Sample records for wards zylna choroba

  1. 4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  2. Doctor Ward's Accidental Terrarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the story of the accidental invention of the Wardian case, or terrarium, by Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. Advocates the use of this story in teaching precollege biology as an illustration of how a chance event can lead to a major scientific advancement and as an example of the common occurrence of multiple discovery in botany. Contains 34…

  3. Consequences of anomalous ward identities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wess; B. Zumino

    1971-01-01

    The anomalies of Ward identities are shown to satisfy consistency or integrability relations, which restrict their possible form. For the case of SU(3) × SU(3) we verify that the anomalies given by Bardeen satisfy the consistency relations. A solution of the anomalous Ward identities is also given which describes concisely all anomalous contributions to low energy theorems. The contributions to

  4. 4GL ward management system.

    PubMed Central

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferred. A host of potentials and pitfalls is associated with the implementation of this new approach to Patient Management. PMID:1807662

  5. The Cauchy Problem of the Ward equation

    E-print Network

    Derchyi Wu

    2008-06-02

    We generalize the results of Villarroel, Fokas and Ioannidou, Dai, Terng and Uhlenbeck to study the inverse scattering problem of the Ward equation with non-small data and solve the Cauchy problem of the Ward equation with a non-small purely continuous scattering data.

  6. PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARDJH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARD-J-H. FLOOR, FOUNDATION AND FRAMING PLANS." OCTOBER 31, 1942. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  7. 9. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, WARD-L-H. Elevation, Sections & Roof Framing.' 10-31-42 - Madigan Hospital, Detention Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  8. 10. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Detention Ward, WARD-S-H. Plan & Schedules.' 6-22-43 - Madigan Hospital, Detention Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  9. 3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  10. Semantic Cohesion and Learning Arthur Ward and Diane Litman

    E-print Network

    Litman, Diane J.

    Semantic Cohesion and Learning Arthur Ward and Diane Litman University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh the cohesion of tutorial dialog in a way #12;2 Ward and Litman similar to the lexical reiteration cohesion

  11. Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Philip S. Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Philip S.

    Chapter 1 Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Evolution Philip S. Ward 1.1 Introduction Since their origin features of evolutionary history. Species-level taxonomy has advanced more fitfully than ant phylogenetics and features of their biology are dis- cussed. The state of species-level taxonomy is eval- uated

  12. Handheld Computing Devices in a Surgical Ward.

    E-print Network

    Grasso, Floriana

    devices for more than three years to improve the quality of service. In this paper we describe the design documentation and maintenance of medical record quality is a crucial issue. We tested the introduction of the surgical ward. Our hypothesis was that the use of handheld devices could enhance communication and quality

  13. Formal Transformations and WSL Martin Ward

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    Formal Transformations and WSL Part Two Martin Ward STRL Senior Research Fellow Royal Society of Transformations #12;Types of Transformations A Syntactic Transformation changes the syntax of the program but preserves the exact sequence of operations carried out by the program. Many restructuring transformations

  14. Ken Kimes & Sandra Ward: New Natives Farm

    E-print Network

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    to do that. They’ll plant and water, call it good. Then thewith sunlight, air and water and the plants grow. You justplants down in Salinas they’ll release into their holding Ken Kimes and Sandra Ward ponds water

  15. Standardization of Bone Mineral Density at Femoral Neck, Trochanter and Ward’s Triangle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Lu; T. Fuerst; S. Hui; H. K. Genant

    2001-01-01

    :   The International Committee for Standards in Bone Measurement (ICSBM) has published standardization formulas for total hip\\u000a bone mineral density (BMD). In many applications, however, BMD of hip subregions, such as femoral neck (FN), trochanter (TR),\\u000a and Ward’s triangle (WT), are commonly measured. This paper addresses whether the standardization formulas for total hip BMD\\u000a can be adequately used for hip

  16. PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "COMBINATION WARD, WARDKH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "COMBINATION WARD, WARD-K-H. ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND ROOF FRAMING PLAN." OCTOBER 31, 1942 - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  17. Computer-aided geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir, North Ward Estes field, Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Jr. Wylie; E. K. Davidsen; J. D. Gillespie; R. S. Butler

    1988-01-01

    The North Ward Estes field is located along the western edge of the Central Basin platform in Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas. The field is part of an upper Guadalupian productive trend that extends uninterrupted for 90 mi on the edge of the platform. The North Ward Estes field has produced over 350 million bbl of oil (one-third of the

  18. The role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, David

    In this article the role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety is explored. The background to the development of the patient safety agenda is briefly discussed and the relationship between quality and safety is illustrated. The pivotal importance of the role of the ward manager in delivering services to patients is underlined and literature on patient safety is examined to identify what a ward manager can do to make care safer. Possible actions of the ward manager to improve safety discussed in the literature are structured around the Leadership Framework. This framework identifies seven domains for the leadership of service delivery. Ward managers use their personal qualities, and network and work within teams, while managing performance and facilitating innovation, change and measurement for improvement. The challenge of promoting patient safety for ward managers is briefly explored and recommendations for further research are made. PMID:23123893

  19. Ward Identities and Chiral Anomaly in the Luttinger Liquid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Benfatto; Vieri Mastropietro

    2005-01-01

    Systems of interacting non-relativistic fermions in d =1, as well as spin chains or interacting two dimensional Ising models, verify an hidden approximate Gauge invariance which can be used to derive suitable Ward identities. Despite the presence of corrections and anomalies, such Ward identities can be implemented in a Renormalization Group approach and used to exploit nontrivial cancellations which allow

  20. Mobile Task Management for Medical Ward Rounds -The MEDo Approach

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    they currently manage ward rounds in general, i.e., the communication with other healthcare professionals interactions and communication among healthcare professionals. Problems of ward inpatients become more and more user interface on a tablet integrating process support, mobile task management, and access

  1. 2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4. ON LEFT IS BUILDING NO. 9952-B, FOLLOWED BY THE B (NORTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9953-9958. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  2. 1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4 ON WEST SIDE OF COMPLEX. CAMERA IS POINTED NORTHWEST. IN RIGHT FOREGROUND IN BUILDING NO. 9930-A, FOLLOWED BY THE A (SOUTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9931-9937. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  3. Effective sigma models and lattice Ward identities

    E-print Network

    Dittmann, L; Wipf, A; Dittmann, Leander; Heinzl, Thomas; Wipf, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    We perform a lattice analysis of the Faddeev-Niemi effective action conjectured to describe the low-energy sector of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. To this end we generate an ensemble of unit vector fields ("color spins") n from the Wilson action. The ensemble does not show long-range order but exhibits a mass gap of the order of 1 GeV. From the distribution of color spins we reconstruct approximate effective actions by means of exact lattice Schwinger-Dyson and Ward identities ("inverse Monte Carlo"). We show that the generated ensemble cannot be recovered from a Faddeev-Niemi action, modified in a minimal way by adding an explicit symmetry-breaking term to avoid the appearance of Goldstone modes.

  4. [Burns. An epidemiologic casualty ward study].

    PubMed

    Maagaard Mortensen, N H; Poulsen, E U

    1990-05-21

    Four hundred eighty five persons were treated for burns at the casualty ward of Aarhus County Hospital between 1 January and 31 December 1986. Compared to a previous study from the municipality of Copenhagen only minor differences were found concerning the distribution of patient sex and age, and the cause and scene of accident. Small children aged 0-5 years constituted a high risk group, representing more than 18% of all burn injuries. Ninety one per cent of the accidents in this group took place in the home, and the need for further prophylactic measures is evident. Our suggestions include better insulation of oven doors, and protective shields at the front of electric stoves. Further, we emphasize that children should never be left alone in the kitchen without proper supervision. PMID:2360269

  5. Ward Identity Implies Recursion Relation at Tree and Loop Level

    E-print Network

    Yun Zhang; Gang Chen

    2013-02-09

    In this article, we use Ward identity to calculate tree and one loop level off shell amplitudes in pure Yang-Mills theory with a pair of external lines complexified. We explicitly prove Ward identity at tree and one loop level using Feynman rules, and then give recursion relations for the off shell amplitudes. We find that the cancellation details in the proof of Ward identity simplifies our derivation of the recursion relations. Then we calculate three and four point one loop off shell amplitudes as examples of our method.

  6. Ward identity implies recursion relations in Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang

    2012-07-01

    The Ward identity in gauge theory constrains the behavior of the amplitudes. We discuss the Ward identity for amplitudes with a pair of shifted lines with complex momenta. This will induce a recursion relation identical to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations at the finite poles of the complexified amplitudes. Furthermore, according to the Ward identity, it is also possible to transform the boundary term into a simple form, which can be obtained by a new recursion relation. For the amplitude with one off-shell line in pure Yang-Mills theory, we find this technique is effective for obtaining the amplitude even when there are boundary contributions.

  7. Three Bridge Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Three Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's Crossing Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Spanning East Fork of Point Remove Creek at Fryer Bridge Road (CR 67), Solgohachia, Conway County, AR

  8. 1. VIEW OF DETENTION WARD AREA, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM Y ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DETENTION WARD AREA, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM Y STREET - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1065, Northeast of Intersection of South Ninth Avenue & South "Y" Street, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  9. Elevation of north facades of #156158 (triple wards) National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of north facades of #156-158 (triple wards) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Generalized On-Shell Ward Identities in String Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jen-Chi Lee

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated that an infinite set of string-tree level on shell Ward identities, which are valid to all sigma-model loop orders, can be systematically constructed without referring to the string field thoery. As examples, bosonic massive scattering amplitudes are calculated explicitly up to the second massive excited states. Ward identities satisfied by these amplitudes are derived by using zero-norm

  13. Reliability of a functioning scale (GAF) among psychiatric ward staff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ove Sonesson; Tomas Tjus; Hans Arvidsson

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the reliability of the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) when used by psychiatric staff from acute psychiatric wards. A special focus was attributed to factors predicting the reliability of the GAF.101 raters from six acute psychiatric wards assessed six GAF-vignettes. Intraclasscorrelation (ICC) with a model of absolute agreement was used as the overall reliability measure.An overall

  14. Nursing Education Utilizing Experiences in a Virtual Hospital Ward.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Keiko; Matsumoto, Maki; Takai, Kiyako; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Iwata, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Environmental design should be required at medical facilities for conducting medical practice safely and for making hospitalization comfortable. Many medical nursing students cannot imagine medical facilities, especially hospital wards, when they study medical environments in a basic nursing lecture. As a result, they cannot connect well with patient assistance. We employed a computer assisted designing software, "3D My Home Designer" (Mega Soft Company) that runs on Windows 8, and considered the usefulness of it for lectures on environmental design showing how to design a hospital ward for patients' optimal hospital stay. We drew a medical facility in 2-D first, transformed it into 3D images, and then created movies of a virtual hospital ward in which a patient walked around. These movies consisted of 3 kinds: a) hospital room with changeable wall color, b) different allocations of hospital room and nurse station, and c) a blurred ward which corresponded to how a patient with poor eyesight (cataract) would see a ward. We prepared as controls: a') still images of a hospital room, b') still images of ward, and c') a documentation on how a ward is seen by a patient with a cataract. We gave a questionnaire to students and nurses about these movies and still images (controls). In a) and b), there were no differences between the movies and still images in both students and nurses. In c), both students and nurses had a viewpoint from the patient with poor eyesight. From these results, we consider that the students, who have fewer experiences in a hospital, may understand the environments well by movies and the application of a virtual movie ward to nursing education may be useful in a lecture, depending on the readiness of the students. PMID:26073505

  15. Superconformal Ward Identities and N=2 Yang-Mills Theory

    E-print Network

    P. S. Howe; P. C. West

    1996-08-01

    A reformulation of the superconformal Ward identities that combines all the superconformal currents and the associated parameters in one multiplet is given for theories with rigid N=1 or N=2 supersymmetry. This form of the Ward Identities is applied to spontaneously broken N=2 Yang-Mills theory and used to derive a condition on the low energy effective action. This condition is satisfied by the solution proposed by Seiberg and Witten.

  16. Exploring the experiences of young people nursed on adult wards.

    PubMed

    Dean, Linda; Black, Sharon

    2015-02-26

    This paper reports on a study of experiences of young people aged 14 to 18 years who were nursed on acute adult hospital wards in NHS hospitals in England. In spite of British government guidelines, young people from 14 years of age continue to be admitted to adult wards in the UK. Although much has been written about the transition of the young person to adult services, there is little research about the experiences of young people who are nursed on adult wards. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of eight young people who had been nursed on adult wards between 2004 and 2010. Data were collected in 2010. In-depth interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework ( Colaizzi, 1978 ). Themes explored included expectations of what the experience may be like, young people's first impressions of the ward environment, the feelings of the young person while in hospital, the attitudes of people towards them including, both staff and other patients, and future admissions and how they would cope with readmissions. Better provision needs to be made for young people including appropriately trained staff, adolescent-friendly environments and areas in adult wards that are dedicated to adolescents. PMID:25723268

  17. How Well Equipped are ENT Wards for Airway Emergencies?

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Rupan; Thirlwall, Andrea; Corbridge, Rogan

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION With increased cross cover of specialities at night and more direct triaging of casualty patients to ENT wards, there is an increased need to ensure that there is adequate provision of emergency airway management. There are currently no national guidelines on what equipment should be available on ENT wards, and the authors have devised a portable airway box with all equipment deemed necessary to manage an acute airway. We believe that all junior doctors covering ENT should have airway training and access to an airway box. The aim of this study was to determine the provision of on-ward airway equipment and training on ENT wards in England. MATERIALS AND METHODS A telephone survey of all English hospitals with in-patient ENT services. RESULTS A total of 103 departments were contacted with 98% response rate. Most wards were covered by a combination of ENT and other specialties. Results indicated that only 18% of departments had an airway box and 28% had some training in airway management. CONCLUSIONS Results suggest poor provision of emergency airway equipment and training on wards. We recommend the use of an airway box, and list of minimal equipment required. PMID:16551407

  18. The Ventilation, Heating and Lighting of Hospital Wards

    PubMed Central

    Watt, James

    1933-01-01

    History of ventilation in last 100 years, showing reversal of ideas and influence of sanatorium idea. Physiology of cool moving air. How it affects metabolism, heat-loss and heat-production. Relation to sunlight. Reactive capacity of the individual. Practice of these teachings, as illustrated by sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis and by open-air schools. Exposure to cooling air a powerful therapeutic agent. Infrequent occurrence in sanatoria of diseases or complications often ascribed to cold. Dilution of infection. Applicability to diseases other than tuberculosis. Shock and old age. Perflation and diffusion, their relative values. Uniformity or variability of effect desirable? Incompatibility of good ventilation and ordinary standards of heating. Former the more important. Conclusion that ward temperatures may be lowered without harm. Measures necessary to compensate, clothing, classification of patients, small wards. Changing standards of comfort. Psychological effects. Systems of ventilation in hospital wards. Mechanical by propulsion or extraction being displaced by natural system, usually by cross-window ventilation. Supplementary ventilators. Objection to heating of incoming air. Fallibility of human factor in management. Sash versus casement windows. Hoppers. Austral window. Orientation and exposure of wards. Ventilation of small wards. Proportion of window space to solid wall. Balconies. Floor space. Heating of wards. Heating of air or floor or walls. Open fires. Value of radiant heat. Steam or water under low or high pressure. Radiators or pipes. Lighting. Avoidance of glare from windows. Arrangement of beds in wards. Colour of walls. Blinds and curtains. Artificial lighting. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:19989481

  19. Ward nutrition coordinators to improve patient nutrition in hospital.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Jackie

    It is important that patients receive adequate nutrition while in hospital. Reports and research over the past 10 years have highlighted the problems in the NHS of managing the nutritional needs of patients (King's Fund, 1992; McWhirter and Pennington, 1994; Edington et al, 2000). This article describes a successful pilot study addressing nutrition at the ward level. It resulted from a multidisciplinary team forming to share their specific nutritional concerns; through creative thinking they devised a new role of nutrition coordinator. In the study a healthcare assistant was used from the existing ward establishment and given one-week intensive multidisciplinary induction before commencing the role in the wards. The main focus of the role was to facilitate, rather than undertake, the nutritional care of patients throughout their stay. Following a 6-month trial, the role demonstrated a significant impact on nutritional screening, nutritional service, patients' perceptions of their nutritional care, and staff satisfaction. PMID:14581841

  20. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  1. Reorganizing a hospital ward as an accountable care unit.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason; Payne, Christina; Methvin, Amanda; Bonsall, Joanna M; Chadwick, Liam; Clark, Diaz; Castle, Bryan W; Tong, David; Dressler, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Traditional hospital wards are not specifically designed as effective clinical microsystems. The feasibility and sustainability of doing so are unclear, as are the possible outcomes. To reorganize a traditional hospital ward with the traits of an effective clinical microsystem, we designed it to have 4 specific features: (1) unit-based teams, (2) structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds, (3) unit-level performance reporting, and (4) unit-level nurse and physician coleadership. We called this type of unit an accountable care unit (ACU). In this narrative article, we describe our experience implementing each feature of the ACU. Our aim was to introduce a progressive approach to hospital care and training. PMID:25399928

  2. The facies, depositional environment, and cyclicity of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian), North Ward-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Eide, Michael Gary

    1993-01-01

    , TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL GARY EIDE Approved as to style and content by: es M. zullo Chair of Committee) Robert R. Berg (Member) Va he T h crian (Member) John H. Span (Head of Department) May 1993 ABSTRACT The Facies, Depositional...THE FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT, AND CYCLICITY OF THE QUEEN FORMATION (GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN), NORTH WARD-ESTES FIELD, WARD COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL GARY EIDE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University...

  3. 8. BUILDING NO. 9953B. INTERIOR OPEN WARD AS VIEWED FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BUILDING NO. 9953-B. INTERIOR OPEN WARD AS VIEWED FROM OFFICE HALLWAY. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. BUILDING NO. 9953B. INTERIOR OF OPEN WARD SHOEING FOUR WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING NO. 9953-B. INTERIOR OF OPEN WARD SHOEING FOUR WINDOWS ON EAST WALL AND CURTAIN DIVIDERS FOR PATIENTS. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  5. 9. BUILDING NO. 9953B. INTERIOR OF OPEN WARD AS VIEWED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING NO. 9953-B. INTERIOR OF OPEN WARD AS VIEWED FROM DOORWAY TO SUN PORCH AT NORTH END OF BUILDING - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  6. Informed Switching Strongly Decreases the Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Hospital Wards

    E-print Network

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    Informed Switching Strongly Decreases the Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Hospital Wards, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract Antibiotic resistant nosocomial infections are an important cause of antibiotic resistance in the hospital ward. We assume that information on resistance frequencies stems from

  7. How many species of prokaryotes are there? Bess B. Ward*

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    Commentary How many species of prokaryotes are there? Bess B. Ward* Geosciences Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 The microorganisms classified in the two prokaryotic domains of prokaryotes. Less than 30 years ago, the answer to the even more fundamental question ``How many individuals

  8. 14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Significance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the Bess B. Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    Significance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the ocean Bess B. Ward Department of Geosciences: bacteria capable of oxidizing ammonium to nitrogen gas (N2). This new source of N2 has now been detected the existence of bacteria capable of coupling the oxidation of ammonium directly to the reduction of nitrate [6

  10. Nosocomial infections in intensive care wards: A multicenter prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. D. Daschner; P. Frey; G. Wolff; P. C. Baumann; P. Suter

    1982-01-01

    In a three-year prospective investigation, a total of 6,952 patients were investigated prospectively in nine intensive care wards and their rate of nosocomial infections was analysed. The frequency of the nosocomial infections varied between 3% and 27%. The most frequent nosocomial infections were urinary tract infections, sepsis, infections of the skin and of the subcutaneous tissue, pneumonia and wound infections.

  11. Ward Edwards Library's Materials in Communication Disciplines: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Cheryl

    The Ward Edwards Library of Central Missouri State University attempts to collect the materials necessary to support classroom needs and faculty research. This assessment gauges how well the library print collection supports the Department of Communication, in which undergraduate majors and postgraduate degrees are offered in a total of 85…

  12. 2. Ramp No. 3 connection between two Standard Wards: Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Ramp No. 3 connection between two Standard Wards: Building Nos. 9935-A (left) and 9934-A (right). Note asymetrical wooden door, and brick arch above doorway. - Madigan Hospital, Corridors & Ramps, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  13. Magic Cayley-Sudoku Tables Rosanna Mersereau `13 & Michael Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Michael B.

    Magic Cayley-Sudoku Tables Rosanna Mersereau `13 & Michael Ward Western Oregon University Joint / 14 #12;Definition A Magic Cayley-Sudoku table is a Cayley-Sudoku table in which the blocks are magic squares, that is, the blocks are square and the group sum of the elements in every row, column

  14. Hospitalized patients’ views on in-ward psychological counseling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Schoenberg; Shoshana Shiloh

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the feelings and beliefs of patients hospitalized in an orthopedic rehabilitation ward for receiving psychological help in that setting. Semi-structured interviews with 10 hospitalized patients were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Themes of an approach–avoidance conflict towards receiving psychological help were identified, some of them unique to the hospital setting. Approach

  15. Open-Ward Accomodations in a Long-Term Care Facility: The Elderly's Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayser-Jones, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    A field study of residents' satisfaction or dissatisfaction with open-ward accomodations in a skilled-nursing facility revealed that 88 percent of the respondents preferred the open ward to any other type of room accomodation. Findings suggest that for residents with multiple functional disabilities, the open ward is a supportive environment.…

  16. SINCE AGE 13 PARENTS DECEASED, FOSTER CARE, OR WARD/DEPENDENT OF THE COURT

    E-print Network

    SINCE AGE 13 PARENTS DECEASED, FOSTER CARE, OR WARD/DEPENDENT OF THE COURT Student Name (please in foster care, or were you a dependent or ward of the court? As noted in your Free Application for Federal. I currently am or was a ward/dependent of the court since age 13. Attach to this form court

  17. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  18. Investigation of cross-infection in isolation wards of different design.

    PubMed Central

    McKendrick, G. D.; Emond, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey was conducted in seven hospitals to assess the risk of cross-infection with the highly infectious air-borne diseases, varicella-zoster and measles, in isolation wards of different design. Existing wards and isolation techniques were found to afford a high degree of protection, but there was considerable variation in the incidence of cross-infection related to ward structure, ward practice and the availability of trained staff. Recommendations are made for the design of new isolation wards and for safe practice. PMID:1060693

  19. Psychiatric staff on the wards does not share attitudes on aggression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The concept of ward culture has been proposed as a reason for the often reported differences in treatment decisions when managing inpatient aggression. We therefore studied whether staff on wards actually shares similar perceptions and attitudes about aggression and whether the specialty of the ward on which the staff members work influences these opinions. Methods The Attitudes Towards Aggression Scale was used to assess attitudes towards aggression in 31 closed psychiatric wards. Altogether 487 staff members working on the study wards were asked to fill in the scale. Respondent’s gender, age, educational level, working experience on the current ward, and specialty of this ward (acute, forensic, rehabilitation) served as background variables. Results Most of the variance found was due to differences between individuals. Belonging to the personnel of a particular ward did not explain much of the variance. Conclusions Psychiatric staff on the wards does not share attitudes on aggression. As each staff member has his/her own opinion about aggression, training for dealing with aggression or violent incidents should be done, at least partly, on an individual level. We also suggest caution in using the concept of ward culture as an explanation for the use of restrictive measures on psychiatric wards. PMID:24778708

  20. A system of air recirculation and antibacterial surface treatment in a surgical ward

    PubMed Central

    Ayliffe, G. A. J.; Beard, M. A.; Filbey, J.

    1962-01-01

    A system of surface treatment with an antibacterial agent and air recirculation through treated filters was set up in a 15-bedded surgical ward, using an adjacent 10-bedded ward as a control. Nasal, wound, and urinary cross-infection was studied in both wards for over one year. Total bacterial counts and counts of Staphylococcus pyogenes were made from settle plates and blanket sweep plates. After the installation of the system aerial contamination in the test ward was reduced appreciably more than in the control ward. The number of blankets contaminated with Staph. pyogenes was similar in both wards. There was no significant difference in wound, nasal, or urinary cross-infection between the two wards. PMID:13863501

  1. Effects and impacts of Productive Ward from a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    White, Mark; Waldron, Michelle

    The Productive Ward: releasing time to care (PW) initiative is predominantly a nurse-led quality improvement (QI) offering, designed to streamline ward work processes and clinical environments in an attempt to 'release time to care'. It has been implemented widely in the UK, recently attracting international interest. This paper systematically reviews the literature relating to the PW initiative, highlights and ranks the reported effects and impacts from a nursing perspective. Nine themes emerged from our content analysis. This paper examines the three most reported themes-empowerment, leadership and engagement-exploring how they may influence the opportunities for implementing and sustaining the initiative. This study brings some experience, learning and insight from the PW initiative to those currently involved in implementation. It also highlights some elements of change not being delivered by PW. The comprehensive list of reported impacts and effects, from a nursing perspective, adds value to senior nurses attempting to cultivate a culture of QI. PMID:24763297

  2. Renormalization group and Ward identities for infrared QED4

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropietro, Vieri [Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A regularized version of Euclidean QED4 in the Feynman gauge is considered, with a fixed ultraviolet cutoff, photon mass of the size of the cutoff, and any value, including zero, of the electron mass. We will prove that the Schwinger functions are expressed by convergent series for small values of the charge and verify the Ward identities, up to corrections which are small for momentum scales far from the ultraviolet cutoff.

  3. Clonal Dissemination of Staphylococcus epidermidis in an Oncology Ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth L. Muldrew; Yi-Wei Tang; Haijing Li; Charles W. Stratton

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the main cause of catheter-related infections, especially among immunosuppressed and neutropenic patients, as well as a source of bacterial contamination in blood cultures. Using biochemical identification and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), we sought to identify possible clonal isolates of bacteremia in patients with central lines in an oncology ward (OW), with comparison to isolates that were

  4. Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

  5. Slavnov-Taylor and ward identities in the electroweak theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the electroweak theory, we discuss a class of gauge-fixing choices suitable for calculating electromagnetic processes. In particular, we show that with our choices, in addition to the basic Slavnov-Taylor identities guaranteeing that physical results are independent of the choice of the gauge fixing, we also have the standard Ward identities in quantum electrodynamics, which play a well-known crucial role in calculating electromagnetic processes and, specifically, in analyzing the electromagnetic radiative corrections.

  6. Ward Morgan Photography, Southwest Michigan 1939-1980

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ward Morgan spent decades documenting life in and around Kalamazoo, Michigan. He went into interiors of women's shoe stores, took photos of students in classrooms, and photographed folks gathering for a society meeting. Most of his work took place in the middle decades of the 20th century, and these everyday photos eventually found their way to Western Michigan University. Visitors can browse these 500 photos randomly or look through the list of available topics, which include Advertising, Religious, Education, and Business Scenes.

  7. Ventilation assessment of an infectious disease ward housing TB patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, M.S.; Hughes, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) assisted the National Center for Infectious Diseases and the National Center for Prevention Services, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in their investigation of nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis (TB) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center. NIOSH was asked to determine whether ventilation requirements expected of TB patient isolation facilities were being met. In the Infectious Disease ward (513), 24 staff were given a tuberculin skin test (TST) in the summer of 1991. Eleven (46%) were positive then, and 13 were negative. Ten of the 13 testing negative in 1991 were retested within a year, and 5 (50%) converted to a positive TST. NIOSH investigators made ventilation measurements on Ward 5B, an infectious diseases ward housing patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), two of them with infectious TB, to determine the status of the systems serving the area. Airflow measurements showed that in all the single-patient rooms, exhaust airflow was essentially zero. The average supply airflow varied above and below the designed value. These rooms were all positively pressurized, which would be recommended for the isolation of infectious patients. Based on the measurements made during this evaluation, it was recommended that a separate isolation facility be constructed in the hospital to house infectious patients. Interim corrective measures for the systems in place were also recommended.

  8. Risk stratification of hospitalized patients on the wards.

    PubMed

    Churpek, Matthew M; Yuen, Trevor C; Edelson, Dana P

    2013-06-01

    Patients who suffer adverse events on the wards, such as cardiac arrest and death, often have vital sign abnormalities hours before the event. Early warning scores have been developed with the aim of identifying clinical deterioration early and have been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. In this review, we discuss recently developed and validated risk scores for use on the general inpatient wards. In addition, we compare newly developed systems with more established risk scores such as the Modified Early Warning Score and the criteria used in the Medical Early Response Intervention and Therapy (MERIT) trial in our database of > 59,000 ward admissions. In general we found the single-parameter systems, such as the MERIT criteria, to have the lowest predictive accuracy for adverse events, whereas the aggregate weighted scoring systems had the highest. The Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (CART) score was best for predicting cardiac arrest, ICU transfer, and a composite outcome (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78, respectively), whereas the Standardized Early Warning Score, VitalPAC Early Warning Score, and CART score were similar for predicting mortality (AUC, 0.88). Selection of a risk score for a hospital or health-care system should be guided by available variables, calculation method, and system resources. Once implemented, ensuring high levels of adherence and tying them to specific levels of interventions, such as activation of a rapid response team, are necessary to allow for the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. PMID:23732586

  9. Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. C.; Ferraz, A.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-12-01

    Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

  10. Action Ward Identity and the Stückelberg-Petermann Renormalization Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dütsch, Michael; Fredenhagen, Klaus

    A fresh look at the renormalization group (in the sense of Stückelberg-Petermann) from the point of view of algebraic quantum field theory is given, and it is shown that a consistent definition of local algebras of observables and of interacting fields in renormalized perturbative quantum field theory can be given in terms of retarded products. The dependence on the Lagrangian enters this construction only through the classical action. This amounts to the commutativity of retarded products with derivatives, a property named Action Ward Identity by Stora.

  11. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    PubMed Central

    Laskaratos, Faidon-Marios; Wallace, Deirdre; Gkotsi, Despoina; Burns, Aine; Epstein, Owen

    2015-01-01

    The ward round (WR) is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching. PMID:25907002

  12. Quadratic Isocurvature Cross-Correlation, Ward Identity, and Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    Daniel J. H. Chung; Hojin Yoo; Peng Zhou

    2013-03-25

    Sources of isocurvature perturbations and large non-Gaussianities include field degrees of freedom whose vacuum expectation values are smaller than the expansion rate of inflation. The inhomogeneities in the energy density of such fields are quadratic in the fields to leading order in the inhomogeneity expansion. Although it is often assumed that such isocurvature perturbations and inflaton-driven curvature perturbations are uncorre- lated, this is not obvious from a direct computational point of view due to the form of the minimal gravitational interactions. We thus compute the irreducible gravitational contributions to the quadratic isocurvature-curvature cross-correlation. We find a small but non-decaying cross-correlation, which in principle serves as a consistency prediction of this large class of isocurvature perturbations. We apply our cross-correlation result to two dark matter isocurvature perturbation scenarios: QCD axions and WIMPZILLAs. On the technical side, we utilize a gravita- tional Ward identity in a novel manner to demonstrate the gauge invariance of the computation. Furthermore, the detailed computation is interpreted in terms of a soft-{\\zeta} theorem and a gravitational Ward identity. Finally, we also identify explicitly all the counterterms that are necessary for renormalizing the isocurvature perturbation composite operator in inflationary cosmological backgrounds.

  13. Impact of Moving Objects on Contaminant Concentration Distributions in an Inpatient Ward with

    E-print Network

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Impact of Moving Objects on Contaminant Concentration Distributions in an Inpatient Ward Moving objects can disturb stratified flow and contaminant concentration gradient in an inpatient ward of moving objects, such as a walking visitor, a walking caretaker, the changing of the sheet on a patient

  14. EssenCES, a short questionnaire for assessing the social climate of forensic psychiatric wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert Schalast; Mirja Redies; Mick Collins; Jacqueline Stacey; Kevin Howells

    2008-01-01

    Background A supportive ward atmosphere is considered by many to be a precondi- tion for successful treatment in forensic psychiatry, but there is a clear need for a valid and economic climate evaluation instrument. Aims To validate a sh ort questionnaire, designed for assessing forensic psychiatric wards. Climate dimensions measured with the 'Essen Climate Evaluation Schema' (EssenCES) are 'Therapeutic Hold',

  15. Creating Readers: Vonda Ward--Broward County Library, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article details the work of Vonda Ward--a middle-school teacher turned librarian. When Vonda Ward was a middle-school teacher, she could not get her students to share her excitement about history because they could not read its stories. That is when she realized how much subject mastery depended on the basics. Broward County Library's leaders…

  16. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sirio Fiorino; Eugenio Detotto; Michele Battilana; Letizia Bacchi-Reggiani; Renzo Moretti; Furio Benfenati; Adriana Caselli; Serena Marchi; Maria R. Testi; Claudio G. Gallo; Andrea Cuppini; Giuseppe Kindt; Maurizio Moretti

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionRecent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3) can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward.

  17. UK ward design: Patient dependency, nursing workload, staffing and quality—An observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Hurst

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundThere are important relationships between ward design, patient welfare and staff activity in the literature but studies seem not to have tested all the variables. Whether ward designs influence nursing structures, processes and outcomes, therefore, has not been fully answered. While studies provide helpful guidance, nursing efficiency and effectiveness implications are speculative.

  18. 77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ...1625-AA87 Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY AGENCY...the waters of the East River and Bronx Kill, in the vicinity of Randalls and Wards...from a portion of the East River and Bronx Kill when public officials are scheduled...

  19. Quality and safety at the point of care: how long should a ward round take?

    PubMed

    Herring, Roselle; Desai, Tejal; Caldwell, Gordon

    2011-02-01

    In April 2009 a 'considerative checklist' was developed to ensure that all important aspects of care on a team's routine and post-take general internal medicine ward rounds had been addressed and in order to answer the question: How long should a ward round take, when conducted to high standards of quality and safety at the point of care? The checklist has been used on 120 ward rounds: 90 routine ward rounds and 30 post-take ward rounds. Overall, the average time per patient was 12 minutes (10 minutes on routine rounds and 14 minutes on post-take rounds). The considerative checklist has encouraged and enabled documented evidence of high quality and safe medical care, and anecdotally improved team working, communication with patients, and team and patient satisfaction. PMID:21404777

  20. Light-front Ward-Takahashi identity and current conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinho, J. A. O.; Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Sauer, P. U. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2007-11-01

    We construct a conserved electromagnetic current for two-boson systems in finite mass boson exchange models within light-front dynamics. For that purpose, we use a quasipotential reduction to perform the three-dimensional light-front projection of the 4-dimensional current operator. The electromagnetic current operator acting on the valence component of bound and scattering states can be perturbatively calculated in the quasipotential expansion, in correspondence with a truncation of the Fock space. The divergence of the proposed current operator satisfies a Ward-Takahashi identity at any given order of the quasipotential expansion. Also shown is the relation between the three-dimensional light-front reduction of the field-theoretic Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes and current for bound and scattering states with the 4-dimensional ones. The matrix elements of the 4-dimensional current operator can be fully recovered from the corresponding light-front ones. In one test case the theoretical framework is realized explicitly.

  1. Prevention of measles spread on a paediatric ward.

    PubMed

    Tapisiz, A; Polat, M; Kara, S S; Tezer, H; Simsek, H; Aktas, F

    2015-03-01

    Since measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant airborne transmission risk in hospitals, effective prevention measures are crucial. After a mother accompanying her child on a paediatric ward lacking a negative pressure room was diagnosed with measles, exposed persons without evidence of immunity (documentary evidence of receiving two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine) were treated with vaccination or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The interruption of transmission with these treatments was evaluated. There were 44 children and 101 adults exposed to the index patient. Twenty-five children and 88 adults were considered immune, providing evidence of immunity. Nineteen children and 13 adults were either given vaccination or IVIG for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). There were no additional cases of measles after 3 weeks follow-up. We conclude that measles is highly preventable by adequate PEP with vaccination or IVIG in a healthcare setting that lacks the benefit of a negative pressure room. PMID:24877882

  2. Ward Morgan Photography, Southwest Michigan 1939-1980

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Morgan, Ward

    Ward Morgan spent almost fifty years of his life chronicling the people, places, and activities he knew best around southwestern Michigan in the 20th century. He documented industry rise and fall, weddings galore, company Christmas parties, and the streetscapes of Kalamazoo. This digital collection of almost 1,000 images is culled from a 27,000 item negative collection given to the Western Michigan University Libraries. On the homepage, visitors can use a scrollbar to move through a nice sampling of the collection, including a night scene in Kalamazoo and several industrial machine shops. Visitors can look at the Recent Additions area as well, and if interested, they can sign up to receive the RSS feed offered here. Finally, the site also has some Suggested Topics for casual browsing including residential scenes and people working.

  3. An evaluation of antiseptics used for hand disinfection in wards.

    PubMed Central

    Ojajärvi, J.

    1976-01-01

    The antibacterial effectiveness of hand antiseptics commonly used in wards was studied by laboratory and in-use tests and their acceptability assessed by means of a questionnaire passed to hospital staff. To determine the immediate and long-term antibacterial effects of the preparations the in-use tests were performed by groups of students. The greatest immediate reduction in bacterial counts on hands was obtained by products containing chlorhexidine. The long-term antibacterial effect was recorded with emulsions containing 3% hexachlorophane, 2% Irgasan CF3R or 4% chlorhexidine when used constantly on several consecutive days. Considerable discrepancies were recorded in the antibacterial effectiveness of some preparations when comparing laboratory and in-use test results. Therefore it is suggested that antiseptics should be tested by in-use tests which more closely resemble practical conditions before their use, or further trial, in hospital. PMID:812901

  4. An innovative model for teaching complex clinical procedures: Integration of standardised patients into ward round training for final year students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Nikendei; B. Kraus; H. Lauber; M. Schrauth; P. Weyrich; S. Zipfel; J. Jünger; S. Briem

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Ward rounds are an essential activity for doctors in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. However, although the need for ward round training is emphasized in the published literature, there are currently no reports of ward round training in a simulated

  5. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of 11 interrelated concepts emerged from an analysis of the data, and a synthesis of the main themes. This paper focuses on the results and recommendations that emerged from the quantitative and qualitative patient data. A further paper will focus on nurses' perceptions of the same topics. PMID:16965473

  6. An Analysis On Ward Identity For Multi-Field Inflation

    E-print Network

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2013-01-01

    Given a correlation function (or n-point function), can the corresponding nature of space-time be determined ? To answer this question it is required to derive the Ward Identity (WI), analyse the symmetries and arrive at the law of conservation. Modus operandi involves Lie differentiating two-point function considering the symmetry to be non-anomalous. The WI so obtained is shown to form a Lie algebra which determines the nature of space-time. Solving the identity results in a law of conservation, which physically explains the reason for WI to form an algebra and contains in it an equation of motion for four-point function. As a special case, a relation between mass and potential involving the spatial derivatives of four- and five- point function is obtained. Finally, the conservation equation is exploited to get the probability amplitude for the two-point function which shows how correlation functions provide an opportunity to probe the fundamental laws of physics.

  7. [Electronic data processing in ward management--possibilities for rationalization and cost control].

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Göhl, J; Tischler, K; Hohenberger, W

    1997-01-01

    Electronic data processing in ward management increases cost and time efficiency. Nurses and doctors will have more time to concentrate their genuine rather than administrative duties. Therefore the presented model has gained high acceptance. PMID:9574273

  8. Ward Takahashi identities and fluctuation-dissipation theorem in a superspace formulation of the Langevin equation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chaturvedi; A. K. Kapoor; V. Srinivasan

    1984-01-01

    A class of Langevin equations is formulated as a field theory in superspace. The Ward Takahashi identities associated with the hidden supersymmetry are derived which in turn are shown to lead to the fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  9. Ward Solutions, Ltd Page 1 of 12 EICT Architecture 2009-2013

    E-print Network

    Ward Solutions, Ltd Page 1 of 12 EICT Architecture 2009-2013 UCD EICT Architecture 2009 ­ 2013 Architecture 2009-2013 Table of Contents 1 Introduction ..............................................................................................................3 2 Approach to Architecture Development 2009 - 2013 ...........................................4

  10. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. Purpose To provide insights into students’ experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. Methods A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. Results The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students’ anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. Conclusion On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students’ support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians. PMID:25278789

  11. User Interface Design for PDAs: Lessons and Experience with the WARD-IN-HAND Prototype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Panagiotis Karampelas; Demosthenes Akoumianakis; Constantine Stephanidis

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the process and outcomes of the evaluation of a user interface prototype running on a Personal Digital\\u000a Assistant (PDA). The prototype was developed in the context of the IST-funded project WARD-INHAND and implements a PDA version\\u000a of a ward information system. The evaluation, carried out by the IS4ALL project, was based on a usage scenario comprising\\u000a mock-ups

  12. A staff questionnaire study of MRSA infection on ENT and general surgical wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Phillips; A. K. Golagani; A. Malik; F. B. Payne

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) infection has received much attention in both the medical and non-medical press. However, it is not widely encountered\\u000a on ENT wards, given the profile of short-stay, relatively well patients, although its impact seems to be increasing. We wished\\u000a to explore the knowledge and attitudes towards MRSA on general surgical and ENT wards, and see if there

  13. Ophthalmology hospital wards contamination to pathogenic free living Amoebae in Iran.

    PubMed

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Haghighi, Ali; Taghipour, Niloofar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoeba in ophthalmology wards in reference hospitals in Iran. Since an increasing number of Acanthamoeba Keratitis cases after eye surgery and eye trauma have been recently observed in this country, it could be possible that the disinfection procedures undertaken in the clinical setting may not have a good hygiene and disinfection procedures, hence the aim of this study. Therefore, 42 dust and biofilm samples were collected from different areas of ophthalmology wards and checked for the presence of FLA using morphological criteria, PCR based analysis and DNA sequencing. Of the 42 samples from dust and biofilm sources, 18(42.86%) isolates were found to contain FLA and 12(92.3%) isolates belonged to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype. Isolation of the pathogenic genotype T4 from medical instruments, including slit lamp in corneal wards, may be a threat for patients undergoing eye surgery in these wards. Other FLA isolated in this study included Acanthamoeba genotype T5, Vahlkampfia sp, Naegleria australiensis, Vermamoeba vermiformis and Echinamoeba exudans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of potentially pathogenic FLA in ophthalmology wards in Iran. Improved disinfection methods and monitoring of hospitals ward are thus necessary in this area in order to minimize the risk of infection in patients. PMID:26204177

  14. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  15. Dispersal and transfer of Staphylococcus aureus in an isolation ward for burned patients

    PubMed Central

    Hambraeus, Anna

    1973-01-01

    The dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus from burned patients, the relation between nasal carriage by the staff and exposure to airborne Staph. aureus, and the transfer of Staph. aureus-carrying particles within the ward have been studied. The dispersal of Staph. aureus from burned patients was correlated to the size of the burn wound. The median values varied from 21 c.f.u./m.2/hr. for patients with small burns to 453 c.f.u./m.2/hr. for extensively burned patients. The size of the dispersed particles appeared to be smaller than that usually found in hospital wards. Carriage of nasal strains by the staff was correlated to the air counts; the number of patient sources did not seem to be of great importance. The transfer of Staph. aureus within the ward was at least 6 to 20 times that which would have been expected if transfer was due to air movement only. PMID:4520514

  16. Factors influencing the choice of the first ward: comparison between newly qualified nurses and managers.

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa; Tosatto, Donella; Borghi, Gianni; Maura, Mesaglio

    2007-01-01

    We had given a questionnaire to a group of newly qualified nurses and nursing managers responsible for their recruitment with the purpose of understanding the factors influencing the choice of the first ward. For this study, 45 nurses and 10 nursing managers had been recruited. There are 19 factors that influence the choice of the first ward: the most important is the kind of patient, both, nursing managers and newly qualified nurses agreed about, while about the other factors there were different answers. Reflecting on the choice factors may help hospitals to better understand the expectations of the newly qualified nurses and start improving projects to make even the less requested wards more attractive; it can also help the faculty to reflect about the academic curriculum that mostly influences the professional future of the students. PMID:17207008

  17. Protective isolation in single-bed rooms: studies in a modified hospital ward

    PubMed Central

    Ayliffe, G. A. J.; Collins, B. J.; Lowbury, E. J. L.; Wall, Mary

    1971-01-01

    Studies were made in a modified hospital ward containing 19 beds, 14 of them in the open ward, one in a window-ventilated side-room, two in rooms with partial-recirculation ventilators giving 7-10 air changes per hour, and two in self-contained isolation suites with plenum ventilation (20 air changes per hour), ultra-violet (UV) barriers at doorways and airlocks. Preliminary tests with aerosols of tracer bacteria showed that few bacteria entered the plenum or recirculation-ventilated rooms. Bacteria released inside mechanically ventilated cubicles escaped into the corridor, but this transfer was reduced by the presence of an airlock. UV barriers at the entrance to the airlock and the cubicle reduced the transfer of bacteria from cubicle to corridor. During a period of 4 years while the ward was in use for surgical and gynaecological patients, the incidence of post-operative sepsis and colonization of wounds by multiple-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was lower (though not significantly lower) in the plenum-ventilated rooms than in the open ward, the recirculator-ventilated cubicles and the window-ventilated cubicles. Nasal acquisition of multiple-resistant Staph. aureus was significantly less common in the plenum-ventilated than in the recirculator-ventilated cubicles and in the other areas. Mean counts of bacteria on settle-plates were significantly lower in the plenum-ventilated cubicles than in the other areas; mean settle-plate counts in the recirculator-ventilated cubicles were significantly lower than in the open ward and in the window-ventilated side-room; similar results were shown by slit-sampling of air. Mean settle-plate counts were significantly lower in all areas when the ward was occupied by female patients. Staph. aureus was rarely carried by air from plenum-ventilated or other cubicles to the open ward, or from the open ward to the cubicles; though staphylococci were transferred from one floor area to another, they did not appear to be redispersed into the air in sufficient numbers to infect the patients. Ultra-violet irradiation caused a significant reduction in the total and staphylococcal counts from the floors of airlocks, and a significant reduction of total counts in the air. PMID:5289715

  18. Exact lattice Ward-Takahashi identity for the N=1 Wess-Zumino model

    SciTech Connect

    Bonini, Marisa [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Feo, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2005-06-01

    We consider a lattice formulation of the four-dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model that uses the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. This formulation has an exact supersymmetry on the lattice. We show that the corresponding Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied, both at fixed lattice spacing and in the continuum limit. The calculation is performed in lattice perturbation theory up to order g{sup 2} in the coupling constant. We also show that this Ward-Takahashi identity determines the finite part of the scalar and fermion renormalization wave functions which automatically leads to restoration of supersymmetry in the continuum limit. In particular, these wave functions coincide in this limit.

  19. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Croft Buck; Lene Brandstrup; Ivan Brandslund; Jens Peter Kampmann

    2007-01-01

    Objective  To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target\\u000a areas widely considered to be indicators of good prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these\\u000a intervention areas were defined as “sub-optimal prescriptions,” and then discussed between

  20. Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology (1995)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The full text of the 1995 book Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology can be viewed online at the National Academies Press Website. The book contains information on the geology, hydrogeology, and ecology of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal site in the Mojave Desert. The format is Open Book, a "browsable, nonproprietary, fully and deeply searchable version of the publication." The National Academies Press notes that it is not intended to replace printed books.

  1. [Security rules in acute inpatient wards in psychiatric hospitals in the greater area of Athens].

    PubMed

    Koukia, E; Giannouli, E; Gonis, N; Douzenis, A

    2009-04-01

    This research concerns the recording of safety measures in acute mental health wards of psychiatric hospitals in the greater area of Athens. The practices of control and testing on patients performed by nurses are also reported. The total sample consists of 14 acute inpatient psychiatric wards. The results indicated that important differences were noticed in the controls and prohibitions. Moreover, the main characteristic was the lack of protocols and measures of safety, a situation that burdened nursing practice. The lack of rules and strategies that would promote the safety of patient, professionals and therapeutic milieu, were brought into light by nurses' quotes. PMID:22218133

  2. Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to-Face Proximity and Mixing Patterns with Wearable

    E-print Network

    Barrat, Alain

    Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to- Face Proximity and Mixing Patterns.5 meters, and a time resolution of 20 seconds. The study was conducted in a general pediatrics hospital, Cattuto C, Colizza V, et al. (2011) Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to-Face Proximity

  3. Inpatient Performance of Primary Care Residents: Impact of Reduction in Time on the Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goroll, Allan H.

    1979-01-01

    The inpatient (ward/intensive care unit) performance of primary care medical residents was compared with that of their peers in the standard internal medicine residency program. Nearly identical performances of the two groups suggests that substantial time in the first two years of residency can be devoted successfully to ambulatory training.…

  4. Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz 10th June 2010 1 #12;CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Using Blowfish-ROOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.4 The ROOT Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.5 The Main

  5. Renormalization Group and Ward Identities in regularized QED4 with large photon mass

    E-print Network

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Renormalization Group and Ward Identities in regularized QED4 with large photon mass Vieri analyze, by Renormalization Group methods, a regularized version of Euclidean QED4 with any value regularizations used in the Wilsonian Renormalization Group approach to QFT, introduced in [P] and [G], which has

  6. Interfacial conditions during evaporation or condensation of water C. A. Ward* and D. Stanga

    E-print Network

    Ward, Charles A.

    Interfacial conditions during evaporation or condensation of water C. A. Ward* and D. Stanga manuscript received 15 June 2001; published 29 October 2001 Steady-state evaporation and condensation experiments have been conducted with water under conditions where buoyancy-driven convection is not present

  7. Assessment of the capacity to consent to treatment in patients admitted to acute medical wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylfa Fassassi; Yanik Bianchi; Friedrich Stiefel; Gérard Waeber

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of capacity to consent to treatment is an important legal and ethical issue in daily medical practice. In this study we carefully evaluated the capacity to consent to treatment in patients admitted to an acute medical ward using an assessment by members of the medical team, the specific Silberfeld's score, the MMSE and an assessment by a senior

  8. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marit F Svindseth; Jim Aage Nøttestad; Juliska Wallin; John Olav Roaldset; Alv A Dahl

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). METHODS: This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning

  9. Evaluation of physiological work demands and low back neuromuscular fatigue on nurses working in geriatric wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ling Hui; Gabriel Y. F. Ng; Simon S. M. Yeung; Christina W. Y. Hui-Chan

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological demands and low back neuromuscular fatigue patterns following a daytime work shift of 21 female nurses working in geriatric wards. Subjects’ heart rate (HR) at work was monitored for 8h and surface electromyogram (EMG) of their back muscle was recorded during a 1-minute horizontal trunk holding test before and after work. Results showed that the

  10. Light-front Ward-Takahashi identity for two-fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marinho, J. A. O.; Frederico, T. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pace, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salme, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma I, Piazzale A. Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Sauer, P. U. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Leibniz University, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2008-06-01

    We propose a three-dimensional electromagnetic current operator within light-front dynamics that satisfies a light-front Ward-Takahashi identity for two-fermion systems. The light-front current operator is obtained by a quasipotential reduction of the four-dimensional current operator and acts on the light-front valence component of bound or scattering states. A relation between the light-front valence wave function and the four-dimensional Bethe-Salpeter amplitude both for bound or scattering states is also derived, such that the matrix elements of the four-dimensional current operator can be fully recovered from the corresponding light-front ones. The light-front current operator can be perturbatively calculated through a quasipotential expansion, and the divergence of the proposed current satisfies a Ward-Takahashi identity at any given order of the expansion. In the quasipotential expansion the instantaneous terms of the fermion propagator are accounted for by the effective interaction and two-body currents. We exemplify our theoretical construction in the Yukawa model in the ladder approximation, investigating in detail the current operator at the lowest nontrivial order of the quasipotential expansion of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The explicit realization of the light-front form of the Ward-Takahashi identity is verified. We also show the relevance of instantaneous terms and of the pair contribution to the two-body current and the Ward-Takahashi identity.

  11. The Loreto basin formed by rapid west-ward tilting and asymmetric subsidence with-

    E-print Network

    Dorsey, Becky

    ABSTRACT The Loreto basin formed by rapid west- ward tilting and asymmetric subsidence with subsidence histories and stratigraphic evolution. Sedimentary rocks of the Loreto basin are divided into four stratigraphic se- quences that record discrete phases of fault- controlled subsidence and basin filling. Se

  12. WA-RD 451.1 September 1999 BMP's for Stormwater Runoff in Confined Spaces

    E-print Network

    WA-RD 451.1 September 1999 BMP's for Stormwater Runoff in Confined Spaces Introduction. Stormwater-based approaches have been proposed using various methods and media for separating pollutants from stormwater will allow water resource specialists to specify stormwater quality improvement projects that satisfy water

  13. The efficacy of Emergency Medicine Ward for the management of patients with mental disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CM Chan

    Objective: Patients with mental disorders are one of the target groups selected for management in the Emergency Medicine Ward (EMW) with the enrolment of psychiatric advanced practice nurses. This study aimed to determine whether the EMW can be efficiently used for the management of patients with mental disorders in terms of length of stay (LOS), admission rate, and re-attendance rate

  14. Rituals of temporality: The social construction of time in a nursing ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hava Golander

    1995-01-01

    This article examines how institutionalized life and its interactional dynamics are combined by the elderly in order to construct a unique time perspective. It is based on a four year anthropological fieldwork conducted in the nursing ward of a large geriatric center in Israel. The ethnography describes three time-structuring processes: (1) Revising the Past—constituting boundaries between past and present through

  15. Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward

    E-print Network

    Langseth, Helge

    Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward Evaluation Study is on the situation awareness task, and more spec as being able to per- ceive their environment, being aware of the presence of people and other agents

  16. Role of the short stay observation ward in accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S W Goodacre

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the role of the accident and emergency (A&E) short stay ward by a survey of departments in the United Kingdom and review of published reports. METHODS: A postal questionnaire with telephone follow up to all major A&E departments with short stay beds. RESULTS: 95 departments were found to have short stay beds. These units received between 19000

  17. Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The flux of fixed nitrogen into the marine environment is increasing as a direct result of anthropogenic nitrogen loading, but the controls on the mechanisms

  18. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  19. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  20. Power consumption modeling in optical multilayer Ward Van Heddeghem, Filip Idzikowski*

    E-print Network

    Wichmann, Felix

    1 Power consumption modeling in optical multilayer networks Ward Van Heddeghem, Filip Idzikowski in these studies is the power consumption of the individual network devices. It appears that across different studies, a wide range of power values for similar equipment is used. This is a result of the scattered

  1. A survey of ward nurses attitudes to the Intensive Care Nurse Consultant service in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Tammie; Taylor, Carmel; Eastwood, Glenn M; Jones, Daryl; Baldwin, Ian; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2012-05-01

    The aim of an Intensive Care Nurse Consultant (ICNC) service is to optimise care of complex ward patients and reduce adverse events. Despite their widespread implementation, specific assessment of ward nurses' attitudes towards such is lacking. Accordingly, we surveyed ward nurses' attitudes towards our ICNC service in five domains: (a) accessibility and approachability; (b) perceived ICNC skill and knowledge; (c) perceived influence on patient management; (d) usefulness as a resource of clinical information; (e) impact upon adverse outcomes. To achieve this, an anonymous Liker-type questionnaire was distributed to 208 ward nurses in our hospital. We also included space for free text. Completed questionnaires were entered manually into a SURVEYMONKEY™ pro-forma to permit automatic report generation and results summary. The major findings were that ICNC staff were perceived as being approachable and good communicators, were skilled at early detection of deteriorating patients, and that they reduce serious adverse events. In addition, nurses believe the ICNC service provides continuity of care post discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU), as well as assisting staff to prioritise clinical issues following medical emergency team (MET) review or ICU discharge. The ward nurses did not believe that the ICNC service reduced their skills in managing ward patients. In contrast, respondents stated that the ICNC service needed to improve the processes of referral to allied health and education of ward staff regarding deteriorating patients. Finally, ward nurses suggest they would call the MET service rather than the ICNC service for patients who had already deteriorated. This survey suggests that the ICNC service is valued, and is perceived to prevent the development of adverse events, rather than playing a major role in the management of the deteriorating patient. There is a need to improve referrals to allied health and further educate ward nurses. PMID:22088555

  2. Prospective cohort study protocol to describe the transfer of patients from intensive care units to hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, Denise L; Bagshaw, Sean M; Dodek, Peter; Forster, Alan J; Fowler, Robert A; Lamontagne, François; Turgeon, Alexis F; Potestio, Melissa; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The transfer of patient care between the intensive care unit (ICU) and the hospital ward is associated with increased risk of medical error and adverse events. This study will describe patient transfer from ICU to hospital ward by documenting (1) patient, family and provider experiences related to ICU transfer, (2) communication between stakeholders involved in ICU transfer, (3) adverse events that follow ICU transfer and (4) opportunities to improve ICU to hospital ward transfer. Methods This is a mixed methods prospective observational study of ICU to hospital ward transfer practices in 10 ICUs across Canada. We will recruit 50 patients at each site (n=500) who are transferred from ICU to hospital ward, and distribute surveys to enrolled patients, family members, and healthcare providers (ICU and ward physicians and nurses) after patient transfer. A random sample of 6 consenting study participants (patients, family members, healthcare providers) from each study site (n=60) will be offered an opportunity to participate in interviews to further describe stakeholders’ experience with ICU to hospital ward transfer. We will abstract information from patient health records to identify clinical data and use of transfer tools, and identify adverse events that are related to the transfer. Ethics and Dissemination Research ethics board approval has been obtained at the coordinating study centre (UofC REB13-0021) and 5 study sites (UofA Pro00050646; UBC-PHC H14-01667; Sunnybrook 336-2014; QCH 14-07; Sherbrooke 14-172). Dissemination of the findings will provide a comprehensive description of transfer from ICU to hospital ward in Canada including the uptake of validated or local transfer tools, a conceptual framework of the experiences and needs of stakeholders in the ICU transfer process, a summary of adverse events experienced by patients after transfer from ICU to hospital ward, and opportunities to guide quality improvement efforts. PMID:26155820

  3. Outbreak of staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a maternity ward linked to an asymptomatic healthcare worker.

    PubMed

    Occelli, P; Blanie, M; Sanchez, R; Vigier, D; Dauwalder, O; Darwiche, A; Provenzano, B; Dumartin, C; Parneix, P; Venier, A G

    2007-11-01

    An outbreak of staphylococcal bullous impetigo occurred over a period of five months in a maternity ward involving seven infected and two colonised neonates. The skin lesions were due to epidermolytic toxin A-producing Staphylococcus aureus. Infection control measures were implemented and a retrospective case-control study performed. Contact with an auxiliary nurse was the only risk factor for cases of bullous impetigo (P<0.01). The nurse cared for all seven cases and was an asymptomatic nasal carrier of the epidemic strain. Repeated courses of decontamination treatment failed to eradicate carriage. Nine months after the last case, another neonate developed a more severe form of bullous impetigo and the auxiliary nurse was reassigned to an adult ward. PMID:17945394

  4. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  5. The effect of increased bed numbers on MRSA transmission in acute medical wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Kibbler; A. Quick; A.-M. O'Neill

    1998-01-01

    An 18-month prospective survey was performed to examine the effect of adding a fifth bed to four-bedded bays in three acute medical wards on colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Screening procedures were in accordance with the UK national guidelines. All patients newly colonized with MRSA were visited, and their bed location determined. Data from the five-bedded bays were compared

  6. Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality

    E-print Network

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    tx H2O | pg. 24 A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January... 1991, a committee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (now Texas AgriLife Extension Service) and Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District person- nel met on the development of a 4-H water camp educating youth on water issues...

  7. Stroke units and general wards in seven Italian regions: the PROSIT Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Candelise; G. Micieli; R. Sterzi; A. Morabito

    2005-01-01

    PROSIT (research PROject on Stroke services in ITaly) is a study performed to evaluate number and work organisation of acute in-hospital services (stroke units, SU) and general wards (GW), in seven Italian regions (Liguria, Lombardia, Lazio, Veneto, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, Emilia Romagna, Toscana), which have a population of 29 169 811 inhabitants and a relative ratio of 225\\/100 000 hospitalisations for acute

  8. Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality 

    E-print Network

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    tx H2O | pg. 24 A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January... 1991, a committee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (now Texas AgriLife Extension Service) and Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District person- nel met on the development of a 4-H water camp educating youth on water issues...

  9. Clockwork SUSY: supersymmetric Ward and Slavnov-Taylor identities at workin Green's functions and scattering amplitudes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thorsten Ohl; Juergen Reuter

    2003-01-01

    We study the cancellations among Feynman diagrams that implement the Ward and Slavnov-Taylor identities corresponding to the conserved supersymmetry current in supersymmetric quantum field theories. In particular, we show that the Faddeev-Popov ghosts of gauge and supersymmetries never decouple from the physical fields, even for abelian gauge groups. The supersymmetric Slavnov-Taylor identities provide efficient consistency checks for automatized calculations and

  10. A Recessive Variant of the Romano-Ward Long-QT Syndrome?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvia G. Priori; Peter J. Schwartz; Carlo Napolitano; Laura Bianchi; Adrienne Dennis; Arthur M. Brown; Giorgio Casari

    Background—The congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by prolonged ventricular repolarization and life-threatening arrhythmias. Mutations of the KVLQT1 gene, a cardiac potassium channel, generate two allelic diseases: the Romano-Ward syndrome, inherited as a dominant trait, and the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Methods and Results—A consanguineous family with the clinical phenotype

  11. A program to perform Ward's clustering method on several regionalized variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervada-Sala, Carme; Jarauta-Bragulat, Eusebi

    2004-10-01

    There are many statistical techniques that allow finding similarities or differences among data and variables. Cluster analysis encompasses many diverse techniques for discovering structure within complex sets of data. The objective of cluster analysis is to group either the data or the variables into clusters such that the elements within a cluster have a high degree of "natural association" among themselves while clusters are "relatively distinct" from one another. To do so, many criteria have been described: partitioning methods, arbitrary origin methods, mutual similarity procedures and hierarchical clustering techniques. One of the most widespread hierarchical clustering methods is the Ward's method. Earth science studies deal in general with multivariate and regionalized observations which may be compositional, i.e. data such as percentages, concentrations, mg/kg (ppm). Sometimes, it is interesting to know whether these data have to be divided into different subpopulations. This problem cannot be studied with traditional Ward's method because samples are not independent. In that case, an extension of Ward's clustering method to spatially dependent samples can be used. This methodology is based on a generalized Mahalanobis distance, which uses the covariance and cross-covariance (or variogram and cross-variogram) matrices. This paper describes a refinement of this method previously defined, which was iterative and tedious, as it was necessary to re-estimate the spatial covariance structure at each step. In this paper, we stay within the same theoretical framework, but we improve the methodology using the fast fourier Transform method to find the covariance structure. Thus, we obtain a generalization to several variables of adapted Ward's clustering method.

  12. Unfulfilled expectations: a narrative study of individuals’ experiences of being a patient on an acute psychiatric inpatient ward in Scotland 

    E-print Network

    Stenhouse, Rosemary Clare

    2009-01-01

    This study examines people’s experiences of being a patient on an acute psychiatric inpatient ward in Scotland. Within the existing research base few studies focus on the patient’s experience of acute psychiatric inpatient ...

  13. Ramond-Ramond S-matrix elements from the T-dual Ward identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei Velni, Komeil; Garousi, Mohammad R.

    2014-05-01

    Recently it has been speculated that the Ward identities associated with the string dualities and the gauge symmetries can be used as guiding principles to find all components of the scattering amplitude of n supergravitons from a given component of the S matrix. In this paper, we apply the Ward identities associated with the T duality and the gauge symmetries on the disk-level S-matrix element of one Ramond-Ramond (RR) (p-3) form, one Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz (NSNS), and one Neveu-Schwarz (NS) state to find the corresponding S-matrix elements of the RR (p-1) form, (p+1) form, or the RR (p+3) form on the world volume of a Dp-brane. Moreover, we apply these Ward identities on the S-matrix element of one RR (p -3) form and two NSNS states to find the corresponding S-matrix elements of the RR (p-1) form, (p+1) form, (p+3) form, or the RR (p+5) form.

  14. OnWARD: ontology-driven web-based framework for multi-center clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2011-12-01

    With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. PMID:21924379

  15. A Controlled Investigation of Optimal Internal Medicine Ward Team Structure at a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Lewis, Roger J.; Sue, Darryl; Chavoshan, Bahman; Vintch, Janine; Munekata, Mark; Kim, Caroline; Lanks, Charles; Witt, Mallory D.; Stringer, William; Harrington, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Background The optimal structure of an internal medicine ward team at a teaching hospital is unknown. We hypothesized that increasing the ratio of attendings to housestaff would result in an enhanced perceived educational experience for residents. Methods Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (HUMC) is a tertiary care, public hospital in Los Angeles County. Standard ward teams at HUMC, with a housestaff?attending ratio of 5?1, were split by adding one attending and then dividing the teams into two experimental teams containing ratios of 3?1 and 2?1. Web-based Likert satisfaction surveys were completed by housestaff and attending physicians on the experimental and control teams at the end of their rotations, and objective healthcare outcomes (e.g., length of stay, hospital readmission, mortality) were compared. Results Nine hundred and ninety patients were admitted to the standard control teams and 184 were admitted to the experimental teams (81 to the one-intern team and 103 to the two-intern team). Patients admitted to the experimental and control teams had similar age and disease severity. Residents and attending physicians consistently indicated that the quality of the educational experience, time spent teaching, time devoted to patient care, and quality of life were superior on the experimental teams. Objective healthcare outcomes did not differ between experimental and control teams. Conclusions Altering internal medicine ward team structure to reduce the ratio of housestaff to attending physicians improved the perceived educational experience without altering objective healthcare outcomes. PMID:22532860

  16. Drinking Water Quality Surveillance in a Vulnerable Urban Ward of Ahmedabad.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena; Choudhury, Nandini; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Somvanshi, Bhushan

    2014-05-01

    The World Bank estimates that 21% of all communicable diseases in India are related to unsafe water with diarrhoea alone causing more than 0.1 million deaths annually. The WHO drinking water surveillance parameters of quality, quantity, accessibility, affordability and continuity were assessed in one vulnerable ward of Ahmedabad-a fast growing city in Western India. Interviews with key informants of the ward office, health centre and water supply department, secondary analysis and mapping of field test reports and a questionnaire-based survey of different household types were conducted. We found that Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) supplies water to the ward intermittently for two hours during the day. Housing society clusters supplement their AMC water supply with untested bore-well water. The water quality surveillance system is designed for a twenty-four-hour piped distribution of treated surface water. However, in order to maintain surveillance over an intermittent supply that includes ground water, the sampling process should include periodic surveys of water actually consumed by the citizens. The laboratory capacity of the Central Water Testing Laboratory should expand to include more refined tests for microbial and chemical contamination. PMID:25254083

  17. OnWARD: Ontology-driven Web-based Framework for Multi-center Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. PMID:21924379

  18. Significant Reduction of Nosocomial Pneumonia after Introduction of Disinfection of Upper Airways Using PovidoneIodine in Geriatric Wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hironori Masaki; Tsuyoshi Nagatake; Norichika Asoh; Hiroyuki Yoshimine; Kiwao Watanabe; Hiroshi Watanabe; Kazunori Oishi; Naoto Rikitomi; Keizo Matsumoto

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of disinfection of the upper airway using povidone-iodine against nosocomial pneumonia in geriatric wards. Cases of nosocomial pneumonia were retrospectively analyzed between January 1991 and March 1995 in geriatric wards (190 beds). Moreover, the relationship concerning methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates between patient and environment was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with the SmaI restriction

  19. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  20. Effects of family-centered care on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in pediatric wards in a pediatric ward in Chaloos in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Forouzan; Hassan, Syed Tajuddin Syed; Yaghmai, Farideh; Ismaeil, Suriani Binti; Suandi, Turiman Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family-centered care (FCC) involves holistic care and requires cooperation with the family in planning, intervention, and the evolution of the care that is being provided. Many previous studies have provided results that indicate the importance of the family’s involvement in pediatric care, but there is still resistance in doing so within the organizational culture of the hospitals in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of FCC on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Methods: This Quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Seventy hospitalized children between the ages of 1 and 3 who suffered from diarrhea, vomiting, or pneumonia were selected through convenience sampling. They were divided randomly into two equal groups, a control group (routine care) and an experimental group (family-centered care). SPSS Statistics 14 software was used to analyze the data, and p<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: In the FCC group, the mean score of satisfaction among the parents of the children was 20 out of 90 before the intervention, but, after the FCC method was used, it increased to 83.2 out of 90. In addition, a significant difference was found between the scores of satisfaction for the control and experimental groups (p<0.001), and all parents of children in the experimental group expressed high satisfaction. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the practice of FCC in caring for the sick children can increase the satisfaction of their parents significantly. The role of the family’s involvement is critical in every component of the intervention efforts, as shown by the constructs of participatory support, educational support, and psychological support. Thus, a notable implication here is that FCC may lead to increased quality of care and should be included in the educational programs of the nursing staff in pediatric ward PMID:26120418

  1. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. Methods and analysis The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2?months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. Ethics and dissemination A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. PMID:25273812

  2. Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?

    PubMed Central

    Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

  3. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to March 17, 2012. Data on the prescribed drugs were collected from patient charts and prescription papers among all patients who were admitted during the study period. Descriptive statistics was used to determine frequency, prevalence, means, and standard deviations. The relationship between dependent and independent variables were computed using logistic regression (with significance declared at p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval). Results Out of the 384 Medication order s identified during the study, a total of 223 prescribing errors were identified. This corresponds to an overall medication prescribing error rate of 58.07%. Incomplete prescriptions and dosing errors were the two most common types of prescribing errors. Antibiotics (54.26%) were the most common classes of drugs subjected to prescribing error. Day of the week and route of administration were factors significantly associated with increased prescribing error. Conclusions Medication prescribing errors are common in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital. Improving quick access to up to date reference materials, providing regular refresher trainings and possibly including a clinical pharmacist in the healthcare team are recommended. PMID:24826198

  4. Outcomes of early switching from intravenous to oral antibiotics on medical wards

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Dominik; Koller, Michael; Haller, Patricia; Lampert, Markus L.; Plagge, Herbert; Hug, Balthasar; Koch, Gian; Battegay, Manuel; Flückiger, Ursula; Bassetti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate outcomes following implementation of a checklist with criteria for switching from intravenous (iv) to oral antibiotics on unselected patients on two general medical wards. Methods During a 12 month intervention study, a printed checklist of criteria for switching on the third day of iv treatment was placed in the medical charts. The decision to switch was left to the discretion of the attending physician. Outcome parameters of a 4 month control phase before intervention were compared with the equivalent 4 month period during the intervention phase to control for seasonal confounding (before–after study; April to July of 2006 and 2007, respectively): 250 episodes (215 patients) during the intervention period were compared with the control group of 176 episodes (162 patients). The main outcome measure was the duration of iv therapy. Additionally, safety, adherence to the checklist, reasons against switching patients and antibiotic cost were analysed during the whole year of the intervention (n = 698 episodes). Results In 38% (246/646) of episodes of continued iv antibiotic therapy, patients met all criteria for switching to oral antibiotics on the third day, and 151/246 (61.4%) were switched. The number of days of iv antibiotic treatment were reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 9%–29%, P = 0.001; 6.0–5.0 days in median) with no increase in complications. The main reasons against switching were persisting fever (41%, n = 187) and absence of clinical improvement (41%, n = 185). Conclusions On general medical wards, a checklist with bedside criteria for switching to oral antibiotics can shorten the duration of iv therapy without any negative effect on treatment outcome. The criteria were successfully applied to all patients on the wards, independently of the indication (empirical or directed treatment), the type of (presumed) infection, the underlying disease or the group of antibiotics being used. PMID:19401304

  5. S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 PRECISION CALCULATIONS OF W AND Z PRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Yost, Scott

    S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 PRECISION CALCULATIONS OF W AND Z PRODUCTION AT THE LHC: PROGRESS IN PRECISION LUMINOSITY STUDIES S.A. YOST, C. GLOSSER AND B.F.L. WARD DEPARTMENT grant pst.clg.980342. 1 #12;S.A. Yost, C. Glosser and B.F.L. Ward PAPER-0063 2 Yennie

  6. On the regularization and renormalization of certain anomalous ward identities in meson-nucleon dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schweda

    1971-01-01

    Summary  Two simple possibilities of perturbation-theoretical realizations of the generalized Ward identities (W.I.) of the axial-vector\\u000a current in meson-nucleon dynamics are considered. In both cases the single pionfermion loop leads to anomalies, if one compares\\u000a the field-theoretical generalized W.I. with the actual perturbation-theoretical computation. It will be shown that for the\\u000a first example, using the point-splitting technique, we get a more

  7. [Mother/child affective bond at the unit of the pediatric ward].

    PubMed

    Faquinello, Paula; Collet, Neusa

    2003-12-01

    This study presents the importance of the mother-son relationship in the child physical and emotional development. It aims at contributing to the construction of knowledge in nursing, by rescuing the importance of the mothers' stay in the units of the pediatric ward. It is a bibliographical research using as sources: books, scientific articles, journals, magazines, encyclopedias and the Internet. By reading and analyzing the texts it is possible to identify how the consolidation of the mother and son affective bond is processed and to point out the positive aspects of the mother's stay with the hospitalized son. PMID:15083788

  8. Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basko, D. M.

    2009-09-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the single-phonon Raman peak at 1580 cm-1 is calculated for a clean graphene monolayer. The resulting intensity is determined by the trigonal warping of the electronic bands and the anisotropy of the electron-phonon coupling, and is proportional to the second power of the excitation frequency. The main contribution to the process comes from the intermediate electron-hole states with typical energies of the order of the excitation frequency, contrary to what has been reported earlier. This occurs because of strong cancellations between different terms of the perturbation theory, analogous to Ward identities in quantum electrodynamics.

  9. It is time to introduce ST analysis for fetal monitoring in the labor ward?

    PubMed

    Visser, Gerard H A; Kessler, Jørg

    2014-06-01

    Five randomized controlled trials have been published on intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring with ST analysis of the fetal electrocardiogram, but the debate on its usefulness has not yet been ended. We consider ST analysis a useful and cost-effective addition to conventional fetal heart rate monitoring. We will provide support for this opinion by discussing the pathophysiology of ST changes in relation to fetal asphyxia, the results of the randomized controlled trials and numerous meta-analyses of these randomized controlled trials and trends in fetal outcome in hospitals in different countries following the introduction of the ST technology in the labor ward. PMID:24766548

  10. Point prevalence and risk factors for healthcare-associated infections in primary healthcare wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Puhto; P. Ylipalosaari; P. Ohtonen; H. Syrjala

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study was to document the point prevalence of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the public primary\\u000a healthcare wards, which treat both acute and long-term care patients. We also assessed the risk factors for HAI and the consumption\\u000a of alcoholic hand rubs and antibiotics.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A cross-sectional study was performed in northern Finland in 2006 including all healthcare centers

  11. Examination of particulate matter and heavy metals and their effects in at-risk wards in Washington, DC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Natasha Ann

    One of the major contributions to pollution in the Washington, DC urban environment is particulate matter (PM). Quite often, ambient airborne toxics are closely associated with fine PM (PM2.5). We have performed high-resolution aerosol measurements of PM2.5 in four wards (Ward 1, 4, 5, and 7) of Washington, DC during two intensive observational periods (IOP). The first IOP occurred during the summer of 2003 (June 23rd to August 8th). The second IOP transpired during the late fall season of 2003 (October 20th to December 4 th). The measurement platform consisted of a Laser Particle Counter (LPC) and a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Cascade Impactor (QCM) to obtain both in-situ number and mass density distributions across the measurement sites. The data shows spatial distributions of particulate matter characterized as a function of size and mass properties. The QCM analyses show significant levels (> 15 mug/m3) of ward-averaged PM2.5 in Wards 4, 1, and 7 respectively during the summer IOP. However, all wards were less than the EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 15 mug/m 3 during the fall IOP ward-averaged measurements. Yet, investigations of the site-averaged measurements during the fall revealed some specific locations in Ward 4 that exceeded the NAAQS. Results also show that the aerosol mass density peaked in the 0.3 mum mode during the summer IOP and in the 0.15 mum mode during the fall IOP. The number density peaked in the 0.3--0.5 mum size range. Accordingly, the distributions have also been analyzed as a function of meteorological factors, such as wind speed and direction via NOAA HYSPLIT trajectories. One important attribute to this study is the evaluation of risks amongst IBC subgroups (youth, adults, elderly, black, white, hispanic, male, and female) for bath pediatric asthma rates and the onset of lung cancer over a lifetime (70-year period) when exposed to these levels of particulates. It has been determined that there are individual excess risks associated with inhalation of PM2.5 and the selected heavy metals chromium, arsenic, and cadmium. Particularly, Ward 4 has generated higher risks than the other three investigated wards for both health effects.

  12. Contamination of the hospital environment with gastroenteric viruses: comparison of two pediatric wards over a winter season.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Chris I; Taylor, Clive; Gennery, Andrew R; Cant, Andrew J; Galloway, Angela; Xerry, Jacqueline; Adigwe, Juliet; Gray, Jim J

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the extent of gastroenteric virus contamination in a pediatric primary immunodeficiency (PPI) ward and a general pediatric ward over a winter season and to determine whether changes to hospital infection control interventions would have an impact on environmental contamination levels within pediatric units. Environmental swabs were collected weekly from 11 sites in both wards from 15 December 2005 to 3 March 2006 and examined for the presence of norovirus (NoV), astrovirus, and rotavirus (RV) by reverse transcriptase PCR. Viruses were detected in 17% and 19% of swabs from both wards. Virus contamination for NoV and RV decreased from 20% to 6% and 15% to 10% of swabs, respectively, in the PPI ward from the 2004 study by Gallimore et al. (C. I. Gallimore, C. Taylor, A. R. Gennery, A. J. Cant, A. Galloway, M. Iturriza-Gomara, and J. J. Gray, J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:395-399, 2006). Overall, changes to cleaning protocols were deemed to have reduced the level of environmental contamination with gastroenteric viruses, but contamination still occurred due to a breakdown in infection control procedures indicated by contamination in areas frequented by parents but used only occasionally by staff. PMID:18614656

  13. Contamination of the Hospital Environment with Gastroenteric Viruses: Comparison of Two Pediatric Wards over a Winter Season?

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Chris I.; Taylor, Clive; Gennery, Andrew R.; Cant, Andrew J.; Galloway, Angela; Xerry, Jacqueline; Adigwe, Juliet; Gray, Jim J.

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the extent of gastroenteric virus contamination in a pediatric primary immunodeficiency (PPI) ward and a general pediatric ward over a winter season and to determine whether changes to hospital infection control interventions would have an impact on environmental contamination levels within pediatric units. Environmental swabs were collected weekly from 11 sites in both wards from 15 December 2005 to 3 March 2006 and examined for the presence of norovirus (NoV), astrovirus, and rotavirus (RV) by reverse transcriptase PCR. Viruses were detected in 17% and 19% of swabs from both wards. Virus contamination for NoV and RV decreased from 20% to 6% and 15% to 10% of swabs, respectively, in the PPI ward from the 2004 study by Gallimore et al. (C. I. Gallimore, C. Taylor, A. R. Gennery, A. J. Cant, A. Galloway, M. Iturriza-Gomara, and J. J. Gray, J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:395-399, 2006). Overall, changes to cleaning protocols were deemed to have reduced the level of environmental contamination with gastroenteric viruses, but contamination still occurred due to a breakdown in infection control procedures indicated by contamination in areas frequented by parents but used only occasionally by staff. PMID:18614656

  14. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    PubMed Central

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia. Methods A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services. Results Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%), followed by transcription errors (15%), dispensing errors (14%), and prescribing errors (7%). Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant. Conclusion Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors. PMID:24940067

  15. Performance of a propane slug pilot in a watered-out sand--South Ward field

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, J.R.; McCaskill, N.; Herbeck, E.F.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a pilot test of the propane slug process on the watered-out Yates Sand of the Atlantic Richfield operated W. D. Johnson lease, S. Ward field in W. Texas. The Yates Sand in S. Ward field had undergone a very successful secondary recovery operation by waterflooding. In the case of the W. D. Johnson lease, secondary recovery was 3 times that of primary resulting in a total recovery by both primary and secondary of 63% of the original oil-in-place. At the time the propane pilot was initiated, the waterflood was in its final stages with the pilot area being nearly depleted. A propane slug pilot was undertaken as an experiment to determine if the process would be a successful tertiary mechanism in the field as had been indicated in the laboratory. A closed 5-spot with injection into the 4 corner wells and production from the center well was used for the pilot test. The pilot area covered approx. 10 acres. In undertaking this pilot, a total of 88,000 bbl of propane were injected into the 4 corner wells. Between one-fourth and one-third of the injected propane probably swept the enclosed pilot area. The propane was followed first by gas, and then alternately by gas and water.

  16. Gastroenteritis at the pediatric ward of Tembakau Deli Hospital, Medan, in 1988.

    PubMed

    Nasution, F R; Panggabean, G; Loebis, M S; Siregar, Z

    1991-01-01

    In a period of 1 year (1 January-31 December 1988) a retrospective study on patients admitted to the Pediatric ward of Tembakau Deli Hospital, Medan, was done. This hospital is a referral hospital for patients from hospitals of Dept. of Plantation in North Sumatera and Aceh. During year 1988, there were 1339 infants and children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward Tembakau Deli, Medan. Of these patients, 183 had gastroenteritis; it was most frequently found in the age group of 0-13 months (46.4%). The patients consisted of 53.55% males and 46.45% females. Most of the patients i.e. 140 (76.51%), had good nutrition. Malnutrition were found in 31 patients where 16.94% among them were moderate malnutrition, and 12 patients (6.55%) had malnutrition. The total mortality rate of gastroenteritis in this study was 2.18% which was usually associated with severe complications while pure gastroenteritis showed no (0%) mortality. PMID:1845656

  17. Evaluation of parenteral nutritional support in the surgical and medical wards of a referral teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Malnutrition is a common problem in patients who are hospitalized in surgical and medical wards. Surgical patients, geriatric populations and individuals with severe illness are more vulnerable to malnutrition during their hospitalization course. The purpose of this study was evaluation of parenteral nutrition services in a referral teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. Method Medical records of 72 patients who received parenteral nutrition during one year period in different surgical and medical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were reviewed retrospectively by clinical pharmacists. Criteria for initiation of parenteral nutrition, selection of appropriate formulation and monitoring parameters were assessed based on the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations. Results Based on the patients' anthropometric parameters and serum albumin levels, 4.2%, 75% and 20.8% of the patients were well-nourished, moderately malnourished and severely malnourished respectively at the hospital admission and before nutritional support. Adequate calorie, protein, carbohydrate and lipid supports were achieved in 21.1%, 32.4%, 23.7% and 10.5% of the patients respectively. About 91% of the patients experienced at least one complication of the nutritional support. Conclusion In this evaluation, several errors in assessment, establishing goals, and monitoring of parenteral nutrition regimens have been detected. Approximately all of the patients did not receive to the trace elements supports goals. PMID:23351175

  18. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  19. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  20. Significant reduction of nosocomial pneumonia after introduction of disinfection of upper airways using povidone-iodine in geriatric wards.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hironori; Nagatake, Tsuyoshi; Asoh, Norichika; Yoshimine, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kiwao; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Oishi, Kazunori; Rikitomi, Naoto; Matsumoto, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of disinfection of the upper airway using povidone-iodine against nosocomial pneumonia in geriatric wards. Cases of nosocomial pneumonia were retrospectively analyzed between January 1991 and March 1995 in geriatric wards (190 beds). Moreover, the relationship concerning methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates between patient and environment was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with the SmaI restriction enzyme. The incidence of nosocomial pneumonia decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Major causative organisms of nosocomial pneumonia were MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which significantly decreased. PFGE studies showed that the patterns of MRSA isolates show a strong association between patient and environment. Our study indicates that disinfection of the upper airways by povidone-iodine is very important in the prevention of nosocomial pneumonia in geriatric wards. PMID:16490984

  1. The effectiveness of substitution of hospital ward care from medical doctors to physician assistants: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of an expected shrinking supply of medical doctors for hospitalist posts, an increased emphasis on efficiency and continuity of care, and the standardization of many medical procedures, the role of hospitalist is increasingly allocated to physician assistants (PAs). PAs are nonphysician clinicians with medical tasks. This study aims to evaluate the effects of substitution of hospital ward care to PAs. Methods/Design In a multicenter matched controlled study, the traditional model in which the role of hospitalist is taken solely by medical doctors (MD model) is compared with a mixed model in which a PA functions as a hospitalist, contingent with MDs (PA/MD model). Twenty intervention and twenty control wards are included across The Netherlands, from a range of medical specialisms. Primary outcome measure is patients’ length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes include indicators for quality of hospital ward care, patients experiences with medical ward care, patients health-related quality of life, and healthcare providers’ experiences. An economic evaluation is conducted to assess the cost implications and potential efficiency of the PA/MD model. For most measures, data is collected from medical records or questionnaires in samples of 115 patients per hospital ward. Semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals are conducted to identify determinants of efficiency, quality and continuity of care and barriers and facilitators for the implementation of PAs in the role of hospitalist. Discussion Findings from this study will help to further define the role of nonphysician clinicians and provides possible key components for the implementation of PAs in hospital ward care. Like in many studies of organizational change, random allocation to study arms is not feasible, which implies an increased risk for confounding. A major challenge is to deal with the heterogeneity of patients and hospital departments. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01835444 PMID:24472112

  2. [A diagnostic algorithm and treatment procedure in disordered vital functions in newborns admitted to a resuscitation ward].

    PubMed

    Ostre?kov, I F; Podkopaev, V N; Moiseev, D B; Karpysheva, E V; Markova, L A; Sizov, S V

    1997-01-01

    Total mortality decreased by 2.5 times in the wards for intensive care of the newborns in the Tushino Pediatric Hospital in 1996 and is now 7.6%. Such results are due to a complex of measures, one such measure being the development and introduction of an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of newborns hospitalized in intensive care wards. The algorithm facilitates the work of the staff, helps earlier diagnose a disease, and, hence, carry out timely scientifically based therapy. PMID:9382220

  3. Estimating the unquenched strange quark mass from the lattice axial Ward identity

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckeler, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J.M. [School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Irving, A.C.; Rakow, P.E.L. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Pleiter, D. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Schierholz, G. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum fuer Informationstechnik Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-01

    We present a determination of the strange quark mass for two flavors (n{sub f}=2) of light dynamical quarks using the axial Ward identity. The calculations are performed on the lattice using O(a) improved Wilson fermions and include a fully nonperturbative determination of the renormalization constant. In the continuum limit we find m{sub s}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=111(6)(4)(6) MeV, using the force scale r{sub 0}=0.467 fm, where the first error is statistical, the second and third are systematic due to the fit and scale uncertainties, respectively. Results are also presented for the light quark mass and the chiral condensate. The corresponding results are also given for r{sub 0}=0.5 fm.

  4. Comparison of automatic oscillometric arterial pressure measurement with conventional auscultatory measurement in the labour ward.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M A; Thomas, T A; Prys-Roberts, C

    1993-02-01

    We have compared two non-invasive methods of arterial pressure (AP) measurement used in labour wards: an automatic oscillometric measurement obtained by Dinamap 1846, and a conventional auscultatory measurement obtained by midwives. A total of 369 AP measurements were recorded, involving 28 normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women during labour, with or without extradural analgesia. Compared with the midwife group, the Dinamap group had a greater systolic AP, by 2.7 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and smaller diastolic AP, by 9.8 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The correlations between the two methods were highly significant, but the limits of agreement were relatively wide for both systolic and diastolic AP measurements. We conclude that a clinically important difference exists in diastolic AP measurements. Dinamap diastolic AP must be corrected using a regression equation, or simply by adding 10 mm Hg, before being compared with the available normal and hypertensive AP values. PMID:8435255

  5. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children's ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children's service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved. PMID:25200240

  6. Developing the role of a ward housekeeper within a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Jo

    The implementation of a housekeeper induction competency programme demonstrates the innovative way that the clinical standards facilitator has led the development of the housekeeping service at one NHS Trust. This service has been developed to ensure that there is sufficient training, support and opportunity to share best practice for the housekeepers. A Trust-wide approach using the multidisciplinary team (including dieticians, catering and facilities managers) has contributed to the raising of standards in meeting the patients' nutritional needs, as well as improving the ward environment. NHS Estates guidance (DH, 2001b) relating to the housekeeping service and the Essence of Care benchmarks for nutrition (DH, 2001a) were used to provide this framework for continuous quality improvement. PMID:17353837

  7. Real-Time thermal Ward-Takahashi Identity for vectorial current in QED and QCD

    E-print Network

    Zhou Bang-Rong

    2005-12-05

    It is shown that, by means of canonical operator approach, the Ward-Takahashi identity (WTI) at finite temperature $T$ and finite chemical potential $\\mu$ for complete vectorial vertex and complete fermion propagator can be simply proven, rigorously for Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and approximately for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) where the ghost effect in the fermion sector is neglected. The WTI shown in the real-time thermal matrix form will give definite thermal constraints on the imaginary part of inverse complete Feynman propagator including self-energy for fermion and will play important role in relevant physical processes. When the above inverse propagator is assumed to be real, the thermal WTI will essentially be reduced to its form at $T=\\mu=0$ thus one can use it in the latter's form. At this point, a practical example is indicated.

  8. Fully consistent theory of response functions in the cuprate pseudogap phase: Implementing the Ward Takahashi identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Te; Boyack, Rufus; Scherpelz, Peter; Levin, Kathryn

    2015-03-01

    There is a multiplicity of pairing-based theories of the cuprate pseudogap associated with Fermi surface reconstruction or charge ordering, which have a simple mean-field-like self energy. These include the scenario of Yang, Rice and Zhang and the recent Amperean pairing scenario of Lee. We demonstrate here how to arrive at precise response functions for this class of theories which include vertex corrections, where necessary. Thus one can address two body physics experiments at the same level of accuracy that one addresses the one body physics of photoemission spectroscopy. We do so by exploiting the Ward Takahashi identity. As an illustration, we present the spin dynamical response functions of neutron scattering for three different scenarios, finding that a recently proposed pair Amperean pairing scheme is readily distinguishable from other related scenarios. This work is supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant 0820054.

  9. Preliminary report on nurse job satisfaction on wards for the elderly, mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Mountain, G A; Bowie, P C; Dabbs, A R

    1990-03-01

    The effect of Community Care Policies upon staffing levels within institutions is potentially problematic; wider job opportunities becoming available to nurses as community provision increases. The job satisfaction of nurses still working within institutions must, therefore, be an issue of importance in the maintenance of suitably qualified and experienced staff. This study examines the differing amounts of job satisfaction reported by a sample of 59 nurses all working on long-stay wards for the elderly, mentally ill; located within three different institutions. The results show that the measures selected for use have high content and face validity for this population. The effects of institutional and staff management are highlighted as being major influences upon the degree of job satisfaction. PMID:10104279

  10. Modified Early Warning Score Changes Prior to Cardiac Arrest in General Wards

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Mi; Huh, Jin Won; Koh, Younsuck; Lim, Chae-Man; Hong, Sang Bum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The frequency, extent, time frame, and implications of changes to the modified early warning score (MEWS) in the 24 hours prior to cardiac arrest are not known. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and trends of the MEWS prior to in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) on a ward, and to evaluate the association between changes in the MEWS and in-hospital mortality. Methods A total of 501 consecutive adult IHCA patients who were monitored and resuscitated by a medical emergency team on the ward were enrolled in the study between March 2009 and February 2013. The MEWS was calculated at 24 hours (MEWS24), 16 hours (MEWS16), and 8 hours (MEWS8) prior to cardiac arrest. Results Out of 380 patients, 268 (70.5%) had a return of spontaneous circulation. The survival rate to hospital discharge was 25.8%. When the MEWS was divided into three risk groups (low: ?2, intermediate: 3–4, high: ?5), the distribution of the low-risk MEWS group decreased at each time point before cardiac arrest. However, even 8 hours prior to cardiac arrest, 45.3% of patients were still in the low MEWS group. The MEWS was associated with in-hospital mortality at each time point. However, increasing MEWS value from MEWS24 to MEWS8 was not associated with in-hospital mortality [OR 1.24 (0.77–1.97), p = 0.38]. Conclusions About half of patients were still in low MEWS group 8 hours prior to cardiac arrest and an increasing MEWS only occurred in 46.8% of patients, suggesting that monitoring the MEWS alone is not enough to predict cardiac arrest. PMID:26098429

  11. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Nubia Amparo; Aguilar, Nora Luz; Restrepo, Beatriz Elena; Vanegas, Marcela; Alzate, Sandra; Martínez, Mónica; Gamboa, Sonia Patricia; Castaño, Eliana; Barbosa, Janeth; Román, Juliana; Serna, Ángela María; Hoyos, Gloria Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p= 0.363). For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%), followed by diarrhea (8.3%); an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05). For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest incidence (22.9%), followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%); all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05). Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an association with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits. PMID:24893056

  12. A study of nurse tutors' conceptualization of their ward teaching role.

    PubMed

    Jones, J A

    1985-07-01

    It is generally agreed by the nursing profession that the art and science of nursing can only be learnt in the direct delivery of patient care and that, in order to do this, students need to identify with a practitioner role-model in the clinical area. This research arose from the belief that nurse educationalists are failing to provide these learning opportunities for their students. The focus of the study was to identify factors in the nurse teacher's work role which mitigate against their teaching in the clinical area. The methodology was chosen in order to demonstrate the nurse teacher's conceptualization of her work role. In the first stage of the project this involved the repertory grid technique. From the results, a semantic differential questionnaire was built up and used for an attitude survey of a second sample of nurse teachers. The research samples consisted mainly of nurse tutors but a small group of both clinical teachers and senior tutors was included for comparison studies. Results showed that the main factors leading to a lack of clinical teaching by educational staff include lack of control and a sense of conflict, stress and anxiety in the ward-teaching situation, lack of peer support and an inability to plan ahead for such work. The most pervasive feature which emerged, however, was the felt lack of available time for clinical work vis-a-vis their other duties. This is discussed in terms of role strain. Differences in response between teacher grades were studied and showed that all the problems found appear to be greater among the nurse tutor group. This may be a consequence of a further finding that clinical teachers are more likely to make finer and more frequent distinctions between the aims and problems of ward- and school-based teaching. PMID:3850101

  13. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Ballerini; Roberto M Boccalon; Giancarlo Boncompagni; Massimo Casacchia; Francesco Margari; Lina Minervini; Roberto Righi; Federico Russo; Andrea Salteri; Sonia Frediani; Andrea Rossi; Marco Scatigna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the

  14. The Association of Ward Atmosphere with Burnout and Attitudes of Treatment Team Members in a State Psychiatric Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Caldwell; Kenneth J. Gill; Elaine Fitzgerald; Michael Sclafani; Peg Grandison

    2006-01-01

    As part of a Clinical Affiliation Agreement between a major state psychiatric facility and a state university, it was agreed that the hospital's staff would be assessed in terms of: burnout, nursing functioning, and ward atmosphere. The assessment data would be used to examine hospital characteristics as they relate to the strategies necessary to transform an approach of custodial care

  15. Comparative hygienic surveillance of contamination with pseudomonads in a cystic fibrosis ward over a 4-year period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J BOBETAHAMMER; B. Fiedler; P. Gudowius; H. von der Hardt; U. Römling; B. Tümmler

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the long-term distribution and population dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a highly contaminated hospital environment, two 4-week epidemiological studies, with an interval of 4 years, were carried out in the cystic fibrosis (CF) ward of the Paediatric Clinic of the Medical School of Hannover. Out of the 1948 specimens taken, P. aeruginosa was mainly identified

  16. Architectural change and the effects on the perceptions of the ward environment in a medium secure unit for women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clive G. Long; Vikki Langford; Rebecca Clay; Lorraine Craig; Clive R. Hollin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the architectural design considerations and effects of moving patients from an adapted Victorian medium secure unit to a purpose built facility. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Patients and staff views of the old and new unit environments were compared in terms of homeliness, architectural features, ward atmosphere (WAS) and patient satisfaction. Findings –

  17. An Exploratory Evaluation of the Ward and Hudson Offending Pathways Model with Sex Offenders Who Have Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, Peter E.; Maxted, Helen; Murphy, Glynis H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: It was predicted that offenders with intellectual disability (ID) categorised according to Ward & Hudson's (1998b) self-regulation theory as having an "Approach" goal would have higher levels of distorted cognitions, less victim empathy, and a history of more prolific offending compared to those with an "Avoidant" goal. Offenders…

  18. Over the last 3 years,extensive fractures have appeared in the ~3000-yr-old Ward Hunt Ice

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    .The orange color is due to carotenoids that protect the algal cells against bright solar radiation and 1980s.The precise triggering mechanism for the recent fractures is not known, but it might include,552 Fig.1.This RADARSAT image (30 August 2002) of theWard Hunt Ice Shelf shows the serpentine crack

  19. Ward Identities and a Perturbative Analysis of a U(1) Goldstone Boson in a Many Fermion System

    E-print Network

    Feldman, Joel

    Abstract. We derive Ward identities, to all orders of perturbation theory, in many Fermion systems ¯ / k;oe (I:1) for the connected Euclidean Green's functions, where the action A(/; ¯ /) = \\Gamma) 2 IR \\Theta IR d ; oe 2 f''; #g , are genera­ tors of an infinite dimensional Grassmann algebra over

  20. IR system to provide effective IR countermeasure (IRCM) capability to ward off threats posed by shoulder-fired missiles (SFMs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Jha

    2007-01-01

    This paper present an unique IR sensor technology capable of providing effective deception and noise jamming IReM capability to ward off threats posed by SFMs or STINGER missiles operated by various terrorist groups and Islamic radicals. More than 60,000 such missiles are currently in the hands of Islamic radicals and terrorist groups. Even one such missile can bring down a

  1. New approach for the time motion analysis of medical staffs in a ward by video image processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shima Okada; Yuko Ohno

    2007-01-01

    Time motion analysis is a popular tool for the job analysis of the medical staffs in a ward, especially for nurses. The usual time motion analysis is thought to be expensive and exhaustive for the study being conducted by trained observers continuously. Recently the more simple method is proposed applying the RFID, however, the study cost is also expensive and

  2. Rate of Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Units and General Wards of Iranian Hospitals and Methods for Their Detection

    PubMed Central

    AKBARI SARI, Ali; DOSHMANGHIR, Leila; NEGHAHBAN, Zahra; GHIASIPOUR, Maryam; BEHESHTIZAVAREH, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to estimate the rate of pressure ulcers in intensive care units (ICUs) and medical and surgical wards of Iranian hospitals and compare the performance of methods of medical record review as well as direct observation for their detection. Methods The research team visited 308 patients in medical and surgical wards of hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences and a further 90 patients in their ICUs between March 2009 and April 2010. In addition 310 patient records were randomly selected from patients discharged from the ICUs between March 2009 and April 2010. And a further 600 patient records were randomly selected from the patients that were discharged from medical and surgical wards between March 2010 and April 2011. These 910 selected records were retrospectively reviewed to identify pressure ulcers. Data were collected by a structured checklist. Results In ICUs 24 of 90 patients (26.7%, 95% CI: 17.56 to 35.84) that were directly observed and 59 of 310 patients (19.0%, 95% CI: 14.63 to 23.37) that were studied by retrospective review of medical records had pressure ulcers. In medical and surgical wards, 5 of 308 patients (1.6%, 95% CI: 0.20 to 3.00) that were directly observed had pressure ulcers, but no pressure ulcer was detected by review of 600 medical records. Conclusion Pressure ulcers are significantly more frequent in ICUs than in medical and surgical wards and a significant proportion of pressure ulcers are not reported.

  3. Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Bloodstream Infections in Hematology Wards: One Year Experience at the Catholic Blood and Marrow Transplantation Center

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Yeon-Joon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in 2 distinctive hematological wards of the Catholic Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) center. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical data of patients who developed BSIs from June 2009 to May 2010 in 2 hematologic wards at the Catholic BMT center. Ward A is a 44-bed unit mainly conducting conventional high dose chemotherapy and ward B is a 23-bed unit exclusively conducting BMT. Results Overall, 222 BSI episodes were developed from 159 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia in ward A and multiple myeloma in ward B were more frequent than in ward B and A, respectively. Sex, age, presence of neutropenia, shock, Pitt bacteremia score, type of central catheter, level of C-reactive protein, duration of admission days, type of BSI, overall mortality and distribution of organisms were not different between the 2 wards. There were 202 monomicrobial and 20 polymicrobial BSI episodes, including 2 fungemia episodes. The incidence rate of overall BSIs per 1,000 patient-days was higher in ward A than in ward B (incidence rate ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval 1.97-4.22, P<0.001). Among 243 organisms isolated, the number of gram positives, gram negatives and fungi were 122, 119 and 2, respectively. Escherichia coli was the most common organism in both ward A and B (27.6% and 42.4%), followed by viridians streptococci (18.6% and 15.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.3% and 9.0%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers accounted for 31.9% (23/72) of E. coli and 71.0% (22/31) of K. pneumoniae. Out of 19 Enterococcus faecium, 7 isolates (36.8%) were resistant to vancomycin. The crude mortality rates at 7 and 30 days after each BSI episode were 4.5% (10/222) and 13.1% (29/222), and were significantly higher in the patients with shock compared with those without shock (20.5% vs. 1.1%, P<0.001 and 38.5% vs. 7.7%, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions The incidence rate of BSIs was higher in patients receiving chemotherapy than those receiving BMT, but the distribution of organisms was not different between the 2 wards. E. coli was the most common causative BSI organism in hematologic wards followed by viridians streptococci and K. pneumoniae. PMID:24265950

  4. Workplace Learning: An analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students’ ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students’ expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Methods: Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. Results: We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. Conclusion: For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a longitudinal manner. The data suggest that the development and establishment of guidelines for medical teachers associated with clearly defined learning objectives for the students’ internships are urgently needed. Based on our findings, we provide first recommendations and suggest possible solutions. PMID:25489343

  5. Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the wetland because it had been platted with large areas privately owned. A self-published workshop report was produced each of the first three years. Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle with downtown New Orleans in the background. Photo by Travis Scott, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007.

  6. The role and resources required for the introduction of generic ward assistants using GRASP systems workload methodology: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L

    1997-01-01

    Non-nursing workers have been advocated as a means of ameliorating high nursing utilizations, whether the cause be budgetary or the inability to recruit trained staff. The creation of a generic worker who would undertake domestic, catering and non-nursing activities has been seen as a way of improving the ward environment and releasing trained staff and health care assistants from non-nursing activities, GRASP systems workload methodology was used to develop a job description and a tool to quantify the resources needed to introduce such workers. A quantitative research study and activity analysis was carried out on two sample wards to validate the tool. The results were validated by a 'within study' audit process comparative analysis and an activity qualitative analysis using a Likert attitudinal scale. Empirical analysis of the study's findings and the financial consequences were predicted across the Trust. PMID:9146199

  7. Supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity in one-loop lattice perturbation theory: General procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, Alessandra [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma and INFN Gruppo, Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2004-09-01

    The one-loop corrections to the lattice supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity (WTi) are investigated in the off-shell regime. In the Wilson formulation of the N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, supersymmetry is broken by the lattice, by the Wilson term, and is softly broken by the presence of the gluino mass. However, the renormalization of the supercurrent can be realized in a scheme that restores the continuum supersymmetric WTi (once the on-shell condition is imposed). The general procedure used to calculate the renormalization constants and mixing coefficients for the local supercurrent is presented. The supercurrent not only mixes with the gauge invariant operator T{sub {mu}}. An extra mixing with other operators coming from the WTi appears. This extra mixing survives in the continuum limit in the off-shell regime and cancels out when the on-shell condition is imposed and the renormalized gluino mass is set to zero. Comparison with numerical results is also presented.

  8. Infrastructural arrangements for integrated care: implementing an electronic nursing plan in a psychogeriatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Gunnar; Munkvold, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The paper contributes to the conceptualisation of “integrated care” in heterogeneous work practices. A dynamic perspective is developed, emphasising how integrated care is malleable, open, and achieved in practice. Furthermore, we explore the role of nursing plans in integrated care practices, underscoring the inherent difficulties of building one common infrastructural system for integrated care. Methods Empirically, we studied the implementation of an electronic nursing plan in a psychiatric ward at the University Hospital of North Norway. We conducted 80 hours of participant observation and 15 interviews. Results While the nursing plan was successful as a formal tool among the nurses, it was of limited use in practice where integrated care was carried out. In some instances, the use of the nursing plan even undermined integrated care. Conclusion Integrated care is not a constant entity, but is much more situated and temporal in character. A new infrastructural system for integrated care should not be envisioned as replacing most of the existing information sources, but rather seen as an extension to the heterogeneous ensemble of existing ones. PMID:17627295

  9. Diagnostic significance of Aspergillus species isolated from respiratory samples in an adult pneumology ward.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takayoshi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Tashiro, Masato; Takazono, Takahiro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Seki, Masafumi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yasuoka, Akira; Kohno, Shigeru

    2011-08-01

    Although the diagnostic significance of isolating Aspergillus spp. from respiratory cultures has been studied in immunocompromised hosts with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), little is known of such infections in immunocompetent patients with other forms of aspergillosis. In this study of adult pneumology ward patients, we examined the association between Aspergillus spp. and disease prevalence. Laboratory records from April 1998 to March 2009 were reviewed to identify patients with Aspergillus spp. in respiratory samples. Correlations between the isolated species and clinical characteristics of patients were evaluated. During the study period, 165 Aspergillus spp. isolates were detected in the respiratory cultures of 139 patients. Of these patients, 62 (45%) were colonized with Aspergillus spp. and displayed no clinical symptoms of aspergillosis, while 77 (55%) had a form of pulmonary aspergillosis, characterized as either chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) (48%), aspergilloma (29%), IPA (13%), or allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) (10%). The dominant species were Aspergillus fumigatus (41%), A. niger (32%), and A. versicolor (12%). A. fumigatus was most commonly isolated in patients with IPA, aspergilloma, and CNPA, whereas A. niger was the dominant species in colonized patients and those with ABPA. Isolation of an Aspergillus spp. from respiratory samples does not confirm it as the etiologic pathogen because airway colonization by Aspergillus spp. is a common feature in several chronic lung diseases. Repeated isolation of the identical Aspergillus species and detection of anti-Aspergillus antibodies and/or Aspergillus antigens in sera are needed to determine the isolate represents the etiologic agent of disease. PMID:21208028

  10. Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2015-02-01

    Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ?24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur. PMID:25444670

  11. Changing hospital policy from the wards: an introduction to health policy education.

    PubMed

    Jacobsohn, Vanessa; DeArman, Maria; Moran, Patrick; Cross, Jennette; Dietz, Deidre; Allen, Rebekah; Bachofer, Sally; Dow-Velarde, Lily; Kaufman, Arthur

    2008-04-01

    Although the need for physician participation in critiquing and setting health policies is great, physician participation in health policy activities is low. Many barriers hamper physician involvement, from limited time to ignorance of their potential roles, to minimal exposure to the issue during medical education. University of New Mexico School of Medicine family medicine residents and students on ward teams were trained to ask specific questions on rounds that framed individual patient encounters as windows into broader community health and policy issues. Teams selected problems on which to intervene, with the intent of influencing hospital policies to improve health care and outcomes. Ten projects were completed in six months, four of which are presented. Resident and student accomplishments included (1) identifying a free drug formulary at the Health Care for the Homeless pharmacy to reduce readmission rates of discharged homeless patients, (2) expanding hospital outpatient pharmacy hours to reduce preventable emergency room visits for medications, (3) expanding the hospital social service workforce to address the overwhelming need to discharge indigent patients needing extended care, and (4) certifying residents and faculty to provide outpatient buprenorphine treatment as a harm-reduction intervention for opiate-addicted patients, thereby reducing preventable hospitalizations for overdose or for medical complications from illicit opiate use. Hospital health policy is made more accessible to learners if issues that generate policy discussions emerge from their daily learning environment, if learners can intervene to improve those policies within a limited timeframe, and if faculty mentors are available to guide their interventions. PMID:18367894

  12. Modeling Clinical Context: Rediscovering the Social History and Evaluating Language from the Clinic to the Wards

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Colin; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    Social, behavioral, and cultural factors are clearly linked to health and disease outcomes. The medical social history is a critical evaluation of these factors performed by healthcare providers with patients in both inpatient and outpatient care settings. Physicians learn the topics covered in the social history through education and practice, but the topics discussed and documented in real-world clinical narrative have not been described at scale. This study applies large-scale automated topic modeling techniques to discover common topics discussed in social histories, to compare those topics to the medical textbook representation of those histories, and to compare topics between clinical settings to illustrate differences of clinical context on narrative content. Language modeling techniques are used to consider the extent to which inpatient and outpatient social histories share in their language use. Our findings highlight the fact that clinical context and setting are distinguishing factors for social history documentation, as the language of the hospital wards is not the same as that of the ambulatory clinic. Moreover, providers receive little feedback on the quality of their documentation beyond that needed for billing processes. The findings in this study demonstrate a number of topics described in textbooks – schooling, religion, alternative health practices, stressors, for example - do not appear in social histories in either clinical setting. PMID:25717417

  13. Correlation functions of twist fields from Ward identities in the massive Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyon, Benjamin; Silk, James

    2011-07-01

    We derive non-linear differential equations for correlation functions of U(1) twist fields in the two-dimensional massive Dirac theory. Primary U(1) twist fields correspond to exponential fields in the sine-Gordon model at the free-fermion point, and it is well-known that their vacuum two-point functions are determined by integrable differential equations. We extend part of this result to more general quantum states (pure or mixed) and to certain descendents, showing that some two-point functions are determined by the sinh-Gordon differential equations whenever there is translation and parity invariance, and the density matrix is the exponential of a bilinear expression in fermions. We use methods involving Ward identities associated to the copy-rotation symmetry in a model with two independent, anti-commuting copies. Such methods were used in the context of the thermally perturbed Ising quantum field theory model. We show that they are applicable to the Dirac theory as well, and we suggest that they are likely to have a much wider applicability to free fermion models in general. Finally, we note that our form-factor study of descendents twist fields combined with a CFT analysis provides a new way of evaluating vacuum expectation values of primary U(1) twist fields: by deriving and solving a recursion relation.

  14. Cross infection in a surgical ward caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with transferable resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F R Falkiner; C T Keane; M Dalton; M T Clancy; G A Jacoby

    1977-01-01

    An outbreak of gentamicin- and tobramycin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection occurred in a surgical ward over a three-month period. Resistant Ps. aeruginosa strains with the same serological, phage, and pyocin type were cultured from the urine of six patients. Identical organisms were found on urine bottles, bedpans, and the hands of attendant staff. Inadequate disinfection played a major role in cross-infection.

  15. [A review of the experience, the effectiveness and the spread of behavioral-cognitive group intervention in psychiatric ward].

    PubMed

    Veltro, Franco; Chiarullo, Rossella; Leanza, Valeriana; Di Padua, Paola; Oricchio, Ines; Addona, Franco; Vendittelli, Nicola; di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The use of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Intervention (CBGI) in Psychiatric Ward (SPDC) in Italy began in the year 2000 and it became more and more popular in different geographic areas of our country. In this paper we briefly describe the intervention, the theoretical framework, the effectiveness and efficiency in Italy as well as in the international context. Based on the theoretical model "stress-vulnerability-coping", the ICCG is a manualized treatment, innovative and effective in the acute care, using the group setting to foster a climate of collaboration between users and operators, to raise awareness, the adherence to the treatment plan and the satisfaction. This article provides an overview of studies of effectiveness, in particular those performed in Rome, Campobasso, Foggia, Arezzo which are of different lengths (1, 2, 4 and 5 years of follow-up). The results showed a reduction in voluntary as well as compulsory treatment (p<.01), an increase of ward's atmosphere and of the user satisfaction (p<.01), and also decreased aggressive acts (p.01). Finally, the results obtained through a survey of the various experiences, of the diffusion and how the intervention is applied in the various SPDC Italians are shown. The CBGI is more popular in the North of Italy, according with an increasing demand for training. The practical benefits observed by data collected are also illustrated; they mainly consist in improving the climate of the ward, in a better positive communication among users and between them and the professionals, in the fastest adherence to the treatment and of the active participation and informed care. Are also discussed factors that hinder the use in routine, including the low participation of psychiatrists and the difficulty in changing the organizational style of work in the ward. PMID:23748723

  16. Clockwork SUSY Supersymmetric Ward and Slavnov-Taylor Identities At Work in Green's Functions and Scattering Amplitudes

    E-print Network

    Ohl, T; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Juergen

    2003-01-01

    We study the cancellations among Feynman diagrams that implement the Ward and Slavnov-Taylor identities corresponding to the conserved supersymmetry current in supersymmetric quantum field theories. In particular, we show that the Faddeev-Popov ghosts of gauge- and supersymmetries never decouple from the physical fields, even for abelian gauge groups. The supersymmetric Slavnov-Taylor identities provide efficient consistency checks for automatized calculations and can verify the supersymmetry of Feynman rules and the numerical stability of phenomenological predictions simultaneously.

  17. Integrating care for high-risk patients in England using the virtual ward model: lessons in the process of care integration from three case sites

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Geraint; Vaithianathan, Rhema; Wright, Lorraine; Brice, Mary R; Lovell, Paul; Rankin, Seth; Bardsley, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients at high risk of emergency hospitalisation are particularly likely to experience fragmentation in care. The virtual ward model attempts to integrate health and social care by offering multidisciplinary case management to people at high predicted risk of unplanned hospitalisation. Objective To describe the care practice in three virtual ward sites in England and to explore how well each site had achieved meaningful integration. Method Case studies conducted in Croydon, Devon and Wandsworth during 2011–2012, consisting of semi-structured interviews, workshops, and site visits. Results Different versions of the virtual wards intervention had been implemented in each site. In Croydon, multidisciplinary care had reverted back to one-to-one case management. Conclusions To integrate successfully, virtual ward projects should safeguard the multidisciplinary nature of the intervention, ensure the active involvement of General Practitioners, and establish feedback processes to monitor performance such as the number of professions represented at each team meeting. PMID:24250284

  18. Adoption of an electronic observation chart with an integrated early warning scoring system on pilot wards: a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Nwulu, Ugochi; Westwood, David; Edwards, Debby; Kelliher, Fiona; Coleman, Jamie J

    2012-07-01

    The charting of physiological variables in hospital inpatients allows for recognition and treatment of deteriorating patients. The use of electronic records to capture patients' vital signs is still in its infancy in the United Kingdom. The main objective of this article was to describe the adoption of an electronic observation charting function integrated into an established bedside e-prescribing record system on acute wards in a large English university hospital. This new function also has the capability of contacting Critical Care Outreach and clinical staff when patients deteriorate. Data captured over a 4-month period from the pilot wards showed that 80% of observation sets were completed sufficiently to produce early warning scores over the time period. A daily average of 419 Standardized Early Warning Score produced 74 alerts to clinical staff, and two critical alarms per day were e-mailed to the Outreach team. The wards showed different levels of completeness of observations (from 69% to 92%). Although a good overall rate of completeness of physiological data was found, traditional gaps in observation recording documented in the literature (eg, recording of respiratory rate) were still apparent. This system can be used for audit for targeted staff education and to evaluate the Critical Care Outreach service. PMID:22525045

  19. Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Lesley; Gallini, Andrew; Corser, Rachael; Elworthy, Gina; Scotcher, Ann; Barrand, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Frail older people experience frequent care transitions and an integrated healthcare system could reduce barriers to transitions between different settings. The study aimed to investigate care transitions of frail older people from acute hospital wards to community healthcare or community hospital wards, within a system that had vertically integrated acute hospital and community healthcare services. Theory and methods The research design was a multimethod, qualitative case study of one healthcare system in England; four acute hospital wards and two community hospital wards were studied in depth. The data were collected through: interviews with key staff (n = 17); focus groups (n = 9) with ward staff (n = 36); interviews with frail older people (n = 4). The data were analysed using the framework approach. Findings Three themes are presented: Care transitions within a vertically integrated healthcare system, Interprofessional communication and relationships; Patient and family involvement in care transitions. Discussion and conclusions A vertically integrated healthcare system supported care transitions from acute hospital wards through removal of organisational boundaries. However, boundaries between staff in different settings remained a barrier to transitions, as did capacity issues in community healthcare and social care. Staff in acute and community settings need opportunities to gain better understanding of each other's roles and build relationships and trust. PMID:24868193

  20. The Effect on Mortality of Fluconazole or Echinocandins Treatment in Internal Medicine Wards

    PubMed Central

    Filippini, Claudia; Raviolo, Stefania; Fossati, Lucina; Montrucchio, Chiara; Aldieri, Chiara; Petrolo, Alessia; Cavallo, Rossana; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of candidemia has increased over the past two decades, with an increased number of cases in Internal Medicine and a prevalence ranging from 24% to 57%. This single-center retrospective study was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and the risk factors associated with mortality of candidemia in patients admitted to Internal Medicine wards (IMWs) of the City of Health and Sciences, Molinette Hospital, Turin, from January 2004 to December 2012. For each patient, demographic, clinical and microbiological data were collected. A case of candidemia was defined as a patient with at least one blood culture positive for Candida spp. Amongst 670 episodes of candidemia, 274 (41%) episodes occurred in IMWs. The mortality was 39% and was associated at multivariate analysis with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst removal of central venous catheter ?48h was significantly associated with survival. In the 77 patients treated with early antifungal therapy the mortality was 29% and was not significantly different with caspofungin or fluconazole, whilst in patients with definitive therapy the mortality was significantly lower with echinocandins compared to fluconazole (11.7% Vs. 39%; p=0.0289), a finding confirmed by multivariate analysis. The mortality was significantly associated with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst CVC removal ?48h was associated with survival. In patients with early therapy, fluconazole or caspofungin were equally effective. However, echinocandins were significantly more effective as definitive treatment, a finding not explained by differences in treatment delays. Further studies are needed to understand the full potential of these different therapeutic strategies in IMWs. PMID:25938486

  1. Characterization of Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Surgical Wards' Patients in a Nigerian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Deboye O.; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L.; Lawal, Oladejo O.; Amusa, Yemisi B.; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

  2. The Relationship between Therapeutic Alliance and Service User Satisfaction in Mental Health Inpatient Wards and Crisis House Alternatives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Methods and Findings Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. Results We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. Conclusions and Implications We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute ward service users experience a lack of compassion and humanity from ward staff and how this could be changed. PMID:25010773

  3. Hand contamination during routine care in medical wards: the role of hand hygiene compliance.

    PubMed

    Monistrol, Olga; López, M Liboria; Riera, Montserrat; Font, Roser; Nicolás, Carme; Escobar, Miguel Angel; Freixas, Núria; Garau, Javier; Calbo, Esther

    2013-04-01

    The hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) are the most common vehicle for the transmission of micro-organisms from patient to patient and within the healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multimodal campaign on the type and amount of resident and transient flora and the presence of potential risk factors for hand contamination during routine care. A before-after (PRE and POST periods) interventional study was carried out in medical wards of a tertiary care hospital. Eighty-nine samples were analysed. Samples were cultured immediately before patient contact using a glove-juice method. Data collected included socio-demographic and risk factors for hand contamination. Flora was measured as log10 c.f.u. ml(-1) and evaluated by comparing median values in the PRE and POST periods. Transient flora was isolated from the hands of 67.4 and 46.1 % of HCWs in the PRE and POST periods, respectively (P<0.001). Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were the predominant contaminants. Resident flora was isolated from 92.1 % of HCWs in the PRE period and from 70.8 % in the POST period (P<0.001). The meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci log10 c.f.u. count ml(-1) decreased from 1.96 ± 1.2 to 0.89 ± 1.2 (mean ± s d; P<0.001), and the global flora count decreased from 2.77 ± 1.1 to 1.56 ± 1.4 (P<0.001). In the POST period, the wearing of fewer rings (P<0.001), shorter fingernail length (P = 0.008), a shorter time since recent hand hygiene (HH) (P = 0.007) and an increased use of alcohol-based hand rub instead of soap (P<0.001) were documented. The HH multimodal strategy reduced the number of risk factors and the level of HCW hand contamination. PMID:23329322

  4. Effect of communication skill training using group psychoeducation method on the stress level of psychiatry ward nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Lohrasbi, Fatemeh; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing is a dynamic and supportive job, with the main role of taking care of patients. Maintaining appropriate communication of the nurse with the patients is particularly known as the main core of care in mental health. However, in spite of the importance of providing communication, one of the main sources of stress in nurses of psychiatry wards is communication with the patients. Some important reasons for inappropriate relationship between the nurse and patient can be lack of necessary skills to communicate with patients because of insufficient training. Although training communication skills is an important part of the education of medical and paramedical students, in recent studies it has been demonstrated that the communication skills learned in theoretical courses would not necessarily be transferred to clinical settings, and proving training in clinical settings is a must. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of training communication skills using psychoeducation method on the stress level of nurses of psychiatry wards in 2010. METHODS: This is a quasi-experimental study. The participants were 45 nurses; 23 and 22 in the experiment and control groups, respectively, working in psychiatry wards of Noor and Farabi hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was carried out by the census method, and then the participants were randomly assigned to the two groups of experiment and control, using random number table. The two groups filled out the demographic data form and also the questionnaire on nurses’ occupational stress, designed by the researcher. The questionnaire was filled out three times; before, immediately after, and one month after the training. Training of communication skills was carried out using group psychoeducation method, in six sessions, each lasted for 1.5 hours. The training sessions of the experiment group were held in Farabi Hospital. RESULTS: The findings indicated that before the intervention, the members of the two groups had a high level of occupational stress. Immediately after the training, the stress level of the experiment group decreased significantly, and the decrease was sustained for the following one month. CONCLUSIONS: Training communicative skills using group psychoeducation method can decrease the occupational stress of psychiatry ward nurses. PMID:22069416

  5. IR system to provide effective IR countermeasure (IRCM) capability to ward off threats posed by shoulder-fired missiles (SFMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. R.

    2007-10-01

    This paper present an unique IR sensor technology capable of providing effective deception and noise jamming IReM capability to ward off threats posed by SFMs or STINGER missiles operated by various terrorist groups and Islamic radicals. More than 60,000 such missiles are currently in the hands of Islamic radicals and terrorist groups. Even one such missile can bring down a commercial jet transport carrying more than 350 passengers. The proposed IReM system deploys innovative jamming technique to confuse the missile seeker receiver by introducing sharp FM-modulated noise spikes in the receiver bandwidth, thereby preventing the detection and tracking of aircraft.

  6. V. Ayvazyan, S. Choroba, Z. Geng, G. Petrosyan, S. Simrock, V. Vogel

    E-print Network

    800 1000 1200 1400 1600 -200 -100 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Time / s DetuningofACC23vectorsum ACC3_C3 ACC3_C4 ACC3_C5 ACC3_C6 ACC3_C7 ACC3_C8 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 0 0.5 1 1 · DOOCS interface ( ) -= - t et 10 #12;Smoothing of Forward Power Overshoots ACC2 forward power

  7. Close encounters in a pediatric ward: measuring face-to-face proximity and mixing patterns with wearable sensors

    E-print Network

    Isella, L; Barrat, A; Cattuto, C; Colizza, V; Broeck, W Van den; Gesualdo, F; Pandolfi, E; Ravà, L; Rizzo, C; Tozzi, A E; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017144

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial infections place a substantial burden on health care systems and represent a major issue in current public health, requiring notable efforts for its prevention. Understanding the dynamics of infection transmission in a hospital setting is essential for tailoring interventions and predicting the spread among individuals. Mathematical models need to be informed with accurate data on contacts among individuals. We used wearable active Radio-Frequency Identification Devices to detect face-to-face contacts among individuals with a spatial resolution of about 1.5 meters, and a time resolution of 20 seconds. The study was conducted in a general pediatrics hospital ward, during a one-week period, and included 119 participants. Nearly 16,000 contacts were recorded during the study, with a median of approximately 20 contacts per participants per day. Overall, 25% of the contacts involved a ward assistant, 23% a nurse, 22% a patient, 22% a caregiver, and 8% a physician. The majority of contacts were of brief ...

  8. Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Surgery Wards of a Large Teaching Hospital in Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Silvano; Gioia, Renato; De Simone, Giuseppe; Noviello, Silvana; Lombardi, Domenico; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Rega, Maria Rosaria; Massari, Angelo; Elberti, Maria Giovanna; Grisi, Lucilla; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Surgical infections represent an increasingly important problem for the National Health System. In this study we retrospectively evaluated the bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganisms concerned as well as the utilization of antibiotics in the General and Emergency Surgery wards of a large teaching hospital in southern Italy in the period 2011–2013. Methods Data concerning non-duplicate bacterial isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility were retrieved from the Vitek 2 database. The pharmacy provided data about the consumption of antibiotics in the above reported wards. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used. Results In all, 94 Gram-negative were isolated in 2011, 77 in 2012, and 125 in 2013, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa always being the most frequently isolated microorganisms. A. baumannii showed high rates of resistance to carbapenems (with values of 100% in 2011 and 2012) and low rates of resistance to tigecycline, colistin and amikacin. In the same years, there were respectively 105, 93, and 165 Gram-positive isolated. The rate of MRSA isolates ranged from 66% to 75% during the study period. Conclusions Our results show no significant increase in antimicrobial resistance over the period in question, and a higher rate of both MRSA isolates and resistance to carbapenems in A. baumannii compared with other European data.

  9. Prospective pilot study on the incidence of infections caused by peripheral venous catheters at a general surgical ward

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Ines; Geßner, Stephan; Wegner, Christian; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Device-associated infections comprise a significant proportion of all nosocomial infections. In this prospective, observational pilot study the incidence of infections in 89 peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) was documented on a general surgical ward employing an infection data sheet developed by the Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Greifswald in adherence to CDC standards for infections. 16 of 20 infections were documented during a four-week time period when medical students in the first four months of their practical year performed their compulsory rotation on the general surgical ward. Insufficient knowledge of adequate hygienic measures as well as non-compliance to aseptical procedural measures prior to and following insertion of a peripheral venous catheter are the assumed instigators of these infections. In order to ensure a uniform hygienic standard in the performance of applied procedures, it is essential that medical students during this practical year receive not only theoretical, but also hands-on schooling prior to initiation of their subsequent official residency. PMID:23967392

  10. [Factors associated with the use of supplements among newborns in communal wards in Rio de Janeiro, 2009].

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maria Inês Couto de; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Fonseca, Vania Matos

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this study was to estimate the prevalence of the use of supplements among newborns and analyze the factors associated with their use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 with a representative sample of 687 mothers interviewed in 15 communal wards in hospitals of the Unified Health System in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Prevalence ratios (PR) of supplement use were obtained by Poisson Regression with robust variance, using a hierarchical model. The prevalence of supplement use was 49.8%. Factors associated with supplement use were: being submitted to the rapid HIV test (PR = 1.37; CI95%:1.18-1.58); cesarean delivery (PR = 1.57; CI95%:1.38-1.79); not being helped to breastfeed in the delivery room (PR = 1.60; CI95%:1.29-1.99); mother-child separation (PR = 1.24; CI95%:1.05-1.46); pacifier use (PR = 1.31; CI95%:1.08-1.58); maternal or neonatal interventions (PR = 1.56; CI95%:1.34-1.82); BFH certification (PR = 0.52; CI95%:0.44-0.61); and not receiving help to breastfeed in the communal ward (PR = 0.78; CI95%:0.66-0.92). Supplements to breast milk are being widely used. Hospital routines should be reviewed, so that exclusive breastfeeding becomes the norm. PMID:23358768

  11. [The home palliative care transition manual for the regional cooperation from the general ward at Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital].

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Ko

    2007-12-01

    Recently, a home palliative care has been recommended for terminal stage cancer patients. However, a few clinics are available providing a home palliative care. As a result of that, there have been many cases of the terminal stage cancer patients who could not receive a peace of mind care and die peacefully at home. Home palliative care has been promoted in Shizuoka City by starting Shizuoka city regional cooperation conference of cancer management with a help from Shizuoka city medical association and the general hospital. It is important to have the knowledge and technique put into practice by clinics and home visiting nurses for a further improvement of the palliative care. In order to transfer patient smoothly, the palliative care team conference is held in the general ward and the homecare transition manual is used at the hospital. An application of homecare insurance, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged in parallel to management of physical and psychological symptoms of the patient, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged. Before a patient is discharged from the hospital, the meeting will be held among the ward staff, visiting nurse and the patient's family. We intervened 8 cases from April to July 2007. Six out of 8 cases were transferred to home, and 2 patients were died at home. The home care transition manual will be shared with other hospitals from now on. PMID:20443259

  12. Documenting the NICU design dilemma: parent and staff perceptions of open ward versus single family room units

    PubMed Central

    Domanico, R; Davis, D K; Coleman, F; Davis, B O

    2010-01-01

    Objective: With neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) evolving from multipatient wards toward family-friendly, single-family room units, the study objective was to compare satisfaction levels of families and health-care staff across these differing NICU facility designs. Study Design: This prospective study documented, by means of institutional review board-approved questionnaire survey protocols, the perceptions of parents and staff from two contrasting NICU environments. Result: Findings showed that demographic subgroups of parents and staff perceived the advantages and disadvantages of the two facility designs differently. Staff perceptions varied with previous experience, acclimation time and employment position, whereas parental perceptions revealed a naiveté bias through surveys of transitional parents with experience in both NICU facilities. Conclusion: Use of transitional parent surveys showed a subject naiveté bias inherent in perceptions of inexperienced parents. Grouping all survey participants demographically provided more informative interpretations of data, and revealed staff perceptions to vary with position, previous training and hospital experience. PMID:20072132

  13. Documenting the NICU design dilemma: comparative patient progress in open-ward and single family room units

    PubMed Central

    Domanico, R; Davis, D K; Coleman, F; Davis, B O

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To test the efficacy of single family room (SFR) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) designs, questions regarding patient medical progress and relative patient safety were explored. Addressing these questions would be of value to hospital staff, administrators and designers alike. Study Design: This prospective study documented, by means of Institution Review Board-approved protocols, the progress of patients in two contrasting NICU designs. Noise levels, illumination and air quality measurements were included to define the two NICU physical environments. Result: Infants in the SFR unit had fewer apneic events, reduced nosocomial sepsis and mortality, as well as earlier transitions to enteral nutrition. More mothers sustained stage III lactation, and more infants were discharged breastfeeding in the SFR. Conclusion: This study showed the SFR to be more conducive to family-centered care, and to enhance infant medical progress and breastfeeding success over that of an open ward. PMID:21072040

  14. Which Medication Is the Patient Taking at Admission to the Emergency Ward? Still Unclear Despite the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Ida; Wyss, Katja; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte; Bergman, Ulf; Odar-Cederlöf, Ingegerd; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Fryckstedt, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Correct information on patients’ medication is crucial for diagnosis and treatment in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to investigate the concordance between the admission chart and two other records of the patient’s medication. Methods This cohort study includes data on 168 patients over 18 years admitted to the Emergency Ward between September 1 and 30, 2008. The record kept by the general practitioner and the patient record of dispensed drugs in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register were compared to the admission chart record. Results Drug record discrepancies of potential clinical significance between the admission chart record and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register or general practitioner record were present in 79 and 82 percent, respectively. For 63 percent of the studied patients the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. For 62 percent the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the general practitioner record. In addition, for 32 percent of the patients the admission chart record included drugs not registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and for 52 percent the admission chart record included drugs not found in the general practitioner record. The most discordant drug classes were cardiovascular and CNS-active drugs. Clinically significant drug record discrepancies were more frequent in older patients with multiple medication and caregivers. Conclusion The apparent absence of an accurate record of the patient’s drugs at admission to the Emergency Ward constitutes a potential patient safety hazard. The available sources in Sweden, containing information on the drugs a particular patient is taking, do not seem to be up to date. These results highlight the importance of an accurate list of currently used drugs that follows the patient and can be accessed upon acute admission to the hospital. PMID:26068920

  15. Field Study on Runoff Processes at a Snow-covered Hillslope in Ward Valley, Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, N.; Kavvas, M. L.; Easton, D.; Dogrul, E. C.; Yoon, J.; Chen, Z.

    2012-12-01

    At the snow covered hillslope in Ward Creek watershed, Lake Tahoe Basin, overland flow, subsurface stormflow, channel flow, atmospheric quantities, and groundwater table underneath the snowpack were measured during the water years, 2000 and 2001. The analyses of the hillslope runoff measurements revealed that majority of the snowmelt water infiltrated into the top soil layer, and that the saturated subsurface flow was the largest contributor to the stream channel flow throughout the observation period. However, it was found that the overland flow or longitudinal flow within the snowpack may still happen even over unfrozen and unsaturated topsoil on a relatively mild hillslope (16 %). Analysis of the major rain-on-snow event of May 7, 2000, showed that the snowmelt water, caused by the energy flux from raindrops, might not be the major contributor to the runoff peak discharge since very little snowmelt was observed during the rain-on-snow event. Consequently, spring storm hydrographs in the Sierra Nevada may be enhanced by the high soil-water in the topsoil due to the daily water supply by snowmelt as well as by overland/within snowpack flow. (A) Observed and simulated snow water equivalence (SWE) and estimated snowmelt rate, (B) observed overland flow, (C) observed rootzone discharge and consolidated discharge, and (D) observed stream discharge and precipitation at Ward Creek observation site. Schematic of hillslope runoff pathways at a riparian cross-section in a snow covered watershed. It may be reasonable to assume that the capillary suction may be able to help sustain some portion of water within the snowpack even over a highly permeable soil.

  16. Examination of Heavy Metals and Particulate Matter Exposures and Effects in Susceptible Wards in the Washington, D.C. Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, N. A.; Morris, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    The District of Columbia has one of the greatest health disparities of cancer in the nation and ranks seventh highest as one of the unhealthiest places to live due to poor air quality (EPA Report, 1999). Also, a 1999 report from the Centers for Disease Control stated that the District had the highest overall rate of cancer incidence in the nation. Particulate matter is one of the major contributors to pollution in the environment. Quite often particulate matter is composed of toxic materials including heavy metals, pesticides, and spores. In some cases, the heavy metal particulates are considered carcinogenic. They are typically characterized as particles with diameters smaller than 1 m and are easily deposited into the alveolar regions of the human lungs, which can impose threatening health risks. In this study, I will design and execute an environmental exposure assessment for PM2.5, PM10, and heavy metals like chromium, as well as lead, cadmium and arsenic, in four observed wards of Washington, DC. Most interestingly, spatial distributions of both aerosols and heavy metals will be characterized as a function of size and mass properties. This will formulate a limited climatology of both types of particulate matter and selected heavy metals for specific regions within the District of Columbia. This dataset will further be related to epidemiological data and health outcomes for the observed areas of study. The essence of this study lies in its notoriety as the first to generate a dataset that focuses on toxic air pollutants in particular wards and may be utilized in various aspects of public health.

  17. Assessment of selected quality fields of nursing care in neurosurgical wards: a prospective study of 530 people – multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Œlusarz, Robert; Biercewicz, Monika; Barczykowska, Ewa; Haor, Beata; G?owacka, Mariola

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the elements influencing the assessment of nursing care quality is the assessment of the nurse’s functions that determine the nurse’s particular tasks. The aim of this work was to assess selected tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality on neurosurgical wards, on the basis of patients’ and nursing staff’s opinions. Materials and methods The research was carried out on neurosurgical wards in Poland on a group of 455 patients and 75 nurses. In order to assess nursing care quality, an author’s original questionnaire (Questionnaire – Patient Satisfaction) was used. Results Statistically significant differences concerned particular groups (both patients and nurses) in the assessment of selected issues: providing information about performed activities and operations (P=0.000 and P=0.040), respecting personal dignity and assuring discretion during the operations (P=0.000 and P=0.001), speed of response to patient’s requests (P=0.000 and P=0.000), time availability of nurses for the patient (P=0.000 and P=0.000), providing information about further self-care at home (P=0.032, P=0.008), and nurses’ attitude (kindness, courtesy, tenderness, care) to patients (patient’s assessment only P=0.000). Conclusion Selected tasks in the field of the caring function of nurses were assessed differently by particular groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the assessment of particular tasks in the opinions of patients and nurses, which means that both examined groups similarly assessed tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality. PMID:25170257

  18. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 2. General Ward Corpsman QPCB Task Sort for Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 2 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties for a general ward corpsman. (BT)

  19. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nococomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Devine; R. P. D. Cooke; E. P. Wright

    2001-01-01

    A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate

  20. Etiology and Symptoms of Pediatric Admission in the Emergency and Pediatric Wards in Qa'em Hospital in Mashad, Iran in 1382-83 (2003-4)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Hashemzadeh

    Background and Purpose: Etiology of pediatric admission is changing. In this study the most common causes of children's admission and duration of hospitalization were reviewed. In regard to complications of disorders, theresults of this study will promote managing and facilities in pediatric ward. Methods and materials: Pediatric patients admitted to Qa'em Hospital in Mashad, Iran in one year were studied.

  1. Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden, Steven Smith, Bruce McNamara, Edgar Buck

    E-print Network

    Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden Chemical fingerprinting of anthropogenic and mineral uranium leading to chemical age dating of reactive uranium samples Develop x-ray and/or electron microscopy protocol for non- destructive uranium sample

  2. A survey of the quality of nursing services for brain trauma patients in the emergency wards of hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran (2012)

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Seyed Ali; Ayoubian, Ali; Mardani, Sheida; Hashemidehaghi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Head trauma is the main cause of disabilities and death among young people, and the side effects of head trauma pose some of the greatest medical challenges. Rapid diagnosis and the use of proper treatments can prevent more severe brain damage. The purpose of this research was to determine the quality of nursing services provided to brain trauma patients in hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive, cross-sectional study in the emergency wards of selected hospitals in Guilan in 2012. The research population was comprised of all the brain trauma patients in these hospitals. We developed a two-section questionnaire, ascertained its validity, and determined that it had a reliability of 88% (Cronbach’s alpha). Subsequently, we used the questionnaire for gathering data. The data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software, and descriptive analysis tests (frequency rate and average) and deductive analyses tests (chi-squared) also were used. Results: The results showed that the quality of health services provided to brain-trauma patients in the emergency ward was at the moderate level of 58.8% of the cases and at a low level in 41.2% of the cases. Conclusion: Based on the results that showed that the services were of moderate quality, the staff members in the emergency ward were required to update their knowledge and use the required measures to minimize or prevent side effects in brain-trauma patients; clearly, mastery of such measures was a real need among the emergency ward’s staff. PMID:25763140

  3. The Effect of Additional Training on Motor Outcomes at Discharge from Recovery Phase Rehabilitation Wards: A Survey from Multi-Center Stroke Data Bank in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Nariaki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Jeong, Seungwon; Sugiyama, Motoya; Kondo, Katsunori; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential benefits of additional training in patients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation ward using the data bank of post-stroke patient registry. Subjects and Methods Subjects were 2507 inpatients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation wards between November 2004 and November 2010. Participants were retrospectively divided into four groups based upon chart review; patients who received no additional rehabilitation, patients who were added with self-initiated off hours training, patients who were added with off hours training by ward staff, patients who received both self-initiated training and training by ward staff. Parameters for assessing outcomes included length of stay, motor/cognitive subscales of functional independent measures (FIM) and motor benefit of FIM calculated by subtracting the score at admission from that at discharge. Results Participants were stratified into three groups depending on the motor FIM at admission (?28, 29?56, 57?) for comparison. Regarding outcome variables, significant inter-group differences were observed in all items examined within the subgroup who scored 28 or less and between 29 and 56. Meanwhile no such trends were observed in the group who scored 57 or more compared with those who scored less. In a decision tree created based upon Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection method, variables chosen were the motor FIM at admission (the first node) additional training (the second node), the cognitive FIM at admission(the third node). Conclusions Overall the results suggest that additional training can compensate for the shortage of regular rehabilitation implemented in recovery phase rehabilitation ward, thus may contribute to improved outcomes assessed by motor FIM at discharge. PMID:24626224

  4. Spatial variation of heart failure and air pollution in Warwickshire, UK: an investigation of small scale variation at the ward-level

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Oscar; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Ji, Chen; Linnane, John; Clarke, Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To map using geospatial modelling techniques the morbidity and mortality caused by heart failure within Warwickshire to characterise and quantify any influence of air pollution on these risks. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Warwickshire, UK. Participants Data from all of the 105 current Warwickshire County wards were collected on hospital admissions and deaths due to heart failure. Results In multivariate analyses, the presence of higher mono-nitrogen oxide (NOx) in a ward (3.35:1.89, 4.99), benzene (Ben) (31.9:8.36, 55.85) and index of multiple deprivation (IMD; 0.02: 0.01, 0.03), were consistently associated with a higher risk of heart failure morbidity. Particulate matter (Pm; ?12.93: ?20.41, ?6.54) was negatively associated with the risk of heart failure morbidity. No association was found between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and heart failure morbidity. The risk of heart failure mortality was higher in wards with a higher NOx (4.30: 1.68, 7.37) and wards with more inhabitants 50+ years old (1.60: 0.47, 2.92). Pm was negatively associated (?14.69: ?23.46, ?6.50) with heart failure mortality. SO2, Ben and IMD scores were not associated with heart failure mortality. There was a prominent variation in heart failure morbidity and mortality risk across wards, the highest risk being in the regions around Nuneaton and Bedworth. Conclusions This study showed distinct spatial patterns in heart failure morbidity and mortality, suggesting the potential role of environmental factors beyond individual-level risk factors. Air pollution levels should therefore be taken into account when considering the wider determinants of public health and the impact that changes in air pollution might have on the health of a population. PMID:25468504

  5. The effect of a virtual ward program on emergency services utilization and quality of life in frail elderly patients after discharge: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris YP; Lee, Diana Tze-Fan; Lee, Iris FK; Lam, Lai-Wah; Lee, Susanna WY; Chan, May WM; Lam, Yin-Ming; Leung, Siu-Hung; Chiu, Pui-Chi; Ho, Nelly KF; Ip, Ming-Fai; Hui, May MY

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Attendance at emergency departments and unplanned hospital readmissions are common for frail older patients after discharge from hospitals. A virtual ward service was piloted to deliver “hospital-at-home” services by community nurses and geriatricians to frail older patients immediately after their discharge from hospital to reduce emergency services utilization. Objectives This study examined the impacts of the virtual ward service on changes in the patients’ emergency attendance and medical readmissions, and their quality of life (QOL). Methods A matched-control quasi-experimental study was conducted at four hospitals, with three providing the virtual ward service (intervention) and one providing the usual community nursing care (control). Subjects in the intervention group were those who are at high risk of readmission and who are supported by home carers recruited from the three hospitals providing the virtual ward service. Matched control patients were those recruited from the hospital providing usual care. Outcome measures include emergency attendance and medical readmission in the past 90 days as identified from medical records, and patient-reported QOL as measured by the modified Quality-of-Life Concerns in the End of Life Questionnaire (Chinese version). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared the changes in the outcome variables between groups. Results A total of 39 patients in each of the two groups were recruited. The virtual ward group showed a greater significant reduction in the number of unplanned emergency hospital readmissions (?1.41±1.23 versus ?0.77±1.31; P=0.049) and a significant improvement in their overall QOL (n=18; 0.60±0.56 versus 0.07±0.56; P=0.02), but there was no significant difference in the number of emergency attendances (?1.51±1.25 versus ?1.08±1.48; P=0.29). Conclusion The study results support the effectiveness of the virtual ward service in reducing unplanned emergency medical readmissions and in improving the QOL in frail older patients after discharge. PMID:25678782

  6. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ? 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (? 85 years), chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and severe cognitive impairment adversely affects the outcome of elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward. PMID:21970460

  7. Sharp Arc-ward Grain Size Increase in the Forearc Mantle Wedge and Its Implications for Subduction Zone Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Behn, M. D.; He, J.

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the grain size distribution in the mantle wedge, we couple a 2-D steady-state finite-element thermal and mantle flow model and the grain size evolution model of Austin and Evans [Geology, 2007] following the parameterization of Behn et al. [EPSL, 2009] for wet olivine. For the mantle wedge, we use a composite wet olivine rheology that incorporates grain-size-dependent diffusion creep and grain-size-independent dislocation creep. The deformation mechanism with the faster strain rate dominates the mantle deformation. Both the thermal and deformation conditions in the wedge depend strongly on viscous coupling between the slab and the mantle. In our model, we use the slab-mantle stress-coupling approach of Wada et al. [JGR, 2008] and set a rheologically controlled decoupling-coupling transition at a depth of 70-80 km to be consistent with geological and geophysical observations. Because the grain size evolution model does not account for brittle deformation, we model only regions >600°C. We find that compared to the rate of advection, grain size rapidly achieves its steady-state value, allowing us to approximate the grain size in the mantle wedge based solely on its steady-state value. Our modeling results show that the steady-state grain size increases arc-ward from ~100 ?m at the most seaward part of the creeping region to ~1 cm in the sub-arc mantle regardless of subduction parameters such as slab age, subduction rate, and slab dip. This is because the flow and thermal fields in the creeping region are relatively uniform owing to the common decoupling-coupling transition depth. Despite the large variation in grain size within the creeping region, its effect on the mantle rheology and flow is very small, as >90% of the deformation in the flowing part of the creeping region is accommodated by grain-size independent dislocation creep. The arc-ward increase in grain size by ~2 orders of magnitude over a relatively short distance in the forearc wedge results in a sharp increase in permeability by ~4 orders of magnitude, promoting greater upward migration of fluid and melt in the sub-arc mantle than in the forearc. This may explain the seismological observations and the location of arc volcanoes, which indicate focusing of fluid and/or melt above the location at which the slab reaches ~100-km depth.

  8. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33) plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies) while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies). Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species) followed by roots (13 species) while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further enhances the validity of plants used in traditional medicine in this region as resources that can be relied on to provide effective, accessible and affordable basic healthcare to the local communities. The plants documented also have the potential of being used in drug development and on farm domestication initiatives. PMID:20663166

  9. The use of typing methods and infection prevention measures to control a bullous impetigo outbreak on a neonatal ward

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe an outbreak of Bullous Impetigo (BI), caused by a (methicillin susceptible, fusidic acid resistant) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strain, spa-type t408, at the neonatal and gynaecology ward of the Jeroen Bosch hospital in the Netherlands, from March-November 2011. Methods We performed an outbreak investigation with revision of the hygienic protocols, MSSA colonization surveillance and environmental sampling for MSSA including detailed typing of SA isolates. Spa typing was performed to discriminate between the SA isolates. In addition, Raman-typing was performed on all t408 isolates. Results Nineteen cases of BI were confirmed by SA positive cultures. A cluster of nine neonates and three health care workers (HCW) with SA t408 was detected. These strains were MecA-, PVL-, Exfoliative Toxin (ET)A-, ETB+, ETAD-, fusidic acid-resistant and methicillin susceptible. Eight out of nine neonates and two out of three HCW t408 strains yielded a similar Raman type. Positive t408 HCW were treated and infection control procedures were reinforced. These measures stopped the outbreak. Conclusions We conclude that treatment of patients and HCW carrying a predominant SA t408, and re-implementing and emphasising hygienic measures were effective to control the outbreak of SA t408 among neonates. PMID:23168170

  10. Characteristics of immigrant and non-immigrant patients in a dual-diagnosis psychiatric ward and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sophie D; Blass, David; Bensimon-Braverman, Meital; Barak, Lee Topaz; Delayahu, Yael

    2014-12-01

    Two studies were conducted among patients in a male dual diagnosis (severe mental illness [SMI] with substance use) ward. The research examined the following questions: (1) Do immigrant and non-immigrant dual diagnosis patients exhibit similar or different socio-demographic, clinical and criminological characteristics? (2) What are the implications for treatment of immigrant (and non-immigrant) patients? Study one analyzed computerized hospital records of 413 male patients; Study two examined patient files of a subgroup of 141 (70 immigrant) male patients. Alongside similarities, non-immigrant patients reported higher numbers of repeat and involuntary hospitalizations and more drug use while immigrants showed longer hospitalizations, more suicide attempts, more violent suicide attempts, more violent offenses and more alcohol use. Among non-immigrants significant relationships were found between severity of SMI and crime/violence while among immigrants a significant relationship was found between suicidality and crime/violence. Implications for treatment include need for awareness of suicide risk among immigrant dual-diagnosis patients and an understanding of the differential relationship with crime/violence for the two populations. PMID:24488692

  11. Sauti Za Wananchi “voice of the people”: patient satisfaction on the medical wards at a Kenyan Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Geren Starr; Jerotich, Tecla Sum; Cheriro, Betsy Rono; Kiptoo, Robert Sitienei; Crowe, Susie Joanne; Koros, Elijah Kipkorir; Muthoni, Doreen Mutegi; Onalo, Paul Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is one indicator of healthcare quality. Few studies have examined the inpatient experiences in resource-scarce environments in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods To examine patient satisfaction on the public medical wards at a Kenyan referral hospital, we performed a cross-sectional survey focused on patients’ satisfaction with medical information and their relationship with staffing and hospital routine. Ratings of communication with providers, efforts to protect privacy, information about costs, food, and hospital environment were also elicited. Results Overall, the average patient satisfaction rating was 64.7, nearly midway between “average” and “good” Higher rated satisfaction was associated with higher self-rated general health scores and self-rated health gains during the hospitalization (p = 0.023 and p = 0.001). Women who shared a hospital bed found privacy to be “below average” to “poor” Most men (72.7%) felt information about costs was insufficient. Patients rated food and environmental quality favorably while also frequently suggesting these areas could be improved. Conclusion Overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the care provided. These ratings may reflect modest patients’ expectations as well as acceptable circumstances and performance. Women expressed concern about privacy while men expressed a desire for more information on costs. Inconsistencies were noted between patient ratings and free response answers. PMID:25469201

  12. Nonexistence of the Luttinger-Ward Functional and Misleading Convergence of Skeleton Diagrammatic Series for Hubbard-Like Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozik, Evgeny; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    The Luttinger-Ward functional ? [G ] , which expresses the thermodynamic grand potential in terms of the interacting single-particle Green's function G , is found to be ill defined for fermionic models with the Hubbard on-site interaction. In particular, we show that the self-energy ? [G ]?? ? [G ]/? G is not a single-valued functional of G : in addition to the physical solution for ? [G ] , there exists at least one qualitatively distinct unphysical branch. This result is demonstrated for several models: the Hubbard atom, the Anderson impurity model, and the full two-dimensional Hubbard model. Despite this pathology, the skeleton Feynman diagrammatic series for ? in terms of G is found to converge at least for moderately low temperatures. However, at strong interactions, its convergence is to the unphysical branch. This reveals a new scenario of breaking down of diagrammatic expansions. In contrast, the bare series in terms of the noninteracting Green's function G0 converges to the correct physical branch of ? in all cases currently accessible by diagrammatic Monte Carlo calculations. In addition to their conceptual importance, these observations have important implications for techniques based on the explicit summation of the diagrammatic series.

  13. Risk Factors and Scoring System for Predicting Bacterial Resistance to Cefepime as Used Empirically in Haematology Wards

    PubMed Central

    El Maaroufi, Hicham; Goubard, Agathe; Redjoul, Rabah; Legrand, Patrick; Pautas, Cécile; Mikdame, Mohamed; Doghmi, Kamal; Toma, Andréa; Maury, Sébastien; Schwarzinger, Michael; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Bacterial resistance is of growing concern in haematology wards. As the inappropriate administration of empirical antibacterial may alter survival, we studied risk factors for resistance to our usual empirical first-line antibacterial therapy, cefepime. Methods. We retrospectively studied 103 first episodes of bacteraemia recorded in our haematology department over 2.5 years. Risk factors for cefepime-resistance were identified by multivariate logistic regression with backward selection (P < 0.05). A scoring system for predicting cefepime-resistance was built on independent factor, with an internal validation by the bootstrap resampling technique. Results. 38 (37%) episodes were due to Gram-negative bacteria. Fifty (49%) were due to bacteria resistant to cefepime. Cefepime resistance was significantly associated with a decreased survival at day 30 (P < 0.05). Three risk factors were independently associated with cefepime-resistance: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; ?18 days since hospital admission; and receipt of any ?-lactam in the last month. Patients with ?2 of these risk factors had a probability of 86% (CI 95%, 25 to 100%) to carry a cefepime-resistant strain. Conclusion. Using our scoring system should reduce the indication of very broad antibacterial regimens in the empirical, first-line treatment of febrile hematology patients in more than 80% of the cases.

  14. Infant feeding policies in maternity wards and their effect on breast-feeding success: an analytical overview.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, R; Pollitt, E; Lönnerdal, B; Dewey, K G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this review is to examine the plausibility of a causal relationship between maternity ward practices and lactation success. METHODS. Studies were located with MEDLINE, from our personal files, and by contacting researchers working in this field. Of the 65 studies originally reviewed, 18 met our inclusion criteria (i.e., hospital-based intervention, experimental design with randomization procedures, or quasi-experimental design with adequate documentation). RESULTS. Meta-analysis indicated that commercial discharge packs had an adverse effect on lactation performance. The impact of early mother-infant contact on lactation success was unclear. Rooming-in and breast-feeding guidance in a rooming-in context had a beneficial impact on breast-feeding among primiparae. Breast-feeding on demand was positively associated with lactation success. In-hospital formula supplementation of 48 mL per day was not associated with poor breast-feeding performance. CONCLUSIONS. Hospital-based breast-feeding interventions can have a beneficial effect on lactation success, particularly among primiparous women. PMID:8279619

  15. A stepped wedge, cluster controlled trial of an intervention to improve safety and quality on medical wards: the HEADS-UP study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Ashrafian, Hutan; Long, Susannah J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of preventable deaths in healthcare are due to errors on general wards. Staff perceptions of safety correlate with patient survival, but effectively translating ward teams’ concerns into tangibly improved care remains problematic. The Hospital Event Analysis Describing Significant Unanticipated Problems (HEADS-UP) trial evaluates a structured, multidisciplinary team briefing, capturing safety threats and adverse events, with rapid feedback to clinicians and service managers. This is the first study to rigorously assess a simpler intervention for general medical units, alongside an implementation model applicable to routine clinical practice. Methods/analysis 7 wards from 2 hospitals will progressively incorporate the intervention into daily practice over 14?months. Wards will adopt HEADS-UP in a pragmatic sequence, guided by local clinical enthusiasm. Initial implementation will be facilitated by a research lead, but rapidly delegated to clinical teams. The primary outcome is excess length of stay (a surplus stay of 24?h or more, compared to peer institutions’ Healthcare Resource Groups-predicted length of stay). Secondary outcomes are 30-day readmission or excess length of stay; in-hospital death or death/readmission within 30?days; healthcare-acquired infections; processes of escalation of care; use of traditional incident-reporting systems; and patient safety and teamwork climates. HEADS-UP will be analysed as a stepped wedge cluster controlled trial. With 7840 patients, using best and worst case predictions, the study would achieve between 75% and 100% power to detect a 2–14% absolute risk reduction in excess length of stay (two-sided p<0.05). Regression analysis will use generalised linear mixed models or generalised estimating equations, and a time-to-event regression model. A qualitative analysis will evaluate facilitators and barriers to HEADS-UP implementation and impact. Ethics and dissemination Participating institutions’ Research and Governance departments approved the study. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Trial registration number ISRCTN34806867. PMID:26100026

  16. Prevalence and Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli from Pediatric Wards of a Malaysian Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. S. Ho; G. Balan; S. Puthucheary; B. H. Kong; K. T. Lim; L. K. Tan; X. P. Koh; C. C. Yeo; K. L. Thong

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of Escherichia coli resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) is of concern as ESC is often used to treat infections by Gram-negative bacteria. One-hundred and ten E. coli strains isolated in 2009-2010 from children warded in a Malaysian tertiary hospital were analyzed for their antibiograms, carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC genes, possible inclusion of the beta-lactamase genes

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Contamination in Bedside Surfaces of a Hospital Ward and the Potential Effectiveness of Enhanced Disinfection with an Antimicrobial Polymer Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, John W. M.; Chung, Terence W. K.; Loke, Alice Y.

    2015-01-01

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced from 4.4 ± 8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07 ± 0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards. PMID:25768241

  18. Estimating the Effectiveness of Isolation and Decolonization Measures in Reducing Transmission of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Hospital General Wards

    PubMed Central

    Worby, Colin J.; Jeyaratnam, Dakshika; Robotham, Julie V.; Kypraios, Theodore; O'Neill, Philip D.; De Angelis, Daniela; French, Gary; Cooper, Ben S.

    2013-01-01

    Infection control for hospital pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) often takes the form of a package of interventions, including the use of patient isolation and decolonization treatment. Such interventions, though widely used, have generated controversy because of their significant resource implications and the lack of robust evidence with regard to their effectiveness at reducing transmission. The aim of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of isolation and decolonization measures in reducing MRSA transmission in hospital general wards. Prospectively collected MRSA surveillance data from 10 general wards at Guy's and St. Thomas' hospitals, London, United Kingdom, in 2006–2007 were used, comprising 14,035 patient episodes. Data were analyzed with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to model transmission dynamics. The combined effect of isolation and decolonization was estimated to reduce transmission by 64% (95% confidence interval: 37, 79). Undetected MRSA-positive patients were estimated to be the source of 75% (95% confidence interval: 67, 86) of total transmission events. Isolation measures combined with decolonization treatment were strongly associated with a reduction in MRSA transmission in hospital general wards. These findings provide support for active methods of MRSA control, but further research is needed to determine the relative importance of isolation and decolonization in preventing transmission. PMID:23592544

  19. Patients Hospitalized in General Wards via the Emergency Department: Early Identification of Predisposing Factors for Death or Unexpected Intensive Care Unit Admission—A Historical Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Boulain, Thierry; Runge, Isabelle; Delorme, Nathalie; Bouju, Angèle; Valéry, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background. To identify, upon emergency department (ED) admission, predictors of unexpected death or unplanned intensive care/high dependency units (ICU/HDU) admission during the first 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards. Methods. Prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical adult ED in a teaching hospital, including consecutive patients hospitalized on regular wards after ED visit, and identification of predictors by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Among 4,619 included patients, 77 (1.67%) target events were observed: 32 unexpected deaths and 45 unplanned transfers to an ICU/HDU. We identified 9 predictors of the target event including the oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and use of psychoactive drug(s). All predictors put the patients at risk during the first 15 days of hospitalization. A logistic model for hospital mortality prediction (death of all causes) still comprised oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and the use of psychoactive drug(s) as risk factors. Conclusion. The “use of oxygen therapy on the ED,” the “current use of psychoactive drug(s)”, and the “lack of knowledge of current medications taken by the patients” were important predisposing factors to severe adverse events during the 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards following the ED visit. PMID:24624300

  20. Patients Hospitalized in General Wards via the Emergency Department: Early Identification of Predisposing Factors for Death or Unexpected Intensive Care Unit Admission-A Historical Prospective.

    PubMed

    Boulain, Thierry; Runge, Isabelle; Delorme, Nathalie; Bouju, Angèle; Valéry, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background. To identify, upon emergency department (ED) admission, predictors of unexpected death or unplanned intensive care/high dependency units (ICU/HDU) admission during the first 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards. Methods. Prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical adult ED in a teaching hospital, including consecutive patients hospitalized on regular wards after ED visit, and identification of predictors by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Among 4,619 included patients, 77 (1.67%) target events were observed: 32 unexpected deaths and 45 unplanned transfers to an ICU/HDU. We identified 9 predictors of the target event including the oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and use of psychoactive drug(s). All predictors put the patients at risk during the first 15 days of hospitalization. A logistic model for hospital mortality prediction (death of all causes) still comprised oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and the use of psychoactive drug(s) as risk factors. Conclusion. The "use of oxygen therapy on the ED," the "current use of psychoactive drug(s)", and the "lack of knowledge of current medications taken by the patients" were important predisposing factors to severe adverse events during the 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards following the ED visit. PMID:24624300

  1. Accidents on hospital wards.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, S; Bonfield, G

    1991-01-01

    Eight hospitals reported 781 non-iatrogenic accidents occurring to patients and visitors under 16 years of age during an 18 month period up to October 1989. Accidents more often involved boys and children aged 3 to 5 years old. Falls from a height, slips, and striking accidents were common by day and falls by night. A total of 41% of accidents to inpatients occurred when parents were present. Only three accidents were serious. Altogether 27% involved beds and cots, and only one consequent injury was more than minor. Data collected routinely in case of medicolegal action can be presented in a form that may facilitate preventative work. Potentially remediable causes for concern include falls from beds and cots and the use of makeshift equipment. PMID:1929510

  2. Ward off unwanted advances.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicola

    2015-06-24

    Sexual harassment in the workplace remains a taboo topic, especially in certain professions. Nurses are particularly vulnerable to sexual harassment from patients, visitors or co-workers. PMID:26103877

  3. The Teamwork Assessment Scale: A Novel Instrument to Assess Quality of Undergraduate Medical Students' Teamwork Using the Example of Simulation-based Ward-Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Fischer, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simulation-based teamwork trainings are considered a powerful training method to advance teamwork, which becomes more relevant in medical education. The measurement of teamwork is of high importance and several instruments have been developed for various medical domains to meet this need. To our knowledge, no theoretically-based and easy-to-use measurement instrument has been published nor developed specifically for simulation-based teamwork trainings of medical students. Internist ward-rounds function as an important example of teamwork in medicine. Purposes: The purpose of this study was to provide a validated, theoretically-based instrument that is easy-to-use. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify if and when rater scores relate to performance. Methods: Based on a theoretical framework for teamwork behaviour, items regarding four teamwork components (Team Coordination, Team Cooperation, Information Exchange, Team Adjustment Behaviours) were developed. In study one, three ward-round scenarios, simulated by 69 students, were videotaped and rated independently by four trained raters. The instrument was tested for the embedded psychometric properties and factorial structure. In study two, the instrument was tested for construct validity with an external criterion with a second set of 100 students and four raters. Results: In study one, the factorial structure matched the theoretical components but was unable to separate Information Exchange and Team Cooperation. The preliminary version showed adequate psychometric properties (Cronbach’s ?=.75). In study two, the instrument showed physician rater scores were more reliable in measurement than those of student raters. Furthermore, a close correlation between the scale and clinical performance as an external criteria was shown (r=.64) and the sufficient psychometric properties were replicated (Cronbach’s ?=.78). Conclusions: The validation allows for use of the simulated teamwork assessment scale in undergraduate medical ward-round trainings to reliably measure teamwork by physicians. Further studies are needed to verify the applicability of the instrument. PMID:26038684

  4. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). Discussion This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement. PMID:25566807

  5. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address psychosocial needs of HCR patients, assist with triage in a system where both medical inpatient beds and psychiatric services are scarce commodities, and help ensure appropriate follow up. PMID:23088583

  6. Clinical Features of Cardio-Renal Syndrome in a Cohort of Consecutive Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward

    PubMed Central

    Fabbian, F; Pala, M; De Giorgi, A; Scalone, A; Molino, C; Portaluppi, F; Mikhailidis, D.P; Manfredini, R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a disorder of the heart and kidney whereby interactions between the 2 organs can occur. We recorded the clinical features of CRS in patients consecutively admitted to an Internal Medicine ward. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the anthropometric, history, clinical, biochemical and treatment characteristics in 438 out of 2,998 subjects (14.6%) admitted to our unit (from June 2007 to December 2009), diagnosed with CRS, according to Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) recommendations. Estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) was calculated using several equations: MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease; 2 variations GFRMDRD186, GFRMDRD175), Mayo, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and Cockroft-Gault. Results: Mean age was 80±8 years, 222 (50.6%) were males, 321 (73.2%) were smokers, 229 (52.2%) were diabetic, 207 (47.2%) had a history of acute myocardial infarction, 167 (38.1%) had angina, 135 (30.8%) were affected by cerebrovascular disease, 339 (77.3%) had peripheral arterial disease. CRS was type 1 in 211 cases (48.2%), type 2 in 96 (21.9%), type 3 in 88 (20.1%), type 4 in 29 (6.6%) and type 5 in 14 (3.2%). eGFR, calculated by different formulae, ranged between 31 and 36 ml/min/1.73 m2. GFR was lower in CRS type 3 than in the other types, and the values ranged between 24 and 27 ml/min/1.73 m2. Mean hospital length-of-stay (LOS) was 9.8±6.3 days. Diuretics were the most prescribed medication (78.7%); only 5 patients underwent haemodialysis. Conclusions: CRS is common, especially in the elderly. CRS Type 1 was the prevalent subset and patients had stage 3-4 renal insufficiency. Results obtained from the GFR equations were similar although the Mayo equation tended to overestimate the eGFR. PMID:22207887

  7. 'It makes me want to run away to Saudi Arabia': management and implementation challenges for public financing reforms from a maternity ward perspective.

    PubMed

    Penn-Kekana, Loveday; Blaauw, Duane; Schneider, Helen

    2004-10-01

    Poor practice by health care workers has been identified as contributing to high levels of maternal mortality in South Africa. The country is undergoing substantial structural and financial reforms, yet the impact of these on health care workers performance and practice has not been studied. This study, which consisted of an ethnography of two labour wards (one rural and one urban), aimed to look at the factors that shaped everyday practice of midwives working in district hospitals in South Africa during the implementation of a public sector reform to improve financial management. The study found that the Public Financing Management Act, that aimed to improve the efficiency and accountability of public finance management, had the unintended consequence of causing the quality of maternal health services to deteriorate in the hospital wards studied. The article supports the need for increased dialogue between those working in the sexual and reproductive health and health systems policy arenas, and the importance of giving a voice to front-line health workers who implement systems changes. However, it cautions that there are no simple answers to how health systems should be organized in order to better provide sexual and reproductive health services, and suggests instead that more attention in the debate needs to be paid to the challenges of policy implementation and the socio-political context and process issues which affect the success or failure of the implementation. PMID:15452017

  8. Quality of end-of-life treatment for cancer patients in general wards and the palliative care unit at a regional cancer center in Japan: a retrospective chart review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuki Sato; Mitsunori Miyashita; Tatsuya Morita; Makiko Sanjo; Yasuo Shima; Yosuke Uchitomi

    2008-01-01

    Goals  In Japan, most cancer patients die in the hospital. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of end-of-life treatment\\u000a for dying cancer patients in general wards and palliative care unit (PCU).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A retrospective chart review study was conducted. The following data on cancer patients who died in general wards (N?=?104) and PCU (N?=?201) at a

  9. mu-Squared Dependent Deviation of the Non Perturbative ZA,MOM from the True Axial Renormalisation Constant, Implied by Ward Identity

    E-print Network

    Ph. Boucaud; J. -P. Leroy; A. Le Yaouanc; J. Micheli; O. Pène; J. Rodriguez-Quintero

    2015-04-02

    It is recalled why, as already stated in a previous paper, there seems to be an inconsistency in identifying the non perturbative ZA,MOM as the renormalisation of the axial current, or equivalently, in setting as normalisation condition that the renormalised vertex=1 at p^2 = mu^2 at some renormalisation scale mu, where p is the momentum in the legs. Indeed, unlike the vector case, the Ward-Takahashi (WT) identity for the axial current is shown to imply both the renormalisation scale independence of ZA and a mu2 dependence of ZA,MOM. This mu^2 dependence is simply related to certain invariants in the pseudoscalar vertex and can persist in the chiral limit due to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry (pion pole). It is seen clearly in the mu^2 dependence of some lattice calculations of ZA,MOM/ZV,MOM near the chiral limit.

  10. mu-Squared Dependent Deviation of the Non Perturbative ZA,MOM from the True Axial Renormalisation Constant, Implied by Ward Identity

    E-print Network

    Boucaud, Ph; Yaouanc, A Le; Micheli, J; Pène, O; Rodriguez-Quintero, J

    2015-01-01

    It is recalled why, as already stated in a previous paper, there seems to be an inconsistency in identifying the non perturbative ZA,MOM as the renormalisation of the axial current, or equivalently, in setting as normalisation condition that the renormalised vertex=1 at p^2 = mu^2 at some renormalisation scale mu, where p is the momentum in the legs. Indeed, unlike the vector case, the Ward-Takahashi (WT) identity for the axial current is shown to imply both the renormalisation scale independence of ZA and a mu2 dependence of ZA,MOM. This mu^2 dependence is simply related to certain invariants in the pseudoscalar vertex and can persist in the chiral limit due to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry (pion pole). It is seen clearly in the mu^2 dependence of some lattice calculations of ZA,MOM/ZV,MOM near the chiral limit.

  11. Pharmacotherapy for Adverse Events Reduces the Length of Hospital Stay in Patients Admitted to Otolaryngology Ward: A Single Arm Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Ryo; Okayasu, Shinji; Kuze, Bunya; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine whether adverse events extend the duration of hospitalization, and to evaluate the effectiveness of medical intervention in ameliorating adverse events and reducing the prolonged hospital stay associated with adverse events. Methods A single arm intervention study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2014 in the otolaryngology ward of a 614-bed, university-affiliated hospital. Adverse events were monitored daily by physicians, pharmacists and nurses, and recorded in the electronic medical chart for each patient. Appropriate drug management of adverse events was performed by physicians in liaison with pharmacists. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the length of hospitalization of patients who underwent medical intervention for adverse events. Results Of 571 patients admitted to the otolaryngology ward in a year, 219 patients (38.4%) experienced adverse events of grade ?2. The duration of hospitalization was affected by the grade of adverse events, with a mean duration of hospital stay of 9.2, 17.2, 28.3 and 47.0 days for grades 0, 1, 2, and 3–4, respectively. Medical intervention lowered the incidence of grade ?2 adverse events to 14.5%. The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in patients who showed an improvement of adverse events after medical intervention than those who did not (26.4 days vs. 41.6 days, hazard ratio 1.687, 95% confidence interval: 1.260–2.259, P<0.001). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated that insomnia, constipation, nausea/vomiting, infection, non-cancer pain, oral mucositis, odynophagia and neutropenia were significant risk factors for prolongation of hospital stay. Conclusion Patients who experienced adverse events are at high risk of prolonged hospitalization. Medical intervention for adverse events was found to be effective in reducing the length of hospital stay associated with adverse events. PMID:25549093

  12. Transmission of endemic ST22-MRSA-IV on four acute hospital wards investigated using a combination of spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing.

    PubMed

    Creamer, E; Shore, A C; Rossney, A S; Dolan, A; Sherlock, O; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Sullivan, D J; Kinnevey, P M; O'Lorcain, P; Cunney, R; Coleman, D C; Humphreys, H

    2012-11-01

    The transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between individual patients is difficult to track in institutions where MRSA is endemic. We investigated the transmission of MRSA where ST22-MRSA-IV is endemic on four wards using demographic data, patient and environmental screening, and molecular typing of isolates. A total of 939 patients were screened, 636 within 72 h of admission (on admission) and 303 >72 h after admission, and 1,252 environmental samples were obtained. Isolates were typed by spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. A composite dendrogram generated from the three sets of typing data was used to divide isolates into 'dendrogram groups' (DGs). Ten percent of patients (92/939) were MRSA-positive; 7 % (44/636) on admission and 16 % (48/303) >72 h after admission (p?=?0.0007). MRSA was recovered from 5 % of environmental specimens (65/1,252). Most isolates from patients (97 %, 85/88) and the environment (97 %, 63/65) exhibited the ST22-MRSA-IV genotype. Four DGs (DG1, DG4, DG16 and DG17) accounted for 58 % of ST22-MRSA-IV isolates from patients. Epidemiological evidence suggested cross-transmission among 44/92 patients (48 %) but molecular typing confirmed probable cross-transmission in only 11 instances (13 %, 11/88), with the majority of cross-transmission (64 %; 7/11) occurring on one ward. In the setting of highly clonal endemic MRSA, the combination of local epidemiology, PFGE, spa and dru typing provided valuable insights into MRSA transmission. PMID:22814876

  13. Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2014-11-01

    From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (P<0.05), and most of these isolates were isolated during a later year than cluster E isolates (P<0.05). By MLST analysis, 94% of cluster E and G isolates (29/31) were ST68. Although no time or space clustering could be identified by the conventional hospital-acquired infection monitoring system, E. coli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (P<0.05). Isolates obtained from patients who had stayed in the respiratory care ward had a significantly higher rate of aac(6')-Ib-cr and blaCTX-M-14 positivity, and were more likely to belong to ST68/S68-like (all P<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report of prolonged clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period. PMID:25168964

  14. Ward, P. S. 2007. The ant genus Leptanilloides: discovery of the male and evaluation of phylogenetic relationships based on DNA sequence data, pp. 637-649. In Snelling, R. R., B. L.

    E-print Network

    Ward, Philip S.

    . Ward (eds) Advances in ant systematics (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): homage to E. O. Wilson ­ 50 years, Formicidae, phylogeny, morphology, dorylomorphs, doryline section, Leptanilla, subterranean ants, 18S r are rarely collected and are assumed to be hypogaeic predators, possibly with legionary habits. For many

  15. AM odel Analysis Approach for Reassessment of the Public Shelter Plan Focusing both on Accessibility and Accommodation Capacity for Residents - Case Study of Nagata Ward in Kobe City, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei XU; Norio OKADA; Michinori HATAYAMA; Yukiko TAKEUCHI

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we address the needs for reassessing and improving the implementability of the public shelter plan that has been completed exclusively by some local administrative bodies. Using a case study in Nagata Ward of Kobe City, Japan, we propose a simulation and GIS-based model approach to reassess implementability by focus- ing on residents' accessibility to nearby shelters and

  16. Reiki and related therapies in the dialysis ward: an evidence-based and ethical discussion to debate if these complementary and alternative medicines are welcomed or banned

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAMs) are increasingly practiced in the general population; it is estimated that over 30% of patients with chronic diseases use CAMs on a regular basis. CAMs are also used in hospital settings, suggesting a growing interest in individualized therapies. One potential field of interest is pain, frequently reported by dialysis patients, and seldom sufficiently relieved by mainstream therapies. Gentle-touch therapies and Reiki (an energy based touch therapy) are widely used in the western population as pain relievers. By integrating evidence based approaches and providing ethical discussion, this debate discusses the pros and cons of CAMs in the dialysis ward, and whether such approaches should be welcomed or banned. Discussion In spite of the wide use of CAMs in the general population, few studies deal with the pros and cons of an integration of mainstream medicine and CAMs in dialysis patients; one paper only regarded the use of Reiki and related practices. Widening the search to chronic pain, Reiki and related practices, 419 articles were found on Medline and 6 were selected (1 Cochrane review and 5 RCTs updating the Cochrane review). According to the EBM approach, Reiki allows a statistically significant but very low-grade pain reduction without specific side effects. Gentle-touch therapy and Reiki are thus good examples of approaches in which controversial efficacy has to be balanced against no known side effect, frequent free availability (volunteer non-profit associations) and easy integration with any other pharmacological or non pharmacological therapy. While a classical evidence-based approach, showing low-grade efficacy, is likely to lead to a negative attitude towards the use of Reiki in the dialysis ward, the ethical discussion, analyzing beneficium (efficacy) together with non maleficium (side effects), justice (cost, availability and integration with mainstream therapies) and autonomy (patients’ choice) is likely to lead to a permissive-positive attitude. Summary This paper debates the current evidence on Reiki and related techniques as pain-relievers in an ethical framework, and suggests that physicians may wish to consider efficacy but also side effects, contextualization (availability and costs) and patient’s requests, according also to the suggestions of the Society for Integrative Oncology (tolerate, control efficacy and side effects). PMID:23799960

  17. Nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and skills in these areas-a viewpoint: case of health centre wards in Finland.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Soili; Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating-were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic-to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

  18. Anammox moving bed biofilm reactor pilot at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plants in Brooklyn, New York: start-up, biofilm population diversity and performance optimization.

    PubMed

    Mehrdad, M; Park, H; Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Chandran, K

    2014-01-01

    New York City Environmental Protection in conjunction with City College of New York assessed the application of the anammox process in the reject water treatment using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) located at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plant, in Brooklyn, NY. The single-stage nitritation/anammox MBBR was seeded with activated sludge and consequently was enriched with its own 'homegrown' anammox bacteria (AMX). Objectives of this study included collection of additional process kinetic and operating data and assessment of the effect of nitrogen loading rates on process performance. The initial target total inorganic nitrogen removal of 70% was limited by the low alkalinity concentration available in the influent reject water. Higher removals were achieved after supplementing the alkalinity by adding sodium hydroxide. Throughout startup and process optimization, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were used for monitoring the relevant species enriched in the biofilm and in the suspension. Maximum nitrogen removal rate was achieved by stimulating the growth of a thick biofilm on the carriers, and controlling the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the bulk flow and the nitrogen loading rates per surface area; all three appear to have contributed in suppressing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria activity while enriching AMX density within the biofilm. PMID:25401307

  19. Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects and Therapy of Chronic Otitis Media in the “ENT” and Cervicofacial Surgery Ward in the University Hospital of Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Gyebre, Y. M. C.; Ouedraogo, R. W.-L.; Elola, A.; Ouedraogo, B. P.; Sereme, M.; Ouattara, M.; Ouoba, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical aspects of chronic otitis media and its therapeutic processes in our context. Patients and Methods. In a prospective study over a period of 1 year (March 2009–February 2010), 79 patients with chronic otitis media have been cared for in the otolaryngology ward of the University Hospital of Ouagadougou. Results. Chronic otitis media (COM) commonly occurs in the age group from 0 to 15 years (40.50%). Otorrhea was the main reason for consultation in 53 cases (67.10%); the most frequently encountered clinicopathological forms were simple COM (71%) followed by otitis media with effusion (24.30%). Intra-auricular instillations of traditional products (46.09%) were the dominant favoring factor. Treatment was essentially through medication in 59 cases with a stabilization of lesions. Endotemporal complications were noticed in 6 cases. Conclusion. The fight against chronic otitis media is carried out through preventive measures of education the of people. PMID:24066241

  20. Nurse Managers' Perceptions Related to Their Leadership Styles, Knowledge, and Skills in These Areas—A Viewpoint: Case of Health Centre Wards in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles—visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating—were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles—visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic—to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

  1. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  2. CURRICULUM VITAE MICHAEL J. WARD

    E-print Network

    Jellinek, Mark

    Meeting in the session "Diffusion-Driven Pattern Formation in Biological Model Systems: Title: "Localized (effective Jan. 2011). RESEARCH INTERESTS Applied analysis, reaction-diffusion systems, scientific computing editor of this journal since 6/96. · Editor: Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems Series B

  3. The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is…

  4. To ward Computational Systems Biology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lingchong You

    2004-01-01

    The development and successful application of high-throughput technologies are transform- ing biological research. The large quantities of data being generated by these technologies have led to the emergence of systems biology, which emphasizes large-scale, parallel characterization of biological systems and integration of fragmentary information into a coherent whole. Complementing the reductionist approach that has dominated biology for the last century,

  5. Application of a trigger tool in near real time to inform quality improvement activities: a prospective study in a general medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brian M; Dyal, Sonia; Etchells, Edward E; Knowles, Sandra; Gerard, Lauren; Diamantouros, Artemis; Mehta, Rajin; Liu, Barbara; Baker, G Ross; Shojania, Kaveh G

    2015-01-01

    Background Retrospective record review using trigger tools remains the most widely used method for measuring adverse events (AEs) to identify targets for improvement and measure temporal trends. However, medical records often contain limited information about factors contributing to AEs. We implemented an augmented trigger tool that supplemented record review with debriefing front-line staff to obtain details not included in the medical record. We hypothesised that this would foster the identification of factors contributing to AEs that could inform improvement initiatives. Method A trained observer prospectively identified events in consecutive patients admitted to a general medical ward in a tertiary care academic medical centre (November 2010 to February 2011 inclusive), gathering information from record review and debriefing front-line staff in near real time. An interprofessional team reviewed events to identify preventable and potential AEs and characterised contributing factors using a previously published taxonomy. Results Among 141 patients, 14 (10%; 95% CI 5% to 15%) experienced at least one preventable AE; 32 patients (23%; 95% CI 16% to 30%) experienced at least one potential AE. The most common contributing factors included policy and procedural problems (eg, routine protocol violations, conflicting policies; 37%), communication and teamwork problems (34%), and medication process problems (23%). However, these broad categories each included distinct subcategories that seemed to require different interventions. For instance, the 32 identified communication and teamwork problems comprised 7 distinct subcategories (eg, ineffective intraprofessional handovers, poor interprofessional communication, lacking a shared patient care, paging problems). Thus, even the major categories of contributing factors consisted of subcategories that individually related to a much smaller subset of AEs. Conclusions Prospective application of an augmented trigger tool identified a wide range of factors contributing to AEs. However, the majority of contributing factors accounted for a small number of AEs, and more general categories were too heterogeneous to inform specific interventions. Successfully using trigger tools to stimulate quality improvement activities may require development of a framework that better classifies events that share contributing factors amenable to the same intervention. PMID:25749028

  6. Four important features in the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf revealed from the high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution images taken by Formosat-2 in Summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Chang, Y.; Yan, S.; Wu, A.

    2008-12-01

    Massive ice shelf collapsing in Polar Regions is indisputably a clear warning of global warming. To investigate such a rapid change of a breaking up event at a remote site requires an innovative approach that is able to make both high-temporal- and high-spatial-resolution observations. Deploying a high-spatial-resolution sensor in a daily revisit orbit, Formosat-2 successfully captured the details of Wilkins Ice Shelf disintegration event in March 2008, using its 2-m multi-spectral remote sensing imagery. Right after a few extensive fractures were found in the largest ice shelf in the Arctic (Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, WHIS) and reported in May 2008, Formosat-2 was employed to make an intensive observation in this region. A total of eleven scenes of WHIS were acquired from 5 June to 30 August 2008, and ten of them were taken in a preferable low-cloud- cover condition. After the basic processing of level-2 georeferencing, band-to-band coregistration, spectral summation intensity modulation pan-sharpening, and multi-temporal images coregistration, we are able to summarize four important features in WHIS from the time series of Formosat-2 images. First, the sea ice velocity field in the vicinity of WHIS can be inferred by using ice floes as tracers and manually identifying identical floes in consecutive images. There is an eastward flow along the coast of Ellesmere Island. This flow is one of the main forces that gradually tears apart the outermost WHIS in summer. Second, a considerable number of melt ponds with scales of a few to tens of meters is found across the lower part of WHIS. As the temperature rises in summer, the total area of melt ponds increases as a result. In some cases, the melting water soon drains away and a large scale of disintegration occurs afterwards. Third, the extent of organic sedimentary material, namely microbial mat, can be clearly identified from these multispectral images. Fourth, the recent break-up event poses a threat to Disraeli Fiord, the largest remaining epishelf lake in the Northern Hemisphere. A new channel has formed recently, which may accelerate the drainage of the epishelf lake. This research demonstrates that high-spatial- and high- temporal-resolution optical imagery taken from Formosat-2 is a useful data source for studying the collapse of ice shelf in Polar Regions.

  7. An Investigation into Reliability of Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements, and into the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Means of Independent Mobility in the Ward: Examinations of Patients Who Underwent Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery, as well as the relationship between independent mobility in the ward and knee muscle strength. [Subjects] The subjects were 75 patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery. [Methods] We used a hand-held dynamometer and a belt to measure isometric knee extension muscle strength three times, and used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to investigate the reliability of the measurements. We used a receiver operating characteristic curve to investigate the cutoff values for independent walking with walking sticks and non-independent mobility. [Results] ICCs (1, 1) were 0.9 or higher. The cutoff value for independent walking with walking sticks was 0.289 kgf/kg on the non-fractured side, 0.193 kgf/kg on the fractured side, and the average of both limbs was 0.238 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] We consider that the test-retest reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who have undergone femoral neck fracture surgery is high. We also consider that isometric knee extension muscle strength is useful for investigating means of independent mobility in the ward. PMID:24567667

  8. An Investigation into Reliability of Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements, and into the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Means of Independent Mobility in the Ward: Examinations of Patients Who Underwent Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Munenori; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery, as well as the relationship between independent mobility in the ward and knee muscle strength. [Subjects] The subjects were 75 patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery. [Methods] We used a hand-held dynamometer and a belt to measure isometric knee extension muscle strength three times, and used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to investigate the reliability of the measurements. We used a receiver operating characteristic curve to investigate the cutoff values for independent walking with walking sticks and non-independent mobility. [Results] ICCs (1, 1) were 0.9 or higher. The cutoff value for independent walking with walking sticks was 0.289 kgf/kg on the non-fractured side, 0.193 kgf/kg on the fractured side, and the average of both limbs was 0.238 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] We consider that the test-retest reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who have undergone femoral neck fracture surgery is high. We also consider that isometric knee extension muscle strength is useful for investigating means of independent mobility in the ward. PMID:24567667

  9. CHOROBA PRÓCHNICOWA Z?BÓW MLECZNYCH A ZAWARTO?? WYBRANYCH PIERWIASTKÓW W POWIERZCHNIOWEJ WARSTWIE SZKLIWA* THE CONTENT OF CHOSEN ELEMENTS IN SUPERFICIAL LAYER OF ENAMEL IN MILK TEETH DECAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MONIKA SZMIDT

    Summary Introduction: The aim of this study was to check op- portunities of early caries detection in primary dentition by using new portable device - KaVo Diagnodent. Values of Diagnodent were interpreted by Hibst and Paulus scale. It was also decided to check if this scale is useful for detect- ing caries in milk teeth. In this study a new

  10. INTEGRATION OF THE EUROPEAN XFEL ACCELERATING MODULES E. Vogel, S. Barbanotti, J. Branlard, H. Brueck, S. Choroba, L. Hagge, K. Jensch, D. Kaefer, V. Katalev,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 09 (string assembly) and WP-03 (module assembly) at CEA, Saclay and the final module operation test and shipped to CEA for the string and module assembly. Both companies manufactured reference cavities whichINTEGRATION OF THE EUROPEAN XFEL ACCELERATING MODULES E. Vogel, S. Barbanotti, J. Branlard, H

  11. iMu arrayS:The biOMechanicS Of baSeball piTching eric berKSOn Md, ryan aylWard MS, JaMeS zachazeWSKi dpT,aTc, JOSeph paradiSO phd,ThOMaS J. gill Md

    E-print Network

    0 iMu arrayS:The biOMechanicS Of baSeball piTching eric berKSOn Md, ryan aylWard MS, JaMeS zachaze biomechanical studies have attempted to quan- tify the mechanics of throwing and to measure the forces sustained in the upper extremity during high-velocity pitching. Biomechanical testing of pitchers in its current state

  12. Formal Transformations and WSL Martin Ward

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    decoys. Chaff -- looks like an aircraft on radar Plywood model glider -- visually looks like an aircraft on radar Plywood model glider -- visually looks like an aircraft . . . add a tape player and amplifier like an aircraft on radar Plywood model glider -- visually looks like an aircraft . . . add a tape

  13. 11 Ward St. Somerville, MA 02143

    E-print Network

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    , and Instrumentation for Polymeric Materials PDMS 65% Silica 17% Thixotrol 9% Boric Acid 4% Glycerine 1% Titanium state through thermal vibrations). However due to the Boric acid there are also transient Boron mediated

  14. Methods of Transposition of Nurses between Wards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shigeji; Masuda, Masakazu

    In this paper, a computer-implemented method for automating the transposition of a hospital’s nursing staff is proposed. The model is applied to the real case example ‘O’ hospital, which performs a transposition of its nursing staff once a year. Results are compared with real data obtained from this hospital’s current manual transposition system. The proposed method not only significantly reduces the time taken to construct the transposition, thereby significantly reducing management labor costs, but also is demonstrated to increase nurses’ levels of satisfaction with the process.

  15. Ward Doesn't Live Here Anymore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marion Tolbert

    In this paper, reproduced from a speech given before the Communications Network in Philanthropy, the author uses television as a metaphor to explain the role of the family in the United States, focusing on the "Leave It to Beaver" series. An oral picture is used to discuss the changing nature of the family and divorce. First the family life of the…

  16. Duplex ultrasound, clinical score, thrombotic risk, and D-dimer testing for evidence based diagnosis and management of deep vein thrombosis and alternative diagnoses in the primary care setting and outpatient ward.

    PubMed

    Michiels, J J; Moosdorff, W; Maasland, H; Michiels, J M; Lao, M U; Neumann, H A; Dulicek, P; Stvrtinova, V; Barth, J; Palareti, G

    2014-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has an annual incidence of 0.2% in the urban population. First episodes of calf vein thrombosis (CVT) and proximal DVT are frequently elicited by risk factors, including varicose veins, cancer, pregnancy/postpartum, oral contraceptives below the age of 50 years, immobility or surgery. Leg pain and tenderness in the calf and popliteal fossa on physical examination may result from other conditions than DVT labeled as alternative diagnosis (AD) Congenital venous thrombophilia is present in every third first DVT, increased FVIII in every fourth first DVT, and FV Leiden/FII mutation in 40% of women on oral anticonceptive pill before reaching the menopause. Routine thrombophilia testing for FV Leiden/prothrombin mutation and FVIII as main risk factor for venous thrombosis is recommended. Primary superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) and DVT patients with a autosomal dominant family history of DVT are candidates for thrombophilia testing for congenital AT, PC and PS deficiency. The requirement for a safe diagnostic strategy of CVT and DVT should be based on an objective post-test incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) of less than 0.1% with a negative predictive value for exclusion of DVT of 99.9% during 3 months follow-up. Modification of the Wells score by elimination of the "minus 2 points" for AD is mandatory and will improve the diagnostic accuracy of CVT/DVT suspicion in the primary care setting and outpatient ward. The sequential use of complete DUS, ELISA D-dimer testing and modified clinical Wells' score assessment is safe and effective for the exclusion and diagnosis of CVT, DVT and AD. About 10% to 20% of patients with DVT develop overt post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) at one year post-DVT, and both PTS and DVT recurrences further increase to about 30% during long-term follow-up. Objective risk stratification of PTS complications using DUS for recanalization and reflux and D-dimer testing will become an integral part in routine clinical practice to assess the optimal duration of wearing medical elastic stockings and anticoagulation for the prevention DVT recurrence as the best option to reduce the incidence and costs of suffering from irreversible PTS. PMID:24452081

  17. Reservoir characterization of Yates Formation (Permian, Guadalupian), South Ward field, Ward County, Texas

    E-print Network

    Dronamraju, Sharma

    1997-01-01

    for facies 3 is 148psia, which is classed as "seal facies". Facies 4 through 6 are also fluid barriers. At a field scale, the Yates Formation is divided into two High Frequency Sequences (HFSS) separated by a prominent erosional unconformity. The lower HFS...

  18. 1general information We look forWard to

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Stephan

    Higher Education Rankings among the world top 100 universities from which Fortune 500 CEO's graduated according to a study compiled for Spear's Magazine (www.spearswms. com/spears-lists/lists/smarter- money

  19. WIPP gets thumbs up; Ward Valley time runs out

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    Legislation passed in late September clears the way for the Department of Energy to begin shipment of national defense transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, NM, as early as November 1997. On September 23, President Clinton signed the Fiscal Year 1997 Defense Authorization Bill, which contained amendments to the 1992 WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The implementation of the law will help the DOE in its cleanup sites nationwide, and will enhance public health and safety by providing for the disposal of the waste in a 2150-ft underground salt formation, far away from population centers. Key components of the legislation include the following: (1) The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will continue as primary regulator of WIPP. (2) The EPA will have one year to review the Compliance Certification Application, which the DOE was to submit by October 31, 1996. Upon EPA certification (expected in October 1997), the DOE will begin shipping transuranic waste in November 1997. (3) A six-month waiting period for waste shipments has been removed (previously, the DOE was required to wait 180 days after the Energy Secretary`s decision to begin disposal operations). (4) New Mexico will receive $20 million immediately, and annually for 14 years, with the funds to be used for infrastructure and road improvements in the state.

  20. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  1. Couple relationship in hysterical patients staying in a psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Maci, C; Vella, G

    1992-01-01

    The study starts from the observation about the high frequency of hysteric patient that spontaneously ask the psychiatric admission often with a consent of the husband. The hospitalization has revealed important clinical information, gained by the use of integrated story. In fact extending the observation about the familiar context of the hysteric patient, and in particular to the interaction with the partner, have showed some redundance: 1) patient were especially household; 2) with a lower education level; 3) were married with sons in the age of independency; 4) live important life events; 5) the husbands were often involved with the families of origin; 6) the symptomatology presented; 7) the beginning of the symptomatology often happen after the marriage and the birth of the first son; 8) the husbands of these patients present mostly an obsessive personality with hypochondriac manner; 9) the patient often manifest several dissatisfied request. PMID:1476358

  2. 1 | P a g e Faculty name: Adam Ward

    E-print Network

    Casavant, Tom

    : The University of Iowa EPSCoR Platforms and Plans: Bioenergy - Agro Project Title: How do storm events Project: Geography Institution: The University of Iowa EPSCoR Platforms and Plans: Cyberinfrastructure Project Title and deployment of environmental sensors that can be used to support EPSCoR researchers. The type and variety

  3. Ward Burdick Award article. The Golden Age of American Medicine.

    PubMed

    Conn, R B

    1989-06-01

    Commercialization of medicine with introduction of the profit motive is changing the patient care process, reducing the professional independence of physicians and inflating the total cost of medical care. The payers for medical care, governments at all levels and employers, are no longer willing or able to accept continuing escalation in the costs of medical care. Correction of financial distortions is an inevitable process in every economic milieu, and distortions in the health care system will be corrected in one way or another. Medicine is an unusual enterprise in that there are no sharp dividing lines between what is necessary and what is clearly unnecessary or between perfectly acceptable and unacceptable outcomes. Initiatives to define what is necessary and what is acceptable are being taken by organized medicine and by the federal government. This has been described as a "revolution" in medicine, but there is no other viable approach to balancing medical care requirements with available resources. PMID:2729185

  4. Multidisciplinary teams in geriatric wards: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Evers, H K

    1981-05-01

    This paper argues that the rhetoric of multidisciplinary teamwork is central to the provision of health care generally and geriatric care in particular. Yet the notion of teamwork is poorly defined, and the supposed benefits for patients are not always readily apparent. Looking at teamwork in practice, examples from research are used to illustrate how multidisciplinary decision making and work with patients can, under particular circumstances, take on the appearance of collaboration amongst a team of expert colleagues, which co-opts patients and relatives to the status of team members. But very often, multidisciplinary work with patients is coordinated not by mutual collaboration amongst a team of equals, but by means of established work routines which are broadly applied to whole categories of patients, and by the operation of the traditional hierarchy of social relations in health care. For long stay patients, the pervasiveness of the teamwork mythology and the frequent concurrent withdrawal of other professionals can, at worst, leave the nurses in the invidious position of having responsibility, but no formal or legal authority for caring for their patients: work which no other professional is anxious to do. This leads to negative outcomes for patients as well as for nurses. Finally, it is stressed that analysis of multidisciplinary teamwork both in theory and in practice is vital if we are to understand the conditions under which multidisciplinary teamwork both flourishes, and can be demonstrated to be a necessary condition for the creation of positive care outcomes for geriatric patients in hospital. This paper seeks to raise some of the issues which must be confronted in the endeavour. PMID:6787102

  5. Evaluating an alternating mattress on an elderly rehabilitation ward.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deborah

    2015-06-24

    Pressure ulcer prevention is a primary requirement for the NHS. Robust nursing procedures and the provision of pressure-relieving equipment is vital in meeting this requirement. However, the Department of Health also regards making considerable financial savings as a fundamental requirement. There is a firm clinical consensus among national and international bodies that patients at a high risk of developing pressure ulcers, or with existing tissue damage, should be cared for on an alternating (pressure-relieving) mattress system. This evaluation process looks at the performance of the lower cost Air-Flo(®) 8 Acute alternating (pressure-relieving) mattress system to see if it is effective in meeting the needs of patients. The outcomes suggest that when combined with a pressure ulcer management plan and turning schedule the Air-Flo(®) 8 Acute performed well, giving an option to continue to care for high-risk patients with an empirically proven effective therapy, while making considerable financial savings. PMID:26110990

  6. On Ward Identities in Lifshitz-like Field Theories

    E-print Network

    Pedro R. S. Gomes; M. Gomes

    2012-03-09

    In this work, we develop a normal product algorithm suitable to the study of anisotropic field theories in flat space, apply it to construct the symmetries generators and describe how their possible anomalies may be found. In particular, we discuss the dilatation anomaly in a scalar model with critical exponent z=2 in six spatial dimensions.

  7. Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author

    E-print Network

    ) VU university medical center, division IV & VU University, Faculty of Sciences, Department)20 4443068 Email: am.debruin@vumc.nl Homepage: www.few.vu.nl/~debruin R. Bekker (PhD) VU University, Faculty (MSc) VU university medical center Research assistant G.M. Koole (PhD) VU University, Faculty

  8. Psychiatric Morbidity and Referral on Two General Medical Wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Maguire; D. L. Julier; K. E. Hawton; J. H. J. Bancroft

    1974-01-01

    Psychiatric morbidity among 230 medical inpatients was determined by a two-stage screening procedure, using the General Health Questionnaire and Standardized Psychiatric Interview. Of these patients, 23% were considered psychiatrically ill, affective disorders being the commonest illnesses encountered; and 27 (12%) were psychiatrically referred. While referral was related to severity of psychiatric illness and previous psychiatric illness, the degree to which

  9. Adding Abstractive Reflection to a Tutorial Dialog System Arthur Ward

    E-print Network

    Litman, Diane J.

    .edu Diane Litman University of Pittsburgh Learning Research and Development Center Department of Computer Science Pittsburgh, Pa., 15260, USA litman@cs.pitt.edu Abstract In this work we hypothesize that giving et al., 2005), and Itspoke (Litman and Silliman, 2004), have at- tempted to address the problem

  10. Ward identities in Lifshitz-like field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Pedro R. S.; Gomes, M.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we develop a normal product algorithm suitable to the study of anisotropic field theories in flat space, apply it to construct the symmetries generators and describe how their possible anomalies may be found. In particular, we discuss the dilatation anomaly in a scalar model with critical exponent z=2 in six spatial dimensions.

  11. Calibration of models using groundwater age Ward Sanford

    E-print Network

    modeling The need for groundwater age data There have been substantial efforts recently by geo- chemists, chemical concentrations, or apparent age interpreted from the chemistry. Age is proving to be a widely used of the effective porosity, which will be discussed shortly. Advective-age simulation Groundwater cannot be dated

  12. Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

  13. ChemWARD : extracting chemical structure from printed diagrams

    E-print Network

    Moscicki, Angelique (Angelique E.)

    2009-01-01

    Over the years, a vast amount of literature in the field of chemistry has accumulated, and searching for documents about specific molecules is a formidable task. To the extent that the literature is textual, services like ...

  14. A Logical levothyroxine dose Individualization: Optimization Approach at discharge from Radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up in patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Balancing the Risk based strategy and the practical issues and challenges: Experience and Views of a large volume referral centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit; Asopa, Ramesh; Chaukar, Devendra; DCruz, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, the authors discuss the issue of individualization of thyrotropin suppressive therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients and share their views with respect to optimizing the dose of levothyroxine (LT) prescription both during discharge from radioiodine therapy ward and during follow-up. The changing management paradigm at our Institute during post-thyroidectomy period and during the preparation for radioiodine scan is also briefly highlighted. Five factors can be identified as important determinants for the dose individualization approach: (1) Persistence or absence of metastatic disease, (2) the risk characteristics of the patient and the tumor (3) patient's clinical profile, symptomatology, and contraindications (4) the feasibility to ensure a proper thyroid stimulating hormone TSH suppression level (depends on patient's socio-economic and educational background, the connectivity with the local physician and his expertise) (5) time period elapsed since initial diagnosis. While discussing each individual case scenario, the authors, based upon their experience in one of the busiest thyroid cancer referral centers in the country, discuss certain unaddressed points in the current guideline recommendations, deviations made and some challenges toward employing them into practice, which could be situation and center specific. In addition to these, the value of clinical examination, patient profile and detailed enquiry about clinical symptomatology by the attending physician in each follow-up visit cannot be overemphasized. According to the authors, this aspect, quite important for dose determination in an individual, is relatively underrepresented in the present guidelines. It would also be worthwhile to follow a conservative approach (till clear data emerges) in patients who have characteristics of “high-risk” disease, but are clinically and biochemically disease free, if no medical contraindications exist and patient tolerates the suppressive therapy well. This would be particularly applicable in the presence of aggressive histopathological variants, where, in the event of recurrence/metastasis, the disease demonstrates adverse prognosis and higher incidence of radioiodine refractoriness. At the end, certain important and noteworthy concepts pertaining to LT prescription that has definitive practical implications for the suppressive therapy in DTC patients are described. PMID:24019666

  15. The facies, environments of deposition and cyclicity of the Yates Formation, North Ward-Estes field, Ward County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Ronnie Delane

    1997-01-01

    The Yates Formation is part of the Artesia Group, a sequence of interbedded carbonates, clastics and evaporates that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian basin in Late Permian (Upper Guadalupian) time. The Artesia Group...

  16. Voice Activation of a Robotic VehicleVoice Activation of a Robotic Vehicle Dornesia WardDornesia Ward

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    to control a Lego Mindstorms NXT robot. The b t' t i t ll d th h th t i i f i d OBJECTIVES This project of NXT and PC Bluetooth; creates the class and class constructor. assembly of the Lego Mindstorms NXT-based operating system for LeGO Mindstorms platforms. 3 5 The robot is a product of LEGO. The LEGO Mindstorms NXT

  17. Impact of Vaccinating HCWs on the Ward and Possible Influence of Avian Flu Threat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Chittaro; D. Turello; L. Calligaris; F. Farneti; A. Faruzzo; E. Fiappo; M. Panariti; S. Brusaferro

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background:\\u000a   The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a 2-year vaccination program on the compliance of healthcare workers (HCWs)\\u000a employed in an acute care university hospital to influenza vaccination.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods:\\u000a   The study was carried out in October\\/November from 2004 to 2006 in a 286-bed acute care university hospital located in northern\\u000a Italy employing

  18. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars K. Addas,2,* A. Ward,1

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    .D.-C7C Phage Display Peptide Library (M13-C7C, New England Biolabs, Beverly, MA) [5]. We were able viruses con- jugated with 10-nm colloidal Au particles (Ted Pella, Redding, CA). In this article, we focus on the colloidal star constructed by attaching the engineered phages to a 1 m diameter polystyrene sphere

  19. Ward Identities and Mass N=1 Super Yang-Mills Theory

    E-print Network

    u#25;er #12; Abstract We study the lattice regularization of N = 1 Super Yang-Mills theory. Projecting dynamical gluinos. The lattice regularization of N = 1 Super Yang-Mills theory breaks supersymmetry at any renormalization. The ratios of the renormalization coeÃ?cients Z T =Z S and MR =Z S are determined non

  20. NitrificationE D I T E D B Y Bess B. Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    . Nicol, Sven Leininger, and Christa Schleper 157 IV ANAEROBIC AMMONIA OXIDATION (ANAMMOX) 179 8. Metabolism and Genomics of Anammox Bacteria Boran Kartal,Jan T. Keltjens, and Mike S. M.Jetten 181 9. Distribution, Activity, and Ecology of Anammox Bacteria in Aquatic Environments Mark Trimmer and Pia Engstrom

  1. Rachel A. Ward Department of Mathematics and ICES, University of Texas at Austin

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship 2012 DOD-Navy grant N00014-12-1-0743 2012-2014 Harrington Faculty Fellowship annual meeting, Minneapolis, MN PROGRAM FOR WOMEN AND MATHEMATICS June 2011 4 Lectures: Sparsity

  2. Ethical case deliberation on the ward. A comparison of four methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert Steinkamp; Bert Gordijn

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyse and compare four methods of ethical case deliberation. These include Clinical Pragmatism, The Nijmegen Method of ethical case deliberation, Hermeneutic dialogue, and Socratic dialogue. The origin of each method will be briefly sketched. Furthermore, the methods as well as the related protocols will be presented. Each method will then be evaluated against

  3. Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics in Norwegian emergency wards, a cross-sectional national study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rune A Kroken; Erik Johnsen; Torleif Ruud; Tore Wentzel-Larsen; Hugo A Jørgensen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surveys on prescription patterns for antipsychotics in the Scandinavian public health system are scarce despite the prevalent use of these drugs. The clinical differences between antipsychotic drugs are mainly in the areas of safety and tolerability, and international guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia offer rational strategies to minimize the burden of side effects related to antipsychotic treatment. The

  4. WARD: A Weighted Array Data Scheme for Subspace Processing in Impulsive Noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin He; Zhong Liu

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with robust array signal processing in impulsive noise environments. A simple weighting signal is defined to weight all sensor data in a snapshot-by-snapshot way, so that the resulting array data have the desired statistical characteristics used in the subspace-based direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation techniques. Then any traditional subspace-based technique can be used for DOA estimation. In working

  5. Constraints on the IR behaviour of gluon and ghost propagator from Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identities

    E-print Network

    Ph. Boucaud; J. P. Leroy; A. Le Yaouanc; J. Micheli; O. Pène; A. Y. Lokhov; J. Rodríguez-Quintero; C. Roiesnel

    2007-01-15

    We consider the constraints of the Slavnov-Taylor identity of the IR behaviour of gluon and ghost propagators and their compatibility with solutions of the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation and with the lattice picture.

  6. GENERIC ORBITS AND TYPE ISOLATION IN THE GURARIJ SPACE ITA BEN YAACOV AND C. WARD HENSON

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a Banach space E, and study their properties. The topometric structure of the type space, a fundamental notion of metric model theory, is defined there, as well as (topometrically) isolated types, which

  7. Pedagogical encounters between nurses and patients in a medical ward—A field study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Friberg; E. Pilhammar Andersson; J. Bengtsson

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundPatient teaching is regarded as an important aspect of nursing care as well as an essential part of the nursing profession. In nursing practice, a distinction can be made between formal (planned) and informal (spontaneous) patient teaching. The major part of patient teaching research is within the area of formal teaching. In spite of the fact that spontaneous teaching occurs

  8. Acute pain treatment on postoperative and medical non-surgical wards

    PubMed Central

    Korczak, Dieter; Kuczera, Carmen; Rust, Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of acute pain treatment in hospitals is examined. An efficient therapy of acute pain is efficient and cost-effective. Although every patient is entitled for the relief of pain, many hospitals do not treat acute pain in an optimal manner. PMID:23904888

  9. The other side of caring: abuse in a South African maternity ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christiaan Schoombee

    2010-01-01

    The abuse of women by nurses in maternity units of hospitals world?wide has been documented in research conducted by universities, non?governmental organisations and government agencies. In the current paper, patients and nurses of a maternity unit of one particular South African hospital are interviewed about their experiences of childbirth and their experiences of being nurses in a maternity unit. Interviews

  10. Assessment of quality of care in postpartum wards of Shaheed Beheshti Medical Science University hospitals, 2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Simbar; Z. Alizadeh Dibazari; J. Abed Saeidi; H. Alavi Majd

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – Despite 77 per cent antenatal care coverage and 90 per cent skilled attendant at delivery, adjusted maternal mortality in Iran is 76 per 100,000 births. Low quality of maternal health services is one cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. However, few and limited studies have been devoted to the quality of postpartum care in Iran. This study aims

  11. ADAPTIVE MONITORING IN ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE SYSTEMS Mohammad Ahmad Munawar and Paul A.S. Ward

    E-print Network

    Ward, Paul A.S.

    Computing [9]. Many aspects of Autonomic Computing such as self-configuring, self-healing, self-tuning, self, each of which fulfills specific needs. Each software can it- self be composed of many parts- ingly large, have complex structure, and are frequently updated. The composite and componentized

  12. Compassionate containment? Balancing technical safety and therapy in the design of psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wilbert; Wood, Victoria; Spencer, Ian; Mason, James; Close, Helen; Reilly, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    This paper contributes to the international literature examining design of inpatient settings for mental health care. Theoretically, it elaborates the connections between conceptual frameworks from different strands of literature relating to therapeutic landscapes, social control and the social construction of risk. It does so through a discussion of the substantive example of research to evaluate the design of a purpose built inpatient psychiatric health care facility, opened in 2010 as part of the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Findings are reported from interviews or discussion groups with staff, patients and their family and friends. This paper demonstrates a strong, and often critical awareness among members of staff and other participants about how responsibilities for risk governance of 'persons' are exercised through 'technical safety' measures and the implications for therapeutic settings. Our participants often emphasised how responsibility for technical safety was being invested in the physical infrastructure of certain 'places' within the hospital where risks are seen to be 'located'. This illuminates how the spatial dimensions of social constructions of risk are incorporated into understandings about therapeutic landscapes. There were also more subtle implications, partly relating to 'Panopticist' theories about how the institution uses technical safety to supervise its own mechanisms, through the observation of staff behaviour as well as patients and visitors. Furthermore, staff seemed to feel that in relying on technical safety measures they were, to a degree, divesting themselves of human responsibility for risks they are required to manage. However, their critical assessment showed their concerns about how this might conflict with a more therapeutic approach and they contemplated ways that they might be able to engage more effectively with patients without the imposition of technical safety measures. These findings advance our thinking about the construction of therapeutic landscapes in theory and in practice. PMID:23916450

  13. NIH Director's Early Independence !ward (EI!) --A Grand Experiment in Catalyzing the Biomedical Workforce

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    metagenomic reprogramming of the human microbiome through microbilome engineering Daniela Witten, Ph A vaccination in Mali Dr. Basta aims to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases, to assess the direct and indirect effects of vaccination, and to determine optimal strategies for disease prevention

  14. Ward features affecting stigma experiences in contemporary psychiatric hospitals: a multilevel study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mieke Verhaeghe; Piet Bracke

    2008-01-01

    Background  Various studies have revealed the existence and negative consequences of stigmatization of persons receiving professional\\u000a mental health care. Less attention is generally paid to factors affecting these stigma experiences. The influence of the immediate\\u000a treatment context, especially, is largely neglected.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  In this article, a multilevel design is used to explore the link between characteristics of the treatment context and stigma

  15. How we implemented a classroom-based educational intervention for ward-based diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles G; Atherley, Anique; George, Colette; Morris, Clare

    2014-10-13

    Abstract Background: Junior doctors require training to adequately manage the increasing numbers of adult, hospitalized patients with diabetes whom they encounter. Aims: Junior doctors experiencing the intervention acquire knowledge and skills that improve their management of inpatients with diabetes. Methods: We designed and administered, a one-hour, classroom-based, educational intervention to 242 juniors doctors. This resulted in a 49% reduction in insulin prescription errors and an increase in their confidence in the delivery of care. A number of key steps were taken to develop the intervention. First, aims, objectives, methods and assessment were carefully aligned with learning objectives at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy. Clarity was enhanced through the structuring of the introduction, body and conclusion. Clinically authentic active learning methods were used to increase engagement and provide an opportunity for junior doctors to reflect and make connections with their own clinical practice. Additionally, refinement was integrated into the process of administration. Results: Qualitative analysis from 205 trainees (85%) revealed that trainees liked a number of design features, their ability to be interactive, and immediacy behaviors of facilitators. Conclusion: Classroom-based training can impact clinically delivered care. Achieving this goal requires well-thought-out content design and evaluation. PMID:25306995

  16. Do clinical nurse specialists in palliative care de-skill or empower general ward nurses?

    PubMed

    Mytton, Elizabeth J; Adams, Ann

    2003-02-01

    This article reports on a small-scale exploratory study looking into the relationships between specialist nurses and general nurses in acute palliative care, to establish mutual role expectations and conditions under which generalists exhibit empowered or de-skilled behaviour. The main aims were to investigate understandings of role expectation and to establish the conditions under which generalists exhibited empowered or de-skilled behaviour. Semi-structured interviews, based on a patient vignette, were conducted with eight general nurses and two specialist nurses in one UK NHS trust. It was found that generalists valued specialists' clinical knowledge and skills, especially their communication skills. However, generalists demonstrated little insight into the work methods or full job remit, particularly the educational role, of specialists. There was a common understanding of the generalist's role by both generalists and specialists. Generalists shared anxieties about palliative care. De-skilling was not reported, but generalists acknowledge 'handing over' care and a disinclination to develop challenging clinical skills. Empowerment was not found to be associated with clinical grade, but with motivation to learn about palliative care. Further research is required to verify these preliminary findings. PMID:12668941

  17. More general correlation functions of twist fields from Ward identities in the massive Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, James

    2012-05-01

    Following on from previous work we derive the nonlinear differential equations of more general correlators of U(1) twist fields in two-dimensional massive Dirac theory. Using the conserved charges of the double-copy model equations parametrizing the correlators of twist fields with arbitrary twist parameter are found. This method also gives a parametrization of the correlation functions of general, fermionic, descendent twist fields. The equations parametrizing correlators of primary twist fields are compared to those of the literature and evidence is presented to confirm that these equations represent the correct parametrization.

  18. From Classroom to Boardroom and Ward: Developing Generic Intercultural Skills in Diverse Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Michelle C.; Mak, Anita S.

    2013-01-01

    A strategic approach to internationalize learning in higher education institutions is to use the curriculum and classroom cultural diversity to create opportunities to broaden students' intercultural perspectives, appreciate sociocultural variability in professional practice, and improve their intercultural interaction skills. There is no…

  19. A review of "The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America." by Lee Ward

    E-print Network

    Geoffrey M. Vaughan

    2005-01-01

    colonies. Thus the second paradox is resolved: the radical Whigs in the colonies and the moder- ate Whigs in Britain had become two great nations divided by a common philosophy. Perhaps as a coda, Lee explains in Part III that the arguments of Sidney were...

  20. Note on Adiabatic Modes and Ward Identities In A Closed Universe

    E-print Network

    Xiao Xiao

    2014-07-31

    As statements regarding the soft limit of cosmological correlation functions, consistency relations are known to exist in any flat FRW universe. In this letter we explore the possibility of finding such relations in a spatially closed universe, where the soft limit $\\textbf{q}\\rightarrow 0$ does not exist in any rigorous sense. Despite the absence of spatial infinity of the spatial slices, we find the adiabatic modes and their associated consistency relations in a toy universe with background topology $R\\times S^2$. Flat FRW universe adiabatic modes are recovered via taking the large radius limit $R\\gg \\mathcal{H}^{-1}$, for which we are living in a small local patch of Hubble size on the sphere. It is shown that both dilation and translation adiabatic modes in the local patch are recovered by a global dilation on the sphere, acting at different places.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of apparent outbreak of invasive aspergillosis in ahematology ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEXANDER LEENDERS; Belkum van A. F; SASKIA JANSSEN; Marie de S; J. A. J. W. Kluytmans; JENNE WIELENGA; B. Löwenberg; H. A. Verbrugh

    1996-01-01

    During a 2-month period, five patients suffering from invasive infections\\u000a caused by Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus fumigatus were identified in\\u000a the Hematology Department of the University Hospital Dijkzigt (Rotterdam,\\u000a The Netherlands). To study the epidemiological aspects of invasive\\u000a aspergillosis, strains from these patients and from the hospital\\u000a environment, isolated during extensive microbiological screening, were\\u000a subjected to genotyping. A novel DNA

  2. Wards in the keyway: amino acids with anomalous pK(a)s in calycins.

    PubMed

    Eberini, Ivano; Sensi, Cristina; Bovi, Michele; Molinari, Henriette; Galliano, Monica; Bonomi, Franco; Iametti, Stefania; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2012-12-01

    As a follow-up to our recent analysis of the electrostatics of bovine ?-lactoglobulin (Eberini et al. in Amino Acids 42:2019-2030, 2011), we investigated whether the occurrence in the native structure of calycins-the superfamily to which ?-lactoglobulin belongs-of amino acids with anomalous pK (a)s is an infrequent or, on the contrary, a common occurrence, and whether or not a general pattern may be recognized. To this aim, we randomly selected four calycins we had either purified from natural sources or prepared with recombinant DNA technologies during our previous and current structural and functional studies on this family. Their pIs vary over several pH units and their known functions are as diverse as carriers, enzymes, immunomodulators and/or extracellular chaperones. In our survey, we used both in silico prediction methods and in vitro procedures, such as isoelectric focusing, electrophoretic titration curves and spectroscopic techniques. By comparing the results under native conditions (no exposure of the proteins to chaotropic agents) to those after protein unfolding (in the presence of 8 M urea), a shift is observed in the pK (a) of at least one amino acid per protein, which results in a measurable change in pI. Three types of amino acids are involved: Cys, Glu, and His, their position varies along the calycin sequence. Although no common mechanism may thus be recognized, we hypothesize that the 'normalization' of anomalous pK (a)s may be the phenomenon that accompanies, and favors, structural rearrangements such as those involved in ligand binding by these proteins. An interesting, if anecdotal, validation to this view comes from the behavior of human retinol binding protein, for which the pI of the folded and liganded protein is intermediate between those of the folded and unliganded and of the unfolded protein forms. Likewise, both solid (from crystallography) and solution state (from CD spectroscopy) data confirm that the protein undergoes structural rearrangement upon retinol binding. PMID:22643844

  3. Implementation of a microprocessor-based overcurrent relay / by Ernie Ward McWilliams

    E-print Network

    McWilliams, Ernie Ward

    1979-01-01

    located there. The N6802 also has two negative-true interrupt lines: a maskable 1nterrupt request ( IRg), and a non-maskable interrupt (NMI). The two types of interrupts are similar, except that the IRg will be ignored by the microprocessor if a...

  4. DELANEY AND WARD Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory: An Overview of the First Fifty Years

    E-print Network

    Reuter, Martin

    bombers carrying nuclear weapons led to the formation of Lincoln Laboratory (originally Project Lincoln. The MIT Radiation Laboratory was a focal point for much of the Allied development of microwave radar

  5. Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011) by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male) including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female), two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male). Results We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses. Conclusions The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care. PMID:22748059

  6. Dental Care for the Mentally Retarded; A Handbook for Ward Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Birmingham. Dental Advisory Committee.

    Included in a handbook are discussions on general information for dental health for the institutionalized retarded, their need for dental care, the attendant's role in providing care, dental information for the attendant, how and when to use a toothbrush, care of toothbrushes and equipment, and indications of abnormal mouth conditions. Information…

  7. SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET Michael D. Adams and Rabab Ward

    E-print Network

    Adams, Michael D.

    SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET TRANSFORMS Michael D. Adams and Rabab of symmetry-preserving re- versible integer-to-integer wavelet transforms. The transforms from both that preserve symmetry. For example, symmetry-preserving transforms have the advantage of being compatible

  8. Breach in the 9th Ward Levee, New Orleans August 2005 GettyImages

    E-print Network

    Womeldorf, Carole

    choices of a world under unprecedented stress. #12;Recent engineering headlines: · Inadequate levees breached due to Katrina · Engineers fail to convince management of risk of Columbia's return to earth students to handle tough engineering questions? · Can our teaching of engineering fundamentals be more

  9. An elasmobranch maternity ward: female round stingrays Urobatis halleri use warm, restored estuarine habitat during gestation.

    PubMed

    Jirik, K E; Lowe, C G

    2012-04-01

    The habitat use and movements of the round stingray Urobatis halleri were compared between shallow restored and natural habitats of the Anaheim Bay Estuary (CA, U.S.A.) in relation to water temperature. Restored habitat remained significantly warmer than natural habitat from spring through to autumn. Strong sexual segregation occurred in the restored habitat with mature female U. halleri forming large unisex aggregations in summer, during months of peak seasonal water temperatures, and males only present during spring. Most mature females collected from restored habitat during months of high abundance were determined to be pregnant using non-invasive field ultrasonography. Tagged females typically spent <14 days in the restored habitat, using the habitat less as seasonal water temperatures decreased. Females tended to emigrate from the estuary by mid-August, coinciding with the time of year for parturition. The elevated water temperatures of the restored habitat may confer an energetic cost to male U. halleri, but females (particularly pregnant females) may derive a thermal reproductive benefit by using warm, shallow habitats for short periods of time during months of peak water temperatures. These findings have management implications for the design of coastal habitat restoration projects and marine protected areas that incorporate thermal environments preferred by aggregating female elasmobranchs. PMID:22497381

  10. WARD: A Wearable Action Recognition In this paper, we present a public human action

    E-print Network

    of the most common actions in a human's daily activities, such as standing, sitting, walking, and jumping female and 13 male). It includes the following 13 continuous-action categories: 1. Stand. 2. Sit. 3. Lie upstairs. 10. Go downstairs. 11. Jog. 12. Jump. 13. Push wheelchair. Each subject is asked to perform five

  11. Plant Science Bulletin 55(2) 2009 The Biology of Deserts. Ward, David. 2008. ISBN-

    E-print Network

    Gorelick, Root

    . Another fun example is various Bursera spp. that squirt terpene resins from chewed leaves, squirting in the genus Blepharida can disable this mechanism by investing 1.5 hours cutting the resin canals, even though

  12. The effects of regional characteristics on population growth in Korean cities, counties and wards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bun Song Lee; Sun Eae Chun; Suk Young Kim

    2007-01-01

    This study identifies the regional characteristics influencing population growth in Korean cities during 1980–2000. Our results indicate that regions followed the fortunes of industries to which regions had been initially exposed. The initial employment share of manufacturing industries positively affects population growth, even though the strength of impact decreases in recent periods, which is consistent with Glaeser et al. [Glaeser,

  13. Signal Versus Noise on the Wards: What “Messages” from the Hidden Curriculum Do Medical Students Perceive to Be Importantly Meaningful?

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Jeannette M.

    2013-01-01

    Interested in the hidden curriculum and the learning environment for professionalism at our school, a group of educators called the RIPPLE Team (Relationships in Positive Professional Learning Environments) created The Professionalism Journal for use by third-year medical students during their Internal Medicine and Psychiatry clerkships. The students are introduced to the online journal and encouraged to use it as a means to pause, reflect on the events of the day, and write about episodes or exchanges they find personally important and meaningful. They are informed that their journal entries will be de-identified and used as the triggers for a facilitated and confidential discussion among their peers at the end of the clerkship. This article will report on the themes of the journal entries made by Internal Medicine clerks during one academic year. PMID:23874008

  14. Flow situations during everyday practice in a medical hospital ward. Results from a study based on experience sampling method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Åsa Bringsén; Göran Ejlertsson; Ingemar H Andersson

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing is a constant balance between strain and stimulation and work and health research with a positive reference point has been recommended. A health-promoting circumstance for subjective experience is flow, which is a psychological state, when individuals concurrently experience happiness, motivation and cognitive efficiency. Flow situations can be identified through individuals' estimates of perceived challenge and skills. There is,

  15. Documenting Pain as the Fifth Vital Sign: A Feasibility Study in an Oncology Ward in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. R. Devi; T. S. Tang

    2008-01-01

    Background: Monitoring acute postoperative pain as the fifth vital sign is currently practiced in many developed countries. In Sarawak, pain is an important symptom as 70% of cancer patients present with advanced disease. As the existing validated pain assessment tools were found to be difficult to use, we studied the feasibility of modifying the use of a pain assessment tool,

  16. Deformation Embedding for Point-Based Elastoplastic Simulation Ben Jones, Stephen Ward, Ashok Jallepalli, Joseph Perenia, and Adam W. Bargteil

    E-print Network

    Bargteil, Adam W.

    -based finite element methods. We also introduce a new estimate for the volume of a particle, allowing particle recently been showcased in special effects, for example the honey in Bee Movie [Ruilova 2007] and the food space--the weighted least-squares best embedding of rest space into three dimensions, while preserving

  17. Submicron Streptavidin Patterns for Protein Assembly Karen L. Christman,, Michael V. Requa, Vanessa D. Enriquez-Rios, Sabrina C. Ward,|

    E-print Network

    . Films containing the pH-reactive polymer poly(3,3-diethoxypropyl methacrylate) and a photoacid generator patterning and assembly was demonstrated using streptavidin, biotinylated anthrax toxin receptor-1, and the protective antigen moiety of anthrax toxin and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force

  18. Independent health care: using a board-to-ward approach to achieve improvement in infection prevention standards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Millward; S. Barnett; A. Jones

    2010-01-01

    The Health and Social Care Act 2008 places a legal responsibility upon healthcare organisations to provide a clean environment where infection risks are minimised. From April 2010, the regulation of both the NHS and the independent healthcare sector will, for the first time, fall under the same legislative framework. Nuffield Health (NH) is an independent healthcare provider with 30 acute

  19. Hierarchical Parallel Coordinates for Exploration of Large Datasets Ying-Huey Fua, Matthew O. Ward and Elke A. Rundensteiner

    E-print Network

    Gousie, Michael B.

    visualization of large multivariate data sets based on a number of novel extensions to the parallel coordinates. Keywords: Large-scale multivariate data visualization, hierarchi- cal data exploration, parallel for the visualization of large data sets. The quantification of the term "large" varies and is subject to revision

  20. Child Deaths From Injury in the Special Wards of Tokyo, Japan (2006–2010): A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hideto; Hikiji, Wakako; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been increasing interest in the formal review of child deaths in Japan. In this study we examined the causes and scene information regarding child deaths from injury in Tokyo, the capital of Japan, as preparation for implementation of a full-scale review of child deaths. Methods Documents on deaths from injury (excluding homicides) investigated by the Tokyo Medical Examiner’s Office during the period from 2006 through 2010 were reviewed. Deaths of children younger than 18 years (N = 217) were selected as the study sample. We examined the cause of and information on the death and were particularly interested in whether a case had preventable factors. Results Overall, 67% of the cases were deaths from unintentional injury. The main cause of death among children younger than 1 year was asphyxia, and the proportions of deaths from traffic accidents were higher in older age groups. Thirty percent of deaths from injury were due to suicide, and all cases of suicide were among children older than 10 years. Although analysis of preventable factors was difficult in some cases, owing to limited information on the death scene, 87% of deaths from unintentional injury, excluding those involving traffic accidents, had preventable factors. Conclusions Most unintentional child deaths from injury appear to be preventable. Development of a system to collect detailed information on the scene at the time of death will help decrease child deaths in Japan. PMID:24705644

  1. Remarks Following the City of Charlottesville's 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony Hon. S. Ward Casscells III, M.D.

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    . This week has reminded us of the courage of our firefighters, our police, our EMTs, and our military, and fully aware that war is the last and most desperate answer to problems. #12;A bright spot in their lives the need for our military to know history and technology, to be fluent in other languages and cultures, so

  2. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Bell Canyon sandstones, Scott field, Ward and Reeves counties, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Kashatus, Gerard Paul

    1986-01-01

    Canyon divisions separated by thinner interchannel portions of the same division. Sands from later submarine flows filled in the topographi- cally lower interchannel areas of previous flows. The lack of erosion- al surfaces has led... the shelves to attain current velocities high enough to produce an unstable fluid interface causing extensive mixing at the top of the submarine currents. A low density turbid cloud that behaved as a separate transport mode could have formed above...

  3. Clinical risk conditions for acute lung injury in the intensive care unit and hospital ward: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Niall D; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Esteban, Andrés; Gordo, Federico; Honrubia, Teresa; Peñuelas, Oscar; Algora, Alejandro; García, Gema; Bustos, Alejandra; Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    2007-01-01

    Background Little is known about the development of acute lung injury outside the intensive care unit. We set out to document the following: the association between predefined clinical conditions and the development of acute lung injury by using the American–European consensus definition; the frequency of lung injury development outside the intensive care unit; and the temporal relationship between antecedent clinical risk conditions, intensive care admission, and diagnosis of lung injury. Methods We conducted a 4-month prospective observational study in three Spanish teaching hospitals, enrolling consecutive patients who developed clinical conditions previously linked to lung injury, both inside and outside the intensive care unit. Patients were followed prospectively for outcomes, including the diagnosis of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Results A total 815 patients were identified with at least one clinical insult; the most common were sepsis, pneumonia, and pancreatitis. Pulmonary risk conditions were observed in 30% of cases. Fifty-three patients (6.5%) developed acute lung injury; 33 of these (4.0%) met criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Lung injury occurred most commonly in the setting of sepsis (46/53; 86.7%), but shock (21/59; 36%) and pneumonia (20/211; 9.5%) portended the highest proportional risk; this risk was higher in patients with increasing numbers of clinical risk conditions (2.2%, 14%, and 21% (P < 0.001) in patients with one, two, and three conditions, respectively). Median days (interquartile range) from risk condition to diagnosis of lung injury was shorter with pulmonary (0 (0 to 2)) versus extrapulmonary (3 (1 to 5)) (P = 0.029) risk conditions. Admission to the intensive care unit was provided to 9/20 (45%) patients with acute lung injury and to 29/33 (88%) of those with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Lung injury patients had higher mortality than others (acute lung injury 25.0%; acute respiratory distress syndrome 45.5%; others 10.3%; P < 0.001). Conclusion The time course from clinical insult to diagnosis of lung injury was rapid, but may be longer for extrapulmonary cases. Some patients with lung injury receive care and die outside the intensive care unit; this observation needs further study. PMID:17784960

  4. Assessment of quality of midwifery care in labour and delivery wards of selected Kordestan Medical Science University hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masoumeh Simbar; Farideh Ghafari; Shahnaz Tork Zahrani; Hamid Alavi Majd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – Quality improvement of reproductive health care has been announced as one of five global strategies to accelerate progress toward reproductive health goals. The World Health Organization emphasises the evaluation of structure, procedure and outcome of health services to improve quality of care. This study aims to assess the quality of provided care in labour and delivery units in

  5. Goldstone theorem, Hugenholtz-Pines theorem, and Ward-Takahashi relation in finite volume Bose-Einstein condensed gases

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Hiroaki [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: enomotohiroaki@akane.waseda.jp; Okumura, Masahiko [Department of Applied Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: okumura@aoni.waseda.jp; Yamanaka, Yoshiya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yamanaka@waseda.jp

    2006-08-15

    We construct an approximate scheme based on the concept of the spontaneous symmetry breakdown, satisfying the Goldstone theorem, for finite volume Bose-Einstein condensed gases in both zero and finite temperature cases. In this paper, we discuss the Bose-Einstein condensation in a box with periodic boundary condition and do not assume the thermodynamic limit. When energy spectrum is discrete, we found that it is necessary to deal with the Nambu-Goldstone mode explicitly without the Bogoliubov's prescription, in which zero-mode creation- and annihilation-operators are replaced with a c-number by hand, for satisfying the Goldstone theorem. Furthermore, we confirm that the unitarily inequivalence of vacua in the spontaneous symmetry breakdown is true for the finite volume system.

  6. Clui: A Platform for Handles to Rich Objects Hubert Pham, Justin Mazzola Paluska, Robert C. Miller, and Steve Ward

    E-print Network

    Clui: A Platform for Handles to Rich Objects Hubert Pham, Justin Mazzola Paluska, Robert C. Miller, that provides uniform handles to rich objects. Clui uses plugins to 1) create Webits on existing pages - Graphical user interfaces. INTRODUCTION As web applications become more popular, it is important to consider

  7. Effect of Frailty on Functional Gain, Resource Utilisation, and Discharge Destination: An Observational Prospective Study in a GEM Ward

    PubMed Central

    Kawryshanker, Sujatha; Raymond, Warren; Inderjeeth, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. A geriatric evaluation and management unit (GEM) manages elderly inpatients with functional impairments. There is a paucity of literature on frailty and whether this impacts on rehabilitation outcomes. Objectives. To examine frailty score (FS) as a predictor of functional gain, resource utilisation, and destinations for GEM patients. Methods. A single centre prospective case study design. Participants (n = 136) were ?65 years old and admitted to a tertiary hospital GEM. Five patients were excluded by the preset exclusion criteria, that is, medically unstable, severe dementia or communication difficulties after stroke. Core data included demographics, frailty score (FS), and functional independence. Results. The mean functional improvement (FIM) from admission to discharge was 11.26 (95% CI 8.87, 13.66; P < 0.001). Discharge FIM was positively correlated with admission FIM (? = 0.748; P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with frailty score (? = ?1.151; P = 0.014). The majority of the patients were in the “frail” group. “Frail” and “severely frail” subgroups improved more on mean FIM scores at discharge, relative to that experienced by the “pre-frail” group. Conclusion. All patients experienced functional improvement. Frailer patients improved more on their FIM and improved relatively more than their prefrail counterparts. Higher frailty correlated with reduced independence and greater resource utilisation. This study demonstrates that FS could be a prognostic indicator of physical independence and resource utilisation. PMID:24695584

  8. Risk factors for acquisition of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among patients on a renal ward during a community hospital outbreak

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elise M. Beltrami; Daniel A. Singer; Laurie Fish; Kelly Manning; Sally Young; Shailen N. Banerjee; Robert Baker; William R. Jarvis

    2000-01-01

    Background: During an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) infection and colonization at a community hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, we performed a case-control study of patients on the hospital's renal unit to determine risk factors for acquisition of VRE among this potentially high-risk patient population. Methods: Twenty-four renal patients with VRE colonization\\/infection (ie, case-patients) were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses

  9. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

  10. Accounting for the Unity of Experience in Dilthey, Rickert, Bradley and Ward Christopher Pincock, Department of Philosophy, Purdue University

    E-print Network

    Pincock, Chris

    the equally vexing distinction between analytic and continental philosophy, "No individual or movement, no dramatic event is solely or simply responsible for the opening up of the analytic-continental rift is an accident" (Simons 2001, 296) to conclude that "what we make of the divide is our business" (Simons 2001

  11. M. Kovari, R. Kemp, H. Lux, P. Knight, J. Morris, D.J. Ward CCFE-PR(14)12

    E-print Network

    and the published scenario include the bootstrap current and loop voltage. The PROCESS models for these are being drive and bootstrap fraction need the most extrapolation from the perspective of plasma physics. Contents 1. Introduction

  12. 5:30 social hour, dinner & aWards cereMonY MONONA TERRACE CONVENTION CENTER

    E-print Network

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    , Professor Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering 10:15 BreaK--Coffee, tea, juice, pastries 10:45 seMinar--using microtechnology to improve access to diagnostics in the developing world Scott Berry

  13. A Decolonizing Encounter: Ward Churchill and Antonia Darder in Dialogue. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 430

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orelus, Pierre W., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "A Decolonizing Encounter" examines the effects of western colonialism on historically marginalized and colonized populations living both in the West and the "third world". Specifically, it explores crucial issues such as the decolonizing of schools and communities of color; the decentralization of power of the capitalist and colonial state;…

  14. Maximizing teaching on the wards: review and application of the One-Minute Preceptor and SNAPPS models.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Jennifer M; Nixon, James; Lang, Valerie J

    2015-02-01

    Hospitalist educators face a number of challenges in teaching clinical reasoning to residents and medical students. Helping to develop trainees' clinical acumen is an essential and highly nuanced process, yet complex patients, documentation requirements, and productivity goals compete with teaching time. Workplace-based assessment is particularly important for residents with the institution of the developmental milestones for meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. Two frameworks for facilitating the clinical reasoning discussion-the One-Minute Preceptor preceptor and SNAPPS-have been well studied in the outpatient setting with positive results. Both models show promise for use in the inpatient teaching environment with little modification. This narrative review compares and contrasts these 2 teaching frameworks and discusses their application to the inpatient teaching environment. These models can provide opportunities for hospitalist educators to better assess trainees, integrate regular feedback, and encourage self-directed learning. These teaching frameworks can also allow hospitalists to provide more focused education to trainees without taking additional valuable time. PMID:25627348

  15. Evaluating alternative hypotheses for the early evolution and diversification of ants Sen G. Brady, Ted R. Schultz, Brian L. Fisher, and Philip S. Ward

    E-print Network

    Villemant, Claire

    million years ago, indicating that a Jurassic origin is highly unlikely. divergence dating Formicidae long-branch attraction phylogeny Ants (Hymenoptera:Formicidae) are the world's most success- ful group of eusocial positions in many terrestrial environments (3). Ants are among the leading predators of invertebrates

  16. An ounce of prevention. The AHA tries to ward off political attacks by showing its worth through healthcare ROI study, election cards and a new logo.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Fearing political backlash, the American Hospital Association is taking the offensive, crafting an image that shows hospitals are providing essential services despite the hefty price tag. In an attempt to rebrand itself, the AHA is touting a study on healthcare return on investment, has created an election card detailing "Seven Steps to a Healthier America" and debuted a new logo. PMID:14974297

  17. Comparison Of Povodine-Iodine Versus Savlon For Pre Catheterization Cleansing And The Association Of Bacteriuria With Its Antibiotic Susceptibility In Catheterised Patients Of The Surgical Ward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SHOBHA K. L; RAMACHANDRA L

    Background: Urinary tract infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections, and urinary catheterization is the most frequent predisposing factor. Nosocomial infections associated with urinary catheters may increase the mortality rate upto three times. These infections also pose a considerable financial burden. Different methods for urinary tract infection prophylaxis have been proposed for patients who undergo continuous catheterization. This

  18. WHICH MILD HEAD INJURED PATIENTS SHOULD HAVE FOLLOW-UP AFTER DISCHARGE FROM AN ACCIDENT AND EMERGENCY WARD?: A STUDY IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SETTING IN KELANTAN, MALAYSIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HC Chan; WAW Adnan; K Jaalam; J Abdullah

    Mild head injury (MHI) is a common presentation to many hospitals in both rural and urban settings in Southeast Asia, but it is not well studied. We studied 330 patients that presented to Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia Emergency Department with possible MHI, with the intentions to identify prognostic factors that may improve the diagnosis of MHI in the emergency setting

  19. New Algorithmic Tools For Electronic Structure Computations Y. Bai 1 , R. M. Day 1 , W.N. Gansterer 1;2 and R. C. Ward 1 ,

    E-print Network

    Ward, Robert C.

    New Algorithmic Tools For Electronic Structure Computations Y. Bai 1 , R. M. Day 1 , W.N. Gansterer Author: W. N. Gansterer University of Tennessee, USA and Vienna University of Technology Wiedner Hauptstr with eigenvalue problems arising in the SCF method in electronic structure computations in mind. The tech- niques

  20. Study of the outcome of suicide attempts: characteristics of hospitalization in a psychiatric ward group, critical care center group, and non-hospitalized group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaoru Kudo; Kotaro Otsuka; Jin Endo; Tomoyuki Yoshida; Hisayasu Isono; Takehito Yambe; Hikaru Nakamura; Sachiyo Kawamura; Atsuhiko Koeda; Junko Yagi; Nobuo Kemuyama; Hisako Harada; Fuminori Chida; Shigeatsu Endo; Akio Sakai

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The allocation of outcome of suicide attempters is extremely important in emergency situations. Following categorization of suicidal attempters who visited the emergency room by outcome, we aimed to identify the characteristics and potential needs of each group. METHODS: The outcomes of 1348 individuals who attempted suicide and visited the critical care center or the psychiatry emergency department of the

  1. The completeness of medication histories in hospital medical records of patients admitted to general internal medicine wards: Completeness of medication in hospital medical records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Sang Lau; Christa Florax; Arijan J. Porsius; Anthonius De Boer

    2001-01-01

    Aims Accurate recording of medication histories in hospital medical records (HMR) is important when patients are admitted to the hospital. Lack of registration of drugs can lead to unintended discontinuation of drugs and failure to detect drug related problems. We investigated the comprehensiveness of medication histories in HMR with regard to prescription drugs by comparing the registration of drugs in

  2. The meaning and significance of clinical group supervision and supervised individually planned nursing care as narrated by nurses on a general team psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Hallberg, I R

    2000-09-01

    By interviewing 22 psychiatric nurses, the present study aimed to reveal the meaning and significance of systematic clinical group supervision and supervised individually planned nursing care, using latent content analysis. The interpreted meaning was 'confronting the complexity of ongoing life in daily nursing care' and the interpreted significance was 'strengthening the foundation for nursing care'. Reflection on action and confirmation seemed to be core components in the process of clinical supervision. Focusing on the relational and task aspects in nursing care within a group approach may have contributed to the positive experiences of development that occurred. PMID:11887255

  3. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of a flux rope driven CME Ward B. Manchester IV, Tamas I. Gombosi, Ilia Roussev, Darren L. De Zeeuw,

    E-print Network

    Roussev, Ilia I.

    , Ilia Roussev, Darren L. De Zeeuw, I. V. Sokolov, Kenneth G. Powell, and Ga´bor To´th1 Center for Space Citation: Manchester, W. B., IV, T. I. Gombosi, I. Roussev, D. L. De Zeeuw, I. V. Sokolov, K. G. Powell, G

  4. Public health assessment for Vega Baja Solid Waste Disposal, Rio Abajo Ward/La Trocha, Vega Baja County, Puerto Rico, Region 2: CERCLIS Number PRD980512669. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-11-30

    The Vega Baja Waste Disposal Site is a public health hazard because long-term exposure to lead in soil in some yards cause harmful effects in children. Children and especially preschool children who live in yards with elevated levels of soil lead might be exposed to small amounts of lead when they accidentally swallow soil and dust that cling to their hands. The level of lead in garden vegetables from the site is not a public health threat. It is safe for residents to grow and eat garden vegetables. ATSDR recommends that EPA prevent long-term exposure to lead-contaminated soil where lead levels are consistently elevated. ATSDR also recommends that EPA consult with ATSDR officials to ensure that Superfund activities to stop exposure to lead-contaminated soil at the site continues to be protective of public health.

  5. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  6. A model on the dynamics of odontogenic cyst growth John P. Ward BSc MSc PhD, Lecturer, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough

    E-print Network

    .franks@nottingham.ac.uk. Gabriel Landini DrOdont PhD, Reader, Oral Pathology Unit, School of Dentistry, The University either rests of the dental lamina (glands of Serres)2 or extensions of mucosal basal cells3 . Keratocysts

  7. Student Financial Services Division of Enrollment and Access

    E-print Network

    PARENTS DECEASED, FOSTER CARE, OR WARD/DEPENDENT OF THE COURT Student Name (please print) CSUID On your a dependent or ward of the court? As noted in your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) you may or was a ward/dependent of the court since age 13. - Attach to this form court documentation regarding your ward/dependent

  8. Business process re-engineering in healthcare management: a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massimo Bertolini; M. Bevilacqua; F. E. Ciarapica; G. Giacchetta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to carry out the business process re-engineering (BPR) of a surgical ward in a hospital in order to improve the efficiency of the ward. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This work was developed using a case study on a surgical ward. In this type of ward, in which scheduled and unscheduled operations often have to

  9. A multicenter, randomized, triple-masked, placebo-controlled trial of the effect of ambulatory continuous femoral nerve blocks on discharge-readiness following total knee arthroplasty in patients on general orthopaedic wards.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Mariano, Edward R; Girard, Paul J; Loland, Vanessa J; Meyer, R Scott; Donovan, John F; Pugh, George A; Le, Linda T; Sessler, Daniel I; Shuster, Jonathan J; Theriaque, Douglas W; Ball, Scott T

    2010-09-01

    A continuous femoral nerve block (cFNB) involves the percutaneous insertion of a catheter adjacent to the femoral nerve, followed by a local anesthetic infusion, improving analgesia following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Portable infusion pumps allow infusion continuation following hospital discharge, raising the possibility of decreasing hospitalization duration. We therefore used a multicenter, randomized, triple-masked, placebo-controlled study design to test the primary hypothesis that a 4-day ambulatory cFNB decreases the time until each of three predefined readiness-for-discharge criteria (adequate analgesia, independence from intravenous opioids, and ambulation 30m) are met following TKA compared with an overnight inpatient-only cFNB. Preoperatively, all patients received a cFNB with perineural ropivacaine 0.2% from surgery until the following morning, at which time they were randomized to either continue perineural ropivacaine (n=39) or switch to normal saline (n=38). Patients were discharged with their cFNB and portable infusion pump as early as postoperative day 3. Patients who were given 4 days of perineural ropivacaine attained all three criteria in a median (25th-75th percentiles) of 47 (29-69)h, compared with 62 (45-79)h for those of the control group (Estimated ratio=0.80, 95% confidence interval: 0.66-1.00; p=0.028). Compared with controls, patients randomized to ropivacaine met the discharge criterion for analgesia in 20 (0-38) versus 38 (15-64)h (p=0.009), and intravenous opioid independence in 21 (0-37) versus 33 (11-50)h (p=0.061). We conclude that a 4-day ambulatory cFNB decreases the time to reach three important discharge criteria by an estimated 20% following TKA compared with an overnight cFNB, primarily by improving analgesia. PMID:20573448

  10. Comparison of PCR/Electron spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools. Methods Traditional clinical microbiology (TCM) and PCR/ESI-TOF-MS were used to recover and detect microorganisms from the hands and personal protective equipment of 10 burn intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers providing clinical care at a tertiary care military referral hospital. High-use environmental surfaces were assessed in 9 burn ICU and 10 orthopedic patient rooms. Clinical cultures during the study period were reviewed for pathogen comparison with investigational molecular diagnostic methods. Results From 158 samples, 142 organisms were identified by TCM and 718 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. The molecular diagnostic method detected more organisms (4.5?±?2.1 vs. 0.9?±?0.8, p?

  11. THE EFFECT OF AGE OF THE CALF ON THE AVAILABILITY OF NUTRIENTS IN VEGETABLE MILK-REPLACER RATIONS 1 C. H. ~OLLER, ~'3 G. ~\\/(. WARD, ~ A. D. McGILLIARD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. HUFFMAN; C. W. DUNCA

    The study was designed to determine the influence of age on the ability of the calf to digest vegetable milk-replacer rations by determining the amounts of nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus that were retained at four ages (10, 18, 26, and 34 days). Whole milk and evaporated milk were fed as standards of comparison. Male Holstein calves 2 to 4 days

  12. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1?% (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P?=?0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment. PMID:24925907

  13. Public health assessment for V and M/Albaladejo Norte Ward (a/k/a V and M/Albaladejo Farms site), Vega Baja, Vega Baja County, Puerto Rico, Region 2: CERCLIS Number PRD987366101. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-30

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) published a Site Review and Update for the V and M/Albaladejo Farms site on May 7, 1997. The site includes the V and M property and the Albaladejo farm. Total acreage is unknown. Several small plots within the site were formerly used for dumping plastic-coated electrical cables, electrical equipment, car batteries, and transformers. To total quantity of waste brought onto the site and the date when activities began are not known. Some wastes were burned, presumably to recover copper, aluminum, and lead. ATSDR prepared public health consultations in 1995 that concluded that site soils posed a potential health concern and concurred with EPA`s proposed cleanup levels. EPA also will investigate groundwater quality to determine whether remedial activities are needed to protect the aquifer that supplies off-site public wells that serve large numbers of residents in Vega Baja. ATSDR concluded that the site poses no apparent public health hazard. The proposed soil removal and proposed groundwater investigation and any required followup groundwater remediation should minimize the potential for future exposures and adverse human health effects.

  14. Snelling, G. C., Snelling, R. R. 2007. New synonymy, new species, new keys to Neivamyrmex army ants of the United States, pp. 459-550. In Snelling, R. R., B. L. Fisher, and P. S. Ward (eds).

    E-print Network

    Villemant, Claire

    Snelling, G. C., Snelling, R. R. 2007. New synonymy, new species, new keys to Neivamyrmex army ants of the American Entomological Institute, 80. NEW SYNONYMY, NEW SPECIES, NEW KEYS TO NEIVAMYRMEX ARMY ANTS level, new status, having previously been regarded as a subspecies of N. pilosus (F. Smith). One species

  15. End-of-Life and Palliative Care on the Wards - Survival Week, 2008 Matthew Ellman, MD, Director, End of Life Care Skills Training 1. Key Points: ? End-of-Life (EoL) care communication and assessment are as important as other skills you are learning during survival week. ? As a medical student on the wards, you will have opportunities to begin to develop your skills in palliative and end-of-life care. ? Learning to just be present and become more comfortable with patients at EoL and attend to the needs of the dying is crucial. Your presence alone can make a big difference with patients. 2. Skill-building opportunities during 3 rd year: ? Ward Based EoL care assignment: gain comfort communicating and assessing patients at end of life on the wards and share self-reflections in conference. You will evaluate a patient you are caring for on ANY CLERKSHIP. Case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Jubanik; Matthew Ellman; Peggy Bia; Grace Jeng; Ken Miller; Julie Rosenbaum; Mark Siegel; Steven Wolfson; Michael Berman; Maddie DeRosa; Larry Solomon; Megan McCabe; Kristen Wilkins; Gary Kopf; Melissa Perkal

    conference takes place on Psychiatry clerkship. Required for 3 rd year. ? Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Project: learn principles of pain and non-pain symptom management, spiritual and cultural aspects of palliative care, and how to work on inter-disciplinary team. Program of on-line interactive cases followed by workshops on Med 2 and Emergency Med. ? \\

  16. FAR-FIELD TSUNAMI IMPACT ON THE U.S. EAST COAST FROM AN EXTREME FLANK COLLAPSE OF THE

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    into the ocean. Such a slide could be triggered, e.g., by moderate seismicity related to volcanic activity. Ward; #12;/ In their pioneering but still somewhat controversial work, Ward and Day (2001) predicted

  17. 77 FR 39694 - National Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Petition for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...Services, LLC. e. Name of Project: Wards Island Tidal Energy Project. f. Location: The proposed Wards Island Tidal Energy Project will be located off the south...Island Sound in the Borough of Manhattan, New York City, NY. g....

  18. PKD Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... charity. National Headquarters: 8330 Ward Parkway, Suite 510, Kansas City, MO 64114 . Phone: 1.800.PKD.CURE © ... charity. National Headquarters: 8330 Ward Parkway, Suite 510, Kansas City, MO 64114. Phone: 1.800.PKD.CURE © ...

  19. 2012 -2013 INDEPENDENCY STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    in foster care. · When you were age 13 or older, you were a dependent/ward of the court. · As of the day you/ward of the court: Were you, at any time since you turned 13, a dependent/ward of the court even if you are no longer a dependent/ward of the court as of today? (For federal student aid purposes, someone who

  20. 2013 -2014 INDEPENDENCY STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    in foster care. · When you were age 13 or older, you were a dependent/ward of the court. · As of the day you/ward of the court: Were you, at any time since you turned 13, a dependent/ward of the court even if you are no longer a dependent/ward of the court as of today? (For federal student aid purposes, someone who

  1. Question #44 Free childcare

    E-print Network

    Holland, Jeffrey

    or were you a dependent or ward of the court?" Q: I am a single mom with one child and will get free day parents deceased, were you in foster care or were you a dependent or ward of the court?" Question #52 care or were you a dependent or ward of the court?" Question #53 Section 2 "As determined by a court

  2. Institutional Review Board ... University of Missouri-Columbia

    E-print Network

    Noble, James S.

    to both bio-medical and social-behavioral-educational research involving wards of the state in research the circumstances for foster children (Wards of the State) in their care. Foster parents cannot consent for fosterInstitutional Review Board . ... University of Missouri-Columbia . Wards of the State Effective

  3. From Strangers to Partners: Examining Convergence within a Longitudinal Study of Task-Oriented Dialogue

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    ). These patterns can include lexical choice (Hirschberg 2008; Ward and Litman 2007), syntactic choice (Reitter et; Ward and Litman 2007), and can also be leveraged for lexical and syntactic priming that may improve has also been explored in the context of learning; for example, Ward and Litman (2007) studied lexical

  4. Psychiatric outcome following paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission: a cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gwyneth Rees; Julia Gledhill; M. Elena Garralda; Simon Nadel

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine whether paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission is associated with greater psychiatric morbidity in children and parents as compared with general paediatric ward admissions. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Paediatric intensive care unit and two general paediatric wards of a London teaching hospital. Participants Children aged 5–18 years discharged from PICU (exposed cohort) and general paediatric wards (unexposed

  5. Little effect of transfer technique instruction and physical fitness training in reducing low back pain among nurses: a cluster randomised intervention study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. E. Ebbehøj; N. Wiese; L. H. Larsen; J. Duckert; H. Tønnesen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a transfer technique education programme (TT) alone or in combination with physical fitness training (TTPT) compared with a control group, who followed their usual routine. Eleven clinical hospital wards were cluster randomised to either intervention (six wards) or to control (five wards). The intervention cluster was individually randomised to

  6. The role of gowns in preventing nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): gown use in MRSA control.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; Ramman-Haddad, L; Dendukuri, N; Libman, M D

    2006-02-01

    During a 2-year period, a standard isolation protocol for control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was compared with a similar protocol in which gowns were not used but the availability of alcohol-based hand disinfectant was increased. Intervention wards had 0.10 fewer new MRSA transmissions per ward per month, compared with control wards (P was not significant). PMID:16465638

  7. Studying the Effects of Early Child Care Experiences on the Development of Children of Color in the United States: Toward a More Inclusive Research Agenda Deborah J. Johnson, Elizabeth Jaeger, Suzanne M. Randolph, Ana Mari Cauce, Janie Ward and National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay Belsky; Cathryn L. Booth; Robert Bradley; Celia A. Brownell; Margaret Burchinal; Susan B. Campbell; Ana Mari Cauce; K. Alison Clarke-Stewart; Martha Cox; Sarah L. Friedman; Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek; Aletha Huston; Elizabeth Jaeger; Deborah J. Johnson; Bonnie Knoke; Nancy Marshall; Kathleen McCartney; Marion O'Brien; Margaret Tresch Owen; Deborah Phillips; Robert Pianta; Suzanne M. Randolph; Susan Spieker; Deborah Lowe Vandell; Janie Ward; Marsha Weinraub

    Evidence is presented of the different cultural and ecological contexts affecting early child care for families of color. It is argued that improvements on previous research require a fundamental shift in how race, ethnicity, and culture as psychological variables are examined. Furthermore, to avoid the pitfalls and failures of previous research, new research must incorporate expanded models of child care

  8. A review of "Redefining Female Religious Life: French Ursulines and English Ladies in Seventeenth-Century Catholicism" by Laurence Lux-Sterritt 

    E-print Network

    Baker, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    to defend themselves against attack on a number of fronts. Ward?s imitation of the Society of Jesus proved a significant obstacle and it was widely believed that the English Ladies ?were usurping roles which were rightfully male? (47). Despite being... activity, and were eventually entrusted to establish an Ursuline movement in Quebec. Characteristically, Ward flouted gender boundaries, openly intending for the English Ladies to model the missionary activities of the Society of Jesus, a factor which...

  9. Adverse drug events in hospitalized patientsA comparison of doctors, nurses and patients as sources of reports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. L. A. van den Bemt; A. C. G. Egberts; A. W. Lenderink; J. M. Verzijl; K. A. Simons; W. S. C. J. M. van der Pol; H. G. M. Leufkens

    1999-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relative value of adverse drug events reported by doctors, nurses and patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: The study was conducted on a total of four wards: the paediatric and internal medicine wards (including geriatric patients)\\u000a of two peripheral hospitals in the Netherlands. Adverse drug events were collected by spontaneous reporting (doctor and nurse\\u000a reports) and by daily ward

  10. Barley Production in Texas.

    E-print Network

    Atkins, I. M.; Gardenhire, J. H.; Porter, K. B.

    1958-01-01

    selection. These strains became knon by their origin such as Tennessee Winter, Texn Winter and Wisconsin Winter. More recent11 plant breeders have selected superior strains fi given areas. Reno, Ward and Pueblo are similar strail] ~ selected from... years. Two recently developed varieties, Kecc~r~i and Dicktoo, have even greater hardiness thar Reno, Ward and Pueblo, and, in addition, ha1 considerable resistance to the greenbug (aphid\\ Both are tall growing varieties similar to Rer and Ward...

  11. 78 FR 21715 - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...gynecology, emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, urology...administration; nutritional care; supply and services...nursing services (to include intensive and intermediate care wards); pharmacy;...

  12. Panmixia on a continental scale in a widely distributed colonial waterbird

    E-print Network

    Green, Clay - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    . American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) breed across continental North America ­ Pelecanus erythrorhynchos. INTRODUCTION High mobility may enable long-distance dispersal (Ward, Skibinski

  13. David Perrin COLLEGE COUNCIL

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    and Education Les Chatelain CHAIR Occupational Therapy Lorie Richards CHAIR Physical Therapy Scott Ward CHAIR (Interim) Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Kelly Bricker Facility Services Director Brent Park Administrative

  14. David Perrin COLLEGE COUNCIL

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Les Chatelain CHAIR Occupational Therapy Lorie Richards CHAIR Physical Therapy Scott Ward CHAIR (Interim) Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Kelly Brecker Facility Services Director Brent Park Administrative

  15. View of room lined with posters beneath balcony seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of room lined with posters beneath balcony seating - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Ward Memorial Hall, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  16. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, P. Kent Fairbanks, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, P. Kent Fairbanks, Photographer August, 1968 SOUTHWEST (FRONT) ELEVATION. - Pine Valley Ward Chapel, Main & Grass Valley Streets, Pine Valley, Washington County, UT

  17. 1 (rev. January 2014) This form must be completed if you are claiming entitlement to in-state tuition benefits pursuant to Section 23-7.4 of the Code of Virginia.

    E-print Network

    . NO . . . Continue to Question 4. 5. Are you (the student) a military dependent or are you on active duty with the Active Duty OR Military Dependent Tuition Benefit Forms you will find at the link below. Return all forms married? Yes No 5. Are you an orphan or a ward of the court, or were you a ward of the court until age 18

  18. 78 FR 34994 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ...Form; and OMB Number: Dependency Statements; Parent...137-6), and Ward of a Court (DD Form 137-7...necessary to certify dependency or obtain information...21-22, or a ward of a court). While members usually...members of the public. Dependency claim examiners...

  19. 75 FR 38089 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...Form, and OMB Number: Dependency Statements; Parent...137-6), and Ward of a Court (DD Form 137-7...collection is used to certify dependency or obtain information...21-22, or a ward of a court). While members usually...members of the public. Dependency claim examiners...

  20. Student Services Bldg (0222), Suite 200, 800 Washington Street SW, Blacksburg, VA 24061 www.finaid.vt.edu | finaid@vt.edu | ph: 540.231.5179 | fax: 540.231.9139

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    parents were deceased, you were in foster care or you were a dependent or ward of the court. If you meet or a dependent/ward of the court. You are or were an emancipated minor as determined by a court in your state 1415_ DEPCL_10.21.13_1/1 2014-2015 Student Dependency Status Clarification Worksheet Student ID Number

  1. Experiment in managing sociopathic behaviour disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Woodside; A Harrow; J V Basson; J W Affleck

    1976-01-01

    A ward catering for both sexes admitted patients with aggressive suicidal, or otherwise disturbed behaviour for observation and treatment until decisions could be made about their long-term needs. Patients were referred from the police, special hospitals, and the courts and some were transferred from other wards in the hospital. A third of the first 100 patients were admitted for forensic

  2. The Natural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Caroline Ward's energetic enthusiasm for books and children is contagious. In 36 years of library service to children, no librarian, student, or child who has heard her tell a story, give a booktalk, lead a discussion group, or teach a children's literature class is likely to have forgotten the experience. While Ward is cheerfully offhand about…

  3. Group Therapy with Multiple Therapists in A Large Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschleman, Philip; Freundlich, David

    The utilization of multiple therapists in large group therapy meetings has been found to be a significant improvement over the traditional ward meeting or patient-staff conference. The initially limited goals of reducing ward tension and acting out by means of patients ventilation were surpassed. Despite the size of the meetings it was often…

  4. Knowledge of Rural and Urban Homemakers in Indigenous Resource Management Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shipra Sood; Avinash Sharma

    The study conducted on 120 rural and urban homemakers in two randomly selected panchayat wards and two municipal council wards of district Kangra of Himachal Pradesh revealed their knowledge regarding indigenous resource management practices. Results showed that knowledge levels vary among rural and urban homemakers which were tested with Z- test at 5 percent level of significance. There was significant

  5. Thinking the Unthinkable: Exposing the Vulnerabilities in the NHS Response to Coordinated Terrorist

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    of activity. In the entire hospital there are few staff other than the nursing staff on the wards. Many of the nursing staff are agency and bank nurses who are in some cases working their first shift in the ward. None and the automatic fire doors close shut. Staff do not panic. On two of the upper floors nurses discover that some

  6. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Norris; H. Brown; R. Gedden; T. Lovinger; L. Scheele; M. A. Shaker

    1997-01-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward

  7. Policy for controlling pain after surgery: effect of sequential changes in management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Gould; D. L. Crosby; M. Harmer; S. M. Lloyd; J. N. Lunn; G. A. Rees; D. E. Roberts; J. A. Webster

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To observe the effects of introducing an acute pain service to the general surgical wards of a large teaching hospital. DESIGN--A study in seven stages: (1) an audit of current hospital practice succeeded by the sequential introduction to the general surgical wards of (2) pain assessment charts; (3) an algorithm to allow more frequent use of intramuscular analgesia; (4) increased

  8. Ant Ecology Lori Lach, Catherine L. Parr, and Kirsti L. Abbott

    E-print Network

    Mooney, Kailen A.

    Ant Ecology EDITED BY Lori Lach, Catherine L. Parr, and Kirsti L. Abbott 1 #12;Contents Foreword of Abbreviations xvii Part I: Global Ant Diversity and Conservation 1 1. Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Evolution 3 Philip S. Ward Box 1.1 Applications of taxonomy: why should we name ants? 11 Philip S. Ward Box 1.2 How

  9. The knowledge of healthcare professionals regarding elderly persons' oral care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Kearns; M W Barber; M A Gosney; A J Preston

    2006-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the knowledge and views of nursing staff on both acute elderly care and rehabilitation wards regarding elderly persons' oral care with that of carers in nursing homes.Subjects One hundred nurses working on acute, sub-acute and rehabilitation wards for elderly people (Group 1) and 75 carers in nursing homes (Group 2) were

  10. Infection control and prevention strategies in the ICU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Widmer

    1994-01-01

    Although only 5–10% of all hospitalized patients are treated in ICUs, they account for approximately 25% of all nosocomial infections, and the incidence of nosocomial infections in ICUs is 5–10 times higher than that observed in general hospital wards. Systemic and respiratory infections are far more common than in general wards, and most epidemics originate, in ICUs. Nosocomial infections are

  11. Infant formula samples and breast feeding among Philippine urban poor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George M. Guthrie; Helen A. Guthrie; Tomas L. Fernandez; Nenita O. Estrera

    1985-01-01

    An experiment was performed on the maternity wards of three public hospitals in Cebu City, Philippines to determine whether the distribution of free samples of infant formula reduced the likelihood that mothers would breast feed or caused mothers to terminate nursing early. Samples were given or withheld alternately for 2 week intervals to mothers as they left maternity wards. They

  12. Effectiveness of Lighting Sysytems for Patient Rooms and Corridors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tu?çe Kazanasmaz; Arda Düzgüne?

    2004-01-01

    Results are reported on a trial study conducted to determine the working status of luminaires in the patient wards of a representative hospital located in Ankara, Turkey. The sampling plan used took in four floors from an eleven-storey ward building having 3 semi-detached blocks with each floor allocated to a specific clinical department, and 36 patient rooms of varying accommodation

  13. Preventing nosocomial infections: improving compliance with standard precautions in an Indonesian teaching hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. O. Duerink; H. Farida; N. J. D. Nagelkerke; H. Wahyono; M. Keuter; E. S. Lestari; U. Hadi; P. J. J. A. van den Broek

    2006-01-01

    Standard precautions can prevent transmission of micro-organisms. This study investigated hand hygiene, handling of needles and use of personal protective equipment in an Indonesian teaching hospital, and performed a multi-faceted intervention study to improve compliance. An intervention was performed in an internal medicine ward and a paediatric ward, consisting of development of a protocol for standard precautions, installation of washstands,

  14. Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) echoic angular discrimination: Effects of object separation and complexity

    E-print Network

    Hawaii at Hilo, University of

    Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) echoic angular discrimination: Effects of object separation-2294 Sonja J. Mevissen The Dolphin Institute, 420 Ward Ave., Suite 212, Honolulu, Hawaii Adam A. Pack-2294 and The Dolphin Institute, 420 Ward Ave., Suite 212, Honolulu, Hawaii Scott R. Roberts and Lea K. Carsrud

  15. Dependent Child Tuition Remission Application

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Dependent Child Tuition Remission Application To be eligible for this benefit, the child must be the biological child, adopted child, stepchild, or ward of the employee and must be the employee's dependent (see of the parent-child or guardian-ward relationship is required and must be submitted to University Human

  16. PROFILES OF LARGE COMBINATORIAL STRUCTURES Michael T. Lugo

    E-print Network

    Pemantle, Robin

    has explained to me how probabilists think. His door has always been open, even if I didn't take Virag, Mark Ward, and Herb Wilf. In particular Mark Ward taught a course in analytic combinatorics from Flajolet and Sedgewick's book in the fall of 2006, which introduced me to the power and beauty of analytic

  17. 4. Elevation view of south sides of Building Nos. 9945A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation view of south sides of Building Nos. 9945-A (left) and 9946-A (right). Detention Wards, including detention wall connecting the two buildings. - Madigan Hospital, Detention Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  18. Tyran Steward Department of History, University of Michigan

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Paul N.

    of race and sport. It analyzes the 1934 benching of Willis Ward, an African-American football player civil rights. This study also probes how Ward's benching affected his own career as a lawyer, judge, M.A., History, June 2009 Morehouse College, B.A., Sociology, May 2000 ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS Visiting

  19. ROTATION DESCRIPTIONS AND ACTIVITIES -201.00 PHARMACY PRACTICE RESIDENCY

    E-print Network

    Martin, Gail

    :* A. Inpatient Pharmaceutical Care: 1) Cardiology 2) Critical Care 3) Emergency Department Medicine 4 activities and precepting pharmacy students. CARDIOLOGY ­ 201.47 Intensive Cardiac Care and Ward Cardiology will include, but not necessarily be limited to: reviewing patient charts, attending ICC and 10 ward Cardiology

  20. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    States By Steven L. Markstrom, Lauren E. Hay, Christian D. Ward-Garrison, John C. Risley, William A this report. Suggested citation: Markstrom, S.L., Hay, L.E., Ward-Garrison, C.D., Risley, J.C., Battaglin, W

  1. Some Essential Environmental Ingredients for Sex Offender Reintegration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boer, Douglas P.

    2013-01-01

    Until the systematic work on the Good Lives Model (GLM) produced by Tony Ward, not a great deal of conceptual structure existed to provide sex offender treatment specialists with a theoretical underpinning for their work in helping offenders develop a better life as a way to prevent reoffending. However, the work of Ward and colleagues initially…

  2. 75 FR 12252 - Final Fair Market Rents for the Housing Choice Voucher Program and Moderate Rehabilitation Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ...Thursday, March 11, 2010, that updated the FMRs for Reno-Sparks, NV, and Ward County, ND. The March 11, 2010, notice inadvertently...notice in the Federal Register that updated the FMRs for Reno-Sparks, NV, and Ward County, ND. As discussed in that...

  3. Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal for Therapeutic and Supportive Organizations 21(2): 119-131, Summer 2000, Special Issue, The Sanctuary Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyndra J. Bills

    The authors of this paper describe the first author's personal experience of introducing a Sanctuary Model of treatment into a regressed and violent state hospital ward. When this experiment began, the ward averaged one hundred reported violent incidents per month. By a year later, the number of violent incidents had been dramatically decreased using trauma-based therapeutic milieu principles. Within two

  4. Time and motion study for pharmacists' activities in a geriatric hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesca Wirth; Lilian M. Azzopardi; Marise Gauci; Maurice Zarb Adami; Anthony Serracino-Inglott

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To identify and quantify activities undertaken by pharmacists in a geriatric hospital. Methods A data-collection form was developed, validated and tested for applicability and practicality. Pharmacist activities were organised into three categories: Clinical, Administration and Others. Clinical activities incorporated patient discharge, patient admission, checking the ward controlled-drugs record book, emergency trolley and patient medication trolley, prescription monitoring, ward round,

  5. Global population structure of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares,

    E-print Network

    RobertWard):Bob.Ward@marine.csiro.au 566 Abstract.-Yellowfin tuna, Thun- nus albacares, were sampled from one region of the Atlantic Ocean least four yellowfin tuna stocks: Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, west-central Pacific Ocean, and east but did support the separation of Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean. and Pacific Ocean stocks. Manuscript

  6. Sixteen Years of Croup in a Western Australian Teaching Hospital: Effects of Routine Steroid Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary C Geelhoed

    1996-01-01

    Study objective: To describe the experience of croup at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children (PMH), the only tertiary pediatric hospital in Western Australia, from 1980 through 1995 with reference to the introduction of routine steroid treatment in the ICU in 1989, in the general hospital wards from 1989 through 1993, and in the emergency department observation ward in 1993. Methods:

  7. Infrastructure and Contamination of the Physical Environment in Three Bangladeshi Hospitals: Putting Infection Control into Context

    PubMed Central

    Rimi, Nadia Ali; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P.; Islam, Mohammed Saiful; Uddin, Main; Hossain, Mohammad Jahangir; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Nahar, Nazmun; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper describes the physical structure and environmental contamination in selected hospital wards in three government hospitals in Bangladesh. Methods The qualitative research team conducted 48 hours of observation in six wards from three Bangladeshi tertiary hospitals in 2007. They recorded environmental contamination with body secretions and excretions and medical waste and observed ward occupant handwashing and use of personal protective equipment. They recorded number of persons, number of open doors and windows, and use of fans. They measured the ward area and informally observed waste disposal outside the wards. They conducted nine focus group discussions with doctors, nurses and support staff. Results A median of 3.7 persons were present per 10 m2 of floor space in the wards. A median of 4.9 uncovered coughs or sneezes were recorded per 10 m2 per hour per ward. Floors in the wards were soiled with saliva, spit, mucous, vomitus, feces and blood 125 times in 48 hours. Only two of the 12 patient handwashing stations had running water and none had soap. No disinfection was observed before or after using medical instruments. Used medical supplies were often discarded in open containers under the beds. Handwashing with soap was observed in only 32 of 3,373 handwashing opportunities noted during 48 hours. Mosquitoes and feral cats were commonly observed in the wards. Conclusions The physical structure and environment of our study hospitals are conducive to the spread of infection to people in the wards. Low-cost interventions on hand hygiene and cleaning procedures for rooms and medical equipment should be developed and evaluated for their practicality and effectiveness. PMID:24586516

  8. [Genetic similarity of vancomycin resistant strains of Enterococcus faecium isolated from clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    M?ynarczyk, Andrzej; Grzybowska, Wanda; Mrówka, Agnieszka; Tyski, Stefan; M?ynarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    Twenty vancomycin resistant E. faecium strains (VRE) isolated from patients of three different hospital wards in 2005-2008 were examined. The strains originated from patients of intensive therapy, urological and internistic wards. The chosen wards differ significantly in their specificity. In all cases the presence of o vanA and lack of vanB, vanD, vanE and vanG genes and were found. Strains were compared by using RFLP-PFGE, the reference method for molecular typing of VRE. One group including fourteen strains showing similarity higher than 79.5% was distinguished. This group was divided into subgroups. The greatest similarity was found among strains from patients of intensive therapy ward. Two subgroups of strains showing similarity more than 93.3%, of four strains each were identified. The similarity between these two subgroups was 79.5%. Most strains from other two wards showed less than 79.5% similarity and they could be recognised as not related. Only one strain from internal ward and two strains from urologic ward were similar in 82.1 - 86.4% to one of subgroups of strains originated from intensive therapy. PMID:21473093

  9. A measurement of the relative intensities of some vibronic bands

    E-print Network

    Loyd, Coleman Monroe

    1955-01-01

    values in Table VIII and Table IX, Previous values in tho literature are those by Johnston and Urey and the theoretical values obtained by Ward . Figure 9 1 8 is a curve for the values fran Table X together with Ward's theoretical curve. Ward's values... have been scaled to give his sax1am value the value obtained by' the present work, Johnston and Urey estinated the peak absorption te be at a which agrees closely with the present work. Had Johnston and Uroy taken into account underlying bands...

  10. Hospital outbreak of Norwalk-like virus.

    PubMed

    Russo, P L; Spelman, D W; Harrington, G A; Jenney, A W; Gunesekere, I C; Wright, P J; Doultree, J C; Marshall, J A

    1997-08-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Norwalk-like virus occurred in two areas of the hospital: area 1, consisting of three adjacent and interconnected wards, with mostly elderly patients; and area 22, an acute ward in a separate building with elderly patients. In area 1, 40 patients and 20 staff were affected; in area 2, 18 patients and 14 staff were affected. Infection control measures were instituted in consultation with the government health authority. These measures did not appear to affect the course of the outbreak, but may have prevented spreads to the other wards. PMID:9324510

  11. Particle Physics Masterclass

    ScienceCinema

    Helio Takai

    2010-01-08

    Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

  12. Scalar-graviton interaction in the noncommutative space

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; Elias-Filho, M. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil)

    2006-09-15

    We obtain the leading order interaction between the graviton and the neutral scalar boson in the context of noncommutative field theory. Our approach makes use of the Ward identity associated with the invariance under a subgroup of symplectic diffeomorphisms.

  13. The Ishihara Symposium: Granites and Associated Metallogenesis Geoscience Australia 121

    E-print Network

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    of relatively high Na, Sr and low Y, HREE magmas. They have similarities to Archean Tonalite-Trondhjemite-GranodioriteSY) diorite-tonalite- granodiorite plutons developed continental-ward of, and 10-15 m.y. after, parallel belts

  14. Volume 63, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-print Network

    Dickson, Donald

    2005-01-01

    of belief, have had a powerful afterlife in Protestant societies, and Dyrness has traced their development very clearly. Right from the start, the leading reformers differed in their attitudes to- wards images, the decoration of churches...

  15. The material and energy flow through the abrasive waterjet machining and recycling processes

    E-print Network

    Kurd, Michael Omar, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the material and energy flow through the abrasive waterjet machine and the WARD recycling machine. The goal was to track all of the material, water, abrasive, energy, air, and ...

  16. November/December 2007 Clovertales

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Fall in Somerset County. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen Scene 7 Club Corner 8 Hurray

  17. January/February 2009 Clovertales

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Welcome to 2009 Last Rothenburger Carol K. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen Scene 6 Club

  18. November/December 2005 Clovertales

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    , on an age appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Happy, Lisa Rothenburger Carol K. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen

  19. May/June 2012 A bi-monthly newsletter about Somerset County 4-H

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Carol Ward Page 2May/June 2012 Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen Scene 6 Club Corner 8 Hurray For... 9, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression

  20. 1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST SECTION OF COMPLEX - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS, VOL. 17, NO. 3, MAY 2006 755 Continuous-Valued Probabilistic Behavior

    E-print Network

    Huang, Haimei

    information. In addition, although implantable instruments can be minia- turised by reducing transistor sizes, intrinsic electronic noise is expected to grow dramatically as transistor size shrinks to- ward the deep

  2. Approximation and interpolation employing divergence-free radial basis functions with applications 

    E-print Network

    Lowitzsch, Svenja

    2004-09-30

    physical properties be fulfilled, such as a function being divergence free. No such class of radial basis functions that reflects these physical properties was known until 1994, when Narcowich and Ward introduced a family of matrix-valued radial basis...

  3. The Last of the Daley Years Chicago City Council Voting Report #5

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    by regular party "machine" Democrats. This is true even if the Republican Party manages to retain one seat from either the 41st or 45th wards which have the only Republican candidates running. The 2007 ­ 2011

  4. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830

    E-print Network

    -Party Agencies (DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology testing effort. Laboratory and numerical modeling efforts (Truex et al. 2011; Ward et al. 2008; Oostrom et

  5. Hybridization between Invasive Populations of Dalmatian Toadflax (Linaria dalmatica)

    E-print Network

    Hybridization between Invasive Populations of Dalmatian Toadflax (Linaria dalmatica) and Yellow between the parent species. Nomenclature: Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (L.) P. Mill., LINDA Toadflax (Linaria vulgaris) Sarah M. Ward, Caren E. Fleischmann, Marie F. Turner, and Sharlene E. Sing

  6. DEPT NAME DEPT LOCATION CHAIR CHAIR EMAIL STAFF NAME STAFF EMAIL

    E-print Network

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    Barnes abarnes@olemiss.edu 7046 Ginger Dykes gdykes@olemiss.edu 5631 Political Science 133 Deupree Hall History 310 Bishop Dr. Joe Ward jward@olemiss.edu 2052 Modern Languages C-115 Bondurant Dr. Don Dyer

  7. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    elements charged with addressing these types of questions. A major im- petus came during the droughts the RRDM: Dr. Frank Ward of New Mexico State University, Dr. John Loomis of the University of California

  8. The Razing Tide of the Port of New Orleans: Power, Ideology, Economic Growth and the Destruction of Community

    E-print Network

    Azcona, Brian Lloyd

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to a critical diagnosis of Hurricane Katrina s impact on two communities in the New Orleans area: the Lower Ninth Ward and St. Bernard through a systematic inquiry into the built environment ...

  9. NRES 725: Plant Physiological Ecology Spring 2011

    E-print Network

    Nowak, Robert S.

    discrimination, and habitat distribution in boxelder, Acer negundo. Ecology 74:798-815. Dawson TE, Ward JK-specific study of Acer negundo (boxelder) growing under different conditions. Functional Ecology 18:212-222. Scot

  10. 24. DETAIL VIEW IN COAL TOWER No. 1 OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW IN COAL TOWER No. 1 OF THE LEVERS THAT MANIPULATE THE COAL BUCKETS, LOOKING OVER THE BOOM - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Perch exposure and predation risk: a comparative study

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    if they sing in exposed places (Ward and Slater 2005). For instance, male Golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) predominantly select high song perches to enhance their ability to perform visual and vocal

  12. Enrollment Projections for UNC Charlotte: 2020 The Long-Range Enrollment Planning Task Force

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    at the Future of Third Ward," The Charlotte Observer, December 13, 2006, p. 4D. 5 Charlotte Center City Partners collar jobs. In order for the Charlotte region to sustain the current trajectory, UNC Charlotte must play

  13. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 96, No. 3, pp. 11141130, June 2006, doi: 10.1785/0120050080 Optimal Nearly Analytic Discrete Approximation to the Scalar

    E-print Network

    Yang, Dinghui

    1114 Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 96, No. 3, pp. 1114­1130, June 2006 equations have provided useful tools in exploration seismology. In the for- ward modeling, the wave equation

  14. 3/25/2011 12:20 PM Name Company

    E-print Network

    64 Swenson, Sean NCAR 65 Tilmes, Simone NCAR 66 Ward, Daniel Cornell University 67 White, James NCAR, Synte NCAR 53 Ren, Xiaolin NCAR 54 Ricciuto, Daniel Oak Ridge National Laboratory 55 Riley, William

  15. Best foot forward to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    A NINE-STRONG team from Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, is preparing to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to raise money for Elephant ward, which treats children with leukaemia and other cancers. PMID:25858391

  16. 31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  17. 31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  18. 31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  19. 31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  20. 31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  1. 31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  2. 31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  3. 31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  4. 31 CFR 360.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 360.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  5. 31 CFR 353.61 - Payment after death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Minors, Incompetents, Aged Persons, Absentees, et al. § 353.61 Payment after death. After the death of the ward, and at any time prior to the representative's...

  6. 76 FR 64236 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Market, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...earth. * * * * * AEA VA E5 New Market, VA [New] New Market Airport, VA (Lat. 38[deg...a 14.8-mile radius of New Market Airport. Issued in College Park, Georgia, on October 4, 2011. Mark D. Ward, Manager,...

  7. Treatment of Child Abuse Reece Robert Hanson Rochelle Sargent John et al Treatment of Child Abuse 392pp £50 Johns Hopkins University Press 9781421412733 142141273X [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    PACKED WITH useful information, this American text will be invaluable for healthcare professionals who work in mental health, children's wards and emergency departments, as well as social workers and lawyers acting as child advocates. PMID:25746880

  8. EARLY CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT: LIFE AMONG THE SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early Craniofacial Development: Life Among the Signals. Sid Hunter and Keith Ward. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711 Haloacetic acids (HAA) are chemicals formed during drinking water disinfection and present in finished tap water. Exposure o...

  9. The 2006 Illinois General Election A Vote Analysis

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Board of Elections and is funded in part with a grant from AT&T Illinois ­ its author is Institute certain variable is the growing number of Hispanics moving into these wards. Analyzing Hispanic turnout

  10. Z .Marine Geology 160 1999 183196 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermargeo

    E-print Network

    Huh, Chih-An

    . Schematic of regional circulation in the East China and Yellow Seas. #12;( )C.-A. Huh, C.-C. Sur that only a small portion of this sediment load is transported south- Z .ward by the Yellow Sea Coastal

  11. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. NRHH Phone/E-Mail List Spring 2012 All Phone Numbers Begin With the 341 Prefix Unless Otherwise Noted

    E-print Network

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Noted Quadrangle Frank Fitzpatrick Warren Hall Claire Quinn Chris Lupardus Jacob Goldsmith Brittney Abel Staiger Nathan Ward Professional Staff Tina Sheppard Kristi Schulte Joe Jackson Joni Burch Judy Jacobs

  16. Annales Geophysicae (2003) 21: 869879 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Geophysicae

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2003-01-01

    prior to the expansion onset of substorms and decreases after the onset (e.g. Frank and Craven, 1988 for the unloading process (e.g. Burch, 1979). North- ward turnings of the IMF have often been referred

  17. An fMRI investigation of executive function in early psychosis. P. Johnston1

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    An fMRI investigation of executive function in early psychosis. P. Johnston1 , U. Schall1 , P. Ward in a first episode psychosis cohort, 22 healthy controls and 20 first episode patients have been scanned

  18. Automatically Measuring Lexical and Acoustic/Prosodic Convergence in Tutorial Dialog Corpora

    E-print Network

    Litman, Diane J.

    Ward and Diane Litman Learning Research and Development Center University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pa., 15260, USA artward@cs.pitt.edu, litman@cs.pitt.edu Abstract We use language technology to develop corpus

  19. Guide to Understanding Your Sleep Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... numbers," admits Dr. Rochelle Goldberg, a specialist in sleep medicine who is past president of the American Sleep ... from a report of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Task Force, chaired by Dr. W. Ward Flemons, ...

  20. Author's personal copy On non-monotonic rate dependence of stress hysteresis of superelastic shape

    E-print Network

    Sun, Qing-Ping

    -induced for- ward/reverse phase transition with latent heat release/absorption. By solving the convective heat the iso- thermal damping capacity (energy dissipation per unit material volume, i.e., hysteresis loop area

  1. Sensory exploitation as an evolutionary origin to nuptial food gifts in insects

    E-print Network

    Sakaluk, Scott

    of copulation duration (Thornhill 1976b), premature removal of sper- matophores (Sakaluk 1984; Simmons 1986) and internal manipulation of ejaculates (Ward 1993; Eberhard 1996). Because it is in the interests of males

  2. A Hierarchical Clustering Methodology for the Estimation of Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) methodology based on hierarchical clustering was developed to predict toxicological endpoints. This methodology utilizes Ward's method to divide a training set into a series of structurally similar clusters. The structural sim...

  3. Grants Management Contacts

    Cancer.gov

    Please contact the grants management specialist assigned to your institution for questions regarding NCI grants. Institution Assigned Specialist FY 2015 3P Biotechnologies, INC. Scharf, Sarah Adheren, INC. Ward, Rosemary Alabama State University Young,

  4. Bull-switching in African Bovid Herds: Assessing Best Practices for Breeding Management in Waterbuck

    E-print Network

    Jones, Renee Crystal Michelle

    2011-10-21

    systems, such as zoos, males can be separated from females to control breeding. Breeding of a species was managed with procedures such as contraceptives for common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) [Gould and Johnson- Ward, 2000], removal or separation...

  5. Movement Restriction Implications on Potential Welfare Slaughter for Texas High Plains Feedlots

    E-print Network

    Galli, Monica

    2012-02-14

    , seasonal differences in total costs were examined. This study expanded on the High Plains Study conducted by M. Ward, L. Highfield, P. Vongseng, and M. Garner by using their epidemiological data combined with a cost accounting framework to estimate...

  6. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, P. Kent Fairbanks, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, P. Kent Fairbanks, Photographer August, 1968 GENERAL VIEW OF PINE VALLEY. - Pine Valley Ward Chapel, Main & Grass Valley Streets, Pine Valley, Washington County, UT

  7. 77 FR 55893 - Projects Rescinded for Consumptive Uses of Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ...201008071, Ward Township, Tioga County, Pa.; Rescind Date: May 18, 2012. 2. Talisman Energy USA, Inc., Pad ID: 05 069 Porcupine Enterprise, LLC, ABR-201009035, Orwell Township, Bradford County, Pa.; Rescind Date: May 18, 2012. 3....

  8. 5. VIEW OF SITE, AREA B; LOG BUILDING AND BUNKHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SITE, AREA B; LOG BUILDING AND BUNKHOUSE (Features 9 and 10) AT FAR LEFT AND HOUSE (Feature 13) AT CENTER (n.d.) - Gold Dust Mine, Mill & Camp Complex, Wards Gulch, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

  9. Talk for 2nd Year CS students: 28 Jan 2011 University of Birmingham INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Sloman, Aaron

    attention and winning favour. · Competitors for food and mates lead to deception, fighting, warding off't succeed. Videos: Show BigDog (Boston Dynamics): very impressive, but constantly reacting to the immediate

  10. Cognitive and Behavioral Correlates to Overt Behavior Change within a Token Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzesiak, Roy C.; Locke, Bill J.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects were psychiatric patients assigned to a newly formed experimental ward. These results suggest that the overt behavior altered in such programs is accompanied by shifts in cognitive or "internal" aspects of psychological functioning as well. (Author)

  11. You will get well acqua inted with the fishhold in your boat. its arrange-

    E-print Network

    - ward, the propeller shaft passe!> through the fishhold with a shaft box generally built around it and wa hed, and the inside of the shaft box washed . The fish are not butchered in the ~Iaughterhouse

  12. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for

    E-print Network

    LBNL-6152E Lighting energy savings potential of split- pane electrochromic windows controlled Berkeley National Laboratory G. Ward Anyhere Software Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort L

  13. The influence of merged muscle excitation modules on post-stroke hemiparetic walking performance

    E-print Network

    Jessica L. Allen a , Steven A. Kautz b,c , Richard R. Neptune a, a Department of Mechanical Engineering support, for- ward propulsion, mediolateral control and leg swing; Allen and Neptune, 2012; Neptune et al

  14. A TorPath to TorCoin: Proof-of-Bandwidth Altcoins for Compensating Relays

    E-print Network

    Coin, an "altcoin" that uses the Bitcoin protocol to re- ward relays for contributing bandwidth. Relays "mine" TorCoin is an alternative cryptocurrency, or altcoin, based on the Bitcoin protocol [8]. Unlike Bitcoin, its proof

  15. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE RADIAL GATE AT THE OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE RADIAL GATE AT THE OUTLET WORKS AT DAM 96, LOOKING WEST. THE GATE IS IN THE DOWN POSITION, ALLOWING PARTIAL DISCHARGE. - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 96, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Ward County, ND

  16. 78 FR 77777 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ...Eduardo Nunez Michael J. Sawlville Richard Seidel Kyle Smith Kirk C. Ward...Larry Brown Larry E. Carter Eric Cherry Donald Darling David Dibbs Everett...Braaten Stanley Chaskey Keith Dowty Richard B. Grove Richard Hazelwood Wilton F. Marine...

  17. A Spectrum of Oxygen Isotopic Zoning Profiles in CAIs Records Varying Exposure to Distinct Protoplane-tary Disk Environments. J. I. Simon1

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Lawrence

    , and anorthite. The latter are found to- wards the interior along with spinel in concentrations so high instrumental mass fractionation (IMF) and reproducibility by analyses of terrestrial spinel, anorthite

  18. Modeling a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth: CME generation and interplanetary propagation

    E-print Network

    Roussev, Ilia I.

    propagation Ward B. Manchester IV, Tamas I. Gombosi, Ilia Roussev, Aaron Ridley, Darren L. De Zeeuw, I. V, magnetohydrodynamics, space weather Citation: Manchester, W. B., IV, T. I. Gombosi, I. Roussev, A. Ridley, D. L. De

  19. Measurement of ion motion in a shear Alfvn wave Nathan Palmer, Walter Gekelman, and Stephen Vincena

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angles, University of

    . The Freja mission observed strong low frequency electromagnetic spikes with E/ B vA/c in conjunction being field-aligned currents and earth- ward flows of high-energy ion beams. The GEODESIC sounding

  20. INSPIRING GENERATIONS THROUGH KNOWLEDGE AND DISCOVERY Highlights of New Science Discoveries, Research Programs, and Initiatives

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Colombia near the mine. About as thick as a standard dictionary, the turtle's shell may have warded off with world's biggest snake The discovery of a new fossil turtle species in Colombia's Cerrejón coal mine