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1

4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

2

CURRICULUM VITAE GEOFF K. WARD  

E-print Network

CURRICULUM VITAE GEOFF K. WARD Department of Criminology, Law, CA 92697 EMPLOYMENT Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Law Professor, Department of Criminology, Law & Society University of California, Irvine

Brody, James P.

3

15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

4

Hospital ward layout and nurse staffing.  

PubMed

This literature review discusses the evidence that modern wards divided into small bedrooms or bays, require higher nurse staffing levels. Aspects of ward design and operation such as patient privacy, nursing efficiency, patient dependency and ward organization are outlined and methods for establishing staffing levels which take ward design into account are described. The majority of ward evaluation studies concerned with nurse staffing concentrate on two areas, the use of the nurses' time (particularly in travel) and user opinion of wards. The conclusions drawn suggest that the two main measures of ward layout which relate to effective and efficient nursing care are short travel distances and features which facilitate the maximum contact between nurses and patients. Further, how these two principles are incorporated effectively into a ward will depend upon a number of other factors which effect nursing work viz, the number and characteristics of the patients and ward staff and the policies and practices of the nurses themselves. PMID:6749940

Seelye, A

1982-05-01

5

Change Impact Analysis Martin Ward  

E-print Network

Change Impact Analysis Martin Ward STRL Senior Research Fellow Royal Society Industry Fellow martin@gkc.org.uk Software Technology Research Lab De Montfort University #12;Change Impact Analysis Impact analysis of the software system that are affected by the changes #12;Impact Analysis is Essential Impact analysis

Singer, Jeremy

6

Fibonacci Designs Harold N. Ward  

E-print Network

2 and r = y2 , with x; y > 0. Let Ft and Lt be the t-th Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, respectivelyFibonacci Designs Harold N. Ward Department of Mathematics University of Virgnia Charlottesville and the corresponding symmetric designs can be expressed by Fibonacci numbers. Although the question of existence seems

Ward, Harold N.

7

CURRICULUM VITAE GEOFF K. WARD  

E-print Network

, and Personal Convictions to Treatment and Punishment Orientations." Crime and Delinquency vol. 56, n. 1. Geoff, and Essays Geoff Ward (2014). "The Slow Violence of State Organized Race Crime." Theoretical Criminology (2012). "Racialized Crime Control and Societal Exclusion: A Tremendous Problem for Generations" (Invited

Brody, James P.

8

The Cauchy Problem of the Ward equation  

E-print Network

We generalize the results of Villarroel, Fokas and Ioannidou, Dai, Terng and Uhlenbeck to study the inverse scattering problem of the Ward equation with non-small data and solve the Cauchy problem of the Ward equation with a non-small purely continuous scattering data.

Derchyi Wu

2008-06-02

9

Inappropriate admissions to psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

Our seven clinical vignettes illustrate different mechanisms of inappropriate admissions to psychiatric wards and the circumstances and outcome of such admissions, with emphasis on the shared responsibility of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric physicians, the financial consequences, and the implications of such admissions on the profession's public image. Inappropriate admissions create undue tensions and demands on an already overworked psychiatric staff, and raise legitimate issues of quality of care, the need for clinical and administrative guidelines for consultation and transfer, the degree of communication between psychiatry and other specialties, and a host of psychodynamic considerations, somehow overlooked in recent years. The main issue in most cases is the level of communication between the psychiatric and nonpsychiatric camps. Clinical, epidemiologic, and actuarial studies are needed in this area. PMID:4012380

Alarcon, R D; Walter-Ryan, W G; Shaw, L

1985-07-01

10

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward  

E-print Network

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward #12;In 1925. Labconco CorporationLabconco Corporation #12;Laboratory VentilationLaboratory Ventilation #12;Laboratory Ventilation ProductsLaboratory Ventilation Products #12;History of Fume HoodsHistory of Fume Hoods Thomas

Farritor, Shane

11

SUSY Ward identities, superamplitudes and counterterms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ward identities of SUSY and R-symmetry relate n-point amplitudes in supersymmetric theories. We review recent work in which these Ward identities are solved in {\\cal N}=4 SYM and {\\cal N}=8 supergravity. The solution, valid at both tree and loop level, expresses any NKMHV superamplitude in terms of a basis of ordinary amplitudes. Basis amplitudes are classified by semi-standard tableaux of rectangular {\\cal N}×K Young diagrams. The SUSY Ward identities also impose constraints on the matrix elements of candidate ultraviolet counterterms in {\\cal N}=8 supergravity, and they can be studied using superamplitude basis expansions. This leads to a novel and quite comprehensive matrix element approach to counterterms, which we also review. This article is an invited review for a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to 'Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories'.

Elvang, Henriette; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Kiermaier, Michael

2011-11-01

12

"Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

2014-01-01

13

Formal Transformations and WSL Martin Ward  

E-print Network

Formal Transformations and WSL Part Two Martin Ward STRL Senior Research Fellow Royal Society of Transformations #12;Types of Transformations A Syntactic Transformation changes the syntax of the program but preserves the exact sequence of operations carried out by the program. Many restructuring transformations

Singer, Jeremy

14

Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

Chandler, Daniel Ross

15

Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Philip S. Ward  

E-print Network

Chapter 1 Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Evolution Philip S. Ward 1.1 Introduction Since their origin features of evolutionary history. Species-level taxonomy has advanced more fitfully than ant phylogenetics and features of their biology are dis- cussed. The state of species-level taxonomy is eval- uated

Ward, Philip S.

16

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF INDIVIDUAL FUNDS OF MEMBERS OF THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving...

2013-04-01

17

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

...ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF INDIVIDUAL FUNDS OF MEMBERS OF THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving...

2014-04-01

18

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF INDIVIDUAL FUNDS OF MEMBERS OF THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving...

2010-04-01

19

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF INDIVIDUAL FUNDS OF MEMBERS OF THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving...

2012-04-01

20

25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ACTIVITIES DEPOSIT AND EXPENDITURE OF INDIVIDUAL FUNDS OF MEMBERS OF THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving...

2011-04-01

21

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

22

Entanglement Entropy Flow and the Ward Identity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive differential equations for the flow of entanglement entropy as a function of the metric and the couplings of the theory. The variation of the universal part of entanglement entropy under a local Weyl transformation is related to the variation under a local change in the couplings. We show that this relation is, in fact, equivalent to the trace Ward identity. As a concrete application of our formalism, we express the entanglement entropy for massive free fields as a two-point function of the energy-momentum tensor.

Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Smolkin, Michael

2014-12-01

23

Solution to the Ward identities for superamplitudes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supersymmetry and R-symmetry Ward identities relate on-shell amplitudes in a supersymmetric field theory. We solve these Ward identities for N K MHV amplitudes of the maximally supersymmetric mathcal{N} = 4 and mathcal{N} = 8 theories. The resulting superamplitude is written in a new, manifestly supersymmetric and R-invariant form: it is expressed as a sum of very simple SUSY and {text{SU}}{left( mathcal{N} right)_R} -invariant Grassmann polynomials, each multiplied by a “basis amplitude”. For N K MHV n-point superamplitudes the number of basis amplitudes is equal to the dimension of the irreducible representation of SU( n - 4) corresponding to the rectangular Young diagram with mathcal{N} columns and K rows. The linearly independent amplitudes in this algebraic basis may still be functionally related by permutation of momenta. We show how cyclic and reflection symmetries can be used to obtain a smaller functional basis of color-ordered single-trace amplitudes in mathcal{N} = 4 gauge theory. We also analyze the more significant reduction that occurs in mathcal{N} = 8 supergravity because gravity amplitudes are not ordered. All results are valid at both tree and loop level.

Elvang, Henriette; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Kiermaier, Michael

2010-10-01

24

18. View looking NE up corridor showing Wards Island Viaduct ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. View looking NE up corridor showing Wards Island Viaduct in foreground and Randalls Island Viaduct in background. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 8.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

25

Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity.  

SciTech Connect

The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

Chang, L.; Liu, Y.-X.; Roberts, C. D.; Shi, Y.-M.; Sun, W.-M.; Zong, H.-S.; Physics; Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics; Peking Univ.; National Lab. of Heavy Ion Accelerator; Univ. of New South Wales; Nanjing Univ.; Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology

2009-03-01

26

Ward Identity Implies Recursion Relation at Tree and Loop Level  

E-print Network

In this article, we use Ward identity to calculate tree and one loop level off shell amplitudes in pure Yang-Mills theory with a pair of external lines complexified. We explicitly prove Ward identity at tree and one loop level using Feynman rules, and then give recursion relations for the off shell amplitudes. We find that the cancellation details in the proof of Ward identity simplifies our derivation of the recursion relations. Then we calculate three and four point one loop off shell amplitudes as examples of our method.

Yun Zhang; Gang Chen

2012-07-15

27

Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.  

PubMed

Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. PMID:24768090

Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

2014-11-01

28

The facies, depositional environment, and cyclicity of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian), North Ward-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas. LEA S Lrntnttten 0 S I I I P ARSON cnlreen G A~ N E S e L 1 k e k ee t ~E ttotetrrne( kS+~ l Hentrh Oeeparrctr u reerlerro Porker ruternoa C7 I r Ncornten T c rem rr rln I Snort Hille ( 1 W A R, I...THE FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT, AND CYCLICITY OF THE QUEEN FORMATION (GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN), NORTH WARD-ESTES FIELD, WARD COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL GARY EIDE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University...

Eide, Michael Gary

2012-06-07

29

Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Ward Field and grandstand (Facility S 1009), looking toward Recreation Center portion of Facility 161 (visible below tree canopy). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Recreational Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

30

1. ON HILLSIDE ABOVE ADDITIONAL WARDS AND OFFICES, SHOWING WOOD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. ON HILLSIDE ABOVE ADDITIONAL WARDS AND OFFICES, SHOWING WOOD FRAME CORRIDORS TO REAR - Fort Randall, Latrine & Bath, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

31

JOURNAL OF CONFLICT RESOLUTIONShin, Ward / POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY Lost in Space  

E-print Network

1995) or for a collection of states such as less developed countries (e.g., Atesoglu and Mueller 1991 growth in geographic regions such as Europe (e.g., Avramides 1997), the Middle East (e.g., Ward and Cohen

32

Elevation of north facades of #156158 (triple wards) National ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Elevation of north facades of #156-158 (triple wards) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

33

18. INTERIOR OF WARD ROOM WITH RUDDER QUADRANT AND SHAFT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. INTERIOR OF WARD ROOM WITH RUDDER QUADRANT AND SHAFT LOCATED ABOVE. NOTE WIRE ROPE ALONG CEILING WHICH RUNS DIRECT TO WHEEL MECHANISM. - Lightship 116, Pier 3, Inner Harbor, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

34

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

35

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

36

Ward rounds are an essential component of good basic care.  

PubMed

In my day, we called intentional rounding 'ward rounds' or 'the back round'. It puzzles me that the prime minister is championing a £450,000 study to see if they lead to better care (News December 17). PMID:25605106

Smith, Joan

2015-01-21

37

Bacterial Resistance to Trimethoprim in Geriatric Medical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by organisms resistant to trimethoprim (TMP), as well as their faecal carriage were studied in two geriatric wards. TMP-resistant UTI was common (26 and 50% of admission and ward-acquired infections, respectively) and was associated with male sex, recurrent and transferred admissions and length of stay. There was a strong relationship between faecal carriage and isolation

M. J. Bendall; S. Ebrahim; R. G. Finch; R. C. B. Slack; K. J. Towner

1989-01-01

38

Why patients need leaders: introducing a ward safety checklist.  

PubMed

The safety and consistency of the care given to hospital inpatients has recently become a particular political and public concern. The traditional 'ward round' presents an obvious opportunity for systematically and collectively ensuring that proper standards of care are being achieved for individual patients. This paper describes the design and implementation of a 'ward safety checklist' that defines a set of potential risk factors that should be checked on a daily basis, and offers multidisciplinary teams a number of prompts for sharing and clarifying information between themselves, and with the patient, during a round. The concept of the checklist and the desire to improve ward rounds were well received in many teams, but the barriers to adoption were informative about the current culture on many inpatient wards. Although the 'multidisciplinary ward round' is widely accepted as good practice, the medical and nursing staff in many teams are failing to coordinate their workloads well enough to make multidisciplinary rounds a working reality. 'Nursing' and 'medical' care on the ward have become 'de-coupled' and the potential consequences for patient safety and good communication are largely self-evident. This problem is further complicated by a medical culture which values the primacy of clinical autonomy and as a result can be resistant to perceived attempts to 'systematize' medical care through instruments such as checklists. PMID:22977047

Amin, Yogen; Grewcock, Dave; Andrews, Steve; Halligan, Aidan

2012-09-01

39

The Ventilation, Heating and Lighting of Hospital Wards  

PubMed Central

History of ventilation in last 100 years, showing reversal of ideas and influence of sanatorium idea. Physiology of cool moving air. How it affects metabolism, heat-loss and heat-production. Relation to sunlight. Reactive capacity of the individual. Practice of these teachings, as illustrated by sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis and by open-air schools. Exposure to cooling air a powerful therapeutic agent. Infrequent occurrence in sanatoria of diseases or complications often ascribed to cold. Dilution of infection. Applicability to diseases other than tuberculosis. Shock and old age. Perflation and diffusion, their relative values. Uniformity or variability of effect desirable? Incompatibility of good ventilation and ordinary standards of heating. Former the more important. Conclusion that ward temperatures may be lowered without harm. Measures necessary to compensate, clothing, classification of patients, small wards. Changing standards of comfort. Psychological effects. Systems of ventilation in hospital wards. Mechanical by propulsion or extraction being displaced by natural system, usually by cross-window ventilation. Supplementary ventilators. Objection to heating of incoming air. Fallibility of human factor in management. Sash versus casement windows. Hoppers. Austral window. Orientation and exposure of wards. Ventilation of small wards. Proportion of window space to solid wall. Balconies. Floor space. Heating of wards. Heating of air or floor or walls. Open fires. Value of radiant heat. Steam or water under low or high pressure. Radiators or pipes. Lighting. Avoidance of glare from windows. Arrangement of beds in wards. Colour of walls. Blinds and curtains. Artificial lighting. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:19989481

Watt, James

1933-01-01

40

Non-perturbative Renormalization Constants using Ward Identities  

E-print Network

We extend the application of axial Ward identities to calculate $b_A, b_P$ and $b_T$, coefficients that give the mass dependence of the renormalization constants of the corresponding bilinear operators in the quenched theory. The extension relies on using operators with non-degenerate quark masses. It allows a complete determination of the O(a) improvement coefficients for bilinears in the quenched approximation using Ward Identities alone. Only the scale dependent normalization constants $Z_P^0$ (or $Z_S^0$) and $Z_T$ are undetermined. We present results of a pilot numerical study using hadronic correlators.

Tanmoy Bhattacharya; Shailesh Chandrasekharan; Rajan Gupta; Weonjong Lee; Stephen Sharpe

1999-04-26

41

Non-perturbative Renormalization Constants using Ward Identities  

E-print Network

We extend the application of vector and axial Ward identities to calculate $b_A$, $b_P$ and $b_T$, coefficients that give the mass dependence of the renormalization constants of the corresponding bilinear operators in the quenched theory. The extension relies on using operators with non-degenerate quark masses. It allows a complete determination of the $O(a)$ improvement coefficients for bilinears in the quenched approximation using Ward Identities alone. Only the scale dependent normalization constants $Z_P^0$ (or $Z_S^0$) and $Z_T$ are undetermined. We present results of a pilot numerical study using hadronic correlators.

T. Bhattacharya; S. Chandrasekharan; R. Gupta; W. Lee; S. Sharpe

1998-10-07

42

Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author  

E-print Network

number of refused admissions, particularly for smaller units. Queuing theory is used to quantify, refused admissions, capacity management, clinical wards, queuing models, Erlang loss model 2 #12 occupancy levels instead of service level standards (e.g. percentage of refused admissions, waiting time etc

43

TILTING SATURN. I. ANALYTIC MODEL William R. Ward  

E-print Network

TILTING SATURN. I. ANALYTIC MODEL William R. Ward Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research@astro.umd.edu Receivved 2003 December 30; accepted 2004 July 15 ABSTRACT The tilt of Saturn's spin axis to its orbit plane to gravitational perturbations of Saturn by the planet Neptune. A similarity between the precession period

Hamilton, Douglas P.

44

17. New York Connecting Railroad: Little Hell Gate Bridge. Wards ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. New York Connecting Railroad: Little Hell Gate Bridge. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 8.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

45

75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-RO4-SFUND-2010-1053, FRL-9243-2] Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County...past response costs concerning the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh...SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the...

2010-12-27

46

78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...9788-2; CERCLA-04-2013-3754] Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County...entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh...Submit your comments by Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the...

2013-03-06

47

Ward-based clinical teaching in gynaecology: principles and practice.  

PubMed

Clinical teaching on the wards remains a prime method of educational instruction. Despite changes in modern educational climate and patient expectations, its value is still irrefutable. There is evidence to suggest that such teaching is beneficial to students and patients alike. This paper describes the planning and delivery steps of a ward-based teaching session with 'pregnancy of unknown location' as an example. The organisation, following-up and feedback after the session are also mentioned. We have discussed the models applicable to clinical teaching and explored ways how the 'microskill' technique could be potentially used in such a situation. The paper also focuses on the use of clinical reasoning processes. Finally, the six domains of knowledge necessary to become a good preceptor have been applied to the session. A good teaching exercise is moored to sound pedagogical principles. Its success relies on mutual trust and understanding between the teacher and the taught. PMID:20701497

Mukhopadhyay, S; Smith, S

2010-01-01

48

Ward Identities for Transport in 2+1 Dimensions  

E-print Network

We use the Ward identities corresponding to general linear transformations, and derive relations between transport coefficients of $(2+1)$-dimensional systems. Our analysis includes relativistic and Galilean invariant systems, as well as systems without boost invariance such as Lifshitz theories. We consider translation invariant, as well as broken translation invariant cases, and include an external magnetic field. Our results agree with effective theory relations of incompressible Hall fluid, and with holographic calculations in a magnetically charged black hole background.

Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

2015-01-01

49

Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee  

E-print Network

Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

Walter, Frederick M.

50

Drug administration errors in paediatric wards: a direct observation approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paediatric patients are more vulnerable to drug administration errors due to a lack of appropriate drug dosages and strengths\\u000a for use in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the extent and types of drug administration\\u000a errors in two paediatric wards and to identify measures to reduce such errors. A researcher was stationed

Siew Siang Chua; Hui Ming Chua; Asma Omar

2010-01-01

51

Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

2014-01-01

52

Surgical ward rounds in England: a trainee-led multi-centre study of current practice  

PubMed Central

Background Recent guidance advocates daily consultant-led ward rounds, conducted in the morning with the presence of senior nursing staff and minimising patients on outlying wards. These recommendations aim to improve patient management through timely investigations, treatment and discharge. This study sought to evaluate the current surgical ward round practices in England. Methods Information regarding timing and staffing levels of surgical ward rounds was collected prospectively over a one-week period. The location of each patient was also documented. Two surgical trainee research collaboratives coordinated data collection from 19 hospitals and 13 surgical subspecialties. Results Data from 471 ward rounds involving 5622 patient encounters was obtained. 367 (77.9%) ward rounds commenced before 9am. Of 422 weekday rounds, 190 (45%) were consultant-led compared with 33 of the 49 (67%) weekend rounds. 2474 (44%) patients were seen with a nurse present. 1518 patients (27%) were classified as outliers, with 361 ward rounds (67%) reporting at least one outlying patient. Conclusion Recommendations for daily consultant-led multi disciplinary ward rounds are poorly implemented in surgical practice, and patients continue to be managed on outlying wards. Although strategies may be employed to improve nursing attendance on ward rounds, substantial changes to workforce planning would be required to deliver daily consultant-led care. An increasing political focus on patient outcomes at weekends may prompt changes in these areas. PMID:24581228

2014-01-01

53

Risk stratification of hospitalized patients on the wards.  

PubMed

Patients who suffer adverse events on the wards, such as cardiac arrest and death, often have vital sign abnormalities hours before the event. Early warning scores have been developed with the aim of identifying clinical deterioration early and have been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. In this review, we discuss recently developed and validated risk scores for use on the general inpatient wards. In addition, we compare newly developed systems with more established risk scores such as the Modified Early Warning Score and the criteria used in the Medical Early Response Intervention and Therapy (MERIT) trial in our database of > 59,000 ward admissions. In general we found the single-parameter systems, such as the MERIT criteria, to have the lowest predictive accuracy for adverse events, whereas the aggregate weighted scoring systems had the highest. The Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (CART) score was best for predicting cardiac arrest, ICU transfer, and a composite outcome (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78, respectively), whereas the Standardized Early Warning Score, VitalPAC Early Warning Score, and CART score were similar for predicting mortality (AUC, 0.88). Selection of a risk score for a hospital or health-care system should be guided by available variables, calculation method, and system resources. Once implemented, ensuring high levels of adherence and tying them to specific levels of interventions, such as activation of a rapid response team, are necessary to allow for the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. PMID:23732586

Churpek, Matthew M; Yuen, Trevor C; Edelson, Dana P

2013-06-01

54

Risk Stratification of Hospitalized Patients on the Wards  

PubMed Central

Patients who suffer adverse events on the wards, such as cardiac arrest and death, often have vital sign abnormalities hours before the event. Early warning scores have been developed with the aim of identifying clinical deterioration early and have been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. In this review, we discuss recently developed and validated risk scores for use on the general inpatient wards. In addition, we compare newly developed systems with more established risk scores such as the Modified Early Warning Score and the criteria used in the Medical Early Response Intervention and Therapy (MERIT) trial in our database of > 59,000 ward admissions. In general we found the single-parameter systems, such as the MERIT criteria, to have the lowest predictive accuracy for adverse events, whereas the aggregate weighted scoring systems had the highest. The Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage (CART) score was best for predicting cardiac arrest, ICU transfer, and a composite outcome (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78, respectively), whereas the Standardized Early Warning Score, VitalPAC Early Warning Score, and CART score were similar for predicting mortality (AUC, 0.88). Selection of a risk score for a hospital or health-care system should be guided by available variables, calculation method, and system resources. Once implemented, ensuring high levels of adherence and tying them to specific levels of interventions, such as activation of a rapid response team, are necessary to allow for the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. PMID:23732586

Churpek, Matthew M.; Yuen, Trevor C.

2013-01-01

55

The productive ward and the productive operating theatre.  

PubMed

A new approach: The Productive Ward, facilitates removal of time wastage in a busy modern hospital. The lessons learnt from this system are potentially generic and can be applied to other departments, such as in the operating theatres. Inherent to this innovative approach are the 'lean' principles that are now spreading across many organisational settings. Womack et al (1990) set out the key steps to organising companies to deliver value to their customers. We now apply those principles and witness the value to patient care. PMID:21488461

Bloodworth, Kerry

2011-03-01

56

Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains  

SciTech Connect

Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

Costa, L. C. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André (Brazil)] [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André (Brazil); Ferraz, A. [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, International Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59012-970 Natal (Brazil)] [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, International Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59012-970 Natal (Brazil); Mastropietro, Vieri [Dipartimento di Matematica F. Enriques, Universitá di Milano, Via C. Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Matematica F. Enriques, Universitá di Milano, Via C. Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2013-12-15

57

Quadratic Isocurvature Cross-Correlation, Ward Identity, and Dark Matter  

E-print Network

Sources of isocurvature perturbations and large non-Gaussianities include field degrees of freedom whose vacuum expectation values are smaller than the expansion rate of inflation. The inhomogeneities in the energy density of such fields are quadratic in the fields to leading order in the inhomogeneity expansion. Although it is often assumed that such isocurvature perturbations and inflaton-driven curvature perturbations are uncorre- lated, this is not obvious from a direct computational point of view due to the form of the minimal gravitational interactions. We thus compute the irreducible gravitational contributions to the quadratic isocurvature-curvature cross-correlation. We find a small but non-decaying cross-correlation, which in principle serves as a consistency prediction of this large class of isocurvature perturbations. We apply our cross-correlation result to two dark matter isocurvature perturbation scenarios: QCD axions and WIMPZILLAs. On the technical side, we utilize a gravita- tional Ward identity in a novel manner to demonstrate the gauge invariance of the computation. Furthermore, the detailed computation is interpreted in terms of a soft-{\\zeta} theorem and a gravitational Ward identity. Finally, we also identify explicitly all the counterterms that are necessary for renormalizing the isocurvature perturbation composite operator in inflationary cosmological backgrounds.

Daniel J. H. Chung; Hojin Yoo; Peng Zhou

2013-03-25

58

The impact of twice-daily consultant ward rounds on the length of stay in two general medical wards.  

PubMed

Excess average length of stay (ALoS) not only results in an increased cost to hospitals but also increases the risk of hospital-acquired infection and thromboembolism. Various factors suggested to affect ALoS have yet to demonstrate a significant impact in clinical practice. Increased consultant input has been identified as an important factor influencing ALoS. As a result, a radical and innovative consultant job plan, replacing twice-weekly with twice-daily ward rounds (WRs) on a university teaching hospital's two medical words has been designed. The number of discharges (NoDs) significantly increased (p < 0.01), ALoS reduced (p < 0.01), whereas, readmission rate and mortality remained unchanged (p = NS) over 12 months following twice-daily WRs compared to two other wards with twice-weekly WRs. This innovative model resulted in almost doubling the NoDs and halving the ALoS. This study suggests that ALoS can be reduced and sustained with a cultural and behavioural shift in consultant working patterns, without affecting readmission rate or inpatient mortality. PMID:22268301

Ahmad, Aftab; Purewal, Tejpal S; Sharma, Dushyant; Weston, Philip J

2011-12-01

59

Application of the Weka Machine Learning Library to Hospital Ward Occupancy Problems  

E-print Network

Application of the Weka Machine Learning Library to Hospital Ward Occupancy Problems Ian Harris1 the Weka machine learning library and three years of historical ward occupancy data from Rockyview Hospital. We use Weka's classi- fier algorithms and the Rockyview data to build a model of patient flow through

Denzinger, Jörg

60

Early detection of postoperative delirium and confusion in a surgical ward using the NEECHAM confusion scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The early detection and prevention of postoperative delirium and confusion has become an important issue in surgical ward management. With the aim of determining an objective technique for early detection of delirium, 64 patients admitted to a surgical ward before surgery were examined using the NEECHAM confusion scale. On the 2nd postoperative day they were tested again and divided into

Toshiko Matsushita; Eisuke Matsushima; Michio Maruyama

2004-01-01

61

The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines  

PubMed Central

Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. Images PMID:13687726

Bate, J. G.

1961-01-01

62

Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

2013-01-01

63

Modeling Dependencies in International Relations Peter D. Ho# and Michael D. Ward  

E-print Network

evidence to the contrary. The geopolitical perspective that undergirds a realist perspective on politics: www.stat.washington.edu/ho#. Michael Ward is Professor of Political Science, Department of Political University of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195 Michael D. Ward Political Science University of Washington

Hoff, Peter

64

Modeling Dependencies in International Relations Peter D. Hoff and Michael D. Ward  

E-print Network

evidence to the contrary. The geopolitical perspective that undergirds a realist perspective on politics: www.stat.washington.edu/hoff. Michael Ward is Professor of Political Science, Department of Political University of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195 Michael D. Ward Political Science University of Washington

Hoff, Peter

65

Reclaiming Mrs. Wilfrid Ward's The Job Secretary: Metafiction and Female Authorship  

Microsoft Academic Search

MRS. WILFRID WARD'S reputation has suffered unjustly since her death and her name does not appear in the most recent encyclopedias of women's writing.1 One likely reason for this oblivion lies in Mrs. Ward's commitment to her Catholic beliefs and in her deep conviction that her fiction should somehow enhance those beliefs, just at a time (the turn of the

Maria Carla Martino

2006-01-01

66

Medication errors in hospital: computerized unit dose drug dispensing system versus ward stock distribution system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rates and types of drug prescription and administration errors in one pediatric nephrology ward, comparing two dispensing schemes : the first one defined as handwritten prescription plus ward stock distribution system (WSDS), and the second one as computerized prescription plus unit dose drug dispensing system (UDDDS). Method: Data were collected

Jean-Eudes Fontan; Vincent Maneglier; V. X. Nguyen; F. Brion; C. Loirat

2003-01-01

67

An evaluation of antiseptics used for hand disinfection in wards.  

PubMed Central

The antibacterial effectiveness of hand antiseptics commonly used in wards was studied by laboratory and in-use tests and their acceptability assessed by means of a questionnaire passed to hospital staff. To determine the immediate and long-term antibacterial effects of the preparations the in-use tests were performed by groups of students. The greatest immediate reduction in bacterial counts on hands was obtained by products containing chlorhexidine. The long-term antibacterial effect was recorded with emulsions containing 3% hexachlorophane, 2% Irgasan CF3R or 4% chlorhexidine when used constantly on several consecutive days. Considerable discrepancies were recorded in the antibacterial effectiveness of some preparations when comparing laboratory and in-use test results. Therefore it is suggested that antiseptics should be tested by in-use tests which more closely resemble practical conditions before their use, or further trial, in hospital. PMID:812901

Ojajärvi, J.

1976-01-01

68

$B_7$, $B_8$ and chiral Ward identities  

E-print Network

We present recent progress in understanding weak matrix elements on the lattice. We use HYP staggered fermions in quenched QCD to study numerically various properties of the $K^+\\to\\pi^+$ amplitudes of the electroweak penguin operators $Q_7$ and $Q_8$. We check chiral Ward identities to probe the validity of using improved staggered fermions in the calculation of weak matrix elements. We address the issue of mixing with unphysical lower dimension operators, which causes a divergent term in the case of the $\\Delta I = 1/2$ amplitudes. We propose a particular subtraction method as the best choice. We also measure the gold-plated ratio $R$ originally suggested by Becirevic and Villadoro.

Weonjong Lee; George T. Fleming

2005-09-30

69

Room for improvement: noise on a maternity ward.  

PubMed

BackgroundFor mothers who have just given birth, the postpartum hospital stay is meant to promote an environment where resting, healing and bonding can take place. New mothers, however, face many interruptions throughout the day including multiple visitors and noise caused by medical equipment, corridor conversations and intercom announcements. This paper argues that disruptions and noise on a maternity ward are detrimental to the healing process for new mothers and their newborns and healthcare decision-makers need to act to improve the environment for these patients. This paper also provides recommendations on how to reduce the noise levels, or at least control the noise on a maternity ward, through the implementation of a daily quiet time.DiscussionHospital disruptions and its negative health effects in particular for new mothers and their children are illustrated in this paper. Hospital noise and interruptions act as a stressor for both new mothers and staff, and can lead to sleep deprivation and detrimental cardiovascular health effects. Sleep deprivation is associated with a number of negative mental and physical health consequences such as decreased immune function, vascular dysfunction and increased sympathetic cardiovascular modulation. Sleep deprivation can also increase the risk of postpartum mental health disorders in new mothers. Some efforts have been made to reduce the disruptions experienced by these patients within a hospital setting. For example, the introduction of a daily quiet time is one way of controlling noise levels and interruptions, however, these have mostly been implemented in intensive care units.SummaryNoise and disruptions are a significant problem during postpartum hospital stay. Healthcare institutions are responsible for patient-centered care; a quiet time intervention promises to contribute to a safe, healing environment in hospitals. PMID:25432130

Adatia, Safina; Law, Susan; Haggerty, Jeannie

2014-11-29

70

Variability in Costs across Hospital Wards. A Study of Chinese Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Introduction Analysts estimating the costs or cost-effectiveness of health interventions requiring hospitalization often cut corners because they lack data and the costs of undertaking full step-down costing studies are high. They sometimes use the costs taken from a single hospital, sometimes use simple rules of thumb for allocating total hospital costs between general inpatient care and the outpatient department, and sometimes use the average cost of an inpatient bed-day instead of a ward-specific cost. Purpose In this paper we explore for the first time the extent and the causes of variation in ward-specific costs across hospitals, using data from China. We then use the resulting model to show how ward-specific costs for hospitals outside the data set could be estimated using information on the determinants identified in the paper. Methodology Ward-specific costs estimated using step-down costing methods from 41 hospitals in 12 provinces of China were used. We used seemingly unrelated regressions to identify the determinants of variability in the ratio of the costs of specific wards to that of the outpatient department, and explain how this can be used to generate ward-specific unit costs. Findings Ward-specific unit costs varied considerably across hospitals, ranging from 1 to 24 times the unit cost in the outpatient department — average unit costs are not a good proxy for costs at specialty wards in general. The most important sources of variability were the number of staff and the level of capacity utilization. Practice Implications More careful hospital costing studies are clearly needed. In the meantime, we have shown that in China it is possible to estimate ward-specific unit costs taking into account key determinants of variability in costs across wards. This might well be a better alternative than using simple rules of thumb or using estimates from a single study. PMID:24874566

Adam, Taghreed; Evans, David B.; Ying, Bian; Murray, Christopher J. L.

2014-01-01

71

PUBLICATIONS [1] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, NASEC-  

E-print Network

PUBLICATIONS [1] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, NASEC­400. [4] M. J. Ward, F. M. Odeh, D. S. Cohen, Asymptotic Methods for MOSFET Modeling, SIAM J. Appl. Math. J. Ward, Low-Voltage Backscattered Electron Collection for Package Substrates and Integrated

Jellinek, Mark

72

From ward-based critical care to educational curriculum 2: a focussed ethnographic case study.  

PubMed

The earlier published literature review (Part 1) identified the limits of our current understanding of the context of ward-based critical care nursing. Critical care curriculum for acute ward nurses, which will have to develop as part of meeting the mandates for 'training' outlined in Comprehensive Critical Care [Comprehensive Critical Care: a Review of Adult Critical Care Services (2000) Department of Health], will benefit from greater understanding of the culture and context of ward-based critical care nursing. In this, Part 2, the methods and findings of a focussed ethnographic case study are presented. The study explored, in depth, the culture and context of ward-based critical care in one acute surgical ward. Seven nurses were interviewed about their experiences of caring for critically ill ward patients. The data were analysed with a view to exploring what knowledge and skills were 'compatible' with the nurses' perceived role and the 'practical applicability' and 'relative advantage' of such knowledge for these practitioners. The context of ward care was found to be busy and contradictory for the nurses. The concepts central to this study; 'compatibility', 'practical applicability' and 'relative advantage' [Communication of Innovations (1971) The Free Press] were found to be complex concepts when studied in relation to real life clinical practice. PMID:12487434

Cutler, Lee R

2002-10-01

73

Randomised trial of infant sleep location on the postnatal ward  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether postnatal mother–infant sleep proximity affects breastfeeding initiation and infant safety. Design Randomised non?blinded trial analysed by intention to treat. Setting Postnatal wards of the Royal Victoria Hospital (RVI), Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Participants 64 newly delivered mother–infant dyads with a prenatal intention to breastfeed (vaginal deliveries, no intramuscular or intravenous opiate analgesics taken in the preceding 24?h). Intervention Infants were randomly allocated to one of three sleep conditions: baby in mother's bed with cot?side; baby in side?car crib attached to mother's bed; and baby in stand?alone cot adjacent to mother's bed. Main outcome measures Breastfeeding frequency and infant safety observed via night?time video recordings. Results During standardised 4?h observation periods, bed and side?car crib infants breastfed more frequently than stand?alone cot infants (mean difference (95% confidence interval (CI)): bed v stand?alone cot?=?2.56 (0.72 to 4.41); side?car crib v stand?alone cot?=?2.52 (0.87 to 4.17); bed v side?car crib?=?0.04 (?2.10 to 2.18)). No infant experienced adverse events; however, bed infants were more frequently considered to be in potentially adverse situations (mean difference (95% CI): bed v stand?alone cot?=?0.13 (0.03 to 0.23); side?car crib v stand?alone cot?=?0.04 (?0.03 to 0.12); bed v side?car crib?=?0.09 (?0.03–0.21)). No differences were observed in duration of maternal or infant sleep, frequency or duration of assistance provided by staff, or maternal rating of postnatal satisfaction. Conclusion Suckling frequency in the early postpartum period is a well?known predictor of successful breastfeeding initiation. Newborn babies sleeping in close proximity to their mothers (bedding?in) facilitates frequent feeding in comparison with rooming?in. None of the three sleep conditions was associated with adverse events, although infrequent, potential risks may have occurred in the bed group. Side?car cribs are effective in enhancing breastfeeding initiation and preserving infant safety in the postnatal ward. PMID:16849364

Ball, H L; Ward?Platt, M P; Heslop, E; Leech, S J; Brown, K A

2006-01-01

74

Hospital ward design and prevention of hospital-acquired infections: A prospective clinical trial  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Renovation of a general medical ward provided an opportunity to study health care facility design as a factor for preventing hospital-acquired infections. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a hospital ward designed with predominantly single rooms was associated with lower event rates of hospital-acquired infection and colonization. METHODS: A prospective controlled trial with patient allocation incorporating randomness was designed with outcomes on multiple ‘historic design’ wards (mainly four-bed rooms with shared bathrooms) compared with outcomes on a newly renovated ‘new design’ ward (predominantly single rooms with private bathrooms). RESULTS: Using Poisson regression analysis and adjusting for time at risk, there were no differences (P=0.18) in the primary outcome (2.96 versus 1.85 events/1000 patient-days, respectively). After adjustment for age, sex, Charlson score, admitted from care facility, previous hospitalization within six months, isolation requirement and the duration on antibiotics, the incidence rate ratio was 1.44 (95% CI 0.71 to 2.94) for the new design versus the historic design wards. A restricted analysis on the numbers of events occurring in single-bed versus multibed wings within the new design ward revealed an event incidence density of 1.89 versus 3.47 events/1000 patient-days, respectively (P=0.18), and an incidence rate ratio of 0.54 (95% CI 0.15 to 1.30). CONCLUSIONS: No difference in the incidence density of hospital-acquired infections or colonizations was observed for medical patients admitted to a new design ward versus historic design wards. A restricted analysis of events occurring in single-bed versus multibed wings suggests that ward design warrants further study. PMID:25371689

Ellison, Jennifer; Southern, Danielle; Holton, Donna; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wallace, Jean; Faris, Peter; Ghali, William A; Conly, John

2014-01-01

75

The sound of silence--nurses' non-verbal interaction within the ward round.  

PubMed

This study describes nurses' non-verbal interaction in the ward round within intensive care. Data were collected through participant observation, fieldwork notes and ethnographic interview techniques from eight intensive care nurses. This article focuses on the themes 'Being there', 'Knowing the script', 'Knowing what you want from the ward round' and 'Silencing and gaze', which emerged from the data. A key issue highlighted in this study is that nurses need to recognize their contribution to patient management decisions within the ward round. Drawing from the data, educational and training strategies are suggested to enhance collaborative practice in the clinical setting of intensive care. PMID:14725388

Hill, Karen

2003-01-01

76

Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.  

PubMed

This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of 11 interrelated concepts emerged from an analysis of the data, and a synthesis of the main themes. This paper focuses on the results and recommendations that emerged from the quantitative and qualitative patient data. A further paper will focus on nurses' perceptions of the same topics. PMID:16965473

Alexander, J

2006-10-01

77

Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. Purpose To provide insights into students’ experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. Methods A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. Results The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students’ anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. Conclusion On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students’ support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians. PMID:25278789

Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

2014-01-01

78

Learning clinical communication on ward-rounds: an ethnographic case study  

E-print Network

communication on the ward-round. We assumed that partici- pation in routine workplace practices was key to learning (Billetts 2011). Sensitising concepts from the disciplinary traditions of the ethnography of communication informed the analysis (Hymes 1996... 2014, 1–6, Early Online Learning clinical communication on ward-rounds: An ethnographic case study SALLY QUILLIGAN University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, UK Abstract Objective: To explore what factors influence student...

Quilligan, Sally

2014-08-26

79

Detection of prescription errors by a unit-based clinical pharmacist in a nephrology ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the impact of a clinical pharmacist on detection and prevention of prescription errors at the nephrology ward\\u000a of a referral hospital. Setting: Nephrology ward of a major referral hospital in Southern Iran. Method: During a 4-month period, a clinical pharmacist was assigned to review medication order sheets and drug orders three times\\u000a a week at the nephrology

Ghazal Vessal

2010-01-01

80

Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation  

PubMed Central

Background Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care. Methods/design The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants. Discussion This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability. Trial registration (NCT01912001). PMID:24528505

2014-01-01

81

The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Design Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Setting Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Participants Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Intervention Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Main outcome measure Median survival time of a chocolate. Results 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R2=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). Conclusions From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors. Further practical studies are needed. PMID:24333986

2013-01-01

82

Exploring the potential impact of hospital ward-based pharmacy interns on drug safety.  

PubMed

Clinical pharmacists play an important role in improving drug safety on hospital wards. However, little is known about the impact of pharmacy interns. The objective of our study was, therefore, to investigate the impact of hospital ward-based pharmacy interns on drug safety. This study was conducted as part of the project "P-STAT 2: Pharmacy interns on the ward" on 14 surgical wards in seven hospitals in Germany and a total of 27 pharmacy interns participated. All patients admitted to the participating wards from 1st June 2008 until 31st October 2008 and from 1st December 2008 till 30th April 2009 were included. The pharmacy interns were involved in medication reconciliation, and identifying, resolving, and preventing drug-related problems (DRPs) using the classification system APS-Doc. A total of 6,551 patients were included. Patients received on average (+/- SD) 4.4 +/- 3.9 drugs. The pharmacy interns detected a total of 4,085 DRPs and on average 0.6 +/- 1.2 DRPs per patient. Most frequently detected DRPs were potential drug-drug interactions (n = 591, 14%), missing drug strength, when different strengths were available (n = 373, 9%), and incomplete medication record (n = 296, 7%). The pharmacy interns conducted an intervention for 98% (n = 4,011) of all DRPs. According to their documentation, 74% of the DRPs (n = 3,038) were solved. Drugs which were most often related with DRPs were simvastatin, diclofenac, and ibuprofen. This is the very first study exploring the potential impact of pharmacy interns on drug safety on surgical wards in Europe. Pharmacy interns can play an important role to improve drug safety on hospital wards. PMID:24791599

Schorr, S G; Eickhoff, C; Feldt, S; Hohmann, C; Schulz, M

2014-04-01

83

Detection of Equator-ward Meridional Flows in the Deep Solar Interior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The meridional flow observed on the solar surface is a slow plasma motion from the equator to the poles. Flux-transport dynamo models of the solar cycle assume that this flow transports magnetic field of decaying active regions and causes polar field reversals. At what depth the meridional flow turns to equator-ward and how fast is the return flow are important questions for a better understanding of the dynamo process, and are also long-time puzzles of helioseismology. A recent finding of a systematic center-to-limb variation in the time-distance helioseismology measurements allows us to develop an empirical correction procedure for acoustic travel times, and improve the accuracy of helioseismic inferences. Using the helioseismic data of two entire years of SDO/HMI continuous observations and removing the systematic effect, we have detected the equator-ward meridional flows. Inversion of the travel times shows that the near-surface pole-ward meridional flow starts turning equator-ward at approximately 0.92 R_sun at low latitudes, and that the depth of the flow turning point increases with latitude. The equator-ward flow has a speed of 10 m/s or so, and extends from the surface to about 0.82 R_sun. Our analysis also shows evidences for a second meridional circulation cell starting at about 0.82 R_sun and extending deep to near the tachocline area (0.7 R_sun).

Zhao, J.; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L.

2012-12-01

84

Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.  

PubMed

This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

2014-05-01

85

Managing patients with deliberate self harm admitted to an accident and emergency observation ward.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To review the case records of patients admitted to an accident and emergency (A&E) observation ward following deliberate self harm. METHODS: The hospital notes of 568 patients admitted during one year following episodes of deliberate self harm were reviewed. The study was retrospective. RESULTS: The majority of these patients had taken an overdose and were between 18 and 35 years of age. Most patients were admitted to the observation ward after midnight or in the evening and were subsequently managed by an A&E based deliberate self harm team. Only 20% of admissions required evaluation by a psychiatrist. Most patients were discharged the next day without further follow up. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a specialised A&E based team and an A&E observation ward is appropriate for the management of many deliberate self harm patients. PMID:8821223

Ryan, J; Clemmett, S; Perez-Avila, C

1996-01-01

86

The ethics of space, design and color in an oncology ward.  

PubMed

Change affects all areas of healthcare organizations and none more so than each aspect of the oncology ward, beginning with the patient's room. It is there that the issues faced by the major players in healing environments - administrator, caregiver, family member, and, most importantly, the patient - come sharply into focus. Hospitals are building new facilities or renovating old ones in order to adapt to new environmental demands of patient care and security. Driven by ethical and professional responsibility, the oncological team headed by Professor Hellmut Samonigg of Graz Medical University Graz pursued a vision of designing a model oncology ward unique in Europe. Friedensreich Hundertwasser, the world-famous artist, was the creative force behind the design. The oncology ward became a place of healing, permeated with a colorful sense of life and harmonious holistic care. The successful outcome was confirmed by the extraordinarily positive feedback by patients, families, and healthcare staff. PMID:22883931

Andritsch, Elisabeth; Stöger, Herbert; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Andritsch, Hans; Kasparek, Anne-Katrin; Schaberl-Moser, Renate; Ploner, Ferdinand; Samonigg, Hellmut

2013-06-01

87

First-class health: amenity wards, health insurance, and normalizing health care inequalities in Tanzania.  

PubMed

In 2008, a government hospital in southwest Tanzania added a "first-class ward," which, unlike existing inpatient wards defined by sex, age, and ailment, would treat patients according to their wealth. A generation ago, Tanzanians viewed health care as a right of citizenship. In the 1980s and 1990s, structural adjustment programs and user fees reduced people's access to biomedical attention. Tanzania currently promotes "amenity" wards and health insurance to increase health care availability, generate revenue from patients and potential patients, and better integrate for-profit care. In this article, I examine people's discussions of these changes, drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in the 2000s and 1990s. I argue that Tanzanians criticize unequal access to care and health insurance, although the systemic structuring of inequalities is becoming normalized. People transform the language of socialism to frame individualized market-based care as mutual interdependence and moral necessity, articulating a new biomedical citizenship. PMID:24753314

Ellison, James

2014-06-01

88

Ratio of Pediatric ICU versus Ward Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Events is Increasing  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequency of pediatric in-hospital CPR events occurring in intensive care units (ICUs) compared to general wards. We hypothesized that the proportion of pediatric CPR provided in ICUs versus general wards has increased over the past decade and this shift is associated with improved resuscitation outcomes. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting Total of 315 hospitals in the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GTWG-R) database. Patients Total of 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events between January 1, 2000 and September 14, 2010. CPR events were defined as external chest compressions >1minute. Measurements and Results The primary outcome was proportion of total ICU versus general ward CPR events over time evaluated by chi square test for trend. Secondary outcome included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following the CPR event. Among 5870 pediatric CPR events, 5477 (93.3%) occurred in ICUs compared to 393 (6.7%) on inpatient wards. Over time, significantly more of these CPR events occurred in the ICU compared to the wards (test for trend: p<0.01), with a prominent shift noted between 2003 and 2004 (2000-2003: 87 - 91% vs. 2004-2010: 94 - 96%). In a multivariable model controlling for within center variability and other potential confounders, ROSC increased in 2004-2010 compared with 2000-2003 (RR 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.13). Conclusions In-hospital pediatric CPR is much more commonly provided in ICUs vs. Wards and the proportion has increased significantly over the past decade with concomitant increases in return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23921270

Berg, Robert A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Holubkov, Richard; Nicholson, Carol E.; Dean, J. Michael; Harrison, Rick; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen; Newth, Christopher; Moler, Frank; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Doctor, Allan; Wessel, David; Berger, John; Shanley, Thomas; Carcillo, Joseph; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

2013-01-01

89

‘Safety by DEFAULT’: introduction and impact of a paediatric ward round checklist  

PubMed Central

Introduction Poor communication is a source of risk. This can be particularly significant in areas of high clinical acuity such as intensive care. Ward rounds are points where large amounts of information must be communicated in a time-limited environment with many competing interests. This has the potential to reduce effective communication and risk patient safety. Checklists have been used in many industries to improve communication and mitigate risk. We describe the introduction of a ward round safety checklist ‘DEFAULT’ on a paediatric intensive care unit. Methods A non-blinded, pre- and post-intervention observational study was undertaken in a 12-bedded Level 3 tertiary PICU between July 2009 and December 2011. Results Ward round stakeholders subjectively liked the checklist and felt it improved communication. Introduction of the ward round checklist was associated with an increase in median days between accidental extubations from 14 (range 2 to 86) to 150 (56 to 365) (Mann–Whitney P <0.0001). The ward round checklist was also associated with an increase in the proportion of invasively ventilated patients with target tidal volumes of <8 ml/kg, which increased from 35 of 71 patients at 08.00 representing a proportion of 0.49 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.60) to 23 of 38 (0.61, 0.45 to 0.74). This represented a trend towards an increased proportion of cases in the target range (z = 1.68, P = 0.09). Conclusions The introduction of a ward round safety checklist was associated with improved communication and patient safety. PMID:24479381

2013-01-01

90

Phase Transition Free Regions in the Ising Model via the Kac-Ward Operator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide an upper bound on the spectral radius of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for a general planar graph. Combined with the Kac-Ward formula for the partition function of the planar Ising model, this allows us to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e., it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

Lis, Marcin

2014-11-01

91

Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology (1995)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The full text of the 1995 book Ward Valley: An Examination of Seven Issues in Earth Sciences and Ecology can be viewed online at the National Academies Press Website. The book contains information on the geology, hydrogeology, and ecology of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal site in the Mojave Desert. The format is Open Book, a "browsable, nonproprietary, fully and deeply searchable version of the publication." The National Academies Press notes that it is not intended to replace printed books.

92

Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.  

PubMed

Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. PMID:25457434

Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

2014-12-01

93

NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: An Abelian Ward identity and the vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive an Abelian-like Ward identity in the color superconducting phase and calculate vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap. Making use of the Ward identity, we show that subleading order contributions to the gap from vertices are absent for gapped excitations.

Xu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Qun

2009-09-01

94

Translating Fall Incidence Data into Fall-Preventive Measures in Geriatric Wards – A Survey in Belgian Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Fall incidents and their negative outcomes represent a considerable problem in hospitals, especially in geriatric wards, and require implementation of strategies to prevent these undesirable events. For this reason, the College of Geriatrics, a body funded by the Belgian Government to set up quality improvement initiatives in geriatric wards, selected ‘Fall prevention in Belgian hospitals’ as a quality project

Joke Coussement; Eddy Dejaeger; Margareta Lambert; Nele Van Den Noortgate; Leen De Paepe; Steven Boonen; Didier Schoevaerdts; Koen Milisen

2009-01-01

95

Nurse and patient activities and interaction on psychiatric inpatients wards: A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundDespite major developments in community mental health services, inpatient care remains an important yet costly part of the service system and patients who are admitted frequently spend a long period of time in hospital. It is, therefore, crucial to have a good understanding of activities that take place on inpatient wards.

Jessica Sharac; Paul McCrone; Ramon Sabes-Figuera; Emese Csipke; Ann Wood; Til Wykes

2010-01-01

96

Melatonin and light treatment of ewes for autumn lambing H. WILLIAMS Sandra WARD  

E-print Network

Melatonin and light treatment of ewes for autumn lambing H. WILLIAMS Sandra WARD Kim CAIRNS Jackie II and III were group fed a diet containing melatonin and providing 3 mg/ewe at 16.00 hrs daily lowland systems of UK sheep production demands compact lambing and a high lambing percentage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

97

Evaluation of the suitability of a patient data management system for ICUs on a general ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of the ICUData patient data management system (PDMS) for intensive care units (ICU), by IMESO GmbH, Hüttenberg, Germany, was based on the assumption that processes and therapies at ICU are the most complex with the highest data density compared with those in other wards. Based on experience with the system and on a survey conducted among users at

Axel Junger; Achim Michel; Matthias Benson; Lorenzo A. Quinzio; Johannes Hafer; Bernd Hartmann; Patrick Brandenstein; Kurt Marquardt; Gunter Hempelmann

2001-01-01

98

Scalable Web server cluster design with workload-aware request distribution strategy WARD  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a Web cluster in which the content-aware distribution is performed by each of the nodes in a Web cluster. Each server in the cluster may forward a request to another node based on the requested content. We propose a new workload-aware request distribution strategy WARD, that assigns a small set of most frequent files, called core, to be

Ludmila Cherkasova; Magnus Karlsson

2001-01-01

99

Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward  

E-print Network

Controls on Nitrogen Loss Processes in Chesapeake Bay Sediments Andrew R. Babbin* and Bess B. Ward is increasing as a direct result of anthropogenic nitrogen loading, but the controls on the mechanisms, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The flux of fixed nitrogen into the marine environment

Ward, Bess

100

Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward  

E-print Network

Case-based Reasoning for Situation-aware Ambient Intelligence: A Hospital Ward Evaluation Study is on the situation awareness task, and more spec as being able to per- ceive their environment, being aware of the presence of people and other agents

Langseth, Helge

101

DELANEY AND WARD Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory: An Overview of the First Fifty Years  

E-print Network

· DELANEY AND WARD Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory: An Overview of the First Fifty Years VOLUME 12, NUMBER 2, 2000 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL 147 Radar Development at Lincoln Laboratory of the first fifty years of radar development at Lincoln Laboratory. It begins by reviewing early Laboratory

Reuter, Martin

102

"Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

Byrd, Jodi A.

2007-01-01

103

The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and fibromyalgia in patients hospitalized on internal medicine wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of nonarticular pain complaints (chronic widespread pain, chronic localized pain, transient pain) and fibromyalgia in hospitalized patients and to study utilization patterns of health services associated with pain related problems. Methods: Five hundred twenty-two patients hospitalized on internal medicine wards were enrolled. Data were collected with a questionnaire covering demographic background, information on pain and

Dan Buskila; Lily Neumann; Lisa R. Odes; Elena Schleifer; Roman Depsames; Mahmoud Abu-Shakra

2001-01-01

104

As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

Schmidt, Peter

2009-01-01

105

77 FR 10960 - Security Zone, East River and Bronx Kill; Randalls and Wards Islands, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...safety of the President of the United States, members of his official party...establish security zones. The United States Secret Service requested that the Coast...departure of the President of the United States to and from Randalls and Wards...

2012-02-24

106

Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz  

E-print Network

Blowfish-ROOT Analysis Package Version 0.0 Ward Andrew Wurtz 10th June 2010 1 #12;CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Using Blowfish-ROOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.4 The ROOT Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.5 The Main

Saskatchewan, University of

107

The efficiency of an air filtration system in the hospital ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to ascertain the efficiency and effectiveness of an air filtration system (Electromedia Model 100C, Clean Air UK, UK) in the hospital ward. The sampling was conducted using a portable Surface Air Sampler (Cherwell Laboratories, Bicester, UK) in conjunction with settle plates. Samples were taken two days before and two days following activation of the filtration system

N. A. McLarnon; G. Edwards; J. G. Burrow; W. Maclaren; K. E. Aidoo; M. Hepher

2006-01-01

108

Kendall H. Cortelyou-Ward, PhD University of Central Florida  

E-print Network

of Health & Medical Informatics, S7:001, 1-5. 10. Cortelyou-Ward, Swain, Yeung (2012) Mitigating Error Administration. University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida Major Field: Public Affairs with specialization in Healthcare Administration Dissertation Topic: The Effect of Work Environment on the Career Commitment

Wu, Shin-Tson

109

Deception as a Means for Power among Collaborative Agents Derrick Ward, Henry Hexmoor  

E-print Network

@uark.edu Abstract We have developed a method for measuring the social power that agents exercise upon one another and its implications are unavoidable. The amount of social power agents exercise using communicationDeception as a Means for Power among Collaborative Agents Derrick Ward, Henry Hexmoor Computer

Hexmoor, Henry

110

QSM GRANT RECIPIENTS 2011 -2012 Aimee Cowell Fifth Ward Junior High School St. Tammany  

E-print Network

QSM GRANT RECIPIENTS 2011 - 2012 Aimee Cowell Fifth Ward Junior High School St. Tammany Aleta Overby JonesboroHodge High School Jackson Alexis DeFreese Cypress Springs Elementary Lincoln Alice M Hebert Jennings High School Jefferson Davis Amanda Holland Summerfield Elementary Caddo Amber Perr J

Harms, Kyle E.

111

Fast Convex Closure for Efficient Predicate Detection Paul A.S. Ward and Dwight S. Bedasse  

E-print Network

Fast Convex Closure for Efficient Predicate Detection Paul A.S. Ward and Dwight S. Bedass´e Shoshin of the matching primitive events. In particular, the Xie and Taylor convex-closure algorithm forms the basis for hierarchical compound events. In this paper, we study the cause of the problems in the Xie and Taylor algo

Ward, Paul A.S.

112

Safewards: a new model of conflict and containment on psychiatric wards  

PubMed Central

Accessible summary Rates of violence, self-harm, absconding and other incidents threatening patients and staff safety vary a great deal by hospital ward. Some wards have high rates, other low. The same goes for the actions of staff to prevent and contain such incidents, such as manual restraint, coerced medication, etc. The Safewards Model provides a simple and yet powerful explanation as to why these differences in rates occur. Six features of the inpatient psychiatric system have the capacity to give rise to flashpoints from which adverse incidents may follow. The Safewards Model makes it easy to generate ideas for changes that will make psychiatric wards safer for patients and staff. Abstract Conflict (aggression, self-harm, suicide, absconding, substance/alcohol use and medication refusal) and containment (as required medication, coerced intramuscular medication, seclusion, manual restraint, special observation, etc.) place patients and staff at risk of serious harm. The frequency of these events varies between wards, but there are few explanations as to why this is so, and a coherent model is lacking. This paper proposes a comprehensive explanatory model of these differences, and sketches the implications on methods for reducing risk and coercion in inpatient wards. This Safewards Model depicts six domains of originating factors: the staff team, the physical environment, outside hospital, the patient community, patient characteristics and the regulatory framework. These domains give risk to flashpoints, which have the capacity to trigger conflict and/or containment. Staff interventions can modify these processes by reducing the conflict-originating factors, preventing flashpoints from arising, cutting the link between flashpoint and conflict, choosing not to use containment, and ensuring that containment use does not lead to further conflict. We describe this model systematically and in detail, and show how this can be used to devise strategies for promoting the safety of patients and staff. PMID:24548312

Bowers, L

2014-01-01

113

Psychological Evaluation of Patients in Critical Care/Intensive Care Unit and Patients Admitted in Wards  

PubMed Central

Background: Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire. Aim: To assess and compare the depression, anxiety and stress Scores from the patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those admitted to ward. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients admitted to hospital, 40 from ICU and 40 admitted to ward were recruited. They were explained the procedure and after taking an informed consent, they were administered Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) Questionnaire, which contains 42-item questionnaire which includes three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress. The responses were computed and tabulated. We analysed the responses with Student’s t-test and Chi-square test, p<0.05 accepted as statistically significant. Results: The results revealed significantly elevated stress, depression and anxiety among the ICU patients when compared to those in the ward (p<0.001). Above normal anxiety and stress levels were also seen in the ward patients, compared to the scores in normal range. 50% and 25% respectively showed mild and normal depression scores in ward patients, compared to 12% and 5% in those admitted to ICU. This trend was also true for Anxiety and stress scores. Conclusion: From the results we found that there were elevated depression, anxiety and stress levels among the patients and this was significantly higher in ICU patients. Various factors could influence the psychological wellbeing of the patients, including the hospital environment, care givers, presence of family members nearby apart from the seriousness of illness, apprehensions about possibility of death. Such studies were rare among Indian patients. The findings of this study could be useful in incorporating suitable psychological help to the patients in hospitals to improve their recovery and wellbeing.

Sharma B, Gaurav; EVS, Maben; MS, Kotian

2014-01-01

114

Applying mobile and pervasive computer technology to enhance coordination of work in a surgical ward.  

PubMed

Collaboration, coordination, and communication are crucial in maintaining an efficient and smooth flow of work in an operating ward. This coordination, however, often comes at a high price in terms of unsuccessfully trying to get hold of people, disturbing telephone calls, looking for people, and unnecessary stress. To accommodate this situation and to increase the quality of work in operating wards, we have designed a set of pervasive computer systems which supports what we call context-mediated communication and awareness. These systems use large interactive displays, video streaming from key locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75% of the participants strongly agreed that these systems had made their work easier. PMID:17911688

Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob E

2007-01-01

115

The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.  

PubMed

Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

2014-03-01

116

Checking the transverse Ward-Takahashi relation at one loop order in 4-dimensions  

E-print Network

Some time ago Takahashi derived so called {\\it transverse} relations relating Green's functions of different orders to complement the well-known Ward-Green-Takahashi identities of gauge theories by considering wedge rather than inner products. These transverse relations have the potential to determine the full fermion-boson vertex in terms of the renormalization functions of the fermion propagator. He & Yu have given an indicative proof at one-loop level in 4-dimensions. However, their construct involves the 4th rank Levi-Civita tensor defined only unambiguously in 4-dimensions exactly where the loop integrals diverge. Consequently, here we explicitly check the proposed transverse Ward-Takahashi relation holds at one loop order in $d$-dimensions, with $d=4+\\epsilon$.

M. R. Pennington; R. Williams

2006-06-30

117

Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide

H. F. Wang; L. Craig; J. A. Ross; L. Zepeda; Q. Carpenter

2010-01-01

118

The effect of increased bed numbers on MRSA transmission in acute medical wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

An 18-month prospective survey was performed to examine the effect of adding a fifth bed to four-bedded bays in three acute medical wards on colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Screening procedures were in accordance with the UK national guidelines. All patients newly colonized with MRSA were visited, and their bed location determined. Data from the five-bedded bays were compared

C. C. Kibbler; A. Quick; A.-M. O'Neill

1998-01-01

119

Analysis of the quality of prescriptions at a cardiovascular ward in Brazil: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim of study To analyze the quality of prescriptions in a hospital in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional pilot study of the quality of prescriptions of adult patients admitted at the cardiovascular ward. Data\\u000a were collected with the help of a structured form developed by the researchers based on related literature, with items about\\u000a medications and completeness of prescriptions. The form

J. S. Siqueira; A. R. Antoniolli; C. C. Silvestre; A. D. Oliveira-Filho; W. B. Silva; D. P. Lyra

2011-01-01

120

Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality  

E-print Network

tx H2O | pg. 24 A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January... 1991, a committee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (now Texas AgriLife Extension Service) and Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District person- nel met on the development of a 4-H water camp educating youth on water issues...

Supercinski, Danielle

2008-01-01

121

Dispersion of Expiratory Droplets in a General Hospital Ward with Ceiling Mixing Type Mechanical Ventilation System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the dispersion characteristics of polydispersed droplets in a general hospital ward equipped with ceiling-mixing type ventilation system. Injections of water test droplets containing non-volatile content were produced. The injections simulate human coughs with a similar droplet size distribution (peak size at 12 ? m) and airflow rate (0.4 L\\/s). The dispersion of test droplets was measured in-situ

M. P. Wan; C. Y. H. Chao; Y. D. Ng; G. N. Sze To; W. C. Yu

2007-01-01

122

Drinking Water Quality Surveillance in a Vulnerable Urban Ward of Ahmedabad  

PubMed Central

The World Bank estimates that 21% of all communicable diseases in India are related to unsafe water with diarrhoea alone causing more than 0.1 million deaths annually. The WHO drinking water surveillance parameters of quality, quantity, accessibility, affordability and continuity were assessed in one vulnerable ward of Ahmedabad—a fast growing city in Western India. Interviews with key informants of the ward office, health centre and water supply department, secondary analysis and mapping of field test reports and a questionnaire-based survey of different household types were conducted. We found that Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) supplies water to the ward intermittently for two hours during the day. Housing society clusters supplement their AMC water supply with untested bore-well water. The water quality surveillance system is designed for a twenty-four-hour piped distribution of treated surface water. However, in order to maintain surveillance over an intermittent supply that includes ground water, the sampling process should include periodic surveys of water actually consumed by the citizens. The laboratory capacity of the Central Water Testing Laboratory should expand to include more refined tests for microbial and chemical contamination. PMID:25254083

Iyer, Veena; Choudhury, Nandini; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Somvanshi, Bhushan

2014-01-01

123

Nurse and patient activities and interaction on psychiatric inpatients wards: a literature review  

PubMed Central

Background Despite major developments in community mental health services, inpatient care remains an important yet costly part of the service system and patients who are admitted frequently spend a long period of time in hospital. It is, therefore, crucial to have a good understanding of activities that take place on inpatient wards. Objective To review studies that have measured nursing and patient activity and interaction on psychiatric inpatient wards. Data sources and review methods This literature review was performed by searching electronic databases and hand-checking reference lists. Results The review identified 13 relevant studies. Most used observational methods and found that at best 50% of staff time is spent in contact with patients, and very little time is spent delivering therapeutic activities. Studies also showed that patients spend substantial time apart from staff or other patients. Conclusion On inpatient psychiatric wards, evidence over 35 years has found little patient activity or patient social engagement. The reasons for this trend and recommendations for the future are discussed. PMID:20417514

Sharac, Jessica; McCrone, Paul; Sabes-Figuera, Ramon; Csipke, Emese; Wood, Ann; Wykes, Til

2014-01-01

124

OnWARD: Ontology-driven Web-based Framework for Multi-center Clinical Studies  

PubMed Central

With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. PMID:21924379

Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

2011-01-01

125

Drinking Water Quality Surveillance in a Vulnerable Urban Ward of Ahmedabad.  

PubMed

The World Bank estimates that 21% of all communicable diseases in India are related to unsafe water with diarrhoea alone causing more than 0.1 million deaths annually. The WHO drinking water surveillance parameters of quality, quantity, accessibility, affordability and continuity were assessed in one vulnerable ward of Ahmedabad-a fast growing city in Western India. Interviews with key informants of the ward office, health centre and water supply department, secondary analysis and mapping of field test reports and a questionnaire-based survey of different household types were conducted. We found that Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) supplies water to the ward intermittently for two hours during the day. Housing society clusters supplement their AMC water supply with untested bore-well water. The water quality surveillance system is designed for a twenty-four-hour piped distribution of treated surface water. However, in order to maintain surveillance over an intermittent supply that includes ground water, the sampling process should include periodic surveys of water actually consumed by the citizens. The laboratory capacity of the Central Water Testing Laboratory should expand to include more refined tests for microbial and chemical contamination. PMID:25254083

Iyer, Veena; Choudhury, Nandini; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Somvanshi, Bhushan

2014-05-01

126

Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.  

PubMed

Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N?=?181, n?=?146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p?=?0.021), support for innovation (p?=?0.042) and task orientation (p?=?0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

2015-01-01

127

A Hierarchical Cluster Algorithm for Dynamic, Centralized Timestamps Paul A.S. Ward and David J. Taylor  

E-print Network

A Hierarchical Cluster Algorithm for Dynamic, Centralized Timestamps Paul A.S. Ward and David J. Taylor Shoshin Distributed Systems Group Department of Computer Science University of Waterloo fpasward

Ward, Paul A.S.

128

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Bell Canyon sandstones, Scott field, Ward and Reeves counties, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD. WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD PAUL KASHATUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD, WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD...

Kashatus, Gerard Paul

2012-06-07

129

Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

2013-01-01

130

Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward  

PubMed Central

Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. Methods and analysis The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2?months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. Ethics and dissemination A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. PMID:25273812

Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

2014-01-01

131

The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.  

PubMed

In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme. PMID:16806622

Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

2006-10-01

132

Nursing and midwife staffing needs in maternity wards in Burkina Faso referral hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background In 2006, Burkina Faso set up a policy to subsidize the cost of obstetric and neonatal emergency care. This policy has undoubtedly increased attendance at all levels of the health pyramid. The aim of this study was to measure the capacity of referral hospitals’ maternity services to cope with the demand for health services after the implementation of this policy. Methods This study was conducted in three referral health centres (CMAs, CHRs, and CHUs). The CHU Yalgado Ouédraogo (tertiary level) and the CMA in Sector 30 (primary level) were selected as health facilities in the capital, along with the Kaya CHR (secondary level). At each health facility, the study included official maternity ward staff only. We combined the two occupational categories (nurses and midwives) because they perform the same activities in these health facilities. We used the WISN method recommended by WHO to assess the availability of nurses and midwives. Results Nurses and midwives represented 38% of staff at the University Hospital, 65% in the CHR and 80% in the CMA. The number of nurses and midwives needed for carrying out the activities in the maternity ward in the University Hospital and the CMA is greater than the current workforce, with WISN ratio of 0.68 and 0.79 respectively. In the CHR, the current workforce is greater than the number required (WISN ratio = 2). This medical centre is known for performing a high number curative and preventive activities compared to the Kaya CHR. Like the CHU, the delivery room is a very busy unit. This activity requires more time and more staff compared to other activities. Conclusion This study showed a shortage of nurses and midwives in two health facilities in Ouagadougou, which confirms that there is considerable demand. At the Kaya CHR, there is currently enough staff to handle the workload in the maternity ward, which may indicate a need to expand the analysis to other health facilities to determine whether a redistribution of health human resources is warranted.

2014-01-01

133

Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?  

PubMed Central

Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

2014-01-01

134

Outcomes of early switching from intravenous to oral antibiotics on medical wards  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate outcomes following implementation of a checklist with criteria for switching from intravenous (iv) to oral antibiotics on unselected patients on two general medical wards. Methods During a 12 month intervention study, a printed checklist of criteria for switching on the third day of iv treatment was placed in the medical charts. The decision to switch was left to the discretion of the attending physician. Outcome parameters of a 4 month control phase before intervention were compared with the equivalent 4 month period during the intervention phase to control for seasonal confounding (before–after study; April to July of 2006 and 2007, respectively): 250 episodes (215 patients) during the intervention period were compared with the control group of 176 episodes (162 patients). The main outcome measure was the duration of iv therapy. Additionally, safety, adherence to the checklist, reasons against switching patients and antibiotic cost were analysed during the whole year of the intervention (n = 698 episodes). Results In 38% (246/646) of episodes of continued iv antibiotic therapy, patients met all criteria for switching to oral antibiotics on the third day, and 151/246 (61.4%) were switched. The number of days of iv antibiotic treatment were reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 9%–29%, P = 0.001; 6.0–5.0 days in median) with no increase in complications. The main reasons against switching were persisting fever (41%, n = 187) and absence of clinical improvement (41%, n = 185). Conclusions On general medical wards, a checklist with bedside criteria for switching to oral antibiotics can shorten the duration of iv therapy without any negative effect on treatment outcome. The criteria were successfully applied to all patients on the wards, independently of the indication (empirical or directed treatment), the type of (presumed) infection, the underlying disease or the group of antibiotics being used. PMID:19401304

Mertz, Dominik; Koller, Michael; Haller, Patricia; Lampert, Markus L.; Plagge, Herbert; Hug, Balthasar; Koch, Gian; Battegay, Manuel; Flückiger, Ursula; Bassetti, Stefano

2009-01-01

135

Generalized Stirling permutations and forests: Higher-order Eulerian and Ward numbers  

E-print Network

We consider a family of combinatorial problems related to generalized Stirling permutations with fixed number of ascents that can also be understood in terms of ordered trees and forests. They will be solved by introducing a three-parameter generalization of the well-known Eulerian numbers that will be studied in the framework of generating-function methods. By using a non-trivial involution, we map these generalized Eulerian numbers onto a family of generalized Ward numbers for which we also provide a combinatorial interpretation.

J. Fernando Barbero G.; Jesús Salas; Eduardo J. S. Villaseñor

2014-05-05

136

Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students  

PubMed Central

The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students’ educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student “teams” leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the “inner circle”, or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38), students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students’ clinical learning and preparation for practice. PMID:25028569

Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana; Sandry, Kate

2014-01-01

137

Patient risk factors for developing a drug-related problem in a cardiology ward  

PubMed Central

Background Because of the high incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs) among hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases and their potential impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify the most susceptible patients, who therefore require closer monitoring of drug therapy. Purpose To identify the profile of patients at higher risk of developing at least one DRP during hospitalization in a cardiology ward. Method We consecutively included all patients hospitalized in the cardiology ward of a teaching hospital in 2009. DRPs were identified through a computerized warning system designed by the pharmacy department and integrated into the electronic medical record. Results A total of 964 admissions were included, and at least one DRP was detected in 29.8%. The variables associated with a higher risk of these events were polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR]=1.228; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.153–1.308), female sex (OR=1.496; 95% CI=1.026–2.180), and first admission (OR=1.494; 95% CI=1.005–2.221). Conclusion Monitoring patients through a computerized warning system allowed the detection of at least one DRP in one-third of the patients. Knowledge of the risk factors for developing these problems in patients admitted to hospital for cardiovascular problems helps in identifying the most susceptible patients. PMID:25565852

Urbina, Olatz; Ferrández, Olivia; Luque, Sònia; Grau, Santiago; Mojal, Sergi; Pellicer, Rosa; Riu, Marta; Salas, Esther; Comin-Colet, Josep

2015-01-01

138

Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.  

PubMed

This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

2005-07-01

139

[Emergence of linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains from two inpatients in a pediatric ward].  

PubMed

We report herein on the isolation of three linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains in 2011 from two pediatric inpatients at Kitasato University Hospital, Japan. Three linezolid resistant strains were isolated from two patients who shared the same room of a pediatric inpatient ward. Two linezolid resistant strains were isolated from patient A who had been treated with a total of 17,600mg of linezolid during 60 days of hospitalization (strains 1 and 2). The linezolid resistant E. faecalis persisted through the time that the patient had been discharged from the hospital. Another linezolid resistant strain was isolated from patient B who had no history of linezolid administration. The resistant strain in patient B phased out spontaneously. The minimum inhibitory concentration of linezolid in these strains ranged from 8.0 to 16.0 microg/mL. PCR amplification of the chromosomal gene encoding domain V of the 23S rRNA and subsequent nucleotide sequencing revealed that all the strains had at least one G2576T mutation. The pulse-field-gel electrophoretograms of the DNA treated with the SmaI restriction enzyme showed an identical profile suggesting that they were derived from a single resistant strain. These results suggested that the resistant strain occurred in patient A and was transmitted to patient B within the inpatient ward. PMID:23198574

Nihonyanagi, Shin; Adachi, Yuzuru; Onuki, Tomoyo; Nakazaki, Nobuhiko; Hirata, Yasuyosi; Fujiki, Kuniko; Takayama, Yoko; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Bandoh, Yuki; Dantsuji, Yurika; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

2012-09-01

140

The cost of a hospital ward in Europe: is there a methodology available to accurately measure the costs?  

PubMed

Costing health care services has become a major requirement due to an increase in demand for health care and technological advances. Several studies have been published describing the computation of the costs of hospital wards. The objective of this article is to examine the methodologies utilised to try to describe the basic components of a standardised method, which could be applied throughout Europe. Cost measurement however is a complex matter and a lack of clarity exists in the terminology and the cost concepts utilised. The methods discussed in this review make it evident that there is a lack of standardized methodologies for the determination of accurate costs of hospital wards. A standardized costing methodology would facilitate comparisons, encourage economic evaluation within the ward and hence assist in the decision-making process with regard to the efficient allocation of resources. PMID:15366283

Negrini, D; Kettle, A; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Edbrooke, D L

2004-01-01

141

Trends and inequalities in cardiovascular disease mortality across 7932 English electoral wards, 1982–2006: Bayesian spatial analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has more than halved in England since the 1980s, but there are few data on small-area trends. We estimated CVD mortality by ward in 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, and examined trends in relation to starting mortality, region and community deprivation. Methods We analysed CVD death rates using a Bayesian spatial technique for all 7932 English electoral wards in consecutive 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, separately for men and women aged 30–64 years and ?65 years. Results Age-standardized CVD mortality declined in the majority of wards, but increased in 186 wards for women aged ?65 years. The decline was larger where starting mortality had been higher. When grouped by deprivation quintile, absolute inequality between most- and least-deprived wards narrowed over time in those aged 30–64 years, but increased in older adults; relative inequalities worsened in all four age–sex groups. Wards with high CVD mortality in 2002–06 fell into two groups: those in and around large metropolitan cities in northern England that started with high mortality in 1982–86 and could not ‘catch up’, despite impressive declines, and those that started with average or low mortality in the 1980s but ‘fell behind’ because of small mortality reductions. Conclusions Improving population health and reducing health inequalities should be treated as related policy and measurement goals. Ongoing analysis of mortality by small area is essential to monitor local effects on health and health inequalities of the public health and healthcare systems. PMID:23129720

Asaria, Perviz; Fortunato, Lea; Fecht, Daniela; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Abellan, Juan Jose; Hambly, Peter; de Hoogh, Kees; Ezzati, Majid; Elliott, Paul

2012-01-01

142

The effectiveness of substitution of hospital ward care from medical doctors to physician assistants: a study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Because of an expected shrinking supply of medical doctors for hospitalist posts, an increased emphasis on efficiency and continuity of care, and the standardization of many medical procedures, the role of hospitalist is increasingly allocated to physician assistants (PAs). PAs are nonphysician clinicians with medical tasks. This study aims to evaluate the effects of substitution of hospital ward care to PAs. Methods/Design In a multicenter matched controlled study, the traditional model in which the role of hospitalist is taken solely by medical doctors (MD model) is compared with a mixed model in which a PA functions as a hospitalist, contingent with MDs (PA/MD model). Twenty intervention and twenty control wards are included across The Netherlands, from a range of medical specialisms. Primary outcome measure is patients’ length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes include indicators for quality of hospital ward care, patients experiences with medical ward care, patients health-related quality of life, and healthcare providers’ experiences. An economic evaluation is conducted to assess the cost implications and potential efficiency of the PA/MD model. For most measures, data is collected from medical records or questionnaires in samples of 115 patients per hospital ward. Semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals are conducted to identify determinants of efficiency, quality and continuity of care and barriers and facilitators for the implementation of PAs in the role of hospitalist. Discussion Findings from this study will help to further define the role of nonphysician clinicians and provides possible key components for the implementation of PAs in hospital ward care. Like in many studies of organizational change, random allocation to study arms is not feasible, which implies an increased risk for confounding. A major challenge is to deal with the heterogeneity of patients and hospital departments. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01835444 PMID:24472112

2014-01-01

143

Nosocomial Outbreak of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Primarily Affecting a Pediatric Ward in South Africa in 2012  

PubMed Central

We describe a nosocomial outbreak of diarrheal disease caused by extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, focused on a pediatric ward in South Africa. The outbreak peaked between May 2012 and July 2012. Person-to-person transmission was the most likely mechanism of spread of the infection, expedited due to a breakdown in hand-washing and hygiene, suboptimal infection control practices, overcrowding of hospital wards, and an undesirable nurse-to-patient ratio. PMID:24478499

Mthanti, Mnikelwa A.; Haumann, Carel; Tyalisi, Nomalungisa; Boon, Gerald P. G.; Sooka, Arvinda; Keddy, Karen H.

2014-01-01

144

The Einstein-Maxwell system, Ward identities, and the Vilkovisky construction  

E-print Network

The gauge fixing dependence of the one-loop effective action of quantum gravity in the proper-time representation is investigated for a space of arbitrary curvature, and the investigation is extended to Maxwell-Einstein theory. The construction of Vilkovisky and DeWitt for removal of this depence is then considered in general gauges, and it is shown that nontrivial criteria arising from a Ward identity of the theory must be obeyed by the regularization scheme, if the construction is to remove the gauge dependence of quadratic and quartic divergences. The results apply also to non-Abelian gauge theories; they are used to address the question of gauge dependence of asymptotic freedom arising through internal graviton lines at one-loop order as suggested by Robinson and Wilczek.

N. K. Nielsen

2014-06-03

145

Supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity in one-loop lattice perturbation theory: General procedure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The one-loop corrections to the lattice supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity (WTi) are investigated in the off-shell regime. In the Wilson formulation of the N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, supersymmetry is broken by the lattice, by the Wilson term, and is softly broken by the presence of the gluino mass. However, the renormalization of the supercurrent can be realized in a scheme that restores the continuum supersymmetric WTi (once the on-shell condition is imposed). The general procedure used to calculate the renormalization constants and mixing coefficients for the local supercurrent is presented. The supercurrent not only mixes with the gauge invariant operator T?. An extra mixing with other operators coming from the WTi appears. This extra mixing survives in the continuum limit in the off-shell regime and cancels out when the on-shell condition is imposed and the renormalized gluino mass is set to zero. Comparison with numerical results is also presented.

Feo, Alessandra

2004-09-01

146

Comparison of automatic oscillometric arterial pressure measurement with conventional auscultatory measurement in the labour ward.  

PubMed

We have compared two non-invasive methods of arterial pressure (AP) measurement used in labour wards: an automatic oscillometric measurement obtained by Dinamap 1846, and a conventional auscultatory measurement obtained by midwives. A total of 369 AP measurements were recorded, involving 28 normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women during labour, with or without extradural analgesia. Compared with the midwife group, the Dinamap group had a greater systolic AP, by 2.7 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and smaller diastolic AP, by 9.8 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The correlations between the two methods were highly significant, but the limits of agreement were relatively wide for both systolic and diastolic AP measurements. We conclude that a clinically important difference exists in diastolic AP measurements. Dinamap diastolic AP must be corrected using a regression equation, or simply by adding 10 mm Hg, before being compared with the available normal and hypertensive AP values. PMID:8435255

Hasan, M A; Thomas, T A; Prys-Roberts, C

1993-02-01

147

Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p= 0.363). For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%), followed by diarrhea (8.3%); an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05). For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest incidence (22.9%), followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%); all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05). Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an association with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits. PMID:24893056

Giraldo, Nubia Amparo; Aguilar, Nora Luz; Restrepo, Beatriz Elena; Vanegas, Marcela; Alzate, Sandra; Martínez, Mónica; Gamboa, Sonia Patricia; Castaño, Eliana; Barbosa, Janeth; Román, Juliana; Serna, Ángela María; Hoyos, Gloria Marcela

2012-01-01

148

Frequency, types, and direct related costs of medication errors in an academic nephrology ward in Iran.  

PubMed

Medication errors are ongoing problems among hospitalized patients especially those with multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy such as patients with renal diseases. This study evaluated the frequency, types and direct related cost of medication errors in nephrology ward and the role played by clinical pharmacists. During this study, clinical pharmacists detected, managed, and recorded the medication errors. Prescribing errors including inappropriate drug, dose, or treatment durations were gathered. To assess transcription errors, the equivalence of nursery charts and physician's orders were evaluated. Administration errors were assessed by observing drugs' preparation, storage, and administration by nurses. The changes in medications costs after implementing clinical pharmacists' interventions were compared with the calculated medications costs if the medication errors were continued up to patients' discharge time. More than 85% of patients experienced medication error. The rate of medication errors was 3.5 errors per patient and 0.18 errors per ordered medication. More than 95% of medication errors occurred at prescription nodes. Most common prescribing errors were omission (26.9%) or unauthorized drugs (18.3%) and low drug dosage or frequency (17.3%). Most of the medication errors happened on cardiovascular drugs (24%) followed by vitamins and electrolytes (22.1%) and antimicrobials (18.5%). The number of medication errors was correlated with the number of ordered medications and length of hospital stay. Clinical pharmacists' interventions decreased patients' direct medication costs by 4.3%. About 22% of medication errors led to patients' harm. In conclusion, clinical pharmacists' contributions in nephrology wards were of value to prevent medication errors and to reduce medications cost. PMID:24987790

Gharekhani, Afshin; Kanani, Negin; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

2014-09-01

149

Nosocomial Transmission of CTX-M-2 ?-Lactamase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii in a Neurosurgery Ward  

PubMed Central

Three strains of cefotaxime (CTX)-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, FM0209680, FM0300106, and FM0301433, were isolated from transtracheal aspirate cultures of three patients with probable nosocomial infections in a neurosurgery ward in Japan. The CTX MICs for these isolates were greater than 128 ?g/ml but were drastically reduced in the presence of 4 ?g of clavulanic acid per ml. These strains were also resistant to ceftriaxone, cefpodoxime, and aztreonam but were susceptible to ceftazidime and imipenem. The profile of resistance to various broad-spectrum ?-lactams was transferred by conjugation. Strain FM0209680 was not eradicated from case patient 1 by administration of imipenem, ceftazidime, and levofloxacin, even after a 6-month hospitalization period. Strains FM0300106 and FM0301433 were isolated from case patients 2 and 3 during the sixth week following admission, respectively, and then each patient was colonized for 3 weeks. Eradication of FM0300106 was successfully obtained from case patient 2 by imipenem treatment, while administration of imipenem was continued to prevent pneumonia. Prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was discontinued in case patient 3 because of the lack of pneumonic symptoms, and FM0301433 disappeared after the discontinuation of antimicrobial chemotherapy. All three strains carried the blaCTX-M-2 gene, and the appearance of colonies in the growth-inhibitory zones around disks of CTX and aztreonam in double-disk synergy tests suggested inducible ?-lactamase production in these A. baumannii strains. The ribotyping investigation suggested that all these strains belong to the same clonal lineage. The plasmids harbored by A. baumannii had the same restriction profile as those harbored by Proteus mirabilis strains previously isolated in a urology ward of the Funabashi Medical Center. PMID:15364979

Nagano, Noriyuki; Nagano, Yukiko; Cordevant, Christophe; Shibata, Naohiro; Arakawa, Yoshichika

2004-01-01

150

Hostile interaction in a general hospital ward leading to disturbed behaviour and bulimia in anorexia nervosa: its successful management  

Microsoft Academic Search

A girl of 17 years with severe anorexia nervosa, treated on a medical ward in a teaching hospital, developed bulimia, stole food, was sometimes doubly incontinent, behaved angrily, and aroused the hostility of patients and staff. The growth of a vicious circle of hostility is described and it was hypothesized that the hostility had aggravated the bulimia. On the basis

S. I. Cohen

1978-01-01

151

METAWSL and MetaTransformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan  

E-print Network

METAWSL and Meta­Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan the transformations ap­ plicability conditions) and returns a semantically equiva­ lent program. In the FermaT to be a domain­specific language for writing program transformations. As a result, FermaT is capable

Singer, Jeremy

152

METAWSL and Meta-Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan  

E-print Network

METAWSL and Meta-Transformations in the FermaT Transformation System Martin Ward and Hussein Zedan the transformations ap- plicability conditions) and returns a semantically equiva- lent program. In the FermaT to be a domain-specific language for writing program transformations. As a result, FermaT is capable

Singer, Jeremy

153

Deriving a Slicing Algorithm via FermaT Transformations M. P. Ward and H. Zedan Software Technology Research Lab  

E-print Network

Deriving a Slicing Algorithm via FermaT Transformations M. P. Ward and H. Zedan Software Technology specification via FermaT transformations. The general method (which is presented in a separate paper. The FermaT transformation theory, [49,63] which is based on WSL, is therefore capable of deriving complex

Singer, Jeremy

154

IR system to provide effective IR countermeasure (IRCM) capability to ward off threats posed by shoulder-fired missiles (SFMs)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper present an unique IR sensor technology capable of providing effective deception and noise jamming IReM capability to ward off threats posed by SFMs or STINGER missiles operated by various terrorist groups and Islamic radicals. More than 60,000 such missiles are currently in the hands of Islamic radicals and terrorist groups. Even one such missile can bring down a

A. R. Jha

2007-01-01

155

Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.  

PubMed

Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type ?-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region. PMID:25622942

Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

2015-03-01

156

Active Student Participation May Enhance Patient Centeredness: Patients' Assessments of the Clinical Education Ward for Integrative Medicine  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To examine the impact of active student participation on quality of care in an integrative inpatient setting. Methods. Over a two-year period, we surveyed all patients treated on the Clinical Education Ward for Integrative Medicine (CEWIM), where final-year medical students are integrated into an internal medicine ward complementing conventional medicine with anthroposophic medicine. Patients treated on the regular wards of the same internal medicine department served as the control group (CG). General quality of care was studied with the Picker Inpatient Questionnaire, physician empathy with the Consultation and Relational Empathy measure, and patient enablement with the Patient Enablement Index. ANCOVA was used to control for covariates while examining significant differences between both patient groups. Results. Comparison of the CG wards and the CEWIM revealed no significant differences in medical treatment success. The CEWIM, however, achieved better results for physician-patient interaction, physician empathy, and patient enablement. Eighty Percent of the CEWIM patients rated student participation as positively impacting quality of care. Conclusion. Our results indicate that incorporating students in an integrative healthcare setting may result in greater patient centeredness. Further studies are needed to determine whether this is due to organizational advantages, students' empathic activity, the impact of teaching, or learner-teacher interaction. PMID:23573149

Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie; Lutz, Gabriele; Valk-Draad, Maria

2013-01-01

157

A Comparative Analysis of Base Expectancy Tables for Selected Subpopulations of California Youth Authority Wards. Research Report No. 55.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Base expectancy tables developed by the California Youth Authority apply to total population of male wards released on parole by the state. Subpopulations of relatively homogeneous make-up offered the possibility of developing base expectancy tables of greater predictive ability. Multiple regression analysis showed the overall advantages and…

Beverly, Robert F.

158

"Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the…

Beasley, James P.

2007-01-01

159

Modeling Hair Using Level-of-Detail Representations Kelly Ward Ming C. Lin Joohi Lee Susan Fisher Dean Macri  

E-print Network

Modeling Hair Using Level-of-Detail Representations Kelly Ward Ming C. Lin Joohi Lee Susan Fisher http://gamma.cs.unc.edu/HSLOD/ Abstract: We present a novel approach for modeling hair using level-of-detail representations. The set of representations include individual strands, hair clusters, and hair strips

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

160

Counterpoint: Practice versus Process--Rigidity of Reinforcement Requirements Results in Regressive Research: A Reply to Ward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This counterpoint responds to Phillip Ward's commentary on a study by Gerald Biederman and others which concluded that verbal reinforcement in combination with interactive modeling strategies may produce confusion in children with language/learning difficulties. The counterpoint argues that the commentary indicates problems with semantics and with…

Biederman, Gerald B.; Davey, Valerie A.

1995-01-01

161

Pathways to Sexual Offense Recidivism Following Treatment: An Examination of the Ward and Hudson Self-Regulation Model of Relapse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ward and Hudson (1998, 2000) proposed a self-regulation model of relapse in sexual offenders, which classifies offenders into one of four pathways. This study examined the validity of the model, whether sexual recidivists are characterized by one predominant pathway and offense type, and whether participants would change pathway pre- to…

Webster, Stephen D.

2005-01-01

162

An Exploratory Evaluation of the Ward and Hudson Offending Pathways Model with Sex Offenders Who Have Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: It was predicted that offenders with intellectual disability (ID) categorised according to Ward & Hudson's (1998b) self-regulation theory as having an "Approach" goal would have higher levels of distorted cognitions, less victim empathy, and a history of more prolific offending compared to those with an "Avoidant" goal. Offenders…

Langdon, Peter E.; Maxted, Helen; Murphy, Glynis H.

2007-01-01

163

An analysis of the controversy caused by Mary Ward's Institute in the 1620s. by Laurence Lux-Sterritt.  

E-print Network

-Sterritt. During the reign of Elizabeth I, English Catholicism experienced a degree of persecution that was meant, by the end of the reign it was rising again with force.1 The unique vocation of Yorkshire woman, Mary Ward (1585-1645), can be seen as an eloquent illustration of this new English Catholic spirit

Boyer, Edmond

164

Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Bloodstream Infections in Hematology Wards: One Year Experience at the Catholic Blood and Marrow Transplantation Center  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in 2 distinctive hematological wards of the Catholic Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) center. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical data of patients who developed BSIs from June 2009 to May 2010 in 2 hematologic wards at the Catholic BMT center. Ward A is a 44-bed unit mainly conducting conventional high dose chemotherapy and ward B is a 23-bed unit exclusively conducting BMT. Results Overall, 222 BSI episodes were developed from 159 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia in ward A and multiple myeloma in ward B were more frequent than in ward B and A, respectively. Sex, age, presence of neutropenia, shock, Pitt bacteremia score, type of central catheter, level of C-reactive protein, duration of admission days, type of BSI, overall mortality and distribution of organisms were not different between the 2 wards. There were 202 monomicrobial and 20 polymicrobial BSI episodes, including 2 fungemia episodes. The incidence rate of overall BSIs per 1,000 patient-days was higher in ward A than in ward B (incidence rate ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval 1.97-4.22, P<0.001). Among 243 organisms isolated, the number of gram positives, gram negatives and fungi were 122, 119 and 2, respectively. Escherichia coli was the most common organism in both ward A and B (27.6% and 42.4%), followed by viridians streptococci (18.6% and 15.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.3% and 9.0%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers accounted for 31.9% (23/72) of E. coli and 71.0% (22/31) of K. pneumoniae. Out of 19 Enterococcus faecium, 7 isolates (36.8%) were resistant to vancomycin. The crude mortality rates at 7 and 30 days after each BSI episode were 4.5% (10/222) and 13.1% (29/222), and were significantly higher in the patients with shock compared with those without shock (20.5% vs. 1.1%, P<0.001 and 38.5% vs. 7.7%, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions The incidence rate of BSIs was higher in patients receiving chemotherapy than those receiving BMT, but the distribution of organisms was not different between the 2 wards. E. coli was the most common causative BSI organism in hematologic wards followed by viridians streptococci and K. pneumoniae. PMID:24265950

Kwon, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Yeon-Joon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

2013-01-01

165

Consumption of herbal remedies and dietary supplements amongst patients hospitalized in medical wards  

PubMed Central

What is already known about this subject In general, use of herbal remedies and supplements is constantly rising in the western population and this may be potentially dangerous due to adverse effects and drug–herb interactions. All information up to now has been derived from the general population or outpatients. There are no publications on the rate of consumption of herbals in inpatients, or the awareness of the medical team of this fact. What this study adds Approximately 25% of patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards consume some kind of herbal or dietary supplement.Consumption is associated with higher income, nonsmoking and benign prostatic hypertrophy.The medical team was aware of the consumption in only 23% of the cases, and all drug–herbal interactions which we discovered were missed by the medical team. Aims Herbal remedies may have adverse effects and potentially serious interactions with some commonly prescribed conventional medications. Little is known about consumption of herbal remedies and dietary supplements by hospitalized patients. The aim was to evaluate the rate of consumption and characterize the patients hospitalized in internal medicine departments who consume herbal remedies and dietary supplements. Also, to assess the medical teams' awareness and assess the percentage of patients with possible drug–herb interactions. Methods Patients hospitalized in the medical wards of two hospitals in Israel were interviewed about their use of herbal remedies or dietary supplements. The medical records were searched for evidence that the medical team had knowledge of the use of herbal remedies or dietary supplements. Results Two hundred and ninety-nine hospitalized medical patients were interviewed. Of the participants, 26.8% were herbal or dietary supplement consumers (HC). On multivariate analysis the only variates associated with herbal or dietary supplement consumption were the hospital [odds ratio (OR) 2.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29, 6.52], income (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.15, 1.05), smoking habits (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.05, 0.55) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (OR 4.64, 95% CI 1.3, 16.5). Ninety-four percent of the patients had not been asked specifically of herbal consumption by the medical team. Only 23% of the hospital's medical files of the HC patients had any record of the use of herbal or dietary supplements. Seven possible drug–herbal interactions were encountered (7.1%). The most serious was an interaction between camomile tea and ciclosporin. Conclusions Herbal remedy consumption is common amongst patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards and is often overlooked by the medical team. Patients and doctors should be more aware of the possible adverse effects and of the potential of herb–drug interactions. PMID:17425631

Goldstein, Lee H; Elias, Mazen; Ron-Avraham, Gilat; Biniaurishvili, Ben Zion; Madjar, Magali; Kamargash, Irena; Braunstein, Rony; Berkovitch, Matitiahu; Golik, Ahuva

2007-01-01

166

Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study  

PubMed Central

Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients actively participating in students’ learning and they both experience it as a joint action. An attending relationship is based on a one-way relationship between patients and students resulting in patients passively participating by letting students to practice on their bodies but without engaging in a learning dialogue with the students. PMID:24989155

2014-01-01

167

Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the wetland because it had been platted with large areas privately owned. A self-published workshop report was produced each of the first three years. Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle with downtown New Orleans in the background. Photo by Travis Scott, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007.

Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

2010-12-01

168

Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.  

PubMed

Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ?24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur. PMID:25444670

Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

2015-02-01

169

Dietary lipids and blood cholesterol: quantitative meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the quantitative importance of dietary fatty acids and dietary cholesterol to blood concentrations of total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies of solid food diets in healthy volunteers. SUBJECTS: 395 dietary experiments (median duration 1 month) among 129 groups of individuals. RESULTS: Isocaloric replacement of saturated fats by complex carbohydrates for 10% of dietary calories resulted in blood total cholesterol falling by 0.52 (SE 0.03) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.36 (0.05) mmol/l. Isocaloric replacement of complex carbohydrates by polyunsaturated fats for 5% of dietary calories resulted in total cholesterol falling by a further 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.11 (0.02) mmol/l. Similar replacement of carbohydrates by monounsaturated fats produced no significant effect on total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Avoiding 200 mg/day dietary cholesterol further decreased blood total cholesterol by 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 0.10 (0.02) mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: In typical British diets replacing 60% of saturated fats by other fats and avoiding 60% of dietary cholesterol would reduce blood total cholesterol by about 0.8 mmol/l (that is, by 10-15%), with four fifths of this reduction being in low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:9006469

Clarke, R.; Frost, C.; Collins, R.; Appleby, P.; Peto, R.

1997-01-01

170

Nitrogen removal process optimization in New York City WPCPS: a case study of Wards Island WPCP.  

PubMed

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection has been engaged in a continuous process to develop a nitrogen removal program to reduce the nitrogen mass discharge from its water pollution control plants, (WPCPs), from 49,158 kg/d to 20,105 kg/d by the year 2017 as recommended by the Long Island Sound Study. As part of the process, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken involving bench, pilot and full scale studies to identify the most effective way to upgrade and optimize the existing WPCPs. Aeration tank 13 (AT-13) at the Wards Island WPCP was particularly attractive as a full-scale research facility because its aeration tank with its dedicated final settling tanks and RAS pumps could be isolated from the remaining treatment facilities. The nitrogen removal performance of AT-13, which, at the time, was operated as a "basic step feed BNR Facility", was evaluated and concurrently nitrification kinetic parameters were measured using in-situ bench scale experiments. Additional bench scale experiments provided denitrification rates using different sources of carbon and measurement of the maximum specific growth rate of nitrifying bacteria. The combined findings were then used to upgrade AT-13 to a "full" BNR facility with carbon and alkalinity addition. This paper will focus on the combined bench and full scale results that were the basis for the consequent upgrade. PMID:19901478

Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Musabyimana, M; Deur, A; Beckmann, K

2009-01-01

171

Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards  

PubMed Central

Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

2014-01-01

172

Suicide of physicians in the special wards of Tokyo Metropolitan area.  

PubMed

Numerous studies on physician suicide in various countries have been reported but no data from Japan on the issue can be found to date. In this study, physician suicides in the special wards of Tokyo Metropolitan area in 1996-2010 were investigated retrospectively. A total of 87 cases were enrolled. The results suggested that physician suicide has been linked to pre-existing psychiatric illnesses and occupational problems, and that psychiatrists have a relatively higher suicide risk compared to those majoring in other specialities of medicine. A distinctive feature was that 19 cases had used either drugs or devices which were accessible due to their profession some time during the process of committing suicide. Another notable feature was that 4 out of 5 anaesthesiologists enrolled in the study had chosen poisoning for their suicide method, with the drugs frequently used in their speciality. The findings advocate strongly for efficient suicide prevention measures for physicians including an early detection and treatment of psychiatric illnesses, as well as an urgent need for a more effective pharmacy management in applicable institutions together with the implementation of self discipline on each physician. This is the first broad academic study on physician suicide in Japan. PMID:24485419

Hikiji, Wakako; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

2014-02-01

173

Inappropriate prescribing for older people admitted to an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify inappropriate prescribing among older patients on admission to and discharge from an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards, and to compare changes during stay within and between these groups. Design Observational study. Setting and subjects Altogether 400 community-dwelling people aged ??70 years, on consecutive emergency admittance to hospital wards of internal medicine and orthopaedic surgery, were randomized to an intermediate-care nursing home unit or hospital wards; 290 (157 at the intermediate-care nursing home unit and 133 in hospital wards) were eligible for this sub-study. Main outcome measures Prevalence on admission and discharge of potentially inappropriate medications (Norwegian general practice [NORGEP] criteria) and drug–drug interactions; changes during stay. Results The mean (SD) age was 84.7 (6.2) years; 71% were women. From admission to discharge, the mean numbers of drugs prescribed per person increased from 6.0 (3.3) to 9.3 (3.8), p

Bakken, Marit Stordal; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen; Engeland, Anders; Ruths, Sabine

2012-01-01

174

Does antimicrobial use density at the ward level influence monthly central line-associated bloodstream infection rates?  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD), for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose)/(defined daily dose × patient days) ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰), 14 (42.4%) of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936–15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527–0.922 (P=0.038). Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R2=0.1897). Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated.

Yoshida, Junichi; Harada, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Tetsuya; Asano, Ikuyo; Ueno, Takako; Matsubara, Nobuo

2014-01-01

175

Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital. Method A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors. Result In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications. Conclusion We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions. PMID:25183081

Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Berhanie, Alemayehu; Tigistu, Habtamu; Abraham, Yishak; Getachew, Yosheph; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Unakal, Chandrashekhar

2014-01-01

176

The team builder: the role of nurses facilitating interprofessional student teams at a Swedish clinical training ward.  

PubMed

Interprofessional education (IPE) is an educational strategy attracting increased interest as a method to train future health care professionals. One example of IPE is the clinical training ward, where students from different health care professions practice together. At these wards the students work in teams with the support of facilitators. The professional composition of the team of facilitators usually corresponds to that of the students. However, previous studies have revealed that nurse facilitators are often in the majority, responsible for student nurses' profession specific facilitation as well as interprofessional team orientated facilitation. The objective of this study was to describe how nurses act when facilitating interprofessional student teams at a clinical training ward. The research design was ethnography and data were collected through participant observations and interviews. The analysis revealed the four strategies used when facilitating teams of interprofessional students to enhance collaborative work and professional understanding. The nurse facilitator as a team builder is a new and exciting role for nurses taking on the responsibility of facilitating interprofessional student teams. Future research needs to explore how facilitating nurses balance profession specific and team oriented facilitating within the environment of an interprofessional learning context. PMID:21342789

Elisabeth, Carlson; Ewa, Pilhammar; Christine, Wann-Hansson

2011-09-01

177

Experiences of Australian mothers who gave birth either at home, at a birth centre, or in hospital labour wards.  

PubMed

In order to compare their antenatal education levels, reasons for choosing the birthplace, experiences during labor and childbirth, analgesia, satisfaction with birth attendants and others present, and related attitudes 395 Sydney-area mothers were recruited within one year of giving birth. Five sources were used to obtain mail-questionnaire responses from 239 who gave birth in a hospital labor ward, 35 at a birth centre, and 121 who chose to give birth at home. Homebirth mothers were older, more educated, more feminist, more willing to accept responsibility for maintaining their own health, better read on childbirth, more likely to be multiparous, and gave higher rating of their midwives than labour-ward mothers, with birth-centre mothers generally scoring between the other two groups. As well, homebirth and birth-centre mothers were more likely to feel the birthplace affected the bonding process and were less likely to regard birth as a medical condition than labour-ward mothers. In regression analysis birth venue (among other variables) significantly predicted satisfaction with doctor, if present during labour and delivery, and five variables correlated with birth venue significantly predicted satisfaction with midwife, husband/partner, and other support person. Findings are discussed in the light of the current struggle between medical and 'natural' models of childbirth. PMID:8434272

Cunningham, J D

1993-02-01

178

The Effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry and Decision Support System on Medication Errors in the Neonatal Ward: Experiences from an Iranian Teaching Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication dosing errors are frequent in neonatal wards. In an Iranian neonatal ward, a 7.5 months study was designed in three\\u000a periods to compare the effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) without and with decision support functionalities in reducing non-intercepted medication dosing errors in antibiotics and anticonvulsants.\\u000a Before intervention (Period 1), error rate was 53%, which did not significantly change

Alireza Kazemi; Johan Ellenius; Faramarz Pourasghar; Shahram Tofighi; Aref Salehi; Ali Amanati; Uno G. H. Fors

2011-01-01

179

The identification and epidemiology of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in patient rooms and the ward environment  

PubMed Central

Background Research has indicated that the environment may play an important role in the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile in healthcare facilities. Despite the significance of this finding, few data exist from longitudinal studies investigating MRSA and C. difficile contamination, concurrently, in both patient rooms and the general ward environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of MRSA and C. difficile contamination in patient rooms and the ward environment and identify risk factors associated with a surface being contaminated with these pathogens. Methods Environmental surfaces in patient rooms and the general environment in the medical and surgical wards of a community hospital were sampled six times over a 15 week period. Sterile electrostatic cloths were used for sampling and information pertaining to the surface sampled was recorded. MRSA isolates and C. difficile specimens were obtained from hospitalized patients. Enrichment culture was performed and spa typing or ribotyping was conducted for MRSA or C. difficile, respectively. Exact logistic regression models were constructed to examine risk factors associated with MRSA and C. difficile contamination. Results Sixteen (41%) patient rooms had???1 surfaces contaminated with MRSA and/or C. difficile. For 218 surfaces investigated, 3.2% and 6.4% were contaminated with MRSA or C. difficile, respectively. Regression models indicated that surfaces in rooms exposed to a C. difficile patient had significantly increased odds of being contaminated with C. difficile, compared to surfaces in unexposed patient rooms. Additionally, compared to plastic surfaces, cork surfaces had significantly increased odds of being contaminated with C. difficile. For 236 samples collected from the ward environment, MRSA and C. difficile were recovered from 2.5% and 5.9% of samples, respectively. Overall, the majority of MRSA and C. difficile strains were molecularly identified as spa type 2/t002 (84.6%, n?=?11) and ribotype 078 (50%, n?=?14), respectively. Conclusions In patient rooms and the ward environment, specific materials and locations were identified as being contaminated with MRSA or C. difficile. These sites should be cleaned and disinfected with increased vigilance to help limit the transmission and dissemination of MRSA and C. difficile within the hospital. PMID:23883171

2013-01-01

180

Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Frail older people experience frequent care transitions and an integrated healthcare system could reduce barriers to transitions between different settings. The study aimed to investigate care transitions of frail older people from acute hospital wards to community healthcare or community hospital wards, within a system that had vertically integrated acute hospital and community healthcare services. Theory and methods The research design was a multimethod, qualitative case study of one healthcare system in England; four acute hospital wards and two community hospital wards were studied in depth. The data were collected through: interviews with key staff (n = 17); focus groups (n = 9) with ward staff (n = 36); interviews with frail older people (n = 4). The data were analysed using the framework approach. Findings Three themes are presented: Care transitions within a vertically integrated healthcare system, Interprofessional communication and relationships; Patient and family involvement in care transitions. Discussion and conclusions A vertically integrated healthcare system supported care transitions from acute hospital wards through removal of organisational boundaries. However, boundaries between staff in different settings remained a barrier to transitions, as did capacity issues in community healthcare and social care. Staff in acute and community settings need opportunities to gain better understanding of each other's roles and build relationships and trust. PMID:24868193

Baillie, Lesley; Gallini, Andrew; Corser, Rachael; Elworthy, Gina; Scotcher, Ann; Barrand, Annabelle

2014-01-01

181

Microbial habitat dynamics and ablation control on the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (83°02N, 74°00W) is an 40 m thick ice feature that occupies a large embayment along Canada's northernmost coast. Sediments cover 10% of its surface and provide a habitat for diverse microbial communities. These assemblages form an organo-sedimentary matrix (microbial mat) composed of cold-tolerant cyanobacteria and several other types of organisms. We investigated the environmental properties (temperature, irradiance, conductivity and nutrient concentration) of the microbial mat habitat and the effect of the microbial mats on the surface topography of the ice shelf. The low albedo of microbial mats relative to the surrounding snow and ice encouraged meltwater production, thereby extending the growth season to 61 days despite only 52 days with mean temperatures above 0 °C. We found large excursions in salinity near the microbial mat during freeze-up and melt, and 54% of all ponds sampled had conductivity profiles indicating stratification. Nutrient concentrations within the microbial mats were up to two orders of magnitude higher than those found in the water column, which underscores the differences between the microbial mat microenvironment and the overall bulk properties of the cryo-ecosystem. The average ice surface ablation in the microbial mat-rich study site was 1.22 m year-1, two times higher than values measured in areas of the ice shelf where mats were less prevalent. We demonstrate with topographic surveys that the microbial mats promote differential ablation and conclude that the cohesive microbial aggregates trap and stabilize sediment, reduce albedo, and thereby influence the surface morphology of the ice shelf.

Mueller, Derek R.; Vincent, Warwick F.

2006-03-01

182

Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to ShirazPediatric Neurology Ward  

PubMed Central

Objective Incidence of CNS acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS), especially multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, appears to be on the rise worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, and prognosis of different types of ADS in Iranian children. Materials & Methods During the period 2002-2012, all the patients (aged 1-18 years) with ADS, such as MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), optic neurotic (ON), Devic disease, and transverse myelitis (TM), referred to the pediatric neurology ward, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were included in this study. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, past and family history, preclinical findings, clinical course, and outcome were obtained. Results We identified 88 patients with ADS in our center. The most prevalent disease was MS with 36.5% (n=32), followed by AEDM 26.1% (n=31), ON 17% (n=13), TM 15.9% (n=14), and Devic disease 4.5% (n=4). MS, ON, TM were more common among females while ADEM was more common in males. Children with ADEM were significantly younger than those with other types of ADS. Family history was positive in 10% of patients with MS. Previous history of recent infection was considerably seen in cases with ADEM. Clinical presentation and prognosis in this study was in accordance with those in previous studies on children. Conclusion In this study, the most common type of ADS was MS, which was more common in female and older age cases. ADEM was more common in male and younger children. ADEM and ON had the best and Devic disease had the worst prognosis. PMID:24949046

INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saeedeh; MORADI, Mehrpoor; DASHTI, Hassan; SAFARI, Nazila

2014-01-01

183

[Acute lumbago due to the manual lifting of patients in wards: prevalence and incidence data].  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to measure the occurrence (prevalence and incidence) of episodes of acute low back pain (definite effect) in a wide sample of health workers assisting disabled patients. A questionnaire was used for the study both of true acute low back pain and of episodes of ingravescent low back pain controlled pharmacologically at the onset. The questionnaire identified overall acute and pharmacologically controlled episodes occurring in the previous 12 months, both in the course of work and over the whole life of the subject. Appropriately trained operators administered the questionnaire to 551 subjects; 481 valid answer cards were obtained from 372 females and 109 males working in medical, orthopaedic and geriatric departments. 75.4% of the sample had high exposure index levels for patient lifting. The prevalence of true acute low back pain was 9% in males and 11% in females referred to the previous 12 months. Taking acute true and pharmacologically controlled low back pain together the prevalences rose to 13.8% for males and 26.9% in females. Data from the reference populations showed that acute low back pain did not exceed 3% on average in the previous year. Since work seniority in the hospital wards was known, the incidences were calculated, giving 7.9% in females and 5.29% in males for acute low back pain, and 19% in females and 3.49% in males for pharmacologically controlled low back pain. Considering the number of episodes in 100 workers/year, acute low back pain alone reached prevalences of 13-14%. This therefore appears to confirm the positive ratio between episodes of low back pain and duties involving assistance to disabled patients. PMID:10371816

Colombini, D; Cianci, E; Panciera, D; Martinelli, M; Venturi, E; Giammartini, P; Ricci, M G; Menoni, O; Battevi, N

1999-01-01

184

Hand contamination during routine care in medical wards: the role of hand hygiene compliance.  

PubMed

The hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) are the most common vehicle for the transmission of micro-organisms from patient to patient and within the healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multimodal campaign on the type and amount of resident and transient flora and the presence of potential risk factors for hand contamination during routine care. A before-after (PRE and POST periods) interventional study was carried out in medical wards of a tertiary care hospital. Eighty-nine samples were analysed. Samples were cultured immediately before patient contact using a glove-juice method. Data collected included socio-demographic and risk factors for hand contamination. Flora was measured as log10 c.f.u. ml(-1) and evaluated by comparing median values in the PRE and POST periods. Transient flora was isolated from the hands of 67.4 and 46.1 % of HCWs in the PRE and POST periods, respectively (P<0.001). Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were the predominant contaminants. Resident flora was isolated from 92.1 % of HCWs in the PRE period and from 70.8 % in the POST period (P<0.001). The meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci log10 c.f.u. count ml(-1) decreased from 1.96 ± 1.2 to 0.89 ± 1.2 (mean ± s d; P<0.001), and the global flora count decreased from 2.77 ± 1.1 to 1.56 ± 1.4 (P<0.001). In the POST period, the wearing of fewer rings (P<0.001), shorter fingernail length (P = 0.008), a shorter time since recent hand hygiene (HH) (P = 0.007) and an increased use of alcohol-based hand rub instead of soap (P<0.001) were documented. The HH multimodal strategy reduced the number of risk factors and the level of HCW hand contamination. PMID:23329322

Monistrol, Olga; López, M Liboria; Riera, Montserrat; Font, Roser; Nicolás, Carme; Escobar, Miguel Angel; Freixas, Núria; Garau, Javier; Calbo, Esther

2013-04-01

185

Kubo formulas for viscosity: Hall viscosity, Ward identities, and the relation with conductivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by recent work on Hall viscosity, we derive from first principles the Kubo formulas for the stress-stress response function at zero wave vector that can be used to define the full complex frequency-dependent viscosity tensor, both with and without a uniform magnetic field. The formulas in the existing literature are frequently incomplete, incorrect, or lack a derivation; in particular, Hall viscosity is overlooked. Our approach begins from the response to a uniform external strain field, which is an active time-dependent coordinate transformation in d space dimensions. These transformations form the group GL(d,R) of invertible matrices, and the infinitesimal generators are called strain generators. These enable us to express the Kubo formula in different ways, related by Ward identities; some of these make contact with the adiabatic transport approach. The importance of retaining contact terms, analogous to the diamagnetic term in the familiar Kubo formula for conductivity, is emphasized. For Galilean-invariant systems, we derive a relation between the stress response tensor and the conductivity tensor that is valid at all frequencies and in both the presence and absence of a magnetic field. In the presence of a magnetic field and at low frequency, this yields a relation between the Hall viscosity, the q2 part of the Hall conductivity, the inverse compressibility (suitably defined), and the diverging part of the shear viscosity (if any); this relation generalizes a result found recently by others. We show that the correct value of the Hall viscosity at zero frequency can be obtained (at least in the absence of low-frequency bulk and shear viscosity) by assuming that there is an orbital spin per particle that couples to a perturbing electromagnetic field as a magnetization per particle. We study several examples as checks on our formulation. We also present formulas for the stress response that directly generalize the Berry (adiabatic) curvature expressions for zero-frequency Hall conductivity or viscosity to the full tensors at all frequencies.

Bradlyn, Barry; Goldstein, Moshe; Read, N.

2012-12-01

186

Evaluation of clinical pharmacist recommendations in the geriatric ward of a Belgian university hospital  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the type, acceptance rate, and clinical relevance of clinical pharmacist recommendations at the geriatric ward of the Ghent university hospital. Methods The clinical pharmacist evaluated drug use during a weekly 2-hour visit for a period of 4 months and, if needed, made recommendations to the prescribing physician. The recommendations were classified according to type, acceptance by the physician, prescribed medication, and underlying drug-related problem. Appropriateness of prescribing was assessed using the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) before and after the recommendations were made. Two clinical pharmacologists and two clinical pharmacists independently and retrospectively evaluated the clinical relevance of the recommendations and rated their own acceptance of them. Results The clinical pharmacist recommended 304 drug therapy changes for 100 patients taking a total of 1137 drugs. The most common underlying drug-related problems concerned incorrect dose, drug–drug interaction, and adverse drug reaction, which appeared most frequently for cardiovascular drugs, drugs for the central nervous system, and drugs for the gastrointestinal tract. The most common type of recommendation concerned adapting the dose, and stopping or changing a drug. In total, 59.7% of the recommendations were accepted by the treating physician. The acceptance rate by the evaluators ranged between 92.4% and 97.0%. The mean clinical relevance of the recommendations was assessed as possibly important (53.4%), possibly low relevance (38.1%), and possibly very important (4.2%). A low interrater agreement concerning clinical relevance between the evaluators was found: kappa values ranged between 0.15 and 0.25. Summated MAI scores significantly improved after the pharmacist recommendations, with mean values decreasing from 9.3 to 6.2 (P < 0.001). Conclusion In this study, the clinical pharmacist identified a high number of potential drug-related problems in older patients; however, the acceptance of the pharmacotherapy recommendations by the treating physician was lower than by a panel of evaluators. This panel, however, rated most recommendations as possibly important and as possibly having low relevance, with low interrater reliability. As the appropriateness of prescribing seemed to improve with decreased MAI scores, clinical pharmacy services may contribute to the optimization of drug therapy in older inpatients. PMID:23807844

Somers, Annemie; Robays, Hugo; De Paepe, Peter; Van Maele, Georges; Perehudoff, Katrina; Petrovic, Mirko

2013-01-01

187

"Driving the devil away": qualitative insights into miraculous cures for AIDS in a rural Tanzanian ward  

PubMed Central

Background The role of religious beliefs in the prevention of HIV and attitudes towards the infected has received considerable attention. However, little research has been conducted on Faith Leaders' (FLs) perceptions of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world. This study investigated FLs' attitudes towards different HIV treatment options (traditional, medical and spiritual) available in a rural Tanzanian ward. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 FLs purposively selected to account for all the denominations present in the area. Data was organised into themes using the software package NVIVO-7. The field work guidelines were tailored as new topics emerged and additional codes progressively added to the coding frame. Results Traditional healers (THs) and FLs were often reported as antagonists but duality prevailed and many FLs simultaneously believed in traditional healing. Inter-denomination mobility was high and guided by pragmatism. Praying for the sick was a common practice and over one third of respondents said that prayer could cure HIV. Being HIV-positive was often seen as "a punishment from God" and a consequence of sin. As sinning could result from "the work of Satan", forgiveness was possible, and a "reconciliation with God" deemed as essential for a favourable remission of the disease. Several FLs believed that "evil spirits" inflicted through witchcraft could cause the disease and claimed that they could cast "demons" away. While prayers could potentially cure HIV "completely", ART use was generally not discouraged because God had "only a part to play". The perceived potential superiority of spiritual options could however lead some users to interrupt treatment. Conclusions The roll-out of ART is taking place in a context in which the new drugs are competing with a diversity of existing options. As long as the complementarities of prayers and ART are not clearly and explicitly stated by FLs, spiritual options may be interpreted as a superior alternative and contribute to hampering adherence to ART. In contexts where ambivalent attitudes towards the new drugs prevail, enhancing FLs understanding of ART's strengths and pitfalls is an essential step to engage them as active partners in ART scale-up programs. PMID:20646300

2010-01-01

188

Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study  

PubMed Central

Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved significantly from admission to discharge both for FPA and non-FPA patients. PMID:17239235

Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

2007-01-01

189

Enacting 'team' and 'teamwork': using Goffman's theory of impression management to illuminate interprofessional practice on hospital wards.  

PubMed

Interprofessional teamwork is widely advocated in health and social care policies. However, the theoretical literature is rarely employed to help understand the nature of collaborative relations in action or to critique normative discourses of teamworking. This paper draws upon Goffman's (1963) theory of impression management, modified by Sinclair (1997), to explore how professionals 'present' themselves when interacting on hospital wards and also how they employ front stage and backstage settings in their collaborative work. The study was undertaken in the general medicine directorate of a large NHS teaching hospital in England. An ethnographic approach was used, including interviews with 49 different health and social care staff and participant observation of ward-based work. These observations focused on both verbal and non-verbal interprofessional interactions. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The study findings suggest that doctor-nurse relationships were characterised by 'parallel working', with limited information sharing or effective joint working. Interprofessional working was based less on planned, 'front stage' activities, such as wards rounds, than on ad hoc backstage opportunistic strategies. These backstage interactions, including corridor conversations, allowed the appearance of collaborative 'teamwork' to be maintained as a form of impression management. These interactions also helped to overcome the limitations of planned front stage work. Our data also highlight the shifting 'ownership' of space by different professional groups and the ways in which front and backstage activities are structured by physical space. We argue that the use of Sinclair's model helps to illuminate the nature of collaborative interprofessional relations within an acute care setting. In such settings, the notion of teamwork, as a form of regular interaction and with a shared team identity, appears to have little relevance. This suggests that interventions to change interprofessional practice need to include a focus on ad hoc as well as planned forms of communication. PMID:21549467

Lewin, Simon; Reeves, Scott

2011-05-01

190

IR system to provide effective IR countermeasure (IRCM) capability to ward off threats posed by shoulder-fired missiles (SFMs)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper present an unique IR sensor technology capable of providing effective deception and noise jamming IReM capability to ward off threats posed by SFMs or STINGER missiles operated by various terrorist groups and Islamic radicals. More than 60,000 such missiles are currently in the hands of Islamic radicals and terrorist groups. Even one such missile can bring down a commercial jet transport carrying more than 350 passengers. The proposed IReM system deploys innovative jamming technique to confuse the missile seeker receiver by introducing sharp FM-modulated noise spikes in the receiver bandwidth, thereby preventing the detection and tracking of aircraft.

Jha, A. R.

2007-10-01

191

[The new communication system about each patient's treatment from the ward to the chemotherapy center in our hospital].  

PubMed

Because the expert nurse of the chemotherapy center collected his profile from his chart and the hospital summary of nursing and we orientated about the induced chemotherapy regimen to the patient who got it after discharge from the ward former, we could not grasp neither his general condition nor mental status adequately. The merit of the outpatient chemotherapy is the improvement of the quality of life, but the patient feels the solitude and anxiety because of the lack of the medical and nursing staff around him. Then we changed that we have visited the patients to collect their profile and orientate about new regimen on his bedside for the smooth conversion to the outpatient chemotherapy. We visited a-total of 45 patients in 2007. Thirty-eight patients visited before their discharge answered, The orientation of the new chemotherapy before my discharge let me get with a security. The visit also enabled both staffs of the chemotherapy center and the ward to possess the common information of each patient and to do the common nursing. We thought that the visit before discharge was effective for the smooth conversion to the outpatient chemotherapy. We would like to reduce the anxiety of the patients who had chemotherapy and to support their struggle against diseases, cooperating to other department and standardizing our care program. PMID:20716901

Yamashita, Maki; Mitsuka, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Takeno, Atsuko; Tatsumi, Mitsutoshi; Nakamura, Takahito

2010-08-01

192

The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience  

PubMed Central

To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

2014-01-01

193

The good pain management (GPM) ward program in china and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience.  

PubMed

To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

2014-07-01

194

Preliminary study of the fungal ecology at the haematology and medical-oncology ward in Bamako, Mali.  

PubMed

Data on fungal epidemiology in sub-Saharan African countries are scarce. This exploratory study aimed to characterize the fungal flora at the Onco-Haematology ward of the National Teaching Hospital of Point G in Bamako, Mali. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the dry and in the rainy seasons. Nasal swab and sputum samples were collected from the hospitalized patients while airborne fungal spores were collected using electrostatic dust-fall collectors. Fungi were identified by their morphological characteristics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Candida albicans was the most frequent yeast species colonizing patients; Aspergillus species were isolated in 86 % of the patients and were the main airborne environmental contaminants. Overall, airborne fungal contamination rates increased from 33.8 % in the dry to 66.2 % in the rainy season (p < 0.001). The most frequent Aspergillus species were Aspergillus niger (36.6 %) and Aspergillus flavus (32.92 %). In contrast, Aspergillus fumigatus (5.43 %) was relatively rare. This high level of fungal exposure raises concern regarding the management of at-risk patients in this Onco-Haematology ward and stresses the need for strengthening the mycological diagnostic capacities to accompany the implementation of adapted fungal infection prevention and management policies. PMID:24889723

Niaré-Doumbo, Safiatou; Normand, Anne Cécile; Diallo, Yacouba Lazarre; Dembelé, Abdoul Karim; Thera, Mahamadou A; Diallo, Dapa; Piarroux, Renaud; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ranque, Stéphane

2014-08-01

195

Parents' Experience of the Transition with their Child from a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) to the Hospital Ward: Searching for Comfort Across Transitions.  

PubMed

Parents of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) have many needs and stressors, but research has yet to examine their experience of their child's transfer from PICU to the hospital ward. Ten parents were interviewed following transfer from PICU to a hospital ward at a children's hospital in Canada. Parents' experience involved a search for comfort through transitions. The themes were: 'being a parent with a critically ill child is exhausting', 'being kept in the know', 'feeling supported by others', and 'being transferred'. Findings from this study can help nurses and health professionals working with parents during transitions. PMID:25023951

Berube, Kristyn M; Fothergill-Bourbonnais, Frances; Thomas, Margot; Moreau, Denise

2014-01-01

196

Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward  

PubMed Central

Background Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches such as the Health Workers for Change initiative have been successful in improving provider-client relationships in various developing country settings, but have not yet been reported in the complex environment of hospital wards. We evaluated the HWC approach for improving the relationship between nurses and parents on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. Methods The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after the workshops, by means of an adapted Picker questionnaire. Two focus-group discussions were held with the workshop participants six months after the intervention. Results During the workshops, nurses demonstrated awareness of poor relationships between themselves and mothers. To tackle this, they proposed measures including weekly meetings to solve problems, maintain respect and increase cooperation, and representation to administrative forces to request better working conditions such as equipment, salaries and staff numbers. The results of the parent satisfaction questionnaire showed some improvement in responsiveness of nurses to client needs, but overall the mean percentage of parents reporting each of 20 problems was not statistically significantly different after the intervention, compared to before it (38.9% versus 41.2%). Post-workshop focus-group discussions with nursing staff suggested that nurses felt more empathic towards mothers and perceived an improvement in the relationship, but that this was hindered by persisting problems in their working environment, including poor relationships with other staff and a lack of response from hospital administration to their needs. Conclusion The intended outcome of the intervention was not met. The priorities of the intervention – to improve nurse-parent relationships – did not match the priorities of the nursing staff. Development of awareness and empathy was not enough to provide care that was satisfactory to clients in the context of working conditions that were unsatisfactory to nurses. PMID:19549319

Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose; Reyburn, Hugh; Poulsen, Anja; Chandler, Clare IR

2009-01-01

197

Documenting the NICU design dilemma: comparative patient progress in open-ward and single family room units  

PubMed Central

Objective: To test the efficacy of single family room (SFR) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) designs, questions regarding patient medical progress and relative patient safety were explored. Addressing these questions would be of value to hospital staff, administrators and designers alike. Study Design: This prospective study documented, by means of Institution Review Board-approved protocols, the progress of patients in two contrasting NICU designs. Noise levels, illumination and air quality measurements were included to define the two NICU physical environments. Result: Infants in the SFR unit had fewer apneic events, reduced nosocomial sepsis and mortality, as well as earlier transitions to enteral nutrition. More mothers sustained stage III lactation, and more infants were discharged breastfeeding in the SFR. Conclusion: This study showed the SFR to be more conducive to family-centered care, and to enhance infant medical progress and breastfeeding success over that of an open ward. PMID:21072040

Domanico, R; Davis, D K; Coleman, F; Davis, B O

2011-01-01

198

Assessment of selected quality fields of nursing care in neurosurgical wards: a prospective study of 530 people – multicenter studies  

PubMed Central

Background One of the elements influencing the assessment of nursing care quality is the assessment of the nurse’s functions that determine the nurse’s particular tasks. The aim of this work was to assess selected tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality on neurosurgical wards, on the basis of patients’ and nursing staff’s opinions. Materials and methods The research was carried out on neurosurgical wards in Poland on a group of 455 patients and 75 nurses. In order to assess nursing care quality, an author’s original questionnaire (Questionnaire – Patient Satisfaction) was used. Results Statistically significant differences concerned particular groups (both patients and nurses) in the assessment of selected issues: providing information about performed activities and operations (P=0.000 and P=0.040), respecting personal dignity and assuring discretion during the operations (P=0.000 and P=0.001), speed of response to patient’s requests (P=0.000 and P=0.000), time availability of nurses for the patient (P=0.000 and P=0.000), providing information about further self-care at home (P=0.032, P=0.008), and nurses’ attitude (kindness, courtesy, tenderness, care) to patients (patient’s assessment only P=0.000). Conclusion Selected tasks in the field of the caring function of nurses were assessed differently by particular groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the assessment of particular tasks in the opinions of patients and nurses, which means that both examined groups similarly assessed tasks involved in the nurse’s caring function, which influence nursing care quality. PMID:25170257

Œlusarz, Robert; Biercewicz, Monika; Barczykowska, Ewa; Haor, Beata; G?owacka, Mariola

2014-01-01

199

Specific character of anaerobic bacterial infections in patients treated in transplantation wards at one of the clinical hospitals in Warsaw.  

PubMed

Immunocompromised patients and patients undergoing invasive procedures are predisposed to bacterial infections, due to the possibility of micro-organism translocation from their physiological habitat. Infectious complications may occur both in the early and late post-transplantation periods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proportion as well as susceptibility profiles of obligatory anaerobes in the etiology of infections in patients hospitalized at transplantation wards of a large clinical hospital in Warsaw. A total of 104 strains of obligatory anaerobes derived from patients hospitalized in two transplantation clinics at a clinical hospital in Warsaw were evaluated. The strains were isolated from 87 clinical samples collected from 84 patients of two transplantation wards between 2007 and 2012. A total of 104 obligatory anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated and identified, with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria constituting 60.6% and 39.4% of the isolates, respectively. Almost exclusively non-spore-forming anaerobes were detected in evaluated samples. The present study showed all isolated Gram-positive bacteria to be susceptible to ß-lactam antibiotics. Metronidazole-resistant bacteria were found among the genera Propionibacterium and Actinomyces. All Gram-negative rods were susceptible to imipenem and metronidazole. Among them, Bacteroides spp. and Parabacteroides distasonis showed resistance to penicillin G (100%). Because of their pathogenicity and altered antibiotic susceptibility profiles, the bacteria of the genera Bacteroides and Parabacteroides are of greatest clinical importance. Approximately 25% of isolates exhibit also resistance to clindamycin. Because of the growing rates of clindamycin resistance, the role of metronidazole in the treatment of Bacteroides spp. is of increasing importance. PMID:25380872

Kierzkowska, M; Majewska, A; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Mlynarczyk, A; Chmura, A; Durlik, M; Deborska-Materkowska, D; Paczek, L; Mlynarczyk, G

2014-10-01

200

Prevalence of HIV and Disease Outcomes on the Medical and Surgical Wards at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends HIV Counseling and Testing (HCT) in a range of clinical settings. We describe the characteristics of patients diagnosed with HIV on the medical and surgical wards at a tertiary care hospital in Malawi. Methods: Under the universal opt-out HCT protocol we characterized the number of new HIV/AIDS infections and associated clinical features among hospitalized surgical and medical patients diagnosed during the course of admission. Results: All 2985 and 3959 medical and surgical patients, respectively, admitted between April 2012 and January 2013 were screened for HCT. 62% and 89% of medical and surgical patients, respectively, had an unknown status on admission and qualified for testing. Of the patients with an unknown status, a new HIV diagnosis was made in 20% and 7% of medical and surgical patients, respectively. Of the newly diagnosed patients with a CD4 count recorded, 91% and 67% of medical and surgical patients, respectively, had a count less than 350, qualifying for ART by Malawi ART guidelines. Newly HIV-diagnosed medical and surgical patients had an inpatient mortality of 20% and 2%, respectively. Discussion: While newly diagnosed HIV-positive medical patients had high inpatient mortality and higher rates of WHO stage 3 or 4 conditions, surgical patients presented with less advanced HIV, though still meeting ART initiation guidelines. The medical inpatient wards are an obvious choice for implementing voluntary counseling and testing (VCT), but surgical patients present with less advanced disease and starting treatment in this group could result in more years of life gained. PMID:24505214

Kendig, Claire E.; McCulloch, Denise J.; Rosenberg, Nora E.; Samuel, Jonathan C.; Mabedi, Charles; Shores, Carol G.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Matoga, Mitch; Charles, Anthony G.

2013-01-01

201

Transmission dynamics of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli clones in rehabilitation wards at a tertiary care centre.  

PubMed

Increasing resistance due to the production of ESBL in Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli) has become a major threat to public health. Our aims were to study the incidence of ESBL-E. coli acquisition during hospitalization and the transmission rates of different ESBL-E. coli clones. This was a prospective case-control study, conducted in two geriatric rehabilitation wards in Tel-Aviv. Serial rectal cultures were collected from admission till discharge. All patient-unique ESBL-E. coli isolates were subjected to molecular typing by PFGE, MLST and determination of ESBL genes. An acquisition of ESBL-E. coli was defined as traceable when a patient with the same ST, PFGE type and ESBL gene was hospitalized in the same ward in parallel to the acquisition case. ESBL-E. colis were recovered from 125 patients out of 492 enrolled: 52 were recovered upon admission, 59 acquired ESBL-E. coli during their stay, and there was undetermined status in 14 patients. A low Norton's score was associated with acquisition (O.R. 1.14 for each point, 95% C.I. 1.01-1.29, p < 0.05). ESBL-E. coli infections (n = 9) had occurred only in ESBL-E. coli carriers. The pandemic ST131 clone was the most common (48/125). The majority of the isolates (101/125) produced CTX-M-type ESBL. Of the 59 acquisition cases, 32 were traced to another patient. In-hospital dissemination was highest in the CTX-M-27-producing ST131 and the SHV-5-producing ST372 sub-clones (acquisition/admission ratios of 17/11 and 9/3, respectively), with almost all cases traced to other patients. In conclusion, most ESBL-E. coli acquisition cases were traceable to other patients. The transmission potential varied significantly between ESBL-E. coli clones. PMID:22963432

Adler, A; Gniadkowski, M; Baraniak, A; Izdebski, R; Fiett, J; Hryniewicz, W; Malhotra-Kumar, S; Goossens, H; Lammens, C; Lerman, Y; Kazma, M; Kotlovsky, T; Carmeli, Y

2012-12-01

202

Evaluating alternative hypotheses for the early evolution and diversification of ants Sen G. Brady, Ted R. Schultz, Brian L. Fisher, and Philip S. Ward  

E-print Network

Evaluating alternative hypotheses for the early evolution and diversification of ants Seán G. Brady and diversification of ants Sea´n G. Brady* , Ted R. Schultz*, Brian L. Fisher , and Philip S. Ward§¶ *Department September 28, 2006 (received for review July 12, 2006) Ants are the world's most diverse and ecologically

Villemant, Claire

203

Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nococomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate

J. Devine; R. P. D. Cooke; E. P. Wright

2001-01-01

204

Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden, Steven Smith, Bruce McNamara, Edgar Buck  

E-print Network

Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden Chemical fingerprinting of anthropogenic and mineral uranium leading to chemical age dating of reactive uranium samples Develop x-ray and/or electron microscopy protocol for non- destructive uranium sample

205

Microbial Contamination on Used Surgical Masks among Hospital Personnel and Microbial Air Quality in their Working Wards: A Hospital in Bangkok  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the relationship of bacterial and fungal contamination on used surgical masks worn by the hospital personnel and microbial air quality in their working wards. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 230 used surgical masks collected from 214 hospital personnel, and 215 indoor air samples collected from their working wards to culture for bacterial and fungal counts. This study was carried out at the hospital in Bangkok. Group or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lacto-phenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient at the significant level of p<0.050. Results Means and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal contamination on inside area of the used masks were 47 ± 56 and 15 ± 9 cfu/ml/piece, and on outside area were 166 ± 199 and 34 ± 18 cfu/ml/piece, respectively, p<0.001. The bacterial and fungal contamination on used masks from hospital personnel working in the male and female medical wards and out-patient department, as well as the bacterial and fungal counts of the indoor air sample collected from the same area were relatively higher than the other wards. The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi contaminated on inside and outside areas of the used masks and air samples were similar (Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp.; respectively). For its relationship, results found that bacterial and fungal counts in air samples showed significantly positive correlation with the bacterial contamination load on outside area of the used masks, r=0.16, p=0.018 and r=0.21, p=0.003, respectively. Conclusion High bacterial contamination on outside area of the used masks was demonstrated, and it showed a significant correlation with microbial air quality of working wards. PMID:25337311

Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Aiempradit, Natkitta; Vatanasomboon, Pisit

2014-01-01

206

Spatial variation of heart failure and air pollution in Warwickshire, UK: an investigation of small scale variation at the ward-level  

PubMed Central

Objectives To map using geospatial modelling techniques the morbidity and mortality caused by heart failure within Warwickshire to characterise and quantify any influence of air pollution on these risks. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Warwickshire, UK. Participants Data from all of the 105 current Warwickshire County wards were collected on hospital admissions and deaths due to heart failure. Results In multivariate analyses, the presence of higher mono-nitrogen oxide (NOx) in a ward (3.35:1.89, 4.99), benzene (Ben) (31.9:8.36, 55.85) and index of multiple deprivation (IMD; 0.02: 0.01, 0.03), were consistently associated with a higher risk of heart failure morbidity. Particulate matter (Pm; ?12.93: ?20.41, ?6.54) was negatively associated with the risk of heart failure morbidity. No association was found between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and heart failure morbidity. The risk of heart failure mortality was higher in wards with a higher NOx (4.30: 1.68, 7.37) and wards with more inhabitants 50+ years old (1.60: 0.47, 2.92). Pm was negatively associated (?14.69: ?23.46, ?6.50) with heart failure mortality. SO2, Ben and IMD scores were not associated with heart failure mortality. There was a prominent variation in heart failure morbidity and mortality risk across wards, the highest risk being in the regions around Nuneaton and Bedworth. Conclusions This study showed distinct spatial patterns in heart failure morbidity and mortality, suggesting the potential role of environmental factors beyond individual-level risk factors. Air pollution levels should therefore be taken into account when considering the wider determinants of public health and the impact that changes in air pollution might have on the health of a population. PMID:25468504

Bennett, Oscar; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Ji, Chen; Linnane, John; Clarke, Aileen

2014-01-01

207

Mobile and Fixed Computer Use by Doctors and Nurses on Hospital Wards: Multi-method Study on the Relationships Between Clinician Role, Clinical Task, and Device Choice  

PubMed Central

Background Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. Objective We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. Methods Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital. Observers used a checklist to record the clinical tasks completed, devices used, and location of the activities. Field notes were also documented during observations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after observation sessions. Assessment of the physical attributes of three devices—stationary PCs, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs—was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. Results The majority (93.1%) of observed nursing tasks were conducted using generic COWs. Most nursing tasks were performed in patients’ rooms (57%) or in the corridors (36%), with a small percentage at a patient’s bedside (5%). Most nursing tasks related to the preparation and administration of drugs. Doctors on ward rounds conducted 57.3% of observed clinical tasks on generic COWs and 35.9% on tablet PCs. On rounds, 56% of doctors’ tasks were performed in the corridors, 29% in patients’ rooms, and 3% at the bedside. Doctors not on a ward round conducted 93.6% of tasks using stationary PCs, most often within the doctors’ office. Nurses and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. Conclusions The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses’ work, and clinical tasks performed by doctors during ward rounds, require highly mobile computer devices. Nurses and doctors on ward rounds showed a strong preference for generic COWs over all other devices. Tablet PCs were selected by doctors for only a small proportion of clinical tasks. Even when using mobile devices clinicians completed a very low proportion of observed tasks at the bedside. The design of the devices and ward space configurations place limitations on how and where devices are used and on the mobility of clinical work. In such circumstances, clinicians will initiate workarounds to compensate. In selecting hardware devices, consideration should be given to who will be using the devices, the nature of their work, and the physical layout of the ward. PMID:19674959

Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, Mirela; Creswick, Nerida

2009-01-01

208

The association between insurance status and in-hospital mortality on the public medical wards of a Kenyan referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Observational data in the United States suggests that those without health insurance have a higher mortality and worse health outcomes. A linkage between insurance coverage and outcomes in hospitalized patients has yet to be demonstrated in resource-poor settings. Methods To determine whether uninsured patients admitted to the public medical wards at a Kenyan referral hospital have any difference in in-hospital mortality rates compared to patients with insurance, we performed a retrospective observational study of all inpatients discharged from the public medical wards at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya, over a 3-month study period from October through December 2012. The primary outcome of interest was in-hospital death, and the primary explanatory variable of interest was health insurance status. Results During the study period, 201 (21.3%) of 956 patients discharged had insurance. The National Hospital Insurance Fund was the only insurance scheme noted. Overall, 211 patients (22.1%) died. The proportion who died was greater among the uninsured compared to the insured (24.7% vs. 11.4%, Chi-square=15.6, p<0.001). This equates to an absolute risk reduction of 13.3% (95% CI 7.9–18.7%) and a relative risk reduction of 53.8% (95% CI 30.8–69.2%) of in-hospital mortality with insurance. After adjusting for comorbid illness, employment status, age, HIV status, and gender, the association between insurance status and mortality remained statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.40, 95% CI 0.24–0.66) and similar in magnitude to the association between HIV status and mortality (AOR=2.45, 95% CI 1.56–3.86). Conclusions Among adult patients hospitalized in a public referral hospital in Kenya, insurance coverage was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. This association was comparable to the relationship between HIV and mortality. Extension of insurance coverage may yield substantial benefits for population health. PMID:24560256

Stone, Geren S.; Tarus, Titus; Shikanga, Mainard; Biwott, Benson; Ngetich, Thomas; Andale, Thomas; Cheriro, Betsy; Aruasa, Wilson

2014-01-01

209

The effect of a virtual ward program on emergency services utilization and quality of life in frail elderly patients after discharge: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Attendance at emergency departments and unplanned hospital readmissions are common for frail older patients after discharge from hospitals. A virtual ward service was piloted to deliver “hospital-at-home” services by community nurses and geriatricians to frail older patients immediately after their discharge from hospital to reduce emergency services utilization. Objectives This study examined the impacts of the virtual ward service on changes in the patients’ emergency attendance and medical readmissions, and their quality of life (QOL). Methods A matched-control quasi-experimental study was conducted at four hospitals, with three providing the virtual ward service (intervention) and one providing the usual community nursing care (control). Subjects in the intervention group were those who are at high risk of readmission and who are supported by home carers recruited from the three hospitals providing the virtual ward service. Matched control patients were those recruited from the hospital providing usual care. Outcome measures include emergency attendance and medical readmission in the past 90 days as identified from medical records, and patient-reported QOL as measured by the modified Quality-of-Life Concerns in the End of Life Questionnaire (Chinese version). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared the changes in the outcome variables between groups. Results A total of 39 patients in each of the two groups were recruited. The virtual ward group showed a greater significant reduction in the number of unplanned emergency hospital readmissions (?1.41±1.23 versus ?0.77±1.31; P=0.049) and a significant improvement in their overall QOL (n=18; 0.60±0.56 versus 0.07±0.56; P=0.02), but there was no significant difference in the number of emergency attendances (?1.51±1.25 versus ?1.08±1.48; P=0.29). Conclusion The study results support the effectiveness of the virtual ward service in reducing unplanned emergency medical readmissions and in improving the QOL in frail older patients after discharge.

Leung, Doris YP; Lee, Diana Tze-Fan; Lee, Iris FK; Lam, Lai-Wah; Lee, Susanna WY; Chan, May WM; Lam, Yin-Ming; Leung, Siu-Hung; Chiu, Pui-Chi; Ho, Nelly KF; Ip, Ming-Fai; Hui, May MY

2015-01-01

210

Infant feeding policies in maternity wards and their effect on breast-feeding success: an analytical overview.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this review is to examine the plausibility of a causal relationship between maternity ward practices and lactation success. METHODS. Studies were located with MEDLINE, from our personal files, and by contacting researchers working in this field. Of the 65 studies originally reviewed, 18 met our inclusion criteria (i.e., hospital-based intervention, experimental design with randomization procedures, or quasi-experimental design with adequate documentation). RESULTS. Meta-analysis indicated that commercial discharge packs had an adverse effect on lactation performance. The impact of early mother-infant contact on lactation success was unclear. Rooming-in and breast-feeding guidance in a rooming-in context had a beneficial impact on breast-feeding among primiparae. Breast-feeding on demand was positively associated with lactation success. In-hospital formula supplementation of 48 mL per day was not associated with poor breast-feeding performance. CONCLUSIONS. Hospital-based breast-feeding interventions can have a beneficial effect on lactation success, particularly among primiparous women. PMID:8279619

Pérez-Escamilla, R; Pollitt, E; Lönnerdal, B; Dewey, K G

1994-01-01

211

Interprofessional education on a training ward for older people: students' conceptions of nurses, occupational therapists and social workers.  

PubMed

Collaboration between professionals in health and social care is essential to meet the needs of the patient. The collaboration is dependent on knowledge and understanding of each other's roles. One means of improving communication and collaboration among professionals is interprofessional education. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how students in nursing, occupational therapy and social work perceived their own and the other professions. Over a three-week period two interviews were conducted with each of 16 students who were on an interprofessional training ward for older people in a municipal setting in Sweden. A phenomenographical approach was used in the analysis of the interviews. The findings showed great variation in how the students perceived the professions, from simplistic in terms of tasks to a more complex conception in terms of knowledge, responsibility and values. Differences in the ways professions were described concerning their professional stance towards the patients were especially accentuated. The findings indicate that the students need opportunities for reflection on and scrutiny of each other's beliefs and knowledge. The influence of interprofessional education involving reflection on the different health-care professions needs to be explored in future research. PMID:17654156

Lidskog, Marie; Löfmark, Anna; Ahlström, Gerd

2007-08-01

212

The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

1993-06-01

213

Characteristics of immigrant and non-immigrant patients in a dual-diagnosis psychiatric ward and treatment implications.  

PubMed

Two studies were conducted among patients in a male dual diagnosis (severe mental illness [SMI] with substance use) ward. The research examined the following questions: (1) Do immigrant and non-immigrant dual diagnosis patients exhibit similar or different socio-demographic, clinical and criminological characteristics? (2) What are the implications for treatment of immigrant (and non-immigrant) patients? Study one analyzed computerized hospital records of 413 male patients; Study two examined patient files of a subgroup of 141 (70 immigrant) male patients. Alongside similarities, non-immigrant patients reported higher numbers of repeat and involuntary hospitalizations and more drug use while immigrants showed longer hospitalizations, more suicide attempts, more violent suicide attempts, more violent offenses and more alcohol use. Among non-immigrants significant relationships were found between severity of SMI and crime/violence while among immigrants a significant relationship was found between suicidality and crime/violence. Implications for treatment include need for awareness of suicide risk among immigrant dual-diagnosis patients and an understanding of the differential relationship with crime/violence for the two populations. PMID:24488692

Walsh, Sophie D; Blass, David; Bensimon-Braverman, Meital; Barak, Lee Topaz; Delayahu, Yael

2014-12-01

214

Microbial Pattern and Antimicrobial Resistance, a Surgeon’s Perspective: Retrospective Study in Surgical Wards and Seven Intensive-Care Units in Two University Hospitals in Cairo, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Significant morbidity and mortality in surgical practice is due to infection with resistant pathogens. Data from Egyptian hospitals may reflect a peculiar pattern. Methods: Retrospective study of antimicrobial susceptibility of 1,064 isolates from patients in surgical zones and intensive-care units (ICUs) in the largest 2 hospitals in Cairo in 2003. Results: The infection rate in surgical wards was 0.41%,

Gamal Moustafa Saied

2006-01-01

215

Patients Hospitalized in General Wards via the Emergency Department: Early Identification of Predisposing Factors for Death or Unexpected Intensive Care Unit Admission—A Historical Prospective  

PubMed Central

Background. To identify, upon emergency department (ED) admission, predictors of unexpected death or unplanned intensive care/high dependency units (ICU/HDU) admission during the first 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards. Methods. Prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical adult ED in a teaching hospital, including consecutive patients hospitalized on regular wards after ED visit, and identification of predictors by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Among 4,619 included patients, 77 (1.67%) target events were observed: 32 unexpected deaths and 45 unplanned transfers to an ICU/HDU. We identified 9 predictors of the target event including the oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and use of psychoactive drug(s). All predictors put the patients at risk during the first 15 days of hospitalization. A logistic model for hospital mortality prediction (death of all causes) still comprised oxygen administration on the ED, unknown current medications, and the use of psychoactive drug(s) as risk factors. Conclusion. The “use of oxygen therapy on the ED,” the “current use of psychoactive drug(s)”, and the “lack of knowledge of current medications taken by the patients” were important predisposing factors to severe adverse events during the 15 days of hospitalization on regular wards following the ED visit. PMID:24624300

Boulain, Thierry; Runge, Isabelle; Delorme, Nathalie; Bouju, Angèle; Valéry, Antoine

2014-01-01

216

Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction) with care was experienced by carers from MMHU compared with standard care wards. PMID:24362015

Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

2013-01-01

217

Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). Discussion This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement. PMID:25566807

Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

2015-01-01

218

Antibiotic Stewardship Ward Rounds and a Dedicated Prescription Chart Reduce Antibiotic Consumption and Pharmacy Costs without Affecting Inpatient Mortality or Re-Admission Rates  

PubMed Central

Background Antibiotic consumption is a major driver of bacterial resistance. To address the increasing burden of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections, antibiotic stewardship programmes are promoted worldwide to rationalize antibiotic prescribing and conserve remaining antibiotics. Few studies have been reported from developing countries and none from Africa that report on an intervention based approach with outcomes that include morbidity and mortality. Methods An antibiotic prescription chart and weekly antibiotic stewardship ward round was introduced into two medical wards of an academic teaching hospital in South Africa between January-December 2012. Electronic pharmacy records were used to collect the volume and cost of antibiotics used, the patient database was analysed to determine inpatient mortality and 30-day re-admission rates, and laboratory records to determine use of infection-related tests. Outcomes were compared to a control period, January-December 2011. Results During the intervention period, 475.8 defined daily doses were prescribed per 1000 inpatient days compared to 592.0 defined daily doses/1000 inpatient days during the control period. This represents a 19.6% decrease in volume with a cost reduction of 35% of the pharmacy’s antibiotic budget. There was a concomitant increase in laboratory tests driven by requests for procalcitonin. There was no difference in inpatient mortality or 30-day readmission rate during the control and intervention periods. Conclusions Introduction of antibiotic stewardship ward rounds and a dedicated prescription chart in a developing country setting can achieve reduction in antibiotic consumption without harm to patients. Increased laboratory costs should be anticipated when introducing an antibiotic stewardship program. PMID:24348995

Boyles, Tom H.; Whitelaw, Andrew; Bamford, Colleen; Moodley, Mischka; Bonorchis, Kim; Morris, Vida; Rawoot, Naazneen; Naicker, Vanishree; Lusakiewicz, Irena; Black, John; Stead, David; Lesosky, Maia; Raubenheimer, Peter; Dlamini, Sipho; Mendelson, Marc

2013-01-01

219

Privacy or help? The use of curtain positioning strategies within the maternity ward environment as a means of achieving and maintaining privacy, or as a form of signalling to peers and professionals in an attempt to seek information or support.  

PubMed

Midwives in the local maternity unit had noted that the interactions between women within the ward environment had started to decline. Women were spending long periods of time behind curtains drawn around their bed space. The staff hypothesized that this was because women desired the privacy of a single room. The literature review revealed a lack of understanding of the concept of privacy within a ward environment from a nursing or midwifery perspective. The review therefore, concentrated on the information offered by the fields of psychology and sociology. This study aimed to observe the methods women use to maintain or preserve their privacy within the ward environment. An ethnographic approach was used incorporating use of documentary evidence, participant observation and discussion, field maps and field notes. The findings of this study centred around the use of curtain positioning, subsequently referred to as 'signalling'. The strategies employed by women included complete closure for total withdrawal, semi-closure for seeking information or support, and partial closure of curtains around the individual's bed space for periods of solitude or rest. The findings have implications for both general and maternity hospital wards but in particular, wards within maternity units that incorporate women with mixed methods of infant feeding, or women in labour mixed with either postnatal or antenatal women. PMID:9515603

Burden, B

1998-01-01

220

How much does self-reported health status, measured by the SF-36, vary between electoral wards with different Jarman and Townsend scores?  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The best way for practices to determine the health status of patients living in areas with different socioeconomic characteristics is unclear. AIMS: To see how much SF-36 health status varies between electoral wards, how much of this variation can be explained by census-derived Jarman and Townsend scores, and compare the performance of census scores with direct socioeconomic information. METHOD: A postal questionnaire survey of 3000 randomly selected 18 to 75-year-olds residing in 15 electoral wards and registered with two urban practices. RESULTS: The response rate was 73%. Only two of the eight SF-36 domains were significantly associated with Jarman scores, whereas seven domains were associated with the Townsend score. Of the four socioeconomic variables derived directly from the survey, unemployment showed the weakest association, housing tenure was associated with seven domains, and car ownership and low income were associated with all eight. Income explained between 47% to 71% of the variation across the eight domains. CONCLUSION: The most accurate predictions about health status were made from direct socioeconomic information. Nonetheless, the association between Townsend score and health status was strong enough to be of practical importance. This study cautions against assuming the Jarman score of a population has a clear relationship with its health status. PMID:11042914

Marsh, P; Carlisle, R; Avery, A J

2000-01-01

221

Parental distress around supplementing breastfed babies using nasogastric tubes on the post-natal ward: a theme from an ethnographic study.  

PubMed

There is abundant evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding. In the UK, supplementation in hospital has consistently been shown to be associated with shortened duration of breastfeeding. This paper reports on a subset of the data from an ethnographic study that explored the expectations, beliefs and experiences of mothers and health professionals concerning supplementation, using a variety of methods, of breastfed babies in an English maternity unit in 2002. This paper aims to describe the expectations, beliefs and experiences of mothers and health professionals concerning supplementation by nasogastric (NG) tube on the post-natal ward. Participant observation was carried out on day and night shifts and at weekends over 9 months. Mothers, midwives, neonatal nurses, health care assistants and senior paediatricians were interviewed. Categories and themes were generated. The researchers' constructs of 'the essential method', when the tube was the method needed for medical reasons, and 'the chosen method', when other methods of oral feeding should have been possible, emerged. The latter included time pressures and the avoidance of any form of oral activity that might perhaps make return to the breast more difficult. The data concerning the use of NG tubes for supplementation yielded the specific theme of parental distress. In the absence of evidence that supplementation by NG tube on the post-natal ward is associated with greater breastfeeding success than other methods, the use of the tube to avoid any form of 'oral confusion' should be discontinued. Its use primarily to save time should not be considered acceptable. PMID:19292746

Taylor, Alison M; Cloherty, Michele; Alexander, Jo; Holloway, Immy; Galvin, Kathleen; Inch, Sally

2009-04-01

222

[1981-1983 breast feeding studies of 1,500 mothers in Dortmund and Haltern. II. Volume of breast milk in the maternity ward].  

PubMed

In two large maternity wards encouraging breast-feeding, breast-milk volumes (weighing of the baby before and after each feeding) and weight development of the infants were determined until dismissal. On days 2, 3 and 4, 20-30%, 60-70%, and 80-90% of the mothers, respectively, produced milk. The largest increase in milk volume ("Einschuss") usually took place between days 3 and 4. Milk volume increased from an average of 150-180 ml on day 4 to 270-300 ml on day 6. Development of milk production was independent of type of delivery; however, the usual delay of one day following caesarean section was not made up for until discharge. Fully breast-feeding mothers produced on the average the same amounts of milk as mothers at the turn of the century. Throughout their stay in the maternity ward, mothers with good breast-feeding experience produced more milk than those with bad or without any breast-feeding experience. Nursing all infants at fairly regular intervals during the day and at night is recommended in order to achieve that as many mothers as possible are fully breast-feeding on discharge. Comparing energy intake and weight development between groups of fully, partially and non breast-fed infants suggested a better utilization of breast-milk. PMID:3614219

Kersting, M; Koester, H; Wennemann, J; Wember, T; Schöch, G

1987-05-01

223

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).  

PubMed

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

224

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients)  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65–101). Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

225

Patterns of ‘balancing between hope and despair’ in the diagnostic phase: a grounded theory study of patients on a gastroenterology ward  

PubMed Central

Title Patterns of ‘balancing between hope and despair' in the diagnostic phase: a grounded theory study of patients on a gastroenterology ward Aim The aim of the study was to learn how patients going through the diagnostic phase experienced and handled their situation. Background Many studies report about the stressful diagnostic phase; however, none has presented a conceptual theory where the concepts are sufficiently related to each other. The Theory of Preparative Waiting has previously been published as a descriptive grounded theory and describes the experience of a group of gastroenterology patients going through the diagnostic phase. Method A classical grounded theory design was used, with data derived from 18 in-depth interviews with 15 patients in a gastroenterology ward at a Norwegian University Hospital. Interviews were conducted during 2002–2003. Findings Participants' main concern was found to be how they could prepare themselves for the concluding interview and life after diagnosis. The theoretical code of ‘balancing’ had four patterns; controlling pain, rational awaiting, denial, and accepting. These patterns of ‘balancing’ guided how participants used the categories of ‘Preparative Waiting Theory’‘seeking and giving information’, ‘interpreting clues’, ‘handling existential threats’ and ‘seeking respite’. Patterns were strategies, so one person could use more than one pattern. Conclusion The diagnostic phase was a difficult time for the participants and the ‘Preparative Waiting Theory’ can assist nurses in assessing how patients prepare themselves differently for getting a diagnosis. All patients would find it helpful to be followed up by a designated contact person at the ward; however, patients using mostly the patterns of controlling pain and denial would benefit most from such support. What is already known about this topic Theoretical coding is the least understood part of grounded theory analysis. The ambiguity of the diagnostic phase causes uncertainty and is experienced as the most stressful part of the illness trajectory for patients. The informational needs and different ways of dealing with the emotional challenge of waiting in the diagnostic phase are widely acknowledged. What this paper adds A conceptual grounded theory where the processes of preparing for a diagnosis are related to each other through the theoretical code of ‘balancing’. Articulation of how the four ‘balancing’ patterns of controlling pain, rational awaiting, denial and accepting explain how patients prepare differently for getting a diagnosis. A model which could be used in developing the nursing role for patients in the diagnostic phase. PMID:18352961

Giske, Tove; Artinian, Barbara

2008-01-01

226

[Comment on “Labor pains at subduction's birth” by William Ward Maggs, and “Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989” by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom] Earthquake update  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the two notes in Eos on the recent great earthquake on the Macquarie Ridge (“Labor Pains at Subduction's Birth,” by William Ward Maggs, June 13, p. 650, and “Macquarie Earthquake of May 23, 1989,” by Barbara Romanowicz and Goran Ekstrom, July 11, p. 700), we would like to put the record straight on minor comments in the articles.Tsunami: Indeed, a tsunami was generated and recorded on at least four tide gages along the coast of southeastern Australia, southeast Tasmania and southeastern New South Wales. The peak-to-trough amplitude was very small, 0.3 m, barely above the normal harbor seiche at each ot the tide gage sites. The duration of the wave train in Sydney harbor was seven hours.

McCue, Kevin

227

Evaluation of the Use and Reasons for Not Using a Helmet by Motorcyclists Admitted to the Emergency Ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital in Kerman  

PubMed Central

Background: Motorcycle crashes are the cause of severe morbidity and mortality especially because of head injuries. It seems that wearing a helmet has an effective role in protection against head injuries. Nevertheless, motorcyclists usually have no tendency to wear a helmet when driving in cities and have several reasons for this behavior. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the use and reasons for not using a helmet by motorcyclists admitted to an emergency ward of a trauma hospital due to accident in Kerman, Iran. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out by recoding the opinions of motorcyclists who had been transferred to the emergency ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital (Kerman/Iran). Since no data was available on the frequency of the use of helmets, a pilot study was carried out and a sample size of 377 was determined for the main study. Then a researcher-made questionnaire was used to investigate the motorcyclists’ reasons for not using a helmet. Results: Only 21.5% of the motorcyclists had been wearing helmets at the time of the accident. The most frequent reasons for not using a helmet were the heavy weight of the helmet (77%), feeling of heat (71.4%), pain in the neck (69.4%), feeling of suffocation (67.7%), limitation of head and neck movements (59.6%) and all together, physical discomfort was the main cause of not wearing a helmet during motorcycle rides. Conclusions: In general, it appears that it is possible to increase the use of helmets by eliminating its physical problems, and increasing the knowledge of community members in relation to the advantages of helmet use, which will result in a significant decrease in traumas resulting from motorcycle accidents. PMID:25599066

Faryabi, Javad; Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Alirezaee, Shahin

2014-01-01

228

Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review  

PubMed Central

Background: Non-communicable diseases are increasing worldwide due to rapidly changing lifestyles and socio-economic status. It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. Objective: To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu. Materials and Methods: A review of admissions into the Paediatrics ward of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, between January 1999 and December 2008 was done using the registry of admission and discharge. Results: The age range of patients admitted during the period was 2 months to 18 years (mean 5.27 ± 5.42 years). There were 1173 (59.6%) males and 796 (40.4%) females. Disorders of the haematological system accounted for 514 (23.3%) of the non-communicable diseases among the admissions, malignancies accounted for 424 (19.2%) among the admissions, whereas the renal, central nervous, and cardiovascular systems were involved in 282 (12.8%), 274 (12.4%), and 241 (10.9%) patients, respectively. There were 274 (12.4%) deaths and 1667 (75.5%) discharges while 38 (1.7%) were discharged against medical advice. Data on 221(10.2%) of the patients were reported missing. Malignancies contributed to 75 (27.3%) of the deaths, haematological disorders accounted for 44 (16%) whereas renal disorders and nutritional disorders contributed to 43 (15.7%) and 41 (15%) of the deaths, respectively. Conclusion: Non-communicable diseases affect children in our environment and contribute to morbidity and mortality in children. Strategies to prevent these diseases should be encouraged in order to avert the challenges of double burden of the diseases in children.

Emodi, IJ; Ikefuna, AN; Ujunwa, FA; Chinawa, JM

2014-01-01

229

Pharmacotherapy for Adverse Events Reduces the Length of Hospital Stay in Patients Admitted to Otolaryngology Ward: A Single Arm Intervention Study  

PubMed Central

Background To determine whether adverse events extend the duration of hospitalization, and to evaluate the effectiveness of medical intervention in ameliorating adverse events and reducing the prolonged hospital stay associated with adverse events. Methods A single arm intervention study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2014 in the otolaryngology ward of a 614-bed, university-affiliated hospital. Adverse events were monitored daily by physicians, pharmacists and nurses, and recorded in the electronic medical chart for each patient. Appropriate drug management of adverse events was performed by physicians in liaison with pharmacists. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the length of hospitalization of patients who underwent medical intervention for adverse events. Results Of 571 patients admitted to the otolaryngology ward in a year, 219 patients (38.4%) experienced adverse events of grade ?2. The duration of hospitalization was affected by the grade of adverse events, with a mean duration of hospital stay of 9.2, 17.2, 28.3 and 47.0 days for grades 0, 1, 2, and 3–4, respectively. Medical intervention lowered the incidence of grade ?2 adverse events to 14.5%. The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in patients who showed an improvement of adverse events after medical intervention than those who did not (26.4 days vs. 41.6 days, hazard ratio 1.687, 95% confidence interval: 1.260–2.259, P<0.001). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated that insomnia, constipation, nausea/vomiting, infection, non-cancer pain, oral mucositis, odynophagia and neutropenia were significant risk factors for prolongation of hospital stay. Conclusion Patients who experienced adverse events are at high risk of prolonged hospitalization. Medical intervention for adverse events was found to be effective in reducing the length of hospital stay associated with adverse events. PMID:25549093

Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Ryo; Okayasu, Shinji; Kuze, Bunya; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

230

Well completion and hydraulic-fracture-treatment design and analysis of the Canyon Sands (Lower and Middle Intervals). Phillips Petroleum Company, Ward C Well No. 11, Sonora (Canyon Sands) field, Sutton County, Texas. Topical report, July 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report represents a comprehensive analysis of the testing and design of the completion and hydraulic fracturing treatment on the Lower and Middle Intervals of the Canyon Sands in the Phillips Petroleum Company Ward C No. 11 Well. Presented is a reservoir description; in-situ stress measurements; and the design, execution and evaluation of the mini-frac and propped fracturing treatments. As

Wooten

1991-01-01

231

Meningitis caused by Escherichia coli producing TEM-52 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase within an extensive outbreak in a neonatal ward: epidemiological investigation and characterization of the strain.  

PubMed

Outbreaks caused by Enterobacteriaceae isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in neonatal wards can be difficult to control. We report here an extensive outbreak in a neonatal ward with a case of meningitis caused by an ESBL-producing Escherichia coli strain. Between 24 March and 29 April 2009, among the 59 neonates present in the ward, 26 neonates with ESBL-producing E. coli rectal colonization were detected (44%). One of the colonized neonates developed meningitis with a favorable outcome after treatment combining imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin. Despite strict intensification of hygiene and isolation procedures for more than 1 month, ward closure to new admissions was necessary to control the outbreak. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis performed on 31 isolates recovered from 26 neonates and two mother's milk samples showed a clonal strain. ESBL PCR assays indicated that the strain harbored a TEM-52 ESBL encoded by an IncI1 replicon. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the strain belonged to rare phylogenetic group C, which is closely related to group B1 but appears as group A by the triplex PCR phylogrouping method. The strain harbored the virulence genes fuyA, aer, and iroN and was virulent in a mouse model of septicemia. This work indicates the high potential of colonization, transmission, and virulence of some ESBL-producing E. coli clones. PMID:20519482

Moissenet, Didier; Salauze, Béatrice; Clermont, Olivier; Bingen, Edouard; Arlet, Guillaume; Denamur, Erick; Mérens, Audrey; Mitanchez, Delphine; Vu-Thien, Hoang

2010-07-01

232

Anammox moving bed biofilm reactor pilot at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plants in Brooklyn, New York: start-up, biofilm population diversity and performance optimization.  

PubMed

New York City Environmental Protection in conjunction with City College of New York assessed the application of the anammox process in the reject water treatment using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) located at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plant, in Brooklyn, NY. The single-stage nitritation/anammox MBBR was seeded with activated sludge and consequently was enriched with its own 'homegrown' anammox bacteria (AMX). Objectives of this study included collection of additional process kinetic and operating data and assessment of the effect of nitrogen loading rates on process performance. The initial target total inorganic nitrogen removal of 70% was limited by the low alkalinity concentration available in the influent reject water. Higher removals were achieved after supplementing the alkalinity by adding sodium hydroxide. Throughout startup and process optimization, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were used for monitoring the relevant species enriched in the biofilm and in the suspension. Maximum nitrogen removal rate was achieved by stimulating the growth of a thick biofilm on the carriers, and controlling the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the bulk flow and the nitrogen loading rates per surface area; all three appear to have contributed in suppressing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria activity while enriching AMX density within the biofilm. PMID:25401307

Mehrdad, M; Park, H; Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Chandran, K

2014-01-01

233

Nurse Managers' Perceptions Related to Their Leadership Styles, Knowledge, and Skills in These Areas—A Viewpoint: Case of Health Centre Wards in Finland  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles—visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating—were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles—visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic—to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

2013-01-01

234

Ongoing spread of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in different wards of an acute general hospital, Italy, June to December 2011.  

PubMed

We describe polyclonal spread of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in an acute general hospital in Italy. Between June and December 2011, 58 colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were recovered from 28 patients admitted to different wards, but mainly in the intensive care units. All isolates were tested for drug susceptibility and the presence of beta-lactamase (bla) genes. Clonality was investigated by repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Fifty-two isolates had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for colistin of 6-128 mg/L, carried bla(KPC3) and were attributed to sequence type ST258. The remaining six isolates were susceptible to carbapenems, exhibited MICs for colistin of 3-32 mg/L, and belonged to two different types, ST15 and ST273. Rep-PCR included all isolates in three clusters, one containing all ST258 KPC-3-producing isolates and two containing ST15 and ST273 isolates.Cross-transmission containment measures and intensification of staff and environmental hygiene could not stop the outbreak. Selective pressure and horizontal transmission probably contributed to emergence and spread of three different strains of colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae in the hospital. Strict implementation of the above measures and a wider awareness of the antimicrobial resistance threat are crucial to preserve the last therapeutic options of the multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:22913977

Mammina, C; Bonura, C; Di Bernardo, F; Aleo, A; Fasciana, T; Sodano, C; Saporito, M A; Verde, M S; Tetamo, R; Palma, D M

2012-01-01

235

Nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and skills in these areas-a viewpoint: case of health centre wards in Finland.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceptions related to their leadership styles, knowledge, and their skills in these areas in health centre wards in Finland. The data were collected from nurse managers (n = 252) in health centre hospitals in Finland using a structured questionnaire (response rate 63%). Six leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, democratic, commanding, and isolating-were reflected on. Almost all respondents in every age group considered four leadership styles-visionary, coaching, affiliate, and democratic-to be very important or important. Nurse managers estimated their knowledge and skills in leadership styles to be essentially fairly sufficient or sufficient. Nurse managers' abilities to reflect, understand, and, if necessary, change their leadership style influence the work unit's success and employees' job satisfaction. Nurse managers, especially new nurse managers, need more theoretic, evidence-based education to cope with these expectations and to develop their professional abilities. Together with universities, health care organizations should start planning nurse manager education programmes that focus on strategic issues, leadership, job satisfaction, challenging situations in leadership, change management, work unit management (e.g., economy, efficiency, and resources), and how the nurse managers consider their own wellbeing. PMID:23691356

Vesterinen, Soili; Suhonen, Marjo; Isola, Arja; Paasivaara, Leena; Laukkala, Helena

2013-01-01

236

Well completion and hydraulic-fracture-treatment design and analysis of the Canyon Sands (Lower and Middle Intervals). Phillips Petroleum Company, Ward C Well No. 11, Sonora (Canyon Sands) field, Sutton County, Texas. Topical report, July 1991  

SciTech Connect

The report represents a comprehensive analysis of the testing and design of the completion and hydraulic fracturing treatment on the Lower and Middle Intervals of the Canyon Sands in the Phillips Petroleum Company Ward C No. 11 Well. Presented is a reservoir description; in-situ stress measurements; and the design, execution and evaluation of the mini-frac and propped fracturing treatments. As part of the West Texas Canyon Sands GRI cooperative well program, some of the data and results obtained on another Canyon Sands co-op well are included with the results from the Ward C-11. In-situ stress measurements are coupled with the results from the LSDS log stress to obtain a calibrated stress profile. These data, along with mini-frac data are used to analyze hydraulic fracturing in the reservoir.

Wooten, C.T.

1991-07-11

237

Causes and consequences of head injuries among rural population hospitalized in the Ward for Multi-Organ Injuries. I. Demographic and social structure.  

PubMed

The main objective of the study was the analysis of types, causes and consequences of head injuries among patients treated in the Ward for Multi-Organ Injuries during the period 1999-2002. The study aimed at the recognition of the health situation and selected demographic traits of people who had sustained head injuries. The authors' research tool - a Scientific-Research Protocol - was applied in the study. The survey covered 265 people, including 204 males (77.0%) and 61 females (23.0%) hospitalized due to head injuries; 90 people, i.e. 34% of the total population examined, were rural inhabitants 82.2% were males and 17.8% females. Thus, among the population examined the percentage of males was considerably higher than that of females, both in the sub-populations of urban and rural inhabitants. The percentage of people aged 65 and over was higher among the rural population, compared to urban inhabitants (21.1% and 8.0%, respectively), while the percentage of patients aged under 35 was lower (30.0% and 48.0%, respectively). A significantly higher percentage of patients living in rural areas, compared to urban inhabitants, had an elementary school or elementary vocational education level (77.8% and 46.3%, respectively). The number of patients who were never married was smaller among the rural than urban population (22.2% and 35.4%, respectively), whereas the percentage of those widowed was higher (13.3% and 2.9%, respectively). In the group of patients living in rural areas the percentages of people maintaining themselves on nonagricultural and agricultural work were similar (27.7% and 25.6%, respectively). PMID:19572473

Karwat, Irena Dorota; Gorczyca, Rafa?; Krupa, Szczepan

2009-06-01

238

Dissemination of IncFII(K)-type plasmids in multiresistant CTX-M-15-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from children in hospital paediatric oncology wards.  

PubMed

In this study, extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in children with malignancies hospitalised at a paediatric oncology department in the Czech Republic were investigated. From June 2009 to January 2010, a total of 50 ESBL-producing faecal isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were obtained from 28 patients. These isolates were characterised with regard to ESBL enzymes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and plasmids conferring resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. ESBL-producing isolates included Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=36), Escherichia coli (n=7), Klebsiella oxytoca (n=3), Enterobacter cloacae (n=2) and Citrobacter freundii (n=2). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates belonged to 7 MLST types, including sequence types ST280, ST321, ST323 and ST416 as well as the novel types ST626, ST627 and ST628. The multiresistant epidemic clone E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 was detected in one patient. The gene bla(CTX-M-15) was found on large conjugative IncFII(K) plasmids along with bla(TEM-1), bla(OXA-1), qnrB1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, strA, sul2, aac(3')-II and tet(A) genes in most isolates. Dissemination of IncFII(K) plasmids among various Enterobacteriaceae isolates was considered an important aspect of nosocomial colonisation in the wards by Enterobacteriaceae species producing ESBLs. This is the first study documenting multiple antibiotic resistance elements, including qnr genes, in IncFII(K) plasmids in various bacterial species isolated in a single hospital department. The results highlight the evolution of IncFII(K) plasmids into new variants containing novel antibiotic resistance elements and their important role in spreading ESBL-producing bacteria among hospitalised patients. PMID:23043911

Dolejska, Monika; Brhelova, Eva; Dobiasova, Hana; Krivdova, Jana; Jurankova, Jana; Sevcikova, Alena; Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Cizek, Alois; Vavrina, Martin; Kutnikova, Lucia; Sterba, Jaroslav

2012-12-01

239

Dr. G. Ward Wilson 1 Mine ARD G. Ward Wilson  

E-print Network

to neutralize the sulfuric acid (i.e. carbonates). Hence, the net acid released is defined as: "Acid Rock Comments: 1. Acid production is initially a slow process which requires time to develop. However, once 10 6 x 1.64) The potential for producing sulfuric acid and acid drainage appears overwhelming. #12;Dr

Boisvert, Jeff

240

To ward Computational Systems Biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and successful application of high-throughput technologies are transform- ing biological research. The large quantities of data being generated by these technologies have led to the emergence of systems biology, which emphasizes large-scale, parallel characterization of biological systems and integration of fragmentary information into a coherent whole. Complementing the reductionist approach that has dominated biology for the last century,

Lingchong You

2004-01-01

241

The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is…

Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

1983-01-01

242

Increasing the frequency of hand washing by healthcare workers does not lead to commensurate reductions in staphylococcal infection in a hospital ward  

PubMed Central

Background Hand hygiene is generally considered to be the most important measure that can be applied to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Continuous emphasis on this intervention has lead to the widespread opinion that HAI rates can be greatly reduced by increased hand hygiene compliance alone. However, this assumes that the effectiveness of hand hygiene is not constrained by other factors and that improved compliance in excess of a given level, in itself, will result in a commensurate reduction in the incidence of HAI. However, several researchers have found the law of diminishing returns to apply to hand hygiene, with the greatest benefits occurring in the first 20% or so of compliance, and others have demonstrated that poor cohorting of nursing staff profoundly influences the effectiveness of hand hygiene measures. Collectively, these findings raise intriguing questions about the extent to which increasing compliance alone can further reduce rates of HAI. Methods In order to investigate these issues further, we constructed a deterministic Ross-Macdonald model and applied it to a hypothetical general medical ward. In this model the transmission of staphylococcal infection was assumed to occur after contact with the transiently colonized hands of HCWs, who, in turn, acquire contamination only by touching colonized patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of imperfect hand cleansing on the transmission of staphylococcal infection and to identify, whether there is a limit, above which further hand hygiene compliance is unlikely to be of benefit. Results The model demonstrated that if transmission is solely via the hands of HCWs, it should, under most circumstances, be possible to prevent outbreaks of staphylococcal infection from occurring at a hand cleansing frequencies < 50%, even with imperfect hand hygiene. The analysis also indicated that the relationship between hand cleansing efficacy and frequency is not linear – as efficacy decreases, so the hand cleansing frequency required to ensure R0 < 1 increases disproportionately. Conclusion Although our study confirmed hand hygiene to be an effective control measure, it demonstrated that the law of diminishing returns applies, with the greatest benefit derived from the first 20% or so of compliance. Indeed, our analysis suggests that there is little benefit to be accrued from very high levels of hand cleansing and that in most situations compliance > 40% should be enough to prevent outbreaks of staphylococcal infection occurring, if transmission is solely via the hands of HCWs. Furthermore we identified a non-linear relationship between hand cleansing efficacy and frequency, suggesting that it is important to maximise the efficacy of the hand cleansing process. PMID:18764942

Beggs, Clive B; Shepherd, Simon J; Kerr, Kevin G

2008-01-01

243

Situation analysis and issues in management of biomedical waste in select small health care facilities in a ward under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, Bangalore, India.  

PubMed

Smaller health care facilities especially clinics though believed to generate lesser quantum/categories of medical waste, the number of clinics/small health care settings are considerable. The movement to manage biomedical waste in a safe and scientific manner has gathered momentum among the medium and large hospitals in Bangalore, but there has been a little understanding and focus on the smaller health care facilities/clinics in this aspect. It is important to gather evidence regarding the current situation of bio-medical waste (BMW) management and issues in smaller health care settings, so as to expand the safe management to all points of generation in Bangalore and will also help to plan relevant interventional strategies for the same. Hence an exploratory study was conducted to assess the current situation and issues in management of BMW among small health care facilities (sHCF). This cross sectional study was conducted in T. Dasarahalli (ward number 15) under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagar Palike (BBMP) of Bangalore. Data was collected from a convenient sample of 35 nursing homes (<50 beds) and clinics in December 2011. The results of this study indicate that 3 (20 %) of nursing homes had a Policy for Health Care Waste Management, though committees for Infection control and Hospital waste management were absent. Recording system like injury and waste management registers were non-existent. In our study the Common Bio-medical Waste Treatment Facility operator collected waste from 28 (80 %) of the sHCF. Segregation at the point of generation was present in 22 (62.9 %) of the sHCF. Segregation process was compliant as per BMW rules 1998 among 5 (16.1 %) of the sHCF. 18 sHCF workers were vaccinated with hepatitis B and tetanus. Deficiencies were observed in areas of containment, sharps management and disinfection. It was observed that though the quantum and category of waste generated was limited there exist deficiencies which warrant initiation of system development measures including capacity building. PMID:23982773

Chethana, Thirthahalli; Thapsey, Hemanth; Gautham, Melur Sukumar; Sreekantaiah, Pruthvish; Suryanarayana, Suradhenupura Puttajois

2014-04-01

244

An assessment of the efficacy of searching in biomedical databases beyond MEDLINE in identifying studies for a systematic review on ward closures as an infection control intervention to control outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of our study is to determine the value and efficacy of searching biomedical databases beyond MEDLINE for systematic reviews. Methods We analyzed the results from a systematic review conducted by the authors and others on ward closure as an infection control practice. Ovid MEDLINE including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, CINAHL Plus, LILACS, and IndMED were systematically searched for articles of any study type discussing ward closure, as were bibliographies of selected articles and recent infection control conference abstracts. Search results were tracked, recorded, and analyzed using a relative recall method. The sensitivity of searching in each database was calculated. Results Two thousand ninety-five unique citations were identified and screened for inclusion in the systematic review: 2,060 from database searching and 35 from hand searching and other sources. Ninety-seven citations were included in the final review. MEDLINE and Embase searches each retrieved 80 of the 97 articles included, only 4 articles from each database were unique. The CINAHL search retrieved 35 included articles, and 4 were unique. The IndMED and LILACS searches did not retrieve any included articles, although 75 of the included articles were indexed in LILACS. The true value of using regional databases, particularly LILACS, may lie with the ability to search in the language spoken in the region. Eight articles were found only through hand searching. Conclusions Identifying studies for a systematic review where the research is observational is complex. The value each individual study contributes to the review cannot be accurately measured. Consequently, we could not determine the value of results found from searching beyond MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL with accuracy. However, hand searching for serendipitous retrieval remains an important aspect due to indexing and keyword challenges inherent in this literature. PMID:25387523

2014-01-01

245

Impact of conversion from an open ward design paediatric intensive care unit environment to all isolated rooms environment on incidence of bloodstream infections and antibiotic resistance in Southern Israel (2000 to 2008).  

PubMed

We studied the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical aspects and outcome of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit. All BSI episodes were prospectively identified and analysed. The paediatric intensive care unit moved in 2006 from an open-plan unit to a new (all single room) unit. Three hundred and fifty-three BSI episodes occurred in 299 of 4162 patients. Overall, BSI incidence was 85 per 1000 hospitalised children. Fewer BSI episodes occurred during the last two years of the study (2007 to 2008), compared with 2000 to 2006 (70 of 1061 admissions, 6.5% versus 283 of 3101 admissions, 9.1%, respectively, P=0.01). There were 127 of 340 (37.4%) community-acquired and 213 of 340 (62.6%) nosocomial BSI episodes (31 of 1000 and 51 of 1000, respectively). Nosocomial BSI episodes decreased during 2007 to 2008 versus 2000 to 2006 (37.7% versus 55.8%, P=0.03). In 448 instances, pathogens were isolated, 231 (52%) Gram-positive and 188 (42%) Gram-negative. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (41.1%, 19.9% and 11.7%, respectively) were the most common Gram-positive and Enterobacteriaceae spp. the most frequent Gram-negative organisms (45.2%, of them Klebsiella spp. and E. coli 40% and 29.4%, respectively). A significant decrease was recorded during 2007 to 2008 in Enterobacteriaceae resistance to piperacillin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Thirty of 299 (10%, 9 with S. pneumoniae-BSI) patients died. A significant decrease in BSI and nosocomial incidence and Enterobacteriaceae spp. antibiotic resistance was recorded following the conversion of the paediatric intensive care unit from an open ward to an all isolated rooms environment. PMID:25579287

Lazar, I; Abukaf, H; Sofer, S; Peled, N; Leibovitz, E

2015-01-01

246

Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... cell membrane. These channels transport positively charged atoms (ions), such as potassium and sodium, into and out of cells. In cardiac muscle, ion channels play critical roles in maintaining the heart's ...

247

Using Exercise to Ward Off Depression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exercise can be as effective as psychotherapy and antidepressant therapy in treating mild-to-moderate depression, and even more effective when used in conjunction with them. Exercise can also be preventive therapy for those not clinically depressed. The paper explains how best to work exercise into a depressed patient's therapy. (Author/SM)

Nicoloff, George; Schwenk, Thomas L.

1995-01-01

248

Reservoir characterization of Yates Formation (Permian, Guadalupian), South Ward field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

The Yates Formation is a prominent hydrocarbon producing unit in the Permian Basin of west Texas. Production is predominantly from very fine grained sandstones and siltstones that are interbedded with carbonates. The producing clastics have...

Dronamraju, Sharma

2012-06-07

249

College Student Attitudes to ward Buddhism and Islam  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 197 and a sample of 141 undergraduates from a larger population of 200 at a large southeastern American university revealed their attitudes toward Buddhism and Islam respectively. In regard to Buddhism, while over 90% of the respondents reported NOT being knowledgeable about Buddhism, they reported generally positive beliefs about Buddhism which is associated with spiritual enlightenment, positive

Derek Maher; David Knox; Angela DeCuzzi

2008-01-01

250

A retrospective analysis of dermatological problems in a hematology ward  

PubMed Central

Background Skin problems are common in patients with hematological disorders. Dermatologists play an important role in providing consultative service to other medical specialties. While most requests for dermatologic consultations are for common skin conditions, challenging scenarios and diagnostic dilemmas are frequently encountered, especially in acutely ill, immunocompromised patients. Aim To characterize the profile of dermatological problems encountered in a hematology unit in a tertiary hospital, and to delineate clinical features that may help to distinguish cutaneous adverse drug reactions from toxic erythema of chemotherapy. Materials and methods A retrospective study was conducted reviewing all inpatient referrals for dermatology consultations from the hematology unit during a 6-month period from January 2010 to June 2010, at the largest multidisciplinary tertiary hospital in Singapore. Results Of the 692 referrals for dermatology consultation, 58 (8.3%) came from the hematology department. A total of 60 dermatological diagnoses were made. Most patients were referred for primary dermatological disorders (43.33%, n = 26). The most common diagnoses within this category were cutaneous infections (15%, n = 9) and dermatitis (13.33%, n = 8). Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (16.67%, n = 10) and toxic erythema of chemotherapy (10%, n = 6) were also frequently encountered. We could not identify any distinctive clinical feature that may help to differentiate the two conditions. Conclusion Our study reinforces the importance of inpatient medical dermatology in terms of both service and education to nondermatologists, who continue to face difficulties diagnosing common skin disorders. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions and toxic erythema of chemotherapy are clinically similar and difficult to differentiate. Larger prospective studies are needed to examine this problem. PMID:23766654

Koh, HY

2013-01-01

251

Significance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the Bess B. Ward  

E-print Network

of the processes leading to fixed nitrogen loss. Microbiologists often argue that some bacteria will figure out how sink of fixed nitrogen (i.e. the production of N2) in the marine nitrogen budget. Some bacteria reduce: bacteria capable of oxidizing ammonium to nitrogen gas (N2). This new source of N2 has now been detected

Ward, Bess

252

Psychiatric Morbidity and Referral on Two General Medical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatric morbidity among 230 medical inpatients was determined by a two-stage screening procedure, using the General Health Questionnaire and Standardized Psychiatric Interview. Of these patients, 23% were considered psychiatrically ill, affective disorders being the commonest illnesses encountered; and 27 (12%) were psychiatrically referred. While referral was related to severity of psychiatric illness and previous psychiatric illness, the degree to which

G. P. Maguire; D. L. Julier; K. E. Hawton; J. H. J. Bancroft

1974-01-01

253

MARY WARD'S ENGLISH INSTITUTE: THE APOSTOLATE AS SELF-AFFIRMATION?  

E-print Network

vocation did not imply any disdain towards long-established forms of female religious life. A timely metaphor was omnipresent, portraying the Ladies as soldiers in battle, perhaps, even, on a crusade which carefully since, as she put it: Whoever wishes to serve beneath the banner of the cross as a soldier of God

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

TEACHING THE MENTALLY RETARDED, A HANDBOOK FOR WARD PERSONNEL.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

WRITTEN FOR ATTENDANTS, VOLUNTEERS, PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE, AND PARENTS, THIS MANUAL PRESENTS PRINCIPLES AND METHODS FOR TEACHING THE MENTALLY RETARDED TO BE AS INDEPENDENT AS POSSIBLE. THE FIRST SECTION PROVIDES GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE DEVELOPMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF NORMAL CHILDREN AND CONTRASTS THESE WITH SOME OF THE NEEDS OF THE RETARDED.…

BENSBERG, GERALD J.

255

Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

Barber, William H.

1985-01-01

256

Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward  

PubMed Central

AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

2011-01-01

257

Current Biology Vol 16 No 5 Philip S. Ward  

E-print Network

characteristics of ants and in the range of environments to which they have adapted. From deserts to tropical to ants in the form of food and/or shelter in return for protection against herbivores. Nearly all ant

Ward, Philip S.

258

ChemWARD : extracting chemical structure from printed diagrams  

E-print Network

Over the years, a vast amount of literature in the field of chemistry has accumulated, and searching for documents about specific molecules is a formidable task. To the extent that the literature is textual, services like ...

Moscicki, Angelique (Angelique E.)

2009-01-01

259

The facies, environments of deposition and cyclicity of the Yates Formation, North Ward-Estes field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

The Yates Formation is part of the Artesia Group, a sequence of interbedded carbonates, clastics and evaporates that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian basin in Late Permian (Upper Guadalupian) time. The Artesia Group...

Johnson, Ronnie Delane

2012-06-07

260

On the Topicalization of Indefinite NPs* Gregory L. Ward Ellen F. Prince  

E-print Network

this it is inferred that indefinite NPs may not be preposed. Thus, Hankamer stars 2a but not 2b: (2)a.*A sandwich, I the registry of discourse', either because it has been mentioned previously or because it is in the 'permanent registry' (p. 271). However, this is too strong in that it disallows Topicalizations like the one in 4a

Plotkin, Joshua B.

261

SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET Michael D. Adams and Rabab Ward  

E-print Network

SYMMETRY-PRESERVING REVERSIBLE INTEGER-TO-INTEGER WAVELET TRANSFORMS Michael D. Adams and Rabab of symmetry-preserving re- versible integer-to-integer wavelet transforms. The transforms from both that preserve symmetry. For example, symmetry-preserving transforms have the advantage of being compatible

Adams, Michael D.

262

Enterobacter sakazakii in dried infant formulas and milk kitchens of maternity wards in São Paulo, Brazil.  

PubMed

This study was the first conducted in Brazil to evaluate the presence of Enterobacter sakazakii in milk-based powdered infant formula manufactured for infants 0 to 6 months of age and to examine the conditions of formula preparation and service in three hospitals in São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples of dried and rehydrated infant formula, environments of milk kitchens, water, bottles and nipples, utensils, and hands of personnel were analyzed, and E. sakazakii and Enterobacteriaceae populations were determined. All samples of powdered infant formula purchased at retail contained E. sakazakii at <0.3 [corrected] most probable number (MPN)/100 g. In hospital samples, E. sakazakii was found in one unopened formula can (0.3 MPN/100 g) and in the residue from one nursing bottle from hospital A. All other cans of formula from the same lot bought at a retail store contained E. sakazakii at <0.3 [corrected] MPN/100 g. The pathogen also was found in one cleaning sponge from hospital B. Enterobacteriaceae populations ranged from 10(1) to 10(5) CFU/g in cleaning aids and <5 CFU/g in all formula types (dry or rehydrated), except for the sample that contained E. sakazakii, which also was contaminated with Enterobacteriaceae at 5 CFU/g. E. sakazakii isolates were not genetically related. In an experiment in which rehydrated formula was used as the growth medium, the temperature was that of the neonatal intensive care unit (25 degrees C), and the incubation time was the average time that formula is left at room temperature while feeding the babies (up to 4 h), a 2-log increase in levels of E. sakazakii was found in the formula. Visual inspection of the facilities revealed that the hygienic conditions in the milk kitchens needed improvement. The length of time that formula is left at room temperature in the different hospitals while the babies in the neonatal intensive care unit are being fed (up to 4 h) may allow for the multiplication of E. sakazakii and thus may lead to an increased health risk for infants. PMID:19205461

Palcich, Gabriela; Gillio, Cintia de Moraes; Aragon-Alegro, Lina Casale; Pagotto, Franco J; Farber, Jeffrey M; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria Teresa

2009-01-01

263

Navigating the Wards: Teaching Medical Students to Use Their Moral Compasses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper argues that medical ethics education relies too much on strategies that target ethical thinking and should focus more on students as ethical actors in specific clinical contexts, responding to ethical dilemmas. Traditional approaches may not offer the skills students need to learn norms of ethical behavior. Strategies for encouraging…

Swensen, Sara L.; Rothstein, Julie A.

1996-01-01

264

Power consumption modeling in optical multilayer Ward Van Heddeghem, Filip Idzikowski*  

E-print Network

), technical (reducing the associated heat dissipation) and environmental (reducing the carbon footprint expensive or unfeasible. For illustration and evaluation purpose, we apply both calculation approaches

Wichmann, Felix

265

Safety and efficacy of continuous morphine infusions following pediatric cranial surgery in a surgical ward setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Morphine is avoided by many neurosurgeons following cranial surgery. There exists a concern regarding the potential complications\\u000a and a perception that cranial surgery is less painful than other surgical procedures. At British Columbia Children’s Hospital\\u000a continuous morphine infusions (CMI) have been used to control pain in pediatric neurosurgical patients. The purpose of this\\u000a study was to compare the safety and

Daniel T. Warren; Tim Bowen-Roberts; Christine Ou; Robert Purdy; Paul Steinbok

2010-01-01

266

Accumulation of Nitrogen Oxides in Copper-Limited Cultures of Denitrifying Julie Granger; Bess B. Ward  

E-print Network

Accumulation of Nitrogen Oxides in Copper-Limited Cultures of Denitrifying Bacteria Julie Granger-limited cultures of denitrifying bacteria Abstract-Three strains of heterotrophic denitrifying bac- teria were, by the American Society of Lim~lologyand Oceanography. lllc. Accumulation of nitrogen oxides in copper

Ward, Bess

267

A critical assessment of monitoring practices, patient deterioration, and alarm fatigue on inpatient wards: a review  

PubMed Central

Approximately forty million surgeries take place annually in the United States, many of them requiring overnight or lengthier post operative stays in the over five thousand hospitals that comprise our acute healthcare system. Leading up to this Century, it was common for most hospitalized patients and their families to believe that being surrounded by well-trained nurses and physicians assured their safety. That bubble burst with the Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report: To Err Is Human, followed closely by its 2001 report: Crossing the Quality Chasm. This review article discusses unexpected, potentially lethal respiratory complications known for being difficult to detect early, especially in postoperative patients recovering on hospital general care floors (GCF). We have designed our physiologic explanations and simplified cognitive framework to give our front line clinical nurses a thorough, easy-to-recall understanding of just how these events evolve, and how to detect them early when most amenable to treatment. Our review will also discuss currently available practices in general care floor monitoring that can both improve patient safety and significantly reduce monitor associated alarm fatigue. PMID:25093041

2014-01-01

268

Implementation of a microprocessor-based overcurrent relay / by Ernie Ward McWilliams  

E-print Network

presented. The design and construction of the hardware and the algorithm used to simulate an overcurrent relay are discussed. The testing of the individual sections and the performance of the relay after being installed in a distribution substation... components 1n the sampled sig- nal. Project Ob'ect1ves The objectives of this project were to design and construct a microcomputer-based overcurrent relay, and install the relay in a distri- bution substat1on. The substation in which the relay...

McWilliams, Ernie Ward

2012-06-07

269

LWG Intergenerational Community Center 1100 Ward Street College of Human Ecology 328-5800  

E-print Network

Library Science Program (MLS), Ragsdale 104-B 328-4373 Fax 252-328-4368 Mail Stop 172 Library, Health - Departmental Phone Directory - L #12;Library Copy Center Joyner 1st Floor 328-2326 Mail Stop 215 Library Science, Dept of (LS) Certificate in Virtual Reality in Education & Training 328-4373 Fax 252

270

WA-RD 468-1 June 1999 COSTS AND BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH WSDOT CTR PROGRAMS  

E-print Network

. Such a reduction is sought to ameliorate congestion on the roadway, improve air quality, conserve fossil fuels incentives to encourage alternatives to single occupancy vehicle (SOV) travel. This legislation requires information on the nature of "switchers" -- that is, those employees who are indeed making use of alternatives

271

Rachel A. Ward Department of Mathematics and ICES, University of Texas at Austin  

E-print Network

Grants and awards NSF CAREER Award 2013 - 2018 Air Force Young Investigator Award (AFOSR YIP) 2013 - 2016 and Computation, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ Summer workshop in Mathematics for female high school-DIMENSIONAL APPROXIMATION Sept-Dec 2014 ICERM, Brown University SPECIAL SESSION ON APPROXIMATION THEORY IN SIGNAL PROCESSING

Pillow, Jonathan

272

Pesticides and Childhood Cancer: An Update of Zahm and Ward's 1998 Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are exposed to pesticides through a number of sources, including residential and agricultural applications. Parental occupational exposure to pesticides is also a concern because exposures occurring during pregnancy and carry-home residues also contribute to children's cumulative burden. A number of epidemiological studies consistently reported increased risks between pesticide exposures and childhood leukemia, brain cancer, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Wilms' tumor,

Claire Infante-Rivard; Scott Weichenthal

2007-01-01

273

Stand Alone Air Cleaners: Evaluation and Implications Matthew Ward, Jeffrey A. Siegel, Richard L. Corsi  

E-print Network

systems, deposition to indoor surfaces, and air exchange. The air exchange rate, volumetric flow rate competition by particle deposition with indoor surfaces and removal to HVAC filters. INTRODUCTION Growing for rapid removal of indoor fine particles, with potential use for shelter-in-place strategies following

Siegel, Jeffrey

274

n insidious threat lurks in the dark corners of hospital wards.  

E-print Network

factors responsible for the cellular damage (4). It was estimated in 2002 that the U.S. medical community, internalization, or catalysis) could in theory disrupt intoxication. The Internalization Process. One-trip model. TcdA and TcdB are members of the other class of toxins that Cholesterol, It's Not Just For Heart

Feig, Andrew

275

Calcrete profiles and porosity development in the Wagon Wheel (Pennsylvanian) field, Ward County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Cisco and Canyon formations in the Wagon Wheel field, located on the western edge of the Central Basin platform, contain 10-15 previously unrecognized calcrete profiles, providing excellent evidence of repeated Late Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure. Evidence for calcretes includes (1) rhizoliths, (2) alveolar texture, (3) circumgranular cracking, (4) tangential needle fibers, (5) calcrete glaebules, (6) light shifts in {delta}{sup 13}C profiles, (7) autobrecciation, and (8) laminated crusts. Extreme lateral variability of calcrete profiles makes correlation of subaerial exposure surfaces difficult. Porosity within calcrete profiles is occluded, providing a seal for underlying reservoir facies. Porosity in the Wagon Wheel field is strongly facies dependent. Porous intervals consist of lenticular skeletal grainstone-packstone facies, typically capped by calcrete profiles. Repeated meteoric phreatic lenses established during Late Pennsylvanian exposure events are interpreted to have formed moldic porosity through selective dissolution in strata containing mineralogically metastable allochems. Secondary porosity development, however, is often balanced by precipitation of eogenetic calcite cement. Therefore, meteoric diagenesis associated with Wagon Wheel calcrete development commonly occludes and only rarely enhances primary porosity. Two stages of calcite cementation are recognized: (1) an early pore-rimming nonferroan nonluminescent calcite cement with thin moderate to brightly luminescent microzones, and (2) a later ferroan, dully luminescent calcite cement with broad, indistinct zones. Truncated cements in Cisco- and Canyon-derived lithoclasts indicate nonluminescent cement was precipitated from oxidizing meteoric phreatic waters. Microzones were precipitated during brief periods of stagnation in the phreatic lenses.

Abegg, F.E. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (USA)); Grover, G.A. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., La Habra, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

276

Ward Valley and the Federal Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

In his State of the Union Address delivered on 23 January 1996, President Clinton said, speaking generally, {open_quotes}Passing a law - even the best possible law - is only a first step. The next step is to make it work.{close_quotes} The president is right, of course; faithful execution of any law is the key. Unfortunately, this lesson appears lost on

Pasternak

1996-01-01

277

Psychiatry Ward Specialist, 10-12. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, is designed to train students to perform as assistants to professional personnel in the care and treatment of patients in mental health units. It includes basic concepts of human behavior, the aspects of atypical adjustive reactions, the…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

278

How we implemented a classroom-based educational intervention for ward-based diabetes care.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Junior doctors require training to adequately manage the increasing numbers of adult, hospitalized patients with diabetes whom they encounter. Aims: Junior doctors experiencing the intervention acquire knowledge and skills that improve their management of inpatients with diabetes. Methods: We designed and administered, a one-hour, classroom-based, educational intervention to 242 juniors doctors. This resulted in a 49% reduction in insulin prescription errors and an increase in their confidence in the delivery of care. A number of key steps were taken to develop the intervention. First, aims, objectives, methods and assessment were carefully aligned with learning objectives at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy. Clarity was enhanced through the structuring of the introduction, body and conclusion. Clinically authentic active learning methods were used to increase engagement and provide an opportunity for junior doctors to reflect and make connections with their own clinical practice. Additionally, refinement was integrated into the process of administration. Results: Qualitative analysis from 205 trainees (85%) revealed that trainees liked a number of design features, their ability to be interactive, and immediacy behaviors of facilitators. Conclusion: Classroom-based training can impact clinically delivered care. Achieving this goal requires well-thought-out content design and evaluation. PMID:25306995

Taylor, Charles G; Atherley, Anique; George, Colette; Morris, Clare

2014-10-13

279

CALL for Endangered Languages: Challenges and Rewards M. Ward, J. van Genabith  

E-print Network

have been developed for the production of CALL materials for ELs. A working example of courseware CALL requirements which include lean, low-cost and reusable solutions that do not involve reinventing the CALL wheel, the production of CALL courseware in multiple modalities from a single source

van Genabith, Josef

280

Introducing an osteopathic approach into neonatology ward: the NE-O model  

PubMed Central

Background Several studies showed the effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment on neonatal care in reducing length of stay in hospital, gastrointestinal problems, clubfoot complications and improving cranial asymmetry of infants affected by plagiocephaly. Despite several results obtained, there is still a lack of standardized osteopathic evaluation and treatment procedures for newborns recovered in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this paper is to suggest a protocol on osteopathic approach (NE-O model) in treating hospitalized newborns. Methods The NE-O model is composed by specific evaluation tests and treatments to tailor osteopathic method according to preterm and term infants’ needs, NICU environment, medical and paramedical assistance. This model was developed to maximize the effectiveness and the clinical use of osteopathy into NICU. Results The NE-O model was adopted in 2006 to evaluate the efficacy of OMT in neonatology. Results from research showed the effectiveness of this osteopathic model in reducing preterms’ length of stay and hospital costs. Additionally the present model was demonstrated to be safe. Conclusion The present paper defines the key steps for a rigorous and effective osteopathic approach into NICU setting, providing a scientific and methodological example of integrated medicine and complex intervention. PMID:24904746

2014-01-01

281

Learning to Avoid Objects and Dock with a Mobile Robot Koren Ward 1  

E-print Network

and the relative direction of IR beacons placed in the environment. A set of fuzzy associative maps (FAMs) is also control of velocity. (For a comprehensive survey of adaptive robot work see [1]). These limitations. The fitness evaluation problem is due to the time required to evaluate possible control solutions

Ward, Koren

282

Facilitating the transition from physiology to hospital wards through an interdisciplinary case study of septic shock  

PubMed Central

Background In order to develop clinical reasoning, medical students must be able to integrate knowledge across traditional subject boundaries and multiple disciplines. At least two dimensions of integration have been identified: horizontal integration, bringing together different disciplines in considering a topic; and vertical integration, bridging basic science and clinical practice. Much attention has been focused on curriculum overhauls, but our approach is to facilitate horizontal and vertical integration on a smaller scale through an interdisciplinary case study discussion and then to assess its utility. Methods An interdisciplinary case study discussion about a critically ill patient was implemented at the end of an organ system-based, basic sciences module at New York University School of Medicine. Three clinical specialists—a cardiologist, a pulmonologist, and a nephrologist—jointly led a discussion about a complex patient in the intensive care unit with multiple medical problems secondary to septic shock. The discussion emphasized the physiologic underpinnings behind the patient’s presentation and the physiologic considerations across the various systems in determining proper treatment. The discussion also highlighted the interdependence between the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, which were initially presented in separate units. After the session students were given a brief, anonymous three-question free-response questionnaire in which they were asked to evaluate and freely comment on the exercise. Results Students not only took away physiological principles but also gained an appreciation for various thematic lessons for bringing basic science to the bedside, especially horizontal and vertical integration. The response of the participants was overwhelmingly positive with many indicating that the exercise integrated the material across organ systems, and strengthened their appreciation of the role of physiology in understanding disease presentations and guiding appropriate therapy. Conclusions Horizontal and vertical integration can be presented effectively through a single-session case study, with complex patient cases involving multiple organ systems providing students opportunities to integrate their knowledge across organ systems while emphasizing the importance of physiology in clinical reasoning. Furthermore, having several clinicians from different specialties discuss the case together can reinforce the matter of integration across multiple organ systems and disciplines in students’ minds. PMID:24725336

2014-01-01

283

Ward-Takahashi identities in the description of electroweak transitions of nucleons and pions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For nucleons and pions, the relations between the propagators and vertex functions that describe the vector electroweak transitions have been derived directly as a natural consequence of the symmetries of the strong and electroweak interactions of hadrons. Significantly, the system under study includes various strongly interacting hadrons. The electromagnetic corrections to the vertex functions and propagators of the hadrons are taken into account to within e 2. The results obtained are discussed in connection with the calculation of radiative corrections in the description of electroweak transitions of nucleons and pions.

Bunatian, G. G.

2008-10-01

284

New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. II: The Central Region and the Lower Ninth Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The failure of the New Orleans regional flood protection systems, and the resultant catastrophic flooding of much of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, represents the most costly failure of an engineered system in U.S. history. This paper presents an overview of the principal events that unfolded in the central portion of the New Orleans metropolitan region during this hurricane, and

R. B. Seed; R. G. Bea; A. Athanasopoulos-Zekkos; G. P. Boutwell; J. D. Bray; C. Cheung; D. Cobos-Roa; L. Ehrensing; L. F. Harder Jr.; J. M. Pestana; M. F. Riemer; J. D. Rogers

2008-01-01

285

Measuring perceptual centers using the phase correction Rudi C. Villing & Bruno H. Repp & Tomas E. Ward &  

E-print Network

, including music and speech. Unfortunately, there is currently no comprehensive and reliable model of P-defined times--for example, musical tones, speech syllables, visual flashes, and dance movements. Unfortunately National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, Ireland e-mail: rudi.villing@nuim.ie B. H. Repp Haskins

286

Infrastructuring and Ordering Devices in Health Care: Medication Plans and Practices on a Hospital Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we analyse physicians’ and nurses’ practices of prescribing and administering medication through the use of\\u000a paper-based, and digitalized medication plans. Our point of departure is an ethnographic study of the implications of upgrading\\u000a an electronic medication module (EMM) that is part of an electronic health record (EHR), carried out at an endocrinology department.\\u000a The upgrade led to

Claus Bossen; Randi Markussen

2010-01-01

287

The spectrum of parvovirus b19 infection in a pediatric hemato-oncologic ward.  

PubMed

Of 1059 children, 35 children with various hemato-oncologic diseases were diagnosed with parvovirus B19 infection. The clinical spectrum included 11 immunocompromised patients presenting with prolonged pancytopenia, 7 patients with delayed hematologic recovery after stem cell transplantation, 5 patients with parvovirus B19 as possible cause of severe aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome, and 12 children with hemolytic anemia and transient aplastic crisis. PMID:21502929

Lackner, Herwig; Sovinz, Petra; Benesch, Martin; Aberle, Stephan W; Schwinger, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Sandrin; Strenger, Volker; Pliemitscher, Sonja; Urban, Christian

2011-05-01

288

Number Forms in the Brain Joey Tang, Jamie Ward, and Brian Butterworth  

E-print Network

number and space. Here we report the first neuroimaging study of number-form synesthesia, investigating on word­color or grapheme­color synesthesia. & INTRODUCTION ``Number forms'' (NFs), mental images, & Umilta, 2002). The conscious merging of spatial and numerical repre- sentations is a form of synesthesia

Butterworth, Brian

289

Prevalence and Clinical Features of Patients with the Cardiorenal Syndrome Admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward  

PubMed Central

Background Many patients admitted to a Department of Internal Medicine have different degrees of heart and kidney dysfunction. Mortality, morbidity and cost of care greatly increase when cardiac and renal diseases coexist. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1,087 patients admitted from December 2009 to December 2012 to evaluate the prevalence of the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) and clinical features. Results Out of 1,087 patients discharged from our unit during the study period, 190 (17.5%) were diagnosed as having CRS and classified into five types. CRS was more common in males (68.9%). CRS type 1 was associated with higher age (79.9 ± 8.9 years) and accounted for 61.5% of all deaths (p < 0.001), representing a risk factor for mortality (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.8-10). Congestive heart failure was significantly different among the five CRS types (p < 0.0001) with a greater frequency in type 1 patients. Infectious diseases were more frequent in CRS types 1, 3 and 5 (p < 0.05). Pneumonia presented a statistically higher frequency in CRS types 1 and 5 compared to other classes (p < 0.01), and community-acquired infections were statistically more frequent in CRS types 1 and 5 (p < 0.05). The distribution of community-acquired pneumonia was different among the classes (p < 0.01) with a higher frequency in CRS types 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion CRS is a condition that is more frequently observed in the clinical practice. The identification of predisposing trigger factors, such as infectious diseases, particularly in the elderly, plays a key role in reducing morbidity and mortality. An early recognition can be useful to optimize therapy, encourage a multidisciplinary approach and prevent complications. PMID:25254030

Gigante, Antonietta; Liberatori, Marta; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Sardo, Liborio; Di Mario, Francesca; Dorelli, Barbara; Barbano, Biagio; Rosato, Edoardo; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Amoroso, Antonio

2014-01-01

290

From Classroom to Boardroom and Ward: Developing Generic Intercultural Skills in Diverse Disciplines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A strategic approach to internationalize learning in higher education institutions is to use the curriculum and classroom cultural diversity to create opportunities to broaden students' intercultural perspectives, appreciate sociocultural variability in professional practice, and improve their intercultural interaction skills. There is no…

Barker, Michelle C.; Mak, Anita S.

2013-01-01

291

WARD: A Weighted Array Data Scheme for Subspace Processing in Impulsive Noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with robust array signal processing in impulsive noise environments. A simple weighting signal is defined to weight all sensor data in a snapshot-by-snapshot way, so that the resulting array data have the desired statistical characteristics used in the subspace-based direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation techniques. Then any traditional subspace-based technique can be used for DOA estimation. In working

Jin He; Zhong Liu

2006-01-01

292

Signal Versus Noise on the Wards: What “Messages” from the Hidden Curriculum Do Medical Students Perceive to Be Importantly Meaningful?  

PubMed Central

Interested in the hidden curriculum and the learning environment for professionalism at our school, a group of educators called the RIPPLE Team (Relationships in Positive Professional Learning Environments) created The Professionalism Journal for use by third-year medical students during their Internal Medicine and Psychiatry clerkships. The students are introduced to the online journal and encouraged to use it as a means to pause, reflect on the events of the day, and write about episodes or exchanges they find personally important and meaningful. They are informed that their journal entries will be de-identified and used as the triggers for a facilitated and confidential discussion among their peers at the end of the clerkship. This article will report on the themes of the journal entries made by Internal Medicine clerks during one academic year. PMID:23874008

Shorey, Jeannette M.

2013-01-01

293

Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif Qingzhou Cui, Michelle M. Ward Muscatello and Sanford A. Asher*  

E-print Network

Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif Qingzhou Cui, Michelle M crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol- hydrates.8 Determination of carbohydrates is important in applications such as controlling glycemia

Asher, Sanford A.

294

Ward of the State: New Haven’s Use of Federal and State Grants in the Financing of Public Bridges  

Microsoft Academic Search

New Haven railyards, connecting the city’s downtown with its harbor. This time the city government was onboard. With the cooperation of the local congresswoman, the Mayor testified before Congress in pursuit of federal funding. A $19 million earmark was inserted into the transportation appropriations bill. The $32 million bridge opened in 2003, funded almost entirely by federal and state grants.

Rory Gillis

2010-01-01

295

A Decolonizing Encounter: Ward Churchill and Antonia Darder in Dialogue. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 430  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"A Decolonizing Encounter" examines the effects of western colonialism on historically marginalized and colonized populations living both in the West and the "third world". Specifically, it explores crucial issues such as the decolonizing of schools and communities of color; the decentralization of power of the capitalist and colonial state;…

Orelus, Pierre W., Ed.

2012-01-01

296

Effect of Adsorption on the Surface Tensions of Solid-Fluid Interfaces C. A. Ward* and Jiyu Wu  

E-print Network

of not predicting an infinite amount adsorbed when the pressure is equal to the saturation-vapor pressure. Five , is shown to be the ratio of the liquid-phase pressure at the three-phase line, PL(z3), to the saturation-vapor when the pressure is equal the saturation-vapor pressure cannot be applied because the integral does

Ward, Charles A.

297

Mathematical models for assessing the role of airflow on the risk of airborne infection in hospital wards  

PubMed Central

Understanding the risk of airborne transmission can provide important information for designing safe healthcare environments with an appropriate level of environmental control for mitigating risks. The most common approach for assessing risk is to use the Wells–Riley equation to relate infectious cases to human and environmental parameters. While it is a simple model that can yield valuable information, the model used as in its original presentation has a number of limitations. This paper reviews recent developments addressing some of the limitations including coupling with epidemic models to evaluate the wider impact of control measures on disease progression, linking with zonal ventilation or computational fluid dynamics simulations to deal with imperfect mixing in real environments and recent work on dose–response modelling to simulate the interaction between pathogens and the host. A stochastic version of the Wells–Riley model is presented that allows consideration of the effects of small populations relevant in healthcare settings and it is demonstrated how this can be linked to a simple zonal ventilation model to simulate the influence of proximity to an infector. The results show how neglecting the stochastic effects present in a real situation could underestimate the risk by 15 per cent or more and that the number and rate of new infections between connected spaces is strongly dependent on the airflow. Results also indicate the potential danger of using fully mixed models for future risk assessments, with quanta values derived from such cases less than half the actual source value. PMID:19812072

Noakes, Catherine J.; Sleigh, P. Andrew

2009-01-01

298

Cranial ultrasound abnormalities in full term infants in a postnatal ward: outcome at 12 and 18 months  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo investigate whether cranial ultrasound abnormalities found in low risk full term infants had any influence on neurodevelopmental outcome.METHODSFor 103 infants who had a neurological assessment, a cranial ultrasound examination, and for whom antenatal and perinatal data were collected within 48 hours of delivery, neurodevelopmental status was evaluated at 12 and 18 months. The results of a scored neurological examination

Leena Haataja; Eugenio Mercuri; Frances Cowan; Lilly Dubowitz

2000-01-01

299

Over the last 3 years,extensive fractures have appeared in the ~3000-yr-old Ward Hunt Ice  

E-print Network

.The orange color is due to carotenoids that protect the algal cells against bright solar radiation westward from the central fracture have fragmented a large area of the ice shelf into free-floating ice from 43 m to 28 m.The freeboard of the recently created free-floating ice blocks in the ice shelf

Vincent, Warwick F.

300

M. Kovari, R. Kemp, H. Lux, P. Knight, J. Morris, D.J. Ward CCFE-PR(14)12  

E-print Network

, Oxon, OX14 3DB, UK *Corresponding author. Tel.: +44 (0)1235-46-6427. E-mail address: michael.kovari@ccfe.ac it is a pulsed machine, able to burn for only 1.65 hours at a time. Despite the comparatively large size (major ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 2. Options, constraints and code design

301

Contaminated Handwashing Sinks as the Source of a Clonal Outbreak of KPC-2-Producing Klebsiella oxytoca on a Hematology Ward.  

PubMed

We investigated sinks as possible sources of a prolonged Klebsiella pneumonia carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella oxytoca outbreak. Seven carbapenem-resistant K. oxytoca isolates were identified in sink drains in 4 patient rooms and in the medication room. Investigations for resistance genes and genetic relatedness of patient and environmental isolates revealed that all the isolates harbored the blaKPC-2 and blaTEM-1 genes and were genetically indistinguishable. We describe here a clonal outbreak caused by KPC-2-producing K. oxytoca, and handwashing sinks were a possible reservoir. PMID:25348541

Leitner, Eva; Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Herzog, Kathrin; Pekard-Amenitsch, Shiva; Hoenigl, Martin; Valentin, Thomas; Feierl, Gebhard; Grisold, Andrea J; Högenauer, Christoph; Sill, Heinz; Krause, Robert; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

2015-01-01

302

PARAMETERIZED NEIGHBORHOODBASED FLOODING FOR AD HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS Vijay Dheap, Mohammad Ahmad Munawar, Sagar Naik, Paul A.S. Ward  

E-print Network

networks. Flooding is required by a number of protocols in ad hoc networks, including route discovery [10PARAMETERIZED NEIGHBORHOOD­BASED FLOODING FOR AD HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS Vijay Dheap, Mohammad Ahmad in a network. The focus of this paper is to investigate im­ provements to flooding techniques used in ad hoc

Ward, Paul A.S.

303

Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals  

PubMed Central

Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

2014-01-01

304

John P. Ward John R. King Adrian J. Koerber Julie M. Croft R. Elizabeth Sockett Paul Williams  

E-print Network

models to examine the formation, growth and quorum sensing activity of bacterial biofilms. The growth aspects of the model are based on the assumption of a con- tinuum of bacterial cells whose growth Williams Early development and quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms Abstract: We develop mathematical

305

Remarks Following the City of Charlottesville's 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony Hon. S. Ward Casscells III, M.D.  

E-print Network

. This week has reminded us of the courage of our firefighters, our police, our EMTs, and our military." Today he can walk and speak. But we have not succeeded in stopping the rise of Army suicides. In my of its JAG School, which has contributed importantly to military justice, as well as the Batten School

Acton, Scott

306

Effect of Frailty on Functional Gain, Resource Utilisation, and Discharge Destination: An Observational Prospective Study in a GEM Ward  

PubMed Central

Background. A geriatric evaluation and management unit (GEM) manages elderly inpatients with functional impairments. There is a paucity of literature on frailty and whether this impacts on rehabilitation outcomes. Objectives. To examine frailty score (FS) as a predictor of functional gain, resource utilisation, and destinations for GEM patients. Methods. A single centre prospective case study design. Participants (n = 136) were ?65 years old and admitted to a tertiary hospital GEM. Five patients were excluded by the preset exclusion criteria, that is, medically unstable, severe dementia or communication difficulties after stroke. Core data included demographics, frailty score (FS), and functional independence. Results. The mean functional improvement (FIM) from admission to discharge was 11.26 (95% CI 8.87, 13.66; P < 0.001). Discharge FIM was positively correlated with admission FIM (? = 0.748; P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with frailty score (? = ?1.151; P = 0.014). The majority of the patients were in the “frail” group. “Frail” and “severely frail” subgroups improved more on mean FIM scores at discharge, relative to that experienced by the “pre-frail” group. Conclusion. All patients experienced functional improvement. Frailer patients improved more on their FIM and improved relatively more than their prefrail counterparts. Higher frailty correlated with reduced independence and greater resource utilisation. This study demonstrates that FS could be a prognostic indicator of physical independence and resource utilisation. PMID:24695584

Kawryshanker, Sujatha; Raymond, Warren; Inderjeeth, Charles A.

2014-01-01

307

Re-establishing Conversational Skills in Overtly Psychotic, Chronic Schizophrenic PatientsDiscrete Trials Training on the Psychiatric Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

A discrete trials procedure incorporating graduated prompts, social and consumable reinforcement, corrective feedback, delay of reinforcement, and a chaining procedure was used to teach four actively psychotic, chronic schizophrenic patients rudimentary conversational skills. In a multiple-baseline design, training was sequentially applied to the target conversational skills of giving a salutation, addressing the trainer by his or her name, making a

Stephen E. Wong; James E. Woolsey

1989-01-01

308

Discharge Against Medical Advice in the Pediatric Wards in Boo-ali Sina Hospital, Sari, Iran 2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Since children neither comprehended nor contribute to the decision, discharge against medical advice is a challenge of health care systems in the world. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine the rate and causes of discharge against medical advice. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records by census method. Data was analyzed using SPSS software and x2 statistics was used to determine the relationship between variables. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Rate of discharged against medical advice was 108 (2.2%). Mean of age and length of stay were 2.8±4 (SD).3 years old and 3.7±5.4 (SD) days, respectively. Totally, 95 patients (88.7%) had health insurance and 65 (60.2%) patients lived in urban areas. History of psychiatric disease and addiction in 22 (20.6%) of the parents were negative. In addition, 100 (92.3%) patients admitted for medical treatment and the others for surgery. The relationship of the signatory with patients (72.3%) was father. Of 108 patients discharged against medical advice, 20 (12%) were readmitted. The relationship between the day of discharge and discharge against medical advice was significant (? =0/03). Conclusion: Rate of discharge against medical advice in Boo-ali hospital is the same as the other studies in the same range. The form which is used for this purpose did not have suitable data elements about description of consequence of such discharge, and it has not shown the real causes of discharge against medical advice. PMID:24554800

Mohseni Saravi, Benyamin; Reza Zadeh, Esmaeil; Siamian, Hasan; Yahghoobian, Mahboobeh

2013-01-01

309

Nostalgia for the origin: Notes on reading and melodrama in H.P. Lovecraft's “The case of Charles Dexter Ward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The “event” Derrida refers to at the beginning of “Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences” (1978,278) as a “rupture” and a “decentering” points to a moment in which Western thought ceases to be articulated around the fallacy of a transcendental signified giving to the play of language a fixed origin, a reassuring foundation, a center

David Vilaseca

1991-01-01

310

Semantic Role Parsing: Adding Semantic Structure to Unstructured Text Sameer Pradhan, Kadri Hacioglu, Wayne Ward, James H. Martin, Daniel Jurafsky  

E-print Network

as a classification problem using Sup- port Vector Machines. Using a hand-labeled training set and a set of features Translation. We treat the problem of tagging parsed constituents as a multi-class classification problem will refer to these as ARGMs. An example PropBank style markup: 1. [ARG0 Merrill Lynch Co.] refuses

Martin, James H.

311

F A C U L T Y O F N E W S L E T T E R I M C G I L L U N I V E R S I T Y I 2 0 0 4 -2 0 0 5 I V O L U M E 8 4 , N O . 1  

E-print Network

Swan Dr. Bruce Ward, Mrs. Karin Ward, Dr. Scott Stewart Dr. Bruce Ward, Mrs. Karin Ward, Dr. Scott-r) Dr. George Harasymowycz, Dean Lund, Mr. Alan Edwards (l-r) Dr. Norman Miller, Dr. Bruce Kennedy Dr

Barthelat, Francois

312

A model on the dynamics of odontogenic cyst growth John P. Ward BSc MSc PhD, Lecturer, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough  

E-print Network

Assistant, School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales Bangor, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. Tel), glands of Serres (rests of the dental lamina) and reduced enamel epithelium (remnants of the enamel organ either rests of the dental lamina (glands of Serres)2 or extensions of mucosal basal cells3 . Keratocysts

313

Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n?=?35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n?=?105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p?=?0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR?=?23.15, 95% CI?=?4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR?=?9.48, 95% CI?=?2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR?=?4.41, 95% CI?=?1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR?=?5.50, 95% CI?=?1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and prompt management of these simple clinically recognizable predictors of death and discourage the use of blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension may help reduce deaths in such population. PMID:24040043

Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

2013-01-01

314

Trematodes of Red Sea fishes: Hexangium brayi n. sp. (Angiodictyidae Looss, 1902) and Siphodera aegyptensis n. sp. (Cryptogonimidae Ward, 1917), with a review of their genera.  

PubMed

Specimens of the marine fishes Siganus luridus (Siganidae) and Caesio suevica (Lutjanidae) were caught in the Red Sea off the coast of Sharm El-Sheikh, South Sinai, Egypt. Twelve (30%) and eight (17%) fish, respectively, were found to harbour intestinal trematodes. S. luridus was parasitised by Hexangium brayi n. sp. (Angiodictyidae) and C. suevica by Siphodera aegyptensis n. sp. (Cryptogonimidae). H. brayi n. sp. is differentiated from the other two species of the genus by the vitelline follicles which are confined to the inter-caecal field, its body shape which is distinctly pyriform, the terminations of the intestinal caeca which are distinctly saccular, the eggs which are few in number, and by the excretory vesicle which gives off a lateral arm on each side that divides into two long collecting ducts. S. aegyptensis n. sp. is most similar to S. cirrhiti Yamaguti, 1970, but differs in having a definite number of testes (nine), seven arranged in a ring and the other two situated symmetrically or diagonally within this ring, and vitelline follicles extending posteriorly to the level of the anterior lobes of the ovary. Both genera Hexangium Goto & Ozaki, 1929 and Siphodera Linton, 1910 are reviewed in detail and redefined. PMID:16025212

El-S Hassanine, Reda M; Gibson, David I

2005-07-01

315

Molecular phylogenetics of Floridosentis ward, 1953 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) parasites of mullets (Osteichthyes) from Mexico, using 28S rDNA sequences.  

PubMed

Species of Floridosentis (Acanthocephala) are common parasites of mullets (Mugil spp., Mugilidae) found in tropical marine and brackish water in the Americas. Floridosentis includes 2 species distributed in Mexico, i.e., Floridosentis pacifica, restricted to the Pacific Ocean near Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, and Floridosentis mugilis, distributed along the coast of the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. We sampled 18 populations of F. mugilis and F. pacifica (12 from the Pacific and 6 from the Gulf of Mexico) and sequenced a fragment of the rDNA large subunit to evaluate phylogenetic relationships of populations of Floridosentis spp. from Mexico. Species identification of museum specimens of F. mugilis from the Pacific Ocean was confirmed by examination of morphology traits. Phylogenetic trees inferred with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference indicate that Floridosentis is monophyletic comprising of 2 major well-supported clades, the first clade corresponding to F. mugilis from the Gulf of Mexico, and the second to F. pacifica from the Pacific Ocean. Genetic divergence between species ranged from 7.68 to 8.60%. Intraspecific divergence ranged from 0.14 to 0.86% for F. mugilis and from 1.72 to 4.49% for F. pacifica. Data obtained from diagnostic characters indicate that specimens from the Pacific Ocean in Mexico have differences in some traits among locations. These results are consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis, indicating that F. pacifica is distributed in the Pacific Ocean in Mexico with 3 major lineages. PMID:22360517

Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Morrone, Juan J; García-Varela, Martín

2012-08-01

316

Does music make the ward go round? The role of staff attitudes and burnout in the use of music for people with dementia   

E-print Network

Introduction: The evidence-base for the effectiveness of music on people with dementia is unclear, yet music is frequently used in the care of people with dementia. Little is known about formal dementia caregivers’ views ...

Papageorgiou, Emilia

2013-07-02

317

[Treatment in psychiatric day hospital in comparison with inpatient wards in different European health care systems--objectives of EDEN project].  

PubMed

The paper presents the objectives and design of an ongoing multicenter randomized, controlled trial EDEN (European Day Hospital EvaluatioN). The EDEN-study aims to evaluate the efficacy of acute psychiatric treatment in a day hospital setting in five European centres: Dresden, London, Michalovce, Prague and Wroclaw. The main hypothesis is that day hospital treatment for acute psychiatric patients is as effective as conventional inpatient hospital care. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the viability and effectiveness of day hospitals for acute psychiatric treatment, to identify subgroups of patients with a more or less favourable outcome so that the treatment setting might be specifically applied and to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of day hospital treatment compared to conventional inpatient treatment. The study utilises a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design with repeated measures at a maximum of six time points: at admission (t1), one week after admission (t2), four weeks after admission (t3), discharge (t4), three months after discharge (t5), and 12 months after discharge (t6). A combination of well-established standardised assessment instruments and open questions is used in 6 time periods. If the findings accept the main hypothesis of the study, some practical consequences could be inevitable: at a mental health policy level, these results could lead to an increase in the capacity of day hospitals; at the clinical level clinicians could redefine their concepts of care to consider the day hospital as an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment; from economic point of view could lead to reduction of treatment costs. PMID:12647460

Kiejna, Andrzej; Kallert, Thomas W; Rymaszewska, Joanna

2002-01-01

318

Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization  

PubMed Central

Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue. PMID:24812527

Loch, Alexandre Andrade

2014-01-01

319

PhD Project: Understanding adaptation to climate in the UK: 1800-2000 Supervisors: Professor Mike Hulme (Environmental Sciences), Dr Paul Warde (History)  

E-print Network

PhD Project: Understanding adaptation to climate in the UK: 1800-2000 Supervisors: Professor Mike to the processes of adaptation. Adaptation to climate change is now a major area of research and also and socially contingent nature of adaptation to climate as it has occurred in the past. In particular

Hulme, Mike

320

A study of snake bite among children presenting to a paediatric ward in the main Teaching Hospital of North Central Province of Sri Lanka  

PubMed Central

Background Snake bite is a common problem in the North Central province of Sri Lanka. Common krait (Bungarus careuleus), Ceylon krait (Bungarus ceylonicus), Cobra (Naja naja), Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii), Saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) and Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) are the six species of venomous land snakes in Sri Lanka. A significant number of adults and children are bitten by snakes every year. However, the majority of research studies done in Sri Lanka and other countries show adults bitten by snakes and studies describing children bitten by snakes are very sparse. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was performed in the Teaching Hospital Anuradhapura in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka from May 2010 to 2011 May to describe the characteristics associated with cases of snake bite. Results There were 24 males and 20 females. The highest numbers of bites (48%) were in the range of ages 6-12 years. The majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm to 6 am (59%).The foot was the most common bitten site (48%). Out of all the venomous bites, the Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number (44%) and Russell’s viper (Daboia ruselii) accounted for the second highest number (27%). A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoors while sleeping (22%). Antivenom serum was given to (39%) of venomous bites. Deaths occurred in (11%) of the venomous bites. Conclusions Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number of venomous bites. Majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm and 6 am. Foot was the most common bitten site. A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoor while sleeping. Antivenom serum was given to a significant number of venomous bites. Educating the public on making their houses snake proof and using a torch when going out during night time will help in the prevention of getting bitten by snakes. PMID:25073710

2014-01-01

321

Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Causing Neonatal Toxic Shock Syndrome-Like Exanthematous Disease in Neonatal and Perinatal Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease (NTED) is a new neonatal disease caused by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). We conducted a prospective surveillance study and characterized the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with NTED and compared them with the strains from patients with other MRSA infections and asymptomatic carriers. The study was performed in the

Ken Kikuchi; Naoto Takahashi; Chuncheng Piao; Kyoichi Totsuka; Hiroshi Nishida; Takehiko Uchiyama

2003-01-01

322

Three-dimensional reconstructions from computed tomographic scans on smartphones and tablets: a simple tutorial for the ward and operating room using public domain software.  

PubMed

Handling 3-dimensional reconstructions of computed tomographic scans on portable devices is problematic because of the size of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) stacks. The authors provide a user-friendly method allowing the production, transfer, and sharing of good-quality 3-dimensional reconstructions on smartphones and tablets. PMID:25438270

Ketoff, Serge; Khonsari, Roman Hossein; Schouman, Thomas; Bertolus, Chloé

2014-11-01

323

Use of FMEA analysis to reduce risk of errors in prescribing and administering drugs in paediatric wards: a quality improvement report  

PubMed Central

Objective Administering medication to hospitalised infants and children is a complex process at high risk of error. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a proactive tool used to analyse risks, identify failures before they happen and prioritise remedial measures. To examine the hazards associated with the process of drug delivery to children, we performed a proactive risk-assessment analysis. Design and setting Five multidisciplinary teams, representing different divisions of the paediatric department at Padua University Hospital, were trained to analyse the drug-delivery process, to identify possible causes of failures and their potential effects, to calculate a risk priority number (RPN) for each failure and plan changes in practices. Primary outcome To identify higher-priority potential failure modes as defined by RPNs and planning changes in clinical practice to reduce the risk of patients harm and improve safety in the process of medication use in children. Results In all, 37 higher-priority potential failure modes and 71 associated causes and effects were identified. The highest RPNs related (>48) mainly to errors in calculating drug doses and concentrations. Many of these failure modes were found in all the five units, suggesting the presence of common targets for improvement, particularly in enhancing the safety of prescription and preparation of endovenous drugs. The introductions of new activities in the revised process of administering drugs allowed reducing the high-risk failure modes of 60%. Conclusions FMEA is an effective proactive risk-assessment tool useful to aid multidisciplinary groups in understanding a process care and identifying errors that may occur, prioritising remedial interventions and possibly enhancing the safety of drug delivery in children. PMID:23253870

Lago, Paola; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Scalzotto, Francesca; Parpaiola, Antonella; Amigoni, Angela; Putoto, Giovanni; Perilongo, Giorgio

2012-01-01

324

PARAMETERIZED NEIGHBORHOOD-BASED FLOODING FOR AD HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS Vijay Dheap, Mohammad Ahmad Munawar, Sagar Naik, Paul A.S. Ward  

E-print Network

networks. Flooding is required by a number of protocols in ad hoc networks, including route discovery [10PARAMETERIZED NEIGHBORHOOD-BASED FLOODING FOR AD HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS Vijay Dheap, Mohammad Ahmad in a network. The focus of this paper is to investigate im- provements to flooding techniques used in ad hoc

Ward, Paul A.S.

325

, 20140661, published 13 August 20142812014Proc. R. Soc. B Prashant P. Sharma, Evelyn E. Schwager, Cassandra G. Extavour and Ward C. Wheeler  

E-print Network

: Scorpiones, opisthosoma, Arthropoda, bauplan, tagmosis Author for correspondence: Prashant P. Sharma e, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been The evolutionary success of Arthropoda is attributed to their segmented bauplan and its modularization through

Extavour, Cassandra

326

INTERNATIONAL REPORTS Implementation of Ward-Based Clinical Pharmacy Services in Belgium—Description of the Impact on a Geriatric Unit  

E-print Network

BACKGROUND: Patient-centered clinical pharmacy services are still poorly developed in Europe, despite their demonstrated advantages in North America and the UK. Reporting European pilot experiences is, therefore, important to assess the usefulness of clinical pharmacy services in this specific context. OBJECTIVE: To report the results of the first implementation of Belgian clinical pharmacy services targeting patients at high risk of drug-related problems. METHODS: An intervention study was conducted by a trained clinical pharmacist providing pharmaceutical care to 101 patients (mean age 82.2 y; mean ± SD number of prescribed drugs 7.8 ± 3.5) admitted to an acute geriatric unit, over a 7 month period. All interventions to optimize prescribing, and their acceptance, were recorded. An external panel (2 geriatricians, 1 clinical pharmacist) assessed the interventions ’ clinical significance. Persistence of interventions after discharge was assessed through telephone calls. RESULTS: A total of 1066 interventions were made over the 7 month period. The most frequent drug-related problems underlying interventions were: underuse (15.9%), wrong dose (11.9%), inappropriate duration of therapy (9.7%), and inappropriate choice of medicine (9.6%). The most prevalent consequences were to discontinue a drug (24.5%), add a drug (18.6%), and change dosage (13.7%). Acceptance rate by physicians was 87.8%. Among interventions with clinical impact, 68.3 % and 28.6 % had moderate and major clinical significance, respectively. Persistence of chronic treatment changes 3 months after discharge was 84%. CONCLUSIONS: Involving a trained clinical pharmacist in a geriatric team led to clinically relevant and well-accepted optimization of medicine use. This initiative may be a springboard for further development of clinical pharmacy services. KEY WORDS: Belgium; clinical pharmacy; drug-related problems; frail elderly; pharmaceutical care.

Anne Spinewine; Soraya Dhillon; Louise Mallet; Paul M Tulkens; Léon Wilmotte; Christian Swine

327

"Direct" Calculation of Thermal Rate Constants for the F + H2 f HF + F Reaction Haobin Wang, Ward H. Thompson, and William H. Miller*  

E-print Network

. Thompson, and William H. Miller* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, and Chemical Sciences deal of progress has been made over the last few years in the ability to calculate rate constants evolution is required, a time of p (which is 27 fs for T ) 300 K), and this is the second feature that leads

Miller, William H.

328

Abstract--During the past few years a world-wide trend to-wards renewable and ecologically clean forms of energy has  

E-print Network

market prices for energy are the obvious signs of a shortage in fossil fuel. To maintain an efficient and balancing power capacities based on fossil, and thus predictable, energy sources. With growing renewable, on renewable fuel like linseed oil, or on hydrogen technology. They are used for electric power generation

Wedde, Horst F.

329

Physiologic and Clinical Significance of Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation: What Is Expected from These Measurements in the Clinical Ward and in the Physiology Laboratory?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this essay we review data on absolute quantitation of myocardial blood flow (MBF) in humans. Earlier work established that coronary heart disease (CAD) can be detected by coronary angiography and that this disease has characteristic features at rest and during stress, which indicate the linkage between regional metabolic needs and myocardial perfusion. In the 1970s myocardial perfusion was mapped

J. A. Bianco; J. S. Alpert

1997-01-01

330

Snelling, G. C., Snelling, R. R. 2007. New synonymy, new species, new keys to Neivamyrmex army ants of the United States, pp. 459-550. In Snelling, R. R., B. L. Fisher, and P. S. Ward (eds).  

E-print Network

Snelling, G. C., Snelling, R. R. 2007. New synonymy, new species, new keys to Neivamyrmex army ants of the American Entomological Institute, 80. NEW SYNONYMY, NEW SPECIES, NEW KEYS TO NEIVAMYRMEX ARMY ANTS level, new status, having previously been regarded as a subspecies of N. pilosus (F. Smith). One species

Villemant, Claire

331

Alpert, G. D. 2007. A review of the ant genus Metapone Forel from Madagascar, pp. 8-18. In Snelling, R. R., B. L. Fisher, and P. S. Ward (eds). Advances in ant systematics (Hymenoptera  

E-print Network

Alpert, G. D. 2007. A review of the ant genus Metapone Forel from Madagascar, pp. 8-18. In Snelling. A REVIEW OF THE ANT GENUS METAPONE FOREL FROM MADAGASCAR Gary D. Alpert Entomology Department Museum northeastern Madagascar. Several nest series of M. vincimus were collected from within a log in association

Villemant, Claire

332

[Gastrointestinal parasitosis in patients treated in the Gastroenterology Clinic of the Medical Academy and Clinical Ward at the Institute of Agricultural Medicine in Lublin in the years 1981-1990].  

PubMed

Gastroenteric parasites were found in 118 patients, which made up 1.1% of the total number of patients. This number included 62 men and 50 women aged 17-74, 41 on average. The most frequent parasite was Giardia intestinalis. It was found in 82 patients, which constituted 0.78% of the total number of patients and 69.5% of patients infected by parasites. Trichuris trichiura was diagnosed in 16 patients, which made up 0.150% of the total number of patients and 13.4% of the cases of parasitoses. Ascariasis and oxyuriasis were observed in 8 and 7 patients, respectively. The most rarely found parasites were Taeniarhynchus saginatus (3 patients) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2). Parasitic diseases were most often concomitant with: cholecystitis (23 patients), and duodenal ulcer (15). The results of biochemical tests most frequently showed abnormal values of haemoglobin (31.3% of all parasitoses), elevated lipase values (28.8%), eosinophilia (22.2%). Hypoacidity was observed in 48.3% of cases and the positive bile culture results in 28.8%. PMID:8128725

Schabowski, J; Skrzyd?o-Radoma?ska, B; Daniluk, J

1993-01-01

333

Comparison of PCR/Electron spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare workers  

PubMed Central

Background Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools. Methods Traditional clinical microbiology (TCM) and PCR/ESI-TOF-MS were used to recover and detect microorganisms from the hands and personal protective equipment of 10 burn intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers providing clinical care at a tertiary care military referral hospital. High-use environmental surfaces were assessed in 9 burn ICU and 10 orthopedic patient rooms. Clinical cultures during the study period were reviewed for pathogen comparison with investigational molecular diagnostic methods. Results From 158 samples, 142 organisms were identified by TCM and 718 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. The molecular diagnostic method detected more organisms (4.5?±?2.1 vs. 0.9?±?0.8, p?

2012-01-01

334

Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.  

PubMed

Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1?% (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P?=?0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment. PMID:24925907

Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

2014-09-01

335

SECULAR RESONANCE SWEEPING IN A SELFGRAVITATING PLANETESIMAL DISK, WITH APPLICATION TO THE KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu), W. R. Ward,  

E-print Network

stirring by protoplanets that may have once roamed the outer solar system [1], scattering of KBOs out into inclined Kuiper Belt orbits by the giant planets [2], inclination­pumping due to the close passage of another star [3], and sweeping the Kuiper Belt with secular resonances as the solar nebula gas dispersed

Hahn, Joseph M.

336

Charwoman (any ind.) 2-82.10; Maid, Ward (med. ser.) 2-24.12; Porter I (any ind.) 2-86.10--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

337

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2014-10-01

338

Venu Gana Loluni Ragam: Kedaragowlai (28th  

E-print Network

him Saffron water to ward off the effects of the evil eyes ("dristhi chutti"). This youth") with tresses decorated with fragrant flowers around which honey bees hum. Wave before him Saffron water to ward

Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

339

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2012-10-01

340

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2010-10-01

341

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2013-10-01

342

42 CFR 409.22 - Bed and board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.22 Bed and board. ...requires him to be isolated; (ii) The SNF has no semiprivate or ward accommodations; or (iii) The SNF semiprivate and ward accommodations...

2011-10-01

343

Psychiatric outcome following paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission: a cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine whether paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission is associated with greater psychiatric morbidity in children and parents as compared with general paediatric ward admissions. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Paediatric intensive care unit and two general paediatric wards of a London teaching hospital. Participants Children aged 5–18 years discharged from PICU (exposed cohort) and general paediatric wards (unexposed

Gwyneth Rees; Julia Gledhill; M. Elena Garralda; Simon Nadel

2004-01-01

344

Afring News An electronic journal published by SAFRING, Animal Demography Unit at the University of Cape Town  

E-print Network

. Editor: H. Dieter Oschadleus ADDITIONAL NOTES ON MOULT OF CAPE SISKINS CRITHAGRA TOTTA Vincent L. Ward Recommended citation format: Ward VL. 2012. Additional notes on moult of Cape Siskins Crithagra totta. Afring NOTES ON MOULT OF CAPE SISKINS CRITHAGRA TOTTA Vincent L. Ward Department of Biodiversity & Conservation

de Villiers, Marienne

345

A Principal's Reaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

Zaretsky, Lindy

2004-01-01

346

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156  

E-print Network

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156 /'auteur. . #12;Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward Technical Report Series 156 Pacific and Yukon Region 1992 Canadian Wildlife Service This series mav be cited as: Ward, Peggy. Wetlands

347

Studying the Effects of Early Child Care Experiences on the Development of Children of Color in the United States: Toward a More Inclusive Research Agenda Deborah J. Johnson, Elizabeth Jaeger, Suzanne M. Randolph, Ana Mari Cauce, Janie Ward and National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence is presented of the different cultural and ecological contexts affecting early child care for families of color. It is argued that improvements on previous research require a fundamental shift in how race, ethnicity, and culture as psychological variables are examined. Furthermore, to avoid the pitfalls and failures of previous research, new research must incorporate expanded models of child care

Jay Belsky; Cathryn L. Booth; Robert Bradley; Celia A. Brownell; Margaret Burchinal; Susan B. Campbell; Ana Mari Cauce; K. Alison Clarke-Stewart; Martha Cox; Sarah L. Friedman; Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek; Aletha Huston; Elizabeth Jaeger; Deborah J. Johnson; Bonnie Knoke; Nancy Marshall; Kathleen McCartney; Marion O'Brien; Margaret Tresch Owen; Deborah Phillips; Robert Pianta; Suzanne M. Randolph; Susan Spieker; Deborah Lowe Vandell; Janie Ward; Marsha Weinraub

348

iMu arrayS:The biOMechanicS Of baSeball piTching eric berKSOn Md, ryan aylWard MS, JaMeS zachazeWSKi dpT,aTc, JOSeph paradiSO phd,ThOMaS J. gill Md  

E-print Network

measurements of acceleration and velocity could improve kinematic analysis of baseball pitching. To assess, nutrition, and supplements. Changes due to improper mechanics, poor dynamic stability or muscle fatigue biomechanical studies have attempted to quan- tify the mechanics of throwing and to measure the forces sustained

349

Births in two different delivery units in the same clinic – A prospective study of healthy primiparous women  

PubMed Central

Background Earlier studies indicate that midwife-led birth settings are associated with modest benefits, including reduced medical interventions and increased maternal satisfaction. The generalizability of these studies to birth settings with low intervention rates, like those generally found in Norway, is not obvious. The aim of the present study was to compare intervention rates associated with labour in low-risk women who begin their labour in a midwife-led unit and a conventional care unit. Methods Eligible participants were low-risk primiparas who met the criteria for delivery in the midwife-led ward regardless of which cohort they were allocated to. The two wards are localised at the same floor. Women in both cohorts received the same standardized public antenatal care by general medical practitioners and midwifes who were not involved in the delivery. After admission of a woman to the midwife-led ward, the next woman who met the inclusion criteria, but preferred delivery at the conventional delivery ward, was allocated to the conventional delivery ward cohort. Among the 252 women in the midwife-led ward cohort, 74 (29%) women were transferred to the conventional delivery ward during labour. Results Emergency caesarean and instrumental delivery rates in women who were admitted to the midwife-led and conventional birth wards were statistically non-different, but more women admitted to the conventional birth ward had episiotomy. More women in the conventional delivery ward received epidural analgesia, pudental nerve block and nitrous oxide, while more women in the midwife-led ward received opiates and non-pharmacological pain relief. Conclusion We did not find evidence that starting delivery in the midwife-led setting offers the advantage of lower operative delivery rates. However, epidural analgesia, pudental nerve block and episiotomies were less often while non-pharmacological pain relief was often used in the midwife-led ward. PMID:19545412

Eide, Britt Ingeborg; Nilsen, Anne Britt Vika; Rasmussen, Svein

2009-01-01

350

Adverse drug events in hospitalized patientsA comparison of doctors, nurses and patients as sources of reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study investigated the relative value of adverse drug events reported by doctors, nurses and patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: The study was conducted on a total of four wards: the paediatric and internal medicine wards (including geriatric patients)\\u000a of two peripheral hospitals in the Netherlands. Adverse drug events were collected by spontaneous reporting (doctor and nurse\\u000a reports) and by daily ward

P. M. L. A. van den Bemt; A. C. G. Egberts; A. W. Lenderink; J. M. Verzijl; K. A. Simons; W. S. C. J. M. van der Pol; H. G. M. Leufkens

1999-01-01

351

A re-examination of female child molesters' implicit theories: evidence of female specificity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research by Beech, Parrett, Ward, and Fisher has suggested that Ward and Keenan's male-derived implicit theories represent a good theoretical fit for explaining female child molesters' offence-supportive cognitions. This paper re-examines the applicability of Ward and Keenan's (1999) male-derived implicit theories for explaining the self-reported offence-supportive cognitions of 16 UK female child molesters. Using almost identical analytic methods to

T. A. Gannon; J. A. Hoare; M. R. Rose; N. Parrett

2010-01-01

352

David Perrin COLLEGE COUNCIL  

E-print Network

Blomgren College Computer Committee Bo Foreman College Curriculum Committee Brad Hayes CHAIR Exercise Sport Les Chatelain CHAIR Occupational Therapy Lorie Richards CHAIR Physical Therapy Scott Ward CHAIR

Simons, Jack

353

Failure-mode and effects analysis in improving a drug distribution system.  

PubMed

The medication error rate in an existing ward stock drug distribution system and in an alternative system developed after failure-mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was applied to the ward stock system was studied. In the ward stock system of a large teaching hospital in Western Australia, bulk drug packs were stored in cupboards on the wards, and drug products were transferred to drug trolleys before dose administration by nurses. A pharmacist used the disguised-observer technique to determine the error rate in the ward stock system for a medical ward and a surgical ward. The errors and each step in the system were studied by FMEA. A unit supply individual-patient dispensing (USIPD) system was formulated to respond to the failure modes identified. In this system, a five-day supply of medication was dispensed for each patient from a satellite pharmacy close to the ward. Medication charts were reviewed by a pharmacist, and drugs were dispensed in labeled vials that were placed in a locked drawer at the patient's bedside. The error rate under the USIPD system was determined. Problem areas in the ward stock system identified by FMEA included drug availability, review of orders, drug selection, patient-related issues, and use of nurses' time. The percentage of opportunities during which any error occurred was significantly lower under the USIPD system on both wards. FMEA was used to identify deficiencies in the ward stock system that led to medication errors in an Australian hospital. An alternative drug distribution system designed to address the problems identified was associated with fewer errors. PMID:9117805

McNally, K M; Page, M A; Sunderland, V B

1997-01-15

354

Ant Ecology Lori Lach, Catherine L. Parr, and Kirsti L. Abbott  

E-print Network

Ant Ecology EDITED BY Lori Lach, Catherine L. Parr, and Kirsti L. Abbott 1 #12;Contents Foreword of Abbreviations xvii Part I: Global Ant Diversity and Conservation 1 1. Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, and Evolution 3 Philip S. Ward Box 1.1 Applications of taxonomy: why should we name ants? 11 Philip S. Ward Box 1.2 How

Mooney, Kailen A.

355

Ann Oper Res (2007) 155: 227255 DOI 10.1007/s10479-007-0206-0  

E-print Network

the potential to reduce the cost of transportation for the nurses that traveling to and from the hospital is the construction of a weekly timetable of nurses in all the wards of a large hospital. Each ward needs a weekly timetable for its nurses, that satisfies the shift and task requirements while striving to satisfy, as much

Meisels, Amnon

356

Youth Development Needs and Capacities in the District of Columbia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines, ward-by-ward, indicators of need for youth development services in the District of Columbia (DC), including high school dropout rates, unemployment, poverty, involvement with the criminal justice system, teen parenting, and youth mortality. It discusses capacity to provide various youth development services to address those…

Cave, George

357

University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 13, 2008  

E-print Network

's Council for Development speed networking event. "Ask the Pharmacist" chat Read the transcript of our recent Web chat with Dr. Kristina Ward '94 of URI-ABC6's "Ask the Pharmacist" feature. Dr. Ward, who is Cry Elmina, a book-length poem written for performance in a readers' theater format. More... URI

Rhode Island, University of

358

A multi-center trial of the effects of oral nutritional supplementation in critically ill older inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of nutritional supplementation on dietary intake and on pressure ulcer development in critically ill older patients. The multi-center trial involved 19 wards stratified according to speciality and recruitment for critically ill older patients; 9 wards were randomly selected for nutritional intervention (nutritional intervention group), consisting of the daily distribution of

Isabelle Bourdel-Marchasson; Martine Barateau; Virginie Rondeau; Laurence Dequae-Merchadou; Nathalie Salles-Montaudon; Jean-Paul Emeriau; Gerard Manciet; Jean-François Dartigues

2000-01-01

359

Title: Nurse Rostering with Genetic Algorithms Young Operational Research Conference 12, Guildford, UK, 1998.  

E-print Network

Title: Nurse Rostering with Genetic Algorithms Young Operational Research Conference 12, Guildford algorithms for the solution of a nurse rostering problem at a major UK hospital. The hospital is made up of wards of up to 30 nurses. Each ward has its own group of nurses whose shifts have to be scheduled

Aickelin, Uwe

360

--Program --InterimVice Provost and  

E-print Network

in Teaching aWards George Blumenthal Chancellor UndergradUaTe sTUdenT achievemenT aWards deans' and chancellor as teachers and mentors. Students nominate faculty and the Academic Senate Committee on Teaching selects that the Ron Ruby Award is presented. Ben Leeds Carson, Associate Professor of Music Ben Leeds Carson holds

California at Santa Cruz, University of

361

Postparturitional Testosterone Surge in Male Offspring of Rats Stressed and/or Fed  

E-print Network

Late Pregnancy O. Byron Ward,* Ingeborg L. Ward,* John H. Denning,* Jeffrey A. French, and Shelton E pregnancy show aberrant patterns of sexual behavior masculinization and defeminization that vary to stress and/or alcohol. Possible unique effects each treatment exerts on peri- natal plasma T and it

French, Jeffrey A.

362

Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) echoic angular discrimination: Effects of object separation and complexity  

E-print Network

Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) echoic angular discrimination: Effects of object separation-2294 Sonja J. Mevissen The Dolphin Institute, 420 Ward Ave., Suite 212, Honolulu, Hawaii Adam A. Pack-2294 and The Dolphin Institute, 420 Ward Ave., Suite 212, Honolulu, Hawaii Scott R. Roberts and Lea K. Carsrud

Hawaii at Hilo, University of

363

In Heinke, D., & Mavritsaki, E., Editors, (in press). Computational Modelling in Behavioural Neuroscience  

E-print Network

models in Neuroscience: From membrane to robots. KEVIN N. GURNEY 7. Some finger prints of V1 mechanisms in linked, minimally cognitive agents. ROB WARD AND RONNIE WARD #12;Draft 11. Full solution for the storage neuroscience: Methodologies and Approaches-Minutes of discussions at the workshop in Birmingham, UK in May 2007

Heinke, Dietmar

364

The Use of Unobtrusive Measures in Mental Health Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research should be supplemented with measures that do not require respondent cooperation. Unobtrusive'' measures were developed in this study to describe each ward in a state hospital, including such items as use of window curtains and style of staff dress. This ward profile'' correlated with such criteria as readmission rate, length of stay,…

Palmer, Jean; McGuire, Frederick L.

1973-01-01

365

Substance Use among Iranian Nephrologic Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: This study assessed the prevalence of substance use among Iranian patients with nephrologic disease (chronic renal failure) who were admitted in different nephrologic wards at Shiraz general hospitals. Design: Cross-sectional survey using structured interview and also using DSM-IV criteria for substance dependency. Setting: General hospitals in Shiraz city (patients with nephrologic disease admitted in different nephrologic wards). Participants: 64

Jamshid Ahmadi; Leila Benrazavi

2002-01-01

366

itACiH findings and Boris Magnusson  

E-print Network

home · Equipment at home · Communication - Patient - Ward - Mobile Nurse- Community Nurses · Support Magnusson CS, LTH 2013-10-01 Communication Patient - Doctor - Nurse · Existing systems: - Health systems Video Conference Relatives Communication hub Mobile team Secure Communication Hospital ward Patients

367

DEPENDENCY STATUS VERIFICATION Name ____________________________________ Student ID _________________  

E-print Network

are an orphan or a ward of the court (e.g., copies of parents' death certificates, ward of the court designation of your parent or guardian. YOUTH means you are 21 years of age or younger OR you are still enrolled other than your parents.) If your situation does not meet one of these criteria, submit a letter

Bieber, Michael

368

Multidisciplinary pain management based on a computerized clinical decision support system in cancer pain patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective controlled intervention cohort study in cancer pain patients (n=50 per group) admitted to radiation oncology wards (62 beds, 3 wards) was conducted in a 1621-bed university hospital. We investigated the effect of an intervention consisting of daily pain assessment using the numeric visual analog scale (NVAS) and pain therapy counseling to clinicians based on a computerized clinical decision

Thilo Bertsche; Vasileios Askoxylakis; Gregor Habl; Friederike Laidig; Jens Kaltschmidt; Simon P. W. Schmitt; Hamid Ghaderi; Angelika Zabel-du Bois; Stefanie Milker-Zabel; Jürgen Debus; Hubert J. Bardenheuer; Walter E. Haefeli

2009-01-01

369

Spawning and Culture of Gila Chub Fisheries Research Report 02-07  

E-print Network

, John Romero, Jeff Sorensen, David Ward, and many others. We thank Dr. Paul Barrett, Roger Hamman Ward, and Sebastian Zeltzer for their assistance in the laboratory and field. Thanks to Roger Sorensen and Kirk Young of AGFD for their review of the manuscript. This project was funded by the AGFD Heritage

Bonar, Scott A.

370

Dependent Child Tuition Remission Application  

E-print Network

Dependent Child Tuition Remission Application To be eligible for this benefit, the child must be the biological child, adopted child, stepchild, or ward of the employee and must be the employee's dependent (see of the parent-child or guardian-ward relationship is required and must be submitted to University Human

Hanson, Stephen José

371

Fetal testosterone surge: specific modulations induced in male rats by maternal stress and/or alcohol consumption  

E-print Network

/or alcohol consumption Ingeborg L. Ward,a, * O. Byron Ward,a John D. Affuso,a William D. Long III,a Jeffrey A, exposure to alcohol-alone augmented T on days 18 and 19, stress-alone attenuated prenatal T, and the combination of stress and alcohol completely blocked the normal rise in T between days 17 and 18. When

French, Jeffrey A.

372

Experiment in managing sociopathic behaviour disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

A ward catering for both sexes admitted patients with aggressive suicidal, or otherwise disturbed behaviour for observation and treatment until decisions could be made about their long-term needs. Patients were referred from the police, special hospitals, and the courts and some were transferred from other wards in the hospital. A third of the first 100 patients were admitted for forensic

M Woodside; A Harrow; J V Basson; J W Affleck

1976-01-01

373

FACULTYFACULTY DENTISTRYDENTISTRY  

E-print Network

, prevention and treatment of all aspects of oral disease. The dentist is leader of a dental care team, which. Dentists enjoy the daily challenge of using sound scientific knowledge, modern techniques, and advanced wards and surgical wards and theatres of the University Departments of Medicine ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Tam, Vincent W. L.

374

Group Therapy with Multiple Therapists in A Large Group.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The utilization of multiple therapists in large group therapy meetings has been found to be a significant improvement over the traditional ward meeting or patient-staff conference. The initially limited goals of reducing ward tension and acting out by means of patients ventilation were surpassed. Despite the size of the meetings it was often…

Herschleman, Philip; Freundlich, David

375

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

Contents include the following articles: National Environmental Justice Advisory Council considers Ward Valley resolution; NGA urges Congressional and Presidential support for low-level radioactive waste compacts and transfer of federal land in Ward Valley; RFP issued for SEIS on Ward Valley land transfer; Illinois siting criteria finalized; Consideration of tribal concerns during Ward Valley siting process; State legislators` LLRW working group meets in D.C.; Upcoming state and compact events; Court calendar; Texas compact legislation introduced in Congress; Superfund reform is a priority for 105th Congress; High-level waste bill gets off to an early start; Fort Mojave petition NEJAC for Ward Valley resolution; EPA withdraws cleanup rule from OMB; Board ruling raises doubts about proposed Louisiana enrichment facility; DOE recommends external regulation by NRC; and Supplement--Background on environmental justice.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-02-01

376

Environmental characteristics related to patient assault.  

PubMed

Environmental factors related to physical assault by patients were examined to identify clinical implications warranting further investigation and to test methodology. The concepts of ward conditions (degree of patients' illness, numbers of patients and staff) and ward climate were the focus of the study. Participants were patients and nursing staff on two acute and four long-term psychiatric units in a large neuropsychiatric hospital. Patients and staff were asked to complete the Ward Atmosphere Scale to assess ward mood and climate. Each assault incident was identified from the daily nursing ward report. With each assault occurrence, the nurse manager was asked to complete a questionnaire about environmental conditions at the time of the assault. Most assaults occurred during meal times and afternoons. The most frequent locations were ward corridors and dayrooms. There appeared to be an inverse relationship between assault frequency and number of staff. Crowding rather than total number of patients per ward was suggested as a factor related to assault. Degree of patient acuity seemed to be inversely related to assault frequency. There were suggested trends between assault frequency and a low score on autonomy and a high score on staff control. Clinical implications, ideas for further research, and improved design measures are suggested. The challenge to understand and control this complex phenomenon remains a critical issue for inpatient nursing care. PMID:7829320

Lanza, M L; Kayne, H L; Hicks, C; Milner, J

1994-01-01

377

'Being a nurse leader is a tough role'.  

PubMed

I often hear about the concerns of nurse leaders who work at ward manager level or equivalent in the NHS and independent sectors. They report feeling threatened and having difficulty meeting the diverse challenges of their roles. PMID:24870424

Valle, Jane

2014-06-01

378

The Ishihara Symposium: Granites and Associated Metallogenesis Geoscience Australia 121  

E-print Network

of relatively high Na, Sr and low Y, HREE magmas. They have similarities to Archean Tonalite-Trondhjemite-GranodioriteSY) diorite-tonalite- granodiorite plutons developed continental-ward of, and 10-15 m.y. after, parallel belts

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

379

Menstrual cycle effects on spatial location tasks  

E-print Network

hormonal preparations or oral contraceptives. Measures Mood: Measures of mood included the Spielberger Trait-Stait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) (Spielberger, Gorsuch, Luschcne, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1984), the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Ward, Mendclson...

Andrew, Sarah

2013-02-22

380

76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER (SEE ALSO, DRAWING No. 12 OF 13) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

381

November/December 2007 Clovertales  

E-print Network

appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Fall in Somerset County. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen Scene 7 Club Corner 8 Hurray

Goodman, Robert M.

382

November/December 2005 Clovertales  

E-print Network

, on an age appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Happy, Lisa Rothenburger Carol K. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen

Goodman, Robert M.

383

January/February 2009 Clovertales  

E-print Network

appropriate basis, without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or disability. Welcome to 2009 Last Rothenburger Carol K. Ward County 4-H Agent County 4-H Agent Leaders' & Parents' Outlook 3 Teen Scene 6 Club

Goodman, Robert M.

384

Commonly Prescribed Blood Thinner Associated with Higher Risk of Post-Surgery Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... 6 percent of the LMWH group experienced a surgical site infection, compared to just 0.6 percent of the ... Wang Z, Anderson FA, Ward M, Bhattacharyya T. Surgical site infections and other postoperative complications following prophylactic anticoagulation in ...

385

Counting fish: a typology for fisheries catch data Jennifer Jacquet*, Dirk Zeller and Daniel Pauly  

E-print Network

Counting fish: a typology for fisheries catch data Jennifer Jacquet*, Dirk Zeller and Daniel Pauly, and agriculture (Ward 2004). The FAO *Corresponding author. Email: j.jacquet@fisheries.ubc.ca Journal

Pauly, Daniel

386

75 FR 442 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; South Dakota  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...275-5071, or Sandra Ward, BLM Montana State Office, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101-4669, 406-896-5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The USDA Forest Service has filed an application requesting that the Secretary of the...

2010-01-05

387

75 FR 6702 - Notice of Correction to Notice of Realty Action; Application for Recordable Disclaimer of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...figure and proposed action in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sandra Ward, 406-896-5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of December 23, 2009, the acreage following the legal description...

2010-02-10

388

76 FR 31977 - Public Land Order No. 7768; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6861; Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CONTACT: Lonna Sandau, BLM Missoula Field Office, 406-329-1093, or Sandra Ward, BLM Montana State Office, 406- 896-5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose for which the withdrawal was first made requires this extension to continue...

2011-06-02

389

75 FR 63856 - Public Land Order No. 7753; Extension of Public Land Order No. 7464; Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ward, Bureau of Land Management, Montana State Office, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101-4669, (406) 896- 5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose for which the withdrawal was first made requires this extension to continue...

2010-10-18

390

76 FR 1629 - Public Land Order No. 7757; Withdrawal of National Forest System Land for the Big Ice Cave; Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Sandra Ward, Bureau of Land Management, Montana State Office, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101, 406-896-5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Forest Service will manage the land to protect the Big Ice Cave, its subterranean water...

2011-01-11

391

76 FR 37372 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Notification of a Public Meeting; Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Wildlife Service, 406-538-8706, Ext. 25, or Sandra Ward, Bureau of Land Management, Montana State Office, 406-896-5052. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FWS has filed a petition/application to extend the duration of the withdrawal created...

2011-06-27

392

6. WORKERS COLLECTING SAGO PONDWEED, RED TOP GRASS, LEAFY PONDWEED, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. WORKERS COLLECTING SAGO PONDWEED, RED TOP GRASS, LEAFY PONDWEED, WATER MILFOIL, AND OTHER AQUATIC PLANTS FOR TRANSPLANTING FROM A COULEE SIX MILES AWAY FROM THE REFUGE - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Ward County, ND

393

98. SWITCH HOUSE MAIN LOBBY, GEN 3 CIRCUIT BREAKER, VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

98. SWITCH HOUSE MAIN LOBBY, GEN 3 CIRCUIT BREAKER, VIEW OF OPPOSITE SIDE FROM HAER No. PA-505-97 - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

394

California State University, Long Beach Office of Financial Aid 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840  

E-print Network

than dishonorable; · Currently serving on active duty in U.S. Armed Forces (other than for training; · Orphan, Ward of Court, Foster Care (after age 13); · A self-supporting unaccompanied youth who

Sorin, Eric J.

395

California State University, Long Beach Office of Financial Aid 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840  

E-print Network

for training); · Emancipated Minor or in Legal Guardianship as determined by the court in her/his state of legal residence; · Orphan, Ward of Court, Foster Care (after age 13); · A self-supporting unaccompanied

Sorin, Eric J.

396

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH Office of Financial Aid 1st  

E-print Network

than dishonorable; · Currently serving on active duty in U.S. Armed Forces (other than for training; · Orphan, Ward of Court, Foster Care (after age 13); · A self-supporting unaccompanied youth who

Sorin, Eric J.

397

Division of Enrollment Management S107 Criser Hall Office for Student Financial Affairs PO Box 114025  

E-print Network

(other than for training) · Emancipated Minor or in Legal Guardianship as determined by the court in her/his state of legal residence · Orphan, ward of the court, foster care (after age 13) · A self

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

398

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH Office of Financial Aid 1st  

E-print Network

for training); · Emancipated Minor or in Legal Guardianship as determined by the court in her/his state of legal residence; · Orphan, Ward of Court, Foster Care (after age 13); · A self-supporting unaccompanied

Sorin, Eric J.

399

Binghamton University McNair Scholar Program Application  

E-print Network

were an orphan or ward of the court. None of these statements apply. Income Verification: Taxable: ______________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Please describe any previous training and experience using scientific research methods (If none, say none

Suzuki, Masatsugu

400

Moving Beyond Prevailing Street Design Standards  

E-print Network

of the Center for Law, Energy, and the Environment Graphic design by Crystal M. Ward This paper was prepared classification system 11 The Americans with Disabilities Act 11 State law 12 The Caltrans Highway Design Manual

Kammen, Daniel M.

401

obese. Applying an understanding of nutritional and evolutionary theory  

E-print Network

recently come out of plaster for a snapped Achilles tendon (an injury gained while playing badminton heard the tendon snap again. It was the trauma ward for Dave, either now or after the day's fishing

Couzin, Iain D.

402

Response [to Miller's "Proper Names and Belief Reports"  

E-print Network

reservation is centered about the strategy he borrows from Wettstein, the attempt, namely, to hold cognitive considerations to be independent of semanti­ cal concerns. My remarks shall be directed, then, to­ ward revealing what I feel is a conceptual...

Johnson, Paul F.

403

77 FR 39694 - National Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Petition for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Bose, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888...proposed Wards Island Tidal Energy Project would consist of...Intention: National Currents Energy Services, LLC asks that it...training. The experimental hydrokinetic turbine generator will be...

2012-07-05

404

Stairs to second floor near center of building Fitzsimons ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Stairs to second floor near center of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Tubercular Ward/Nurses' Infirmary, West Harlow Avenue & South Hickey Street, Southwest corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

405

1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST SECTION OF COMPLEX - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

406

Kitchen area on north side of building (first floor) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Kitchen area on north side of building (first floor) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Tubercular Ward/Nurses' Infirmary, West Harlow Avenue & South Hickey Street, Southwest corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

407

Large open room on south side of building (first floor) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Large open room on south side of building (first floor) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Tubercular Ward/Nurses' Infirmary, West Harlow Avenue & South Hickey Street, Southwest corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

408

7 CFR 2700.3 - Functions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-South, Washington, DC 20250. (2) Fort Collins Computer Center, 3825 E. Mulberry Street (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80524. (3) Kansas City Computer Center, 8930 Ward Parkway...

2013-01-01

409

7 CFR 2700.3 - Functions.  

...Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-South, Washington, DC 20250. (2) Fort Collins Computer Center, 3825 E. Mulberry Street (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80524. (3) Kansas City Computer Center, 8930 Ward Parkway...

2014-01-01

410

7 CFR 2700.3 - Functions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-South, Washington, DC 20250. (2) Fort Collins Computer Center, 3825 E. Mulberry Street (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80524. (3) Kansas City Computer Center, 8930 Ward Parkway...

2011-01-01

411

7 CFR 2700.3 - Functions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Independence Ave., SW., Rm. S-107-South, Washington, DC 20250. (2) Fort Collins Computer Center, 3825 E. Mulberry Street (P.O. Box 1206), Fort Collins, CO 80524. (3) Kansas City Computer Center, 8930 Ward Parkway...

2012-01-01

412

ADAPTIVE ROBUST CONTROL OF A LINEAR MOTOR DRIVEN PRECISION INDUSTRIAL GANTRY WITH IMPROVED COGGING FORCE COMPENSATION  

E-print Network

the largely periodic nature of cogging forces with respect to position effectively while B-spline functions and implemented. In another type of research such as [9], a neural-network-based learning feedfor- ward controller

Yao, Bin

413

NRES 725: Plant Physiological Ecology Spring 2011  

E-print Network

discrimination, and habitat distribution in boxelder, Acer negundo. Ecology 74:798-815. Dawson TE, Ward JK-specific study of Acer negundo (boxelder) growing under different conditions. Functional Ecology 18:212-222. Scot

Nowak, Robert S.

414

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Synbiologica team wins 2013 Chinook Entrepreneur  

E-print Network

. CEO Isaac Ward (3rd year, Neuroscience), first-year Biochemistry student Erin -- play very important roles in understanding behaviour and mental health, pregnancy of this device will occur this summer at the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience

Seldin, Jonathan P.

415

Z .Marine Geology 160 1999 183196 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermargeo  

E-print Network

. Schematic of regional circulation in the East China and Yellow Seas. #12;( )C.-A. Huh, C.-C. Sur that only a small portion of this sediment load is transported south- Z .ward by the Yellow Sea Coastal

Huh, Chih-An

416

Novel approaches to investigate behaviors of bacteria by atomic force microscopy and circulating tumor cells through microfluidics  

E-print Network

The adaptability and apparent ingenuity of renegade and intruding cells within the human body present formidable challenges in warding off disease. As the longevity of humans increases, cancer will afflict greater numbers, ...

Gray, David Steven

2014-01-01

417

Spring 2008 Dean's List College of Agriculture and Life Sciences* College of Liberal Arts  

E-print Network

Schrader Hannah Blum Allison Kolker Eric Schroder Rachel Bottjen* Lisa Koll Rebecca Schumacher* Erin-Taylor Rachel Walton Katrina Fetterman Blake Myers Mary Ward Nathan Finck Taylor Noble Jared Weems Ben Fisher

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

418

8. DETAIL OF QUONSET HUT SHOWING BOARDWALK ON TUNDRA CONNECTING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. DETAIL OF QUONSET HUT SHOWING BOARDWALK ON TUNDRA CONNECTING QUONSET HUTS THAT DID NOT HAVE INTERCONNNECTING WOOD FRAME CORRIDORS - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

419

Interior, second floor north side of building toward east end ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, second floor north side of building toward east end - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Open Air Tuberculosis Ward, West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

420

Exterior doorway detail south side of building (first floor) east ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Exterior doorway detail south side of building (first floor) east inset porch; interior staircase visible in background - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Open Air Tuberculosis Ward, West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

421

Interior, second floor south side of building toward east end ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, second floor south side of building toward east end - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Open Air Tuberculosis Ward, West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

422

Interior, first floor southeast side of building, showing french doors ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, first floor southeast side of building, showing french doors and interior windows - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Open Air Tuberculosis Ward, West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

423

Paediatric critical care in Ethiopia.  

PubMed

WHEN I first arrived at the Nigist Eleni Mohammed Memorial General Hospital, I used to do a quick sweep around the ward to ensure all the children were stable and none was near to death. PMID:25671755

Doyle, Patricia

2015-02-01

424

Herpetological Review 44(2), 2013 296 NATURAL HISTORY NOTES  

E-print Network

ALLISTER, Lukfata Public School, West Choc- taw Street, Broken Bow, Oklahoma 74728, USA. LITHOBATES PIPIENS Lithobates pipiens, 37.8 mm SVL, from a farm field in Minot, Ward Co., North Dakota, USA (48.1044°N, 101

Tattersall, Glenn

425

TREATMENT OF MENTAL ILLNESS—The Use and Misuse of Sedation and the Seclusion Room  

PubMed Central

Nine hundred and thirty-nine patients admitted to the locked receiving ward in the psychiatric service of the U. S. Naval Hospital, Oakland, over a ten-month period, many of them psychotic and in an acute initial episode, were treated with an intensive group therapy program, which more appropriately should be called a therapeutic community. During this time, the ward medical officer did not put any patients in a seclusion room. Patients who did not require a locked ward were quickly transferred to the open receiving ward which was established five months after this program began. It was possible to greatly diminish the quantity of sleeping medicine prescribed and practically to eliminate the use of barbiturates given parenterally. Restraints were never used. To be dealt with in this atmosphere of candor and relative freedom seemed to evoke a responsive attitude in the patients and many of them benefited from it. PMID:13396627

Wilmer, Harry A.

1957-01-01

426

78 FR 45547 - North Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Effective Date: July 12, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dean Webster, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency...Mountrail, Nelson, Pembina, Pierce, Ramsey, Sheridan, Stark, Towner, Walsh, Ward, and Wells Counties and the...

2013-07-29

427

Isabelle Charleux, "On Worshipped Ancestors and Pious Donors" Authors' own file, not the published version  

E-print Network

ideology compared to other material representations of power. The dramatic destruction of the Mongol Dawson (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1955), 80. 3 Histoire des Mongols, French translation and annotation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

Immune System May Play Role in Obesity  

MedlinePLUS

... immune cells may help ward off obesity in mice. The new findings are the first to suggest ... versus thinner people. What's more, in experiments with mice, they found that ILC2s seem to spur the ...

429

75 FR 435 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation...the Field Museum of Natural History from Ward's Natural Science Establishment of Rochester, NY (Field Museum of Natural History catalog numbers...

2010-01-05

430

The Razing Tide of the Port of New Orleans: Power, Ideology, Economic Growth and the Destruction of Community  

E-print Network

This study aims to contribute to a critical diagnosis of Hurricane Katrina s impact on two communities in the New Orleans area: the Lower Ninth Ward and St. Bernard through a systematic inquiry into the built environment ...

Azcona, Brian Lloyd

2006-01-01

431

38 CFR 1.220 - On-site activities by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA medical facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...necessary, to meet in a staff member's... (i) Patient rooms and ward areas...Clinic examination rooms; (iii) Nurses stations; ...units; (v) Operating room suites; (vi...may be located in them); or...

2012-07-01

432

38 CFR 1.220 - On-site activities by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA medical facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...necessary, to meet in a staff member's... (i) Patient rooms and ward areas...Clinic examination rooms; (iii) Nurses stations; ...units; (v) Operating room suites; (vi...may be located in them); or...

2013-07-01

433

38 CFR 1.220 - On-site activities by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA medical facilities.  

...necessary, to meet in a staff member's... (i) Patient rooms and ward areas...Clinic examination rooms; (iii) Nurses stations; ...units; (v) Operating room suites; (vi...may be located in them); or...

2014-07-01

434

FACULTY OF HISTORY Job description and selection criteria  

E-print Network

', funded by the European Research Council) Reporting to Dr Bryan Ward-Perkins, History Faculty Vacancy of Art, and the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine. Research in the Faculty is focused around_________________________________________________________________________ FACULTY OF HISTORY Job

Oxford, University of

435

Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014  

MedlinePLUS

... 2012-2014 31 36. Center MM, Jemal A, Smith RA, Ward E. Worldwide variations in colorectal cancer. ... for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014 147. Rein DB, Smith BD, Wittenborn JS, et al. The cost-effectiveness ...

436

OGA Institution Points of Contact  

Cancer.gov

OGA Institution Points of Contact Please contact the Grants Management Specialist assigned to your institution for questions regarding NCI grants. Institution Assigned Specialist FY 2015 3P Biotechnologies, INC. Scharf, Sarah Adheren, INC. Ward,

437

The Dramatic Career of Bulwer-Lytton  

E-print Network

Helen Faucit Governor of the Uastile Jailer Julie de Martemar ( An orphan, ward to Richelieu} arian de Lorme Mistress to Luke of Orleans, hut in Kichelieui4Miss Charles pay] . Courtiers, Pages, Conspirators, Officers, Soldiers, etc„ Mr- G...

Clark, Hazel B.

1914-01-01

438

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-print Network

(Vogt and Jung, 2002). Furthermore, landslides may set off large tsunamis (Bonde- vik et al., 1997; Ward, 2001) that threaten coastal lowlands. Apart from being a geological hazard, the worldwide presence of gas hydrates in continental margin...

Murad, Idris

2011-08-08

439

A restriction of liberty.  

PubMed

Mental health patients admitted to an inpatient psychiatric ward without the use of compulsory powers are called 'informal' or 'voluntary' patients. This means they are free to come and go as they please. PMID:25627511

O'Loingsigh, Niall

2015-01-28

440

East side and part of the front (south side) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East side and part of the front (south side) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, East Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Page Street, northwest corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

441

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

442

IFF Scientific Report 2006 IT/Nano IT/Nano IFF Scientific Report 2006  

E-print Network

phase has a rock-salt structure with Te atoms on all sites of one type, with the other site occupied in order to avoid bias to- wards particular structural types. We have also simu- lated rock-salt (ordered

443

35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL TOWER No. 2 (NOTE: SKYLIGHT ABOVE; COAL CARS IN FAR BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

444

27. BOILER HOUSE, GENERAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, PAST COAL CAR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

27. BOILER HOUSE, GENERAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, PAST COAL CAR No. 9 TOWARD COAL CARS No. 11 & 8 - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

445

34. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR AND TURNAROUND TRACK FOR COAL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

34. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR AND TURN-AROUND TRACK FOR COAL CARS (NOTE: COAL CAR No. 6 IN FAR BACK GROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

446

39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. 1 (WEST) (NOTE: COAL CARS No. 9 & 5 IN BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

447

5. VIEW OF SITE, AREA B; LOG BUILDING AND BUNKHOUSE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW OF SITE, AREA B; LOG BUILDING AND BUNKHOUSE (Features 9 and 10) AT FAR LEFT AND HOUSE (Feature 13) AT CENTER (n.d.) - Gold Dust Mine, Mill & Camp Complex, Wards Gulch, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

448

ORIGINAL PAPER Perch exposure and predation risk: a comparative study  

E-print Network

if they sing in exposed places (Ward and Slater 2005). For instance, male Golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) predominantly select high song perches to enhance their ability to perform visual and vocal

Grether, Gregory

449

Chapter 1 Introduction Diamonds have fascinated humans since their discovery near Golconda, India in the  

E-print Network

1 Chapter 1 Introduction Diamonds have fascinated humans since their discovery near Golconda, India highly valued for their mythical ability to ward off diseases and evil spirits [2]. In the 1870s the dia

Goddard III, William A.

450

A Hierarchical Clustering Methodology for the Estimation of Toxicity  

EPA Science Inventory

A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) methodology based on hierarchical clustering was developed to predict toxicological endpoints. This methodology utilizes Ward's method to divide a training set into a series of structurally similar clusters. The structural sim...

451

SIENA COLLEGE STUDENT EVENTS BOARD April 23, 2012  

E-print Network

, Harrison, Eliseo, Laudenschlager, Angelini, Cicero, Been, Windover, DelSanto, St. Amour, Ward, Allen, Moran report. CHARITY WEEK: Tashjian and St. Amour report hi everyone! A big congratulations to Sammy, Pete

452

SIENA COLLEGE STUDENT EVENTS BOARD February 6, 2012  

E-print Network

, Vanacore, Eliseo, Laudenschlager, Angelini, Been, Windover, Schoonmaker, DelSanto, St. Amour, Ward, Allen't hear from him soon, she's going to get very upset. #12;CHARITY WEEK: Tashjian and St. Amour report

453

SIENA COLLEGE STUDENT EVENTS BOARD April 30, 2012  

E-print Network

. Amour, Ward, Allen, Moran, Bertholf, Donato, O'Brien, Iannuzzi, Kawola, Hannigan, Grippa, Tayler, Murphy. CHARITY WEEK: Tashjian and St. Amour report Charity Week has exciting news! They have finally chosen our

454

3/25/2011 12:20 PM Name Company  

E-print Network

, Rosie NCAR 22 Fox, Andy NCAR/NEON 23 Gotangco Castillo, Charlotte Kendra Purdue University 24 Harper 64 Swenson, Sean NCAR 65 Tilmes, Simone NCAR 66 Ward, Daniel Cornell University 67 White, James NCAR

455

Are you a SPINNING Instructor in need of STAR points or simply interested in learning how to eat healthier, lose weight, decrease body fat  

E-print Network

will enable you to accurately evaluate existing diet plans and ultimately help you to determine what eating plan? Join Master Instructor, Jennifer Ward, RD, LDN, CLC, CPT for a 4-hour Spinning workshop on

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

456

DESY--THESIS--1999--024 September 1999  

E-print Network

(EFP). Making systematic use of the axial gauge, Ward identities and symmetry relations, we can write, die von R.K. Ellis, W.Furmanski, R. Petronzio (EFP) entwickelt wurden. Durch systematischen Gebrauch

457

Particle Physics Masterclass  

ScienceCinema

Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

Helio Takai

2010-01-08

458

EdinburghNapierUniversityEconomicImpact BiGGAR Economics  

E-print Network

like hospital wards and sports facility which, in addition to a gym and sports hall, includes a biomechanics laboratory and an environmental chamber. In addition the University has attracted capital spend

Maizels, Rick

459

40 CFR 26.402 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...agreement to participate in research. Mere failure to object should...participation of their child or ward in research. (d) Parent means a...behalf of a child to general medical care. (f) Observational research means any research...

2011-07-01

460

40 CFR 26.402 - Definitions.  

...agreement to participate in research. Mere failure to object should...participation of their child or ward in research. (d) Parent means a...behalf of a child to general medical care. (f) Observational research means any research...

2014-07-01

461

40 CFR 26.402 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...agreement to participate in research. Mere failure to object should...participation of their child or ward in research. (d) Parent means a...behalf of a child to general medical care. (f) Observational research means any research...

2012-07-01

462

40 CFR 26.402 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...agreement to participate in research. Mere failure to object should...participation of their child or ward in research. (d) Parent means a...behalf of a child to general medical care. (f) Observational research means any research...

2013-07-01

463

November 20, 2007 The Conservation of Global Crop Genetic Resources  

E-print Network

Toennissen, Rockefeller Foundation Bert Visser, Wageningen University Neil Ward, Columbia University Funders: The Rockefeller Foundation The Kendall Foundation * Responsible for meeting organization and primary drafting, and plant genetics and breeding communities met at the Rockefeller Foundation Conference Center in Bellagio

Hendon, Harry

464

arXiv:1307.5853v1[astro-ph.GA]22Jul2013 Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large  

E-print Network

, Andrei L. Korotkov8, Lorenzo Moncelsi9, Tony K. Mroczkowski9, Calvin B. Netterfield4, Giles Novak1, David E. Tucker2, Gregory S. Tucker8, Derek Ward-Thompson14 ABSTRACT 1 Center for Interdisciplinary

Koch, Christof

465

Benjamin: NAP SACC Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care  

Cancer.gov

Ammerman, AS, Benjamin, SE, Sommers, JK, Ward, DS. 2004. The Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) environmental self-assessment instrument. Division of Public Health, NC DHHS, Raleigh, NC, and the Center for Health

466

Mouse Repository Strain Details  

Cancer.gov

Fernandez-Salguero P, Pineau T, Hilbert DM, McPhail T, Lee SS, Kimura S, Nebert DW, Rudikoff S, Ward JM, Gonzalez FJ. 1995. Immune system impairment and hepatic fibrosis in mice lacking the dioxin-binding Ah receptor.

467

meeting-list.xls  

Cancer.gov

Organization Address Phone URL 2004 Annual Meeting 2005 A nnual Meeting Abstract Accepted Next Abstract Due Date American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) 8880 Ward Parkway, Kansas City, MO 64114 913-906-6000

468

The influence of merged muscle excitation modules on post-stroke hemiparetic walking performance  

E-print Network

Jessica L. Allen a , Steven A. Kautz b,c , Richard R. Neptune a, a Department of Mechanical Engineering support, for- ward propulsion, mediolateral control and leg swing; Allen and Neptune, 2012; Neptune et al

469

Particle Physics Masterclass  

SciTech Connect

Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

Helio Takai

2009-04-10

470

camPaign For national distinction HoMeCoMInG rememBering erK rUssell southernF a l l 2 0 0 6 v o l u m e 9 n u m b e r 1 w w w . g e o r g i a s o u t h e r n . e d u  

E-print Network

coffee-table history of Georgia Southern, filled with historical photography. It is truly a privilege a very happy birthday! Bruce Grube, president Vol. 9, no. 1, Fall 2006 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Stephen Ward

Hutcheon, James M.

471

5 CFR 900.405 - Assurances required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...if the applicant establishes, to the satisfaction of the responsible OPM official, that...treatment of individuals as students, patients, wards, inmates, persons subject...unless the applicant establishes, to the satisfaction of the responsible OPM official,...

2010-01-01

472

University of Missouri-Columbia Characteristics of Graduate Education in the  

E-print Network

and international food issues. He currently gives seminars and consults with students and researchers in AsiaFlow Cafe 7A/19, Thanh Thai Street, 14th Ward, 10th District, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam If you are planning

Missouri-Columbia, University of

473

Document Clustering using Word Clusters via the Information Bottleneck Method  

E-print Network

. Finding from our experiments show that this double clustering procedure, which uses the information bot therein). Recently, document clustering has been put for- ward as an important tool for Web search engines

Honavar, Vasant

474

A Bilingual Advantage in Young Adults: Unfounded or Undetectable   

E-print Network

of advantage in executive function found in previous research. Tests of auditory attention and attentional switching were taken from the Test of Everyday Attention battery (TEA; Robertson, Ward, Ridgeway & Nimmo-Smith, 1994), a test of mental flexibility...

Clarkson, Harriet

475

Rapid Relief: A Prefabricated Response  

E-print Network

massive section of floodwall collapsed and sent a violent torrent of brackish water eastward into the Lower 9th Ward homes. Flood Levels rose by ten feet in twenty minutes,? tearing houses from their foundations, erasing blocks upon blocks, ultimately...

Gohmert, Brent Cole

2013-02-06

476

Scalar-graviton interaction in the noncommutative space  

SciTech Connect

We obtain the leading order interaction between the graviton and the neutral scalar boson in the context of noncommutative field theory. Our approach makes use of the Ward identity associated with the invariance under a subgroup of symplectic diffeomorphisms.

Brandt, F. T.; Elias-Filho, M. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil)

2006-09-15

477

The University of Texas at Arlington Undergraduate Assembly  

E-print Network

Robert Kunovich Peter Lehmann Carl Lovely Gladys Maryol Jeffrey McGee Robert McMahon Jackie Michael Sung Lana Rings Jamie Rogers Gerald Saxon Chris Scotese #12;Chandra Subramaniam Mike Ward Collins Watson Joy

Texas at Arlington, University of

478

40 CFR 26.402 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...agreement to participate in research. Mere failure to object should...participation of their child or ward in research. (d) Parent means a...behalf of a child to general medical care. (f) Observational research means any research...

2010-07-01

479

Service Entry Delivery Area  

E-print Network

- 3 NORTH (Winter Ward) 3 SOUTH (Neurology / Rheumatology) 3 EAST (Cardiology Medical Short Stay Unit. EMERGENCY 6. PRINCE WILLIAM WING Ground Level Chest Clinic / Tuberculosis Services Rheumatology Endocrine Cardiothoratic Colorectal Combined Rheumatology & Orthop

New South Wales, University of

480

14. EXTERIOR STAIRS AT NORTH AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS SUBSISTENCE BUILDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. EXTERIOR STAIRS AT NORTH AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS SUBSISTENCE BUILDING FROM GRADE TO ROOF OF COVERED WALK, SHEET 38 - U.S. Naval Hospital, North Ward, Park Boulevard, Balboa Park, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

481

14. View north of second floor with original ceiling height ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. View north of second floor with original ceiling height and contemporary partitions - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, Ward Memorial Building, Franklin Avenue, southeast of Intersection with Rowland Avenue, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

482

EARLY CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT: LIFE AMONG THE SIGNALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Early Craniofacial Development: Life Among the Signals. Sid Hunter and Keith Ward. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711 Haloacetic acids (HAA) are chemicals formed during drinking water disinfection and present in finished tap water. Exposure o...

483

Cluster randomised trial of a targeted multifactorial intervention to prevent falls among older people in hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the efficacy of a targeted multifactorial falls prevention programme in elderly care wards with relatively short lengths of stay.Design Cluster randomised trial.Setting 24 elderly care wards in 12 hospitals in Sydney, Australia.Participants 3999 patients, mean age 79 years, with a median hospital stay of seven days.Interventions A nurse and physiotherapist each worked for 25 hours a week

Robert G Cumming; Catherine Sherrington; Stephen R Lord; Judy M Simpson; Constance Vogler; Ian D Cameron; Vasi Naganathan

2008-01-01

484

Bacillus cereus infections in Traumatology–Orthopaedics Department: retrospective investigation and improvement of healthcare practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To investigate 41 open fractures infected with Bacillus cereus in a Traumatology–Orthopaedy ward and propose a care protocol at admission.Methods. All B. cereus strains isolated from patients hospitalized in the Traumatology-Orthopaedy ward between March 1997 and August 2001 were submitted to molecular analysis (RAPD and PFGE) in order to investigate a putative outbreak. Susceptibility to the main antibiotics and

A. Dubouix; E. Bonnet; M. Alvarez; H. Bensafi; M. Archambaud; B. Chaminade; G. Chabanon; N. Marty

2005-01-01

485

Konsiliarisch-psychiatrische versorgung eines Allgemeinkrankenhauses im zusammenhang mit stationärer kriseninterventio  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This study examined the psychiatric care given at a general hospital associated with a clinical crisis-intervention ward in Munich. The correlations between frequency of suicide attempts, psychiatric crisis and the transfer of patients (treated by attending physicians) to a crisis-intervention ward of particular interest. Of the total 6,004 patients in the general hospital, 227 (130 female, 97 male) were

Christian Vogel; Cord-Michael Haf

1986-01-01

486

Patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) for the management of postoperative pain: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Objective: To compare patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) for postoperative pain management with ward-provided pain therapy.Design: Randomized, prospective pilot study.Setting: University medical center.Patients: 20 ASA status I and II orthopedic patients.Interventions: On the first postoperative day, 20 patients were randomized to receive either PCINA for 4 hours followed by 5 hours of ward-provided pain therapy (Group 1; n = 10)

H. Walter Striebel; Thomas Olmann; Claudia Spies; Glenda Brummer

1996-01-01

487

Death and Children’S Literature: Charlotte’s Web and the Dying Child  

Microsoft Academic Search

An observation by an anthropologist studying the interactions of children in a hospital leukemia ward suggested the topic\\u000a of this paper: the treatment of death in children’s literature, with specific reference to children with life-threatening\\u000a illness. In The Private Worlds of Dying Children, Myra Bluebond-Langner notes:\\u000a \\u000a The most popular book among these children [in a hospital ward with terminal leukemia

Rosalind Ladd

488

Effectiveness of an intervention program in reducing postoperative infections. Italian PRINOS Study Group.  

PubMed

From 1987 to 1989, the National Health Institute carried out a before and after intervention study in order to evaluate the effectiveness of active surveillance and of modification of patient care practices in reducing the incidence of postoperative infections. The initial study population consisted of 20 general and thoracic surgical wards in 12 hospitals; 11 wards were not able to complete the study and were therefore excluded from the analysis. In December 1988, after a 13-month period in which baseline infection rates were assessed in 4,096 patients, written protocols regarding modification of patient care practices were defined and applied. Effectiveness of intervention was evaluated comparing infection rates measured in a 6-month period in 1989 on 1,638 operated patients with those of the previous period. In the overall population, a reduction of 19% of nosocomial infections was observed after the intervention. When individual infection sites were considered, pneumonia rates were statistically significantly reduced by 39%; for the other infection sites the observed differences were not significant. Effectiveness of intervention varied by subgroups of wards. In three of the studied wards, surgical wound infections were significantly reduced by 72%, whereas in the remaining wards the intervention seemed to have no positive impact on infection rates. Nevertheless, the intervention seemed to have been effective in increasing the awareness of infection problems in two other wards. Results of the study suggest that a consistent reduction of postoperative infections can be achieved in surgical wards where usual patient-care practices differ from standard of patient care policies. Nevertheless, the observed variation in effectiveness of intervention by individual wards suggests that differences in structural and behavioral characteristics can affect the compliance with recommended standards. PMID:1928159

Greco, D; Moro, M L; Tozzi, A E; De Giacomi, G V

1991-09-16

489

Syncreticity rising: Elizabeth Peabody's Aesthetic papers  

E-print Network

-street, " the book contains the original publication of Emerson's 1838 lecture "War. " Also contrib&itcd by well-known Transcendental thinkers are "Criticism" by Samuel Gray Ward, a Boston banker and protege of Emerson; "Music" by John Sullivan Dwight, former...'s aesthetic theory, and those of her contributors, John Siillivan Dwight and Samuel Gray Ward. In the celebrated introduction t&?~Vo(??, Emerson distinguishes the Me from the No( Me, the "dualistic philosophical terms" Peabody describes in Aesthetic Papers...

Schultz, Catherine Antoinette

1990-01-01

490

Nosocomial Serratia marcescens individualized by five typing methods in a regional hospital.  

PubMed

The relationships between 69 isolates obtained from 26 patients who were affected by two Serratia marcescens hospital outbreaks occurring in the urology and postnatal wards, were examined by five typing methods for epidemiological purposes. Serotyping, antibiotic resistance profile and electrophoretic analysis of enzymes identified three groups of isolates, while biotyping and bacteriocin typing identified only two. These surveys allowed us to demonstrate the existence of independent episodes of cross-infection among patients of each ward. PMID:1969439

Larose, P; Picard, B; Thibault, M; Grimont, F; Goullet, P

1990-02-01

491

Comparison of spine and femur reference data in native Chinese women from different regions of China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to explore the differences of BMD reference curves at various skeletal sites among Chinese women from different regions of China and to investigate the feasibility of establishing a unified national BMD reference database for Chinese women. We measured BMD at the posteroanterior (PA) lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter and Ward’s triangle by dual-energy X-ray

Xian-Ping Wu; Er-Yuan Liao; Ru-Chun Dai; Peng-Fei Shan; Tuan-Yu Fang; Xiang-Hang Luo; Yin-Zhen Pi; Yebin Jiang

2005-01-01

492

Clinical presentation, natural history, and cumulative death rates of 230 adults with primary cryptococcal meningitis in Zambian AIDS patients treated under local conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

SETTINGInpatient medical wards, Department of Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.OBJECTIVETo define the natural history, clinical presentation, and management outcome of microbiologically confirmed cryptococcal meningitis in adult AIDS patients treated under local conditions where antifungal and antiretroviral therapies are not routinely available.DESIGNA descriptive, longitudinal, observational study.METHODSAll adult patients admitted to the medical wards of the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia

P Mwaba; J Mwansa; C Chintu; J Pobee; M Scarborough; S Portsmouth; A Zumla

2001-01-01

493

Experiment in progressive patient care.  

PubMed

A successful experiment is described in providing total progressive patient care in a small hospital. This was based on dividing ward services into nursing and "hotel" services, the latter being provided by a housekeeping team. Patients were divided into three categories according to the amount of nursing care needed, and two wards were converted, one into an intensive care unit, the other into a homeward bound unit, with high and low nurse/patient ratios respectively. PMID:5676716

Hartley, R; O'Flynn, W R; Rake, M; Wooster, M

1968-09-28

494

Minority Representation in American City Councils: The Effect of Election Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the impact of election systems on African-American and Hispanic representation for city councils and employs two hypotheses:\\u000aHI Ward elections will produce more equitable minority representation than do at-large election systems, independent of the effect of the state's political culture, minority populations, overall population size, and region.\\u000aH2 Mixed cities, those with both ward and at-large elections,

R. ScottRalston

2008-01-01

495

Jupiter's obliquity and a long-lived circumplanetary disk  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been claimed [Canup, R.M., Ward, W.R., 2002. Astron. J. 124, 3404–3423; Ward, W.R., 2003. In: AGU, Fall Meeting 2003] that a long-lived minimum mass circumplanetary gas disk is inconsistent with Jupiter's low obliquity. Here we find that while Jupiter's obliquity may constrain its characteristics it does not rule out a long-lived massive (compared to the mass of the

Ignacio Mosqueira; Paul R. Estrada

2006-01-01

496

The incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo determine the incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients.DesignProspective review of drug charts to identify prescribing errors and prospective observation of nurses preparing and administering drugs to identify medication administration errors. In addition, incident reports were collected for each ward studied.ParticipantsPaediatric patients admitted to hospitals and nurses administering medications to these patients.Setting11 wards (prescribing

Maisoon Abdullah Ghaleb; Nick Barber; Bryony Dean Franklin; Ian Chi Kei Wong

2010-01-01

497

Social development of Russia’s Northern Regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specific features and trends of interregional differences in the social development of Russia’s Northern Regions are considered,\\u000a using methods of econometrics and mathematical statistics. Statistical characteristics point to the process of convergence\\u000a of the northern regions against the background of their high social differentiation. Based on the methods of principal components,\\u000a factor analysis, and Ward’s hierarchical cluster analysis, we grouped

V. I. Akopov; Yu. A. Gadzhiev

2008-01-01

498

Industry, incidents and casualties in South West England: what is their relationship and are there social inequalities in their distribution?  

PubMed

This ecological study aimed, through the analysis of 1,146 wards in the South West of England (1998-2002), firstly, to examine whether chemical incidents and public casualties are more likely near complex industry (emissions to land, air or water: Integrated Pollution Control industry, IPC) or industry with emissions to air only (Local Air Pollution Control industry, LAPC). Secondly, the study examined whether industry, incidents and casualties are found close to deprivation. Social inequalities were examined across quintiles of wards. Fifty-two wards (4.5%) contained an IPC industry and 712 (62.1%) an LAPC. Incidents occurred in 132 wards (11.5%), with casualties in 59 (5.1%). Chemical incidents occurred more frequently in wards with LAPC (152, IPC 20); the same was true of casualties (211, 12). With each additional LAPC site in a ward, the risk of an incident rose by 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8-38%), suggesting a dose-response relationship. No clear social inequalities were found. In the South West of England, the public are more likely to be affected by an incident occurring at a simple LAPC site rather than a complex IPC site. This has implications for emergency planning which, at present, focusses most attention on the larger, more complex IPC sites. PMID:19031101

Scott, Paul; Brown, Paul; Verne, Julia; James, Jody; Gordon, Alistair; Sarangi, Joyshri; Sterne, Jonathan A C

2009-04-01

499

Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital  

PubMed Central

Background: Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. Results: The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Conclusion: Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality. PMID:25405138

Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

2014-01-01

500

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 6  

SciTech Connect

Contents include articles entitled: GAO concludes most Ward Valley SEIS issues previously addressed; Midwest compact halts facility development; Texas publishes proposal to issue WCS radioactive materials license; Central Compact issues export authorizations over NE`s objection; Nebraska governor to host LLRW summit; California regulators reassured re US ecology facility in WA; Southeast Compact augments funding for North Carolina; State and compact calendar of events; IAEA Director General to UN: reexamine nuclear power; DOI convenes meetings on Ward Valley Title VI complaint; California BLM: Tribes fully represented and consulted; MW, NE, and SW file amici curiae briefs in Ward Valley suit; Court denies state`s motion for protective order; WCS files suit against Envirocare and others; States attack DOE`s claim re lack of authority to store spent fuel; House committee passes Texas legislation; Ward Valley land transfer bill introduced in Senate; Senate committee holds hearing on Ward Valley legislation and related GAO report; NRDC threatens to sue DOE re Envirocare; NRC chair criticizes Deputy Interior Secretary`s use of Ward Valley fact sheet; Utility consortium submits license application for storage on Goshute land to NRC; Envirocare cited for SNM violation; EPA begins audit; and EPA rejects Title VI claim re Texas site.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-07-01