the stochastic effects present in a real situation could underestimate the risk by 15 per cent or more and that the number and rate of new infections between connected spaces is strongly dependent on the airflow. Results also indicate the potential danger of using fully mixed models for future risk assessments, with quanta values derived from such cases less than half the actual source value. PMID:19812072

Noakes, Catherine J.; Sleigh, P. Andrew

2009-01-01

403

A study of snake bite among children presenting to a paediatric ward in the main Teaching Hospital of North Central Province of Sri Lanka  

PubMed Central

Background Snake bite is a common problem in the North Central province of Sri Lanka. Common krait (Bungarus careuleus), Ceylon krait (Bungarus ceylonicus), Cobra (Naja naja), Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii), Saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) and Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) are the six species of venomous land snakes in Sri Lanka. A significant number of adults and children are bitten by snakes every year. However, the majority of research studies done in Sri Lanka and other countries show adults bitten by snakes and studies describing children bitten by snakes are very sparse. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was performed in the Teaching Hospital Anuradhapura in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka from May 2010 to 2011 May to describe the characteristics associated with cases of snake bite. Results There were 24 males and 20 females. The highest numbers of bites (48%) were in the range of ages 6-12 years. The majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm to 6 am (59%).The foot was the most common bitten site (48%). Out of all the venomous bites, the Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number (44%) and Russell’s viper (Daboia ruselii) accounted for the second highest number (27%). A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoors while sleeping (22%). Antivenom serum was given to (39%) of venomous bites. Deaths occurred in (11%) of the venomous bites. Conclusions Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number of venomous bites. Majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm and 6 am. Foot was the most common bitten site. A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoor while sleeping. Antivenom serum was given to a significant number of venomous bites. Educating the public on making their houses snake proof and using a torch when going out during night time will help in the prevention of getting bitten by snakes. PMID:25073710

2014-01-01

404

[Prevalence of serological markers for viral hepatitis B and C in patients and medical personnel in the hematologic ward of Novosibirsk city hospital No. 2].  

PubMed

Blood samples of 60 patients and 19 staff members were tested for serological markers of hepatitides B (HBV) and C (HBC) using the Vector-Best JSC enzyme immunoassay kits. HBV and HBC markers were found in 25 in 30% of patients and in 15.8 and 5.3% of staff members, respectively. Part of the sera with HBV and HBC markers were tested for the HBV and HBC RNAs by polymerase chain reaction. The findings confirm that donors should be more thoroughly tested for hepatitis markers, as well as the patients and staff of hematology departments. PMID:9103041

Netesova, I G; Kiselev, N N; Loseva, M I; Iaroslavtseva, O A; Vtorushina, I A; Kalinin, P N; Shustov, A V; Pospelova, T I; Mishenin, A V; Adamovskaia, I A; Za?tsev, S A; Netesov, S V

1997-01-01

405

Three-dimensional reconstructions from computed tomographic scans on smartphones and tablets: a simple tutorial for the ward and operating room using public domain software.  

PubMed

Handling 3-dimensional reconstructions of computed tomographic scans on portable devices is problematic because of the size of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) stacks. The authors provide a user-friendly method allowing the production, transfer, and sharing of good-quality 3-dimensional reconstructions on smartphones and tablets. PMID:25438270

Ketoff, Serge; Khonsari, Roman Hossein; Schouman, Thomas; Bertolus, Chloé

2014-11-01

406

Using in situ simulation to identify and resolve latent environmental threats to patient safety: case study involving a labor and delivery ward.  

PubMed

Since the publication of To Err is Human, health care professionals have looked to high-reliability industries such as commercial aviation for guidance on improving system safety. One of the most widely adopted aviation-derived approaches is simulation-based team training, also known as crew resource management (CRM) training. In the health care domain, CRM training often takes place in custom-built simulation laboratories that are designed to replicate operating rooms or labor and delivery rooms. Unlike these traditional CRM training programs, in situ simulation occurs on actual patient care units, involves actual health care team members, and uses actual organization processes to train and assess team performance. During the past 24 months, our research team has conducted nearly 40 in situ simulations. In this paper, we present the results from one such simulation: a patient who experienced a difficult labor and delivery resulting in an emergency caesarean section and a hysterectomy. During the simulation, a number of latent environmental threats to safety were identified. The following article presents not only the latent threats but also the steps that the hospital has taken to remedy them. Results from clinical simulations in operational health care settings can help identify and resolve latent environmental threats to patient safety. PMID:19927053

Hamman, William R; Beaudin-Seiler, Beth M; Beaubien, Jeffrey M; Gullickson, Amy M; Gross, Amy C; Orizondo-Korotko, Krystyna; Fuqua, Wayne; Lammers, Richard

2009-09-01

407

Using in situ simulation to identify and resolve latent environmental threats to patient safety: case study involving operational changes in a labor and delivery ward.  

PubMed

Since the publication of "To Err Is Human" in 1999, health care professionals have looked to high-reliability industries such as aviation for guidance on improving system safety. One of the most widely adopted aviation-derived approaches is simulation-based team training, also known as crew resource management training. In the health care domain, crew resource management training often takes place in custom-built simulation laboratories that are designed to replicate operating rooms or labor and delivery rooms. Unlike these traditional crew resource management training programs, "in situ simulation" occurs on actual patient care units, involves actual health care team members, and uses actual organization processes to train and assess team performance. During the past 24 months, our research team has conducted nearly 40 in situ simulations. In this article, we present the results from 1 such simulation: a patient who experienced a difficult labor that resulted in an emergency caesarian section and hysterectomy. During the simulation, a number of latent environmental threats to safety were identified. This article presents the latent threats and the steps that the hospital has taken to remedy them. PMID:20588141

Hamman, William R; Beaudin-Seiler, Beth M; Beaubien, Jeffrey M; Gullickson, Amy M; Orizondo-Korotko, Krystyna; Gross, Amy C; Fuqua, Wayne; Lammers, Richard

2010-01-01

408

A model on the dynamics of odontogenic cyst growth John P. Ward BSc MSc PhD, Lecturer, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough  

E-print Network

). Keratocysts, are another type of OC (comprising about 10% of all diagnosed cysts of the jaws) but thought either rests of the dental lamina (glands of Serres)2 or extensions of mucosal basal cells3 . Keratocysts

409

Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters Are Not Superior to Central Venous Catheters in the Acute Care of Surgical Patients on the Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) have supplanted central venous catheters (CVC) for the administration\\u000a of intravenous antibiotics and total parenteral nutrition to patients in our hospital. From the literature, it appears that\\u000a this change has occurred in a number of other surgical units. Accounting for the change are the expected advantages of low\\u000a complication rates at insertion, prolonged use

Simon Turcotte; Serge Dube ´; Gilles Beauchamp

2006-01-01

410

The completeness of medication histories in hospital medical records of patients admitted to general internal medicine wards: Completeness of medication in hospital medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims Accurate recording of medication histories in hospital medical records (HMR) is important when patients are admitted to the hospital. Lack of registration of drugs can lead to unintended discontinuation of drugs and failure to detect drug related problems. We investigated the comprehensiveness of medication histories in HMR with regard to prescription drugs by comparing the registration of drugs in

Hong Sang Lau; Christa Florax; Arijan J. Porsius; Anthonius De Boer

2001-01-01

411

Chelator-induced inhibition of copper metalloenzymes in denitrifying bacteria James W. Moffett,a,* Caroline B. Tuit,b,1 and B. B. Ward b  

E-print Network

than most reported values, suggesting that the organisms have evolved high- affinity Cu transport is probably uncommon in aquatic systems, the presence of reduced sulfur compounds may induce Cu limitation. The link between copper availability and denitrification rates or end products has not been substantiated

Ward, Bess

412

Derivation and validation of a mortality-risk index from a cohort of frail elderly patients hospitalised in medical wards via emergencies: the SAFES study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify predictive factors for 2-year mortality in frail elderly patients after acute hospitalisation, and from these\\u000a to derive and validate a Mortality Risk Index (MRI). A prospective cohort of elderly patients was set up in nine teaching\\u000a hospitals. This cohort was randomly split up into a derivation cohort (DC) of 870 subjects and a validation cohort (VC) of\\u000a 436

M. Dramé; J. L. Novella; P. O. Lang; D. Somme; N. Jovenin; I. Lanièce; P. Couturier; D. Heitz; J. B. Gauvain; T. Voisin; B. De Wazières; R. Gonthier; J. Ankri; C. Jeandel; O. Saint-Jean; F. Blanchard; D. Jolly

2008-01-01

413

Abstract--During the past few years a world-wide trend to-wards renewable and ecologically clean forms of energy has  

E-print Network

- tributed negotiation process, which is compatible with electric distribution procedures. This is part market prices for energy are the obvious signs of a shortage in fossil fuel. To maintain an efficient. It is a top-down proce- dure, from the 500 kV, 110 kV, 20 kV levels, down to the 0.4 kV grids. On the other

Wedde, Horst F.

414

Charting a Course to Teaching Treasures: Medical Educators' Resource Guide (MERG) Scott Tripler MD, Donna Berryman MLIS, Andria Mutrie, Denham Ward, MD  

E-print Network

Charting a Course to Teaching Treasures: Medical Educators' Resource Guide (MERG) Scott Tripler MD by entering "Medical Educators Resource Guide" in Blackboard Syllabus = Content 2008 Colloquium material HERE Workshops = Materials from Faculty Development Series & Colloquiums Medical Educators' Resource Guide (MERG

Goldman, Steven A.

415

Making Shared Caches More Predictable on Multicore Platforms Bryan C. Ward, Jonathan L. Herman, Christopher J. Kenna, and James H. Anderson  

E-print Network

of such systems include avionic and automo- tive systems, medical systems for diagnosis and treatment, and smart to be impeded. In this paper, we consider this prob- lem in the context of shared caches. Next-generation UAVs-time operating system infrastructure for next-generation unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). Currently, avionics

Anderson, James

416

Making Shared Caches More Predictable on Multicore Platforms Christopher J. Kenna, Jonathan L. Herman, Bryan C. Ward, and James H. Anderson  

E-print Network

of such systems include avionic and automo- tive systems, medical systems for diagnosis and treatment, and smart. In this paper, we consider this prob- lem in the context of shared caches. Next-generation UAVs. Our work) infrastructure for next-generation unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). Currently, avionics manufacturers resolve

Anderson, James

417

, 20140661, published 13 August 20142812014Proc. R. Soc. B Prashant P. Sharma, Evelyn E. Schwager, Cassandra G. Extavour and Ward C. Wheeler  

E-print Network

: Scorpiones, opisthosoma, Arthropoda, bauplan, tagmosis Author for correspondence: Prashant P. Sharma e, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been The evolutionary success of Arthropoda is attributed to their segmented bauplan and its modularization through

Extavour, Cassandra

418

An ounce of prevention. The AHA tries to ward off political attacks by showing its worth through healthcare ROI study, election cards and a new logo.  

PubMed

Fearing political backlash, the American Hospital Association is taking the offensive, crafting an image that shows hospitals are providing essential services despite the hefty price tag. In an attempt to rebrand itself, the AHA is touting a study on healthcare return on investment, has created an election card detailing "Seven Steps to a Healthier America" and debuted a new logo. PMID:14974297

Reilly, Patrick

2004-02-01

419

Molecular phylogenetics of Floridosentis ward, 1953 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) parasites of mullets (Osteichthyes) from Mexico, using 28S rDNA sequences.  

PubMed

Species of Floridosentis (Acanthocephala) are common parasites of mullets (Mugil spp., Mugilidae) found in tropical marine and brackish water in the Americas. Floridosentis includes 2 species distributed in Mexico, i.e., Floridosentis pacifica, restricted to the Pacific Ocean near Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, and Floridosentis mugilis, distributed along the coast of the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. We sampled 18 populations of F. mugilis and F. pacifica (12 from the Pacific and 6 from the Gulf of Mexico) and sequenced a fragment of the rDNA large subunit to evaluate phylogenetic relationships of populations of Floridosentis spp. from Mexico. Species identification of museum specimens of F. mugilis from the Pacific Ocean was confirmed by examination of morphology traits. Phylogenetic trees inferred with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference indicate that Floridosentis is monophyletic comprising of 2 major well-supported clades, the first clade corresponding to F. mugilis from the Gulf of Mexico, and the second to F. pacifica from the Pacific Ocean. Genetic divergence between species ranged from 7.68 to 8.60%. Intraspecific divergence ranged from 0.14 to 0.86% for F. mugilis and from 1.72 to 4.49% for F. pacifica. Data obtained from diagnostic characters indicate that specimens from the Pacific Ocean in Mexico have differences in some traits among locations. These results are consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis, indicating that F. pacifica is distributed in the Pacific Ocean in Mexico with 3 major lineages. PMID:22360517

Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Morrone, Juan J; García-Varela, Martín

2012-08-01

420

3D Simulation of a Hospital Environment and Ward Round to Augment a Summer School Program for Pre-Medical Students.  

PubMed

Students applying to medical school may benefit from a better understanding of the clinical environment and the duties of a doctor. Despite attachments at hospital they may feel detached from the decision making process which is a pivotal part of being a clinician. A simulated hospital environment was tried on 30 pre-med students from an urban environment to test the feasibility of using structured clinical scenarios to augment their experience of a clinical setting. PMID:24732508

Kulendran, Myutan; Taylor, Michael; Taylor, David; Darzi, Ara

2014-01-01

421

"Junior Doctor Decision Making: Isn't that an Oxymoron?" A Qualitative Analysis of Junior Doctors' Ward-Based Decision-Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unacceptable levels of adverse healthcare events, combined with changes to training, have put the spotlight on junior doctor decision-making. This study aimed to describe the decisions made by junior doctors and the contextual factors influencing how decisions were made and justified. Stimulated recall interviews with 20 junior doctors across five…

Bull, Stephanie; Mattick, Karen; Postlethwaite, Keith

2013-01-01

422

Princesses on the Wards - Royal Women in Nursing through Wars and Revolutions Hall Coryne Princesses on the Wards - Royal Women in Nursing through Wars and Revolutions 231pp £16.99 The History Press 978 0 7524 8859 2 0752488597 [Formula: see text].  

PubMed

There was a time when the nursing profession was deemed appropriate for European queens and princesses. This fascinating book traces such participation from the daughters of Queen Victoria, who were inspired by Florence Nightingale, to Princess Marie-Astrid of Luxembourg, who trained as a nurse in the 1970s. PMID:25758505

2015-03-11

423

76 FR 43637 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...backwater effects from Cumberland River), and Ward Branch (backwater effects from Cumberland...backwater effects from Cumberland River), and Ward Branch (backwater effects from Cumberland...upstream of the Cumberland River confluence. Ward Branch (backwater effects from From...

2011-07-21

424

76 FR 66714 - Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre-Application Document, and Approving...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Alternative Licensing Procedures; Raymond F. Ward a. Type of Filing: Notice of Intent to File License...August 31, 2011. d. Submitted By: Raymond F. Ward. e. Name of Project: Ward Mill Dam Project. f. Location: On the...

2011-10-27

425

40 CFR 81.335 - North Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is November 15...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is October 18...County Ward County Wells County Williams County a Includes Indian...

2011-07-01

426

40 CFR 81.335 - North Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is November 15...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is October 18...County Ward County Wells County Williams County a Includes Indian...

2013-07-01

427

40 CFR 81.335 - North Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is November 15...County Ward County Wells County Williams County 1 This date is October 18...County Ward County Wells County Williams County a Includes Indian...

2012-07-01

429

Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.  

PubMed

Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1?% (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P?=?0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment. PMID:24925907

Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

2014-09-01

430

Schultz, T. R. 2007. The fungus-growing ant genus Apterostigma in Dominican amber, pp. 425-436. In Snelling, R. R., B. L. Fisher, and P. S. Ward (eds). Advances in ant systematics  

E-print Network

Schultz, T. R. 2007. The fungus-growing ant genus Apterostigma in Dominican amber, pp. 425- 436. THE FUNGUS-GROWING ANT GENUS APTEROSTIGMA IN DOMINICAN AMBER Ted R. Schultz Department of Entomology, MRC 188-7012, U.S.A. schultzt@si.edu ABSTRACT The first fossil species of the fungus-growing ant genus

Schultz, Ted

431

Comparison of PCR/Electron spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare workers  

PubMed Central

Background Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools. Methods Traditional clinical microbiology (TCM) and PCR/ESI-TOF-MS were used to recover and detect microorganisms from the hands and personal protective equipment of 10 burn intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers providing clinical care at a tertiary care military referral hospital. High-use environmental surfaces were assessed in 9 burn ICU and 10 orthopedic patient rooms. Clinical cultures during the study period were reviewed for pathogen comparison with investigational molecular diagnostic methods. Results From 158 samples, 142 organisms were identified by TCM and 718 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. The molecular diagnostic method detected more organisms (4.5?±?2.1 vs. 0.9?±?0.8, p?

2012-01-01

432

[Long-term realistically life-threatening disease].  

PubMed

In this paper the authors discuss a legal code description of a wrongly included (as a result of a legislative error) "long-term really life-threatening disease" (dlugotrwala choroba realnie zagrazajaca zyciu) in the Criminal Code. This category of disease impossible to apply in practice since its terms "long-term" and "realistically life-threatening" are mutually exclusive--is nonetheless applicable to crimes committed from Sept. 1, 1998 to Dec. 8, 2003. In effect this causes a change in the qualification of certain acts in Art. 156 of the Criminal Code, to include those in Art. 157, Paragraph 1, and in some cases, even extending to acts named in Art. 157, Paragraph 2 of the Criminal Code. PMID:15782782

Berent, Jaros?aw; Jurczyk, Agnieszka P; Markuszewski, Leszek; Szram, Stefan

2004-01-01

433

77 FR 39694 - National Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Petition for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Services, LLC. e. Name of Project: Wards Island Tidal Energy Project. f. Location: The proposed Wards Island Tidal Energy Project will be located off the south...Island Sound in the Borough of Manhattan, New York City, NY. g....

2012-07-05

434

31 CFR 315.61 - Payment after death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 315.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's discharge...estate will be entitled to obtain payment of a bond to which the ward was solely...

2010-07-01

435

31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's discharge...estate will be entitled to obtain payment of a bond to which the ward was solely...

2010-07-01

436

31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's discharge...estate will be entitled to obtain payment of a bond to which the ward was solely...

2010-07-01

437

Character and Object Becky Morris  

E-print Network

example Everest and Ward [EW05]). An analysis of these various presentations reveals a distinct change the terminology used in the modern presentation by Everest and Ward and give a sketch of the main steps involved

Avigad, Jeremy

438

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2011-10-01

439

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2012-10-01

440

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2014-10-01

441

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2013-10-01

442

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2010-10-01

443

Maag, Lisa Teaching Assistant Professor Psychology -209 Rawl Building  

E-print Network

of Compliance - 355 Ward Sports Medicine Building Mail Stop 158 Malek, Janet Associate Professor BSOM Bioethics, Matt Director - Exec/Admin ECU Educational Foundation Adm - Ward Sports Medicine Building 309 Mail Stop

444

78 FR 25295 - Final Fair Market Rents for the Housing Choice Voucher Program and Moderate Rehabilitation Single...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...County, ND, Ward County, ND, and Williams County, ND based on surveys conducted...Mountrail County, Ward County, and Williams County. HUD was evaluating a new survey...773 825 1087 1602 1667 Williams County,...

2013-04-30

445

The Relationship between Adjustment and Perceived Locus of Control for Female Psychiatric Inpatients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the longitudinal relationship between internal-external locus of control and adjustment using independent measures within two dissimilar treatment environments: a traditional ward and a token economy ward. Subjects were 65 female psychiatric inpatients. (CM)

Youkilis, Hildreth D.; Bootzin, Richard R.

1979-01-01

446

Modelling Trust Relationships in a Healthcare Network: Experiences with the TCD Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We report on the application of the Trust - Confidence - Distrust (TCD) framework of Gans et al (2003) to the task of modeling trust relationships in a large metropolitan health service We investigated the relationships between an acute stroke ward and a specialist stroke rehabilitation ward by examining the patient handover process that links each ward's activities The

Stefanie Kethers; Günter Gans; Dominik Schmitz; David Sier

2005-01-01

447

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156  

E-print Network

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156 /'auteur. . #12;Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward Technical Report Series 156 Pacific and Yukon Region 1992 Canadian Wildlife Service This series mav be cited as: Ward, Peggy. Wetlands

448

List of the Institute's Recognised Hospitals showing class, eligibility and percentage of reimbursement. (New) Name of the Hospital % admissible for  

E-print Network

of reimbursement. (New) Sr. No. Name of the Hospital % admissible for reimbursement Pay in Pay Band below Rs.7440/- Pay in Pay Band Rs.7440 ­ 13020 Pay in Pay Band of Rs.13020 ­ 28280 Pay in Pay Band above Rs. 28280 1 Asian Heart Institute For Angiography For Angioplasty 80 % 80 % Special Ward Special Ward Special Ward

Narayanan, H.

449

Very slow (h=42) Copyright 2006 by George Peter Bird.  

E-print Network

wend ing,- ap pear- ing- in Swans in Ice land:- white on black. West ward- come wend ing,- ap pear- ing- in Swans in Ice land:- white on black. West ward- come wend ing,- ap pear- ing- in Swans in Ice land:- white on black. West ward- come wend ing,- ap pear- ing- in 10 accel. rall. S. A. T. B. Fl. Vln. pairs

Bird, Peter

450

77 FR 31896 - Product List Changes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...gov. The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in...Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer...Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an...

2012-05-30

451

78 FR 34994 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Years of Age (DD Form 137-6), and Ward of a Court (DD Form 137-7); OMB Control...over age 21, a student age 21-22, or a ward of a court is provided by the military...over age 21, a student age 21-22, or a ward of a court). While members usually...

2013-06-11

452

A Principal's Reaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

Zaretsky, Lindy

2004-01-01

453

76 FR 3516 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...governing the operation of the 103rd Street (Wards Island) Bridge at mile 0.0, across...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 103rd Street (Wards Island) Bridge across the Harlem River...temporary deviation the 103rd Street (Wards Island) Bridge, may remain in the...

2011-01-20

454

5 CFR 1690.13 - Guardianship and conservatorship orders.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and the incapacitated person is called a ward. The TSP must approve a court order...authority by appointing a “guardian of the ward's estate,” by permitting a guardian to “conduct business transactions” for the ward, or by authorizing a guardian to...

2010-01-01

455

76 FR 40234 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Harlem River, New York City, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...governing the operation of the 103rd Street (Wards Island) Pedestrian Bridge at mile 0...rehabilitation project at the 103rd Street (Wards Island) Pedestrian Bridge while soliciting...governing the operation of the 103rd Street (Wards Island) Pedestrian Bridge to...

2011-07-08

456

78 FR 16827 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the on-line instructions; 2. Email to ward.laweeda@epa.gov; or 3. Mail or delivery to La Weeda Ward, Air Division (AIR-1), U.S. Environmental...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: La Weeda Ward, Air Division (AIR-1), U.S....

2013-03-19

457

42 CFR 457.320 - Other eligibility standards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...non-institutionalized child who is not a ward of the State, if the child is physically...An institutionalized child who is not a ward of a State, if the State is the State...placement; (iii) A child who is a ward of a State, regardless of the...

2010-10-01

458

26 CFR 1.212-1 - Nontrade or nonbusiness expenses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...services of a guardian or committee for a ward or minor, and other expenses of guardians...or collection of income inuring to the ward or minor, or in connection with the management...production of income, belonging to the ward or minor, are deductible....

2010-04-01

459

Intensification of the transition between inpatient neurological rehabilitation and home care of stroke patients. Controlled clinical trial with follow-up assessment six months after discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: An intensified transition concept between neurological inpatient rehabilitation and home care was investigated for effects on the functional status of stroke patients and the physical and emotional health of their carers.Design: Controlled clinical trial allocating patients to intervention group (intensified transition on ward II) or control group (standard transition on ward I); patients were allocated to whichever ward had

E Gräsel; J Biehler; R Schmidt; W Schupp

2005-01-01

460

A simulation model of the response of molting Pacific black brant to helicopter disturbance  

E-print Network

the effects of such encounters on animal distribution and behavior been documented. Researchers have observed geese being alarmed by people, boats, hunting activity, low-flying aircraft (Owens 1977, Belanger and Benard 1989, Ward and Stehn 1989), loud... 1981), and brant (Branta bernicla) are considered more vulnerable to human disturbance than any other geese (Ward and stehn 1989). Aircraft have been observed alarming brant on their wintering grounds (Kramer 1976), staging area (Ward and Stehn 1989...

Miller, Mark Wayne

1991-01-01

461

St. Lawrence Cattaraugus  

E-print Network

Richburg Angelica Wellsville Canaseraga Oil Springs Scio Wirt Allen Alma Cuba Hume Amity Almond Belfast Grove Bolivar Willing Ward Alfred Birdsall Burns Andover Angelica Genesee Rushford Wellsville Granger

Keinan, Alon

462

Facilitated patient experience feedback can improve nursing care: a pilot study for a phase III cluster randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background England’s extensive NHS patient survey programme has not fulfilled government promises of widespread improvements in patients’ experiences, and media reports of poor nursing care in NHS hospitals are increasingly common. Impediments to the surveys’ impact on the quality of nursing care may include: the fact that they are not ward-specific, so nurses claim “that doesn’t happen on my ward”; nurses’ scepticism about the relevance of patient feedback to their practice; and lack of prompt communication of results. The surveys’ impact could be increased by: conducting ward-specific surveys; returning results to ward staff more quickly; including patients’ written comments in reports; and offering nurses an opportunity to discuss the feedback. Very few randomised trials have been conducted to test the effectiveness of patient feedback on quality improvement and there have been few, if any, published trials of ward-specific patient surveys. Methods Over two years, postal surveys of recent inpatients were conducted at four-monthly intervals in 18 wards in two NHS Trusts in England. Wards were randomly allocated to Basic Feedback (ward-specific printed patient survey results including patients’ written comments sent to nurses by letter); Feedback Plus (in addition to printed results, ward meetings to discuss results and plan improvements) or Control (no active feedback of survey results). Patient survey responses to questions about nursing care were used to compute wards’ average Nursing Care Scores at each interval. Nurses’ reactions to the patient feedback were recorded. Results Conducting ward-level surveys and delivering ward-specific results was feasible. Ward meetings were effective for engaging nurses and challenging scepticism and patients’ written comments stimulated interest. 4,236 (47%) patients returned questionnaires. Nursing Care Scores improved more for Feedback Plus than Basic Feedback or Control (difference between Control and Feedback Plus?=?8.28?±?7.2 (p?=?0.02)). Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that facilitated patient feedback can improve patients’ experiences such that a full trial is justified. These findings suggest that merely informing nurses of patient survey results in writing does not stimulate improvements, even if results are disaggregated by ward, but the addition of ward meetings had an important and significant impact. PMID:23826970

2013-01-01

463

Current-voltage characteristics from an asymptotic analysis of the MOSFET equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phenomenological formulae for the current-voltage characteristics of a MOSFET are derived by extending the asymptotic method of Ward. Practical methods for combining the perturbation approximations and numerically implementing the Ward equations are developed. A detailed comparison with real MOSFET data is presented and the model is shown to be effective over a range of device geometries.

Ellis Cumberbatch; Henok Abebe; Hedley Morris

2001-01-01

464

Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper  

E-print Network

Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research.S. Department of Energy White Paper Team Ward Jewell, Janet Twomey and Michael Overcash Wichita State University, 2012 #12;Information about this white paper For information about this white paper contact: Ward Jewell

465

Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:418434, 2002 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2002  

E-print Network

of their native range (Nehlsen et al. 1991; Slaney et al. 1996; Smith and Ward 2000; Ward 2000). At least 23 major418 Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:418­434, 2002 Copyright by the American for Multiple Populations of Wild Steelhead in the Dean River, British Columbia MICHAEL A. HENDRY,1 JOHN K

Hendry, Andrew

466

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal for Therapeutic and Supportive Organizations 21(2): 119-131, Summer 2000, Special Issue, The Sanctuary Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors of this paper describe the first author's personal experience of introducing a Sanctuary Model of treatment into a regressed and violent state hospital ward. When this experiment began, the ward averaged one hundred reported violent incidents per month. By a year later, the number of violent incidents had been dramatically decreased using trauma-based therapeutic milieu principles. Within two

Lyndra J. Bills

467

Creative Imagination Is Stable across Technological Media: The Spore Creature Creator versus Pencil and Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

T. B. Ward (1994) investigated creativity by asking participants to draw alien creatures that they imagined to be from a planet very different from Earth. He found that participant drawings reliably contained features typical of common Earth animals. As a consequence, Ward concluded that creativity is structured. The present investigation predicts…

Cockbain, Jessica; Vertolli, Michael O.; Davies, Jim

2014-01-01

468

Substance Use among Iranian Nephrologic Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: This study assessed the prevalence of substance use among Iranian patients with nephrologic disease (chronic renal failure) who were admitted in different nephrologic wards at Shiraz general hospitals. Design: Cross-sectional survey using structured interview and also using DSM-IV criteria for substance dependency. Setting: General hospitals in Shiraz city (patients with nephrologic disease admitted in different nephrologic wards). Participants: 64

Jamshid Ahmadi; Leila Benrazavi

2002-01-01

469

77 FR 143 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-01-03

470

77 FR 42779 - Product List Change  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-07-20

471

77 FR 47885 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-08-10

472

77 FR 49473 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-08-16

473

77 FR 1089 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in the captioned filings...January 10, 2012. 3. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as the officer of the...

2012-01-09

474

77 FR 39273 - Express Mail Rates  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in this proceeding. It...July 9, 2012. 3. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as the officer of the...

2012-07-02

475

77 FR 304 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-01-04

476

77 FR 55233 - Product List Changes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-09-07

477

77 FR 39275 - Product List Changes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-07-02

478

77 FR 49474 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-08-16

479

77 FR 42778 - Product List Change  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-07-20

480

77 FR 4376 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-01-27

481

77 FR 58422 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-09-20

482

77 FR 48178 - New Postal Product  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as officer of the Commission...

2012-08-13

483

77 FR 42515 - Product List Change  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...http://www.prc.gov). The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to serve as Public Representative in these dockets. III...in each docket. 2. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, Natalie Rea Ward is appointed to serve as an officer of the...

2012-07-19

484

77 FR 75452 - New International Mail Contract  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...appears at 39 CFR 3007.40. The Commission appoints Natalie Rea Ward to represent the interest of the general public (Public...Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505, the Commission designates Natalie Rea Ward to serve as an officer of the Commission (Public...

2012-12-20

485

The Natural  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Caroline Ward's energetic enthusiasm for books and children is contagious. In 36 years of library service to children, no librarian, student, or child who has heard her tell a story, give a booktalk, lead a discussion group, or teach a children's literature class is likely to have forgotten the experience. While Ward is cheerfully offhand about…

McClelland, Kate

2005-01-01

486

12 CFR 745.3 - Single ownership accounts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...guardian, custodian, or conservator for the benefit of his ward or for the benefit of a minor under a Uniform Gifts to Minors...any other accounts of the guardian, custodian, conservator, ward, or minor. [51 FR 37560, Oct. 23, 1986, as...

2010-01-01

487

20 CFR 266.12 - Effect of matters or actions submitted or taken by legal guardian, etc.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Board in the same manner and with the same effect as though such matters or actions had been submitted or taken by the ward, if the ward had capacity to act in his or her own behalf; Provided, however, That the Board may, if it deems it...

2010-04-01

488

38 CFR 10.43 - Claim by guardian of child of veteran.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... A claim made by a legal guardian on behalf of his or her