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1

4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

2

United States v. Ward.  

PubMed

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit held that a district court order requiring a criminal defendant to provide a blood sample to test for HIV antibodies did not violate his Fourth Amendment rights. Ward, an interstate truck driver, abducted a woman from a New Jersey parking lot and repeatedly raped her in his truck over the next three days until she escaped in Illinois. The court had ordered Ward to provide a blood sample for HIV-AIDS testing under the federal Violence Against Women Act. Under the Act, a blood test is permissible only when the accused is charged with sexual assault that poses a risk of HIV transmission, probable cause exists that the accused committed the assault, the victim requests the test, and the test would provide information necessary for the victim's health. Pursuant to the Act, the lower court also directed that the results would remain confidential except for disclosure to the victim and the defendant and their respective doctors. PMID:11648635

1997-11-13

3

15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

4

Ward, Robert M. Curriculum Vitae  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... 7. Lorenz RP, Appelbaum PC, Ward RM, Botti JJ. Chorioamnionitis and possible neonatal infection associated with Lactobacillus species. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

5

Nonlocal-symmetry Ward identities  

SciTech Connect

We derive and discuss Ward identities associated with the nonlocal symmetry found in certain two-dimensional field theories. We show the identities are satisfied by the fermion propagator in the presence of the dynamical mass generation occurring in the O(N) Gross-Neveu model as N..-->..infinity.

Curtright, T.L.; Zachos, C.K.

1981-11-15

6

Divergent Vertices and Ward Identies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Schwinger and Adler have discovered that if the A1-omega meson-rhomeson off-shell vertex function is linearly divergent, then the axial-vector Ward identity for the A1-omega meson-rhomeson vertex contains an extra model-dependent term. It is shown here th...

K. G. Wilson

1969-01-01

7

Stroke unit versus neurology ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Few studies have tested the hypothesis of whether the beneficial effect of Stroke Units (SUs) can be reproduced in routine clinical practice and whether SU are also superior to neurological wards [NWs]. We aimed to compare the outcomes of patients of a newly implemented SU to the outcomes of patients hospitalized in a NW. Methods: We made a before-after

Y. Krespi; M. E. Gurol; O. Coban; R. Tuncay; S. Bahar

2003-01-01

8

Psychiatric wards: places of safety?  

PubMed

In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

2010-03-01

9

Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.  

PubMed

The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. PMID:23548577

Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

2013-03-30

10

Present use of five-day wards.  

PubMed Central

A survey of five-day wards serving medical and surgical specialties indicated that 30 such units were operating in England in 1979. Six mixed surgical specialty, eight mixed specialty (medicine and surgery), four medical investigation, and 12 single specialty wards had opened since 1969. There was a varied, and often low, use of these wards. Nurse-staffing levels and allocation of operating theatre time also varied considerably. In busy wards nurse-staffing levels were high and access to operating theatre time reasonable. Medical investigation wards showed some of the highest levels of occupancy and throughput. The potential savings and service improvements that can result from five-day wards have yet to be realised on a wide scale.

Davies, R; Cliff, K S; Waters, W E

1981-01-01

11

Urinary Catheterization in Medical Wards  

PubMed Central

Aims: The study aims to determine the: 1. frequency of inappropriate catheterization in medical wards and the reasons for doing it. 2. various risk factors associated with inappropriate catheterization, catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) and bacterial colonization on Foley's catheters (BCFC). Settings and Design: Hospital-based prospective study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty five patients admitted consecutively in the medical wards of a tertiary care hospital, who underwent catheterization with a Foley's catheter, at admission, have been included in the study. Patient profiles were evaluated using the following parameters: age, sex, diagnosis, functional status, mental status, indication, duration and place of catheterization, development of BCFC and CAUTI. Statistical tests used: Chi-square test. Results: Thirty-six out of 125 (28.8%) patients included were inappropriately catheterized. BCFC developed in 52.8% and 22.4% were diagnosed with a CAUTI. The most frequent indication for inappropriate catheterization was urinary incontinence without significant skin breakdown (27.8%). The risk factors for inappropriate catheterization were female sex (RR=1.29, 95% CI=0.99, 1.69, P<0.05) and catheterization in the emergency (RR=0.74, 95% CI=0.61, 0.90, P<0.05). The risk factors for developing a BCFC were age>60 years (RR=0.65, 95% CI=0.48, 0.89, P<0.05), non-ambulatory functional status (RR=0.57, 95% CI=0.39, 0.84, P<0.01), catheterization in the emergency (RR=2.01, 95% CI=1.17, 3.46, P<0.01) and duration of catheterization>3 days (RR=0.62, 95% CI=0.43, 0.89, P<0.01). The risk factors for acquiring a CAUTI were age>60 years (RR=0.47, 95% CI=0.25, 0.90, P<0.05), impaired mental status (RR=0.37, 95% CI=0.18, 0.77, P<0.01) and duration of catheterization>3 days (RR=0.24, 95% CI=0.10, 0.58, P<0.01). Conclusions: Inappropriate catheterization is highly prevalent in medical wards, especially in patients with urinary incontinence. The patients catheterized in the medical emergency and female patients in particular are at high risk. Careful attention to these factors can reduce the frequency of inappropriate catheterization and unnecessary morbidity.

Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Daga, Mradul K; Garg, Sandeep; Prakash, S K

2010-01-01

12

Food hygiene on the wards.  

PubMed

A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food distribution for ward kitchens too. PMID:20200664

Steuer, Walter

2007-09-13

13

9. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, WARD-L-H. Elevation, Sections & Roof Framing.' 10-31-42 - Madigan Hospital, Detention Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

14

10. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, WARD-S-H. Plan & Schedules.' 6-22-43 - Madigan Hospital, Detention Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

15

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARDJH. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARD-J-H. FLOOR, FOUNDATION AND FRAMING PLANS." OCTOBER 31, 1942. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

16

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section 117.23 Indians...117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any...

2009-04-01

17

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section 117.23 Indians...117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any...

2010-04-01

18

45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional...Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards...entity can be included in research approved under §...

2011-10-01

19

Operation Ward's Island, A Guide to the Trees and Other Features of Ward's Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide for teachers, students, and adults illustrates how it is possible to use Ward's Island as an outdoor laboratory. It contains a guide to 30 kinds of trees on the island, along with clearly drawn maps and illustrations. The guide helps the user to locate these trees along two nature trails. A section called "Ward's Island Roundup"

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

20

Operation Ward's Island, A Guide to the Trees and Other Features of Ward's Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for teachers, students, and adults illustrates how it is possible to use Ward's Island as an outdoor laboratory. It contains a guide to 30 kinds of trees on the island, along with clearly drawn maps and illustrations. The guide helps the user to locate these trees along two nature trails. A section called "Ward's Island Roundup" briefly

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

21

Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial

Chandler, Daniel Ross

22

Safety Issues on British Mental Health Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Assuring patient safety on inpatient psychiatric units is a complex issue that involves mitigating risks as well as promoting safety by building an environment that supports engagement and constructive activity. OBJECTIVES: To review the concerns surrounding inpatient psychiatric units in the United Kingdom that led to a service userdesigned program, Star Wards. The essential elements of the program are

Marion Janner; Kathleen R. Delaney

2012-01-01

23

Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for

O'Nell, Robert M.

2006-01-01

24

Ward Identity in Krein Space Quantization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the previous paper, Krein space quantization has been studied for QED (Forghan et al. in Ann. Phys. 327:2388, 2012). In this paper, the relation between the vertex function and the electron self energy has been studied, showing that the Ward identity is correct for Krein space quantization.

Forghan, B.

2013-04-01

25

Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan

Chandler, Daniel Ross

26

Ward Identity in Krein Space Quantization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the previous paper, Krein space quantization has been studied for QED (Forghan et al. in Ann. Phys. 327:2388, 2012). In this paper, the relation between the vertex function and the electron self energy has been studied, showing that the Ward identity is correct for Krein space quantization.

Forghan, B.

2013-09-01

27

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

28

Lean as a learning system in a hospital ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss lean as a learning system in a hospital ward. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Discusses lean as a learning system in a hospital ward. Findings The Toyota veterans are fond of saying, lean is about making people before making parts or, in the wards' context, developing nurses before delivering care. Originality\\/value

Michael Ball; Anne Rgnier

2007-01-01

29

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "COMBINATION WARD, WARDKH. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "COMBINATION WARD, WARD-K-H. ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND ROOF FRAMING PLAN." OCTOBER 31, 1942 - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

30

34 CFR 300.45 - Ward of the State.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Ward of the State. 300.45 Section 300...Definitions Used in This Part § 300.45 Ward of the State. (a) General. Subject to paragraph (b) of this section, ward of the State means a child who, as...

2009-07-01

31

34 CFR 300.45 - Ward of the State.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ward of the State. 300.45 Section 300...Definitions Used in This Part § 300.45 Ward of the State. (a) General. Subject to paragraph (b) of this section, ward of the State means a child who, as...

2010-07-01

32

Interactional aspects of violent behaviour on acute psychiatric wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violence on psychiatric wards involving staff and patients is a significant problem in many countries. Whilst patient psychopathology is often a factor, the violent interaction between ward staff and patients is often comparable to other violent interactions in the outside world. Thus, approaches from the social sciences can help to analyse the interactional patterns on psychiatric wards in order to

Richard Whittington; Dirk Richter

2005-01-01

33

Virus Cross-infection in Paediatric Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a survey of virus cross-infection in paediatric wards there were 15 cross-infections due to respiratory syncytial (R.S.) virus and 16 due to influenza A, both during a four-month period, and 19 due to parainfluenza viruses over two years. The illnesses produced by these infections acquired in hospital ranged from a slight cold to severe pneumonia: in 17 of the

P. S. Gardner; S. D. M. Court; J. T. Brocklebank; M. A. P. S. Downham; D. Weightman

1973-01-01

34

[Hospital infections in an emergency surgery ward].  

PubMed

A study was conducted on hospital infections in an emergency surgery ward. The survey lasted one year and confirmed the higher incidence of infections after contaminated and dirty operations. Rates of infection were also high after clean operations due to the large number of subjects at risk among the group examined. The most commonly encountered micro-organisms in the infections of surgical wounds were, in order, E. coli, Str. faecalis and Staph. aureus, the latter being only minimally responsive to the standard antibiotics. Several proposals are advanced for prophylaxis in the attempt to halt the circulation of strains with a multiple resistance to antibiotics. PMID:3309727

Soranzo, M L; Pessione, E; Spezia, C; Alberghina, A; Daziano, E; Salassa, B; Olivero, S

1987-09-30

35

Regular ward checks raise standards of care.  

PubMed

This article reports on the introduction of intentional rounding at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust. The approach was piloted and implemented on the initiative of two nurses in wards that ranged from orthopaedic to general medical. Intentional rounding aims to put patients at the centre of care and consists of checking on their condition at hourly or two-hourly intervals, recording their nutritional status and skin integrity, and asking if they need pain relief or help with eating. The introduction of the approach follows concerns about failures in care highlighted by a number of recent high-profile reports. PMID:22690424

Dean, Erin

2012-05-01

36

Choosing a commode for the ward environment.  

PubMed

The choice of appropriate equipment to promote patient independence and enhance nursing care is of major concern to the nurse in the ward environment. This article reports on a recent evaluation of specialist commodes, (Ballinger et al, 1994), with reference to the programme funded by the Medical Devices Agency, Department of Health, under whose auspices the project was carried out. The results of user evaluations and technical tests of six mobile commodes are presented, the preferred model being the Mayfair commode supplied by Carters (J&A) Ltd. The article concludes by identifying a number of important considerations to bear in mind when selecting a commode. PMID:8788461

Ballinger, C; Pain, H; Pascoe, J; Gore, S

37

Preventing assaults on a psychiatric inpatient ward.  

PubMed

Although appropriate evaluation, management, and treatment of violence-prone patients will tend to reduce the incidence of aggressive acts on a psychiatric ward, such measures are not enough to prevent eruptions of violence. The author discusses several specific preventive steps that staff of psychiatric units can take to reduce the likelihood that assaults will occur: forming and maintaining a social norm against violence, recognizing and managing countertransferential reactions among both staff and patients, ensuring responsible involvement by psychiatrists during violent incidents, thoroughly assessing a patient's potential for assault, and paying prompt attention to the significance of an assault for the involved patient, other patients, and staff. PMID:6510902

Felthous, A R

1984-12-01

38

Harrisburg’s Old 8th Ward  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A great deal of ink has been spilled telling the stories of the urban renewal process in the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. Of course, large-scale demolition and redevelopment projects were not without precedent, as proven by the experience of Harrisburg’s 8th Ward in the second decade of the twentieth century. The area was definitely a bit of hardscrabble by the early 1910s, and it seemed to offend the more genteel sentiments of some of Harrisburg’s important civic leaders and their kind. Much of the area was completely razed over the next few years, and by the early 1920s, the old neighborhood was largely gone. This story is told most effectively in this website, which was a creation of Professor Michael Barton at Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg along with some of his students, who worked together to locate primary research materials (such as photographs) that could be used to create a documentary history of the area. Visitors to the site can take a virtual walking tour of the old 8th Ward, peruse a resident directory from the period, and also view historic maps and a view of the area. For those who are interested in learning about how the site was created, there is also a document available here that discusses how it all came to fruition.

Barton, Michael; Gilbert, Stephanie P.

39

[Isolation ward: initial experiences after 4 years].  

PubMed

Since October 1988 there has been an isolation ward at Basle Cantonal Hospital. Its purpose is to treat patients with high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation under protective isolation and by standardized criteria. The isolation ward has two sub-units, viz. the reverse isolation for neutropenic patients (8 single room units) and the LAF unit (5 laminar airflow units) for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Up to July 1992, 287 patients (152 males and 133 females) required 527 hospitalizations. The median age was 41 (5-82) years in the reverse isolation unit and 28 (4-61) years in the LAF unit. Bed occupation was 90% and 82% throughout the period. 71% of patients were from the Basle area and the rest from elsewhere in Switzerland or from other countries. Diagnosis: acute leukemias (112); myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative syndromes (52); severe aplastic anemia or agranulocytosis (46); lymphoproliferative syndromes (50); solid tumors (28). Indications for hospitalisation: BMT (107); complications after BMT (infections, GvHD) (63); chemotherapy on protocols of SAKK (105); other chemotherapies (64); antilymphocyte globulin or growth factor treatment (27); splenectomies (18); neutropenic fever (62); patient work-up (59); terminal care (20). Patients in reverse isolation were hospitalized for a median 17 (1-142) days; in the LAF unit for 52 (1-121) days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8296194

Passweg, J; Gratwohl, A; Stauffer, G; Wuhrmann, J; Buser, U; Tichelli, A; Speck, B; Herrmann, R; Stauffacher, W

1994-01-11

40

18. View looking NE up corridor showing Wards Island Viaduct ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. View looking NE up corridor showing Wards Island Viaduct in foreground and Randalls Island Viaduct in background. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 8.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

41

Advantages and Disadvantages of Special Depression Treatment and Research Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

After the establishment of the first European depression research ward at the PUK Basle 1968 we started the Weissenau depression treatment and research ward in 1976. Since this time there were approximately 1800 admissions of depressed inpatients. Up to this day 3 of the 9 county mental hospitals of Baden-Wrttemberg FRG (1984 2797 depressiv inpatients, average time of stay 49

Gnter Hole; Manfred Wolfersdorf

1986-01-01

42

Ward Design in Relation to Postoperative Wound Infection: Part I  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of postoperative wound infection in a general surgical unit is reported both before and after transfer from a Nightingale type multibed ward to a new race-track type of surgical ward with controlled ventilation and with 40% of its beds in single rooms. Following transfer postoperative wound infection was reduced by about 55%.With the use of certain types of

A. I. G. Davidson; A. Macdonald; G. Smith

1971-01-01

43

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any property, real or personal, by the guardian to or from the ward, or to or from any store, company or organization in which the guardian has a direct interest or...

2011-04-01

44

Zipf's law organizes a psychiatric ward.  

PubMed

We developed a simple mathematical model based on power law fitting for describing the interactions among patients from a psychiatric ward. First we defined a protocol in order to evaluate in a quantative way the state of the patient, measuring sociability/restlessness through a daily analysis of the behavior and attributing a grade for both parameters, per patient. The grades were checked by two different specialists and a table of incidence was constructed. This table generated power laws for the grades and their variations. We concluded that power laws, like Zipf's law, may be good to explain the data, showing a self-organizing process that indicates a strong interaction component determining the whole behavior. We would like to see more data being collected, in other centers and among normal populations, trying to quantify complex collective behavioral phenomena using self-organizing criticality laws. PMID:10366495

Piqueira, J R; Monteiro, L H; de Magalhes, T M; Ramos, R T; Sassi, R B; Cruz, E G

1999-06-01

45

Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity.  

SciTech Connect

The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

Chang, L.; Liu, Y.-X.; Roberts, C. D.; Shi, Y.-M.; Sun, W.-M.; Zong, H.-S.; Physics; Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics; Peking Univ.; National Lab. of Heavy Ion Accelerator; Univ. of New South Wales; Nanjing Univ.; Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology

2009-03-01

46

Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity  

SciTech Connect

The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

Chang Lei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Liu Yuxin [Department of Physics and the State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Roberts, Craig D. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Shi Yuanmei [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2009-03-15

47

42 CFR 70.7 - Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. 70.7 Section 70...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. A parent, guardian...furnish transportation for any minor child or ward, patient or other such person who is...

2011-10-01

48

42 CFR 70.7 - Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. 70.7 Section 70...Responsibility with respect to minors, wards, and patients. A parent, guardian...furnish transportation for any minor child or ward, patient or other such person who is...

2012-10-01

49

Nursing Study-Phase III. The Assessment of Unit Assignment in a Multi-Ward Setting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The unit assignment concept for classifying patients is tested on two medical wards and one surgical ward. In unit assignment, ward structure is decentralized and divided into units of care classified as intense, above average, average, and minimal. A uni...

K. Sjoberg P. Bicknell A. C. Wilson E. L. Heieren

1971-01-01

50

18. INTERIOR OF WARD ROOM WITH RUDDER QUADRANT AND SHAFT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. INTERIOR OF WARD ROOM WITH RUDDER QUADRANT AND SHAFT LOCATED ABOVE. NOTE WIRE ROPE ALONG CEILING WHICH RUNS DIRECT TO WHEEL MECHANISM. - Lightship 116, Pier 3, Inner Harbor, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

51

Environmentalism in American Pedagogy: The Legacy of Lester Ward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A review is presented of the legacy of Lester Frank Ward, widely recognized as the architect of environmentalism in American pedagogy and the creator of some of the most fundamental ideas about American curriculum. (CB)|

Tanner, Laurel N.; Tanner, Daniel

1987-01-01

52

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

53

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

54

Three Bridge Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Three Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's Crossing Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Spanning East Fork of Point Remove Creek at Fryer Bridge Road (CR 67), Solgohachia, Conway County, AR

55

Why patients need leaders: introducing a ward safety checklist.  

PubMed

The safety and consistency of the care given to hospital inpatients has recently become a particular political and public concern. The traditional 'ward round' presents an obvious opportunity for systematically and collectively ensuring that proper standards of care are being achieved for individual patients. This paper describes the design and implementation of a 'ward safety checklist' that defines a set of potential risk factors that should be checked on a daily basis, and offers multidisciplinary teams a number of prompts for sharing and clarifying information between themselves, and with the patient, during a round. The concept of the checklist and the desire to improve ward rounds were well received in many teams, but the barriers to adoption were informative about the current culture on many inpatient wards. Although the 'multidisciplinary ward round' is widely accepted as good practice, the medical and nursing staff in many teams are failing to coordinate their workloads well enough to make multidisciplinary rounds a working reality. 'Nursing' and 'medical' care on the ward have become 'de-coupled' and the potential consequences for patient safety and good communication are largely self-evident. This problem is further complicated by a medical culture which values the primacy of clinical autonomy and as a result can be resistant to perceived attempts to 'systematize' medical care through instruments such as checklists. PMID:22977047

Amin, Yogen; Grewcock, Dave; Andrews, Steve; Halligan, Aidan

2012-09-01

56

Pharmacognostic standardization of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward.  

PubMed

Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward (Turneraceae) has been used traditionally as an aphrodisiac, stimulant, nerve tonic, and laxative and in kidney, menstrual, and pregnancy disorders. Despite a long tradition of use in the treatment of various ailments, no systematic phytochemical and pharmacological work has ever been carried out on T. aphrodisiaca. The authors suggest that the major stumbling block in systematic exploration of the plant is non-availability of authentic plant material. In the present investigation, various pharmacognostic standards for the plant have been generated so that authentic T. aphrodisiaca could be explored for its traditional claims. Microscopically, T. aphrodisiaca leaf showed the presence of abundant unicellular, warty, non-glandular trichomes, anomocytic stomata, and a large number of calcium oxalate crystals along the veins. Powdered stem of the plant showed lignified spiral and pitted tracheidal vessels, and pericyclic fibers were observed in powder microscopy of stem. Total ash of the aerial parts of T. aphrodisiaca was approximately eight and four times more than acid-insoluble and water-soluble ash, respectively. The water-soluble extractive value of the plant was slightly higher than its ethanol-soluble extractive value. Volatile oil content of T. aphrodisiaca was found to be 0.44% (wt/vol), the thin-layer chromatography of which exhibited seven spots using toluene:ethyl acetate (93:7 vol/vol) as mobile phase. Thin-layer chromatography of the petroleum ether extract showed nine spots using hexane:dichloromethane (1:1 vol/vol), while the chloroform extract showed 11 spots using toluene:ethyl acetate:glacial acetic acid (35:4:1 by volume). Phytochemically, the plant was found to contain alkaloids, cyanogenic glycosides, steroids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins, carbohydrates, and proteins. PMID:16822212

Kumar, Suresh; Taneja, Ruchi; Sharma, Anupam

2006-01-01

57

Hospital practices in maternity wards in Lebanon.  

PubMed

This study was conducted in Lebanon with the main objectives of acquiring baseline data on practices and routines applied in the obstetrics ward for women having normal delivery; estimating the frequency of certain practices; and assessing whether women are given choice in these practices. A national sample of 39 hospitals was selected. The director, head midwife, or head nurse of the obstetrics department was interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. The hospitals studied are largely equipped to cope with emergencies and services are available 24 hours a day. On average, the caesarean section rate is 18% and the stillbirth rate is 10 per 1000, but with considerable variability between facilities. The majority of hospitals do not have written policies or standard birth procedures and lack mechanisms for evaluation. Generally, minimal prenatal information is given to women. Companions are allowed during labour but this access is more restricted in delivery. The reported configuration of professional care during labour and delivery is favourable to high quality care. In terms of mobility during labour, most hospitals allow women to move. However, 31 hospitals set an i.v. drip to all women and some use continuous fetal monitoring method. Mobility is restricted in delivery; in 23 hospitals women are tied down. Nearly all hospitals give intra-muscular anaesthesia whereas epidurals are used less frequently. As for postpartum care, most hospitals do not initiate breastfeeding within one hour of birth and few have rooming in. The majority of hospitals do not provide women with family planning methods and a few do not even discuss methods with them. The approach used in this study constitutes a tool for understanding and assessing maternity services that should be applied in other settings. The tool is available from the authors. PMID:11012401

Khayat, R; Campbell, O

2000-09-01

58

The Ventilation, Heating and Lighting of Hospital Wards  

PubMed Central

History of ventilation in last 100 years, showing reversal of ideas and influence of sanatorium idea. Physiology of cool moving air. How it affects metabolism, heat-loss and heat-production. Relation to sunlight. Reactive capacity of the individual. Practice of these teachings, as illustrated by sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis and by open-air schools. Exposure to cooling air a powerful therapeutic agent. Infrequent occurrence in sanatoria of diseases or complications often ascribed to cold. Dilution of infection. Applicability to diseases other than tuberculosis. Shock and old age. Perflation and diffusion, their relative values. Uniformity or variability of effect desirable? Incompatibility of good ventilation and ordinary standards of heating. Former the more important. Conclusion that ward temperatures may be lowered without harm. Measures necessary to compensate, clothing, classification of patients, small wards. Changing standards of comfort. Psychological effects. Systems of ventilation in hospital wards. Mechanical by propulsion or extraction being displaced by natural system, usually by cross-window ventilation. Supplementary ventilators. Objection to heating of incoming air. Fallibility of human factor in management. Sash versus casement windows. Hoppers. Austral window. Orientation and exposure of wards. Ventilation of small wards. Proportion of window space to solid wall. Balconies. Floor space. Heating of wards. Heating of air or floor or walls. Open fires. Value of radiant heat. Steam or water under low or high pressure. Radiators or pipes. Lighting. Avoidance of glare from windows. Arrangement of beds in wards. Colour of walls. Blinds and curtains. Artificial lighting. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5

Watt, James

1933-01-01

59

A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from

Tonje Lossius Husum; Johan Hkon Bjrngaard; Arnstein Finset; Torleif Ruud

2010-01-01

60

Medication decision-making on hospital ward-rounds.  

PubMed

This research explored the decision-making process of selecting medicines for prescription on hospital ward-rounds. We aimed to determine when and with whom medications were discussed, and in particular, whether shared decision making (SDM) occurred on ward-rounds. As a low level of computerized decision support was in place in the hospital at the time, we also examined whether the decision support aided in any medication discussions. Fourteen specialty teams (46 doctors) were shadowed by the investigator while on ward-rounds and all verbal communication about medications was noted. Most medication discussions took place away from the patient bedside and the majority took place between two or more doctors. While a great deal of doctor-patient communication regarding medications took place on ward-rounds, very little of this comprised SDM. More frequently, doctors informed patients of the medications they would be or were currently taking. The computerized decision support had little impact on treatment decision-making. While the value of SDM is often acknowledged in the literature, it appears to be rarely practiced on hospital ward-rounds. PMID:21893883

Baysari, Melissa; Westbrook, Johanna; Day, Richard

2011-01-01

61

Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.  

PubMed Central

The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature.

Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

1977-01-01

62

Caring for young adults on a paediatric ward.  

PubMed

The need for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to have suitable age-specific inpatient facilities has been recognised for many years, yet has received relatively little attention. This article reports the successful introduction of an inpatient facility for AYA, aged 17-24years, on a general paediatric ward in a small district general hospital. From December 2010, a young person's unit (YPU) consisting of an 8-bed area was opened within a 24-bed children's ward. Nursing care was provided by the ward staff, all of whom had been trained in the care of young adults. Policies regarding admission criteria, safeguarding, patient choice, visiting and 'house rules' were drafted, implemented and modified as necessary. Discussions with the adult clinicians (for medical care) and site managers were held to ensure smooth running of the system, and to address any concerns or difficulties. Paediatric patients had priority of admission at times of bed crisis. During 2012, there were a total of 2351 inpatient admissions to the paediatric ward, of whom 379 (16%) were YPU patients aged from 17-24 years. Median length of stay was 2 days for patients aged 17-24 years as compared with 1day for patients aged less than or equal to 16 years. Patients who chose admission to the paediatric ward tended to be younger, in transition from paediatric to adult services for chronic conditions, or with special needs. Patient surveys showed a high level of satisfaction with the facility. Young adults can be cared for safely and effectively on a paediatric ward with minimal additional costs. The essential ingredients for success include discussion with affected parties to address specific concerns, and the establishment of a clear, simple and unambiguous admission policy. PMID:24165407

Aj Heaton, Paul; Routley, Christine; Prosad Paul, Siba

2013-10-23

63

Causality Versus Ward Identity in Disordered Electron Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the problem of fulfilling consistency conditions in solutions for disordered noninteracting electrons. We prove that if we assume the existence of the diffusion pole in an electron-hole symmetric theory we cannot achieve a solution with a causal self-energy that would fully fit the Ward identity. Since the self-energy must be causal, we conclude that the Ward identity is partly violated in the diffusive transport regime of disordered electrons. We explain this violation in physical terms and discuss its consequences.

Jani, V.; Koloren?, J.

64

Ward County, ND National Compensation Survey Private Industry, March 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This summary provides results of a March 2009 survey of occupational pay in Ward County, ND. Tabulations in this publication are limited to private industry; data were not collected for State and local government. Data shown in this summary were collected...

2009-01-01

65

The "spotlight" ... highlighting researchers at work: Ward McCaughey ...  

Treesearch

It appears the aptitude test he took in high school was right; he should be in forestry. ... worked for Clint Carlson, Project Leader and the original lead scientist for the team ... researchers at work: Ward McCaughey: "Don't sweat the small stuff ".

66

4. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. View of north side of East Ward Street west of Dewey Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

67

20. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

68

19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

69

18. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North Dart Street, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

70

21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South McDonald Avenue and Fales Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

71

1. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of north side of East Ward Street west of North Coweta Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

72

15. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

73

12. View of south side of East Ward Street west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. View of south side of East Ward Street west of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

74

7. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South Coweta Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

75

3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between North Coweta Avenue and Dewey Avenue. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

76

11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey AVenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

77

5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and Dewey Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

78

6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South Coweta Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

79

17. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North McDonald Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

80

2. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North Coweta Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

81

13. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. View of south side of East Ward Street east of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

82

14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

83

16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

84

10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey Avenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

85

8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South Coweta Avenue and Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

86

The experience of working on a locked acute psychiatric ward.  

PubMed

This study's aim was to elucidate health-care staff experience of working on a locked acute psychiatric ward. In many countries changes in health care has contributed to fewer beds available in inpatient care, and a concentration of patients with severe psychiatric conditions. This implies a changing work environment in acute psychiatric care. Qualitative interviews with health-care staff (n= 10) were carried out on a ward for patients with affective disorder and eating disorder in a Swedish hospital. Qualitative content analysis was used. Four themes were identified from the data: 'undergoing changes in care delivery', 'feeling a need for security and control', 'managing the demands at work' and 'feeling a sense of responsibility'. This study adds to earlier research into how a sense of responsibility can place a significant burden on health-care staff working on a locked psychiatric ward and also contribute to increased control of patients. This study also shows that relationships and power structures among health-care staff need to be addressed when organizational changes are made in care delivery. Further research is needed to reach a comprehensive understanding of care on locked acute psychiatric wards, including a development of nursing and medicine as knowledge domains in one common context. PMID:22845661

Johansson, I M; Skrster, I; Danielson, E

2012-07-29

87

Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.  

PubMed

A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment. PMID:22249471

Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

2012-02-01

88

Supersymmetric ward identities and NMHV amplitudes involving gluinos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show how Supersymmetric Ward Identities can be used to obtain amplitudes involving gluinos or adjoint scalars from purely gluonic amplitudes. We obtain results for all one-loop six-point NMHV amplitudes in Script N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory which involve two gluinos or two scalar particles. More general cases are also discussed.

Bidder, Steven J.; Dunbar, David C.; Perkins, Warren B.

2005-08-01

89

14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

90

Social deprivation, ethnicity and violent incidents on acute psychiatric wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective comparative study of violent incident forms covering the acute general adult wards at a London teaching hospital and a district general hospital was performed. Although no significant difference was observed between the overall rates of reported violent incidents, there was a significant increase in the proportion of violent incidents directed at persons in the inner city hospital. Grade

J. D. Sheehan; T. Hardie; J. P. Watson

1995-01-01

91

19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

92

20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

93

Finding the Public in Consumer Research: A Reply to Ward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses Ward's analysis of letters sent to the Federal Trade Commission about children's advertising. Advocates that public opinion research concerning consumer protection issues should include information on the degree to which consumers are informed of their fundamental rights with respect to the consumer issues being studied. (CB)|

August, William; Charren, Peggy

1984-01-01

94

Bacterial Colonisation of Doppler Probes on Vascular Surgical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: hospital acquired infections cost the NHS 1 billion each year and medical equipment may act both as source and vector of nosocomial infection. This study examined bacterial contamination of Doppler ultrasound probes (USP) in routine use on vascular surgical wards in six hospitals and the knowledge of staff about the potential for cross infection from contaminated probes. Methods: probe

S. M. G Kibria; K. G Kerr; J Dave; M. J Gough; S Homer-Vanniasinkam; A. I. D Mavor

2002-01-01

95

GENERAL VIEW OF WARD BUILDINGS, B11, B10, B9, AND NORTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GENERAL VIEW OF WARD BUILDINGS, B11, B10, B9, AND NORTH ELEVATION OF CONNECTING HALLWAY OF WARD C BUILDINGS, LOOKING WEST - Barnes General Hospital, East Fourth Plain Boulevard & O Street, Vancouver, Clark County, WA

96

Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was

Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

2009-01-01

97

76 FR 37002 - Safety Zone; Central Astoria Independence Celebration Fireworks Event, Wards Island, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Celebration Fireworks Event, Wards Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...the vicinity of Wards Island, Queens, NY, within a 150-yard radius of a shore...the vicinity of Wards Island, Queens, NY. The fireworks will commence at...

2011-06-24

98

Do post-take ward round proformas improve communication and influence quality of patient care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The post-take ward round is a critical time for reviewing the initial history, examination and results, and the stage at which further treatment and investigations will be determined. However documentation of this ward round is often inadequate, so the benefits of decision making are lost. The documentation of 95 ward rounds was assessed for key items of information before and

A G Thompson; K Jacob; J Fulton; C R McGavin

2004-01-01

99

Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n????=0, n2?0, where ??? is the physical gravition field and n? is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n? dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a "pincer" Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All aixal-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

Capper, D. M.; Leibbrandt, George

1982-02-01

100

Non-Perturbative Renormalization Constants Using Ward Identities  

SciTech Connect

The authors extend the application of vector and axial Ward identities to calculate b{sub A}, b{sub P} and b{sub T}, coefficients that give the mass dependence of the renormalization constants of the corresponding bilinear operators in the quenched theory. The extension relies on using operators with non-degenerate quark masses. It allows a complete determination of the O(a) improvement coefficients for bilinears in the quenched approximation using Ward Identities alone. Only the scale dependent normalization constants Z{sub P}{sup 0} (or Z{sub S}{sup 0}) and Z{sub T} are undetermined. The authors present results of a pilot numerical study using hadronic correlators.

Bhattacharya, T.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Gupta, R.; Lee, W.; Sharpe, S.

1998-07-14

101

Effects of a protected hospital ward area on wandering and nonwandering geriatric patients.  

PubMed

The differential effect of a protected ward area on wandering and nonwandering geriatric patients was evaluated in terms of their physical, cognitive, and psychosocial functioning. Thirty wanderers and 18 nonwanderers were assessed prior to their transfer between the experimental and other wards and again after 6 and 12 weeks. A group (wanderers vs. nonwanderers) x ward (on vs. off the experimental ward) multivariate analysis of covariance, with the pretransfer measurements as the covariates, was used to analyze the data. Analysis revealed the following multivariate effects at both 6 and 12 weeks. The multivariant group x ward interaction for the physical range of motion) variables was significant, with wanderers showing greater range of motion on the experimental ward and nonwanderers showing greater range of motion off the ward. The multivariate group effect for the psychosical variables was also significant, with wanderers showing less improvement than nonwanderers. PMID:886163

Cornbleth, T

1977-09-01

102

Drug administration errors in paediatric wards: a direct observation approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paediatric patients are more vulnerable to drug administration errors due to a lack of appropriate drug dosages and strengths\\u000a for use in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the extent and types of drug administration\\u000a errors in two paediatric wards and to identify measures to reduce such errors. A researcher was stationed

Siew Siang Chua; Hui Ming Chua; Asma Omar

2010-01-01

103

Drug administration errors in paediatric wards: a direct observation approach.  

PubMed

Paediatric patients are more vulnerable to drug administration errors due to a lack of appropriate drug dosages and strengths for use in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the extent and types of drug administration errors in two paediatric wards and to identify measures to reduce such errors. A researcher was stationed in two paediatric wards of a teaching hospital to observe all drugs administered to paediatric inpatients in each of the ward, for 1 day in a week over ten consecutive weeks. All data were recorded in a data collection form and then compared with the actual drugs and dosages prescribed for the patients. Of the 857 drug administrations observed, 100 doses had errors, and this gave an error rate of 11.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 9.5-13.9%]. If wrong time administration errors were excluded, the error rate reduced to 7.8% (95% CI 6.0-9.6%). The most common types of drug administration errors were incorrect time of administration (28.8%), followed by incorrect drug preparation (26%), omission errors (16.3%) and incorrect dose (11.5%). None of the errors observed were considered as potentially life threatening, although 40.4% could possibly cause patient harm. Drug administration errors are as common in paediatric wards in Malaysia as in other countries. Double-checking should be conducted, as this could reduce drug administration errors by about 20%, but collaborative efforts between all healthcare professionals are essential. PMID:19823870

Chua, Siew Siang; Chua, Hui Ming; Omar, Asma

2009-10-14

104

Gauge invariance and the nonrelativistic Ward-Takahashi identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple derivation is given of the nonrelativistic Ward-Takahashi identity, which has been used in nearly every derivation of low-energy theorems for electromagnetic processes in nuclei. The low-energy theorem for Compton scattering is derived without assuming that identity. It is shown that gauge invariance alone leads to the correct form for the Compton amplitude, except that the magnetic recoil term does not have its conventional form. Use of Siegert's theorem, however, leads to that form.

Friar, J. L.; Fallieros, S.

1992-12-01

105

Preventing falls on an elderly care rehabilitation ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Comparison of two flooring types carpet and vinyl in the bed areas, and two modes of physiotherapy conventional therapy and additional leg strengthening exercises in avoiding falls.Design: Randomized 2 2 controlled trial.Setting: Elderly care rehabilitation ward in a community hospital.Subjects: Fifty-four consecutive patients referred for rehabilitation.Outcome measures: The incidence of falls, and the change

I P Donald; K. Pitt; E. Armstrong; H. Shuttleworth

2000-01-01

106

Boxer blurring the lines in Ward Valley debate  

SciTech Connect

This article concerns the controversy over the siting of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level nuclear waste depository in California. The author contends that certain politicians and environmental groups have misrepresented the facts in their opposition to the site. In particular, an accusation about withholding information about the amount of Pu-239 to be stored at the site is false, since that information is available in the public record. Other misrepresentations are presented and discussed.

Newman, P.

1994-04-05

107

Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model  

Microsoft Academic Search

How many beds must be allocated to a specific clinical ward to meet production targets? When budgets get tight, what are the\\u000a effects of downsizing a nursing unit? These questions are often discussed by medical professionals, hospital consultants,\\u000a and managers. In these discussions the occupancy rate is of great importance and often used as an input parameter. Most hospitals\\u000a use

A. M. de Bruin; Ren Bekker; L. van Zanten; G. M. Koole

2010-01-01

108

Modeling Nosocomial Transmission of Rotavirus inPediatric Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nosocomial transmission of viral and bacterial infections is a major problem worldwide, affecting millions of patients (and\\u000a causing hundreds of thousands of deaths) per year. Rotavirus infections affect most children worldwide at least once before\\u000a age five. We present here deterministic and stochastic models for the transmission of rotavirus in a pediatric hospital ward\\u000a and draw on published data to

Christopher M. Kribs-Zaleta; Jean-Franois Jusot; Philippe Vanhems; Sandrine Charles

2011-01-01

109

Pharmacovigilance among surgeons and in surgical wards: overlooked or axiomatic?  

PubMed

To review the status of pharmacovigilance system among surgeons and in surgical wards with recommendations. Literature search using MEDLINE, cross-reference of published data and review of World Health Organization-Pharmacovigilance transcripts. Pharmacovigilance system is still in its infancy among surgeons and in surgical wards. No major studies have been published addressing this issue, till date. Surgeons are professionals least likely to report adverse drug reactions. Moreover widespread and irrational antibiotic use is contributing towards high incidence of adverse events apart from multidrug resistance. Lack of interest, funding and knowledge pose challenges in effective post marketing drug surveillance in surgery. A three tier proactive pharmacovigilance system in surgical wards is suggested along with specific recommendations. The pros and cons of adverse drug reporting among the surgeons are discussed. With growing awareness of pharmacovigilance in various fields of medicine, surgery can no longer remain an exception. In the transition from medical school to surgery clinic a subtle shift must occur from emphasizing pharmacokinetics to appreciating pharmacodynamics. This change in philosophy will occur at the level of instruction when the surgeons of tomorrow are motivated through regulatory and institutional means at school level to adopt pharmacovigilance in their clinical practices along with the practicing surgeons. PMID:22211029

Rodrigues, Gabriel Sunil; Khan, Sohil Ahmed

2010-12-01

110

Pain in the nursing home: assessment and treatment on different types of care wards.  

PubMed

The assessment and management of pain in nursing homes have been shown to be suboptimal, but no study has evaluated differences in clinical setting within these homes. The prevalence and management of pain on different care wards (psychogeriatric, somatic, and rehabilitation) was studied on 562 newly admitted Dutch nursing home residents. Pain was measured according to the Nottingham Health Profile (perceived pain) and the Minimum Data Set pain observation items (frequency and intensity). Pain frequency differed significantly across the different ward types: on psychogeriatric wards (n=247), it was 27.1%; on somatic wards (n=181), 53.9%; and on rehabilitation wards (n=129), 57.8%. Being admitted on a psychogeriatric ward was significantly related to less pain compared to being admitted on a somatic ward, even when adjusted for possible confounders such as age, gender, cognitive status, activities of daily living, pain-related disorders, and depression (odds ratio [OR] 0.38 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.23-0.62]). Patients on psychogeriatric wards who had pain received less pain medication, adjusted for frequency and intensity of pain (OR 0.37 [95% CI=0.23-0.59]), compared to patients on somatic wards. We conclude that admission to a psychogeriatric care ward, independent of cognition, is associated with lower pain prevalence, and also with lower levels of pain treatment. PMID:17616332

Achterberg, Wilco P; Pot, Anne Margriet; Scherder, Erik J; Ribbe, Miel W

2007-07-05

111

Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high. PMID:23370595

Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

2013-05-01

112

Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.  

PubMed

A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3%) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8%) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p<0.01) and institutionalization (p<0.01, OR 3.026). Multivariate analysis found that cognitive impairment on admission (p<0.0002), diabetes (p<0.05, OR1.936), chronic kidney failure (p<0.05, OR2.078) and male gender (p<0.05, OR2.178) was significantly associated with the development of delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies. PMID:23771269

Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

2013-06-16

113

[Activity in a nephrology ward in 2009, Piemonte, Italy].  

PubMed

The characteristics of patients hospitalized in nephrology wards in Italy have changed in recent years due to the aging Italian population and the increased immigration. We analyzed the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized in our nephrology ward (17 beds) from 15 November 2008 to 15 November 2009. In this period there were 507 hospitalizations including 448 patients. The mean age was 64.4+/-18 years (range 16-96 years). Foreigners accounted for 10% of the total; their mean age was significantly lower than that of Italian patients (38.2+/-13.4 vs 67.4+/-15.9 years, p<0.01). 36.3% of patients were on dialysis, 10% were transplant recipients: the reasons for admission in these cases were internal medicine related; 18.15% were hospitalized because of emergency unit crowding without indications for admission to a nephrology ward. Hospitalization lasted a mean of 13+/-13 days. The most frequent diagnosis at discharge was acute renal failure (ARF) (28.9%) (prerenal 42.1%, obstructive 12.2%, drug induced 6.8%, other causes of ARF 38.7%). Patients with ARF were older than patients with other kidney conditions (67.05+/-16.98 vs 56.03+/-18.65 years, p<0.01). ARF resolved or improved in 86 patients (63.7%). Other diagnoses were cardiovascular disease 25.1%, glomerular disease 18.7%, acute pyelonephritis 10.6%, other 16.7%. Foreign patients presented infectionrelated diseases more often than Italian patients (39.2% vs 20.4%, p=0.02). 392 patients were discharged to their homes, 40 (7.9%) found a place in a long-term care facility or home for the elderly, 25 (4.9%) in other hospital units, and 50 patients died (9.8%). In conclusion, patients hospitalized in nephrology wards in 2009 were mostly elderly with a high frequency of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The most frequent diagnosis was prerenal ARF. These data suggest the necessity of improving the prevention of this type of kidney disease. Moreover, the length of hospitalization, which is increasing because of difficult clinical and social situations, could be shortened if more nursing homes, convalescent homes and homes for the elderly were available in Italy. PMID:22167617

Rollino, Cristiana; Beltrame, Giulietta; Ferro, Michela; Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Maina, Luca; Massara, Carlo; Quarello, Francesco

114

Neonatal abstinence syndromepostnatal ward versus neonatal unit management  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimThe aim of this cohort study was to test the hypothesis that caring for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) with\\u000a their mothers on the postnatal ward rather than admit them to the neonatal unit would reduce treatment duration and length\\u000a of hospital stay.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a ResultsThe outcomes of infants with NAS cared for in 20022005 (Group A, n?=?42) and 20062007 (Group

Tolulope Saiki; Silke Lee; Simon Hannam; Anne Greenough

2010-01-01

115

The type, level, and distribution of microorganisms within the ward environment: a zonal analysis of an intensive care unit and a gastrointestinal surgical ward.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE.?To investigate the distribution of hospital pathogens within general and critical care ward environments and to determine the most significant bacterial reservoirs within each ward type. DESIGN.?Prospective 4-month microbiological survey. SETTING.?The intensive care unit (ICU) and gastrointestinal (GI) surgical ward of a London teaching hospital. PATIENTS.?Sampling was conducted in and around the bed space of 166 different patients (99 in the ICU and 67 in the GI ward). METHODS.?Conventional agar contact methodology was used to sample 123 predetermined sites twice a week for 17 weeks. Sixty-one surfaces were located within the ICU, and 62 were located within the GI ward. Each surface was located within a theoretical zone of increasing distance from the patient. Aerobic colony counts were determined, and confirmatory testing was conducted on all presumptive pathogens. RESULTS.?Regardless of ward type, surfaces located closest to the patient, specifically those associated with the bed (side rails, bed control, and call button), were the most heavily contaminated. Elsewhere, the type of surfaces contaminated differed with ward type. In the ICU, bacteria were most likely to be on surfaces that were regularly touched by healthcare workers (e.g., telephones and computer keyboards). In the GI ward, where the patients were mobile, the highest numbers of bacteria (including potential nosocomial pathogens) were on surfaces that were mainly touched by patients, particularly their toilet and shower facilities. CONCLUSIONS.?In terms of cleaning, a hospital should not be considered a single entity. Different ward types should be treated as separate environments, and cleaning protocols should be adjusted accordingly. PMID:23571367

Moore, Ginny; Muzslay, Monika; Wilson, A Peter R

2013-05-01

116

Upgrading the Ward Beecher Planetarium for the 21st Century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on recent progress and future public outreach plans in light of a significant upgrade of the Ward Beecher Planetarium at Youngstown State University. Over a period of 40 years, the facility has been a first-rate 150 seat planetarium and introductory astronomy classroom, and in its history has seen over 50 000 undergraduate students and over 750 000 visits from people in the surrounding area and beyond. Through a recent generous donation from the Ward Beecher Foundation, we have added the SciDome full-dome visualization system, and soon will be replacing our Spitz A3P planetarium star projector. These upgrades, in addition to new digital video projectors and a complete overhaul of our roof-top observatory, are being done in order to further enhance both the education of YSU students and our ability to continue numerous public outreach programs, including full-dome digital planetarium shows, public observing, shows for both elementary and high school students, and home-schooling programs.

Durrell, P. R.; Young, W.; Pirko, R.; Shanks, S. L.; Neiheisel, J.; Dean, M. E.; Kotel, R.; Schaefer, S.; Morlan, R.; Wilson, A.; Feldmeier, J. J.

2005-12-01

117

The changing pattern of mortality in an African medical ward.  

PubMed

The pattern of adult medical deaths in Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi was documented over a 12 month period between April 1992 and March 1993. Results were compared with mortality data collected from the same wards in the pre-AIDS era in 1973. Tuberculosis and AIDS together accounted for 49% of all medical deaths in 1992-93. Eighty-two per cent of deaths occurred in the age group 13-49 years; tuberculosis, AIDS, gastroenteritis, pneumonia, pyogenic meningitis and septicaemia were the most important causes of death in these young patients. These findings are very different to those observed in the same wards 20 years previously when tuberculosis was responsible for 13% of deaths and there were no deaths due to AIDS. The predicted upsurge in AIDS-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa in the 1990s will have grave consequences not only for the health sector, but for the social and economic fabric of the countries concerned. PMID:8560590

Harries, A D; Mvula, B

1995-01-01

118

Reclaiming Mrs. Wilfrid Ward's The Job Secretary: Metafiction and Female Authorship  

Microsoft Academic Search

MRS. WILFRID WARD'S reputation has suffered unjustly since her death and her name does not appear in the most recent encyclopedias of women's writing.1 One likely reason for this oblivion lies in Mrs. Ward's commitment to her Catholic beliefs and in her deep conviction that her fiction should somehow enhance those beliefs, just at a time (the turn of the

Maria Carla Martino

2006-01-01

119

Use Of Computer Terminals On Wards To Access Emergency Test Results: A Retrospective Audit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To assess delay in clinicians obtaining emergency biochemistry test results when the telephoning of results by laboratory staff is supplanted by installation of computer ward terminals. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting Accident and emergency department and acute medical admissions ward of a teaching hospital. Sample 3228 emergency requests for biochemistry tests sent from the accident and emergency department and

Eric S. Kilpatrick; Stephen Holding

2001-01-01

120

Creating Readers: Vonda Ward--Broward County Library, Fort Lauderdale, FL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article details the work of Vonda Ward--a middle-school teacher turned librarian. When Vonda Ward was a middle-school teacher, she could not get her students to share her excitement about history because they could not read its stories. That is when she realized how much subject mastery depended on the basics. Broward County Library's

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

121

Costs of acute stroke care on regular neurological wards: A comparison with stroke unit setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesStroke unit care has been shown to be beneficial but costly. In an own previous study, the resource utilization of stroke unit care has been evaluated. Since the resource utilization on regular neurological wards is widely unknown, we determined the costs for acute stroke care on regular neurological wards to compare both treatment settings.

Yaroslav Epifanov; Richard Dodel; Caroline Haacke; Matthias Schaeg; Oliver Schffski; Michael Hennerici; Tobias Back

2007-01-01

122

The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines  

PubMed Central

Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. Images

Bate, J. G.

1961-01-01

123

Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,

Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

2013-01-01

124

Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Aim of study was to document 1) that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2) that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. METHODS: Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of) the generic version of

Ellen Deilks; Dag Hofoss

2010-01-01

125

Patient preparation for diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures: an analysis of ward nurse knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose This study examined ward nurse understanding of diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures in order to assess whether they were adequately informed to prepare their patients for nuclear medicine imaging examinations.Method A questionnaire was used to establish ward nurse knowledge and understanding of nuclear medicine. The questionnaire had two sections: nurse characteristics and nurse knowledge of information sources about nuclear

R. Higgins; P. Hogg

2002-01-01

126

4WARD: A European Perspective towards the Future Internet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe several approaches to address the challenges of the network of the future. Our main hypothesis is that the Future Internet must be designed for the environment of applications and transport media of the 21st century, vastly different from the initial Internet's life space. One major requirement is the inherent support for mobile and wireless usage. A Future Internet should allow for the fast creation of diverse network designs and paradigms and must also support their co-existence at run-time. We detail the technical and business scenarios that lead the development in the EU FP7 4WARD project towards a framework for the Future Internet.

Brunner, Marcus; Abramowicz, Henrik; Niebert, Norbert; Correia, Luis M.

127

An evaluation of antiseptics used for hand disinfection in wards.  

PubMed Central

The antibacterial effectiveness of hand antiseptics commonly used in wards was studied by laboratory and in-use tests and their acceptability assessed by means of a questionnaire passed to hospital staff. To determine the immediate and long-term antibacterial effects of the preparations the in-use tests were performed by groups of students. The greatest immediate reduction in bacterial counts on hands was obtained by products containing chlorhexidine. The long-term antibacterial effect was recorded with emulsions containing 3% hexachlorophane, 2% Irgasan CF3R or 4% chlorhexidine when used constantly on several consecutive days. Considerable discrepancies were recorded in the antibacterial effectiveness of some preparations when comparing laboratory and in-use test results. Therefore it is suggested that antiseptics should be tested by in-use tests which more closely resemble practical conditions before their use, or further trial, in hospital.

OjajA?rvi, J.

1976-01-01

128

Practical corollaries of transverse Ward-Green-Takahashi identities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The gauge principle is fundamental in formulating the Standard Model. Fermion-gauge-boson couplings are the inescapable consequence and the primary determining factor for observable phenomena. Vertices describing such couplings are simple in perturbation theory and yet the existence of strong-interaction bound-states guarantees that many phenomena within the Model are nonperturbative. It is therefore crucial to understand how dynamics dresses the vertices and thereby fundamentally alters the appearance of fermion-gauge-boson interactions. We consider the coupling of a dressed-fermion to an Abelian gauge boson, and describe a unified treatment and solution of the familiar longitudinal Ward-Green-Takahashi identity and its less well known transverse counterparts. Novel consequences for the dressed-fermion-gauge-boson vertex are exposed.

Qin, Si-xue; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-xin; Roberts, Craig D.; Schmidt, Sebastian M.

2013-05-01

129

How people die in hospital general wards: a descriptive study.  

PubMed

To describe how patients die in hospital, 370 patients (age >18 years; in hospital for>24 hours) who died on the general wards of 40 Italian hospitals were assessed. Differences between patients whose death was expected and patients whose death was unexpected were evaluated. Data on treatments and care in proximity of death were collected after interviewing the nurse responsible for the patient within 72 hours of the patient's death, and from clinical and nursing records. For 58% of patients, death was highly expected. Symptom control was inadequate for the most severely ill patients: 75% experienced at least one "severe" symptom (42% pain and 45% dyspnea). Nurses tended to judge patients' global care as "good" or "very good" (76%), in spite of the persistence of symptoms and the scant use of analgesics. Despite some encouraging signs of sensitivity to end-of-life problems, acute inpatient institutions in Italy still deal inadequately with the needs of dying persons. PMID:16043005

Toscani, Franco; Di Giulio, Paola; Brunelli, Cinzia; Miccinesi, Guido; Laquintana, Dario

2005-07-01

130

Study of Medication Errors on a Community Hospital Oncology Ward  

PubMed Central

Purpose Medication errors (MEs) have been a significant problem resulting in excessive patient morbidity and cost, especially for cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Although some progress has been made, ME measurement methods and prevention strategies remain important areas of research. Methods During a 2-year period (2003-2004), we conducted a prospective study on the oncology ward of a large community hospital, with the goals of (1) complete nurse reporting of observed medication administration errors (MAEs), (2) classifying observed MAEs, and (3) formulating improvement strategies. We also conducted a retrospective review of a randomly chosen sample of 200 chemotherapy orders to assess the appropriateness of ordering, dispensing, and administration. Results Our nurses reported 141 MAEs during the study period, for a reported rate of 0.04% of medication administrations. Twenty-one percent of these were order writing and transcribing errors, 38% were nurse or pharmacy dispensing errors, and 41% were nurse administration errors. Only three MAEs resulted in adverse drug events. Nurses were less likely to report MAEs that they felt were innocuous, especially late-arriving medications from the pharmacy. A retrospective review of 200 chemotherapy administrations found only one clear MAE, a miscalculated dose that should have been intercepted. Conclusions Significant reported MAE rates on our ward (0.04% of drug administrations and 0.03 MAEs/patient admission) appear to be relatively low due to application of current safety guidelines. An emphasis on studying MAEs at individual institutions is likely to result in meaningful process changes, improved efficiency of MAE reporting, and other benefits.

Ford, Clyde D.; Killebrew, Julie; Fugitt, Penelope; Jacobsen, Janet; Prystas, Elizabeth M.

2006-01-01

131

Suicide amongst psychiatric in-patients who abscond from the ward: a national clinical survey  

PubMed Central

Background Suicide prevention by mental health services requires an awareness of the antecedents of suicide amongst high risk groups such as psychiatric in-patients. The goal of this study was to describe the social and clinical characteristics of people who had absconded from an in-patient psychiatric ward prior to suicide, including aspects of the clinical care they received. Methods We carried out a national clinical survey based on a 10-year (1997-2006) sample of people in England and Wales who had died by suicide. Detailed data were collected on those who had been in contact with mental health services in the year before death. Results There were 1,851 cases of suicide by current psychiatric in-patients, 14% of all patient suicides. 1,292 (70%) occurred off the ward. Four hundred and sixty-nine of these patients died after absconding from the ward, representing 25% of all in-patient suicides and 38% of those that occurred off the ward. Absconding suicides were characterised by being young, unemployed and homeless compared to those who were off the ward with staff agreement. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, and rates of previous violence and substance misuse were high. Absconders were proportionally more likely than in-patients on agreed leave to have been legally detained for treatment, non-compliant with medication, and to have died in the first week of admission. Whilst absconding patients were significantly more likely to have been under a high level of observation, clinicians reported more problems in observation due to either the ward design or other patients on the ward. Conclusion Measures that may prevent absconding and subsequent suicide amongst in-patients might include tighter control of ward exits, and more intensive observation of patients, particularly in the early days of admission. Improving the ward environment to provide a supportive and less intimidating experience may contribute to reduced risk.

2010-01-01

132

Psychiatric disorders among elderly patients admitted to hospital medical wards.  

PubMed Central

A psychiatric investigation was carried out on patients aged 65-80 years who were admitted to the medical wards of six general hospitals in an industrial urban area of West Germany. In all, 626 patients were screened for cognitive and affective disorder using a short standardized interview, and at the second stage all those with abnormal responses, as well as a subsample of the apparently normal patients, were examined in greater detail. After correction for inaccuracies of screening, the frequency of psychiatric illness in this patient population was estimated as 30.2%, made up of 9.1% with organic brain syndromes and 21.1% with functional mental disorders. Comparison with field-study data for the same background population showed that the hospital patients were at increased risk for mental disturbance. At follow up after one year, outcome in terms of mortality, admission to long-term care and dependency on others was worst for patients with organic mental disorder, even after matching for age and initial severity of physical impairment. Functional mental illness was also associated with a relatively poor outcome in terms of dependency. The mental status of elderly medical patients appears to be important for the prognosis.

Cooper, B

1987-01-01

133

Food work and feeding assistance on hospital wards.  

PubMed

Approximately 60 per cent of UK patients aged 65 years or older are at risk of malnutrition or their situation worsening while in hospital. We report the results of a qualitative study embedded in research to prevent malnutrition in older people in hospital (the mappmal study). Our aim was to understand and describe processes that promote or inhibit nutrition in hospital. Throughout 2009 we examined meal services at four UK hospital sites across two regional locations, focusing on older patients admitted with dementia, for stroke or for fractured neck of femur. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with National Health Service staff (n = 54), stakeholders (n = 6), and a focus group with former patients and carers (n = 5). We identified ward-based food work as a technical and interpersonal challenge in narratives around malnutrition. Food work constituted two overlapping spheres of activity: interpersonal engagement through feeding assistance and reassurance and the arrangement of resources that facilitate meals such as the preparation of food trolleys. Our analysis is framed by the literature on emotional labour, dirty work and the professionalisation of nursing. We demonstrate how food work is overlooked by being conceptualised as common sense and as one of the most mundane and elementary tasks in hospitals. PMID:23009613

Heaven, Ben; Bamford, Claire; May, Carl; Moynihan, Paula

2012-09-26

134

Should we use automated external defibrillators in hospital wards?  

PubMed

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have shown to improve survival after cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) in many, but not all clinical settings. A recent study reported that the use of AEDs in-hospital did not improve survival. The current retrospective study reports the results of an in-hospital AED programme in a university hospital, and focuses on the quality of AED use. At Ghent University Hospital 30 AEDs were placed in non-monitored hospital wards and outpatient clinics treating patients with non-cardiac problems. Nurses were trained to use these devices. From November 2006 until March 2011, the AEDs were used in 23 of 39 CPA cases, in only one patient the presenting heart rhythm was ventricular fibrillation and this patient survived. Pulseless electrical activity was present in 14 patients (four survived) and asystole in eight patients (one survived). AEDs were attached to eight patients without CPA, and in 16 patients with CPA AED was not used. The quality of AED use was often suboptimal as illustrated by external artifacts during the first rhythm analysis by the AED in 30% (7/23) and more than 20 seconds delay before restart of chest compressions after the AED rhythm analysis in 50% (9/18). The literature data, supported by our results, indicate that in-hospital AED programmes are unlikely to improve survival after CPA. Moreover, their use is often suboptimal. Therefore, if AEDs are introduced in a hospital, initial training, frequent retraining and close follow-up are essential. PMID:23019797

De Regge, M; Monsieurs, K G; Vandewoude, K; Calle, P A

135

Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.  

PubMed

As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families. PMID:20622795

Gill, Finola; Duffy, Anita

136

Iranian nurses' experiences of aggression in psychiatric wards: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Aggression from psychiatric patients is a constant problem for care providers that causes major problems in the therapeutic environment, and may have negative effects on the quality of care. Since recognition of aggression with regard to cultural background leads to better control of aggression in the psychiatric wards, this study has been done to clarify Iranian nurses' experiences of aggression in psychiatric wards. A qualitative content analysis study was conducted to explore experiences of nurses. Data analysis revealed four themes: (1) Damage resulting from aggression, (2) Aggression catalysts, (3) Contagious nature of aggression, and (4) Various control strategies. There are various causes for in-patients' aggression, and nurses use various approaches to control it. These approaches are influenced by personnel, facilities, and ward environment. Identifying these factors and strategies can contribute to better management of aggression and, thus, better quality of care in psychiatric wards. PMID:24066653

Moghadam, Malek Fereidooni; Pazargadi, Mehrnoosh; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi

2013-10-01

137

The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness  

MedlinePLUS

... Issues The Mind-Body Connection How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... system's ability to fight disease." Dangers of Chronic Stress Unhealthy levels of stress come in many guises. ...

138

Large labour wards live up to 'best practice' principle and record fewer medical claims.  

PubMed

Large labour wards handling 3,000 to 3,999 deliveries annually have lower rates of successful obstetric injury claims from patients compared to smaller or very large obstetric units, reveals a study from Denmark. PMID:24063462

2013-09-25

139

Characterisation of Clostridium difficile Hospital WardBased Transmission Using Extensive Epidemiological Data and Molecular Typing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population-based study in Oxfordshire (UK) hospitals by Sarah Walker and colleagues finds that in an endemic setting with good infection control, ward-based contact cannot account for most new cases of Clostridium difficile infection.

A. Sarah Walker; David W. Eyre; David H. Wyllie; Kate E. Dingle; Rosalind M. Harding; Lily OConnor; David Griffiths; Ali Vaughan; John Finney; Mark H. Wilcox; Derrick W. Crook; Tim E. A. Peto

2012-01-01

140

Glass of Wine a Day May Ward Off Depression, Study Suggests  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Glass of Wine a Day May Ward Off Depression, Study Suggests But, moderate ... health, the study authors contend. "One drink a day, preferentially wine, may help prevent depression," said lead ...

141

The limit of community initiatives in addressing resettlement in Kurasini ward, Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the process adopted for the redevelopment of Kurasini ward in Dar-es-Salaam to allow for the expansion of the port. The redevelopment includes the resettlement of more than 36,000 people who have been living in various informal settlements within the ward. However, the resettlement and compensation offer nothing to most residents who are tenants. It has also failed

Tim Ndezi

2009-01-01

142

Detection of prescription errors by a unit-based clinical pharmacist in a nephrology ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the impact of a clinical pharmacist on detection and prevention of prescription errors at the nephrology ward\\u000a of a referral hospital. Setting: Nephrology ward of a major referral hospital in Southern Iran. Method: During a 4-month period, a clinical pharmacist was assigned to review medication order sheets and drug orders three times\\u000a a week at the nephrology

Ghazal Vessal

2010-01-01

143

Candida Isolation in Patients Hospitalized on a Surgical Ward: Significance and Mortality-Related Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundInfections caused by Candida are an emerging pathology on surgical wards. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence, characteristics,\\u000a and predictive factors of mortality in patients colonized and\\/or infected by Candida spp. in this setting.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsA consecutive series of 105 patients hospitalized on a general surgery ward between 2000 and 2004 were included, and 118 positive

J. Marchena-Gomez; T. Saez-Guzman; M. Hemmersbach-Miller; A. Conde-Martel; V. Morales-Leon; A. Bordes-Benitez; M. A. Acosta-Merida

2009-01-01

144

Renal function in the oldest-old on an acute geriatric ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: Evaluation of renal function and relation to risk factors for renal failure in very old patients admitted to an acute geriatric\\u000a ward. Methods: Retrospective chart review ofpatients aged 80 years and over, admitted to the acute geriatric ward from August 1998 till\\u000a August 1999. Recorded data were: age,gender, previous medical history, primary diagnosis, medicationuse, weight, serum creatinine,\\u000a BUN, sodium,

Nele J. Van Den Noortgate; Wim H. Janssens; Marcel B. Afschrift; Norbert H. Lameire

2001-01-01

145

User Interface Design for PDAs: Lessons and Experience with the WARD-IN-HAND Prototype  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the process and outcomes of the evaluation of a user interface prototype running on a Personal Digital\\u000a Assistant (PDA). The prototype was developed in the context of the IST-funded project WARD-INHAND and implements a PDA version\\u000a of a ward information system. The evaluation, carried out by the IS4ALL project, was based on a usage scenario comprising\\u000a mock-ups

Panagiotis Karampelas; Demosthenes Akoumianakis; Constantine Stephanidis

2002-01-01

146

Prevalence of Patients With Do-Not-Resuscitate Status on Acute Geriatric Wards in Flanders, Belgium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Elderly hospitalized patients have low survival rates after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, especially in the long term. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of patients with do-not-resuscitate (DNR) status on acute geriatric wards and the characteristics of the preceding decision-making process. Methods. On all 94 geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium (2002), the geriatrician who performed the bulk of clinical work

Cindy De Gendt; Johan Bilsen; Nele Van Den Noortgate; Margareta Lambert; Robert Vander Stichele; Luc Deliens

147

Productive Ward initiative promotes better communication between mental health teams and ensures timely discharge for patients.  

PubMed

ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: This paper discusses how an acute inpatient unit has implemented the 'Productive Ward' initiative, and utilized three of the Productive Ward Modules - Ward Round, Admissions and Planned Discharge, and Patient Status At a Glance - to promote better communication and working between inpatient nursing and medical teams, Home Treatment Team and Community Mental Health Team (CMHT), as they endeavour to ensure timely discharge for patients. Using the Patient Status At a Glance board to make information on patient status clear and immediate, nursing staff have begun utilizing the Zoning system for managing and targeting nursing resources - a red, amber and green traffic light system, which identifies and categorizes patient risk on a daily basis. Ward staff have initiated a daily 'Rapid Review' of patients, a tightly focused meeting, involving the ward nursing staff, the Inpatient Medical Team, the Home Treatment Team and the CMHT to discuss allocation of Care Co-ordinators, and to identify accommodation issues and other potential blocks to timely discharge. ABSTRACT: The Productive Ward is an initiative whereby nursing staff are empowered to bring about changes in the workplace to streamline systems and release time to care for patients. It is an evidence-based approach, which brings about improved clinical and safety outcomes. This paper discusses how three of the Productive Ward Modules - Ward Round, Admissions and Planned Discharge, and Patient Status At a Glance - have meshed to promote better communication and working between inpatient nursing and medical teams, Home Treatment Team and Community Mental Health Team, and to endeavour to ensure timely discharge for patients. PMID:23157208

Lennard, C

2012-11-15

148

The procedures of hygiene to control hospital-acquired diarrhoea in paediatric wards: a multicentre audit  

Microsoft Academic Search

An audit was carried out in paediatric wards to study the compliance of healthcare workers (HCWs) to the procedures recommended for the control of hospital-acquired diarrhoea. Thirty-two paediatric wards in the southeast of France participated on a voluntary basis in this prospective observational study after completing a self-administered questionnaire recording measures of hygiene. All the observations were made by the

J.-F Jusot; P Vanhems; F Benzait; P Berthelot; H Patural; G Teyssier; J Fabry; B Pozzetto

2004-01-01

149

Electronic patient record use during ward rounds: a qualitative study of interaction between medical staff  

PubMed Central

Introduction Electronic patient records are becoming more common in critical care. As their design and implementation are optimized for single users rather than for groups, we aimed to understand the differences in interaction between members of a multidisciplinary team during ward rounds using an electronic, as opposed to paper, patient medical record. Methods A qualitative study of morning ward rounds of an intensive care unit that triangulates data from video-based interaction analysis, observation, and interviews. Results Our analysis demonstrates several difficulties the ward round team faced when interacting with each other using the electronic record compared with the paper one. The physical setup of the technology may impede the consultant's ability to lead the ward round and may prevent other clinical staff from contributing to discussions. Conclusions We discuss technical and social solutions for minimizing the impact of introducing an electronic patient record, emphasizing the need to balance both. We note that awareness of the effects of technology can enable ward-round teams to adapt their formations and information sources to facilitate multidisciplinary communication during the ward round.

Morrison, Cecily; Jones, Matthew; Blackwell, Alan; Vuylsteke, Alain

2008-01-01

150

Waiting for permission to enter the labour ward world: First time parents experiences of the first encounter on a labour ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundFor women and their partners, the first meeting with professional staff on the labour ward is important. This initial encounter is a short but sensitive meeting. It may be particularly crucial for first time parents, most of whom have no prior experience of the birth environment. The objective of this study was to explore the meaning of first time mothers

Viola Nyman; Soo Downe; Marie Berg

2011-01-01

151

[Development of a cooperative system for palliative care among a hospice ward, general ward, geriatric health services facility, and home in Japan Baptist Hospital-provision of home-based care by hospice physicians].  

PubMed

In November 2009, a home hospice palliative care clinic(clinic)was opened in addition to a hospice ward, general ward, and geriatric health services facility at our hospital. This marked the initiation of a health care system able to provide the palliative care desired by patients and families. We studied the characteristics and hospitalization status of 514 patients with cancer who died at the hospice ward, general ward, or their homes from November 2009 through December 2011. Overall, 373 patients died at the hospice ward, 11 at the general ward, and 130 at home. Hospice physicians participated in the home care of 20 patients. Hospice physicians provide home-based care in cooperation with clinic physicians, facilitating the palliative care of patients who initially do not have a place to receive terminal care and the prompt discharge of patients who want to live at home. PMID:23268903

Yamagiwa, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Shinya; Shiotani, Tomohiro; Fukuda, Akiko; Ito, Satoko; Watanabe, Go; Yamaoka, Yoshio

2012-12-01

152

Implementation issues for mobile-wireless infrastructure and mobile health care computing devices for a hospital ward setting.  

PubMed

mWard is a project whose purpose is to enhance existing clinical and administrative decision support and to consider mobile computers, connected via wireless network, for bringing clinical information to the point of care. The mWard project allowed a limited number of users to test and evaluate a selected range of mobile-wireless infrastructure and mobile health care computing devices at the neuroscience ward at Southern Health's Monash Medical Centre, Victoria, Australia. Before the project commenced, the ward had two PC's which were used as terminals by all ward-based staff and numerous multi-disciplinary staff who visited the ward each day. The first stage of the research, outlined in this paper, evaluates a selected range of mobile-wireless infrastructure. PMID:20703905

Heslop, Liza; Weeding, Stephen; Dawson, Linda; Fisher, Julie; Howard, Andrew

2009-03-11

153

Comparison of student learning in the out-patient clinic and ward round.  

PubMed

In undergraduate medical education there is a trend away from ward-based teaching towards out-patient and community-based teaching. To study the potential effects of this altered emphasis on student learning, a pilot group of final-year medical students at the University of Dundee was asked to keep individual structured log-books. These contained details of patients seen during their 3-week orthopaedic attachment in both a ward and out-patient setting. A comparison of perceived learning in the two settings showed that students learned more from attending an out-patient clinic than a ward round, but did not make full use of the learning potential of either. The setting did not particularly influence the balance of learning as categorized here but only the ward round supplied experience of surgical complications. The amount of learning taking place in an out-patient clinic was influenced by student ability, measured by examination performance, but not by clinic work-load. The implications of increased use of out-patient clinics and the advantages and disadvantages of the approach employed are discussed. It is concluded that in the situation studied student learning in the outpatient setting is as good as or superior to the ward setting but should not totally replace it. PMID:8035712

Davis, M H; Dent, J A

1994-05-01

154

Nurse-led ward rounds: a valuable contribution to acute stroke care.  

PubMed

Stroke is a devastating condition. The Royal College of Physicians (2008) highlights that integrated stroke care can improve patient care. Nurses are an integral part of the multidisciplinary team, providing 24/7 stroke care from planning and implementing care to the evaluation of the patient's condition. To improve the way nurses manage stroke patients in an acute setting, a nurse-led ward round was initiated to look at essential nursing care. The Imperial College Healthcare Trust stroke senior nursing team, consisting of a clinical nurse specialist, a ward manager, and a charge nurse, have organised a weekly stroke nurse-led ward round. The team takes rounds to each stroke patient in the ward to examine and evaluate the essentials of nursing care (e.g. oral care, skin integrity, continence, bowel and bladder management), and current stroke outcome measures. During the rounds, the team address nursing issues, make appropriate nursing goals, and discuss their plans with the nurses and other members of the team. A nurse-led ward round has addressed nursing issues in a timely proactive fashion. The initiative has been successful in improving clinical communication between nurses and patient involvement in their care planning. It has also empowered nurses to make decisions within their professional arena, and its contribution has had an impact on patient care and safety through early detection and prevention of stroke complications. PMID:22874780

Catangui, Elmer Javier; Slark, Julia

155

The ethics of space, design and color in an oncology ward.  

PubMed

Change affects all areas of healthcare organizations and none more so than each aspect of the oncology ward, beginning with the patient's room. It is there that the issues faced by the major players in healing environments - administrator, caregiver, family member, and, most importantly, the patient - come sharply into focus. Hospitals are building new facilities or renovating old ones in order to adapt to new environmental demands of patient care and security. Driven by ethical and professional responsibility, the oncological team headed by Professor Hellmut Samonigg of Graz Medical University Graz pursued a vision of designing a model oncology ward unique in Europe. Friedensreich Hundertwasser, the world-famous artist, was the creative force behind the design. The oncology ward became a place of healing, permeated with a colorful sense of life and harmonious holistic care. The successful outcome was confirmed by the extraordinarily positive feedback by patients, families, and healthcare staff. PMID:22883931

Andritsch, Elisabeth; Stger, Herbert; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Andritsch, Hans; Kasparek, Anne-Katrin; Schaberl-Moser, Renate; Ploner, Ferdinand; Samonigg, Hellmut

2012-08-10

156

Comparative study of the prevalence of sepsis in patients admitted to dermatology and internal medicine wards*  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. The prevalence of this condition has increased significantly in different parts of the world. Patients admitted to dermatology wards often have severe loss of skin barrier and use systemic corticosteroids, which favor the development of sepsis. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the prevalence of sepsis among patients admitted to a dermatology ward compared to that among patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. METHODS It is a cross-sectional, observational, comparative study that was conducted at Hospital Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. Data were collected from all patients admitted to four hospital beds at the dermatology and internal medicine wards between July 2008 and July 2009. Medical records were analyzed for the occurrence of sepsis, dermatologic diagnoses, comorbidities, types of pathogens and most commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS We analyzed 185 medical records. The prevalence of sepsis was 7.6% among patients admitted to the dermatology ward and 2.2% (p = 0.10) among those admitted to the internal medicine ward. Patients with comorbidities, diabetes mellitus and cancer did not show a higher incidence of sepsis. The main agent found was Staphylococcus aureus, and the most commonly used antibiotics were ciprofloxacin and oxacillin. There was a significant association between sepsis and the use of systemic corticosteroids (p <0.001). CONCLUSION It becomes clear that epidemiological studies on sepsis should be performed more extensively and accurately in Brazil so that efforts to prevent and treat this serious disease can be made more effectively.

Almeida, Luiz Mauricio Costa; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Diniz, Lorena dos Santos; Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Silva, Francisco Chagas Lima

2013-01-01

157

Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students' perceptions  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 20122013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results Only 17 students (12.1%) declined to participate in the study. The students current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines medical and surgical) were significantly lower than the scores indicating students expectations (P < 0.001). The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45) and surgical (mean: 3.05) ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001). Conclusion Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside teaching experience for their students.

AlMutar, Sara; AlTourah, Lulwa; Sadeq, Hussain; Karim, Jumanah; Marwan, Yousef

2013-01-01

158

Exact lattice Ward-Takahashi identity for the N=1 Wess-Zumino model  

SciTech Connect

We consider a lattice formulation of the four-dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model that uses the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. This formulation has an exact supersymmetry on the lattice. We show that the corresponding Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied, both at fixed lattice spacing and in the continuum limit. The calculation is performed in lattice perturbation theory up to order g{sup 2} in the coupling constant. We also show that this Ward-Takahashi identity determines the finite part of the scalar and fermion renormalization wave functions which automatically leads to restoration of supersymmetry in the continuum limit. In particular, these wave functions coincide in this limit.

Bonini, Marisa [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Feo, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2005-06-01

159

NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: An Abelian Ward identity and the vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive an Abelian-like Ward identity in the color superconducting phase and calculate vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap. Making use of the Ward identity, we show that subleading order contributions to the gap from vertices are absent for gapped excitations.

Xu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Qun

2009-09-01

160

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure: clinical experience of a respiratory ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure: clinical experience of a respiratory ward. R. Scala, M. Naldi, I. Archinucci, G. Coniglio. Background: Although a controlled trial demonstrat- ed that non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) can be successfully applied to a respiratory ward (RW) for selected cases of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF), clinical practice data about NIV use

R. Scala; M. Naldi; G. Coniglio

161

Ambulation training of neurological patients on the treadmill with a new Walking Assistance and Rehabilitation Device (WARD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study design: Patients with neurological walking impairment were rehabilitated with a new system, consisting of an apparatus to constantly relieve the body weight and a treadmill: The Walking Assistance and Rehabilitation Device (WARD). Patients were evaluated before and after rehabilitation with clinical scales and physiological measurements.Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of the WARD in improving walking capability in these patients.Setting:

F Gazzani; M Bernardi; A Macaluso; D Coratella; JF Ditunno; V Castellano; M Torre; V Macellari; M Marchetti

1999-01-01

162

Translating Fall Incidence Data into Fall-Preventive Measures in Geriatric Wards A Survey in Belgian Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Fall incidents and their negative outcomes represent a considerable problem in hospitals, especially in geriatric wards, and require implementation of strategies to prevent these undesirable events. For this reason, the College of Geriatrics, a body funded by the Belgian Government to set up quality improvement initiatives in geriatric wards, selected Fall prevention in Belgian hospitals as a quality project

Joke Coussement; Eddy Dejaeger; Margareta Lambert; Nele Van Den Noortgate; Leen De Paepe; Steven Boonen; Didier Schoevaerdts; Koen Milisen

2009-01-01

163

THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF POST -KATRINA RECOVERY : PUBLIC CHOICE STYLE CRITIQUES FROM THE NINTH WARD , NEW ORLEANS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an account of the political economy critique residents and other stakeholders in New Orleans' Ninth Ward communities hold of the post-Katrina policy environment. Of particular interest are policies that restricted access and delayed delivery of municipal services to some Ninth Ward neighborhoods, the city-wide redevelopment planning process, and Louisiana's Road Home rebuilding assistance program. We argue that

EMILY CHAMLEE; VIRGIL HENRY STORR

164

Users' behavior and performance of general-purpose color CRT monitors of PACS in the wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hospital-wide PACS uses personal computer and general-purpose color CRT monitor as a client because many clients are demanded in the wards, but medical CRTs are too expensive; and the PACS stored and delivered endoscopic color images. Users should adjust each CRT monitor because of fewer administrators and too many clients. But the adjustment of color CRT monitors is not

Hiroshi Kondoh; Hiromu Nishitani; Takeshi Washiashi

2001-01-01

165

Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). METHODS: This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning

Marit F Svindseth; Jim Aage Nttestad; Juliska Wallin; John Olav Roaldset; Alv A Dahl

2008-01-01

166

Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation  

PubMed Central

Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms.

2011-01-01

167

Serious untoward incidents and their aftermath in acute inpatient psychiatry: the Tompkins Acute Ward study.  

PubMed

Serious untoward incidents, or sentinel events (suicide, homicide, suicide attempt, serious assault, and absconding of high-risk patients) occur from time to time in association with acute psychiatric inpatient wards. The aim of this study was to discover the impact of serious untoward incidents on inpatient wards. Doctors, nurses, and occupational therapists at three hospitals were interviewed about these events and their impact on their wards. Staff reported feelings of shock, depression, demoralization, upset, loss, and grief, followed by ruminations, guilt, and anxiety. Levels of containment increased, as did the focus on risk assessment. Processing of the emotional impact was hindered by the pace of ward life, a lack of external support, and management investigations. Patient responses were largely ignored. A few staff responded negatively, hindering service improvements. Much more attention needs to be given to the needs of the patient group following incidents. Substantial planning, organization, and investment are required to properly prepare for such events and manage their outcome. Without this planning and action, acute inpatient work has the capacity to be damaging to staff. PMID:17064318

Bowers, Len; Simpson, Alan; Eyres, Sophie; Nijman, Henk; Hall, Cerdic; Grange, Angela; Phillips, Louise

2006-12-01

168

WARD: a pneumatic system for body weight relief in gait rehabilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents Walking Assistance and Rehabilitation Device (WARD), a system for walking rehabilitation devised to relieve the patient of his\\/her body weight of a constant and prescribed amount by externally supporting the subject at the upper trunk and pelvis level by means of a harness. The system is based on a pneumatic actuator that has proved to be effective

Fabio Gazzani; Antonello Fadda; Marina Torre; Velio Macellari

2000-01-01

169

Staphylococcus Epidemic with a Strain of the Lysis Form 81 at a Surgical Ward.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A staphylococcus epidemic which concerned seven patients is described, which occurred at a surgical ward. A Staph. aureus with the lysis form 81 (RTD) was discovered to be the source of the epidemic. The epidemic had been started, almost certainly, by a p...

A. Guenter-Haack M. Sprossig

1966-01-01

170

Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in medical ward: repeatability of the protected specimen brush  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia in medical ward: repeatability of the protected specimen brush. B. Herer, C. Fuhrman, D. Demontrond, Z. Gazevic, B. Housset, C. Chouaid. #ERS Journals Ltd 2001. ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to assess the repeatability of two pairs of protected specimen brushes (PSB) done successively in the same lung area and either processed at the

B. Herer; C. Fuhrman; D. demontrond; Z. Gazevic; B. Housset; C. Chouad

2001-01-01

171

Optimizing staffing schedule in light of patient satisfaction for the whole outpatient hospital ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The waiting time for patients in outpatient departments of hospitals is a problem throughout the world. In this con- text, a discrete-event-simulation model was developed to examine congestions and doctor schedules in all depart- ments of an outpatient hospital ward of the Nagoya Univer- sity hospital. The method of gathering the required data on times for all outpatients and their

Soemon Takakuwa; Athula Wijewickrama

2008-01-01

172

Is Clinical Competence Perceived Differently for Student Daily Performance on the Wards versus Clerkship Grading?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical

Wimmers, Paul F.; Kanter, Steven L.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Schmidt, Henk G.

2008-01-01

173

Prevention and management of aggression training and violent incidents on U.K. acute psychiatric wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Reports of violence and injuries to staff and patients in acute psychiatric inpatient settings have led to the development and imple- mentation of training courses in the Prevention and Management of Vi- olence and Aggression (PMVA). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between PMVA training of acute psychiatric ward nurs- ing staff and officially reported

L. Bowers; H. L. I. Nijman; T. Allan; A. Simpson; J. Warren; L. Turner

2006-01-01

174

"Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century

Byrd, Jodi A.

2007-01-01

175

Oral polio vaccination and low case fatality at the paediatric ward in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral polio vaccine (OPV) and diphtheriatetanuspertussis (DTP) vaccines are given simultaneously in routine immunisation programmes in developing countries. It is therefore difficult to determine the separate effects of these vaccines on survival. We used the shortage of DTP vaccine in Bissau to examine the impact of OPV on the case fatality at the paediatric ward in Bissau. For 719 children

Peter Aaby; Amabelia Rodrigues; Sidu Biai; Cesario Martins; Jens Erik Veirum; Christine Stabell Benn; Henrik Jensen

2004-01-01

176

Case presentation of nurse-managed noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in an acute ward setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

A woman with obstructive sleep apnea who was admitted to the sleep disorders laboratory at St George Hospital in Sydney, Australia, for assessment subsequently experienced respiratory arrest. She was successfully resuscitated and 10 days later was transferred from the critical care unit to the respiratory ward with a cuffed, fenestrated tracheostomy tube in situ. A hoarse voice, oxygen desaturation, and

Mary Dunford; Judith Donoghue; Michael Lazaris

1999-01-01

177

As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded

Schmidt, Peter

2009-01-01

178

Improvement of Kim and Warde's Mixed Randomized Response Technique for Complex Surveys By  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a tool for reducing evasive answer bias and the bias due to respondents' refusal to cooperate , randomized response technique (RRT) is extensively applied in many areas of sociological, medical, biological and psychological research involving a study about the sensitive items. Kim and Warde (2005) proposed a mixed RRT assuming equal probability selection of population units and this was

Zawar Hussain; Javid Shabbir

179

Home from home: residents' opinions of nursing homes and long-stay wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: to compare the levels of satisfaction expressed by residents of nursing homes with those of patients in geriatric long-stay wards. Design: a structured satisfaction questionnaire containing 37 closed and two open questions was used to elicit responses from residents of nursing homes in the former South West Thames Regional Health Authority area. This was compared with a similar survey

PAUL F. D. HIGGS; LEA D. MACDONALD; JOHN S. MACDONALD; MICHAEL C. WARD

1998-01-01

180

Observing the process of care: a stroke unit, elderly care unit and general medical ward compared  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose: patients on stroke units have better outcomes but it is not known why. We investigated the process of care on a stroke unit, an elderly care unit and a general medical ward. Methods: comparison of the three settings was by non-participant observation of 12 patients in each. Data were analysed using multi-level modelling methods. Results: stroke unit

PANDORA POUND; C AROLINE SABIN; S HAH EBRAHIM

1999-01-01

181

Psychiatric disorders in inpatients on a neurology ward: estimate of prevalence and usefulness of screening questionnaires  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Patients on neurology wards have been shown to have high rates of psychiatric illness. Prevalence figures of 3964% have been reported previously. However a low rate of recognition of psychiatric illness is also observed in this population.Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of psychiatric illness in neurology inpatients in a regional neuroscience centre and to assess the sensitivity and specificity

Kate Jefferies; Arthur Owino; Hugh Rickards; Niruj Agrawal

2007-01-01

182

When once is not enough: the role of redundancy in a hospital ward setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper discusses the role of redundancy in hospital ward work on the basis of a field study that focuses on the use of paper artifacts supporting healthcare and its coordination. On the basis of literature and direct observations, we identified different kinds of redundancy, i.e. redundancy of effort, functions and data. Hence, we analyzed how these different forms of

Federico Cabitza; Marcello Sarini; Carla Simone; Michele Telaro

2005-01-01

183

As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded

Schmidt, Peter

2009-01-01

184

French national survey of inpatient adverse events prospectively assessed with ward staff  

PubMed Central

Objectives To estimate the incidence of adverse events in medical and surgical activity in public and private hospitals, and to assess the clinical situation of patients and the active errors. Design Prospective assessment of adverse events by external senior nursing and doctor investigators with ward staff. Setting Random three?stage stratified cluster sampling of stays or fractions of stay in a 7?day observation period for each ward. Participants 8754 patients observed in 292 wards in 71 hospitals, over 35?234 hospitalisation days. Main outcome measures Number of adverse events in relation to number of days of hospitalisation. Results The incidence density of adverse events was 6.6 per 1000?days of hospitalisation (95% CI 5.7 to 7.5), of which 35% were preventable. Invasive procedures were the source of half the adverse events, of which 20% were preventable. Adverse events related to the psychological sphere and pain were mostly considered as preventable. Ward staff found it difficult to assess the role of care management in the occurrence of adverse events: 41% of adverse events were expected because of the disease itself, and could have occurred in the absence of the related medical management. Conclusion At the national level in France, every year 120?000190?000 adverse events during hospitalisation can be considered as preventable. Areas such as perioperative period and geriatric units should receive closer attention. As adverse events occurred more commonly in vulnerable patients, who are not specifically targeted by clinical guidance, practising evidence?based medicine is not likely to prevent all cases. Therefore clinical risk management should prioritise empowerment of local staff, provision of favourable conditions within the organisation, and staff training based on simple tools appropriate for ward?level identification and analysis of adverse events.

Michel, Philippe; Quenon, Jean Luc; Djihoud, Ahmed; Tricaud-Vialle, Sophie; de Sarasqueta, Anne Marie

2007-01-01

185

The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during\\u000a hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting\\u000a of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation\\u000a in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not

Joanna E Klopotowska; Peter C Wierenga; Sophia E de Rooij; Clementine C Stuijt; Lambertus Arisz; Paul F Kuks; Marcel G Dijkgraaf; Loraine Lie-A-Huen; Susanne M Smorenburg

2011-01-01

186

Dispersion of Expiratory Droplets in a General Hospital Ward with Ceiling Mixing Type Mechanical Ventilation System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the dispersion characteristics of polydispersed droplets in a general hospital ward equipped with ceiling-mixing type ventilation system. Injections of water test droplets containing non-volatile content were produced. The injections simulate human coughs with a similar droplet size distribution (peak size at 12 ? m) and airflow rate (0.4 L\\/s). The dispersion of test droplets was measured in-situ

M. P. Wan; C. Y. H. Chao; Y. D. Ng; G. N. Sze To; W. C. Yu

2007-01-01

187

Bram Stoker, Genevive Ward and The Lady of the Shroud : Gothic Weddings and Performing Vampires  

Microsoft Academic Search

BRAM STOKER dedicated The Lady of the Shroud (1909) to the American actress-manager Geneviève Ward. In the text's climactic moment a bride-to-be emerges from a burial crypt for a midnight wedding to a man who fears that she may be a vampire. Such Gothic events recall the quasi-marital ceremony in Lucy's crypt in Dracula (1897) in which Godalming stakes the

Catherine Wynne

2006-01-01

188

Isolation of Clostridium difficile from patients and the environment of hospital wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rectal swabs from 122 patients and 497 environmental swabs from several wards were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile in order to assess the role of the environment in the spread of this organism. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 6\\/27 (22.2%) oncology patients and from 8\\/163 (4.9%) environmental specimens obtained from the oncology unit. Items found positive for C

H Malamou-Ladas; S OFarrell; J Q Nash; S Tabaqchali

1983-01-01

189

A qualitative systemic analysis of drug dispensing in Swiss hospital wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective The traditional floor stock drug distribution system entails that, in most Swiss hospitals, drugs are prepared in a pillbox\\u000a for each patient by nurses before administration. The aim of this study was to analyse and evaluate the process of inpatient\\u000a pillbox dispensing in Switzerland. Setting Internal medicine wards in three regional hospitals (3239 beds). Method A qualitative exploratory study

Amina Gadri; Renaud Pichon; Georges L. Zelger

2008-01-01

190

Analysis of the quality of prescriptions at a cardiovascular ward in Brazil: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim of study To analyze the quality of prescriptions in a hospital in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional pilot study of the quality of prescriptions of adult patients admitted at the cardiovascular ward. Data\\u000a were collected with the help of a structured form developed by the researchers based on related literature, with items about\\u000a medications and completeness of prescriptions. The form

J. S. Siqueira; A. R. Antoniolli; C. C. Silvestre; A. D. Oliveira-Filho; W. B. Silva; D. P. Lyra

2011-01-01

191

Randomized prospective study on prophylactic antibiotics in clean orthopedic surgery in one ward for 1 year  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAt present in Japan, there are neither reports on antibiotic prophylaxis regardless of underlying diseases nor precise guidelines\\u000a on prophylactic antibiotics in orthopedic surgery. Therefore, the preventive effect of antimicrobial agents on surgical site\\u000a infection (SSI) after clean orthopedic surgery was studied to control the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in our ward and to reduce SSI caused by

Daisuke Kato; Katsuhiko Maezawa; Ikuho Yonezawa; Yoshiyuki Iwase; Hiroshi Ikeda; Masahiko Nozawa; Hisashi Kurosawa

2006-01-01

192

A Comparative Study of the Use of Four Fall Risk Assessment Tools on Acute Medical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of four falls risk assessment tools (STRATIFY, Downton, Tullamore, and Tinetti) by using them simultaneously in the same environment. DESIGN: Prospective, open, observational study. SETTING: Two acute medical wards admitting predomi- nantly older patients. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred thirty-five patients, 86 female, mean agestandard deviation 83.8 ? 8.01 (range 56-100). MEASUREMENTS: A single clinician prospectively com-

Michael Vassallo; Rachel Stockdale; Jagdish C. Sharma; Roger Briggs; Stephen Allen

193

A Controlled Investigation of Optimal Internal Medicine Ward Team Structure at a Teaching Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background The optimal structure of an internal medicine ward team at a teaching hospital is unknown. We hypothesized that increasing the ratio of attendings to housestaff would result in an enhanced perceived educational experience for residents. Methods Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (HUMC) is a tertiary care, public hospital in Los Angeles County. Standard ward teams at HUMC, with a housestaff?attending ratio of 5?1, were split by adding one attending and then dividing the teams into two experimental teams containing ratios of 3?1 and 2?1. Web-based Likert satisfaction surveys were completed by housestaff and attending physicians on the experimental and control teams at the end of their rotations, and objective healthcare outcomes (e.g., length of stay, hospital readmission, mortality) were compared. Results Nine hundred and ninety patients were admitted to the standard control teams and 184 were admitted to the experimental teams (81 to the one-intern team and 103 to the two-intern team). Patients admitted to the experimental and control teams had similar age and disease severity. Residents and attending physicians consistently indicated that the quality of the educational experience, time spent teaching, time devoted to patient care, and quality of life were superior on the experimental teams. Objective healthcare outcomes did not differ between experimental and control teams. Conclusions Altering internal medicine ward team structure to reduce the ratio of housestaff to attending physicians improved the perceived educational experience without altering objective healthcare outcomes.

Spellberg, Brad; Lewis, Roger J.; Sue, Darryl; Chavoshan, Bahman; Vintch, Janine; Munekata, Mark; Kim, Caroline; Lanks, Charles; Witt, Mallory D.; Stringer, William; Harrington, Darrell

2012-01-01

194

Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clnicas, S?o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.513.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

2011-01-01

195

Impediments to recovery in New Orleans' Upper and Lower Ninth Ward: one year after Hurricane Katrina.  

PubMed

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a rapid succession of plans put forward a host of recovery options for the Upper and Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. Much of the debate focused on catastrophic damage to residential structures and discussions of the capacity of low-income residents to repair their neighbourhoods. This article examines impediments to the current recovery process of the Upper and Lower Ninth Ward, reporting results of an October 2006 survey of 3,211 plots for structural damage, flood damage and post-storm recovery. By examining recovery one year after Hurricane Katrina, and by doing so in the light of flood and structural damage, it is possible to identify impediments to recovery that may disproportionately affect these neighbourhoods. This paper concludes with a discussion of how pre- and post-disaster inequalities have slowed recovery in the Lower Ninth Ward and of the implications this has for post-disaster recovery planning there and elsewhere. PMID:18028156

Green, Rebekah; Bates, Lisa K; Smyth, Andrew

2007-12-01

196

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA No. 2003-0229-2923, Ward Brodt Music Mall, Madison, Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On October 18, 2002, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a confidential employee request for a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at Ward Brodt Music Mall in Madison, Wisconsin. The request centered on workers exposures ...

M. Finley L. Tapp

2004-01-01

197

Review of Some of the Effects of Reduced Dissolved Oxygen on the Fish and Invertebrate Resources of Ward Cove, Alaska.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Executive summary; Introduction; Literature Review; Discussion; Limitations of this review; Literature cited; Appendix A: Native fish species potentially occuring in or near Ward Cove, AK; Appendix B: Location a...

D. W. Karna

2003-01-01

198

Tuning of entertainment robots for RAA\\/RAT application based on fieldworks at aged people's home and pediatrics ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes possibility of robot assisted activity, RAA, and robot assisted therapy, RAT, through the fieldwork in the aged persons' home and the pediatrics ward using several kinds of robots on the market.

T. Sasaki; T. Negishi; M. Shioya; A. Sawanobori; H. Umino; E. Ohkubo; R. Kimura; M. Naganuma

2004-01-01

199

Students' Corner Sleep Deprivation and its associated factors among general ward patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To estimate the occurrence rate of sleep deprivation and to identify the environmental, staff-related and patient-related factors associated with SD among general ward patients of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a pre-tested questionnaire was administered to 108 patients admitted into the general medical and general surgical wards of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi.

Majid Shafiq; Farah F. Salahuddin; Maham Siddiqi; Zaman Shah; Rehmat Ali; Rizwan A. Siwani; Ayesha Saleem; Kashif Shakoor Shaikh; Ali Khan Khuwaja

200

One day survey by the Mental Health Act Commission of acute adult psychiatric inpatient wards in England and Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjectives : To provide (via the Mental Health Act Commission's national visit) empirical evidence on ward occupancy levels, use of the Mental Health Act 1983, nurse staffing, and care of female patients on acute adult psychiatric wards.Design : One day survey of a stratified random sample.Settings : 119\\/250 (47%) acute adult psychiatric inpatient units in England and Wales.Subjects : End

Richard Ford; Graham Durcan; Lesley Warner; Pollyanna Hardy; Matt Muijen

1998-01-01

201

The clinical pharmacists contributions within the multidisciplinary patient care team of an intern nephrology ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To describe and evaluate newly implemented clinical pharmacy services and ward round participation on a specialized nephrology\\u000a ward in a large tertiary care hospital. Method All issues addressed by the clinical pharmacist were systematically collected, and the contributions were classified by type.\\u000a Where applicable, physicians acceptance rates were recorded. The drugs most commonly affected by the clinical pharmacists\\u000a contributions

Gunar Stemer; Rosa Lemmens-Gruber

202

An Evaluation of Risk Factors for In-Patient Falls in Acute and Rehabilitation Elderly Care Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls occurring in elderly in-patients during periods of hospitalization are common, and attempts have been made to predict and prevent them based on risk factor analysis. These have not looked extensively at specific elderly care wards. We have investigated in-patient falls in mixed acute and rehabilitation elderly care wards in a case-controlled study. Fifty fallers were paired with fifty non-fallers,

T. Gluck; H. J. F. M. Wientjes; G. S. Rai

1996-01-01

203

Moxa-stick suffumigation for disinfecting air in hematology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation wards with class 100 laminar flow.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of moxa-stick suffumigation in the hematology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) wards with luminar flow. METHODS: The plate exposure method was used to measure the effect of air-disinfection of moxa-stick suffumigation in hematology and HSCT wards. The yearly average qualified rates of air sampling in HSCT wards were evaluated from 2007 to 2010. To further investigate the disinfecting effect of moxa-stick suffumigation, the colony counts of common pathogens (including Staphylcoccus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) before and after moxa-stick suffumigation were compared. RESULTS: The mean air quality rates of the HSCT wards with class 100 laminar flow were all above 90.0% (91.2%-96.2%) from 2007 to 2010. Moxa-stick suffumigation effectively decreased the presence of bacteria in the hematology ward's air (P<0.01). The most notable effect was the drastic reduction in the colony counts of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the blood plates exposed to air treated with moxa-stick suffumigation (77.152.9 cfu/m(2) vs 196.187.5 cfu/m(2), P<0.01; and 100.235.3 cfu/m(2) vs 371.535.3 cfu/m(2), P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Moxa-stick suffumigation proved to be a reliable and effective airdisinfection method for hematology and HSCT wards, and hence, it should be employed extensively. PMID:23263995

He, Jing-Song; Yang, Qing; Huang, Wei-Jia; Hu, Xiao-Rong

2012-12-21

204

Hand disinfection: a comparison of various agents in laboratory and ward studies.  

PubMed

The efficacy of 14 handwashing or disinfectant preparations was compared in laboratory tests on staff volunteers. The test organism, Escherichia coli, was applied to the fingertips and log reductions (LR) were measured following treatment with the test agent and control preparations (70% isopropanol and non-medicated bar soap). Alcoholic preparations, particularly n-propanol and isopropanol were the most effective showing LRs of 3.1-3.8. Chlorhexidine (LR 2.9) and povidone-iodine detergent preparations were significantly more effective than non-medicated soap (LR 2.1), but triclosan products were not. In addition the residual effect of several of these formulations was assessed after 10 applications by comparing the survival of E. coli on the fingertips over a 32-min period. This number of handwashes compares favourably with those recorded during an 8 h nursing shift. Chlorhexidine-detergent consistently showed the best residual activity. Alcoholic formulations showed little or no residual effect. The survival studies show that on the whole gram-positive organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans) survive better on the skin than Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). However, it would seem that GNB which are considered to be residents (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Enterobacter spp.) survive much better than many other GNB (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli and Proteus vulgaris). The Klebsiella species varied in survival times. Random sampling of ward staff hands showed that contamination with S. aureus and GNB was greater in dermatological and general wards than in an isolation unit, where handwashing or disinfection was carried out after every patient contact. No cross-infection occurred in the isolation ward during periods of study in which 70% alcohol, chlorhexidine-detergent and non-medicated soap were used. PMID:2899107

Ayliffe, G A; Babb, J R; Davies, J G; Lilly, H A

1988-04-01

205

CPR or DNR? End-of-life decision making on a family practice teaching ward.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of patients on a family practice ward who had "code status" orders and end-of-life discussions documented on their charts in the first week of admission. To examine the correlation between a tool predicting the likelihood of benefit from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and actual end-of-life decisions made by family physicians and their patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study using a retrospective chart review. SETTING: A 14-bed teaching ward where family physicians admit and manage their own patients in an urban tertiary care teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients admitted to the ward for 7 or more days between December 1, 1995, and August 31, 1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of documented "do not resuscitate" (DNR) or "full code" orders and documented end-of-life discussions. Prognosis-after-resuscitation (PAR) score. RESULTS: In the 103 charts reviewed, code status orders were entered within 7 days for 60 patients (58%); 31 were DNR, and 29 were full code. Discussion of code status was documented in 25% of charts. The PAR score for 40% of patients was higher than 5, indicating they were unlikely to survive to discharge from hospital should they require CPR. There was a significant association between PAR scores done retrospectively and actual code status decisions made by attending family physicians (P < .005). CONCLUSIONS: End-of-life discussions and decisions were not fully documented in patients' charts, even though patients were being cared for in hospital by their family physicians. A PAR score obtained during the first week of admission could assist physicians in discussing end-of-life orders with their patients.

Calam, B.; Andrew, R.

2000-01-01

206

Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.  

PubMed

Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs) that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each). Wrong frequency 71 (27%), forget to order 37 (14.1%), wrong selection 33 (12.5%), drug interactions 26 (9.9%), forget to discontinue 25 (9.5%) and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5%) were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6%) followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%). Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists. PMID:23945894

Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Eshraghi, Azadeh; Sahraei, Zahra

2013-08-07

207

Axial gauge: Ward identities and the separation of infrared and ultraviolet singularities by analytic regularization  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the method of analytically regulating Yang--Mills theories in the axial gauge preserves gauge invariance. Two- and three-point Ward identities are computed and verified at the one-loop level. The method also permits a convenient and gauge-invariant separation of infrared and ultraviolet singularities in the axial gauge. In the axial gauge the renormalization constants Z/sub 3/ = Z/sub 1/ = 1+11g/sup 2/C/sub 2//(48..pi..epsilon/sup 2/), leading to a ..beta.. function which is identical to that computed in the covariant xi gauges.

Lee, H.; Milgram, M.S.

1985-07-01

208

Minimal WardTakahashi Vertices and Light Cone Pion Distribution Amplitudes from the GND Quark Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The gauge-invariant, nonlocal, dynamical quark model is shown to generate minimal vertices that satisfy the WardTakahashi identities and the flat-like form of the light-cone pion distribution amplitudes. Non-flat form amplitudes can be produced only if we take a finite momentum cutoff and include nonzero pion mass corrections or go beyond the minimal vertices. A by-product of our investigation shows that the variable u appearing in light-cone pion distribution amplitudes is just the standard Feynman parameter in the Feynman parameter integrals.

Li, Chuan; Jiang, Shao-Zhou; Wang, Qing

2013-08-01

209

O(mq/N) effects in the Ward identities approach to the pseudoscalar nonet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anomalous Ward identities are investigated in the combined chiral and large-N limit of QCD, up to non-leading O(mq/N) terms, taking into account chiral symmetry breaking effects in the ?' axial vector couplings. The bound ? > 16 for the ? - ?' mixing angle is obtaned. Gasser and Leutwyler results on the O(mq2) corrections to the ? mass are used to determine the size of the O(mq/N) terms, which are found to be reasonably small. Problems with the anomaly predictions for ?, ?' --> ?? are pointed out. Some aspects of the non-smoothness of the large-N expansion in presence of SU3 breaking effects are clarified.

Grunberg, G.

1986-06-01

210

Patient safety incidents associated with tracheostomies occurring in hospital wards: a review of reports to the UK National Patient Safety Agency  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTracheostomies are increasingly common in hospital wards due to the rising use of percutaneous and surgical tracheostomies in critical care and bed pressures in these units. Hospital wards may lack appropriate infrastructure to care for this vulnerable group and significant patient harm may result.ObjectivesTo identify and analyse tracheostomy related incident reports from hospital wards between 1 October 2005 and 30

B. A. McGrath; A. N. Thomas

2010-01-01

211

Examination of particulate matter and heavy metals and their effects in at-risk wards in Washington, DC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the major contributions to pollution in the Washington, DC urban environment is particulate matter (PM). Quite often, ambient airborne toxics are closely associated with fine PM (PM2.5). We have performed high-resolution aerosol measurements of PM2.5 in four wards (Ward 1, 4, 5, and 7) of Washington, DC during two intensive observational periods (IOP). The first IOP occurred during the summer of 2003 (June 23rd to August 8th). The second IOP transpired during the late fall season of 2003 (October 20th to December 4 th). The measurement platform consisted of a Laser Particle Counter (LPC) and a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Cascade Impactor (QCM) to obtain both in-situ number and mass density distributions across the measurement sites. The data shows spatial distributions of particulate matter characterized as a function of size and mass properties. The QCM analyses show significant levels (> 15 mug/m3) of ward-averaged PM2.5 in Wards 4, 1, and 7 respectively during the summer IOP. However, all wards were less than the EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 15 mug/m 3 during the fall IOP ward-averaged measurements. Yet, investigations of the site-averaged measurements during the fall revealed some specific locations in Ward 4 that exceeded the NAAQS. Results also show that the aerosol mass density peaked in the 0.3 mum mode during the summer IOP and in the 0.15 mum mode during the fall IOP. The number density peaked in the 0.3--0.5 mum size range. Accordingly, the distributions have also been analyzed as a function of meteorological factors, such as wind speed and direction via NOAA HYSPLIT trajectories. One important attribute to this study is the evaluation of risks amongst IBC subgroups (youth, adults, elderly, black, white, hispanic, male, and female) for bath pediatric asthma rates and the onset of lung cancer over a lifetime (70-year period) when exposed to these levels of particulates. It has been determined that there are individual excess risks associated with inhalation of PM2.5 and the selected heavy metals chromium, arsenic, and cadmium. Particularly, Ward 4 has generated higher risks than the other three investigated wards for both health effects.

Greene, Natasha Ann

212

Guardianship for your own good: Improving the well-being of respondents and wards in the USA.  

PubMed

Adult guardianship is a coercive exercise of the state's power over an innocent individual, justified only by: 1) the ward's incapacity; and 2) the need to protect the ward's well-being. The raison d'tre of guardianship is to improve the well-being of the incapacitated ward. Studies of actual guardianship proceedings have long indicated serious ongoing concerns with the process. Repeated revisions of statutes have attempted to improve guardianship procedures, with some success. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the actual effect of guardianship on the well-being of respondents and wards, when the system functions as intended. The presumption that guardianship, when not abused, is in the best interests of an incapacitated adult is called into serious question by empirical research into the role of internal locus of control and autonomy on human well-being. Indeed, a wide range of data indicates that guardianship itself can have significant negative effects on the physical and mental well-being of respondents and wards. The guardianship system must be reformed to maximize the therapeutic effects of guardianship and to minimize the unnecessarily anti-therapeutic effects. I examine the effects of guardianship from a therapeutic jurisprudence perspective and propose and analyze modifications that could enhance the therapeutic effects of guardianship. PMID:21030089

Wright, Jennifer L

2010-10-28

213

Capturing students' learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward.  

PubMed

An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students' learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students' experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts. PMID:23043548

Lachmann, Hanna; Ponzer, Sari; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Benson, Lina; Karlgren, Klas

2012-10-08

214

"On the spot" interventions by mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards in Greece.  

PubMed

The objective of this research was to explore the "on-the spot" clinical interventions mental health nurses make in critical incidents on inpatient psychiatric wards. Mental health nurses play a key role in the management of psychiatric critical incidents. Nurses' autonomy, decision-making, and training in clinical interventions are important issues in psychiatric nursing practice. A descriptive study was conducted among mental health nurses working on inpatient wards of three major psychiatric hospitals in the greater Athens area, using semi-structured interviews. Nurses' personal views also were documented. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 103 mental health nurses, who were encouraged to make personal remarks. The results of this study show that in the majority of critical incidents, the nurses were found to be in contact with the psychiatrist on call; physical restraints were used frequently in violent episodes; reassurance and support were common interventions; the majority of nurses would have preferred not to intervene with critical incidents; and nurses expressed a need for skills training and higher autonomy. The nurses implemented a specific number of interventions in confronting the various types of crises. The need for specialized training was noticed and problems like accountability, autonomy, and medication administration, were considered crucial by the mental heath nurses. PMID:19437252

Koukia, Evmorfia; Madianos, Michael G; Katostaras, Theofanis

2009-05-01

215

A ward-based writing coach program to improve the quality of nursing documentation.  

PubMed

A ward-based writing coach program was piloted at a metropolitan hospital in Australia to produce a quality improvement in nursing documentation. This paper describes the education program, which consisted of two writing workshops, each of one-hour duration followed by one-to-one coaching of nurses. This program could be carried out in any clinical area as a part of the regular education program. Nurses are encouraged to view their documentation practices in a critical light to ensure that the documentation is meaningful to readers within or outside the profession. The importance of nursing documentation as a communication tool for all health care professionals is emphasised. Barriers to meaning, such as fragmentary language or the use of unofficial abbreviations, are discussed. Nurses are also encouraged to document the patient's condition, care and response to care using defined principles for nursing documentation. This program would be transferrable to any clinical setting looking for a ward-based education program for nursing documentation. PMID:21982050

Jefferies, Diana; Johnson, Maree; Nicholls, Daniel; Lad, Shushila

2011-10-05

216

[The work of medical doctors on psychiatric wards: an analysis of everyday activities].  

PubMed

In Germany, the economic situation of psychiatric hospitals has markedly changed during the last years. Whilst the number of patients has steadily increased, many clinics considerably reduced the number of therapeutic staff due to an increasing lack of financial support. The German psychiatry personnel regulations act defines the number of therapeutic staff required for an adequate psychiatric treatment, but the requirements of this regulations act nowadays are widely missed in most of the German psychiatric hospitals. This severely affects the therapeutic work on psychiatric wards. This study analyses tasks and activities of medical doctors on psychiatric wards and compares the hours spent with various types of activities with the amount of time that should be spent according to the personnel regulations act. Results show that doctors spend much more time with documentation and administrative work than originally intended by the personnel regulations act. They compensate this mainly by a reduction of time spent in direct contact with the patients. In this context, the number of psychotherapy sessions as well as sessions with the patients' relatives has been considerably reduced, whereas the time spent for emergency intervention and basic treatment still corresponds to the calculations according to the personnel regulations act. All in all, the results show that a reduction of therapeutic staff in psychiatric hospitals directly leads to a change in treatment settings with a focus on less individual treatment options. PMID:16552614

Putzhammer, A; Senft, I; Fleischmann, H; Klein, H E; Schmauss, M; Schreiber, W; Hajak, G

2006-03-01

217

[Emergence of linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains from two inpatients in a pediatric ward].  

PubMed

We report herein on the isolation of three linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains in 2011 from two pediatric inpatients at Kitasato University Hospital, Japan. Three linezolid resistant strains were isolated from two patients who shared the same room of a pediatric inpatient ward. Two linezolid resistant strains were isolated from patient A who had been treated with a total of 17,600mg of linezolid during 60 days of hospitalization (strains 1 and 2). The linezolid resistant E. faecalis persisted through the time that the patient had been discharged from the hospital. Another linezolid resistant strain was isolated from patient B who had no history of linezolid administration. The resistant strain in patient B phased out spontaneously. The minimum inhibitory concentration of linezolid in these strains ranged from 8.0 to 16.0 microg/mL. PCR amplification of the chromosomal gene encoding domain V of the 23S rRNA and subsequent nucleotide sequencing revealed that all the strains had at least one G2576T mutation. The pulse-field-gel electrophoretograms of the DNA treated with the SmaI restriction enzyme showed an identical profile suggesting that they were derived from a single resistant strain. These results suggested that the resistant strain occurred in patient A and was transmitted to patient B within the inpatient ward. PMID:23198574

Nihonyanagi, Shin; Adachi, Yuzuru; Onuki, Tomoyo; Nakazaki, Nobuhiko; Hirata, Yasuyosi; Fujiki, Kuniko; Takayama, Yoko; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Bandoh, Yuki; Dantsuji, Yurika; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

2012-09-01

218

Evaluation of the biological efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in wards of an Australian hospital.  

PubMed

This study assessed the efficacy of a 'dry' hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in an Australian hospital via a two-armed study. The invivo arm examined the baseline bacterial counts in high-touch zones within wards and evaluated the efficacy of cleaning with a neutral detergent followed by either hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination, or a manual terminal clean with bleach or Det-Sol 500. The invitro arm examined the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination on a variety of different surfaces commonly found in the wards of an Australian hospital, deliberately seeded with a known concentration of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). All bacterial counts were evaluated by a protocol of contact plate method. In the invivo arm, 33.3% of the high-touch areas assessed had aerobic bacterial count below the detection limit (i.e. no bacteria recoverable) post hydrogen peroxide decontamination, and in all circumstances the highest microbial density was ?3cfu/cm(2), while in the invitro arm there was at least a reduction in bacterial load by a factor of 10 at all surfaces investigated. These results showed that dry hydrogen peroxide vapour room decontamination is highly effective on a range of surfaces, although the cleanliness data obtained by these methods cannot be easily compared among the different surfaces as recovery of organisms is affected by the nature of the surface. PMID:21824681

Chan, H-T; White, P; Sheorey, H; Cocks, J; Waters, M-J

2011-08-06

219

Outbreak of multiresistant OXA-24- and OXA-51-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in an internal medicine ward.  

PubMed

Here we describe the clinical, microbiological, epidemiological, and molecular characterization of an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) involving 5 patients admitted to the internal medicine ward of our hospital. Over a 6-week period, 5 MRAB isolates were recovered from 5 patients, including 1 with fatal meningitis, 3 with skin and soft tissue infections, and 1 with respiratory colonization. One sample obtained during environmental monitoring in the ward was A. baumannii-positive. According to the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing results, the strains isolated from all patients and the environmental sample belonged to a single clone, identified as ST79 by multilocus sequence typing. The blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-51 carbapenemases were detected in all isolates. Four patients died, but only the death of the meningitis patient was probably related to the A. baumannii infection. The infection source was probably the hands of the healthcare workers because the outbreak strain was isolated from the surface of a serum container. The results of the present study revealed the importance of strict adherence to control measures by all healthcare workers because the consequences of noncompliance can be very serious. PMID:23883845

Tena, Daniel; Martnez, Nora Mariela; Oteo, Jess; Sez, David; Vindel, Ana; Azaedo, Mara Luisa; Snchez, Lorenzo; Espinosa, Alfredo; Cobos, Juan; Snchez, Rosario; Otero, Ignacio; Bisquert, Julia

2013-01-01

220

Meson-baryon-baryon vertex function and the Ward-Takahashi identity  

SciTech Connect

Ohta proposed a solution for the well-known difficulty of satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity for a photo-meson-baryon-baryon amplitude ({gamma}MBB) when a dressed meson-baryon-baryon (MBB) vertex function is present. He obtained a form for the {gamma}MBB amplitude which contained, in addition to the usual pole terms, longitudinal seagull terms which were determined entirely by the MBB vertex function. He arrived at his result by using a Lagrangian which yields the MBB vertex function at tree level. We show that such a Lagrangian can be neither Hermitian nor charge conjugation invariant. We have been able to reproduce Ohta{close_quote}s result for the {gamma}MBB amplitude using the Ward-Takahashi identity and no other assumption, dynamical or otherwise, and the most general form for the MBB and {gamma}MBB vertices. However, contrary to Ohta{close_quote}s finding, we find that the seagull terms are not robust. The seagull terms extracted from the {gamma}MBB vertex occur unchanged in tree graphs, such as in an exchange current amplitude. But the seagull terms which appear in a loop graph, as in the calculation of an electromagnetic form factor, are, in general, different. The whole procedure says nothing about the transverse part of the ({gamma}MBB) vertex and its contributions to the amplitudes in question. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Wang, S.; Banerjee, M.K. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

1996-12-01

221

Molecular typing and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in respiratory care wards of central Taiwan.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: In industrialized countries, Clostridium difficile is the major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. This study involved a broad overview of baseline epidemiology for C.difficile in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Point prevalence was estimated from a prospective survey conducted in the respiratory care wards of six hospitals in central Taiwan. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) were performed on all toxigenic C. difficile isolates, including asymptomatic and symptomatic strains. RESULTS: A total of 149 patients were screened for C. difficile; the point prevalence for C. difficile infection (CDI) and C. difficile colonization was 4% and 19%, respectively. CDI cases were significantly related to end-stage renal disease, and C. difficile colonization cases were significantly associated with previous admission to an acute-care facility. No hypervirulent PCR ribotype 027 strain was found. MLVA detected two clusters of CDI-related and three clusters of asymptomatic C. difficile strains circulating in wards. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a high prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile colonization in hospitals. Infection control personnel should pay attention to the increasing numbers of CDI cases, and molecular typing for C. difficile should be performed when necessary. PMID:23726464

Wei, Hsiao-Lun; Wei, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Chien-Wen; Shih, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Wen; Lu, Min-Chi; Hsu, Jin-Chyr; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Chiou, Chien-Shun

2013-05-28

222

Identifying key factors associated with aggression on acute inpatient psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

Aggressive behaviour is a critical issue for modern acute psychiatric services, not just because of the adverse impact it has on patients and staff, but also because it puts a financial strain on service providers. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of patient violence to other variables: patient characteristics, features of the service and physical environment, patient routines, staff factors, the use of containment methods, and other patient behaviours. A multivariate cross sectional design was utilised. Data were collected for a six month period on 136 acute psychiatric wards in 26 NHS Trusts in England. Multilevel modelling was conducted to ascertain those factors most strongly associated with verbal aggression, aggression toward objects, and physical aggression against others. High levels of aggression were associated with a high proportion of patients formally detained under mental health legislation, high patient turnover, alcohol use by patients, ward doors being locked, and higher staffing numbers (especially qualified nurses). The findings suggest that the imposition of restrictions on patients exacerbates the problem of violence, and that alcohol management strategies may be a productive intervention. Insufficient evidence is available to draw conclusions about the nature of the link between staffing numbers and violence. PMID:19363731

Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Jones, Julia; Van Der Merwe, Marie; Jeffery, Debra

2009-04-01

223

Trends and inequalities in cardiovascular disease mortality across 7932 English electoral wards, 1982-2006: Bayesian spatial analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has more than halved in England since the 1980s, but there are few data on small-area trends. We estimated CVD mortality by ward in 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, and examined trends in relation to starting mortality, region and community deprivation. Methods We analysed CVD death rates using a Bayesian spatial technique for all 7932 English electoral wards in consecutive 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, separately for men and women aged 3064 years and ?65 years. Results Age-standardized CVD mortality declined in the majority of wards, but increased in 186 wards for women aged ?65 years. The decline was larger where starting mortality had been higher. When grouped by deprivation quintile, absolute inequality between most- and least-deprived wards narrowed over time in those aged 3064 years, but increased in older adults; relative inequalities worsened in all four agesex groups. Wards with high CVD mortality in 200206 fell into two groups: those in and around large metropolitan cities in northern England that started with high mortality in 198286 and could not catch up, despite impressive declines, and those that started with average or low mortality in the 1980s but fell behind because of small mortality reductions. Conclusions Improving population health and reducing health inequalities should be treated as related policy and measurement goals. Ongoing analysis of mortality by small area is essential to monitor local effects on health and health inequalities of the public health and healthcare systems.

Asaria, Perviz; Fortunato, Lea; Fecht, Daniela; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Abellan, Juan Jose; Hambly, Peter; de Hoogh, Kees; Ezzati, Majid; Elliott, Paul

2012-01-01

224

Outbreak of CTX-M-3-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter cloacae in a pediatric ward.  

PubMed

A first resistant strain of Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from a blood specimen in a pediatric patient with immature teratoma-developed sepsis after combination chemotherapy. The strain produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and the same ESBL-producing strains were detected in urine samples from other patients in the pediatric ward. All strains harbored genes for bla (CTX-M-3) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis. Analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that all strains were the same clonal type. These results suggest that ESBL-producing strains might be transmitted in the ward via contact among patients or medical staff. PMID:17721690

Moriguchi, Naohiko; Itahashi, Yuka; Tabata, Nobutada; Yamazumi, Toshiaki; Furuta, Itaru; Shibata, Naohiro; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Miyata, Hiroshi

2007-08-27

225

Evaluation of the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward against carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was designed to demonstrate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward, a Unani herbal formulation. The Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward (MD) at the doses of 250, 500 and 1000mg\\/kg, p.o. was administered after carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4; 1.5ml\\/kg, i.p. once only) intoxication. Treatment with MD at three doses brought the levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, albumin and urea in dose dependent

Arvind Kumar Shakya; Neetu Sharma; Monika Saxena; Sadhana Shrivastava; Sangeeta Shukla

226

[Medium-term strategy for the specific management of pneumology hospitals and wards after the decentralization of the sanitary system].  

PubMed

Identifying and promoting new management techniques for the descentralized pneumology hospitals or wards was one of the most ambitious objectives of the project "Quality in the pneumology medical services through continuous medical education and organizational flexibility", financed by the Human Resourses Development Sectorial Operational Programme 2007-2013 (ID 58451). The "Medium term Strategy on the specific management of the pneumology hospitals or wards after the descentralization of the sanitary system" presented in the article was written by the project's experts and discussed with pneumology managers and local authorities representatives. This Strategy application depends on the colaboration of the pneumology hospitals with professional associations, and local and central authorities. PMID:22097433

Mu?at, Simona Nicoleta; Ioni?a, Diana; Paceonea, Mirela; Chiriac, Nona Delia; Stoicescu, Ileana Paula; Mih?l?an, F D

227

The adoption, local implementation and assimilation into routine nursing practice of a national quality improvement programme: the Productive Ward in England  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim and objective.? To explore why innovations in service and delivery are adopted and how they are then successfully implemented and eventually assimilated into routine nursing practice. Background.? The Productive Ward is a national quality improvement programme that aims to engage nursing staff in the implementation of change at ward level. Design.? Mixed methods (analysis of routine data, online survey,

Glenn Robert; Elizabeth Morrow; Jill Maben; Peter Griffiths; Lynn Callard

2011-01-01

228

Postoperative pain management on surgical wardsdo quality assurance strategies result in long-term effects on staff member attitudes and clinical outcomes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postoperative pain management (POPM) remains suboptimal on surgical wards in many countries despite the availability of effective analgesics, new technologies for drug administration, and clinical practice guidelines for pain management. The aim of the present study was to assess remaining long-term effects on pain management routines, patient experiences, and staff member attitudes in surgical wards more than 3 years after

Margareta Warrn Stomberg; Kerstin Wickstrm; Hkan Joelsson; Bjrn Sjstrm; Hengo Haljame

2003-01-01

229

Developing the role of a ward housekeeper within a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

The implementation of a housekeeper induction competency programme demonstrates the innovative way that the clinical standards facilitator has led the development of the housekeeping service at one NHS Trust. This service has been developed to ensure that there is sufficient training, support and opportunity to share best practice for the housekeepers. A Trust-wide approach using the multidisciplinary team (including dieticians, catering and facilities managers) has contributed to the raising of standards in meeting the patients' nutritional needs, as well as improving the ward environment. NHS Estates guidance (DH, 2001b) relating to the housekeeping service and the Essence of Care benchmarks for nutrition (DH, 2001a) were used to provide this framework for continuous quality improvement. PMID:17353837

Richmond, Jo

230

Patient rights and law: tobacco smoking in psychiatric wards and the Israeli Prevention of Smoking Act.  

PubMed

In August 2001, the Israeli Ministry of Health issued its Limitation of Smoking in Public Places Order, categorically forbidding smoking in hospitals. This forced the mental health system to cope with the issue of smoking inside psychiatric hospitals. The main problem was smoking by compulsorily hospitalized psychiatric patients in closed wards. An attempt by a psychiatric hospital to implement the tobacco smoking restraint instruction by banning the sale of cigarettes inside the hospital led to the development of a black market and cases of patient exploitation in return for cigarettes. This article surveys the literature dealing with smoking among psychiatric patients, the role of smoking in patients and the moral dilemmas of taking steps to prevent smoking in psychiatric hospitals. It addresses the need for public discussion on professional caregivers' dilemmas between their commitment to uphold the law and their duty to act as advocates for their patients' rights and welfare. PMID:15362356

Kagan, Ilya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Tabak, Nili; Abramowitz, Moshe Z; Margolin, Jacob

2004-09-01

231

Effects of discontinuing cover gowns on a postpartal ward upon cord colonization of the newborn.  

PubMed

To determine if the incidence of bacterial cord colonization in neonates increased when cover gowns were discontinued on a postpartal ward, a study was conducted. All infants who were admitted to and discharged from the well infant nursery at an Army medical center in Denver, Colorado, were cultured at the umbilicus at the time of admission and at discharge. The control group (N = 74) continued to gown as usual; the experimental group (N = 50) did not wear gowns. Visitors in both groups received the same instructions regarding handwashing. For all organisms, the control group demonstrated 80% colonization of infants who were negative on admission, and the experimental group demonstrated a colonization rate of 62%. When the chi square is applied, these data are statistically significant for P = 0.02 and P = 0.05. The experimental group had less colonization than the control group. PMID:6558246

Renaud, M T

232

[The detection and diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in an investigatory isolation ward].  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to examine the implication of radiation and microbiological methods in the timely detection and diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in untried prisoners in an investigatory isolation ward. Fluorographic films made in 12,298 convicts were analyzed. Abnormal fluorograms were revealed in 14 and 7.7% of the untried prisoners in 2005 and 2006, respectively; the changes were tuberculosis-associated in 70.2% of cases. Fluorescence microscopy and inoculation were used to carry out sputum tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 41.1% of the convicts with abnormal fluorograms and complaints about productive cough. Early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was made by microscopy in 14.9% of the prisoners; the diagnosis of tuberculosis was verified by the inoculation test in 34.5% of negative microscopy patients. In the remaining patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was based on X-ray studies and the results of treatment. PMID:19110767

Aksenova, K I; Mishin, V Iu; Chernyshev, S I; Iurkevich, O A; Sidorova, S V

2008-01-01

233

[Organization of timely detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in an investigatory isolation ward].  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of fluography (FLG) as a technique for the timely detection of cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in an investigatory isolation ward. According to the WHO data, at early detection stages the bacteria-discharging persons should constitute about 80% of all cases. Analysis of the first FLG films made in 22,973 prisoners in 2005-2007 revealed abnormalities in 7.6% of the convicts and tuberculosis-associated changes in 77% of cases. Sputum smear luminescence microscopy and culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 115 patients showed that the persons who discharged bacteria were 72.2% of the patients. The data suggest that FLG is highly effective in timely identifying cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:20050054

Aksenova, K I; Mishin, V Iu; Kononets, A S; Chernyshev, S I; Demushkina, N I

2009-01-01

234

Anti-anxiety activity studies of various extracts of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward.  

PubMed

Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward (Turneraceae) has been used traditionally for treatment of anxiety neurosis and as an aphrodisiac. Yet, the plant has never been subjected to systematic biological investigation. In the present investigation, petroleum ether (60-80 degrees C), chloroform, methanol, and water extracts of T. aphrodisiaca aerial parts were evaluated for anti-anxiety activity in mice using elevated plus-maze apparatus. Among all the extracts, only methanol exhibited significant anti-anxiety activity at a dose of 25 mg/kg with respect to control as well as standard (diazepam, 2 mg/kg). The bioactive methanol extract was shaken with petroleum ether, chloroform, and n-butyl alcohol, and all the shakings as well as the remaining methanol extract (RME) were further evaluated for anxiolytic activity. Butanol fraction and RME were found to exhibit anxiolytic activity in mice at the dose of 10 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg, respectively. PMID:16635964

Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Anupama

2005-01-01

235

Management of the vulnerable baby on the postnatal ward and transitional care unit.  

PubMed

Many guidelines for the prevention and management of neonatal hypoglycaemia focus on the sick infant admitted to the intensive care unit and pay scant attention to what is known about normal neonatal physiology. It is questionable whether treatment guidelines for low blood glucose levels for sick infants can be applied to a population of well infants on the postnatal ward, especially if such guidelines interfere with the establishment of breastfeeding, which has well recognised long and short term health benefits for mother and baby. What then of the baby who is at risk of abnormal postnatal adaptation, but is not unwell? Can the complications which occur in such infants, such as hypoglycaemia, be safely managed without resorting to admission to a baby unit? Can such vulnerable infants be safely managed in an environment that promotes mother and baby bonding and facilitates breastfeeding? PMID:20576368

de Rooy, Laura; Johns, Alison

2010-06-23

236

Meeting the needs of families and carers on acute psychiatric wards: a nurse-led service.  

PubMed

The needs of families and carers are often not met by the busy staff on inpatient units. A nurse-led family and carers service was set up on three adult acute psychiatric wards. A four-session protocol was developed for structuring sessions with families and carers. Methods of engaging reluctant carers were developed. Satisfaction rates are high. Families and carers value the emotional support, improved communication, help and advice. About one quarter are referred on for further input after discharge. A nurse-run service for the families and carers can make a significant difference to those who use it, providing support, creating a working alliance and improving the two-way exchange of information. PMID:22762305

Radcliffe, J J L; Adeshokan, E O; Thompson, P C; Bakowski, A J

2012-07-05

237

Evaluation of risk factor management of patients treated on an internal nephrology ward: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate treatment quality for the risk factors of hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia as well as the overall treatment quality for patients on an internal nephrology ward. This evaluation included the collection of data concerning the quality of therapeutic drug monitoring, drug use and potential drug-drug interactions. Establishing such baseline information highlights areas that have a need for further therapeutic intervention and creates a foundation for improving patient care, a subject that could be addressed in future clinical pharmacy research projects. Methods Medical charts of patients treated on a single internal nephrology ward were retrospectively evaluated using a predefined data collection form. Assessment of further need for therapeutic intervention was performed. Results For 76.5% (n = 78) of the total study population (n = 102), there was either a possibility (39.2%, n = 40) or a need (37.3%, n = 38) for further intervention based on the overall assessment. For the risk factors of hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia, the proportions of patients that require further intervention were 78.8% (n = 71), 90.6% (n = 58) and 87.9% (n = 58), respectively. Patients with diabetes or hyperlipidemia were less likely to have optimal risk factor control. The number of drugs prescribed and the number of potential drug-drug interactions were significantly higher after in-hospital treatment. Conclusion Risk factor treatment needs optimisation. Risk factor management, systematic medication reviews, and screening for and management of potential drug-drug interactions deserve great attention. Clinical pharmacy services could help in the achievement of treatment goals.

Stemer, Gunar; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa

2009-01-01

238

The Ethnomedicine of the Haya people of Bugabo ward, Kagera Region, north western Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The Kagera region, in north western Tanzania, is endowed with a strong culture of traditional medicine that is well supported by a rich diversity of medicinal plants. However, most of the plants in this region have not been documented nor evaluated for safety and efficacy. As an initiative in that direction, this study documented the knowledge on medicinal plant use by traditional healers of Bugabo Ward in Bukoba District. Methods Key informants were selected with the help of local government officials and information on their knowledge and use of plants for therapeutic purposes was gathered using a semi-structured interview format. Results In this study 94 plant species representing 84 genera and 43 families were found to be commonly used in the treatment of a variety of human ailments. The family Asteraceae had the highest number of species being used as traditional medicines. The study revealed that Malaria is treated using the highest number of different medicinal species (30), followed by skin conditions (19), maternal illnesses and sexually transmitted diseases (14), respiratory diseases (11) and yellow fever, Herpes simplex and peptic ulcers (10). Majority of the species are used to treat less than five different diseases/conditions each and leaves were the most commonly used part, comprising 40% of all the reports on use of plant parts. Trees comprised the most dominant growth form among all plants used for medicinal purposes in the study area. Conclusion Bugabo Ward has a rich repository of medicinal plants and this reinforces the need for an extensive and comprehensive documentation of medicinal plants in the area and a concomitant evaluation of their biological activity as a basis for developing future medicines.

Moshi, Mainen J; Otieno, Donald F; Mbabazi, Pamela K; Weisheit, Anke

2009-01-01

239

Impact of a hand hygiene educational programme on hospital-acquired infections in medical wards.  

PubMed

Improvement in hand hygiene (HH) compliance has been associated with a decrease in the incidence of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) and hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) infection/colonization. We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multimodal intervention in medical wards on HH compliance, alcohol-based hand rub (AHR) consumption and incidence of HAI and HA-MRSA. A before-after intervention study and an assessment 1 year later were conducted in three internal medicine wards. HH compliance during routine patient care was monitored using the WHO HH observation method. AHR consumption was registered. HAI incidence was actively sought during the PRE and POST periods. HAI risk factors were prospectively recorded and incidence density was calculated. A total of 825 patients were prospectively followed in the PRE period and 868 patients in the POST period. We observed 1531 opportunities for HH in PRE and POST periods and 450 1 year later. HH compliance improved from 54.3% to 75.8% (p 0.005) and remained 75.8% at follow-up. AHR consumption increased from 10.5 to 27.2 L/1000 hospital-days and 31.5 L/1000 hospital-days at follow-up. Incidence density of HAI was 6.93 and 6.96/1000 hospital-days in the PRE and POST intervention periods, respectively. HA-MRSA incidence density was 0.92 in the PRE period vs. 0.25/1000 hospital-days in the POST period (p 0.2) and 0.15/1000 hospital-days (p 0.1) 1 year later. A sustained increase in AHR consumption was followed by an improvement in HH compliance after a multimodal campaign. A trend for lower incidence density of new hospital-acquired MRSA was detected in the POST intervention and follow-up periods. PMID:22192567

Monistrol, O; Calbo, E; Riera, M; Nicols, C; Font, R; Freixas, N; Garau, J

2011-12-22

240

The Association of Ward Atmosphere with Burnout and Attitudes of Treatment Team Members in a State Psychiatric Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a Clinical Affiliation Agreement between a major state psychiatric facility and a state university, it was agreed that the hospital's staff would be assessed in terms of: burnout, nursing functioning, and ward atmosphere. The assessment data would be used to examine hospital characteristics as they relate to the strategies necessary to transform an approach of custodial care

Barbara A. Caldwell; Kenneth J. Gill; Elaine Fitzgerald; Michael Sclafani; Peg Grandison

2006-01-01

241

Viral contamination of environmental surfaces on a general paediatric ward and playroom in a major referral centre in Riyadh  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to determine the incidence of viral contamination of environmental surfaces in a hospital in Saudi Arabia. A 6-month prospective study was carried out on a general paediatric ward in which both enteric and respiratory viruses were screened. Weekly samples were taken between August 1993February 1994. A total of 155 samples were taken in which 11 (7%) tested positive

J. Akhter; S. Al-Hajjar; S. Myint; S. M. Hussain Qadri

1995-01-01

242

Active Student Participation May Enhance Patient Centeredness: Patients' Assessments of the Clinical Education Ward for Integrative Medicine  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To examine the impact of active student participation on quality of care in an integrative inpatient setting. Methods. Over a two-year period, we surveyed all patients treated on the Clinical Education Ward for Integrative Medicine (CEWIM), where final-year medical students are integrated into an internal medicine ward complementing conventional medicine with anthroposophic medicine. Patients treated on the regular wards of the same internal medicine department served as the control group (CG). General quality of care was studied with the Picker Inpatient Questionnaire, physician empathy with the Consultation and Relational Empathy measure, and patient enablement with the Patient Enablement Index. ANCOVA was used to control for covariates while examining significant differences between both patient groups. Results. Comparison of the CG wards and the CEWIM revealed no significant differences in medical treatment success. The CEWIM, however, achieved better results for physician-patient interaction, physician empathy, and patient enablement. Eighty Percent of the CEWIM patients rated student participation as positively impacting quality of care. Conclusion. Our results indicate that incorporating students in an integrative healthcare setting may result in greater patient centeredness. Further studies are needed to determine whether this is due to organizational advantages, students' empathic activity, the impact of teaching, or learner-teacher interaction.

Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie; Lutz, Gabriele; Valk-Draad, Maria

2013-01-01

243

Early Use of Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in a Respiratory Ward: A Prospective Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn recent years, the optimal location for noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) has been a matter of debate. Our aim was to detect the effectiveness of NIMV in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) in respiratory ward and factors associated with failure.

Aydin Ciledag; Akin Kaya; Buket Basa Akdogan; Pinar Akin Kabalak; Zeynep P. Onen; Elif Seny Banu Gulbay

2010-01-01

244

"Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the

Beasley, James P.

2007-01-01

245

Assaultive Youth: An Exploratory Study of the Assaultive Experience and Assaultive Potential of California Youth Authority Wards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study was designed to answer the question of what, if any, the practical uses are to which current violence-prediction devices can be employed in classification for rehabilitation. A sample was made up of 4146 California Youth Authority wards who were...

E. A. Wenk R. L. Emrich

1972-01-01

246

Assaultive Youth. An Exploratory Study of the Assaultive Experience and Assaultive Potential of California Youth Authority Wards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study was designed to answer the question of what, if any, are the practical uses to which current violence-prediction devices can be employed in classification for rehabilitation. The sample was made up to 4146 California youth authority wards who we...

E. A. Wenk R. L. Emrich

1972-01-01

247

Inappropriate prescribing for older people admitted to an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify inappropriate prescribing among older patients on admission to and discharge from an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards, and to compare changes during stay within and between these groups. Design Observational study. Setting and subjects Altogether 400 community-dwelling people aged ??70 years, on consecutive emergency admittance to hospital wards of internal medicine and orthopaedic surgery, were randomized to an intermediate-care nursing home unit or hospital wards; 290 (157 at the intermediate-care nursing home unit and 133 in hospital wards) were eligible for this sub-study. Main outcome measures Prevalence on admission and discharge of potentially inappropriate medications (Norwegian general practice [NORGEP] criteria) and drugdrug interactions; changes during stay. Results The mean (SD) age was 84.7 (6.2) years; 71% were women. From admission to discharge, the mean numbers of drugs prescribed per person increased from 6.0 (3.3) to 9.3 (3.8), p

Bakken, Marit Stordal; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen; Engeland, Anders; Ruths, Sabine

2012-01-01

248

The Association of Drug Use and Post-Traumatic Stress Reactions Due to Hurricane Ike Among Fifth Ward Houstonian Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study shows the important link between higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. The study offers secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected on 170 predominately African American males through the Fifth Ward Enrichment program (FWEP) in Houston, Texas, between November and December 2009. Men who stated that in the last

Ronald J. Peters Jr; Angela Meshack; Charles Amos; Kathy Scott-Gurnell; Charles Savage; Kentya Ford

2010-01-01

249

Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small floating islands. The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the wetland because it had been platted with large areas privately owned. A self-published workshop report was produced each of the first three years. Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle with downtown New Orleans in the background. Photo by Travis Scott, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007.

Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

2010-12-01

250

Supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity in one-loop lattice perturbation theory: General procedure  

SciTech Connect

The one-loop corrections to the lattice supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity (WTi) are investigated in the off-shell regime. In the Wilson formulation of the N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, supersymmetry is broken by the lattice, by the Wilson term, and is softly broken by the presence of the gluino mass. However, the renormalization of the supercurrent can be realized in a scheme that restores the continuum supersymmetric WTi (once the on-shell condition is imposed). The general procedure used to calculate the renormalization constants and mixing coefficients for the local supercurrent is presented. The supercurrent not only mixes with the gauge invariant operator T{sub {mu}}. An extra mixing with other operators coming from the WTi appears. This extra mixing survives in the continuum limit in the off-shell regime and cancels out when the on-shell condition is imposed and the renormalized gluino mass is set to zero. Comparison with numerical results is also presented.

Feo, Alessandra [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo, Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

2004-09-01

251

Changing hospital policy from the wards: an introduction to health policy education.  

PubMed

Although the need for physician participation in critiquing and setting health policies is great, physician participation in health policy activities is low. Many barriers hamper physician involvement, from limited time to ignorance of their potential roles, to minimal exposure to the issue during medical education. University of New Mexico School of Medicine family medicine residents and students on ward teams were trained to ask specific questions on rounds that framed individual patient encounters as windows into broader community health and policy issues. Teams selected problems on which to intervene, with the intent of influencing hospital policies to improve health care and outcomes. Ten projects were completed in six months, four of which are presented. Resident and student accomplishments included (1) identifying a free drug formulary at the Health Care for the Homeless pharmacy to reduce readmission rates of discharged homeless patients, (2) expanding hospital outpatient pharmacy hours to reduce preventable emergency room visits for medications, (3) expanding the hospital social service workforce to address the overwhelming need to discharge indigent patients needing extended care, and (4) certifying residents and faculty to provide outpatient buprenorphine treatment as a harm-reduction intervention for opiate-addicted patients, thereby reducing preventable hospitalizations for overdose or for medical complications from illicit opiate use. Hospital health policy is made more accessible to learners if issues that generate policy discussions emerge from their daily learning environment, if learners can intervene to improve those policies within a limited timeframe, and if faculty mentors are available to guide their interventions. PMID:18367894

Jacobsohn, Vanessa; DeArman, Maria; Moran, Patrick; Cross, Jennette; Dietz, Deidre; Allen, Rebekah; Bachofer, Sally; Dow-Velarde, Lily; Kaufman, Arthur

2008-04-01

252

Nitrogen removal process optimization in New York City WPCPS: a case study of Wards Island WPCP.  

PubMed

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection has been engaged in a continuous process to develop a nitrogen removal program to reduce the nitrogen mass discharge from its water pollution control plants, (WPCPs), from 49,158 kg/d to 20,105 kg/d by the year 2017 as recommended by the Long Island Sound Study. As part of the process, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken involving bench, pilot and full scale studies to identify the most effective way to upgrade and optimize the existing WPCPs. Aeration tank 13 (AT-13) at the Wards Island WPCP was particularly attractive as a full-scale research facility because its aeration tank with its dedicated final settling tanks and RAS pumps could be isolated from the remaining treatment facilities. The nitrogen removal performance of AT-13, which, at the time, was operated as a "basic step feed BNR Facility", was evaluated and concurrently nitrification kinetic parameters were measured using in-situ bench scale experiments. Additional bench scale experiments provided denitrification rates using different sources of carbon and measurement of the maximum specific growth rate of nitrifying bacteria. The combined findings were then used to upgrade AT-13 to a "full" BNR facility with carbon and alkalinity addition. This paper will focus on the combined bench and full scale results that were the basis for the consequent upgrade. PMID:19901478

Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Musabyimana, M; Deur, A; Beckmann, K

2009-01-01

253

Unsupplemented breastfeeding in the maternity ward. Positive long-term effects.  

PubMed

Feeding routines in the maternity ward were investigated in 204 mother-infant pairs before and in 203 after a change towards earlier, more frequent breastfeeding and elimination of routine substitute feeds. In the intervention group, the volume of breast-milk increased, while the use of formula and sugar solution decreased correspondingly. The infants in the intervention group lost more weight during the first 2-3 days (6.4% versus 4.6%), but regained their birth weight faster than the supplemented control group. The incidence of hyperbilirubinemia was not significantly different in the two groups. No cases of hypoglycemia were diagnosed. At 6 months, 87% of the infants in the intervention group were still fed at the breast, compared with 66% in the control group. The weight curves were comparable up to 9 months, when intervention group infants were found to weigh slightly less. These follow-up results must be interpreted with some caution due to the low but comparable response rate of the two groups. Thus the intervention study demonstrated that healthy, full-term infants usually have no need for supplements to their mothers' milk provided they have had a satisfactory start in life with early and frequent feeds at the breast. The follow-up study indicated that a more "physiological" start of breastfeeding may have had a positive long term effect on the overall duration of the lactational period. PMID:1927297

Nylander, G; Lindemann, R; Helsing, E; Bendvold, E

1991-01-01

254

Effects of different interior decorations in the seclusion area of a psychiatric acute ward.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to compare development in symptoms, behaviours, treatment and patient satisfaction of a traditional interior and an interior furnished like an ordinary home in a seclusion area. A naturalistic sample of 56 consecutive patients admitted to an acute ward was allocated to two different seclusion areas, one with a traditional interior and one decorated as an ordinary home. Symptoms of psychopathology, therapeutic steps taken, violent episodes, length of patient stay and patient satisfaction were recorded. There were no differences in changes in scores on The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for schizophrenia, The Brset Violence Checklist or the Global Assessment of Function split version scale between the two patient groups. Therapeutic steps taken, number of violent episodes and length of patient stay was also similar. Female patients preferred an ordinary home interior. It was concluded that interior and furnishing like an ordinary home in the seclusion areas created an environment with comparable treatment outcomes to the traditional dismal interior, and had positive effects on many patients' well-being, at least among the women. The traditional beliefs that a sparsely decorated interior is a method to reduce symptoms of psychopathology and dangerous behaviours were not supported by our data. PMID:16195094

Vaaler, Arne E; Morken, Gunnar; Linaker, Olav M

2005-01-01

255

Anti-anxiety Activity Studies on Homoeopathic Formulations of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward  

PubMed Central

Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward (Turneraceae) has been traditionally used for the treatment of anxiety neurosis, and as an aphrodisiac. Mother tinctures (85% ethanol extracts) of T. aphrodisiaca have also been used for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In the present investigation, T. aphrodisiaca mother tinctures formulated by three reputed manufacturers of homoeopathic medicines (NLK, DWSG and SBL) were evaluated for their anxiolytic activity. Dried mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca were subjected to anxiolytic activity evaluation at various doses, i.e. 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 mg/kg p.o. in mice using elevated plus maze apparatus. Dried mother tinctures exhibited significant anxiolytic activity at 50 mg/kg (NLK), 75 mg/kg (DWSG) and 125 mg/kg (SBL), respectively, with reference to control as well as standard (diazepam, 2 mg/kg p.o.). Mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca available in the market, have significant anxiolytic activity. Amongst the three mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca analyzed, the dry residue of NLK possesses the highest amount of anxiolytic constituent(s). To ensure uniformity and consistency of biological effects in herbal formulations, these should be standardized on the basis of bioactive markers. The authors are actively involved in isolating the bioactive constituent(s) from T. aphrodisiaca so that the plant can be standardized on the basis of biologically active constituent(s).

2005-01-01

256

Anti-anxiety Activity Studies on Homoeopathic Formulations of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward.  

PubMed

Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward (Turneraceae) has been traditionally used for the treatment of anxiety neurosis, and as an aphrodisiac. Mother tinctures (85% ethanol extracts) of T. aphrodisiaca have also been used for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In the present investigation, T. aphrodisiaca mother tinctures formulated by three reputed manufacturers of homoeopathic medicines (NLK, DWSG and SBL) were evaluated for their anxiolytic activity. Dried mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca were subjected to anxiolytic activity evaluation at various doses, i.e. 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 mg/kg p.o. in mice using elevated plus maze apparatus. Dried mother tinctures exhibited significant anxiolytic activity at 50 mg/kg (NLK), 75 mg/kg (DWSG) and 125 mg/kg (SBL), respectively, with reference to control as well as standard (diazepam, 2 mg/kg p.o.). Mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca available in the market, have significant anxiolytic activity. Amongst the three mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca analyzed, the dry residue of NLK possesses the highest amount of anxiolytic constituent(s). To ensure uniformity and consistency of biological effects in herbal formulations, these should be standardized on the basis of bioactive markers. The authors are actively involved in isolating the bioactive constituent(s) from T. aphrodisiaca so that the plant can be standardized on the basis of biologically active constituent(s). PMID:15864356

Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Anupam

2005-02-09

257

Nosocomial infections in the general pediatric wards of a hospital in Turkey.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, type, and clinical features of nosocomial infections (NIs), their etiological distribution, and the antibiotic resistance patterns of causative organisms in the general pediatric wards of a hospital in Turkey over a 3-year period. The Hospital Infection Control Committee NI surveillance reports were used as a database. NIs were detected in 171 (2.25%) of the 7,594 hospitalized patients. Some of these patients experienced more than 1 episode, and thus, the total NI episodes were 229. Patients' age varied from 1 to 144 months (mean standard deviation, 14.5 23.6 months). The NI rate was 3.02%, and the NI density was 3.17/1,000 patient days. The most frequent NIs were lower respiratory system infections, blood stream infections, and urinary tract infections. Gram-negative organisms were the most frequently isolated agents. Of the 171 patients with NIs, 47 (27.5%) died. PMID:22814155

Balaban, Ismail; Tan?r, Gnl; Metin Timur, Ozge; Oz, Fatma Nur; Ayd?n Teke, Trkan; Bayhan, Glsm Iclal; Szak, Nejla; Gl, Ne?e

2012-07-01

258

Analysis of the interface and data transfer from ICU to normal wards in a german university hospital.  

PubMed

Typically general wards and intensive care units (ICU) have very different labor organizations, structures and IT-systems in Germany. There is a need for coordination, because of the different working arrangements. Our team investigated the interface between ICU and general ward and especially the respective information transfer in the University hospital in Erlangen (Bavaria, Germany). The research team used a combination of interviews, observations and the analysis of transfer records and forms as part of a methodical triangulation. We identified 41 topics, which are discussed or presented in writing during the handover. In a second step, we investigate the requirements of data transmission in expert interviews. A data transfer concept from the perspective of the nurses and physicians was developed and we formulated recommendations for improvements of process and communication for this interface. Finally the data transfer concept was evaluated by the respondents. PMID:23920878

Vollmer, Anne-Maria; Skonetzki-Cheng, Stefan; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

2013-01-01

259

A journey filled with emotions--mothers' experiences of breastfeeding their preterm infant in a Swedish neonatal ward.  

PubMed

The study took place in a 10-bed neonatal ward in a hospital in the south of Sweden and includes mothers having given birth to a preterm infant born before the 37th week of gestation. The aim of the study was to illuminate mothers' experiences of breastfeeding a preterm infant in a neonatal ward. Data collection includes written protocols from twelve mothers. These protocols were analysed thematically. The results indicate that the mothers should be offered a private place where they can breastfeed or express breastmilk, and that the breastmilk should not be placed in a shared area. The mothers described that they did not want to be separated from their preterm infant during the night. Finally, they also pointed out the importance of support from the health professionals for establishing an exclusive breastfeeding regime. PMID:22724310

Bjrk, Maria; Thelin, Anna; Peterson, Inger; Hammarlund, Kina

2012-03-01

260

Documenting the NICU design dilemma: parent and staff perceptions of open ward versus single family room units  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:With neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) evolving from multipatient wards toward family-friendly, single-family room units, the study objective was to compare satisfaction levels of families and health-care staff across these differing NICU facility designs.Study Design:This prospective study documented, by means of institutional review board-approved questionnaire survey protocols, the perceptions of parents and staff from two contrasting NICU environments.Result:Findings showed that

Renee Domanico; Diana K. Davis; F. Coleman; B O Davis

2010-01-01

261

Clinical predictive values of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase carriage in patients admitted to medical wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

We aimed to reassess, through clinical items, populations at risk for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) carriage at admission to hospital and to assess the risk of further positive clinical culture of ESBL-E among carriers.\\u000a We performed a 5-month cohort study in a medicine ward of a 500-bed university teaching hospital in the Parisian area of France.\\u000a All admitted patients were

E. Rupp; A. Pitsch; F. Tubach; V. de Lastours; F. Chau; B. Pasquet; J.-C. Lucet; A. Andremont; B. Fantin

262

Cross infection in a surgical ward caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with transferable resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin  

Microsoft Academic Search

An outbreak of gentamicin- and tobramycin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection occurred in a surgical ward over a three-month period. Resistant Ps. aeruginosa strains with the same serological, phage, and pyocin type were cultured from the urine of six patients. Identical organisms were found on urine bottles, bedpans, and the hands of attendant staff. Inadequate disinfection played a major role in cross-infection.

F R Falkiner; C T Keane; M Dalton; M T Clancy; G A Jacoby

1977-01-01

263

Outbreak of CTX-M-3-type extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacter cloacae in a pediatric ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

A first resistant strain of Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from a blood specimen in a pediatric patient with immature teratoma-developed sepsis after combination chemotherapy.\\u000a The strain produced extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL), and the same ESBL-producing strains were detected in urine samples\\u000a from other patients in the pediatric ward. All strains harbored genes for bla\\u000a CTX-M-3 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and

Naohiko Moriguchi; Yuka Itahashi; Nobutada Tabata; Toshiaki Yamazumi; Itaru Furuta; Naohiro Shibata; Yoshichika Arakawa; Hiroshi Miyata

2007-01-01

264

[A case-control study of factors associated with intermittent home care among elderly inpatients in home care wards].  

PubMed

We present a case-control study that was conducted to examine the factors associated with intermittent home care on elderly inpatients in home care wards. The results showed that the proportion of intermittent home care was approximately 20%, and the risks for intermittent home care were strongly associated with a lack of intention for continued home care for the elderly, lack of experience of home care, refusal of the family caregiver, and protracted length of stay. PMID:23268917

Ohshima, Hiroko; Ozaki, Mitsuyo; Matsumoto, Akemi; Ihata, Atsuko; Nakamura, Kumi; Harada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takao

2012-12-01

265

Biological responses to sediment remediation based on thin layer placement near a former pulp mill in Ward Cove, AK (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2001, 28acres of the bottom of Ward Cove, AK (USA) were remediated using thin layer placement, to enhance the natural\\u000a recovery of contaminated sediments. The remediated areas were part of an 80-acre area of concern identified offshore from\\u000a the site of a former sulfite pulp mill. The primary chemicals of concern were those commonly associated with organic enrichment\\u000a near

D. Scott Becker; Jane E. Sexton; Lucinda A. Jacobs; Barry Hogarty; Karen Keeley

2009-01-01

266

Epidemiology and acquisition of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a septic orthopedic ward.  

PubMed

Wards cohorting infected orthopaedic patients may be particularly prone to transmitting extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E). We analyze their epidemic pattern by performing molecular typing of ESBL-E isolated from patients and healthcare workers (HCW) from our septic ward. Between March 2010 and November 2011, 186 patients were admitted. Among 565 anal swabs, ESBL-E were detected in 204 samples from 45 patients, suggesting prolonged carriage in affected patients. Among 25 cases with identical ESBL-E species and positive epidemiological links, only 9 were really attributable to our service. We also screened 41 healthcare workers (HCW) on 49 occasions during the study period. Six samples (13%) were positive. None of the ESBL-E detected in HCW were related to any of the patient isolates. Among 60 environmental samples taken at the peak of the epidemic none revealed ESBL-E. We conclude that HCW also were anal carriers of ESBL-E, however the ESBL- strains from the HCW were not the same strains isolated from patients in the septic ward. Moreover, the epidemiological attribution of ESBL by simple vicinity, timing, and species identification might grossly overestimate transmission within a given unit. PMID:23539506

Agostinho, Americo; Renzi, Gesuele; Haustein, Thomas; Jourdan, Ghislaine; Bonfillon, Chantal; Rougemont, Mathieu; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Harbarth, Stephan; Ukay, Ilker

2013-03-01

267

Determinants of adoption of cognitive behavioral interventions in a hospital setting: Example of a minimal-contact smoking cessation intervention for cardiology wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe aim of our study was to identify the psychological and organizational determinants of adopting a smoking cessation intervention in cardiology wards, using the Integrated Change Model (I-Change Model) as the theoretical basis.

Dewi Segaar; Catherine Bolman; Marc C. Willemsen; Hein de Vries

2006-01-01

268

The Effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry and Decision Support System on Medication Errors in the Neonatal Ward: Experiences from an Iranian Teaching Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication dosing errors are frequent in neonatal wards. In an Iranian neonatal ward, a 7.5months study was designed in three\\u000a periods to compare the effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) without and with decision support functionalities in reducing non-intercepted medication dosing errors in antibiotics and anticonvulsants.\\u000a Before intervention (Period 1), error rate was 53%, which did not significantly change

Alireza Kazemi; Johan Ellenius; Faramarz Pourasghar; Shahram Tofighi; Aref Salehi; Ali Amanati; Uno G. H. Fors

2011-01-01

269

Observed Ward Behavior Strongly Associated with Independent Living Skills: An Analysis of Convergent and Criterion-Related Validity of the NOSIE and the ILSI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ratings of ward behavior and skill acquisition are important criteria for monitoring an individuals recovery trajectory during\\u000a inpatient psychiatric rehabilitation. This study compared data from the Nurses Observational Scale for Inpatient Evaluation\\u000a (NOSIE) and the Independent Living Skills Inventory (ILSI) to identify relationships between ward behaviors and independent\\u000a living skills and to support the convergent validity of these instruments. The

Elizabeth A. Cook; Charlie A. Davidson; Jeffrey R. Nolting; William D. Spaulding

2011-01-01

270

The identification and epidemiology of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in patient rooms and the ward environment  

PubMed Central

Background Research has indicated that the environment may play an important role in the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile in healthcare facilities. Despite the significance of this finding, few data exist from longitudinal studies investigating MRSA and C. difficile contamination, concurrently, in both patient rooms and the general ward environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of MRSA and C. difficile contamination in patient rooms and the ward environment and identify risk factors associated with a surface being contaminated with these pathogens. Methods Environmental surfaces in patient rooms and the general environment in the medical and surgical wards of a community hospital were sampled six times over a 15 week period. Sterile electrostatic cloths were used for sampling and information pertaining to the surface sampled was recorded. MRSA isolates and C. difficile specimens were obtained from hospitalized patients. Enrichment culture was performed and spa typing or ribotyping was conducted for MRSA or C. difficile, respectively. Exact logistic regression models were constructed to examine risk factors associated with MRSA and C. difficile contamination. Results Sixteen (41%) patient rooms had???1 surfaces contaminated with MRSA and/or C. difficile. For 218 surfaces investigated, 3.2% and 6.4% were contaminated with MRSA or C. difficile, respectively. Regression models indicated that surfaces in rooms exposed to a C. difficile patient had significantly increased odds of being contaminated with C. difficile, compared to surfaces in unexposed patient rooms. Additionally, compared to plastic surfaces, cork surfaces had significantly increased odds of being contaminated with C. difficile. For 236 samples collected from the ward environment, MRSA and C. difficile were recovered from 2.5% and 5.9% of samples, respectively. Overall, the majority of MRSA and C. difficile strains were molecularly identified as spa type 2/t002 (84.6%, n?=?11) and ribotype 078 (50%, n?=?14), respectively. Conclusions In patient rooms and the ward environment, specific materials and locations were identified as being contaminated with MRSA or C. difficile. These sites should be cleaned and disinfected with increased vigilance to help limit the transmission and dissemination of MRSA and C. difficile within the hospital.

2013-01-01

271

Small-scale, homelike facilities versus regular psychogeriatric nursing home wards: a cross-sectional study into residents' characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Nursing home care for people with dementia is increasingly organized in small-scale and homelike care settings, in which normal daily life is emphasized. Despite this increase, relatively little is known about residents' characteristics and whether these differ from residents in traditional nursing homes. This study explored and compared characteristics of residents with dementia living in small-scale, homelike facilities and regular psychogeriatric wards in nursing homes, focusing on functional status and cognition. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 769 residents with dementia requiring an intensive level of nursing home care: 586 from regular psychogeriatric wards and 183 residents from small-scale living facilities. Functional status and cognition were assessed using two subscales from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS): the Activities of Daily Living-Hierarchy scale (ADL-H) and the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS). In addition, care dependency was measured using Dutch Care Severity Packages (DCSP). Finally, gender, age, living condition prior to admission and length of stay were recorded. Descriptive analyses, including independent samples t- tests and chi-square tests, were used. To analyze data in more detail, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results Residents living in small-scale, homelike facilities had a significantly higher functional status and cognitive performance compared with residents in regular psychogeriatric wards. In addition, they had a shorter length of stay, were less frequently admitted from home and were more often female than residents in regular wards. No differences were found in age and care dependency. While controlling for demographic variables, the association between dementia care setting and functional status and cognition remained. Conclusions Although residents require a similar intensive level of nursing home care, their characteristics differ among small-scale living facilities and regular psychogeriatric wards. These differences may limit research into effects and feasibility of various types of dementia care settings. Therefore, these studies should take resident characteristics into account in their design, for example by using a matching procedure.

2010-01-01

272

Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.  

PubMed

In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

Kolawole, Deboye O; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L; Lawal, Oladejo O; Amusa, Yemisi B; Kck, Robin; Becker, Karsten

2013-07-23

273

Microbial habitat dynamics and ablation control on the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (8302N, 7400W) is an 40 m thick ice feature that occupies a large embayment along Canada's northernmost coast. Sediments cover 10% of its surface and provide a habitat for diverse microbial communities. These assemblages form an organo-sedimentary matrix (microbial mat) composed of cold-tolerant cyanobacteria and several other types of organisms. We investigated the environmental properties (temperature, irradiance, conductivity and nutrient concentration) of the microbial mat habitat and the effect of the microbial mats on the surface topography of the ice shelf. The low albedo of microbial mats relative to the surrounding snow and ice encouraged meltwater production, thereby extending the growth season to 61 days despite only 52 days with mean temperatures above 0 C. We found large excursions in salinity near the microbial mat during freeze-up and melt, and 54% of all ponds sampled had conductivity profiles indicating stratification. Nutrient concentrations within the microbial mats were up to two orders of magnitude higher than those found in the water column, which underscores the differences between the microbial mat microenvironment and the overall bulk properties of the cryo-ecosystem. The average ice surface ablation in the microbial mat-rich study site was 1.22 m year-1, two times higher than values measured in areas of the ice shelf where mats were less prevalent. We demonstrate with topographic surveys that the microbial mats promote differential ablation and conclude that the cohesive microbial aggregates trap and stabilize sediment, reduce albedo, and thereby influence the surface morphology of the ice shelf.

Mueller, Derek R.; Vincent, Warwick F.

2006-03-01

274

The effect of ward round teaching on patients: The health team and the patients' perspectives  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Holding bedside round teaching and involving patients in the teaching of the students might lead to patients dissatisfaction. This study was carried out in order to find the viewpoints of the patients and the medical team about the effect of clinical round on patients hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This study is of cross-sectional descriptive type which is carried out in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences using researcher-made tools. The statistical population included the hospitalized patients, interns, residents, and nurses of the internal wards of educational hospitals. In this study, 110 patients and 150 health team staff are participated. The analysis of the data was done through software Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) 11.5 and descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. Statistical analysis of the variance did not show any significant difference among the interns, nurses, and residents perception of patient's satisfaction. Results: Generally, the patients had a positive viewpoint toward things happening during a round, whereas the medical team's viewpoint was negative. In both groups, the highest satisfaction average pertained to the number of times and the duration of visits, but both groups believed that lack of a definite responsible medical doctor, feeling of insecurity during the incongruous and unclear discussions, and the level of respect for the patient were the causes of dissatisfaction with the clinical round process. Conclusion: The current method of clinical rounds can result in patients dissatisfaction. On the other hand, proper relationship with them leads to the development of a more positive attitude in them. Therefore, revision and correction of the current clinical round procedures and teaching the communication skills to the medical team could help improve this process.

Adibi, Peyman; Enjavian, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Reza; Omid, Athar

2013-01-01

275

Interprofessional Collaboration on an Internal Medicine Ward: Role Perceptions and Expectations among Nurses and Residents  

PubMed Central

Background Effective interprofessional collaboration requires that team members share common perceptions and expectations of each other's roles. Objective Describe and compare residents and nurses perceptions and expectations of their own and each others professional roles in the context of an Internal Medicine ward. Methods A convenience sample of 14 residents and 14 nurses volunteers from the General Internal Medicine Division at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, were interviewed to explore their perceptions and expectations of residents and nurses professional roles, for their own and the other profession. Interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. The same respondents also filled a questionnaire asking their own intended actions and the expected actions from the other professional in response to 11 clinical scenarios. Results Three main themes emerged from the interviews: patient management, clinical reasoning and decision-making processes, and roles in the team. Nurses and residents shared general perceptions about patient management. However, there was a lack of shared perceptions and expectations regarding nurses autonomy in patient management, nurses participation in the decision-making process, professional interdependence, and residents implication in teamwork. Results from the clinical scenarios showed that nurses intended actions differed from residents expectations mainly regarding autonomy in patient management. Correlation between residents expectations and nurses intended actions was 0.56 (p?=?0.08), while correlation between nurses expectations and residents intended actions was 0.80 (p<0.001). Conclusions There are discordant perceptions and unmet expectations among nurses and residents about each others roles, including several aspects related to the decision-making process. Interprofessional education should foster a shared vision of each others roles and clarify the boundaries of autonomy of each profession.

Muller-Juge, Virginie; Cullati, Stephane; Blondon, Katherine S.; Hudelson, Patricia; Maitre, Fabienne; Vu, Nu V.; Savoldelli, Georges L.; Nendaz, Mathieu R.

2013-01-01

276

Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ?0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

Svindseth, Marit F; N?ttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

2008-01-01

277

Outcome Risk Factors during Respiratory Infections in a Paediatric Ward in Antananarivo, Madagascar 2010-2012  

PubMed Central

Background Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of infectious disease-related morbidity, hospitalisation and mortality among children worldwide, and particularly in developing countries. In these low-income countries, most patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI), whether it is mild or severe, are still treated empirically. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with the evolution and outcome of respiratory illnesses in patients aged under 5 years old. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective study in a paediatric ward in Antananarivo from November 2010 to July 2012 including patients under 5 years old suffering from respiratory infections. We collected demographic, socio-economic, clinical and epidemiological data, and samples for laboratory analysis. Deaths, rapid progression to respiratory distress during hospitalisation, and hospitalisation for more than 10 days were considered as severe outcomes. We used multivariate analysis to study the effects of co-infections. Results From November 2010 to July 2012, a total of 290 patients were enrolled. Co-infection was found in 192 patients (70%). Co-infections were more frequent in children under 36 months, with a significant difference for the 1924 month-old group (OR: 8.0). Sixty-nine percent (230/290) of the patients recovered fully and without any severe outcome during hospitalisation; the outcome was scored as severe for 60 children and nine patients (3%) died. Risk factors significantly associated with worsening evolution during hospitalisation (severe outcome) were admission at age under 6 months (OR?=?5.3), comorbidity (OR?=?4.6) and low household income (OR?=?4.1). Conclusion Co-mordidity, low-income and age under 6 months increase the risk of severe outcome for children infected by numerous respiratory pathogens. These results highlight the need for implementation of targeted public health policy to reduce the contribution of respiratory diseases to childhood morbidity and mortality in low income countries.

Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Ratsima, Elisoa Hariniana; Orelle, Arnaud; Ratovoson, Rila; Andrianirina, Zo Zafitsara; Andriatahina, Todisoa; Ramparany, Lovasoa; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Randrianirina, Frederique; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Richard, Vincent

2013-01-01

278

Hand contamination during routine care in medical wards: the role of hand hygiene compliance.  

PubMed

The hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) are the most common vehicle for the transmission of micro-organisms from patient to patient and within the healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multimodal campaign on the type and amount of resident and transient flora and the presence of potential risk factors for hand contamination during routine care. A before-after (PRE and POST periods) interventional study was carried out in medical wards of a tertiary care hospital. Eighty-nine samples were analysed. Samples were cultured immediately before patient contact using a glove-juice method. Data collected included socio-demographic and risk factors for hand contamination. Flora was measured as log10 c.f.u. ml(-1) and evaluated by comparing median values in the PRE and POST periods. Transient flora was isolated from the hands of 67.4 and 46.1 % of HCWs in the PRE and POST periods, respectively (P<0.001). Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were the predominant contaminants. Resident flora was isolated from 92.1 % of HCWs in the PRE period and from 70.8 % in the POST period (P<0.001). The meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci log10 c.f.u. count ml(-1) decreased from 1.96 1.2 to 0.89 1.2 (mean s d; P<0.001), and the global flora count decreased from 2.77 1.1 to 1.56 1.4 (P<0.001). In the POST period, the wearing of fewer rings (P<0.001), shorter fingernail length (P = 0.008), a shorter time since recent hand hygiene (HH) (P = 0.007) and an increased use of alcohol-based hand rub instead of soap (P<0.001) were documented. The HH multimodal strategy reduced the number of risk factors and the level of HCW hand contamination. PMID:23329322

Monistrol, Olga; Lpez, M Liboria; Riera, Montserrat; Font, Roser; Nicols, Carme; Escobar, Miguel Angel; Freixas, Nria; Garau, Javier; Calbo, Esther

2013-01-17

279

"Driving the devil away": qualitative insights into miraculous cures for AIDS in a rural Tanzanian ward  

PubMed Central

Background The role of religious beliefs in the prevention of HIV and attitudes towards the infected has received considerable attention. However, little research has been conducted on Faith Leaders' (FLs) perceptions of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world. This study investigated FLs' attitudes towards different HIV treatment options (traditional, medical and spiritual) available in a rural Tanzanian ward. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 FLs purposively selected to account for all the denominations present in the area. Data was organised into themes using the software package NVIVO-7. The field work guidelines were tailored as new topics emerged and additional codes progressively added to the coding frame. Results Traditional healers (THs) and FLs were often reported as antagonists but duality prevailed and many FLs simultaneously believed in traditional healing. Inter-denomination mobility was high and guided by pragmatism. Praying for the sick was a common practice and over one third of respondents said that prayer could cure HIV. Being HIV-positive was often seen as "a punishment from God" and a consequence of sin. As sinning could result from "the work of Satan", forgiveness was possible, and a "reconciliation with God" deemed as essential for a favourable remission of the disease. Several FLs believed that "evil spirits" inflicted through witchcraft could cause the disease and claimed that they could cast "demons" away. While prayers could potentially cure HIV "completely", ART use was generally not discouraged because God had "only a part to play". The perceived potential superiority of spiritual options could however lead some users to interrupt treatment. Conclusions The roll-out of ART is taking place in a context in which the new drugs are competing with a diversity of existing options. As long as the complementarities of prayers and ART are not clearly and explicitly stated by FLs, spiritual options may be interpreted as a superior alternative and contribute to hampering adherence to ART. In contexts where ambivalent attitudes towards the new drugs prevail, enhancing FLs understanding of ART's strengths and pitfalls is an essential step to engage them as active partners in ART scale-up programs.

2010-01-01

280

Prevalence and burden of diseases presenting to a general pediatrics ward in gondar, ethiopia.  

PubMed

Background: Little is known about pediatric hospital admissions in Ethiopia. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all data entered into the Gondar University Hospital pediatric ward's admission registration books over 1 year. Patient age, sex, origin, length of stay, diagnosis and discharge condition were transcribed into an electronic database for all observations. Missing data were retrieved by chart and death certificate review. Primary outcome measures included death and death in the first 24 h of admission. Results: In all, 1927 patients were admitted to our facility during the year of study. Of these, 64.5% improved, 4.6% were discharged unchanged, 6.5% disappeared and 7.5% died; the remaining 17.0% of outcome data were registered as 'non-death' but could not be specified further. The median age of admission was 2.2 years (interquartile range 1-7 years), with more admissions for children younger than 5 years (70.3%) and more male subjects admitted than female subjects (59.6% male). The median length of stay was 4.0 days (interquartile range 2-10 days). Eighty-one percent of admissions originated from Gondar or its neighboring districts. Most admissions carried a respiratory, nutritional or infectious diagnosis (47.5, 46.8 and 36.5%, respectively). Conditions diagnosed most commonly (>200 cases) included community-acquired pneumonia (812 cases), severe acute malnutrition (381), anemia (274) and acute gastroenteritis (219). Seven diagnoses were associated with mortality after adjusting for demographic covariates: severe acute malnutrition (odds ratio (OR) 2.5, P < 0.001), coma (OR 4.2, P < 0.001), meningitis (OR 2.3, P = 0.018), congestive heart failure (OR 2.4, P = 0.001), severe dehydration (OR 2.5, P = 0.004), aspiration pneumonia (OR 5.4, P < 0.001) and sepsis (OR 3.2, P < 0.001). Thirty-three percent of deaths occurred in the first 24 h of admission, with four diagnoses associated with first-24-h mortality after adjusting for demographic covariates: coma (OR 7.0, P < 0.001), meningitis (OR 3.2, P = 0.008), congestive heart failure (OR 3.1, P = 0.008) and aspiration pneumonia (OR 12.1, P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates a mortality pattern at our hospital that differs considerably from Ethiopia as a whole, and may differ from other hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa. Hospitals must look beyond national and regional agenda when identifying mortality reduction targets. PMID:23644695

Gordon, David M; Frenning, Sarah; Draper, Heather R; Kokeb, Mehretie

2013-05-03

281

Mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in the north-west of Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Stigma is one of the obstacles in the treatment and regaining the mental health of people with mental illness. The aim was determination of mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards. This study was conducted in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in Tabriz, Urmia, and Ardabil in the north-west of Iran. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive analysis study in which 80 nurses participated. A researcher-made questionnaire was used, which measured demographic characteristics and mental illness stigma in the three components of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. All data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: Majority of nurses (72.5%) had medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness. About half of them (48.8%) had great inclination toward the social isolation of patients. The majority of them (62.5%) had positive emotional responses and 27.5% had stereotypical views. There was a significant correlation between experience of living with and kinship of nurses to person with mental illness, with prejudice toward and discrimination of patients. There was also a significant correlation between interest in the continuation of work in the psychiatric ward and prejudice, and also between educational degree and stereotypical views. Conclusions: The data suggest there is a close correlation between the personal experience of nurses and existence of mental illness stigma among them. Therefore, the implementation of constant educational programs on mental illness for nurses and opportunities for them to have direct contact with treated patients is suggested.

Ebrahimi, Hossein; Namdar, Hossein; Vahidi, Maryam

2012-01-01

282

Effect of communication skill training using group psychoeducation method on the stress level of psychiatry ward nurses  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Nursing is a dynamic and supportive job, with the main role of taking care of patients. Maintaining appropriate communication of the nurse with the patients is particularly known as the main core of care in mental health. However, in spite of the importance of providing communication, one of the main sources of stress in nurses of psychiatry wards is communication with the patients. Some important reasons for inappropriate relationship between the nurse and patient can be lack of necessary skills to communicate with patients because of insufficient training. Although training communication skills is an important part of the education of medical and paramedical students, in recent studies it has been demonstrated that the communication skills learned in theoretical courses would not necessarily be transferred to clinical settings, and proving training in clinical settings is a must. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of training communication skills using psychoeducation method on the stress level of nurses of psychiatry wards in 2010. METHODS: This is a quasi-experimental study. The participants were 45 nurses; 23 and 22 in the experiment and control groups, respectively, working in psychiatry wards of Noor and Farabi hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was carried out by the census method, and then the participants were randomly assigned to the two groups of experiment and control, using random number table. The two groups filled out the demographic data form and also the questionnaire on nurses occupational stress, designed by the researcher. The questionnaire was filled out three times; before, immediately after, and one month after the training. Training of communication skills was carried out using group psychoeducation method, in six sessions, each lasted for 1.5 hours. The training sessions of the experiment group were held in Farabi Hospital. RESULTS: The findings indicated that before the intervention, the members of the two groups had a high level of occupational stress. Immediately after the training, the stress level of the experiment group decreased significantly, and the decrease was sustained for the following one month. CONCLUSIONS: Training communicative skills using group psychoeducation method can decrease the occupational stress of psychiatry ward nurses.

Ghazavi, Zahra; Lohrasbi, Fatemeh; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

2010-01-01

283

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Two-particle renormalizations in many-fermion perturbation theory: the importance of the Ward identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse two-particle renormalizations within the many-fermion perturbation expansion. We show that present diagrammatic theories suffer from a lack of direct diagrammatic control over the physical two-particle functions. To rectify this, we introduce and prove a Ward identity enabling an explicit construction of the self-energy from a given two-particle irreducible vertex. Approximations constructed in this way are causal, obey conservation laws, and offer explicit diagrammatic control of singularities in dynamical two-particle functions.

Janis, V.

2003-06-01

284

Cost-effectiveness of ward-based pharmacy care in surgical patients: protocol of the SUREPILL (Surgery & Pharmacy In Liaison) study  

PubMed Central

Background Preventable adverse drug events (pADEs) are widely known to be a health care issue for hospitalized patients. Surgical patients are especially at risk, but prevention of pADEs in this population is not demonstrated before. Ward-based pharmacy interventions seem effective in reducing pADEs in medical patients. The cost-effectiveness of these preventive efforts still needs to be assessed in a comparative study of high methodological standard and also in the surgical population. For these aims the SUREPILL (Surgery & Pharmacy in Liaison) study is initiated. Methods/Design A multi-centre controlled trial, with randomisation at ward-level and preceding baseline assessments is designed. Patients admitted to the surgical study wards for elective surgery with an expected length of stay of more than 48 hours will be included. Patients admitted to the intervention ward, will receive ward-based pharmacy care from the clinical pharmacy team, i.e. pharmacy practitioners and hospital pharmacists. This ward-based pharmacy intervention includes medication reconciliation in consultation with the patient at admission, daily medication review with face-to-face contact with the ward doctor, and patient counselling at discharge. Patients admitted in the control ward, will receive standard pharmaceutical care. The primary clinical outcome measure is the number of pADEs per 100 elective admissions. These pADEs will be measured by systematic patient record evaluation using a trigger tool. Patient records positive for a trigger will be evaluated on causality, severity and preventability by an independent expert panel. In addition, an economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective with the costs per preventable ADE as the primary economic outcome. Other outcomes of this study are: severity of pADEs, number of patients with pADEs per total number of admissions, direct (non-)medical costs and indirect non-medical costs, extra costs per prevented ADE, number and type of pharmacy interventions, length of hospital stay, complications registered in a national complication registration system for surgery, number of readmissions within three months after initial admission (follow-up), quality of life and number of non-institutionalized days during follow-up. Discussion This study will assess the cost-effectiveness of ward-based pharmacy care on preventable adverse drug events in surgical patients from a societal perspective, using a comparative study design. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2258

2011-01-01

285

Evaluation of the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward against carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to demonstrate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward, a Unani herbal formulation. The Majoon-e-Dabeed-ul-ward (MD) at the doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg, p.o. was administered after carbon-tetrachloride (CCl(4); 1.5 ml/kg, i.p. once only) intoxication. Treatment with MD at three doses brought the levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, albumin and urea in dose dependent manner. Signification reduction was found in TBARS content and restored the level of reduced glutathione, adenosine triphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphatase in liver. Therapy of MD showed its protective effect on biochemical and histopathological observation at all the three doses in a dose dependent manner. The study conducted showed that MD possesses strong hepatoprotective activity as decrease the hexobarbitone sleep time and improvement in physiological parameter, excretory capacity (BSP retention time) was seen. DPPH and H(2)O(2) scavenging effects indicated its potent antioxidant activities. The results revealed that MD could afford significant dose-dependent protection against CCl(4) induced hepatocellular injury. PMID:21371873

Shakya, Arvind Kumar; Sharma, Neetu; Saxena, Monika; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Shukla, Sangeeta

2011-03-02

286

Ward-Takahashi identities at finite temperature and phase structure in (2+1)-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model  

SciTech Connect

Chiral Ward-Takahashi identities with composite fields are generalized to finite temperature and applied to investigate the chiral phase transition and phase structure in the (2+1)-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model. In terms of these identities, the mass spectra of fermions and bound states and the Goldberger-Treiman relation at finite temperature are obtained. The vertex correction between the fermion and bound states [sigma] is evaluated beyond the leading order in the 1/[ital N] expansion at zero and finite temperatures. With the aid of the gap equation derived from Ward-Takahashi identities, the phase structure is discussed at zero and finite temperatures. It turns out that (i) at zero temperature, the vertex correction is very small and its influence on the phase structure can be neglected and (ii) at nonzero temperature, the infrared divergence in the vertex correction will make the results of the chiral phase transition obtained at the leading order invalid in next to the leading order and the phase structure is in agreement with Coleman's theorem.

Shen, K. (CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) Institute of Particle Physics, Hua-Zhong Normal University, Wuhan 430070 (China) Institute of Modern Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)); Qiu, Z. (CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) Institute of Particle Physics, Hua-Zhong Normal University, Wuhan 430070 (China))

1993-08-15

287

Clinical predictive values of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase carriage in patients admitted to medical wards.  

PubMed

We aimed to reassess, through clinical items, populations at risk for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) carriage at admission to hospital and to assess the risk of further positive clinical culture of ESBL-E among carriers. We performed a 5-month cohort study in a medicine ward of a 500-bed university teaching hospital in the Parisian area of France. All admitted patients were prospectively enrolled for rectal swabbing and clinical data collection, including bacterial infection at admission and during stay. Variables associated with ESBL-E carriage were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. Five hundred patients were included. The prevalence of ESBL-E was 6.6% (33/500) upon admission. Only previous carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB) was associated with carriage (odds ratio [OR]: 17.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.8-54.2, p?wards was found to be poorly efficient for assessing the at-risk population. PMID:21660500

Rupp, E; Pitsch, A; Tubach, F; de Lastours, V; Chau, F; Pasquet, B; Lucet, J-C; Andremont, A; Fantin, B

2011-06-10

288

[Patient record based ward rounds as an example of coordination between doctors and nurses "courses of action"].  

PubMed

Working in the hospital field is characterized by collective work that requires collaboration and coordination. Characterizing the way, in which individual activities contribute to the construction of a collective activity, is an important issue to better understand teamwork. A phenomenological research approach was applied to analyze the situated activity of nurses and physicians during patient record based ward rounds, according to the theoretical and methodological frame of "course of action" Our findings revealed ward rounds comprising not only an information exchange but a privileged space and moment of construction of knowledge and coordination. Two processes were derived from the actors' commitments and concerns, and from their articulation: "seeking to contribute to a shared interpretation of the situation" and "seeking to develop a precise working knowledge of the situation". These processes contribute to characterize the coordination between the professionals involved in hospital care. Future educational activities for health care professionals should consider the importance of the perception of and meanings for the involved professionals and consider training actions to foster reflecting on and during action. PMID:23923739

Nadot Ghanem, Nicole

2013-06-01

289

[Alcohol related hospitalization in the Department of Clinical Toxicology and Medicine Detoxification Ward of the Krakow Special Hospital of J. Babinski in Krakow].  

PubMed

The patients hospitalised because of acute ethanol intoxication or ethanol withdrawal syndrome at the Krakw Department of Clinical Toxicology and Detoxification Ward of J. Babi?ski Specialistic Hospital in the years 1997-2000 were subjected to the study. A significant increase in number of ethanol related hospitalisation was noted at the Department of Clinical Toxicology (from 1381 patients in year 1997 up to 1771 in year 2000), and at the Detoxification Ward of Babi?ski Hospital from 369 in 1997 and 849 patients in 2000 respectively. A significant increase in number of ethanol dependent patients admitted to the Department of Clinical Toxicology because of acute ethanol intoxication and the patients hospitalised because of ethanol withdrawal syndrome or signs of delirium tremens was noted. The same and even stronger trends in hospitalisation, particularly of those ethanol addicts presenting clinical symptoms of acute ethanol intoxication were observed at the Detoxification Ward of Babi?ski Hospital. PMID:11450348

Pach, J; Kowal, A; Filipecka, E; Kroch, S

2001-01-01

290

How does the environment impact on the quality of life of advanced cancer patients? A qualitative study with implications for ward design.  

PubMed

It is well recognized that the ward environment has an effect on patients' quality of life and may, therefore, impact on the quality of end of life care. The body of evidence that informs ward design policy recommends single-bedded rooms on grounds of reduced infection risk, noise and versatility. Considering the majority of anticipated patient deaths occurring in hospitals, the quality of life aspects of ward design should also be considered. The aim of this study is to explore the views of patients with advanced cancer on the effect the ward environment has on their overall well-being. Semi-structured interviews exploring the experiences of 12 inpatients at a regional cancer centre were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed for emerging themes until theoretical saturation. Four major themes emerged: staff behaviours, the immediate environment, single vs. multi-bedded rooms and contact with the outside environment. The attitude, competence and helpfulness of the staff creates the atmosphere of the ward regardless of layout, furnishings, equipment and dcor. The majority of the patients in this study expressed a strong preference for a multi-bedded room when they were well enough to interact and a single cubicle when they were very ill or dying, which opposes the current advice for building new hospitals with all single rooms. Although the current policy recommends the use of single-bedded rooms, this study suggests the need for a mix of multi-bedded wards and single rooms with respect to the impact of the environment on patient quality of life. PMID:18715977

Rowlands, J; Noble, S

2008-09-01

291

[Hygienic and bacteriological comparative studies in 50 hospitals. IV. The bacterial contamination of fluids of intensiv care units, wards for premature children and new-born wards (author's transl)].  

PubMed

In intensive-care units and wards for prematures frequent use is made of medical apparatuses (such as oxygenators, nebulizers, respirators and incubators). These units are provided with a water reservoir which is utilized for the humidifications of the inspiratory air. They have become indispensable tools, especially in the treatment of seriously-ill patients. However, the water reservoirs of these devices have also frequently been found to harbour sometimes high concentrations of pathogens. With a view to clarifying the question as to the extent that liquids of different origin in the hospital area are contaminated with bacteria, 323 liquid samples were collected from intensive-care units, wards for premature and for newborn babies, and submitted for analysis. The senior nurse was questioned to obtain information about the measures of disinfection adopted in the respective wards. It was possible to cultivate pathogens from 22 per cent of the samples. P. aeruginosa accounted for 46 per cent, Enterobacter for 17.6% and E. coli for 12 per cent. A breakdown of the liquids by origin gives the following picture: 30 per cent of the liquids used for humidification of the inspiratory air (from respirators, inhalers etc.) were contaminated with pathogens. The analysis yielded a similar result in about 47 per cent of the cleaning water samples, in 10 per cent of the solutions in which clinical thermometers are kept and in 0 per cent of liquids from containers in which dressing forceps are kept. It emerged from inquiries that the lack of knowledge about the proper implementation of disinfection measures on the part of the nursing staff is still considerable. As a result, disinfectants of the quarternary ammonium compounds were used for the disinfection of medical apparatus in 37 per cent of all applications although their bactericidal action on gram-negative bacteria is limited. As regards the antimicrobial treatment of such parts as nebulizer chambers, connecting tubes, reservoirs of ultrasonic nebulizers, oxygen bottles and respiratory, parts with which the patient does not come into direct contact - the possibility of sterilizing them by autoclaving should be examined first. Not until this procedure has been ruled out on account of the thermolability of the materials used should another procedure such as keeping the materials in a disinfecting solution be adopted. PMID:823740

Dunkelberg, H; Pfeiffer, E H; Werner, H P; Wittig, J R

1976-03-01

292

The application of heat pipe heat exchangers to improve the air quality and reduce the energy consumption of the air conditioning system in a hospital wardA full year model simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to study the effect of heat pipe heat exchangers on the existing air conditioning system of a hospital ward located in Malaysia, a tropical region. The present research employs the transient system simulation software (TRNSYS) to study the hour-by-hour performance of the system in terms of supply duct air and indoor air conditions in the ward space.

M. Ahmadzadehtalatapeh; Y. H. Yau

2011-01-01

293

The effect of music on body-rocking manifested by severely mentally deficient patients in ward environments.  

PubMed

By controlling whether or not music was played in the wards, the effect of music on stereotyped body-rocking was assessed for twelve severely mentally deficient adults who engaged in this behaviour. There were significant differences between male and female patients. While music did not appear to affect rates, but increased the amounts, of body-rocking in both groups, the distribution of this increase was different. These results suggested that the effect of music was to increase the duration of body-rocking sequences. Once the music had been removed there was, for females, a persistence of the increased amount of body-rocking. It was hypothesised that there may be sexual dimorphism in the brain-hemisphere structures which organise rhythmic stimuli. PMID:745225

Tierney, I R; McGuire, R J; Walton, H J

1978-12-01

294

Documenting the NICU design dilemma: comparative patient progress in open-ward and single family room units  

PubMed Central

Objective: To test the efficacy of single family room (SFR) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) designs, questions regarding patient medical progress and relative patient safety were explored. Addressing these questions would be of value to hospital staff, administrators and designers alike. Study Design: This prospective study documented, by means of Institution Review Board-approved protocols, the progress of patients in two contrasting NICU designs. Noise levels, illumination and air quality measurements were included to define the two NICU physical environments. Result: Infants in the SFR unit had fewer apneic events, reduced nosocomial sepsis and mortality, as well as earlier transitions to enteral nutrition. More mothers sustained stage III lactation, and more infants were discharged breastfeeding in the SFR. Conclusion: This study showed the SFR to be more conducive to family-centered care, and to enhance infant medical progress and breastfeeding success over that of an open ward.

Domanico, R; Davis, D K; Coleman, F; Davis, B O

2011-01-01

295

Nurses' experience of using electronic patient records in everyday practice in acute/inpatient ward settings: A literature review.  

PubMed

Electronic patient record (EPR) systems have a huge impact on nursing documentation. Although the largest group of end-users of EPRs, nurses have had minimal input in their design. This study aimed to review current research on how nurses experience using the EPR for documentation. A literature search was conducted in Medline and Cinahl of original, peer-reviewed articles from 2000 to 2009, focusing on nurses in acute/ inpatient ward settings. After critical assessment, two quantitative and three qualitative articles were included in the study. Results showed that nurses experience widespread dissatisfaction with systems. Current systems are not designed to meet the needs of clinical practice as they are not user-friendly, resulting in a potentially negative impact on individualized care and patient safety. There is an urgent need for nurses to be directly involved in software design to ensure that the essence and complexity of nursing is not lost in the system. PMID:20413414

Stevenson, Jean E; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Gran I; Johansson, Pauline E

2010-03-01

296

Documenting the NICU design dilemma: parent and staff perceptions of open ward versus single family room units  

PubMed Central

Objective: With neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) evolving from multipatient wards toward family-friendly, single-family room units, the study objective was to compare satisfaction levels of families and health-care staff across these differing NICU facility designs. Study Design: This prospective study documented, by means of institutional review board-approved questionnaire survey protocols, the perceptions of parents and staff from two contrasting NICU environments. Result: Findings showed that demographic subgroups of parents and staff perceived the advantages and disadvantages of the two facility designs differently. Staff perceptions varied with previous experience, acclimation time and employment position, whereas parental perceptions revealed a naivet bias through surveys of transitional parents with experience in both NICU facilities. Conclusion: Use of transitional parent surveys showed a subject naivet bias inherent in perceptions of inexperienced parents. Grouping all survey participants demographically provided more informative interpretations of data, and revealed staff perceptions to vary with position, previous training and hospital experience.

Domanico, R; Davis, D K; Coleman, F; Davis, B O

2010-01-01

297

Effect of end-of-life care education on the attitudes of nurses in infants' and children's wards  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Infants palliative care becomes an important aspect of nursing when providing welfare and promoting children's life quality are the objectives of care. The number of children with life threatening diseases has increased alongside the developments in technology and medical treatment in medicine. It is a pure fact that our attitudes are related to our behaviors and performances. This research was conducted with the aim of assessing the effect of intensive course of children's palliative care on the attitudes of children and infants nurses in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental, two-group and two-stage study in which 56 nurses working at Infants and children's wards who met inclusion criteria were divided into experiment and control groups. The participants of experiment group attended in the infants palliative care training course which lasted for 3 weeks. A reliable and already validated questionnaire of Infants and Children Wards Nurses Attitudes Regarding the Dying Children was used before and after training. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding demographic characteristics, except for marital status which was found the study findings were not confounded by it. There was a significant difference between mean test and re-test scores in the experiment group and also between the mean scores of control and experiment groups after training. There was no significant difference between mean scores before and after training in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: End-of-life children care is one of the issues in modern medicine which has not gained a definite status in Iran. It is hoped that nurses would be the forerunners of this modern science in Iran.

Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Bagheri, Sayed Hamid Sayed; Kalantari, Mehrdad; Talakoob, Sadigheh; Samooai, Farangis

2011-01-01

298

The Association between Pain and Depression, Anxiety, and Cognitive Function among Advanced Cancer Patients in the Hospice Ward  

PubMed Central

Background Pain is the most common but severe physical symptom among cancer patients. This study aimed to identify correlation between pain and psychological symptoms for terminal cancer patients. Methods The total sample consisted of 69 subjects who were recruited through two hospice wards, limited to patients who were mentally alert and had no psychiatric diseases. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the numerical rating scale: the pain-free group, 0 to 3 points; and the pain group, 4 to 10 points. We used the Beck depression inventory (BDI), Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), mini-mental status examination-Korea (MMSE-K), and short form 36 health survey (SF-36). Logistic regression analysis was performed to verify the correlation between pain and other psychosocial disorders. Results The mean scores of BDI in the pain-free and pain groups were 25.7 and 31.5; mean BAI scores were 23.4 and 34.7; mean MMSE-K scores were 25.7 and 21.8, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in SF-36 score except scores of body pain. The results of logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, types of cancer, history of chemotherapy, or radiotherapy showed significant correlation between pain and depression (BDI ? 24; odds ratio [OR], 4.199; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.171 to 15.060), and pain and cognitive impairment (MMSE < 24; OR, 5.495; 95% CI, 1.449 to 20.843); but not between pain and anxiety (BAI ? 22; OR, 3.011; 95% CI, 0.907 to 9.997). Conclusion Pain significantly affects depression and cognitive impairment among advanced cancer patients in the hospice ward. Accordingly, more aggressive treatment of pain is required to reduce not only physical suffering but also physiological distress.

Ko, Hae Jin; Seo, Se Jung; Kim, Hyo Min; Chung, Seung Eun

2013-01-01

299

[Comment on ``Labor pains at subduction's birth'' by William Ward Maggs, and ``Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989'' by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom] Earthquake update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the two notes in Eos on the recent great earthquake on the Macquarie Ridge (``Labor Pains at Subduction's Birth,'' by William Ward Maggs, June 13, p. 650, and ``Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989,'' by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom, July 11, p. 700), we would like to put the record straight on minor comments in the articles.Tsunami: Indeed,

Kevin McCue

1990-01-01

300

Decision support system and the adoption of lean in a Swedish emergency ward : Balancing supply and demand towards improved value stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose Facilitated by a decision support system tool, the purpose of this paper is to find the best allocated number of surgeons and medicine doctors that reduce patients' non-value-added time (NVAT) and total time in the system (TTS). Design\\/methodology\\/approach Interview and observation are first conducted in order to get general insights about (and to understand) the emergency ward

Djoko Setijono; Ashkan Mohajeri Naraghi; Uday Pavan Ravipati

2010-01-01

301

Noninvasive vs. conventional mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after failure of medical treatment in the ward: a randomized trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. We conducted a randomized prospective study comparing noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) with conventional mechanical ventilation via endotracheal intubation (ETI) in a group of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who failed standard medical treatment in the emergency ward after initial improvement and met predetermined criteria for ventilatory support. Design and setting. Prospective randomized study in a university hospital

G. Conti; M. Antonelli; P. Navalesi; M. Rocco; M. Bufi; G. Spadetta; G. Meduri

2002-01-01

302

A comparison of management and short-term outcomes of acute myocardial infarction patients admitted to coronary care units and medical wards: the importance of case mix  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Variation in case mix of patients can significantly influence outcome. In this study, the management and outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction who were admitted either to coronary care units or to internal medicine wards were examined. Methods: A nationwide prospective study was performed during a 2-month period in all 26 coronary care units and in 82 of

Avi Porath; Jonathan E Arbelle; Ehud Grossman; Harel Gilutz; Eytan Cohen; Sheldon Greenfield; Moshe Garty

2002-01-01

303

The age of war orphans: Construction and realities of a group of state wards between education and assistance (19171935)  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the beginning of the twentieth century there was a great diversity in the definition of legal age in France. The age of entrance into institutions for orphans, for example, varied greatly throughout the country. In 1917 a special status was introduced specifically for French war orphans that was unique in Europethat of state ward. Having that status, a child

Olivier Faron

1999-01-01

304

Resisting the overplot: Intertextual interventions and generic interplays in the writings of Margaret Fuller, Elizabeth Stoddard, Lydia Maria Child, and Julia Ward Howe  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project examines Margaret Fuller's Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Elizabeth Stoddard's The Morgesons and Two Men, Lydia Maria Child's Philothea, and Julia Ward Howe's The Hermaphrodite. These texts that have troubled critical paradigms because they do not adhere to mainstream nineteenth-century models of women's writing that celebrate the trials and rewards resulting from a heroine's relegation to the domestic

Nicole C Livengood

2007-01-01

305

The effect of information provision on reduction of errors in intravenous drug preparation and administration by nurses in ICU and surgical wards.  

PubMed

Malpractice in preparation and administration of intravenous (IV) medications has been reported frequently. Inadequate knowledge of nurses has been reported as a cause of such errors. We aimed to evaluate the role of nurses' education via installation of wall posters and giving informative pamphlets in reducing the errors in preparation and administration of intravenous drugs in 2 wards (ICU and surgery) of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. A trained observer stationed in 2 wards in different work shifts. He recorded the nurses' practice regarding the preparation and administration of IV drugs and scored them before and after the education process. 400 observations were evaluated. Of them, 200 were related to before education and 200 were related to after education. On a 0-10 quality scale, mean SD scores of before and after education were determined. Mean SD scores of before and after education at the 2 wards were 4.51 ( 1.24) and 6.15 ( 1.23) respectively. There was a significant difference between the scores before and after intervention in ICU (P<0.001), surgery (P<0.001), and total two wards (P<0.001). Nurses' education by using wall poster and informative pamphlets regarding the correct preparation and administration of IV drugs can reduce the number of errors. PMID:23292630

Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Zareh-Toranposhti, Samaneh; Hassani, Abdollah; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Azizian, Homa; Panahi, Yunes

2012-11-01

306

The use of physical restraints as a safety measure in the care of older people in four rehabilitation wards: findings from an exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the prevalence and type of physical restraint used with older persons on four rehabilitation wards in Northern Ireland. A longitudinal observational approach was used. One hundred and two patients were observed on four occasions over a three-day period. Most of the patients (68%) were subjected to some form of physical restraint, side-rails being the most commonly observed method.

Ris??n Gallinagh; Rosemary Nevin; David Mc Ilroy; Fionnuala Mitchell; Linda Campbell; Ruth Ludwick; Hugh McKenna

2002-01-01

307

Ventilation grilles as a potential source of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing an outbreak in an orthopaedic ward at a district general hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a hospital is thought to be mainly by direct contact. Environmental sources such as exhaust ducting systems have been increasingly recognized as a source for MRSA outbreaks in intensive therapy units. We describe an outbreak of MRSA related to ventilation grilles in an orthopaedic ward. Six patients and one nurse were involved

D. N. P. Kumari; T. C. Haji; V. Keer; P. M. Hawkey; V. Duncanson; E. Flower

1998-01-01

308

P1-18 Nutritional status of the cardiac patients hospitalized in cardiology ward of Alzahra Hospital and its comparison with Healthy Eating Index  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular diseases are getting epidemic due to social reconstruction, technology advancement and over population in urban areas, inappropriate food habits and immobility. This study has tried to define the indexes of healthy nutrition in cardiac patients hospitalized in cardiac ward of Alzahr a hospital and to compare it with Healthy Eating Index (HEI). Healthy Eating Index has been also designed

N. Bahreini; M. Entezari; A. Hassansadeh; M. Ganjalideshti; M. Jalali

2007-01-01

309

Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nococomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate

J. Devine; R. P. D. Cooke; E. P. Wright

2001-01-01

310

Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward  

PubMed Central

Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ? 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (? 85 years), chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and severe cognitive impairment adversely affects the outcome of elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward.

2011-01-01

311

Sharp Arc-ward Grain Size Increase in the Forearc Mantle Wedge and Its Implications for Subduction Zone Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate the grain size distribution in the mantle wedge, we couple a 2-D steady-state finite-element thermal and mantle flow model and the grain size evolution model of Austin and Evans [Geology, 2007] following the parameterization of Behn et al. [EPSL, 2009] for wet olivine. For the mantle wedge, we use a composite wet olivine rheology that incorporates grain-size-dependent diffusion creep and grain-size-independent dislocation creep. The deformation mechanism with the faster strain rate dominates the mantle deformation. Both the thermal and deformation conditions in the wedge depend strongly on viscous coupling between the slab and the mantle. In our model, we use the slab-mantle stress-coupling approach of Wada et al. [JGR, 2008] and set a rheologically controlled decoupling-coupling transition at a depth of 70-80 km to be consistent with geological and geophysical observations. Because the grain size evolution model does not account for brittle deformation, we model only regions >600C. We find that compared to the rate of advection, grain size rapidly achieves its steady-state value, allowing us to approximate the grain size in the mantle wedge based solely on its steady-state value. Our modeling results show that the steady-state grain size increases arc-ward from ~100 ?m at the most seaward part of the creeping region to ~1 cm in the sub-arc mantle regardless of subduction parameters such as slab age, subduction rate, and slab dip. This is because the flow and thermal fields in the creeping region are relatively uniform owing to the common decoupling-coupling transition depth. Despite the large variation in grain size within the creeping region, its effect on the mantle rheology and flow is very small, as >90% of the deformation in the flowing part of the creeping region is accommodated by grain-size independent dislocation creep. The arc-ward increase in grain size by ~2 orders of magnitude over a relatively short distance in the forearc wedge results in a sharp increase in permeability by ~4 orders of magnitude, promoting greater upward migration of fluid and melt in the sub-arc mantle than in the forearc. This may explain the seismological observations and the location of arc volcanoes, which indicate focusing of fluid and/or melt above the location at which the slab reaches ~100-km depth.

Wada, I.; Behn, M. D.; He, J.

2010-12-01

312

The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

1993-06-01

313

Antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a ward-specific random effect model in a low antibiotic consumption environment.  

PubMed

Association between previous antibiotic use and emergence of antibiotic resistance has been reported for several microorganisms. The relationship has been extensively studied, and although the causes of antibiotic resistance are multi-factorial, clear evidence of antibiotic use as a major risk factor exists. Most studies are carried out in countries with high consumption of antibiotics and corresponding high levels of antibiotic resistance, and currently, little is known whether and at what level the associations are detectable in a low antibiotic consumption environment. We conduct an ecological, retrospective study aimed at determining the impact of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in three hospitals in Norway, a country with low levels of antibiotic use. We construct a sophisticated statistical model to capture such low signals. To reduce noise, we conduct our study at hospital ward level. We propose a random effect Poisson or binomial regression model, with a reparametrisation that allows us to reduce the number of parameters. Inference is likelihood based. Through scenario simulation, we study the potential effects of reduced or increased antibiotic use. Results clearly indicate that the effects of consumption on resistance are present under conditions with relatively low use of antibiotic agents. This strengthens the recommendation on prudent use of antibiotics, even when consumption is relatively low. PMID:23027651

Aldrin, Magne; Raastad, Ragnhild; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Berild, Dag; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Leegaard, Truls; Monnet, Dominique L; Walberg, Mette; Mller, Fredrik

2012-10-01

314

The use of typing methods and infection prevention measures to control a bullous impetigo outbreak on a neonatal ward  

PubMed Central

Background We describe an outbreak of Bullous Impetigo (BI), caused by a (methicillin susceptible, fusidic acid resistant) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strain, spa-type t408, at the neonatal and gynaecology ward of the Jeroen Bosch hospital in the Netherlands, from March-November 2011. Methods We performed an outbreak investigation with revision of the hygienic protocols, MSSA colonization surveillance and environmental sampling for MSSA including detailed typing of SA isolates. Spa typing was performed to discriminate between the SA isolates. In addition, Raman-typing was performed on all t408 isolates. Results Nineteen cases of BI were confirmed by SA positive cultures. A cluster of nine neonates and three health care workers (HCW) with SA t408 was detected. These strains were MecA-, PVL-, Exfoliative Toxin (ET)A-, ETB+, ETAD-, fusidic acid-resistant and methicillin susceptible. Eight out of nine neonates and two out of three HCW t408 strains yielded a similar Raman type. Positive t408 HCW were treated and infection control procedures were reinforced. These measures stopped the outbreak. Conclusions We conclude that treatment of patients and HCW carrying a predominant SA t408, and re-implementing and emphasising hygienic measures were effective to control the outbreak of SA t408 among neonates.

2012-01-01

315

Health care failure mode and effect analysis: a useful proactive risk analysis in a pediatric oncology ward  

PubMed Central

Background Pediatric inpatient settings are known for their high medication error rate. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Health Care Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) is a valid proactive method to evaluate circumscribed health care processes like prescription up to and including administration of chemotherapy (vincristine) in the pediatric oncology inpatient setting. Methods A multidisciplinary team consisting of a team leader, pharmacy, nursing and medical staff and a patient's parent was assembled in a pediatric oncology ward with a computerized physician order entry system. A flow diagram of the process was made and potential failure modes were identified and evaluated using a hazard scoring matrix. Using a decision tree, it was determined for which failure mode recommendations had to be made. Results The process was divided into three main parts: prescription, processing by the pharmacy, and administration. Fourteen out of 61 failure modes were classified as high risk, 10 of which were sufficiently covered by current protocols. For the other four failure modes, five recommendations were made. Four additional recommendations were made concerning non?high risk failure modes. Most of them were implemented by the hospital management. The whole process took seven meetings and a total of 140?man?hours. Conclusions The systematic approach of HFMEA by a multidisciplinary team is a useful method for detecting failure modes. A patient or a parent of a patient contributes to the multidisciplinarity of the team.

van Tilburg, C M; Leistikow, I P; Rademaker, C M A; Bierings, M B; van Dijk, A T H

2006-01-01

316

Immediate Postoperative Care in the General Thoracic Ward Is Safe for Low-risk Patients after Lobectomy for Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Following major lung resection, patients have routinely been monitored in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recently, however, patients are increasingly being placed in a general thoracic ward (GTW). We investigated the safety and efficacy of the GTW care after lobectomy for lung cancer. Materials and Methods 316 patients who had undergone lobectomy for lung cancer were reviewed. These patients were divided into two groups: 275 patients were cared for in the ICU while 41 patients were care for in the GTW immediately post-operation. After propensity score matching, postoperative complications and hospital costs were analyzed. Risk factors for early complications were analyzed with the whole cohort. Results Early complications (until the end of the first postoperative day) occurred in 11 (3.5%) patients. Late complications occurred in 42 patients (13.3%). After propensity score matching, the incidence of early complications, late complications, and mortality were not different between the two groups. The mean expense was higher in the ICU group. Risk factors for early complications were cardiac comorbidities and low expected forced expiratory volume in one second. The location of postoperative care had no influence on outcome. Conclusion Immediate postoperative care after lobectomy for lung cancer in a GTW was safe and cost-effective without compromising outcomes in low-risk patients.

Park, Seong Yong; Hwang, Yoohwa; Byun, Chun Sung; Bae, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Chang-Young

2011-01-01

317

The association of drug use and post-traumatic stress reactions due to Hurricane Ike among Fifth Ward Houstonian youth.  

PubMed

This study shows the important link between higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. The study offers secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected on 170 predominately African American males through the Fifth Ward Enrichment program (FWEP) in Houston, Texas, between November and December 2009. Men who stated that in the last week they tried to keep from thinking or talking about the hurricane or things that remind them of what happen were significantly more likely to use alcohol (p < .05), marijuana (p < .01), codeine cough syrup (p < .00), anti-energy drinks (p < .00), crystal methamphetamines (p < .00), and Viagra (p < .00). Unadjusted logistic regression showed that they also experienced over twice the odds of reporting past 30 day use of alcohol (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = .98, 6.8), marijuana (OR = 4.31, 95% CI = 1.2, 15.3), codeine cough syrup (OR = 5.22, 95% CI = 1.4, 19.5), and anti-energy drinks (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.4). Adjusted logistic regression revealed that male youth post-traumatic stress reaction is a significant predictor of marijuana use (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.0, 16.5). This study shows the important link of higher drug use and self-medication among youth with higher reported posttraumatic stress reactions after natural disasters. PMID:20509087

Peters, Ronald J; Meshack, Angela; Amos, Charles; Scott-Gurnell, Kathy; Savage, Charles; Ford, Kentya

2010-01-01

318

Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nosocomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?  

PubMed

A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate of MRSA transmission compared to hospital B (1.02 vs. 0.49 new inpatient MRSA cases per 100 hospital admissions for 1999). MRSA containment and handwashing policies were similar at both hospitals, though only hospital B actively audited handwashing compliance and had a 44% higher rate of paper towel usage per hospital bed. Ward-based computer terminals pose a low risk of MRSA cross-infection. This risk can be further reduced if all staff wash their hands before and after patient contact. PMID:11358473

Devine, J; Cooke, R P; Wright, E P

2001-05-01

319

Determinants of Length of Stay in Surgical Ward after Coronary Bypass Surgery: Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor in All Patients, Diabetic or Non-Diabetic  

PubMed Central

Background: Reports on the determinants of morbidity in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) have focused on outcome measures such as length of postoperative stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We proposed that major comorbidities in the ICU hampered the prognostic effect of other weaker but important preventable risk factors with effect on patients length of hospitalization. So we aimed at evaluating postoperative length of stay in the ICU and surgical ward separately. Methods: We studied isolated CABG candidates who were not dialysis dependent. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative variables as well as all classic risk factors of coronary artery disease were recorded. Using multivariate analysis, we determined the independent predictors of length of stay in the ICU and in the surgical ward. Results: Independent predictors of extended length of stay in the surgical ward ( > 3 days) were a history of peripheral vascular disease, total administered insulin during a 24-hour period after surgery, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), last fasting blood sugar of the patients before surgery, and inotropic usage after cardiopulmonary bypass. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC) was found to be 0.71 and Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) goodness of fit statistic p value was 0.88. Independent predictors of extended length of stay in the ICU ( > 48 hours) were surgeon category, New York Heart Association functional class, intra-aortic balloon pump, postoperative arrhythmias, total administered insulin during a 24-hour period after surgery, and mean base excess of the first 6 postoperative hours (AUC = 0.70, HL p value = 0.94). Conclusion: This study revealed that the indices of glycemic control were the most important predictors of length of stay in the ward after cardiac surgery in all patients, diabetic or non-diabetic. However, because HbA1c level did not change under the influence of perioperative events, it could be deemed a valuable measure in predicting outcome in CABG candidates.

Najafi, Mahdi; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza

2012-01-01

320

Treatable factors associated with severe anaemia in adults admitted to medical wards in Blantyre, Malawi, an area of high HIV seroprevalence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe anaemia is a common presentation in non-pregnant adults admitted to hospital in southern Africa. Standard syndromic treatment based on data from the pre-HIV era is for iron deficiency, worms and malaria. We prospectively investigated 105 adults admitted consecutively to medical wards with haemoglobin < 7 g\\/dl. Those with acute blood loss were excluded. Patients were investigated for possible parasitic,

David K. Lewis; Christopher J. M. Whitty; Amanda L. Walsh; Henry Epino; Nynke R. van den Broek; Elizabeth A. Letsky; Clyton Munthali; Joshua M. Mukiibi; Martin J. Boeree

2005-01-01

321

Syncope in the emergency department of a large northern Italian hospital: incidence, efficacy of a short-stay observation ward and validation of the OESIL risk score  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveSyncope causes 13% of all emergency department (ED) visits, a high percentage of hospitalisations and prolonged hospital stay; nevertheless, many cases remain unexplained.MethodsThis study analysed the incidence of syncope at the ED of the University Hospital of Parma in the first half of 2008; then a sample of 200 patients admitted later for syncope into the ED ward was studied,

Filippo Numeroso; Gianluigi Mossini; Eleonora Spaggiari; Gianfranco Cervellin

2010-01-01

322

Mortality and cost outcomes of elderly trauma patients admitted to intensive care and the general wards of an Australian tertiary referral hospital.  

PubMed

Mortality and cost outcomes of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) trauma patients were characterised in a retrospective cohort study from an Australian tertiary ICU Trauma patients admitted between January 2000 and December 2005 were grouped into three major age categories: aged > or =65 years admitted into ICU (n = 272); aged -65 years admitted into general ward (n = 610) and aged < 65 years admitted into ICU (n = 1617). Hospital mortality predictors were characterised as odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. The impact of predictor variables on (log) total hospital-stay costs was determined using least squares regression. An alternate treatment-effects regression model estimated the mortality cost-effect as an endogenous variable. Mortality predictors (P < or = 0.0001, comparator: ICU > or = 65 years, ventilated) were: ICU < 65 not-ventilated (OR 0.014); ICU < 65 ventilated (OR 0.090); ICU age > or = 65 not-ventilated (OR 0.061) and ward > or = 65 (OR 0.086); increasing injury severity score and increased Charlson comorbidity index of 1 and 2, compared with zero (OR 2.21 [1.40 to 3.48] and OR 2.57 [1.45 to 4.55]). The raw mean daily ICU and hospital costs in A$ 2005 (US$) for age < 65 and > or = 65 to ICU, and > or = 65 to the ward were; for year 2000: ICU, $2717 (1462) and $2777 (1494); hospital, $1837 (988) and $1590 (855); ward $933 (502); for year 2005: ICU, $3202 (2393) and $3086 (2307); hospital, $1938 (1449) and $1914 (1431); ward $1180 (882). Cost increments were predicted by age < or = 65 and ICU admission, increasing injury severity score, mechanical ventilation, Charlson comorbidity index increments and hospital survival. Mortality cost-effect was estimated at -63% by least squares regression and -82% by treatment-effects regression model. Patient demographic factors, injury severity and its consequences predict both cost and survival in trauma. The cost mortality effect was biased upwards by conventional least squares regression estimation. PMID:19775042

Chan, L Y L; Moran, J L; Clarke, C; Martin, J; Solomon, P J

2009-09-01

323

Wards in good cheer.  

PubMed

Over the past year a West Midlands trust has introduced activities to improve the experience of patients in a co-ordinated and sustainable way. The initiative is spreading to other settings across the country. PMID:23061125

Handley, Alison

324

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).  

PubMed

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccol, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-02-25

325

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients)  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 7 years, range 65101). Falls were defined accidental (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), medical (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), dementia-related (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and unexplained (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolo, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

326

'It makes me want to run away to Saudi Arabia': management and implementation challenges for public financing reforms from a maternity ward perspective.  

PubMed

Poor practice by health care workers has been identified as contributing to high levels of maternal mortality in South Africa. The country is undergoing substantial structural and financial reforms, yet the impact of these on health care workers performance and practice has not been studied. This study, which consisted of an ethnography of two labour wards (one rural and one urban), aimed to look at the factors that shaped everyday practice of midwives working in district hospitals in South Africa during the implementation of a public sector reform to improve financial management. The study found that the Public Financing Management Act, that aimed to improve the efficiency and accountability of public finance management, had the unintended consequence of causing the quality of maternal health services to deteriorate in the hospital wards studied. The article supports the need for increased dialogue between those working in the sexual and reproductive health and health systems policy arenas, and the importance of giving a voice to front-line health workers who implement systems changes. However, it cautions that there are no simple answers to how health systems should be organized in order to better provide sexual and reproductive health services, and suggests instead that more attention in the debate needs to be paid to the challenges of policy implementation and the socio-political context and process issues which affect the success or failure of the implementation. PMID:15452017

Penn-Kekana, Loveday; Blaauw, Duane; Schneider, Helen

2004-10-01

327

Limits of patient isolation measures to control extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: model-based analysis of clinical data in a pediatric ward  

PubMed Central

Background Extended-spectrum beta-lactamaseproducing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are a growing concern in hospitals and the community. How to control the nosocomial ESBL-E transmission is a matter of debate. Contact isolation of patients has been recommended but evidence supporting it in non-outbreak settings has been inconclusive. Methods We used stochastic transmission models to analyze retrospective observational data from a two-phase intervention in a pediatric ward, successively implementing single-room isolation and patient cohorting in an isolation ward, combined with active ESBL-E screening. Results For both periods, model estimates suggested reduced transmission from isolated/cohorted patients. However, most of the incidence originated from sporadic sources (i.e. independent of cross-transmission), unaffected by the isolation measures. When sporadic sources are high, our model predicted that even substantial efforts to prevent transmission from carriers would have limited impact on ESBL-E rates. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that, considering the importance of sporadic acquisition, e.g. endogenous selection of resistant strains following antibiotic treatment, contact-isolation measures alone might not suffice to control ESBL-E. They also support the view that estimating cross-transmission extent is key to predicting the relative success of contact-isolation measures. Mathematical models could prove useful for those estimations and guide decisions concerning the most effective control strategy.

2013-01-01

328

Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.  

PubMed

In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment. PMID:23609387

Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjrn; Mrland, Jrg; Bramness, Jrgen G

2013-06-01

329

["Cold turkey" detoxification of drug, narcotic and chemical addicts conducted at the Occupational Diseases and Toxicology Ward of the Polish Center of Occupational Medicine in Poznan in 1986-1996].  

PubMed

In this paper we have discussed the method of the "pure" detoxification (without the use of any psychotropics) of patients addicted to drugs, narcotics and chemicals treated at the Occupational Diseases & Toxicology Ward of the WCMP in Pozna?. The material includes 152 cases of addicted patients who were treated in the Ward in the period from 1986 till 1996. Our research proved that the applied method is safe for the patients. We also found that addicts sharing hospital room with general medicine, not addicted patients, experience a positive effects in the process of treatment and resocialization. PMID:9333907

Ma?kowski, W; Sikorski, M

1997-01-01

330

Six-year prospective audit of 'scoop and run' for chest-reopening after cardiac arrest in a cardiac surgical ward setting  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES The aim of the study was to identify which cardiac surgical ward patients benefit from scoop and run to the operating room for chest reopening. METHODS In-hospital arrests in a cardiothoracic hospital were prospectively audited over a 6-year period. The following pieces of information were collected for every patient who was scooped to the operating room following cardiac arrest on the postoperative cardiac surgical wards: type of arrest, time since surgery, patient physiology before arrest, time to chest reopening, location of chest opening, surgical findings on reopening, time to cardiopulmonary bypass (if used) and patient outcomes. Exclusions: arrests in intensive care unit (ICU) and operating rooms. The primary outcome measure was survival to discharge from the hospital. RESULTS There were 99 confirmed ward arrests in 97 cardiac surgical patients. The overall survival rates to discharge and at 1 year were 53.6% (52 of 97 patients) and 44.3% (43 of 97 patients), respectively. Twenty-one of the 97 (21.6%) patients underwent scoop and run to the operating room or ICU. Five of 12 daytime scoop and runs survived to discharge, whereas none of nine survived where scoop and run was undertaken at night (P<0.05). There was a trend towards increased survival when scoop and run was undertaken following ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia arrests (P=0.06) and in younger patients (P=0.12) but neither achieved statistical significance. The median time out from surgery of survivors was 4 days (range 214 days). The median time to chest opening in survivors was 22min. Cardiopulmonary bypass was utilized in four of five survivors. The median ICU and hospital lengths of stay were 176h (range 34857) and 28 days (range 1370), respectively. CONCLUSIONS The key determinant of a favourable scoop and run outcome was whether the arrest occurred during daytime or night-time hours (P<0.05). Despite a median time to chest opening of 22min, all five survivors were discharged neurologically intact. The median time from surgery in these survivors was 4 days. Because of the risk of hypoxic brain damage, scoop and run should be restricted to patients suffering witnessed arrests. The study has potential implications for resuscitation training and out-of-hours medical staffing in cardiothoracic hospitals.

Lees, Nicholas J.; Powell, Sarah J.; Mackay, Jonathan H.

2012-01-01

331

Neuroscience nurses caring for family members of patients with acquired brain injury in acute ward settings: nursing defensively in a double bind.  

PubMed

This article presents the findings from a doctoral research study that led to the development of an inductively derived substantive theory, "Nursing Defensively". This theory describes the process of coping used by staff nurses when caring for family members of acquired brain injury (ABI) patients. This study was conducted in two acute care teaching and one non-teaching neuroscience wards in Toronto, Canada, using grounded theory method. A total of 20 registered nurses participated in the study. Supporting data are presented to permit the reader to "hear" the voices of the nurses caring for families of ABI patients in today's clinical environments. In addition, the author's interpretation of the significance of the findings for nursing is offered for the reader's reflection for applicability to relevant clinical environments and a call for clinical leadership in practice, education and research. PMID:19146205

Yetman, Linda

2008-01-01

332

[Comment on Labor pains at subduction's birth by William Ward Maggs, and Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989 by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom] Earthquake update  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the two notes in Eos on the recent great earthquake on the Macquarie Ridge (Labor Pains at Subduction's Birth, by William Ward Maggs, June 13, p. 650, and Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989, by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom, July 11, p. 700), we would like to put the record straight on minor comments in the articles.Tsunami: Indeed, a tsunami was generated and recorded on at least four tide gages along the coast of southeastern Australia, southeast Tasmania and southeastern New South Wales. The peak-to-trough amplitude was very small, 0.3 m, barely above the normal harbor seiche at each ot the tide gage sites. The duration of the wave train in Sydney harbor was seven hours.

McCue, Kevin

333

Does a post-take ward round proforma have a positive effect on completeness of documentation and efficiency of information management?  

PubMed

The post-take ward round (PTWR) involves the assessment of the latest intake of patients into the hospital. At a busy 400-bed city hospital it had been noted that PTWR notes had, in some cases, become overly brief and uninformative. Previous research had shown that proformas can improve the completeness of the records. So a new proforma was designed and introduced. Its impact on completeness of information was assessed by carrying out an audit of PTWR notes both with and without the proforma. The results showed statistically significant improvements in documentation when the proforma was used. They also showed an improvement in areas of efficiency of record management: for example, the proforma reduced the time taken to retrieve information from the notes, and most users said it saved them time recording in the notes and assimilating information and helped them to speed up patient transfers. PMID:19474222

Wright, Daniel N

2009-06-01

334

Transmission of endemic ST22-MRSA-IV on four acute hospital wards investigated using a combination of spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing.  

PubMed

The transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between individual patients is difficult to track in institutions where MRSA is endemic. We investigated the transmission of MRSA where ST22-MRSA-IV is endemic on four wards using demographic data, patient and environmental screening, and molecular typing of isolates. A total of 939 patients were screened, 636 within 72h of admission (on admission) and 303 >72h after admission, and 1,252 environmental samples were obtained. Isolates were typed by spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. A composite dendrogram generated from the three sets of typing data was used to divide isolates into 'dendrogram groups' (DGs). Ten percent of patients (92/939) were MRSA-positive; 7% (44/636) on admission and 16% (48/303) >72h after admission (p?=?0.0007). MRSA was recovered from 5% of environmental specimens (65/1,252). Most isolates from patients (97%, 85/88) and the environment (97%, 63/65) exhibited the ST22-MRSA-IV genotype. Four DGs (DG1, DG4, DG16 and DG17) accounted for 58% of ST22-MRSA-IV isolates from patients. Epidemiological evidence suggested cross-transmission among 44/92 patients (48%) but molecular typing confirmed probable cross-transmission in only 11 instances (13%, 11/88), with the majority of cross-transmission (64%; 7/11) occurring on one ward. In the setting of highly clonal endemic MRSA, the combination of local epidemiology, PFGE, spa and dru typing provided valuable insights into MRSA transmission. PMID:22814876

Creamer, E; Shore, A C; Rossney, A S; Dolan, A; Sherlock, O; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Sullivan, D J; Kinnevey, P M; O'Lorcain, P; Cunney, R; Coleman, D C; Humphreys, H

2012-07-21

335

Fatores relacionados com a ocorrncia de iatrogenia em idosos internados em enfermaria geritrica: estudo prospectivo Factors related to the occurrence of iatrogenesis in elderly patients hospitalized in a geriatric ward: a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

objective: The proliferation of drugs, therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in the modern medical practice leads to an increased incidence of iatrogenesis especially among the elderly population. The objective of this study was to determine the major factors related to the occurrence of iatrogenesis in elderly patients hospitalized in a geriatric ward. Methods: This is a prospective study including elderly patients

Claudia Szlejf; Jos Marcelo Farfel; Lus Alberto Saporetti; Wilson Jacob-Filho; Jos Antonio Curiati

336

Factors related to the occurrence of iatrogenesis in elderly patients hospitalized in a geriatric ward: a prospective study Fatores relacionados com a ocorrncia de iatrogenia em idosos internados em enfermaria geritrica: estudo prospectivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The proliferation of drugs, therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in the modern medical practice leads to an increased incidence of iatrogenesis especially among the elderly population. The objective of this study was to determine the major factors related to the occurrence of iatrogenesis in elderly patients hospitalized in a geriatric ward. Methods: This is a prospective study including elderly patients

Claudia Szlejf; Jos Marcelo Farfel; Lus Alberto Saporetti; Wilson Jacob-Filho; Jos Antonio Curiati

337

The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: A before-after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members.  

PubMed

Background:Hospital is the most common place of cancer death but concerns regarding the quality of end-of-life care remain.Aim:Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the Liverpool Care Pathway on the quality of end-of-life care provided to adult cancer patients during their last week of life in hospital.Design:Uncontrolled before-after intervention cluster trial.Settings/participants:The trial was performed within four hospital wards participating in the pilot implementation of the Italian version of the Liverpool Care Pathway programme. All cancer patients who died in the hospital wards 2-4 months before and after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway were identified. A total of 2 months after the patient's death, bereaved family members were interviewed using the Toolkit After-Death Family Interview (seven 0-100 scales assessing the quality of end-of-life care) and the Italian version of the Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (VOICES) (three items assessing pain, breathlessness and nausea-vomiting).Results:An interview was obtained for 79 family members, 46 (73.0%) before and 33 (68.8%) after implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway. Following Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway implementation, there was a significant improvement in the mean scores of four Toolkit scales: respect, kindness and dignity (+16.8; 95% confidence interval = 3.6-30.0; p = 0.015); family emotional support (+20.9; 95% confidence interval = 9.6-32.3; p < 0.001); family self-efficacy (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.3-28.2; p = 0.049) and coordination of care (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 4.2-24.3; p = 0.007). No significant improvement in symptom' control was observed.Conclusions:These results provide the first robust data collected from family members of a preliminary clinically significant improvement, in some aspects, of quality of care after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway programme. The poor effect for symptom control suggests areas for further innovation and development. PMID:23652840

Costantini, Massimo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Di Leo, Silvia; Beccaro, Monica; Rossi, Carla; Flego, Guia; Romoli, Vittoria; Giannotti, Michela; Morone, Paola; Ivaldi, Giovanni P; Cavallo, Laura; Fusco, Flavio; Higginson, Irene J

2013-05-01

338

How the drainage of melting ponds leads to cracks? - Evidence revealed from Formosat-2 high spatiotemporal optical images of Ward-Hunt Ice Shelf, Summer 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For years, formation and extinction of melting pond have been regarded as one of the main precursors to the "rapid" disintegration of large ice shelves. Many models of calving and crack propagation have been proposed in regard with melting ponds as well. However, the existing spaceborne sensors all have constraints over the Polar Regions. Narrow cracks and their propagation are not easily observed and measured, and the area change of many small melting ponds is easily under-estimated. Formosat-2 is able to provide high spatiotemporal imagery of the Polar Regions, which provides an ideal source of data to investigate the rapid disintegration caused by tiny cracks and melting ponds over the ice shelves. In this research, we compiled a series of Formosat-2 time-sequential (16 scenes) and high-spatiotemporal (daily revisited orbit; 4 multispectral bands with 8 m, plus 1 panchromatic with 2 m) optical imagery of the Ward-Hunt Ice Shelf (WHIS) taken in the summer of 2008. Sea ice and open regions were masked prior to semi-automatic warping, minimizing errors of change detection. Fifteen out of sixteen scenes of multi-temporal imagery (from June 5th to August 30th, 2008) have been spatially co-registered with the base of the middle date (July 28th). A total of 16 sub-sets were intensively investigated, including the calved (ice island A and B, separated on July 24 and July 26 respectively) and non-calved coastal areas (in the North-eastern coast of WHIS), the southern calved coast, the crack complex in the south of Ward-Hunt Island (WHI), and other typical undulated ice shelf regions. Finally, length of cracks and area of melting ponds in the sub-sets were carefully extracted, estimated and assessed. The results show that a series of melting ponds drained and rifts formed and propagated consequently at various scales in most regions of WHIS. In addition, in some coastal areas, drainage of melting ponds is also highly related to the process of calving events. In conclusion, the propagation of the rifts (length) was highly correlated with the abrupt decreasing of the area of melting ponds, especially in the coastal areas. Capability for change detection over cracks and melting ponds with small scale would enhance the understanding of their impacts to ice shelves.

Chang, Y.-C.; Liu, C.-C.

2009-04-01

339

[The system of drug side effects monitoring in the cardiological wards of the University Hospital No. 1 in Pozna?. 6-year observation].  

PubMed

According to the guidelines from the Polish Ministry of Health, it is necessary to develop in Poland a system for supervising the safety of pharmacotherapy. Within the framework of this system a crucial role has been allocated to the Regional Centres for Monitoring of Side Effects of Drugs, affiliated to University Schools of Medicine. As there is no established routine for reporting side effects of drugs in Poland by medical professionals, the only way to obtain the data on drugs side effects was to prepare the system for internal monitoring of side effects of drugs in three clinical cardiology wards of the Institute of Cardiology at the University Hospital No. 1 in Pozna?. During the 6-year follow up, 208 cases were registered and classified according to the type of the side effect (A, B, C, D) and according to the division into pharmacological groups. Most of the reported side effects belonged to the type A (67.8%), and, subsequently, type C (23.6%), type D (6.2%), type B (2.4%). The presented analysis allowed only for identifying the side effects. For the assessment of incidence and the range of occurrence of these side effects it is necessary to work out an effective, multicenter system for monitoring side effects of drugs in Poland. PMID:10983382

Jab?ecka, A; Jankowski, J; Andrys, I

2000-01-01

340

Recent substance intake among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment and on-site urine testing compared with comprehensive laboratory analyses.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study of acute psychiatric admissions compared physicians' assessments of recent substance intake and on-site urine testing with comprehensive laboratory drug analyses. The sample comprised 325 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. Physicians on call were asked to judge if the patient had recently taken benzodiazepines, opiates, alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, or cocaine. Blood and urine samples were obtained and analyzed with chromatographic laboratory methods for a wide range of substances. A routine on-site urine screening test was performed in 92 of the cases. Physicians' assessments and on-site urine testing were compared with the reference standard of laboratory analyses. The sensitivity of the physician's assessment was highest for amphetamines (76%), followed by benzodiazepines (61%), opiates (57%), cannabis (55%), and cocaine (50%), whereas specificity was greater than 90% for all substances. The sensitivity of the on-site test ranged from 76% for amphetamine to 97% for cannabis, and specificity ranged from 82% for cannabis to 100% for cocaine. The study indicates clinical underdetection of recent substance intake among acute psychiatric admissions. On-site urine testing identified substance use that was not recognized by the physician's initial assessment, although specificity for cannabis and benzodiazepines was low. Chromatographic methods, which offered important supplementary information about substance use, should be considered for the routine screening of acutely admitted psychiatric patients. PMID:20631563

Mordal, Jon; Holm, Bjrn; Mrland, Jrg; Bramness, Jrgen Gustav

2010-08-01

341

[Consultation patterns among Japanese cedar pollinosis subjects at an urban clinic report 2: a 20-year experience (1990-2009) in Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo].  

PubMed

To determine the consultation patterns of Japanese cedar pollinosis subjects during the pollen dispersal season, we surveyed those treated at a private clinic in Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo, from 1990 to 2009. We also studied the relationship between subject numbers and pollen count. The above relationship correlated highly with linear regression equation y = 0.0897x + 627.47 with R = 0.7851 (p < 0.001). The relationship from 1994 to 2009, when the study began in early January, correlated highly with logarithmic regression equation y = 257.43Ln(x) - 1014.8 with R = 0.9542 (p < 0.001). Based on these results, we concluded that estimated pollen count helps predict the year's Japanese cedar pollinosis subject numbers very highly accurately. Numbers of subjects returning did not correlate well with pollen count, and continued to decrease each year. Return visits averaging 2.6 in 1990 gradually decreased to 0.73 in 2006--a reduction we attributed to long-term medication and the increased self-payment proportion in medical expenditures. PMID:22568160

Nishihata, Shinichi; Saito, Yozo

2012-03-01

342

Nurse Managers' Perceptions Related to Their Leadership Styles, Knowledge, and Skills in These Areas--A Viewpoint: Case of Health Centre Wards in Finland  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership stylesvisionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolatingwere reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership stylesvisionary, coaching, affiliate, and democraticto be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing.

Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

2013-01-01

343

Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects and Therapy of Chronic Otitis Media in the "ENT" and Cervicofacial Surgery Ward in the University Hospital of Ouagadougou  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical aspects of chronic otitis media and its therapeutic processes in our context. Patients and Methods. In a prospective study over a period of 1 year (March 2009February 2010), 79 patients with chronic otitis media have been cared for in the otolaryngology ward of the University Hospital of Ouagadougou. Results. Chronic otitis media (COM) commonly occurs in the age group from 0 to 15 years (40.50%). Otorrhea was the main reason for consultation in 53 cases (67.10%); the most frequently encountered clinicopathological forms were simple COM (71%) followed by otitis media with effusion (24.30%). Intra-auricular instillations of traditional products (46.09%) were the dominant favoring factor. Treatment was essentially through medication in 59 cases with a stabilization of lesions. Endotemporal complications were noticed in 6 cases. Conclusion. The fight against chronic otitis media is carried out through preventive measures of education the of people.

Gyebre, Y. M. C.; Ouedraogo, R. W.-L.; Elola, A.; Ouedraogo, B. P.; Sereme, M.; Ouattara, M.; Ouoba, K.

2013-01-01

344

Ongoing spread of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in different wards of an acute general hospital, Italy, June to December 2011.  

PubMed

We describe polyclonal spread of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in an acute general hospital in Italy. Between June and December 2011, 58 colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were recovered from 28 patients admitted to different wards, but mainly in the intensive care units. All isolates were tested for drug susceptibility and the presence of beta-lactamase (bla) genes. Clonality was investigated by repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Fifty-two isolates had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for colistin of 6-128 mg/L, carried bla(KPC3) and were attributed to sequence type ST258. The remaining six isolates were susceptible to carbapenems, exhibited MICs for colistin of 3-32 mg/L, and belonged to two different types, ST15 and ST273. Rep-PCR included all isolates in three clusters, one containing all ST258 KPC-3-producing isolates and two containing ST15 and ST273 isolates.Cross-transmission containment measures and intensification of staff and environmental hygiene could not stop the outbreak. Selective pressure and horizontal transmission probably contributed to emergence and spread of three different strains of colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae in the hospital. Strict implementation of the above measures and a wider awareness of the antimicrobial resistance threat are crucial to preserve the last therapeutic options of the multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:22913977

Mammina, C; Bonura, C; Di Bernardo, F; Aleo, A; Fasciana, T; Sodano, C; Saporito, M A; Verde, M S; Tetamo, R; Palma, D M

2012-08-16

345

Application of low-pressure gas chromatography-ion-trap mass spectrometry to the analysis of the essential oil of Turnera diffusa (Ward.) Urb.  

PubMed

Turnera diffusa Willd. var. afrodisiaca (Ward) Urb. (syn. T. aphrodisiaca) belongs to the family of Turneraceae and is an aromatic plant growing wild in the subtropical regions of America and Africa. It is widely used in the traditional medicine as e.g. anti-cough, diuretic, and aphrodisiac agent. This work presents a 3 min chromatographic analysis using low-pressure (LP) gas chromatography (GC)-ion-trap (IT) mass spectrometry (MS). The combination of a deactivated 0.6 m x 0.10 mm i.d., restrictor with a wide-bore CP-Wax 52 capillary column (10 m x 0.53 mm i.d., 1 microm) reduces the analysis time by a factor of 3-7 in comparison to the use of a conventional narrow bore column. Chromatographic conditions have been optimized to achieve the fastest separation with the highest signal/noise ratio in MS detection. These results allow fast and reliable quality control of the essential oil to be achieved. PMID:14971493

Godoi, Ana F L; Vilegas, Wagner; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Vaeck, Luc; Van Grieken, Ren

2004-02-20

346

A program of professional accreditation of hospital wards by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI): self- versus peer-evaluation.  

PubMed

The Italian Society of Internal Medicine has developed a voluntary program of professional accreditation of the medical units run by its constituency. Participation in the program, which is meant to foster staff involvement in clinical governance, includes all the medical personnel and nurses. Accreditation is awarded provided the candidate unit is able to adhere to a pre-established set of quality standards, meet a number of clinical and organizational requirements and monitor specific indicators. Self-evaluation is the first step in the program, followed by a site visit by a team of peer internists experienced in quality auditing. The program, which has involved so far 19 units, has considered a number of clinical requirements related to the three most frequent diseases in Italian internal medicine wards: chronic heart failure (CHF), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hepatic cirrhosis with ascites (HCA). The comparison between self- and peer-evaluation witnessed less discrepancies for disease-related than for organizational requirements, the latter being met to a smaller degree by most units. In particular, concordance was higher for requirements and indicators pertaining to CHF and HCA than to COPD. This program of professional accreditation developed by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine has the potential to describe, monitor and improve clinical and organizational performances in internal medicine. It should also be seen as a contribution to implement the strategy of professional governance in hospitals. PMID:21833771

Vanoli, Massimo; Traisci, Giancarlo; Franchini, Alberto; Benetti, Gianpiero; Serra, Pietro; Monti, Maria Alice

2011-08-11

347

Nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and skills in these areas-a viewpoint: case of health centre wards in Finland.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating-were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic-to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

Vesterinen, Soili; Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

2013-04-03

348

Impact of routine surgical ward and intensive care unit admission surveillance cultures on hospital-wide nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a university hospital: an interrupted time-series analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To determine whether a routine admission screening in surgical wards and intensive care units (ICUs) was effective in reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections particularly nosocomial MRSA infectionsfor the whole hospital. Methods: The study used a single-centre prospective quasi-experimental design to evaluate the effect of the MRSA screening policy on the incidence density of MRSA-infected\\/nosocomial MRSA-infected patients\\/1000 patient-days (pd)

Iris F. Chaberny; Frank Schwab; Stefan Ziesing; Sebastian Suerbaum; Petra Gastmeier

349

Diagnostic Performance of a Multiple Real-Time PCR Assay in Patients with Suspected Sepsis Hospitalized in an Internal Medicine Ward  

PubMed Central

Early identification of causative pathogen in sepsis patients is pivotal to improve clinical outcome. SeptiFast (SF), a commercially available system for molecular diagnosis of sepsis based on PCR, has been mostly used in patients hospitalized in hematology and intensive care units. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy and clinical usefulness of SF, compared to blood culture (BC), in 391 patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in a department of internal medicine. A causative pathogen was identified in 85 patients (22%). Sixty pathogens were detected by SF and 57 by BC. No significant differences were found between the two methods in the rates of pathogen detection (P = 0.74), even after excluding 9 pathogens which were isolated by BC and were not included in the SF master list (P = 0.096). The combination of SF and BC significantly improved the diagnostic yield in comparison to BC alone (P < 0.001). Compared to BC, SF showed a significantly lower contamination rate (0 versus 19 cases; P < 0.001) with a higher specificity for pathogen identification (1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.99 to 1.00, versus 0.94, 95% CI of 0.90 to 0.96; P = 0.005) and a higher positive predictive value (1.00, 95% CI of 1.00 to 0.92%, versus 0.75, 95% CI of 0.63 to 0.83; P = 0.005). In the subgroup of patients (n = 191) who had been receiving antibiotic treatment for ?24 h, SF identified more pathogens (16 versus 6; P = 0.049) compared to BC. These results suggest that, in patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in an internal medicine ward, SF could be a highly valuable adjunct to conventional BC, particularly in patients under antibiotic treatment.

Pasqualini, Leonella; Leli, Christian; Montagna, Paolo; Cardaccia, Angela; Cenci, Elio; Montecarlo, Ines; Pirro, Matteo; di Filippo, Francesco; Cistaro, Emma; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Bistoni, Francesco; Mannarino, Elmo

2012-01-01

350

The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is

Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

1983-01-01

351

The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is

Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

1983-01-01

352

Four important features in the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf revealed from the high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution images taken by Formosat-2 in Summer 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Massive ice shelf collapsing in Polar Regions is indisputably a clear warning of global warming. To investigate such a rapid change of a breaking up event at a remote site requires an innovative approach that is able to make both high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution observations. Deploying a high-spatial-resolution sensor in a daily revisit orbit, Formosat-2 successfully captured the details of Wilkins Ice Shelf disintegration event in March 2008, using its 2-m multi-spectral remote sensing imagery. Right after a few extensive fractures were found in the largest ice shelf in the Arctic (Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, WHIS) and reported in May 2008, Formosat-2 was employed to make an intensive observation in this region. A total of eleven scenes of WHIS were acquired from 5 June to 30 August 2008, and ten of them were taken in a preferable low-cloud- cover condition. After the basic processing of level-2 georeferencing, band-to-band coregistration, spectral summation intensity modulation pan-sharpening, and multi-temporal images coregistration, we are able to summarize four important features in WHIS from the time series of Formosat-2 images. First, the sea ice velocity field in the vicinity of WHIS can be inferred by using ice floes as tracers and manually identifying identical floes in consecutive images. There is an eastward flow along the coast of Ellesmere Island. This flow is one of the main forces that gradually tears apart the outermost WHIS in summer. Second, a considerable number of melt ponds with scales of a few to tens of meters is found across the lower part of WHIS. As the temperature rises in summer, the total area of melt ponds increases as a result. In some cases, the melting water soon drains away and a large scale of disintegration occurs afterwards. Third, the extent of organic sedimentary material, namely microbial mat, can be clearly identified from these multispectral images. Fourth, the recent break-up event poses a threat to Disraeli Fiord, the largest remaining epishelf lake in the Northern Hemisphere. A new channel has formed recently, which may accelerate the drainage of the epishelf lake. This research demonstrates that high-spatial- and high- temporal-resolution optical imagery taken from Formosat-2 is a useful data source for studying the collapse of ice shelf in Polar Regions.

Liu, C.; Chang, Y.; Yan, S.; Wu, A.

2008-12-01

353

Reviewing the effect of nursing interventions on delirious patients admitted to intensive care unit of neurosurgery ward in Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Disease is an abnormal process that affects all aspects of the human life. The hospital environment and particularly the intensive care unit (ICU) causes stress in the patient and hi/her family. Delirium, due to its sudden onset and startle, unconsciousness, memory impairment, illusion and dynamic or sedentary behaviors, is known as one of the stressor agents. Despite its high prevalence and the high cost complications such as long term mechanical ventilation, hospital pneumonia, pressure ulcer, prolongation of hospitalization in the hospital or the intensive care units, performance reduction and increase in mortality, this disorder remains unknown in most cases. In line with the other treatment team members, nurses should also participate in controlling the discountable factors, helping patients to cope with uncontrollable factors and using pharmacological methods to manage the delirium and feature their own unique capacity more through quick recognition, reviewing the causes and providing scientific care in improving the quality of patient care and improving the patients health status. Hence, this study aimed to review the effect of nursing interventions on delirium of the patients admitted to ICU of the neurosurgery ward in Al-Zahra hospital in Isfahan. METHODS: A two-group multi-stage clinical trial study was carried out on 40 patients with hyperactive delirium admitted to ICU. The questionnaire included demographic data, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale to assess the irritability rate and study method and also cognitive confusion in intensive care unit to determine delirium status of the study population. Simple sampling method was conducted and the study samples were randomly divided into two intervention and control groups. The following nursing interventions performed on the intervention group: assuring, emotional support, clear information and effective communication with the patients and their families and also allowing family visits twice a day. In the control group, the sample received the normal and routine ICU cares. The irritability and delirium severity status of the samples were analyzed on the day of admission and the fifth day using descriptive and inferential statistical methods and also SPSS software. RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed that although there was no significant difference between the groups on the first day of admission in terms of the irritability and delirium severity status, this was significant on the fifth day of the study. Wilcoxon test in the intervention and control groups indicated a significant difference between the study subjects in terms of the irritability and delirium severity status on the first day of admission and the fifth day which indicated the reduction in the irritability severity. But, this reduction was higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Furthermore, McNemar test showed that the number of the subjects with delirium in both groups reduced on the fifth day compared to the first day of admission and there was a significant difference between these two days, the number of samples without delirium in the intervention group was almost two times higher than that in the control group on the fifth day. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing interventions are considered as one of the non-pharmacological methods in treating delirium and by using these methods appropriately in ICUs, the patients hypoactive delirium can be reduced.

Khalifezadeh, Asghar; Safazadeh, Shima; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Mansour, Bahram Amin

2011-01-01

354

Cruelty in Maternity Wards: Fifty Years Later  

PubMed Central

Fifty years have passed since a scandal broke over inhumane treatment of laboring women in U.S. hospitals, yet first-person and eyewitness reports document that medical care providers continue to subject childbearing women to verbal and physical abuse and even to what would constitute sexual assault in any other context. Women frequently are denied their right to make informed decisions about care and may be punished for attempting to assert their right to refusal. Mistreatment is not uncommon and persists because of factors inherent to hospital social culture. Concerted action on the part of all stakeholders will be required to bring about systemic reform.

Goer, Henci

2010-01-01

355

Ward CV redaction 9- 2012 cv  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... In Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: A ... November, 1980; Neonatal Nurses Critical Care ... June, 1989; Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Course ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

356

Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... making proteins that act as channels across the cell membrane. These channels transport positively charged atoms (ions), such ... proteins (particularly ion channels) are inserted into the cell membrane appropriately. A mutation in the ANK2 gene likely ...

357

The new pediatrics: empty wards, bustling clinics.  

PubMed Central

Great strides have been made in reorganizing the way care is provided for children and adolescents with chronic disease in Canada. While financing programs and shedding old practice patterns may represent obstacles to implementation, we are likely to see an increasing amount of care delivered in ambulatory settings. This will most certainly bring these children back into their communities, where they will make demands on general physicians and nurses. Educational integration will challenge the schools, and community groups such as the Red Cross Society and service organizations will have to fill the gaps. In doing so, these agencies and the professionals involved will have to cooperate in the interests of the child with chronic disease. However, there are sufficient rewards helping the ill child get home to make the increased effort worth while.

Issenman, R M

1987-01-01

358

Geriatric assessment on a subacute hospital ward.  

PubMed

The authors collected data on all patients admitted to the Sepulveda Veterans Administration Geriatric Evaluation Unit (GEU) during its first 6 years of operation. Analysis of these data indicate several beneficial effects associated with this type of specialized geriatric care: improved diagnostic accuracy, reduced use of drugs, improved functional status, and improved placement location. The authors also analyzed additional data from a previously published, randomized controlled trial to compare better process of care between patients randomized to the GEU and those receiving usual services. During their initial hospitalizations, GEU patients received significantly more specialty evaluations than controls (4.9 versus 1.7, p less than .001), had longer lengths of stay (85.1 days versus 44.3 days, p less than .001), had more new diagnoses discovered (2.9 versus 0.6, p less than .001), and had more drugs discontinued from their regimens (4.6 versus 2.3 p less than .001). These process differences were probably related to the previously reported outcome differences: GEU patients were more likely than controls to show improvements in functional status, affect, placement location, use of institutional services, and survival. PMID:3815239

Rubenstein, L Z; Josephson, K; Wieland, G D; Pietruszka, F; Tretton, C; Strome, S; Cole, K D; Campbell, L J

1987-02-01

359

Using Exercise to Ward Off Depression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exercise can be as effective as psychotherapy and antidepressant therapy in treating mild-to-moderate depression, and even more effective when used in conjunction with them. Exercise can also be preventive therapy for those not clinically depressed. The paper explains how best to work exercise into a depressed patient's therapy. (Author/SM)

Nicoloff, George; Schwenk, Thomas L.

1995-01-01

360

Cruelty in maternity wards: fifty years later.  

PubMed

Fifty years have passed since a scandal broke over inhumane treatment of laboring women in U.S. hospitals, yet first-person and eyewitness reports document that medical care providers continue to subject childbearing women to verbal and physical abuse and even to what would constitute sexual assault in any other context. Women frequently are denied their right to make informed decisions about care and may be punished for attempting to assert their right to refusal. Mistreatment is not uncommon and persists because of factors inherent to hospital social culture. Concerted action on the part of all stakeholders will be required to bring about systemic reform. PMID:21629381

Goer, Henci

2010-01-01

361

Anomalous Ward Identities in Spinor Field Theories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper considers the model of a spinor field with arbitrary internal degrees of freedom having arbitrary nonderivative coupling to external scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector fields. By carefully defining the S matrix in the interaction pic...

W. A. Bardeen

1969-01-01

362

Rhodon, Rosa Gallica, Al-Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the 4th to 8th centuries, unusually cold weather was correlated with cataclysmic events such as the fall of the Roman Empire in the west, leading to the dark ages in Europe, the transfer of the center Roman culture to Constantinople, and the rise of Islam. Finally a warming trend in the 8th century was coincident with an intellectual blossoming

Katherine Halcrow

2005-01-01

363

Filicidal Women: Jail or Psychiatric Ward?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: Of the sample, 18 women were found guilty, and 14 received a medical disposi- tion. Of those who were the object of a penal disposition, most received a sentence that ex- ceeded 2 years. Women who were sentenced to prison had a lower socioeconomic status and, compared with those who received a medical disposition, were more likely to have

Thierry Webanck

2003-01-01

364

Elusive Rights of the Developmentally Disabled and the Mentally Ill -- From Locked Wards to Locked Wards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic constitutional rights as related to the involuntary confinement of the developmentally disabled and the mentally ill are addressed from the perspective of the nursing home ombudsman program in Wisconsin. State statutes dealing with commitment, place...

1978-01-01

365

Psychiatric Morbidity and Referral on Two General Medical Wards  

PubMed Central

Psychiatric morbidity among 230 medical inpatients was determined by a two-stage screening procedure, using the General Health Questionnaire and Standardized Psychiatric Interview. Of these patients, 23% were considered psychiatrically ill, affective disorders being the commonest illnesses encountered; and 27 (12%) were psychiatrically referred. While referral was related to severity of psychiatric illness and previous psychiatric illness, the degree to which the psychiatric illness obtruded or created problems in management appeared more crucial in determining referral. In half of those with psychiatric illness the problems did not appear to have been detected or dealt with. It is suggested that medical clerking should routinely include questions about mood and psychological responses to illness.

Maguire, G. P.; Julier, D. L.; Hawton, K. E.; Bancroft, J. H. J.

1974-01-01

366

Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in

Barber, William H.

1985-01-01

367

Ward Burdick Award article. The Golden Age of American Medicine.  

PubMed

Commercialization of medicine with introduction of the profit motive is changing the patient care process, reducing the professional independence of physicians and inflating the total cost of medical care. The payers for medical care, governments at all levels and employers, are no longer willing or able to accept continuing escalation in the costs of medical care. Correction of financial distortions is an inevitable process in every economic milieu, and distortions in the health care system will be corrected in one way or another. Medicine is an unusual enterprise in that there are no sharp dividing lines between what is necessary and what is clearly unnecessary or between perfectly acceptable and unacceptable outcomes. Initiatives to define what is necessary and what is acceptable are being taken by organized medicine and by the federal government. This has been described as a "revolution" in medicine, but there is no other viable approach to balancing medical care requirements with available resources. PMID:2729185

Conn, R B

1989-06-01

368

Parenting on trial: state wards and governments accountability in australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past few years, growing attention has been given by the state to the role of parents and guardians in preventing juvenile crime. The emergence of legislation enabling courts to penalize parents for neglect or default in respect of their childrens offending behaviors contrasts with provisions that exempt the state from the same liability when children in care offend.

Judith Bessant; Richard Hil

1998-01-01

369

Field History, Barstow Fusselman Gas Field, Ward County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Barstow Fusselman gas field was discovered in Feb. 1969. The initial well was completed from Silurian Fusselman perforations at 17,548 to 17,576 ft for a calculated absolute open flow potential of 132 MMcfpd. This well was placed on production in July 1969, and as of July 1, 1972, had produced 22.03 billion cu ft. Since that date, there have

James Lacy; M. D. Rogers

1972-01-01

370

Psychiatric Morbidity and Referral on Two General Medical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatric morbidity among 230 medical inpatients was determined by a two-stage screening procedure, using the General Health Questionnaire and Standardized Psychiatric Interview. Of these patients, 23% were considered psychiatrically ill, affective disorders being the commonest illnesses encountered; and 27 (12%) were psychiatrically referred. While referral was related to severity of psychiatric illness and previous psychiatric illness, the degree to which

G. P. Maguire; D. L. Julier; K. E. Hawton; J. H. J. Bancroft

1974-01-01

371

Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in

Barber, William H.

1985-01-01

372

College Student Attitudes to ward Buddhism and Islam  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 197 and a sample of 141 undergraduates from a larger population of 200 at a large southeastern American university revealed their attitudes toward Buddhism and Islam respectively. In regard to Buddhism, while over 90% of the respondents reported NOT being knowledgeable about Buddhism, they reported generally positive beliefs about Buddhism which is associated with spiritual enlightenment, positive

Derek Maher; David Knox; Angela DeCuzzi

2008-01-01

373

Data Collection and Feature Extraction for a Smart Ward Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agitated behavior is common in people with dementia, and one of the challenges faced by doctors and caregivers is the detailed and continuous monitoring of such people. With the use of modern sensor and networking technology, and system directed observation, objective outcomes may be expected and with removal of the manpower requirement. This paper presents a context aware patient data

Jit Biswas; Victor Foo Siang Fook; Qiang Qiu; Maniyeri Jayachandran; Aung Aung Phyo Wai; Pham Viet Thang; That Mon Htwe

2006-01-01

374

Use of Antibiotics in a Haematology Ward - An Audit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Rising rates of antibiotic resistance prompted a review of antibiotic use policies hospitalwide. The Department of Haematology established a new set of consensus guidelines in 2002 for antibiotic use in febrile neutropenia. The aim of our study was to audit adherence to the guidelines established for febrile neutropenia in patients treated for haematologic malignancies. Materials and Methods: An antibiotic

Gee Chuan Wong; Ban Hock Tan; Wong Gee Chuan

2008-01-01

375

Blunt abdominal trauma treated in an intensive care ward  

PubMed Central

Seventy-two cases of major abdominal trauma with an overall mortality of 29% are reviewed. Only cases of sufficient severity to require nursing in an intensive care unit are included. The incidence of injury to the various viscera is shown. Methods of diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The causes of death in this series are analysed and ways of lowering the mortality figures outlined.

Arthur, G. W.; Lane, B. E.

1969-01-01

376

Prescription of psychotropic drugs in adolescent psychiatry wards in Finland.  

PubMed

This point-prevalence study was designed to assess adolescent psychiatrists' practices of prescribing psychotropic drugs in hospital settings, and to compare the practices between the years 1991 and 1999. Data on patients' gender, age, diagnosis and psychotropic medication were obtained by means of a questionnaire sent to four hospital units in Finland. The sample represented 49% in 1991 and 29% in 1999 of all adolescent psychiatric inpatient beds in Finland. Of the patients included in the study, 30% (20/66) in 1991 and 68% (53/78) in 1999 were treated with drugs. The increase was biggest in the proportion of depressive patients and in the proportion of depressive patients receiving drugs. The results of this study suggest that the use of medication may have increased in recent years as new antidepressants and atypical neuroleptics have become available. Prescribing practices appeared to be appropriate, on the understanding that drug therapies are adjunct to other interventions. PMID:15204208

Haapasalo-Pesu, Kirsi-Maria; Erkolahti, Ritva; Saarijrvi, Simo; Aalberg, Veikko

2004-01-01

377

A Logical levothyroxine dose Individualization: Optimization Approach at discharge from Radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up in patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Balancing the Risk based strategy and the practical issues and challenges: Experience and Views of a large volume referral centre in India  

PubMed Central

In this communication, the authors discuss the issue of individualization of thyrotropin suppressive therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients and share their views with respect to optimizing the dose of levothyroxine (LT) prescription both during discharge from radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up. The changing management paradigm at our Institute during post-thyroidectomy period and during the preparation for radioiodine scan is also briefly highlighted. Five factors can be identified as important determinants for the dose individualization approach: (1) Persistence or absence of metastatic disease, (2) the risk characteristics of the patient and the tumor (3) patient's clinical profile, symptomatology, and contraindications (4) the feasibility to ensure a proper thyroid stimulating hormone TSH suppression level (depends on patient's socio-economic and educational background, the connectivity with the local physician and his expertise) (5) time period elapsed since initial diagnosis. While discussing each individual case scenario, the authors, based upon their experience in one of the busiest thyroid cancer referral centers in the country, discuss certain unaddressed points in the current guideline recommendations, deviations made and some challenges toward employing them into practice, which could be situation and center specific. In addition to these, the value of clinical examination, patient profile and detailed enquiry about clinical symptomatology by the attending physician in each follow-up visit cannot be overemphasized. According to the authors, this aspect, quite important for dose determination in an individual, is relatively underrepresented in the present guidelines. It would also be worthwhile to follow a conservative approach (till clear data emerges) in patients who have characteristics of high-risk disease, but are clinically and biochemically disease free, if no medical contraindications exist and patient tolerates the suppressive therapy well. This would be particularly applicable in the presence of aggressive histopathological variants, where, in the event of recurrence/metastasis, the disease demonstrates adverse prognosis and higher incidence of radioiodine refractoriness. At the end, certain important and noteworthy concepts pertaining to LT prescription that has definitive practical implications for the suppressive therapy in DTC patients are described.

Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit; Asopa, Ramesh; Chaukar, Devendra; DCruz, Anil K

2013-01-01

378

Managing functional decline among the elderly patients in ward 3 Geriatric ward using the Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADL)  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThe Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living commonly referred to as Katz ADL by Katz et al (1970) is the most appropriate instrument to assess functional status as a measurement of the person's ability to perform acts of daily living independently.MethodThis Katz ADL was used in 15 geriatric patients aged between 7884. The instrument employs a dichotomous

E Cheah; S Rajaram; H C Chua; H L Ng; H M Tim; F Fadillah; D Zheng

2011-01-01

379

Determinants of hand hygiene compliance in the intensive care unit and surgical ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: In the 24 hospitals that participated in the study the hand hygiene compliance was low. Hand hygiene was performed 19,5% (95% CI 18-21%) of the time. Multilevel logistic regression analysis showed no significant difference between the compliance levels of physicians or nurses. We did find a significant effect for unit type (lower compliance in the ICU compared to surgical

V. Erasmus; P. van Empelen; T. J. Daha; J. H. Richardus; E. W. Steyerberg; M. C. Vos; E. F. van Beeck

380

Geriatric intervention in elderly patients with hip fracture in an orthopedic ward  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Background: Hip fracture is a common cause of long hospital stay in the elderly. Approximately one third of these patients die within the first year. As a consequence geriatric and orthopedic collaboration (orthogeriatrics) has been organized in different ways. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a multidisciplinary geriatric in-hospital intervention on patient outcome. Methods: A total of 495 elderly hip fracture patients consecutively admitted to orthopedic surgery, were followed. Data were based on medical records. The intervention group (n=233) was compared to a historical cohort group (n=262) receiving traditional orthopedic treatment. Intervention program was based on initial physical and mental screening and evaluation, geriatric-focused care, and early discharge planning. The intervention was provided by a multidisciplinary geriatric team. After discharge, follow-up home-visits by a physiotherapist were performed, except for patients discharged to nursing homes, due to a 24-hour staff and easy access to the GP. Results: Median length of stay was reduced from 15 to 13 days. More patients began treatment with calcium/vitamin-D and bisphosphonate (p=sig). There was no difference in hemoglobin variation between the time of admission and three to six months post admission, and no difference in three-month readmissions (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09 [95%CI: 0.71;1.67]). Discharge destination was unchanged (OR=0.93 [95%CI: 0.52; 1.65]). In-hospital mortality was 8% in the intervention group vs. 6% (p=0.48), in the control group. Three-month mortality was 16% in the intervention group vs. 15% (p=0.39), in the control group. In the intervention group, residents from nursing homes had a higher three-month mortality (OR=2.37 [95% CI: 0.99; 5.67]), and the risk of new fractures within two years decreased from 9.5% to 7.7%, though not statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study indicates that co-management of hip fracture patients by orthopedic surgeons and geriatricians may be associated with a reduction in length of hospital stay without negatively affecting major patient outcomes. The concept should be further developed particularly among the frail elderly.

Gregersen, Merete; Metz M?rch, Marianne; Hougaard, Kjeld; Marie Damsgaard, Else

2012-01-01

381

77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...party, and other senior government officials. Under 5 U.S...and rates each agency's responsiveness to small business. If you...effect on State or local governments and would either preempt...State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or...

2012-02-24

382

Implications for treatment of sexual offenders of the Ward and Hudson model of relapse.  

PubMed

A group of 59 child abusers were classified as having either an "avoidant" (n = 15) or an "approach" (n = 44) goal regarding deviant sexual activity with children. Level of distorted beliefs about sexual activity with children (cognitive distortions) and distorted beliefs about their own victims (victim blaming attitudes) in both groups were measured before and after treatment. Results indicate that there was an overall reduction in the level of these distorted beliefs at the posttreatment stage in the approach group. Reductions were not found in the avoidant offenders as men in this group did not have distorted beliefs prior to treatment. Results are discussed in terms of appropriate targeting of treatment. PMID:12731147

Bickley, James A; Beech, Anthony R

2003-04-01

383

An Overview of Strategy Development Models and the Ward-Rivani Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous models for developing strategy, defining and aligning competitive advantage have been proposed over the years (and even centuries if we consider Arian, Sun Tzu etc.) including probably the most famous of all, the 5 forces model by Porter (P5F). With publications in the field of strategy now in the thousands it is difficult to get an overall picture of

David Ward; Elena Rivani

2005-01-01

384

Implications for Treatment of Sexual Offenders of the Ward and Hudson Model of Relapse  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of 59 child abusers were classified as having either an avoidant (n = 15) or an approach (n = 44) goal regarding deviant sexual activity with children. Level of distorted beliefs about sexual activity with children (cognitive distortions) and distorted beliefs about their own victims (victim blaming attitudes) in both groups were measured before and after treatment. Results

James A. Bickley; Anthony R. Beech

2003-01-01

385

Reducing Ward-Clinic Conflicts by Rotational Scheduling of House Staff.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Internal medicine residency programs that put increasing emphasis on outpatient experience and continuity of care place demands on residents that conflict with inpatient responsibilities. The development and implementation at the University of Virginia Hospital of a rotational scheduling system aimed at alleviating the conflict is described.

And Others; Hodge, Robert H.

1979-01-01

386

Medical Data Mining for Early Deterioration Warning in General Hospital Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data mining on medical data has great potential to improve the treatment quality of hospitals and increase the survival rate of patients. Every year, $4$ -- $17\\\\%$ of patients undergo cardiopulmonary or respiratory arrest while in hospitals. Early prediction techniques have become an apparent need in many clinical area. Clinical study has found early detection and intervention to be essential

Yi Mao; Yixin Chen; Gregory Hackmann; Minmin Chen; Chenyang Lu; Marin Kollef; Thomas C. Bailey

2011-01-01

387

Contested motherhood in the ethnic stateVoices from an Israeli postpartum ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impending future loss of the Jewish majority due to higher Palestinian birth rates and shrinking immigration exacerbate existential insecurities among Jewish Israelis. The ongoing competition for limited public resources, electoral power and political influence hinge on the size and natural increase of different ethnic sectors. In this ethnocentric milieu, motherhood for both Israeli and Arab citizens is construed as

Larissa Remennick

2008-01-01

388

LLW Notes Supplement, May/June 1994: Ward Valley, California: Legal issues in summary  

SciTech Connect

This document is a digest of the major issues raised by the petitioners for the superior court`s consideration and of the responses to those issues that were supplied by the state respondents. The issues have been extracted from a joint memorandum filed by the petitioners on March 9. The responses are taken from the state respondents` April 6 memorandum. The superior court`s decision about the merit of each issue - as reported in the court`s May 4 order - is also included. This information is necessarily summary in nature. Persons interested in a detailed explanation of these lawsuits are directed to the parties` memorandums of March 9 and April 6, as well as to the court`s May 4 order.

Norris, C. [ed.; Lovinger, T.

1994-12-31

389

Characteristics of Infantile AutismMoving ToWard Earlier Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early detection of autism plays an important role in enhancing developmental outcomes for affected children. Identifying potential characteristics of the disorder evident during infancy and toddlerhood aids our efforts to screen for such symptoms, Which may lead to earlier and more accurate diagnoses. This revieW examines the literature on detection of autistic characteristics in infants and toddlers, prior to a

Robin P. Goin; Barbara J. Myers

2004-01-01

390

The Assisted Electronic Prescription in Patients Hospitalised in a Chest Diseases Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient medical care requires a certain degree of individualized attention, and to this end technological support is becoming increasingly necessary, if not essential. Even so, the efforts directed at applying new technologies in the health-care system are not always sufficient, especially when taking into account that they could be key factors in patient safety.Treatments are often prescribed manually, which could

Elena Villaman; Alicia Herrero; Rodolfo lvarez Sala

2011-01-01

391

Screening of binge drinking among patients on an emergency surgical ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a sample of 149 emergency surgical patients, binge drinking was assessed through interviews. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for three questionnairesthe Malm modification of brief MAST (Mm-MAST), CAGE, and the Trauma Scaleand two biological markerscarbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Binge drinking was reported by 42% of male patients, aged 1629 years; 66% of

Lars Forsberg; Jan Halldin; Sren Ekman; Sten Rnnberg

2002-01-01

392

Pedagogical encounters between nurses and patients in a medical wardA field study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPatient teaching is regarded as an important aspect of nursing care as well as an essential part of the nursing profession. In nursing practice, a distinction can be made between formal (planned) and informal (spontaneous) patient teaching. The major part of patient teaching research is within the area of formal teaching. In spite of the fact that spontaneous teaching occurs

F. Friberg; E. Pilhammar Andersson; J. Bengtsson

2007-01-01

393

What type of information do parents need after being discharged directly from the delivery ward?  

PubMed

Early discharge normally means that mother and infant are discharged from the hospital between six hours and three days after delivery. Early discharge with home-visits after normal delivery was introduced at Uppsala University Hospital in 1990. Seventeen percent of the women who gave birth in 2003 in Uppsala used the home-care option as an alternative to postnatal care at the hospital. The home-visiting midwives use a checklist to give and gain information about the health of the child and mother and about how breast-feeding is going. The purpose of this study was to examine the parents' need of information after early discharge after delivery and to compare their needs with the information given according to the checklist for home-visits. Forty-two couples completed the study. They were asked to formulate five questions to the midwife at the home-visit. After the questions were gathered, a content-analysis was done. Three different main groups were identified: questions concerning 1) the child (68%) such as hygiene, bowel movements, burping, vomiting, eating, sleeping and sneezing 2) breast-feeding (21%) questions were asked about position while breast-feeding, nipples and amount of milk 3) the mother (11%) questions concerned afterpains, stitches, eating and drinking. The results show that the checklist worked sufficiently well as a work tool, but can be adjusted further according to the parents' need. This study shows that they needed more information about the care of the infant, primarily concerning hygiene. PMID:15508525

Johansson, Katarina; Darj, Elisabeth

2004-01-01

394

MAPO index for risk assessment of patient manual handling in hospital wards: a validation study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manual handling of disabled patientsas regards movementis one of the major factors affecting acute low back pain of exposed nursing staff. In the absence of quantitative methods assessing this kind of risk, the Research Unit Ergonomics of Posture and Movement of Milan developed in 1997 a risk assessment method called Movement and Assistance of Hospital Patients (MAPO), which is applicable

N. Battevi; O. Menoni; M. Grazia Ricci; S. Cairoli

2006-01-01

395

Timing, prevalence, determinants and outcomes of homelessness among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo document the prevalence, timing, associations and short-term housing outcomes of homelessness among acute psychiatric inpatients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsCross-sectional study of 4,386 acute psychiatric admissions discharged from a single NHS Trust in 20082009.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a ResultsHomelessness occurred in 16%. Most homelessness (70%) was either recorded as present at admission or started within 1week.\\u000a It was associated with younger age; male gender; ethnicity other than

Alex D. TullochPaul; Paul Fearon; Anthony S. David

396

Comparison of a geriatric unit with a general ward in Mexican elders.  

PubMed

There is evidence that geriatric services may be more effective in handling problems of the elderly in acute care. We therefore studied a cohort of matched triplets (age, gender and admission diagnosis), to assess the effect of a geriatric service on elderly problems (falls, pressure ulcers, delirium and functional decline). This is a follow up study; comparing a geriatric unit with an internal medicine unit at two hospitals of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Mexico City. Socio-demographic characteristics, functionality, emotional state, cognitive status, delirium, co-morbidities, diagnosis, number of medications, presence of pressure ulcers and falls, were assessed. We developed a composite variable as a global end-point, including: delirium, falls, mortality, pressure sores and functional decline. 70 patients were included in the geriatric services and 140 in the internal medicine unit. Mean age =72.57 years (S.D.), and 52.9% were women. At baseline, only illiteracy, quality of life and the number of medications were statistically different between each group. Fully adjusted multiple logistic conditional regression model found an odds ratio of 0.27 (95% CI 0.1-0.7) for the presence of the composite variable, favoring the geriatric unit. Geriatric units in acute care may be beneficial in different frequent end points in elderly. PMID:21782258

Prez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Gutirez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Snchez-Garcia, Sergio; Jurez-Cedillo, Teresa; Gonzalez, Jose Juan Garca; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Garca-Pea, Carmen

2011-07-22

397

An elasmobranch maternity ward: female round stingrays Urobatis halleri use warm, restored estuarine habitat during gestation.  

PubMed

The habitat use and movements of the round stingray Urobatis halleri were compared between shallow restored and natural habitats of the Anaheim Bay Estuary (CA, U.S.A.) in relation to water temperature. Restored habitat remained significantly warmer than natural habitat from spring through to autumn. Strong sexual segregation occurred in the restored habitat with mature female U. halleri forming large unisex aggregations in summer, during months of peak seasonal water temperatures, and males only present during spring. Most mature females collected from restored habitat during months of high abundance were determined to be pregnant using non-invasive field ultrasonography. Tagged females typically spent <14 days in the restored habitat, using the habitat less as seasonal water temperatures decreased. Females tended to emigrate from the estuary by mid-August, coinciding with the time of year for parturition. The elevated water temperatures of the restored habitat may confer an energetic cost to male U. halleri, but females (particularly pregnant females) may derive a thermal reproductive benefit by using warm, shallow habitats for short periods of time during months of peak water temperatures. These findings have management implications for the design of coastal habitat restoration projects and marine protected areas that incorporate thermal environments preferred by aggregating female elasmobranchs. PMID:22497381

Jirik, K E; Lowe, C G

2012-01-23

398

Introduction of New Clinical Clerks to Nursing Procedures and the Ward Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality of patient care suffers because of the intellectual separatism that exists among medical, nursing, and other professions. Description of an attempt to introduce knowledge of selected nursing and laboratory skills to third-quarter clinical clerks. (Author/PG)

Kunin, Calvin M.; DeGrott, Jane

1975-01-01

399

FTC Advertising Substantiation Program-Automotive Tires. Documentation of Montgomery Ward and Co., Inc.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Documentation is submitted in support of various claims concerning strength, durability, high-speed performance, extended tire mileage and super traction of Riverside HST and Riverside Runabout tires. Portions of this document are not fully legible.

1972-01-01

400

Anticipatory Grief Among Close Relatives of Patients in Hospice and Palliative Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Swedish widowhood study revealed that four out of ten widows regarded the pre-loss period more stressful than the post-loss. The present investigation of close relatives to patients dying from cancer (using interviews and the Anticipatory Grief Scale) found that preparatory grief involves much emotional stress, as intense preoccupation with the dying, longing for his\\/her former personality, loneliness, tearfulness, cognitive

sa K. Johansson; Agneta Grimby

2012-01-01

401

Anticipatory grief among close relatives of patients in hospice and palliative wards.  

PubMed

A Swedish widowhood study revealed that four out of ten widows regarded the pre-loss period more stressful than the post-loss. The present investigation of close relatives to patients dying from cancer (using interviews and the Anticipatory Grief Scale) found that preparatory grief involves much emotional stress, as intense preoccupation with the dying, longing for his/her former personality, loneliness, tearfulness, cognitive dysfunction, irritability, anger and social withdrawal, and a need to talk. Psychological status was bad one by every fifth. However, the relatives mostly stated adjustment and ability to mobilize strength to cope with the situation. The results suggest development of support and guiding programs also for the anticipatory period. PMID:21596732

Johansson, Asa K; Grimby, Agneta

2011-05-19

402

A single control electrostatic focus back-ward wave oscillator for X-band operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an X-band backward wave oscillator using the electrostatic focus principle applied to an interdigital line as described by Hergenrother and Bowers last year. The tube operates over the frequency range of 8.5 to 9.6 kmc with a minimum power output of 20 milliwatts and can be voltage tuned by altering a single electrode voltage. The tube is

R. Harper; R. C. Hergenrother; R. Mc C. Unger

1960-01-01

403

Disability in the over-65s can be warded off with better diet and exercise.  

PubMed

A healthy lifestyle in later life can significantly reduce the risk of disability, according to a study that adds to the evidence showing disability is not an inevitable consequence of ageing. PMID:24044829

2013-09-18

404

Geriatric screening in acute care wardsa novel method of providing care to elderly patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

liver cirrhosis, and cancer. Approximately one quarter of patients had been admitted to hospital in the previous month. The death rate was higher among women than men (10.8% versus 6.7%, P<0.001; odds ratio=1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-2.05), as was the percentage of those with a history of admission in the previous month (32.8% versus 20.0%, P<0.001; odds ratio=1.95; 95% confidence

JKH Luk; T Kwok; J Woo

1999-01-01

405

Ward round--Late presentation of acute compartment syndrome in the thigh.  

PubMed

Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare but has been described as a result of femur fracture and also thigh contusion in sports injury. Emergency fasciotomy has routinely been the recommended treatment. We describe a patient with a closed femur fracture, initially without any syndrome whilst on traction, and required surgical intervention. He was found to have a large haematoma associated with significant muscle damage in the posterior compartment. This case is unusual in that symptoms started 12 days after injury possibly after manipulation of the leg whilst on traction. Diagnosis is mainly clinical with an earliest alarming sign being disproportional increasing pain on passive stretch of the group of muscles. A high index of suspicion and prompt intervention are required to diagnose and treat compartment syndrome and prevent irreversible damage. PMID:20345011

Bates, Jes; Wamisho, Biruk L; Griffin, Meghan; Nyamulani, Nohakhelha

2009-06-01

406

Ward Valley and the Federal Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

In his State of the Union Address delivered on 23 January 1996, President Clinton said, speaking generally, {open_quotes}Passing a law - even the best possible law - is only a first step. The next step is to make it work.{close_quotes} The president is right, of course; faithful execution of any law is the key. Unfortunately, this lesson appears lost on

Pasternak

1996-01-01

407

Impact of Vaccinating HCWs on the Ward and Possible Influence of Avian Flu Threat  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background:\\u000a The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a 2-year vaccination program on the compliance of healthcare workers (HCWs)\\u000a employed in an acute care university hospital to influenza vaccination.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods:\\u000a The study was carried out in October\\/November from 2004 to 2006 in a 286-bed acute care university hospital located in northern\\u000a Italy employing

M. Chittaro; D. Turello; L. Calligaris; F. Farneti; A. Faruzzo; E. Fiappo; M. Panariti; S. Brusaferro

2009-01-01

408

Oral Infections in Home-living Elderly Patients Admitted to an Acute Geriatric Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the oral health of the frail and home-living elderly. The effects of dentogenic infections on the general condition of the elderly are also unknown. We therefore set out to investigate 191 elderly patients referred to an acute geriatric hospital due to sudden worsening of their general health. The patients' mean age was 81.2 6.4 years

J. H. Meurman; H. Pajukoski; S. Snellman; S. Zeiler; R. Sulkava

1997-01-01

409

Would artificial neural networks implemented in clinical wards help nephrologists in predicting epoetin responsiveness?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Due to its strong intra- and inter-individual variability, predicting the ideal erythropoietin dose is a difficult task. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the impact of the main parameters known to influence the responsiveness to epoetin beta and to test the performance of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in predicting the dose required to reach the haemoglobin target

Luca Gabutti; Nathalie Ltscher; Josephine Bianda; Claudio Marone; Giorgio Mombelli; Michel Burnier

2006-01-01

410

Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study  

PubMed Central

Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011) by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male) including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female), two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male). Results We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses. Conclusions The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care.

2012-01-01

411

Malondialdehyde-Deoxyguanosine Adduct Formation in Workers of Pathology Wards. The Role of Air Formaldehyde Exposure  

PubMed Central

Background Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are exposed. Pathologists can experience high formaldehyde exposure levels. Formaldehyde among other properties induce oxidative stress and free radicals, which react with DNA and lipids, leading to oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation, respectively. We measured the levels of air-formaldehyde exposure in a group of Italian pathologists and controls. We analyzed the effect of formaldehyde exposure on leukocyte malondialdehyde-deoxyguanosine adducts (M1-dG), a biomarker of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. We studied the relationship between air-formaldehyde and M1-dG adducts. Methods Air-formaldehyde levels were measured by personal air samplers. M1-dG adducts were analyzed by 32P-postlabelling assay. Results Reduction rooms pathologists were significantly exposed to air-formaldehyde in respect to controls and to the pathologists working in other laboratory areas (p<0.001). A significant difference for M1-dG adducts between exposed pathologists and controls was found (p=0.045). The effect becomes stronger when the evaluation of air-formaldehyde exposure was based on personal samplers (p=0.018). Increased M1dG adduct levels were only found in individuals exposed to air-formaldehyde concentrations higher than 66 ?g/m3. When the exposed workers and controls were subgrouped according to smoking, M1-dG tended to increase in all the subjects but a significant association between M1-dG and air-formaldehyde was only found in not smokers (p= 0.009). Air formaldehyde played a role positive but not significant (r = 0.355, p = 0.075, Pearson correlation) in the formation of M1-dG, only in not smokers. Conclusions Working in the reduction rooms and to be exposed to air-formaldehyde concentrations higher than 66 ?g/m3 is associated with increased levels of M1-dG adducts.

Romanazzi, Valeria; Munnia, Armelle; Piro, Sara; Allione, Alessandra; Ricceri, Fulvio; Guarrera, Simonetta; Pignata, Cristina; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W.; Peluso, Marco

2010-01-01

412

Cultural influences and patient behaviour: some experiences in the paediatric ward of a Nigerian hospital.  

PubMed

In this paper an attempt is made to analyse the incompatibilities between the professional and the layman's ideology in terms of models of illness and their treatment. From an interview with paediatricians at the Ile-Ife Teaching Hospitals Complex in Nigeria, we found out that the conflicting encounters experienced could be divided into 2 groups: opposition as a result of religious ideology, held especially from the Jehovah's Witnesses Sect; and opposition as a result of some child-rearing practices that were being strictly upheld by the mothers of the patients. From the cases cited, we noted that the adherence to some religious ideology was so strong that some patients were willing to withdraw from hospital treatment when it conflicted with a tenet of their religion. Of particular relevance here, was the fact that a religious leader of this sect agreed to a transfusion after he had been assured of secrecy. In this particular case, it was obvious that he feared 'losing face' among his followers. We felt that a more flexible relationship between the doctor and patient would reduce the tension; hence a case was made for a transcultural perspective based on an adequate knowledge of behavioural sciences. PMID:6733862

Odebiyi, A I

413

Compassionate containment? Balancing technical safety and therapy in the design of psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

This paper contributes to the international literature examining design of inpatient settings for mental health care. Theoretically, it elaborates the connections between conceptual frameworks from different strands of literature relating to therapeutic landscapes, social control and the social construction of risk. It does so through a discussion of the substantive example of research to evaluate the design of a purpose built inpatient psychiatric health care facility, opened in 2010 as part of the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Findings are reported from interviews or discussion groups with staff, patients and their family and friends. This paper demonstrates a strong, and often critical awareness among members of staff and other participants about how responsibilities for risk governance of 'persons' are exercised through 'technical safety' measures and the implications for therapeutic settings. Our participants often emphasised how responsibility for technical safety was being invested in the physical infrastructure of certain 'places' within the hospital where risks are seen to be 'located'. This illuminates how the spatial dimensions of social constructions of risk are incorporated into understandings about therapeutic landscapes. There were also more subtle implications, partly relating to 'Panopticist' theories about how the institution uses technical safety to supervise its own mechanisms, through the observation of staff behaviour as well as patients and visitors. Furthermore, staff seemed to feel that in relying on technical safety measures they were, to a degree, divesting themselves of human responsibility for risks they are required to manage. However, their critical assessment showed their concerns about how this might conflict with a more therapeutic approach and they contemplated ways that they might be able to engage more effectively with patients without the imposition of technical safety measures. These findings advance our thinking about the construction of therapeutic landscapes in theory and in practice. PMID:23916450

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wilbert; Wood, Victoria; Spencer, Ian; Mason, James; Close, Helen; Reilly, Joseph

2013-06-21

414

[The social-psychiatric night ward of the nerve clinic of the University of Halle].  

PubMed

The conception of social-psychiatric night-hospital will be showed in a balanced system of psychiatric preventing and rehabilitating measures in the industrial centre of Halle. The care based on a physician-patient contract and will be objectivated by documentation of behavior and psychologic tests. First results confirm expectations and necessity of this special care. PMID:7394082

Mthner, H; Fischer, U; Gillner, M; Weiske, W

1980-02-01

415

In Quest of a Lost Father? Inmates' Preferences of Staff Relation in a Psychiatric Prison Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The findings presented in the following paper suggest that staff members and prison inmates do not agree regarding preferred qualities of staff-inmate relationships. Staff members believe that the crucial relationship qualities in the context of a correctional institution are involvement; support; inmate autonomy; an antiauthoritarian position; and that the relationship should be of a friendly, informal nature, with a low

Sarah Ben-David; Peter Silfen

1994-01-01

416

Psychiatric disorders and personality characteristics of prisoners at regular prison wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundDutch correctional officers are trained to observe prisoners with severe mental disorder. This behavioural approach is assumed to detect psychiatrically disordered prisoners with striking symptoms. On the basis of this screening procedure about 10% of the Dutch prison population is classified as needing special care or control. In the current study, what psychopathology can still be found among the remaining

Erik Bulten; Henk Nijman; Cees van der Staak

2009-01-01

417

Assessment of quality of care in postpartum wards of Shaheed Beheshti Medical Science University hospitals, 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose Despite 77 per cent antenatal care coverage and 90 per cent skilled attendant at delivery, adjusted maternal mortality in Iran is 76 per 100,000 births. Low quality of maternal health services is one cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. However, few and limited studies have been devoted to the quality of postpartum care in Iran. This study aims

M. Simbar; Z. Alizadeh Dibazari; J. Abed Saeidi; H. Alavi Majd

2005-01-01

418

Dental Care for the Mentally Retarded; A Handbook for Ward Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Included in a handbook are discussions on general information for dental health for the institutionalized retarded, their need for dental care, the attendant's role in providing care, dental information for the attendant, how and when to use a toothbrush, care of toothbrushes and equipment, and indications of abnormal mouth conditions.

Alabama Univ., Birmingham. Dental Advisory Committee.

419

Bridging the gap between the intensive care unit and general wardsthe ICU Liaison Nurse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The acute care system in our public hospitals has seen an increase in acuity for multiday patients with associated pressure on access to the intensive care unit (ICU) beds for both elective and emergency patients.When an ICU bed has not been available at this hospital, it has resulted in elective surgery being cancelled and\\/or emergency patients requiring an ICU admission

Anna Green; Liz Edmonds

2004-01-01

420

Evaluation of Factors Delaying Discharge in Acute Orthopedic Wards: a Prospective Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction:Prolonged hospitalization due to delayed discharge not only increases cost, it also increases the risk of medical complications\\u000a e.g., hospital acquired infections. Length of stay (LOS) is one of the indicators that reflect total cost of care during hospitalization.\\u000a The study was planned to evaluate the factors affecting delay in discharges from hospital and whether these factors are avoidable.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Hypothesis:The

Rohit Rambani; Ben Okafor

2008-01-01

421

New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. II: The Central Region and the Lower Ninth Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The failure of the New Orleans regional flood protection systems, and the resultant catastrophic flooding of much of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, represents the most costly failure of an engineered system in U.S. history. This paper presents an overview of the principal events that unfolded in the central portion of the New Orleans metropolitan region during this hurricane, and

R. B. Seed; R. G. Bea; A. Athanasopoulos-Zekkos; G. P. Boutwell; J. D. Bray; C. Cheung; D. Cobos-Roa; L. Ehrensing; L. F. Harder Jr.; J. M. Pestana; M. F. Riemer; J. D. Rogers

2008-01-01

422

Constructing a Rehabilitative Reality in Special Religious Wards in Israeli Prisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traditional prison is not an institution fit for the rehabilitation of criminals. Its structural, social, and cultural realities suppress the ability and motivation of inmates to construct new, more positive perceptions of themselves and of their world, and thus greatly limit their prospects of undergoing an essential change and abandoning crime. In several prisons in Israel, there are special

Un Timor

1998-01-01

423

Newborn skin temperature two days postpartum during breastfeeding related to different labour ward practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimTo investigate (1) the skin temperature pattern in newborns two days after birth in connection to breastfeeding and to examine (2) if the administration of epidural analgesia (EDA) and oxytocin (OT) infusion during labour influences this parameter at this point of time.

W. Jonas; I. Wiklund; E. Nissen; A.-B. Ransj-Arvidson; K. Uvns-Moberg

2007-01-01

424

A spell of chicken-pox on a cancer patients' ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Second episodes of varicella after a definite primary exposure to chicken-pox are well known in immunosuppressed children. We report an outbreak in adult cancer patients. This observation suggests that there is also a higher risk of varicella infection in immunosuppressed adults. As there is a trend for a pronounced severity of chicken-pox in patients receiving anticancer drugs or suffering

R. Eckstein; A. Loy; U. Jehn

1984-01-01

425

Obstetrics during civil war: Six months on a maternity ward in Mallavi, Northern Sri Lanka  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long?term, large?scale ethnic armed conflict continues in Sri Lanka, where militant separatists control a northern section of the island. The conflict has resulted in a large population of internally displaced persons and a shortage of medical staff. Drug and equipment shortages compound the difficulty in access to medical care. This article reports the experiences from 1 November 2000 to

Ondrej Simetka; Brigg Reilley; Mathilda Joseph; Mhairi Collie; Johannes Leidinger

2002-01-01

426

Safety and efficacy of continuous morphine infusions following pediatric cranial surgery in a surgical ward setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeMorphine is avoided by many neurosurgeons following cranial surgery. There exists a concern regarding the potential complications\\u000a and a perception that cranial surgery is less painful than other surgical procedures. At British Columbia Childrens Hospital\\u000a continuous morphine infusions (CMI) have been used to control pain in pediatric neurosurgical patients. The purpose of this\\u000a study was to compare the safety and

Daniel T. Warren; Tim Bowen-Roberts; Christine Ou; Robert Purdy; Paul Steinbok

2010-01-01

427

Pesticides and Childhood Cancer: An Update of Zahm and Ward's 1998 Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are exposed to pesticides through a number of sources, including residential and agricultural applications. Parental occupational exposure to pesticides is also a concern because exposures occurring during pregnancy and carry-home residues also contribute to children's cumulative burden. A number of epidemiological studies consistently reported increased risks between pesticide exposures and childhood leukemia, brain cancer, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Wilms' tumor,

Claire Infante-Rivard; Scott Weichenthal

2007-01-01

428

Laptops on trolleys: lessons from a mobile-wireless hospital ward.  

PubMed

Most hospital-based staff can be considered to be mobile but many hospital information systems (HIS) are based on fixed desk top computers. Wireless networks allow HIS to be brought to the point of care using mobile devices such as laptops on trolleys thus providing data which can aid in clinical decision-making. The research objective of this project focusses on the collaborative design of a laptop solution for providing data at the point of care. The research approach was based on a combination of action research and design science. Action research techniques including participant observation and informal one-to-one discussions were used to obtain information that was used to evolve the trolley design as a design artefact while addressing usability limitations. This paper presents three versions of the trolley design and how they evolved based on the feedback provided to the researchers from clinical use. Also these results show that using iterative action research techniques (planning, action, evaluation and reflection) in collaborative research can provide productive outcomes addressing a specific design objective within an acute care setting. PMID:22760941

Weeding, Stephen; Dawson, Linda

2012-07-04

429

Study of Stomatococcus mucilaginosus isolated in a hospital ward using phenotypic characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-one isolates ofStomatococcus mucilaginosus were cultured from the blood (n=6), throat (n=23) and sputum (n=2) of 18 hospitalized patients, 13 of whom were neutropaenic and five of whom were non-neutropaenic. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, performed by means of a broth microdilution method, showed that the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin were 4 mg\\/l for the isolates collected from neutropaenic patients.

F. H. van Tiel; B. F. M. Slangen; H. C. Schouten; J. A. Jacobs

1995-01-01

430

Palestinian Children in the Hemato-Oncology Ward of an Israeli Hospital  

PubMed Central

Purpose An encounter between Palestinian parents of children with cancer and Israeli medical staff is a very special situation where potential enemies interact in a caring, trusting and intimate relationship for long periods of time. Our aim was to study the psychological and cultural encounter in order to understand the dynamics involved. Method The study is a qualitative one. Data was collected by way of structured in-depth interviews. Participants were physicians and nurses employed in the department, and Palestinian parents accompanying their children who were hospitalized during the research period. Results Six main themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: (1) The decision to come to Israel for treatment. (2) The meeting points of the two peoples: the Israeli check points and the Palestinian Authority permits. (3) Encounter with the Israeli hospital. (4) Relationship between medical staff and parents. (5) Language and cultural barriers. (6) Emotions, thoughts and behaviors during high security tension. Conclusion The interviews depict a poignant picture of the unique encounter between Israeli Doctors and nurses and Palestinian parents. The psychological mechanism used by parents and doctors is splitting-having a dichotomized, simple emotional-perceptual picture of a situation with no conflicts. Nurses use another psychological mechanism in addition which enables them to contain the paradox and the conflict.

Nehari, Miri; Bielorai, Bella; Toren, Amos

2008-01-01

431

Etiological Study of Fever of Unknown Origin in Patients Admitted to Medicine Ward of a Teaching Hospital of Eastern India  

PubMed Central

Background: In a developing country, infectious disease remains the most important cause of fever, but the noncommunicable diseases, like malignancy, are fast becoming important differential diagnoses. An important clinical problem is the cases labeled as fever of unknown origin (FUO), which often evade diagnosis. Objective: The present study was undertaken to find the cause of FUO in a tertiary care hospital of eastern India. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of inpatients, with regard to both clinical signs and investigations. Results: The main diagnosis in the end was tuberculosis, closely followed by hematological malignancy. A substantial number of cases remained undiagnosed despite all investigations. The provisional diagnosis matched with the final in around two thirds of the cases. While for younger patients leukemia was a significant diagnosis, for older ones, extra-pulmonary tuberculosis was a main concern. Interpretation: In India, infectious disease still remains the most important cause of fever. Thus the initial investigations should always include tests for that purpose in a case of FUO. Conclusion: Geographic variations and local infection profiles should always be considered when investigating a case of FUO. However, some of the cases always elude diagnosis, although the patients may respond to empirical therapy.

Bandyopadhyay, Dipanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Ramtanu; Paul, Rudrajit; Roy, Deeptarka

2011-01-01

432

Time of drug elimination in chronic drug abusers. Case study of 52 patients in a "low-step" detoxification ward.  

PubMed

The elimination time of illicit drugs and their metabolites is of both clinical and forensic interest. In order to determine the elimination time for various drugs and their metabolites we recruited 52 volunteers in a protected, low-step detoxification program. Blood samples were taken from each volunteer for the first 7 days, daily, urine sample for the first 3 weeks, daily. Urine was analyzed using a fluorescence-polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), serum using GC/MS. The elimination times of the drugs and/or their metabolites in urine and serum as well as the tolerance intervals/confidence intervals were determined. Due to the sometimes extremely high initial concentrations and low cut-off values, a few of the volunteers had markedly longer elimination times than those described in the literature. The cut-off values were as follows: barbiturates II (200ng/ml), cannabinoids (20ng/ml), cocaine metabolites (300ng/ml), opiates (200ng/ml). GC/MS detected the following maximum elimination times: total morphine in urine up to 270.3h, total morphine and free morphine in serum up to 121.3h, monoacetylmorphine in urine up to 34.5h, 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine up to 433.5h, THC-COOH in serum up to 74.3h, total codeine in urine up to 123h, free codeine in urine up to 97.5h, total codeine in serum up to 29h, free codeine in serum up to 6.3h, total dihydrocodeine (DHC) in urine up to 314.8h, free DHC in urine up to 273.3h, total and free DHC in serum up to 50.1h. Cocaine and its metabolites were largely undetectable in the present study. PMID:11376991

Reiter, A; Hake, J; Meissner, C; Rohwer, J; Friedrich, H J; Oehmichen, M

2001-06-15

433

Do centrally pre-prepared solutions achieve more reliable drug concentrations than solutions prepared on the ward?  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo compare the concentration conformity of infusion solutions manually prepared on intensive care units (ICU) with solutions\\u000a from pharmacy-based, automated production.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsA prospective observational study conducted in a university hospital in Germany. Drug concentrations of 100 standardised infusion\\u000a solutions manually prepared in the ICU and 100 matching solutions from automated production containing amiodarone, noradrenaline\\u000a or hydrocortisone were measured by high-performance

Carola Dehmel; Stephan A. Braune; Georg Kreymann; Michael Baehr; Claudia Langebrake; Heike Hilgarth; Axel Nierhaus; Dorothee C. Dartsch; Stefan Kluge

434

[Duration of breastfeeding from 15 maternity wards of the perinatal network in the Pays de la Loire area].  

PubMed

The "scurit naissance-natre ensemble" network in the Pays de la Loire region of France, with 24 maternity units, conducted a survey of nursing women to determine the duration of breastfeeding and to study the factors influencing this practice. Phone calls were made to mothers at 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months or until weaning. The statistical methods used were the Kaplan-Meier survival curve method with the calculation of the median duration of breastfeeding (exclusive or partial) in weeks, and the Cox multivariate model. The hazard ratio or relative risk (RR) was used in univariate analysis, and the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) in multivariate analysis (>1 related to short duration, and<1 related to long duration). Fifteen maternity units participated, and 239 women were followed. The median duration of breastfeeding was 15 weeks (3.5 months) with 10% discontinuing the first month and 25% continuing breastfeeding at 6 months. The final model of risk of duration contains the following variables: maternal age less than 30 years (aOR=1.54; 1.08-2.19), the time the decision was made before pregnancy (aOR=0.56; 0.38-0.83), BMI greater or equal to 30 (aOR=2.12 (1.18-3.79), and for the first month, the administration of bottle feeding or complements (aOR=2.51; 1.62-3.89), the baby's need to be stimulated to feed (aOR=5.07; 3.24-7.90), breastfeeding on demand (aOR=0.56; 0.39-0.82), and problems breastfeeding (aOR=1.45; 1.005-2.09). This survey to determine the duration of breastfeeding in western France, a region with low initiation rates, duration appears to be relatively long compared to other studies. The factors influencing breastfeeding duration were for some non-modifiable (age, time of the decision, etc.), and for others assistance by a professional (supplements, need for stimulation, difficulty sucking, breastfeeding on demand, etc.). Criteria for identifying difficulties are presented. PMID:23031316

Branger, B; Dinot-Mariau, L; Lemoine, N; Godon, N; Merot, E; Brehu, S; Winer, N; Brossier, J-P

2012-09-30

435

Ethical concerns in isolating patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the rehabilitation ward: a case report.  

PubMed

Concern about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is increasing in rehabilitation facilities. Those affected are often isolated to prevent the spread of MRSA to other patients. Because this isolation often interferes with the traditional rehabilitative approach, rehabilitation team members find themselves in an ethical dilemma as to how to approach these patients. Some patients may feel that strict isolation protocols violate their rights. We report a case showing the ethical dilemmas that an MRSA-positive patient brings to the rehabilitation setting. Isolation techniques make it difficult to treat rehabilitation patients using the current standards of care without compromising the medical ethics principles of autonomy and beneficence. Further study is required to establish protocols for patients with MRSA in the rehabilitation setting. PMID:12098167

Pike, Jeff H; McLean, Deirdre

2002-07-01

436

A Decolonizing Encounter: Ward Churchill and Antonia Darder in Dialogue. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 430  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"A Decolonizing Encounter" examines the effects of western colonialism on historically marginalized and colonized populations living both in the West and the "third world". Specifically, it explores crucial issues such as the decolonizing of schools and communities of color; the decentralization of power of the capitalist and colonial state;

Orelus, Pierre W., Ed.

2012-01-01

437

Search for steady and transient radio pulses to-wards two new Fermi-LAT sources with GMRT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Large Area Telescope aboard Fermi spacecraft has discovered many new pulsars at high energies (Abdo et al. 2009). Sixteen of the 46 sources in this first catalog were discovered at positions of bright gamma-ray sources with no known radio counterparts, suggesting a large radio-quiet pulsar population. The non-detections of radio pulsars in these sources suggest an outer gap origin of the high energy emission and strict upper limits with radio observations of these sources are required. On the other hand, the detection of radio pulsation is useful for an improved timing solution and an estimate of distance. Two of these, PSRs J2238+59 and J1958+2846, without radio counterparts, lie in a region of sky, which was surveyed using GMRT at 610 MHz in a recently concluded radio pulsar survey (Joshi et al. 2009). We present upper limits on pulsed radio emission from our survey for these two sources and the results of a transient search to detect isolated bursts from these sources using the same data.

Joshi, Bhal Chandra; McLaughlin, Maura; Lorimer, Duncan; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew

438

Management of acute bronchiolitis in emergency wards in Spain: variability and appropriateness analysis (aBREVIADo Project).  

PubMed

Most patients with acute bronchiolitis have a mild course and only require outpatient care. However, some of them have to go to emergency departments, because they have respiratory distress or feeding problems. There, they frequently receive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We want to know the variability and appropriateness of these procedures. A cross-sectional study (October 2007 to March 2008) was carried out on 2,430 diagnosed cases of bronchiolitis in hospital emergency departments, which required no hospitalization. An analysis of the appropriateness of the treatments was made in 2,032 cases gathered in ten departments with at least 100 cases, using as criterion the recommendations of a consensus conference. We estimated the adjusted percentages of each department. Most of the bronchiolitis were mild, in spite that they underwent multiple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In the acute phase, different treatments were used: inhaled beta 2 agonists (61.4%), antipyretics (17.1%), oral steroids (11.3%), and nebulized adrenaline (9.3%). In the maintenance phase, the most common treatments were: inhaled beta 2 agonists (50.5%), oral steroids (17%), oral beta 2 agonists (14.9%), and antibiotics (6.1%). The 64% of the treatments used in the acute phase and the 55.9% in the maintenance phase were considered inappropriate in the appropriateness analysis; a great heterogeneity among centers was found. Conclusions: There are discrepancies between clinical practice and evidence-based management of bronchiolitis in Spanish emergency departments. Inappropriate treatments were used in more than half of patients. The wide variation between centers shows the influence of local prescribing habits and reveals the scope for improvement. PMID:22350372

Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Gonzlez de Dios, Javier

2012-02-21

439

[From monologue towards therapeutic dialogue. Same remarks about systemic family consultation in a psychiatric in-patient ward].  

PubMed

Basing on the example of one patient and her family, the system family consultation--as a way towards therapeutic dialogue--is presented. The patient was hospitalised due to schizophrenia. In the given example, the psychiatrist was an observer of the consultation conducted by the psychologist. A system therapy consultation allowed a "multiple-picture" to be obtained: the family members and the patient presented their own understanding of the situation. This new multi-perspective description--showing the patient's symptoms functionality caused diagnostic uncertainty in the psychiatrist--how far is the diagnosis of schizophrenia a justifiable one. According to the authors, the systemic consultation, giving the possibility to empathize with existential, psychological and family problems of the patient, leads to a dialogue with his/her family and it plays one of the most important roles in the therapeutic and diagnostic process. PMID:18567401

Rostworowska, Maria; Opoczy?ska, Ma?gorzata

440

A Decolonizing Encounter: Ward Churchill and Antonia Darder in Dialogue. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 430  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"A Decolonizing Encounter" examines the effects of western colonialism on historically marginalized and colonized populations living both in the West and the "third world". Specifically, it explores crucial issues such as the decolonizing of schools and communities of color; the decentralization of power of the capitalist and colonial state;

Orelus, Pierre W., Ed.

2012-01-01

441

Long-term effect of introducing an early warning score on respiratory rate charting on general wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

The respiratory rate is an early indicator of disease, yet many clinicians underestimate its importance and hospitals report a poor level of respiratory rate recording. We studied the short- and long-term effects of introducing a new patient vital signs chart and the modified early warning score (MEWS), which incorporates respiratory rate on the prevalence of respiratory rate recording in six

Jackie McBride; Debbie Knight; Jo Piper; Gary B Smith

2005-01-01

442

Nurses' experience of using electronic patient records in everyday practice in acute\\/inpatient ward settings: A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic patient record (EPR) systems have a huge impact on nursing documentation. Although the largest group of end-users of EPRs, nurses have had minimal input in their design. This study aimed to review current research on how nurses experience using the EPR for documentation. A literature search was conducted in Medline and Cinahl of original, peer-reviewed articles from 2000 to

Jean E. Stevenson; Gunilla C. Nilsson; Gran I. Petersson; Pauline E. Johansson

2010-01-01

443

Cultural Resources Survey of Borrow Area for Dam 96, Souris River Basin Project, Ward County, North Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A class III cultural resource inventory was accomplished for a small borrow area in the Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge. The surveyed area encompasses about 3 acres on the valley wall slopes of the Souris River. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St....

C. Spaeth

1990-01-01

444

Monitoring Ambulation of Patients in Geriatric Rehabilitation Wards: The Accuracy of Clinicians' Prediction of Patients' Walking Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to determine whether clinicians' estimates of patients' walking time agree with those determined by accelerometer devices. The walking time was measured using a waist-mounted accelerometer device everyday during the patients' waking hours. At each weekly meeting, clinicians estimated the patients' average daily walking

Cheung, Vivian H. Y.; Salih, Salih A.; Crouch, Alisa; Karunanithi, Mohanraj K.; Gray, Len

2012-01-01

445

Ward Wilson - The Winning Weapon? Rethinking Nuclear Weapons in Light of Hiroshima - International Security 31:4  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reexamines the widely held presumption that nuclear weapons played a decisive role in winning the war in the Pacific. Based on new research from Japanese, Soviet, and U.S. archives, it concludes that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, played virtually no role in this outcome. A comparison of the responses of high-level Japanese officials to

Wand Wilson

2007-01-01

446

Routine screening for psychological distress on an Australian inpatient haematology and oncology ward: impact on use of psychosocial services  

Microsoft Academic Search

patients need to be hospitalised to establish a diagnosis, begin treatment or receive pallia- tive care, the loss of involvement in family, work or leisure roles can compound the distress experienced. 2 Between 35% and 47% of cancer patients experience significant psychological distress, with a higher prevalence in conditions where the risk of death is increased. 3,4 Psychological distress can

Stuart J Lee; Lynda J Katona; Sue E De Bono; Katrina L Lewis

2010-01-01

447

Documenting the NICU design dilemma: comparative patient progress in open-ward and single family room units  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To test the efficacy of single family room (SFR) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) designs, questions regarding patient medical progress and relative patient safety were explored. Addressing these questions would be of value to hospital staff, administrators and designers alike.Study Design:This prospective study documented, by means of Institution Review Board-approved protocols, the progress of patients in two contrasting NICU designs.

R Domanico; D K Davis; F Coleman; B O Davis

2011-01-01

448

Comparison of the antibacterial efficacy of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 1% triclosan handwash products in an acute clinical ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antibacterial efficacy of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) and 1% triclosan as handwash antiseptics is well established. Few published studies have identified hand bacteria found in glove juice samples, and most studies have used nonclinical study subjects. We report a longitudinal comparative study to determine the effect of 4% CHG and 1% triclosan on the composition of the hand bacterial

Joan L. Faoagali; Narelle George; Jonathan Fong; Jenny Davy; Muriel Dowser

1999-01-01

449

Comparison of the antibacterial efficacy of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 1% triclosan handwash products in an acute clinical ward.  

PubMed

The antibacterial efficacy of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) and 1% triclosan as handwash antiseptics is well established. Few published studies have identified hand bacteria found in glove juice samples, and most studies have used nonclinical study subjects. We report a longitudinal comparative study to determine the effect of 4% CHG and 1% triclosan on the composition of the hand bacterial flora of clinical staff in a specialist surgical unit. Prehandwash and posthandwash samples were collected on 3 separate occasions throughout each day by using the glove juice method and a supervised handwashing technique. Total bacterial counts were determined as well as counts for specific pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms. Both 4% CHG and 1% triclosan were found to effectively reduce the total hand bacterial count preduty (P =.0001). Four percent CHG also was consistently more effective at reducing the total count than was 1% triclosan. However, 1% triclosan eliminated methicillin-resistant S aureus, whereas 4% CHG failed to do so (P =.0001). Gram-negative bacteria were more likely to be eliminated after the use of 4% CHG compared with 1% triclosan. This study is the first to report the effects of 1% triclosan on the bacterial flora present on the hands of clinical staff and demonstrates the ability of 1% triclosan to eliminate methicillin-resistant S aureus. PMID:10433670

Faoagali, J L; George, N; Fong, J; Davy, J; Dowser, M

1999-08-01

450

Stroke Unit Versus General Medical Wards, II: Neurological Deficits and Activities of Daily Living A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and PurposeThe efficacy of stroke units has been extensively examined. It is unknown, however, whether the superiority of the stroke unit will remain after the increased focus on stroke treatment in general medicine. This study of patients admitted to the hospital early and with a short length of stay determines the effect and identifies certain important components of a

Ole Morten Rnning; Bjrn Guldvog

451

Close encounters in a pediatric ward: measuring face-to-face proximity and mixing patterns with wearable sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nosocomial infections place a substantial burden on health care systems and represent a major issue in current public health, requiring notable efforts for its prevention. Understanding the dynamics of infection transmission in a hospital setting is essential for tailoring interventions and predicting the spread among individuals. Mathematical models need to be informed with accurate data on contacts among individuals. We

Lorenzo Isella; Mariateresa Romano; Alain Barrat; Ciro Cattuto; Vittoria Colizza; Wouter Van den Broeck; Francesco Gesualdo; Elisabetta Pandolfi; Lucilla Rav; Caterina Rizzo; Alberto Eugenio Tozzi; Benjamin Cowling

2011-01-01

452

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. METHODS: This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47

Po-Liang Lu; LK Siu; Tun-Chieh Chen; Ling Ma; Wen-Gin Chiang; Yen-Hsu Chen; Sheng-Fung Lin; Tyen-Po Chen

2009-01-01

453

Bed occupancy and overcrowding as determinant factors in the incidence of MRSA infections within general ward settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) incidence and bed occupancy rates at St Luke's Hospital, Malta, were assessed over a 24-month period. A significant positive correlation was established (r=0.463;P<0.05) between new cases of MRSA infections and overall levels of bed occupancy. This would imply that overcrowding may be a relevant factor in MRSA spread within hospitals, even in non-intensive care settings.

M. A Borg

2003-01-01

454

Dryson equations, Ward identities, and the infrared behavior of Yang-Mills theories. [Schwinger-Dyson equations, Slavnov-Taylor identities  

SciTech Connect

It was shown using the Schwinger-Dyson equations and the Slavnov-Taylor identities of Yang-Mills theory that no inconsistency arises if the gluon propagator behaves like (1/p/sup 2/)/sup 2/ for small p/sup 2/. To see whether the theory actually contains such singular long range behavior, a nonperturbative closed set of equations was formulated by neglecting the transverse parts of GAMMA and GAMMA/sub 4/ in the Schwinger-Dyson equations. This simplification preserves all the symmetries of the theory and allows the possibility for a singular low-momentum behavior of the gluon propagator. The justification for neglecting GAMMA/sup (T)/ and GAMMA/sub 4//sup (T)/ is not evident but it is expected that the present study of the resulting equations will elucidate this simplification, which leads to a closed set of equations.

Baker, M.

1979-01-01

455

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA-2011-0047-3143, October 2011. Multiple Sclerosis Cluster Evaluation in an Inpatient Oncology Ward - Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In January 2011 NIOSH received an employee HHE request concerning a potential cluster of MS cases among nurses employed in the inpatient oncology unit of a university hospital in Wisconsin. The request detailed concern about acrolein as a potential exposu...

E. Page J. Couch

2011-01-01

456

Use of FMEA analysis to reduce risk of errors in prescribing and administering drugs in paediatric wards: a quality improvement report  

PubMed Central

Objective Administering medication to hospitalised infants and children is a complex process at high risk of error. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a proactive tool used to analyse risks, identify failures before they happen and prioritise remedial measures. To examine the hazards associated with the process of drug delivery to children, we performed a proactive risk-assessment analysis. Design and setting Five multidisciplinary teams, representing different divisions of the paediatric department at Padua University Hospital, were trained to analyse the drug-delivery process, to identify possible causes of failures and their potential effects, to calculate a risk priority number (RPN) for each failure and plan changes in practices. Primary outcome To identify higher-priority potential failure modes as defined by RPNs and planning changes in clinical practice to reduce the risk of patients harm and improve safety in the process of medication use in children. Results In all, 37 higher-priority potential failure modes and 71 associated causes and effects were identified. The highest RPNs related (>48) mainly to errors in calculating drug doses and concentrations. Many of these failure modes were found in all the five units, suggesting the presence of common targets for improvement, particularly in enhancing the safety of prescription and preparation of endovenous drugs. The introductions of new activities in the revised process of administering drugs allowed reducing the high-risk failure modes of 60%. Conclusions FMEA is an effective proactive risk-assessment tool useful to aid multidisciplinary groups in understanding a process care and identifying errors that may occur, prioritising remedial interventions and possibly enhancing the safety of drug delivery in children.

Lago, Paola; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Scalzotto, Francesca; Parpaiola, Antonella; Amigoni, Angela; Putoto, Giovanni; Perilongo, Giorgio

2012-01-01

457

Responses of Picoplankton to Nutrient Perturbation in the South China Sea with Special Reference to the Coast wards Distribution of Prochlorococcus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract :?Responses of Prochlorococcus ( Pro) , Synechococcus ( Syn) , pico- eukaryotes ( Euk) and het2 erotrophic bacteria (Bact) in pelagic marine ecosystems to external nutrient perturbations were examined using nitrogen- (N) , phosphorus- ( P) , iron- ( Fe) , and cobalt- (Co) enriched incubations in the South China Sea in November,1997. Variations in abundance of the 4

J Iao Nian-zhi; Yang Yan-hui; Hiroshi Koshikawa; Shigeki Harada; Masataka Watanabe

458

Four important features in the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf revealed from the high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution images taken by Formosat-2 in Summer 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

Massive ice shelf collapsing in Polar Regions is indisputably a clear warning of global warming. To investigate such a rapid change of a breaking up event at a remote site requires an innovative approach that is able to make both high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution observations. Deploying a high-spatial-resolution sensor in a daily revisit orbit, Formosat-2 successfully captured the details of Wilkins

C. Liu; Y. Chang; S. Yan; A. Wu

2008-01-01

459

Assessment of Quality of Care Among Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Admitted to the Dr. Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center Medical Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Limited information is available on how physicians perform the important processes of care on the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. A non-concurrent cohort study was done to assess the quality of care rendered to pneumonia patients admitted in a tertiary government hospital, using quality indicators based on the latest Philippine clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis, empiric management and

Pio T. Esguerra II; Mario M. Panaligan; Audie V. Cuntapay; Irma Claire; O. Bautista; Mari Karr Andaya-Esguerra

460

Outbreak of bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains of phage type 3C/71 in a maternity ward linked to nasal carriage of a healthcare worker.  

PubMed

We describe an outbreak of bullous impetigo (BI) that occurred in a maternity unit and show phenotypic and genotypic properties and relatedness of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Clinical material was obtained from 11 affected neonates. Additionally, nasal swabs from 67 healthy care workers (HCWs) as well as 107 environmental swabs were investigated. All isolates were screened for exfoliative toxin genes (eta, etb), antibiotic susceptibility and phage typed. Chromosomal DNA was genotyped by MLVF method and PCR/RFLP of coagulase gene were tested. Affected neonates were infected by two clusters of eta-positive S. aureus of phage type 3C/71: (1) MLVF type A isolates resistant only to penicillin, and (2) MLVF type B isolates resistant to penicillin and erythromycin/clindamycin. All isolates were susceptible to methicillin. We found 19 of 67 HCWs to be S. aureus nasal carriers. Two nasal isolates from HCWs were related to the outbreak on the basis of phage typing, PCR detection of eta/etb genes, antibiotyping and genotyping. Additionally, environmental swabs from the maternity unit revealed a 3C/71 S. aureus in the mattress of a baby bed. This is the first documented case of an outbreak of BI caused by phage type 3C/71 eta-positive strain of S. aureus. PMID:22378195

Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Budzy?ska, Anna; D?browska-Szponar, Maria

461

The completeness of medication histories in hospital medical records of patients admitted to general internal medicine wards: Completeness of medication in hospital medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims Accurate recording of medication histories in hospital medical records (HMR) is important when patients are admitted to the hospital. Lack of registration of drugs can lead to unintended discontinuation of drugs and failure to detect drug related problems. We investigated the comprehensiveness of medication histories in HMR with regard to prescription drugs by comparing the registration of drugs in

Hong Sang Lau; Christa Florax; Arijan J. Porsius; Anthonius De Boer

2001-01-01

462

An Aetiological Survey of Burns in Abusers of Various Kinds of Drugs Admitted to the Tabriz Sina Hospital Burns Ward in Iran  

PubMed Central

Summary A five-year prospective study (March 2003-March 2008) of burn victims hospitalized in a major burns centre in Iran was conducted in order to survey the aetiology and outcome of burns in patients who were drug addicts. Three hundred and thirty patients addicted to drugs were identified and stratified by age, sex, burn size, presence or absence of inhalation injury, kinds of abuse agents, and cause of burn. The mean patient age was 27.9 yr, and the male:female ratio was 7.6:1. There were 60 deaths overall (18.18%), the majority (47) among patients with flame burns. The mortality rate was significantly higher in multi-drug abusers than in single-drug abusers. Except for burn incidence, there were no significant differences between males and females. The mean burn size, 30.9%, was significantly larger in non-survivors than in survivors (57.8% versus 27.8%; p < 0.001). Inhalation injuries were strongly associated with large burns, and were present in all flame-burn fatalities. Flame burns were the most common type of burns in drug-addicted patients: incorrect use of a lighter and match and falling onto a brazier were the most common causes of flames. There were 11 deaths related to electrical injuries. Large burn size was the strongest predictor of mortality followed by the presence of inhalation injury. The most common agent of abuse was opium, followed by heroin and hashish; there was no difference between males and females in relation to the type of agent of which abuse was made

Maghsoudi, H.; Raghifar, R.

2010-01-01

463

Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 40 mg/day of atorvastatin in reducing the severity of sepsis in ward patients (ASEPSIS Trial)  

PubMed Central

Introduction Several observational studies suggest that statins modulate the pathophysiology of sepsis and may prevent its progression. The aim of this study was to determine if the acute administration of atorvastatin reduces sepsis progression in statin nave patients hospitalized with sepsis. Methods A single centre phase II randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Patients with sepsis were randomized to atorvastatin 40 mg daily or placebo for the duration of their hospital stay up to a maximum of 28-days. The primary end-point was the rate of sepsis progressing to severe sepsis during hospitalization. Results 100 patients were randomized, 49 to the treatment with atorvastatin and 51 to placebo. Patients in the atorvastatin group had a significantly lower conversion rate to severe sepsis compared to placebo (4% vs. 24% p = 0.007.), with a number needed to treat of 5. No significant difference in length of hospital stay, critical care unit admissions, 28-day and 12-month readmissions or mortality was observed. Plasma cholesterol and albumin creatinine ratios were significantly lower at day 4 in the atorvastatin group (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.049 respectively). No difference in adverse events between the two groups was obser