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Sample records for warfarin-induced skin necrosis

  1. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis following heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Nicole M.; Rochet, Nicole; Tran, Connie; Brau, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulants, such as heparin and warfarin, are commonly used in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic events. The risk of developing warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) with warfarin is reported to be <1%. However, the risk of WISN may be increased with the initiation of warfarin in the setting of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome (HITT). WISN can lead to catastrophic tissue necrosis requiring amputations and mass debridement. This report describes a case of WISN following HITT and discusses the appropriate medical management of patients with HITT to avoid secondary WISN. PMID:26722173

  2. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis following heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Fawaz, Bilal; Candelario, Nicole M; Rochet, Nicole; Tran, Connie; Brau, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulants, such as heparin and warfarin, are commonly used in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic events. The risk of developing warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) with warfarin is reported to be <1%. However, the risk of WISN may be increased with the initiation of warfarin in the setting of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome (HITT). WISN can lead to catastrophic tissue necrosis requiring amputations and mass debridement. This report describes a case of WISN following HITT and discusses the appropriate medical management of patients with HITT to avoid secondary WISN. PMID:26722173

  3. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis associated with acquired protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Parsi, Kurosh; Younger, Ian; Gallo, John

    2003-02-01

    A 36-year-old woman developed skin necrosis of the inner thighs following the re-introduction of warfarin after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She had a history of liver disease and cardiomyopathy and was on warfarin for 10 years. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis secondary to protein C deficiency was diagnosed. Although warfarin was ceased immediately, the prothrombin time measurements remained prolonged and warfarin levels remained therapeutic. Our patient, who had attached great significance to warfarin therapy, had continued the ingestion of warfarin despite our advice. She required three surgical debridements. Protein C levels, as measured 1 year later, were within normal limits, confirming the transient nature of the acquired deficiency during the acute event. This is the second reported case of warfarin necrosis associated with acquired protein C deficiency. PMID:12581084

  4. Enoxaparin-induced Skin Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Neloska, Lence; Damevska, Katerna; Pavleska, Lidija

    2015-09-01

    Anticoagulant-induced skin necrosis is a rare and serious complication of treatment with these commonly prescribed drugs. Few cases of heparin induced skin necrosis have been reported in literature and only a small number of them was attributed to enoxaparin (1). We report a case with a delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome. A 78-year-old obese woman with history of hypertension, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, and cardiomyopathy was admitted to the Geriatric Hospital. Six days earlier she had fallen and sustained an intracapsular hip fracture which had been treated conservatively. For the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, low molecular weight heparin (Enoxaparin Sodium 30 mg, s.c. every 12 hours) was started on the day of injury. Her other routine medications included insulin glargine, metformin, enalapril, omeprazole, amlodipine, citalopram, atorvastatin, and pain medication. At admission she was afebrile, with stable vital signs. Clinical examination revealed redness at the sites of subcutaneous injection of enoxaparin, as well small purpuric lesions on the trunk and extremities. Over the following few days, new progressive, painful, and slightly indurated erythematous lesions were noted on the breasts, face, abdomen, and legs. Some of the purpuric lesions became bullous, with subsequent central necrosis (Figure 1). The diagnosis of enoxaparin-induced skin necrosis was proposed and the treatment was discontinued. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and sepsis were excluded in this case based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Chest radiography and clinical features of the lesions excluded fat embolism. Despite intensive supportive care our patient died from multiple organ dysfunction 16 days after the initiation of enoxaparin. Thromboprophylaxis has become established in clinical practice as a safe and effective means of decreasing venous thromboembolic events in surgical patients. Enoxaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, is the standard agents used for antithrombotic therapy and prophylaxis. Despite widespread use, reports about adverse effects from enoxaparin are very scarce (2). Heparin-induced skin necrosis typically affects middle-aged women with a history of thrombotic disease. The skin necrosis occurs between day 5 and 11 following initiation of therapy (3-5). The first symptoms are usually described as painful erythematous, subcutaneous lesions with edema, at the injection sites. Subsequently, bullous transformation is observed before full-skin necrosis occurs (5,6). Our experience with this case highlights the importance of early recognition of this adverse event and careful supervision of all patients who receive this medication. PMID:26476910

  5. Bullous Dermatitis and Skin Necrosis Developing after Adrenalin Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Alper; Baratal?, Emre; Meral, Ozge; Ergul, Ay?e Betul; Aslaner, Hümeyra; Coskun, Ramazan; Torun, Yasemin Altuner

    2015-01-01

    Extravasation of vasopressors can have serious complications varying from simple local reactions to skin necrosis and compartment syndrome. Here, we presented bullous dermatitis and skin necrosis which developed due to extravasation of adrenalin infusion in a Hodgkin lymphoma patient with septic shock who was admitted due febrile neutropenia. PMID:26644776

  6. Skin Flap Necrosis by Bone Marking with Methylene Blue in Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Hoo

    2015-01-01

    One of surgical complications in cochlear implantation is the necrosis of the skin flap above the receiver-stimulator coil. We present a case of 55-year-old woman who underwent cochlear implantation and developed a bluish skin necrosis due to bone marking. The planned position for the receiver-stimulator was marked using methylene blue through skin to bone. She did not undergo skin flap thinning and underwent successful implantation with complete electrode insertion. Few weeks postoperatively, the patient developed bluish discoloration with progressive thick, blue eschar formation and skin flap necrosis. She subsequently underwent wound debridement and skin flap closure. Cochlear explantation was not necessary. Timely diagnosis and management about this complication is necessary to prevent further skin breakdown and subsequent device extrusion. This report identifies the marking using methylene blue as another possible source of skin flap necrosis in cochlear implantation, and surgeons should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:26413579

  7. Nasal Skin Necrosis: An Unexpected New Finding in Severe Chikungunya Fever.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Córdova, Leopoldo G; Saravia, Víctor; Arvelaez, Joanne; Castro, Julio S

    2016-01-01

    Three adult Venezuelan patients with virologically confirmed Chikungunya fever, who developed extensive acute nasal skin necrosis early in the course of a life-threatening illness characterized by shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, are discussed. One patient survived and fully recovered. Nasal necrosis has not previously been associated with the disease. PMID:26423381

  8. Low Molecular Weight Heparin Induced Skin Necrosis without Platelet Fall Revealing Immunoallergic Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Godet, Thomas; Perbet, Sébastien; Lebreton, Aurélien; Gayraud, Guillaume; Cayot, Sophie; Tremblay, Aymeric; Ravinet, Aurélie; Christophe, Sébastien; Guérin, Renaud; Pascal, Julien; Jabaudon, Matthieu; Hassan, Amr; Sapin, Anne-Françoise; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) are commonly used in the ICU setting for thromboprophylaxis as well as curative decoagulation as required during renal replacement therapy (RRT). A rare adverse event revealing immunoallergic LMWH induced thrombopenia (HIT) is skin necrosis at injection sites. We report the case of a patient presenting with skin necrosis witnessing an HIT after RRT, without thrombocytopenia. The mechanism remains unclear. Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies, functional tests (HIPA and/or SRA), and skin biopsy are of great help to evaluate differential diagnosis with a low pretest probability 4T's score. PMID:24307958

  9. Low Molecular Weight Heparin Induced Skin Necrosis without Platelet Fall Revealing Immunoallergic Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Godet, Thomas; Perbet, Sébastien; Lebreton, Aurélien; Gayraud, Guillaume; Cayot, Sophie; Tremblay, Aymeric; Ravinet, Aurélie; Christophe, Sébastien; Guérin, Renaud; Pascal, Julien; Jabaudon, Matthieu; Hassan, Amr; Sapin, Anne-Françoise; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) are commonly used in the ICU setting for thromboprophylaxis as well as curative decoagulation as required during renal replacement therapy (RRT). A rare adverse event revealing immunoallergic LMWH induced thrombopenia (HIT) is skin necrosis at injection sites. We report the case of a patient presenting with skin necrosis witnessing an HIT after RRT, without thrombocytopenia. The mechanism remains unclear. Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies, functional tests (HIPA and/or SRA), and skin biopsy are of great help to evaluate differential diagnosis with a low pretest probability 4T's score. PMID:24307958

  10. Skin necrosis and venous thrombosis from subcutaneous injection of charcoal lighter fluid (naptha).

    PubMed

    Rush, M D; Schoenfeld, C N; Watson, W A

    1998-09-01

    A 33-year-old white man injected approximately 4 cc of charcoal lighter fluid (99.4% naptha/0.6% inert ingredients) subcutaneously into his left antecubital fossa. The injection resulted in the toxic necrosis of his volar forearm skin extending proximally to mid-humerus and distally to the metacarpophalangeal joints of the left hand dorsally over a 6-day period. The patient ultimately required extensive surgical debridement, secondary operative closure, and approximately 150 cm2 of split-thickness skin grafting. This case demonstrates the potential for widespread, delayed toxic necrosis of the skin resulting from subcutaneous injection of naptha. This patient's case appears to represent the most severe and widespread case of toxic necrosis of the skin resulting from the subcutaneous injection of hydrocarbons reported in the literature. This case also demonstrates extensive toxic thrombophlebitis not reported in prior cases involving subcutaneous injection of hydrocarbons. PMID:9725968

  11. Warfarin-Induced Artery Calcification Is Accelerated by Growth and Vitamin D

    E-print Network

    Price, Paul A.

    Warfarin-Induced Artery Calcification Is Accelerated by Growth and Vitamin D Paul A. Price, Samuel A. Faus, Matthew K. Williamson Abstract--The present studies demonstrate that growth and vitamin D. The second set of experiments examined the possible synergy between vitamin D and Warfarin in artery

  12. Necrosis of the ventral penile skin flap: a complication of hypospadias surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Ünal; Abe?, Musa; Sarac, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To review cases of hypospadias that were repaired with TIPU method and consequently resulted in the necrosis of ventral penile skin flaps. Methods. Eighty-three patients with hypospadias underwent TIPU procedure by two surgeons. Neourethra in all patients was covered with dartos flap prepared from the preputium or penile shaft. In cases where ventral skin could not be covered primarily, closure was ensured by using preputial Ombredanne or Byars' flaps to repair ventral defects. Results. The median age of patients was 4 years. Twenty-five (30.12%) patients that underwent hypospadias repair had urethral opening at the coronal level, 33 (39.75%) at the distal penis, 10 (12.04%) at the midpenis, and 15 (18.07%) at the proximal penis. The ventral skin defect could not be primarily covered in 10 patients with penile shaft hypospadias. Consequently, Byars' method was used in 8 of these patients to cover the defect and the Ombredanne method was used in the remaining 2. Ventral skin flap necrosis developed in 5 patients (4 Byars and 1 Ombredanne). It was medically treated in 4 patients. Urethral fistula developed in the other patient whose necrosis was deeper. The mean hospital stay was 7 days for patients without necrosis, and 14 for those with necrosis. Conclusion. We are of the opinion that dartos flaps used in the TIPU method in order to cover neourethra and decrease the incidence of fistula development lead to necrosis in the Ombredanne or Byars' flaps by causing low blood supply to the preputium and thus extend hospital stay. PMID:25922604

  13. Necrosis of the Ventral Penile Skin Flap: A Complication of Hypospadias Surgery in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Ünal; Abe?, Musa; Sarac, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To review cases of hypospadias that were repaired with TIPU method and consequently resulted in the necrosis of ventral penile skin flaps. Methods. Eighty-three patients with hypospadias underwent TIPU procedure by two surgeons. Neourethra in all patients was covered with dartos flap prepared from the preputium or penile shaft. In cases where ventral skin could not be covered primarily, closure was ensured by using preputial Ombredanne or Byars' flaps to repair ventral defects. Results. The median age of patients was 4 years. Twenty-five (30.12%) patients that underwent hypospadias repair had urethral opening at the coronal level, 33 (39.75%) at the distal penis, 10 (12.04%) at the midpenis, and 15 (18.07%) at the proximal penis. The ventral skin defect could not be primarily covered in 10 patients with penile shaft hypospadias. Consequently, Byars' method was used in 8 of these patients to cover the defect and the Ombredanne method was used in the remaining 2. Ventral skin flap necrosis developed in 5 patients (4 Byars and 1 Ombredanne). It was medically treated in 4 patients. Urethral fistula developed in the other patient whose necrosis was deeper. The mean hospital stay was 7 days for patients without necrosis, and 14 for those with necrosis. Conclusion. We are of the opinion that dartos flaps used in the TIPU method in order to cover neourethra and decrease the incidence of fistula development lead to necrosis in the Ombredanne or Byars' flaps by causing low blood supply to the preputium and thus extend hospital stay. PMID:25922604

  14. Chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated central-line dressings and necrosis in complicated skin disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jennifer B; Divito, Sherrie J; Talbot, Simon G

    2014-12-01

    Although chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) disks have been shown to help reduce the incidence of central line-associated blood stream infections, their use can result in local skin necrosis. The effects of CHG disks on patients with complex skin pathology have not been studied. We report 6 cases of dermal necrosis associated with Biopatch (Ethicon Inc, Somerville, NJ) CHG disks in adults with complex skin pathology including those with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, burns, and anasarca. All patients had a CHG disk placed at a central venous catheter insertion site. Age range was from 21 to 84 years. Discovery of the reaction ranged from 4 to 14 days after disk placement. Resultant skin erosions required 2 to 10 weeks to reepithelialize. Complicated skin disorder patients represent a rare subset of the critically ill who appear prone to CHG disk necrosis. Continuous contact of CHG under occlusive dressings is speculated to predispose Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, and burn patients to local chemical injury secondary to loss of the epithelial tissue barrier, decreased cohesion of the epidermal-dermal junction, and increased tissue permeability. In these patients, the risk of placing the CHG disk may present more risk than using alternative antimicrobial dressings. PMID:25035049

  15. Preoperative shock wave therapy reduces ischemic necrosis in an epigastric skin flap model.

    PubMed

    Reichenberger, Matthias A; Germann, Günter; Roth, Heinz Jürgen; Meirer, Romed; Engel, Holger

    2009-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has recently been demonstrated to improve skin flap survival. In all these studies EWST was applied immediately after the surgical intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the preoperative effect of ESWT as a noninvasive technique to precondition flap tissue in a rat epigastric skin flap model. EWST and control groups each contained 10 animals. ESWT was applied 7 days before the surgical intervention, whereas the control group received no treatment. Follow-up evaluation was performed on postoperative day 5. The mean area of flap necrosis, expressed as a percentage of the total flap area, was calculated. A significant reduction of the average flap necrosis area was observed in the ESWT group (27.2% +/- 9.6%) compared with the control group (46.1% +/- 7.9% (P < 0.05). In summary, this study indicates that preoperative ESWT may enhance skin flap survival in a rodent model. PMID:19816153

  16. Methylene Blue Dye-Induced Skin Necrosis in Immediate Breast Reconstruction: Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Chang, Choong Hyun; Park, Chan Heun

    2014-01-01

    Background For early breast cancer patients, skin-sparing mastectomy or nipple-sparing mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy has become the mainstream treatment for immediate breast reconstruction in possible cases. However, a few cases of skin necrosis caused by methylene blue dye (MBD) used for sentinel lymph node localization have been reported. Methods Immediate breast reconstruction using a silicone implant was performed on 35 breasts of 34 patients after mastectomy. For sentinel lymph node localization, 1% MBD (3 mL) was injected into the subareolar area. The operation site was inspected in the postoperative evaluation. Results Six cases of immediate breast reconstruction using implants were complicated by methylene blue dye. One case of local infection was improved by conservative treatment. In two cases, partial necrosis and wound dehiscence of the incision areas were observed; thus, debridement and closure were performed. Of the three cases of wide skin necrosis, two cases underwent removal of the dead tissue and implants, followed by primary closure. In the other case, the breast implant was salvaged using latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap reconstruction. Conclusions The complications were caused by MBD toxicity, which aggravated blood disturbance and skin tension after implant insertion. When planning immediate breast reconstruction using silicone implants, complications of MBD should be discussed in detail prior to surgery, and appropriate management in the event of complications is required. PMID:24883277

  17. Skin Necrosis in a Patient with Factor V Leiden Mutation following Nipple Sparing Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Can

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and immediate breast reconstruction have replaced radical surgical interventions for the treatment of selected patients with breast cancer undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. NSM is technically a difficult procedure. After dissection, the remaining breast skin and nipple-areola complex (NAC) must be thin enough to be free of tumor tissue and thick enough to preserve tissue perfusion. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common cause of hereditary thrombophilia; thrombosis almost always develops in the venous system. The literature includes only a few case series of arterial thrombosis. The present study aimed to describe for the first time a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation that developed nipple-areola complex and skin necrosis, and multiple embolisms in the upper extremity arteries following NSM. PMID:26579335

  18. Skin Necrosis and Purpura Fulminans in Children With and Without Thrombophilia-A Tertiary Center's Experience.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Strauss, Tzipora; Rubinstein, Marina; Ben Harush, Miriam; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Kapelushmik, Joseph; Paret, Gideon; Kenet, Gili

    2015-10-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a very rare clinicopathologic skin disorder comprising dermal microvascular thrombosis associated with perivascular hemorrhage of multiple origins. It may occur as the presenting symptom of severe congenital deficiency of protein C (PC) or protein S (PS) during the newborn period, or later in life following oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists, or of sepsis that may be associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Treatment consists of anticoagulants and PC concentrates during acute episodes. We report our experience in the diagnosis and management of pediatric PF. The medical records of the 6 children aged 2-16 years (median: 5 years) who presented with PF to our tertiary care center between 1996 and 2013 were studied. The thrombophilia workup revealed either the presence of congenital homozygous PC deficiency, prothrombotic polymorphisms (factor V Leiden and FIIG20210A heterozygosity), acquired PC/PS deficiency, or no discernible thrombophilia. The skin necrosis resolved following conservative fresh-frozen plasma/anticoagulant therapy in 2 cases, whereas 3 children required interventional plastic surgery. The sixth case, a 10-year-old child with severe PC deficiency, heterozygous factor V Leiden, and FIIG20210A, received recombinant activated PC. PF in childhood is rare and has multiple etiologies. Understanding of the variable pathogenesis and risk factors will facilitate diagnosis and appropriate clinical management. PMID:26436558

  19. Tumour necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma and substance P are novel modulators of extrapituitary prolactin expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Langan, Ewan A; Vidali, Silvia; Pigat, Natascha; Funk, Wolfgang; Lisztes, Erika; Bíró, Tamás; Goffin, Vincent; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human scalp skin and hair follicles (HFs) are extra-pituitary sources of prolactin (PRL). However, the intracutaneous regulation of PRL remains poorly understood. Therefore we investigated whether well-recognized regulators of pituitary PRL expression, which also impact on human skin physiology and pathology, regulate expression of PRL and its receptor (PRLR) in situ. This was studied in serum-free organ cultures of microdissected human scalp HFs and skin, i.e. excluding pituitary, neural and vascular inputs. Prolactin expression was confirmed at the gene and protein level in human truncal skin, where its expression significantly increased (p?=?0.049) during organ culture. There was, however, no evidence of PRL secretion into the culture medium as measured by ELISA. PRL immunoreactivity (IR) in female human epidermis was decreased by substance P (p?=?0.009), while neither the classical pituitary PRL inhibitor, dopamine, nor corticotropin-releasing hormone significantly modulated PRL IR in HFs or skin respectively. Interferon (IFN) ? increased PRL IR in the epithelium of human HFs (p?=?0.044) while tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ? decreased both PRL and PRLR IR. This study identifies substance P, TNF? and IFN? as novel modulators of PRL and PRLR expression in human skin, and suggests that intracutaneous PRL expression is not under dopaminergic control. Given the importance of PRL in human hair growth regulation and its possible role in the pathogenesis of several common skin diseases, targeting intracutaneous PRL production via these newly identified regulatory pathways may point towards novel therapeutic options for inflammatory dermatoses. PMID:23626671

  20. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Molecule LIGHT Promotes Keratinocyte Activity and Skin Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Herro, Rana; Antunes, Ricardo Da S; Aguilera, Amelia R; Tamada, Koji; Croft, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Several inflammatory diseases including scleroderma and atopic dermatitis display dermal thickening, epidermal hypertrophy, or excessive accumulation of collagen. Factors that might promote these features are of interest for clinical therapy. We previously reported that LIGHT, a TNF superfamily molecule, mediated collagen deposition in the lungs in response to allergen. We therefore tested whether LIGHT might similarly promote collagen accumulation and features of skin fibrosis. Strikingly, injection of recombinant soluble LIGHT into naive mice, either subcutaneously or systemically, promoted collagen deposition in the skin and dermal and epidermal thickening. This replicated the activity of bleomycin, an antibiotic that has been previously used in models of scleroderma in mice. Moreover skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin was dependent on endogenous LIGHT activity. The action of LIGHT in vivo was mediated via both of its receptors, HVEM and LT?R, and was dependent on the innate cytokine TSLP and TGF-?. Furthermore, we found that HVEM and LT?R were expressed on human epidermal keratinocytes and that LIGHT could directly promote TSLP expression in these cells. We reveal an unappreciated activity of LIGHT on keratinocytes and suggest that LIGHT may be an important mediator of skin inflammation and fibrosis in diseases such as scleroderma or atopic dermatitis. PMID:25789702

  1. Inverse Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes Obtained From Alzheimer's Patients and Skin Cancer Survivors: Increased Apoptosis in Alzheimer's and Reduced Necrosis in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Monica; Salech, Felipe; Ponce, Daniela P.; Merino, Daniela; Sinning, Mariana; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2012-01-01

    A paucity of cancer in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and low rates of AD in cancer survivors has been reported in epidemiological studies. Deregulation in opposite directions of biological mechanisms, such as susceptibility to cell death, might be shared in the two disorders. We analyzed lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients as well as healthy controls and found significantly increased vulnerability of AD lymphocytes to H2O2-induced apoptotic death and higher resistance to death of skin cancer lymphocytes, due to reduced necrosis, as compared with healthy controls by pairwise comparisons adjusted for age and sex. H2O2-induced death in lymphocytes was caspase independent and significantly reduced by PARP-1 inhibition in all three groups. These differences in the susceptibility to cell death observed for lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients may be one of the mechanisms that help explain the inverse correlation detected between these diseases in epidemiological studies. PMID:22367434

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 antagonists alleviate inflammatory skin changes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Surguladze, David; Deevi, Dhanvanthri; Claros, Nidia; Corcoran, Erik; Wang, Su; Plym, Mary Jane; Wu, Yan; Doody, Jacqueline; Mauro, David J; Witte, Larry; Busam, Klaus J; Pytowski, Bronek; Rodeck, Ulrich; Tonra, James R

    2009-07-15

    Cancer patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy often experience an acneiform rash of uncertain etiology in skin regions rich in pilosebaceous units. Currently, this condition is treated symptomatically with very limited, often anecdotal success. Here, we show that a monoclonal antibody targeting murine EGFR, ME1, caused a neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation in mice, similar to that reported in patients. This effect was preceded by the appearance of lipid-filled hair follicle distensions adjacent to enlarged sebaceous glands. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), localized immunohistochemically to this affected region of the pilosebaceous unit, was specifically up-regulated by ME1 in skin but not in other tissues examined. Moreover, skin inflammation was reduced by cotreatment with the TNFalpha signaling inhibitor, etanercept, indicating the involvement of TNFalpha in this inflammatory process. Interleukin-1, a cytokine that frequently acts in concert with TNFalpha, is also involved in this process given the efficacy of the interleukin-1 antagonist Kineret. Our results provide a mechanistic framework to develop evidence-based trials for EGFR antibody-induced skin rash in patients with cancer. PMID:19584274

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-?-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H.; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-? on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-? (10 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-? (p < 0.005) and accomplished by MMPs (p < 0.005). Levels of the collagenases MMP-8 and MMP-13 were insignificant and neither MMP-2 nor MMP-14 were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-? increased secretion of MMP-1 (p < 0.01) but had no impact on MMP-1 quantities in the tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed similar tissue MMP-1 expression with or without TNF-? with epidermis being the major source of MMP-1. Increased tissue-derived collagenolytic activity with TNF-? exposure was blocked by neutralizing MMP-1 monoclonal antibody and was not due to down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. TNF-? increased production (p < 0.01), tissue levels (p < 0.005) and catalytic activity of the endogenous MMP-1 activator MMP-3. Type I collagen degradation correlated with MMP-3 tissue levels (rs = 0.68, p < 0.05) and was attenuated with selective MMP-3 inhibitor. Type I collagen formation was down-regulated in cultured compared with native skin explants but was not reduced further by TNF-?. TNF-? had no significant effect on epidermal apoptosis. Our data indicate that TNF-? augments collagenolytic activity of MMP-1, possibly through up-regulation of MMP-3 leading to gradual loss of type I collagen in human skin. PMID:25457675

  4. “Serious skin & soft tissue infections in rheumatoid arthritis patients taking anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha drugs: a nested case–control study”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) drugs are very effective for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but may increase the risk of serious bacterial infections. We assessed the association between the risk of serious skin and soft tissue infections (SSSTI) and the use of these agents in rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA). Methods We conducted a nested case–control study among rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 from 2000–2008. We identified rheumatoid arthritis patients with SSSTI, matched them to three sets of RA controls and used conditional logistic regression to compare the risk of SSSTI between patients treated and those not treated with an anti-TNF drug, after adjusting for known confounders and important covariates. Limited by the design, we could not assess (absolute) risk but only relative risk in terms of association. Results Among the 97 cases and 291 controls, 90 percent were male, 62 percent white, with a mean age of 63 years. Twenty percent received anti-TNF drugs during the study period. Thirty-nine percent of cases and 15 percent of controls died, (OR 3.5, 95% CI: 2.033, 6.11, p <0.01). Diabetes mellitus (37%), kidney disease (16%) and a history of skin infections (27%) were common among cases. Based on conditional logistic regression, anti-TNF use was not significantly associated with skin and soft tissue infections (OR 1.1, 95% CI: 0.61-2.03, p = 0.92). However, patients with diabetes mellitus (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.53-4.13, p = 0.01) or a prior history of skin infection (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.87-11.43, p <0.01) were more likely to have skin and soft tissue infections. Conclusion Use of anti-TNF therapy among RA patients was not associated with an increased risk of SSSTI, but patients with diabetes mellitus and those with a history of prior skin infection were significantly more likely to have SSSTI and mortality was higher among cases than controls in this veteran cohort. PMID:24498926

  5. Analysis of the metabolic deterioration of ex vivo skin from ischemic necrosis through the imaging of intracellular NAD(P)H by multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Washington Y.; Prow, Tarl W.; Sanchez, Washington H.; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo human skin has been used extensively for cosmeceutical and drug delivery studies, transplantable skin allografts, or skin flaps. However, it has a half-life of a few days due to ischemic necrosis. Traditional methods of assessing viability can be time-consuming and provide limited metabolic information. Using multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) we assess ischemic necrosis of ex vivo skin by NAD(P)H autofluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime. Ex vivo skin is stored in the presence and absence of nutrient media (Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium) at -20, 4, and 37 °C and room temperature over a 7-day time course to establish different rates of metabolic deterioration. At higher temperatures we observe a decrease in NAD(P)H autofluorescence, higher image noise, and a significant increase in the average fluorescence lifetime (?m) from ~1000 to 2000 ps. Additionally, significant distortions in NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime histograms correspond to the reduction in autofluorescence. Skin kept at 4 °C, with or without media, showed the least change. Our findings suggest that MPT-FLIM enables useful noninvasive optical biopsies to monitor the metabolic state and deterioration of human skin for research and clinical purposes.

  6. Paradoxical Autoinflammatory Skin Reaction to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Blockers Manifesting as Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Tavecchio, Simona; Berti, Emilio; Gelmetti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel disease, particularly with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, may be associated with a number of cutaneous adverse effects, including psoriasis-like, eczema-like, and lichenoid eruptions. Other rare skin complications are neutrophilic dermatoses such as amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (APF), which is a chronic relapsing pustular disorder classified in this spectrum.The authors analyzed clinical, histopathologic, and cytokine expression profiles of 3 inflammatory bowel disease patients with APF triggered by adalimumab (patient 1) and infliximab (patients 2 and 3).All 3 patients presented with sterile pustules involving the cutaneous folds, genital regions, and scalp 6 months after starting adalimumab (patient 1) and 9 months after starting infliximab (patients 2 and 3). Histology was characterized by epidermal spongiform pustules with a dermal neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate. Tumor necrosis factor blocker withdrawal associated with topical and systemic corticosteroids induced complete remission of APF in all 3 patients. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and its receptors as well as TNF alpha and its receptors were significantly higher in APF than in controls. Also IL-17, leukocyte selectin, and chemokines, such as IL-8, [C-X-C motif] chemokine ligand 1/2/3 (C?=?cysteine, X?=?any amino acid), [C-X-C motif] chemokine ligand 16 (C?=?cysteine, X?=?any amino acid), and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) were significantly overexpressed. Finally, the authors found significant overexpression of both metalloproteinases 2/9 and their inhibitors 1/2.The observation of 3 patients with APF following anti-TNF therapy expands not only the clinical context of APF but also the spectrum of anti-TNF side effects. Overexpression of cytokines/chemokines and molecules amplifying the inflammatory network supports the view that APF is autoinflammatory in origin. PMID:26559252

  7. Avascular Necrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor-?-induced Proteolytic Activation of Pro-matrix Metalloproteinase-9 by Human Skin Is Controlled by Down-regulating Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 and Mediated by Tissue-associated Chymotrypsin-like Proteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuan-Ping; Nien, Yih-Dar; Garner, Warren L.

    2008-01-01

    The proteolytic activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 by conversion of the 92-kDa precursor into an 82-kDa active form has been observed in chronic wounds, tumor metastasis, and many inflammation-associated diseases, yet the mechanistic pathway to control this process has not been identified. In this report, we show that the massive expression and activation of MMP-9 in skin tissue from patients with chronically unhealed wounds could be reconstituted in vitro with cultured normal human skin by stimulation with transforming growth factor-? and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. We dissected the mechanistic pathway for TNF-? induced activation of pro-MMP-9 in human skin. We found that proteolytic activation of pro-MMP-9 was mediated by a tissue-associated chymotrypsin-like proteinase, designated here as pro-MMP-9 activator (pM9A). This unidentified activator specifically converted pro-MMP-9 but not pro-MMP-2, another member of the gelatinase family. The tissue-bound pM9A was steadily expressed and not regulated by TNF-?, which indicated that the cytokine-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 might be regulated at the inhibitor level. Indeed, the skin constantly secreted tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 at the basal state. TNF-?, but not transforming growth factor-?, down-regulated this inhibitor. The TNF-?-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 was tightly associated with down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in a dose-dependent manner. To establish this linkage, we demonstrate that the recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 could block the activation of pro-MMP-9 by either the intact skin or skin fractions. Thus, these studies suggest a novel regulation for the proteolytic activation of MMP-9 in human tissue, which is mediated by tissue-bound activator and controlled by down-regulation of a specific inhibitor. PMID:12004062

  9. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis. PMID:26600786

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of gene therapy with vascular endothelial growth factor or shock wave therapy to reduce ischaemic necrosis in an epigastric skin flap model in rats.

    PubMed

    Meirer, R; Huemer, G M; Oehlbauer, M; Wanner, S; Piza-Katzer, H; Kamelger, F S

    2007-01-01

    The effect of gene therapy with adenovirus-mediated (Ad) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was compared to that of shock wave (SW) therapy on skin flap survival in a rat model, using the epigastric skin flap, based solely on the right inferior epigastric vessels. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (SW-group, Ad-VEGF-group, and Control-group) of 10 rats each. Immediately after surgery, the SW-group was administered 2500 impulses at 0.15mJ/mm(2), in the Ad-VEGF-group injections were made to the subdermal space whereas the Control-group received no treatment. Flap viability was evaluated on day 7 after the operation. Standardised digital pictures of the flaps were taken and transferred to the computer, and necrotic zones relative to total flap surface area were measured and expressed as percentages. Overall, significantly smaller areas of necrotic zones were noted in the SW-group and the Ad-VEGF-group compared with the Control-group (SW-group: median 2.23% (range: 0-5.1) versus Control-group: median 17.4% (range: 11.8-22.8) (p<0.05); Ad-VEGF-group: median 9.25% (range: 7.6-11.9) versus Control-group: median 17.4% (range: 11.8-22.8) (p<0.05)). Furthermore, in the SW-group, areas of necrotic zones were significantly smaller than in Ad-VEGF-group (SW-group: median 2.23% (range: 0-5.1) versus Ad-VEGF-group: median 9.25% (range: 7.6-11.9) (p<0.05)). We conclude that treatment with SW enhances epigastric skin flap survival significantly more than Ad-VEGF treatment and also represents a feasible and cost effective technique to improve blood supply in ischaemic tissue. PMID:17293284

  11. Mastectomy Weight and Tissue Expander Volume Predict Necrosis and Increased Costs Associated with Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yalanis, Georgia C.; Nag, Shayoni; Georgek, Jakob R.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Manahan, Michele A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired vascular perfusion in tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction leads to mastectomy skin necrosis. We investigated factors and costs associated with skin necrosis in postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Methods: Retrospective review of 169 women with immediate TE placement following mastectomy between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013 was performed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected. Logistic regression analysis on individual variables was performed to determine the effects of tissue expander fill volume and mastectomy specimen weight on skin necrosis. Billing data was obtained to determine the financial burden associated with necrosis. Results: This study included 253 breast reconstructions with immediate TE placement from 169 women. Skin necrosis occurred in 20 flaps for 15 patients (8.9%). Patients with hypertension had 8 times higher odds of skin necrosis [odd ratio (OR), 8.10, P < 0.001]. Patients with TE intraoperative fill volumes >300 cm3 had 10 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 10.66, P =0.010). Volumes >400 cm3 had 15 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 15.56, P = 0.002). Mastectomy specimen weight was correlated with skin necrosis. Specimens >500 g had 10 times higher odds of necrosis and specimens >1000 g had 18 times higher odds of necrosis (OR, 10.03 and OR, 18.43; P =0.003 and P <0.001, respectively). Mastectomy skin necrosis was associated with a 50% increased inpatient charge. Conclusion: Mastectomy flap necrosis is associated with HTN, larger TE volumes and mastectomy specimen weights, resulting in increased inpatient charges. Conservative TE volumes should be considered for patients with hypertension and larger mastectomy specimens. PMID:26301139

  12. Nicolau syndrome: an iatrogenic cutaneous necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nischal, Kc; Basavaraj, Hb; Swaroop, Mr; Agrawal, Dp; Sathyanarayana, Bd; Umashankar, Np

    2009-07-01

    Nicolau syndrome is an uncommon complication of intramuscular injection leading to variable degrees of necrosis of skin and the underlying tissues. We report here two cases of this syndrome. Our first case was a 25 year-old male who developed intense pain and purplish discoloration of the skin in the right hip after intramuscular diclofenac injection. The second case was a 60 year-old male who developed intense pain and discoloration of skin, not only at the injection site, but also on the left scapular area and left elbow after receiving chlorpheniramine maleate injection intramuscularly. These cases highlight the need for awareness about this condition and the need to exercise utmost care during the administration of any parenteral injections by dermatologists. PMID:20808597

  13. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  14. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  15. Comparison of the effectiveness of gene therapy with transforming growth factor-beta or extracorporal shock wave therapy to reduce ischemic necrosis in an epigastric skin flap model in rats.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Georg M; Meirer, Romed; Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Kamelger, Florian S; Dunst, Karin M; Wanner, Siegmund; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde

    2005-01-01

    The induction of neoangiogenesis by exogenous growth factors in failing skin flaps has recently yielded promising results. Gene transfer with virus vectors has been introduced as a highly capable route of administration for growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor or fibroblast growth factor. Extracorporal shock waves (ESW) deliver energy by means of high amplitudes of sound to the target tissue and have been shown to induce angiogenesis. We compared the effectiveness of gene therapy with adenovirus-mediated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and ESW therapy to treat ischemically challenged epigastric skin flaps in a rat model. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 10 each with an 8 x 8 cm epigastric skin flap. Rats received either subdermal injections of adenovirus (Ad) encoding TGF-beta (10(8) pfu) or ESW treatment with 750 impulses at 0.15 mJ/mm2. The third group received no treatment and served as a control group. Flap viability was evaluated after 7 days and digital images of the epigastric flaps were taken and areas of necrotic zones relative to total flap surface area calculated. Histologic evaluation and increased angiogenesis were confirmed by CD31 immunohistochemistry. Overall, there was a significant increase in mean percent surviving area in the Ad-TGF-beta group and the ESW group compared to the control group (ESW group: 97.7 +/- 1.8% vs. Ad-TGF-beta: 90.3 +/- 4.0% and control group: 82.6 +/- 4.3%; p < 0.05). Furthermore, in the ESW group mean percent surviving areas were significantly larger than in the Ad-TGF-beta group (ESW group: 97.7 +/- 1.8% vs. Ad-TGF-beta: 90.3 +/- 4.0%; p < 0.05). Flap vascularization was increased by Ad-TGF-beta and ESW with numerous vessels, however, there was no significant difference between the two treatment groups. We conclude that treatment with ESW enhances epigastric skin flap survival significantly more than Ad-TGF-beta treatment and thus represents a modality that is feasible, cost-effective, and less invasive compared to gene therapy with growth factors to improve blood supply to ischemic tissue. PMID:15953045

  16. [Pneumomediastinum and cutaneous necrosis in dermatomyositis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Gallardo C, Natalia; Valenzuela L, Omar; Ibáñez V, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    We report a 37 years old male with a dermatomyositis treated with oral cyclophosphamide. He was admitted to the hospital due to a zone of skin necrosis with purulent exudate, located in the second left toe. A complete blood count showed a leukocyte count of 2,600 cells/mm³. A Chest CAT scan showed a pneumomediastinum with emphysema of adjacent soft tissue. Cyclophosphamide was discontinued and leukocyte count improved. The affected toe was amputated and a chest CAT scan showed a partial resolution of the pneumomediastinum. We discuss and review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of pneumomediastinum and cutaneous necrosis in association with dermatomyositis. PMID:25860279

  17. Nipple-Areola Complex Necrosis after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Autologous Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin-Woo; You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Hyon-Surk; Lee, Byung-Il; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy is increasingly preferred worldwide as a breast cancer treatment option. However, postoperative nipple-areola complex (NAC) necrosis is the most significant complication of nipple-sparing mastectomy. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors for NAC necrosis, and to describe the use of our skin-banking technique as a solution. Methods We reviewed cases of immediate autologous breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy at our institution between June 2005 and January 2014. The patients' data were reviewed and the risk of NAC necrosis was analyzed based on correlations between patient variables and NAC necrosis. Moreover, data pertaining to five high-risk patients who underwent the donor skin-banking procedure were included in the analysis. Results Eighty-five patients underwent immediate autologous breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy during the study period. Partial or total NAC necrosis occurred in 36 patients (43.4%). Univariate analysis and binary regression modeling found that body mass index, smoking history, radiation therapy, and mastectomy volume were significantly associated with NAC necrosis. Of the 36 cases of NAC necrosis, 31 were resolved with dressing changes, debridement, or skin grafting. The other five high-risk patients underwent our prophylactic skin-banking technique during breast reconstruction surgery. Conclusions NAC necrosis is common in patients with multiple risk factors. The use of the skin-banking technique in immediate autologous breast reconstruction is an attractive option for high-risk patients. Banked skin can be used in such cases without requiring additional donor tissue, with good results in terms of aesthetic and reconstructive outcomes. PMID:26430632

  18. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  19. Dry skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin - dry; Winter itch ... Dry skin is common. It happens more often in the winter when cold air outside and heated air inside cause low humidity. Forced-air furnaces make skin even drier. The skin loses moisture and may ...

  20. Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Your Skin KidsHealth > Kids > How the Body Works > Your Skin ... are really dead skin cells. Continue Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  1. Skin Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Skin Biopsy KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Skin Stuff > Skin Biopsy ... Preparation The Procedure Safety Results What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a ...

  2. Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction

    E-print Network

    Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

    2008-01-01

    The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

  3. Aging Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it comes ... early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins and ...

  4. [Skin lesions and joint involvement in purpura fulminans (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Allouis, M; Catier, P; Bracq, H; Babut, J M

    1980-10-01

    Until recently, purpura fulminans had a very prognosis. It can now be treated and the patient may survive but extensive skin necrosis may lead to septic arthritis. The authors have observed 4 cases of this disease. 3 had to suffer amputation of a lower limb. They describe the type of care recommended in order to limit the extent of the necrosis. PMID:6450996

  5. Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. PMID:26612377

  6. Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use of skin flaps or muscle flaps. In the present review, we describe how to perform skin grafting successfully, and some variation of skin grafting. PMID:22570780

  7. Cutaneous Necrosis As a Result of Isosulphane Blue Injection in Mammarian Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bircan, Huseyin Y; Ozcelik, Umit; Koc, Bora; Kemik, Ozgur; Demirag, Alp

    2014-01-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and synchronous breast reconstruction are widely used in breast cancer surgery nowadays. Difficulties in feeling confident in this technique and postoperative surgical complications are the major obstacles against the widespread usage of this technique. Compared with the other surgical techniques, the complications are hard to treat. Cutaneous necrosis because of methylene blue used for sentinel lymph node mapping in patients who underwent skin-sparing mastectomy and SLNB is already reported in the literature. We present here two cases with cutaneous necrosis because of isosulphane blue injection after skin-sparing mastectomy and SLNB as a rare complication of dye injection. PMID:25187747

  8. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter) measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2). Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189), reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003), and flap length (p = 0.009). Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps. PMID:19939277

  9. BREEDING SALMON FOR RESISTANCE TO INFECTIOUS PANCREATIC NECROSIS

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    BREEDING SALMON FOR RESISTANCE TO INFECTIOUS PANCREATIC NECROSIS Infectious pancreatic necrosis. The viral disease infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) has been a major constraint on salmon aquaculture

  10. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, W?odzimierz; S?odkowski, Maciej; Krasnod?bski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  11. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Natalya; Bernstein, Gregory R; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-10-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  12. Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn: be aware of hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Francesco; De Pasquale, Loredana; Cacace, Caterina; Meo, Petronilla; Guarneri, Claudio; Cannavo, Serafinella P

    2006-05-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn is an uncommon, self-limiting panniculitis that usually occurs in full-term infants as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia. The cutaneous involvement may be associated with metabolic complications such as hypoglycaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, anemia and hypercalcaemia. The delayed onset of hypercalcaemia, 1-6 months after the development of the skin manifestations, imposes a prolonged follow-up to avoid its acute toxic effects on cardiovascular and renal systems and the more durable metastatic calcifications. PMID:16712567

  13. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  14. Skin flicks

    E-print Network

    Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

    1993-01-01

    The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

  15. Skin Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... html Chat Online Chat Closed engagement en -- 365 Days of Wellness - 2016-jan-wellness-lives-here-eng. ...

  16. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Squamous cell carcinoma Stasis dermatitis Tattoo removal Tinea versicolor U - W ... of this very serious skin cancer. Learn more. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) This skin cancer tends to form on ...

  17. Skin Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  18. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  19. Upregulated RIP3 Expression Potentiates MLKL Phosphorylation-Mediated Programmed Necrosis in Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Kyung; Kim, Woo-Jung; Yoon, Jung-Ho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Morgan, Michael J; Cho, Hyeseong; Kim, You Chan; Kim, You-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe adverse drug reaction involving extensive keratinocyte death in the epidermis. Histologically, the skin from TEN patients exhibits separation at the dermo-epidermal junction and accompanying necrosis of epidermal keratinocytes. Receptor-interacting protein kinase-3 (RIP3 or RIPK3) is an essential part of the cellular machinery that executes "programmed", or "regulated", necrosis and has a key role in spontaneous cell death and inflammation in keratinocytes under certain conditions. Here we show that RIP3 expression is highly upregulated in skin sections from TEN patients and may therefore contribute to the pathological damage in TEN through activation of programmed necrotic cell death. The expression level of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL), a key downstream component of RIP3, was not significantly different in skin lesions of TEN. However, elevated MLKL phosphorylation was observed in the skin from TEN patients, indicating the presence of RIP3-dependent programmed necrosis. Importantly, in an in vitro model of TEN, dabrafenib, an inhibitor of RIP3, prevented RIP3-mediated MLKL phosphorylation and decreased cell death. Results from this study suggest that the high expression of RIP3 in keratinocytes from TEN patients potentiates MLKL phosphorylation/activation and necrotic cell death. Thus, RIP3 represents a potential target for treatment of TEN. PMID:25748555

  20. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  1. Cutaneous necrosis due to cetrimide application.

    PubMed Central

    August, P J

    1975-01-01

    Reports of necrosis caused by quaternary ammonium compounds, such as cetrimide, are rare. The case is reported of a 77-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital for four months with cutaneous necrosis of the left foot and leg owing to the topical application of cetrimide powder. Images p70-a PMID:1109661

  2. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It usually takes less than a minute. The freezing may cause some discomfort. Your health care provider ... to pain and infection Scarring, especially if the freezing was prolonged or deeper areas of the skin ...

  3. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  4. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Review. 21 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nonmelanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, were diagnosed in 3.3 million people in ... 2005 study found that basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are increasing in men and women under 40. ...

  6. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present?

  7. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  8. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePLUS

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  9. Skin characteristics in newborns

    MedlinePLUS

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of regulated necrosis.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Krautwald, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Linkermann, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    It is now clear that apoptosis does not constitute the sole genetically encoded form of cell death. Rather, cells can spontaneously undertake or exogenously be driven into a cell death subroutine that manifests with necrotic features, yet can be inhibited by pharmacological and genetic interventions. As regulated necrosis (RN) plays a major role in both physiological scenarios (e.g., embryonic development) and pathological settings (e.g., ischemic disorders), consistent efforts have been made throughout the last decade toward the characterization of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this cell death modality. Contrarily to initial beliefs, RN does not invariably result from the activation of a receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-dependent signaling pathway, but may be ignited by distinct molecular networks. Nowadays, various types of RN have been characterized, including (but not limited to) necroptosis, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT)-dependent RN and parthanatos. Of note, the inhibition of only one of these modules generally exerts limited cytoprotective effects in vivo, underscoring the degree of interconnectivity that characterizes RN. Here, we review the signaling pathways, pathophysiological relevance and therapeutic implications of the major molecular cascades that underlie RN. PMID:24582829

  11. Management of peristomal tissue necrosis following prepubic urethrostomy in a cat.

    PubMed

    Jordan, C J; Kulendra, E; Perry, K L; Halfacree, Z J

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the successful management of peristomal tissue necrosis following prepubic urethrostomy in a cat. The novel technique of temporary urethral ligation was used in combination with temporary tube cystostomy and vacuum assisted closure to allow for wound management prior to performing wound closure by utilization of a flank fold skin flap then definitive prepubic urethrostomy. Eleven month follow-up indicated excellent outcome with the cat having returned to normal behaviour apart from having adapted its posture to urinate. PMID:22829103

  12. Transpapillary drainage of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smoczy?ski, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades the strategy of treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed. Endoscopic therapy of patients with symptomatic walled-off pancreatic necrosis has a high rate of efficiency. Here we present a description of a patient with parenchymal limited necrosis of the pancreas and a disruption of the main pancreatic duct. In the treatment, active transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic necrosis (through the major duodenal papilla) was performed and insertion of an endoprosthesis into the main pancreatic duct (through the minor duodenal papilla) was applied, which enabled a bypass over the infiltration and resulted in complete resolution. PMID:26649102

  13. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol

    PubMed Central

    Aghighi, Maryam; Golovko, Daniel; Ansari, Celina; Marina, Neyssa M.; Pisani, Laura; Kurlander, Lonnie; Klenk, Christopher; Bhaumik, Srabani; Wendland, Michael; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment. Materials and Methods Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations. Results 4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001). Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3) compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3). Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with high T1 signal in areas of tumor necrosis and low signal in areas of intracellularly compartmentalized iron. Conclusion Differential T1- and T2-enhancement patterns of USPIO in tumors enable conclusions about their intracellular and extracellular location. This information can be used to characterize the composition of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26569397

  14. Skin - clammy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you are not sure. If you think the person is in shock, lie him or her down on the back and raise the legs about 12 inches. Call your local emergency number (such as 911) or take the person to the hospital. If the clammy skin may ...

  15. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis reduces neutrophil infiltration and necrosis in partial-thickness scald burns in mice.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Jill; Delarosa, Sara; Wu, Jianfeng; Peterson, Jonathan R; Eboda, Oluwatobi N; Su, Grace L; Hemmila, Mark; Krebsbach, Paul H; Cederna, Paul S; Wang, Stewart C; Xi, Chuanwu; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), present in thermally injured tissue, modulates the inflammatory response and causes significant tissue damage. The authors hypothesize that neutrophil infiltration and ensuing tissue necrosis would be mitigated by removing ATP-dependent signaling at the burn site. Mice were subjected to 30% TBSA partial-thickness scald burn by dorsal skin immersion in a water bath at 60 or 20°C (nonburn controls). In the treatment arm, an ATP hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, was applied directly to the site immediately after injury. Skin was harvested after 24 hours and 5 days for hematoxylin and eosin stain, elastase, and Ki-67 staining. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interferon (IFN)-? expression were measured through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. At 24 hours, the amount of neutrophil infiltration was different between the burn and burn + apyrase groups (P < .001). Necrosis was less extensive in the apyrase group when compared with the burn group at 24 hours and 5 days. TNF-? and IFN-? expression at 24 hours in the apyrase group was lower than in the burn group (P < .05). However, Ki-67 signaling was not significantly different among the groups. The results of this study support the role of extracellular ATP in neutrophil activity. The authors demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis at the burn site allays the neutrophil response to thermal injury and reduces tissue necrosis. This decrease in inflammation and tissue necrosis is at least partially because of TNF-? and IFN-? signaling. Apyrase could be used as topical inflammatory regulators to quell the injury caused by inflammation. PMID:23877144

  16. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  17. Healthy Skin Matters Normal Skin

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    to help you remove it. Acne Most teenagers get a skin disease called acne (AK- nee). The blackheads everyone gets them at some point. Acne isn't usually serious, but severe cases can cause scars that will last for years. Acne is caused by bacteria (Propionibacterium acnes, often shortened to P. acnes

  18. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  19. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS. PMID:7852023

  20. Fat tissue histological study at indocyanine green-mediated photothermal/photodynamic treatment of the skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yanina, Irina Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Navolokin, Nikita A; Matveeva, Olga V; Bucharskaya, Alla B; Maslyakova, Galina N; Altshuler, Gregory B

    2012-05-01

    Histological slices of skin samples with the subcutaneous adipose tissue after photothermal/photodynamic treatment are analyzed. In the case of subcutaneous indocyanine green injection and 808-nm diode laser exposure of the rat skin site in vivo, the greatest changes in tissue condition were observed. Processes were characterized by dystrophy, necrosis, and desquamation of the epithelial cells, swelling and necrosis of the connective tissue, and widespread necrosis of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The obtained data are useful for safe layer-by-layer dosimetry of laser illumination of ICG-stained adipose tissue for treatment of obesity and cellulite. PMID:22612149

  1. Fat tissue histological study at indocyanine green-mediated photothermal/photodynamic treatment of the skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, Irina Yu.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2012-05-01

    Histological slices of skin samples with the subcutaneous adipose tissue after photothermal/photodynamic treatment are analyzed. In the case of subcutaneous indocyanine green injection and 808-nm diode laser exposure of the rat skin site in vivo, the greatest changes in tissue condition were observed. Processes were characterized by dystrophy, necrosis, and desquamation of the epithelial cells, swelling and necrosis of the connective tissue, and widespread necrosis of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The obtained data are useful for safe layer-by-layer dosimetry of laser illumination of ICG-stained adipose tissue for treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  2. Oligodendroglial degeneration in distemper: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, M; Zurbriggen, A; Summerfield, A; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C

    1999-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a multifocal demyelinating disease in dogs. It was previously shown that the initial demyelinating lesions are directly virus induced since a correlation between the occurrence of demyelination and CDV replication in white matter cells was observed. During the course of infection oligodendrocytes undergo distinct morphological alterations, partly due to a restricted CDV infection of these cells, and eventually disappear from the lesions. This phenomenon has been described in vivo as well as in vitro. However, the reason for the morphological alterations and the following oligodendroglial depletion remained unclear. Since virus infection can induce cell death, it was investigated whether apoptosis or necrosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of demyelination in canine distemper. In brain tissue sections from dogs with acute distemper apoptotic cells were not detected within the demyelinating lesions using morphological and biochemical cell death criteria. In chronic distemper, apoptotic cells - presumably inflammatory cells - were seen within the perivascular cuffs. These in vivo findings were correlated to the in vitro situation using CDV-infected primary dog brain cell cultures as well as Vero cells. Infection with culture-adapted CDV lead to massive necrosis but not to apoptosis. After infection with virulent CDV neither apoptosis nor necrosis was a predominant feature in either culture system. These findings suggest that virus-induced demyelination in canine distemper is not the direct consequence of apoptosis or necrosis. It is speculated that another mechanism must be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of oligodendrocytes, ultimately leading to demyelination. PMID:10090676

  3. Avoidance of stomas and delayed anastomosis for bowel necrosis: the 'clip and drop-back' technique.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, W G; Grosfeld, J L; West, K; Scherer, L R; Villamizar, E; Rescorla, F J

    1996-04-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and midgut volvulus (MGV) often are associated with extensive bowel necrosis. These cases may require extensive enterectomy and the formation of high or multiple stomas, and frequently are complicated by short bowel syndrome, excessive fluid losses, fistulas, stenosis, and skin breakdown. This report describes a "clip and drop-back" technique, followed by delayed anastomosis performed 48 to 72 hours later. The technique was successful in five severely ill infants (3 NEC, 2 MGV) with extensive necrosis, bowel perforation(s), and peritonitis, who required either a high stoma near the ligament of Treitz or multiple resections and enterostomies. This method removes obvious necrotic perforated bowel, controls contamination, avoids stomas (and their inherent complications in this age group), and preserves bowel length. All five babies survived. The technique is a useful addition to the pediatric surgeon's operative armamentarium in selective cases. PMID:8801309

  4. ATP hydrolysis reduces neutrophil infiltration and necrosis in partial-thickness scald burns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Jill; DeLaRosa, Sara; Wu, Jianfeng; Peterson, Jonathan R; Eboda, Oluwatobi N.; Su, Grace L; Hemmila, Mark; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Cederna, Paul S.; Wang, Stewart C; Xi, Chuanwu; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Extracellular ATP, present in thermally-injured tissue, modulates the inflammatory response and causes significant tissue damage. We hypothesize that neutrophil infiltration and ensuing tissue necrosis would be mitigated by removing ATP-dependent signaling at the burn site. Methods Mice were subjected to 30% total-body- surface-area partial-thickness scald burn by dorsal skin immersion in a water bath at 60°C or 20°C (non-burn controls). In the treatment arm, an ATP hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, was applied directly to the site immediately after injury. Skin was harvested after 24 hours and 5 days for hematoxylin and eosin stain (H&E), elastase, and Ki-67 staining. TNF-? and IFN-? expression were measured through qRT-PCR. Results At 24 hours, the amount of neutrophil infiltration was different between the burn and burn + apyrase groups (p<0.001). Necrosis was less extensive in the apyrase group when compared to the burn group at 24 hours and 5 days. TNF-? and IFN-? expression at 24 hours in the apyrase group was lower than in the burn group (p <0.05). However, Ki-67 signaling was not significantly different among the groups. Conclusions Our results support the role of extracellular ATP in neutrophil activity. We demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis at the burn site allays the neutrophil response to thermal injury and reduces tissue necrosis. This decrease in inflammation and tissue necrosis is at least partially due to TNF-? and IFN-? signaling. Apyrase could be used as topical inflammatory regulators to quell the injury caused by inflammation. PMID:23877144

  5. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin self-exam means checking your own skin regularly for any abnormal growths or unusual changes. A skin self-exam helps find any suspicious skin problems early. The earlier skin cancer is diagnosed, the better chance you will have ...

  6. Evaluation of a metalloporphyrin (THPPMnCl) for necrosis-affinity in rat models of necrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Liu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongjian; Lou, Bin; Peng, Fei; Wang, Xiaoning; Shan, Xin; Jiang, Cuihua; Gao, Meng; Sun, Ziping; Ni, Yicheng; Huang, Dejian; Zhang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    The combination of an (13I)I-labeled necrosis-targeting agent (NTA) with a vascular disrupting agent is a novel and potentially powerful technique for tumor necrosis treatment (TNT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate a NTA candidate, THPPMnCl, using (131)I isotope for tracing its biodistribution and necrosis affinity. (131)I-THPPMnCl was intravenously injected in rat models with liver, muscle, and tumor necrosis and myocardial infarction (MI), followed by investigations with macroscopic autoradiography, triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) histochemical staining, fluorescence microscopy and H&E stained histology for up to 9 days. (131)I-THPPMnCl displayed a long-term affinity for all types of necrosis and accumulation in the mononuclear phagocytic system especially in the liver. Autoradiograms and TTC staining showed a good targetability of (131)I-THPPMnCl for MI. These findings indicate the potential of THPPMnCl for non-invasive imaging assessment of necrosis, such as in MI. However, (13I)I-THPPMnCl is unlikely suitable for TNT due to its long-term retention in normal tissues. PMID:25950601

  7. Preliminary results of a pilot study of pentoxifylline in the treatment of late radiation soft tissue necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Doornbos, J.F.; Vigliotti, A.P.; Wen, B.C.; Anderson, B. )

    1990-08-01

    Between September 1988 and August 1989, 12 patients with 15 sites of late radiation necrosis of the soft tissues were treated with pentoxifylline, a hemorrheologic agent that has been used to treat a variety of vasculo-occlusive disorders. Four of these necroses were located in the oromucosa, four in the mucosa of the female genitalia, and seven in the skin. At the time of analysis, 87% (13/15) of the necroses had healed completely, and one was partially healed. Furthermore, the time-course of healing with pentoxifylline was significantly less than the duration of nonhealing prior to pentoxifylline (average: 9 weeks vs 30 1/2 weeks). All patients had pain relief. These results indicate that pentoxifylline can contribute to the healing of soft tissue radiation necrosis. They also support the concept that late radiation injury in skin and mucosa is at least partly due to vascular injury.

  8. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  9. Components of skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... underlying skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs ... the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives skin its ...

  10. CSD skin test

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease skin test ... cat scratch disease is injected just under the skin. After 48 to 72 hours, a health care ... no special preparation. People with dermatitis or other skin irritations should have the test performed on an ...

  11. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  12. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Punch biopsy; Shave biopsy; Skin biopsy; Biopsy - skin ... There are several ways to do a skin biopsy. Most procedures can be done in your provider's office or an outpatient medical office. It will take about 15 minutes. Which procedure ...

  13. Melanoma of the Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the skin cells called melanocytes (cells that color the skin). Melanocytes are found throughout the lower ... melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. Additional Information Learn more about melanoma More Information ...

  14. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Fungal Skin Infections by Denise M. Aaron, MD NOTE: This ...

  15. Bacterial Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections by A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD NOTE: ...

  16. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  17. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePLUS

    The infection is diagnosed by identifying the fungus in a culture taken from a skin lesion. This usually requires a skin biopsy . ... of pus) Another (secondary) skin infection caused by bacteria Complications related to medicines (for instance, amphotericin B ...

  18. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Signs of Skin Cancer, Doctors Advise (News) B Vitamin May Help Ward Off Some Skin Cancers Additional ... Day News by By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter B Vitamin May Help Ward Off Some Skin Cancers WEDNESDAY, ...

  19. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ? 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ? 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ? 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ? 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results. PMID:24507962

  20. Programmed necrosis in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; De Zen, Federica; Weinberg, Joel; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) had been widely used synonymously to caspase-mediated apoptosis until caspase-independent cell death was described. Identification of necrosis as a regulated process in ischaemic conditions has recently changed our understanding of PCD. At least three pathways of programmed necrosis (PN) have been identified. First, receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis causes organ failure following stroke, myocardial infarction and renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Necroptosis can be mediated either by a large intracellular caspase-8-containing signalling complex called the ripoptosome or by the RIP1-/RIP3-containing necroptosome and is controlled by a caspase-8/FLICE inhibitory protein(long) heterodimer at least in the latter case. Second, mitochondrial permeability transition mediates apoptotic or necrotic stimuli and depends on the mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D. The third PN pathway involves the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-calpain axis that contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI). Preclinical interference with the PN pathways therefore raises expectations for the future treatment of ischaemic conditions. In this brief review, we aim to summarize the clinically relevant PCD pathways and to transfer the basic science data to settings of AKI. We conclude that pathologists were quite right to refer to ischaemic kidney injury as 'acute tubular necrosis'. PMID:22942173

  1. Skin manifestations of drug allergy.

    PubMed

    Ardern-Jones, Michael R; Friedmann, Peter S

    2011-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions range from mild to severe and from those localized only to skin to those associated with systemic disease. It is important to distinguish features of cutaneous drug reactions which help classify the underlying mechanism and likely prognosis as both of these influence management decisions, some of which necessarily have to be taken rapidly. Severe cutaneous reactions are generally T cell-mediated, yet this immunological process is frequently poorly understood and principles for identification of the culprit drug are different to those of IgE mediated allergic reactions. Furthermore, intervention in severe skin manifestations of drug allergy is frequently necessary. However, a substantial literature reports on success or otherwise of glucocorticoids, cyclophsphamide, ciclosporin, intravenous immunoglobulin and anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy for the treatment of toxic epidermal necrolysis without clear consensus. As well as reviewing the recommended supportive measures and evidence base for interventions, this review aims to provide a mechanistic overview relating to a proposed clinical classification to assist the assessment and management of these complex patients. PMID:21480947

  2. Comparing Quantitative Values of Two Generations of Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography Systems: Can We Predict Necrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Mitchell S.; Rivara, Andrew; Dagum, Alexander B.; Huston, Tara L.; Ganz, Jason C.; Bui, Duc T.; Khan, Sami U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several devices exist today to assist the intraoperative determination of skin flap perfusion. Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography (LAICGA) has been shown to accurately predict mastectomy skin flap necrosis using quantitative perfusion values. The laser properties of the latest LAICGA device (SPY Elite) differ significantly from its predecessor system (SPY 2001), preventing direct translation of previous published data. The purpose of this study was to establish a mathematical relationship of perfusion values between these 2 devices. Methods: Breast reconstruction patients were prospectively enrolled into a clinical trial where skin flap evaluation and excision was based on quantitative SPY Q values previously established in the literature. Initial study patients underwent mastectomy skin flap evaluation using both SPY systems simultaneously. Absolute perfusion unit (APU) values at identical locations on the breast were then compared graphically. Results: 210 data points were identified on the same patients (n = 4) using both SPY systems. A linear relationship (y = 2.9883x + 12.726) was identified with a high level or correlation (R2 = 0.744). Previously published values using SPY 2001 (APU 3.7) provided a value of 23.8 APU on the SPY Elite. In addition, postoperative necrosis in these patients correlated to regions of skin identified with the SPY Elite with APU less than 23.8. Conclusion: Intraoperative comparison of LAICGA systems has provided direct correlation of perfusion values predictive of necrosis that were previously established in the literature. An APU value of 3.7 from the SPY 2001 correlates to a SPY Elite APU value of 23.8. PMID:25525483

  3. What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... statistics about melanoma skin cancer? What is melanoma skin cancer? Melanoma is a cancer that starts in ... normal structure and function of the skin. Normal skin The skin is the largest organ in your ...

  4. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, most often ...

  5. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  6. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  7. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients (Halder & Bridgeman-Shah, 1995) (see Table 7). PMID:19691228

  8. Localized Interdental Bone Necrosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K Krishna Mohana; Shankar, B Shiva; Reddy, K Amarendher; Reddy, S Nagalakshmi; Sudhakar, Jaradoddi; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Restorative dentistry involves use of various intracoronal and intracanal medicaments. Commonly used endodontic medicaments include paraformaldehyde, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. These agents are caustic and in higher and in inappropriate concentrations can cause immediate damage to the surrounding hard and/or soft tissues. Proper knowledge of such agents and careful use of such intracanal medicaments is necessary to avoid iatrogenic injuries. This report presented a case of localized alveolar bone necrosis which is an iatrogenic damage occurred because of improper use of intracanal medicaments and improper management of carious tooth structure. Subsequent management of the case is also discussed in this case report. PMID:25214737

  9. Localized interdental bone necrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Krishna Mohana; Shankar, B Shiva; Reddy, K Amarendher; Reddy, S Nagalakshmi; Sudhakar, Jaradoddi; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Restorative dentistry involves use of various intracoronal and intracanal medicaments. Commonly used endodontic medicaments include paraformaldehyde, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. These agents are caustic and in higher and in inappropriate concentrations can cause immediate damage to the surrounding hard and/or soft tissues. Proper knowledge of such agents and careful use of such intracanal medicaments is necessary to avoid iatrogenic injuries. This report presented a case of localized alveolar bone necrosis which is an iatrogenic damage occurred because of improper use of intracanal medicaments and improper management of carious tooth structure. Subsequent management of the case is also discussed in this case report. PMID:25214737

  10. The spectrum of postoperative scleral necrosis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rishi R; Harocopos, George J; Schwab, Ivan R; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2013-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 62-year-old woman developed necrotizing scleritis 23 years following pterygium excision with adjunctive beta-radiation. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) was diagnosed, but the scleritis progressed despite anti-inflammatory therapy, and 10 weeks after presentation the patient developed a hypopyon and decreased vision. After cultures revealed no growth at 72 hours, immunosuppressive therapy was escalated, with a subsequent deterioration in the patient's clinical course. Scedosporium superinfection was eventually cultured and found on histological examination of the enucleated globe. In reported cases, infectious scleral necrosis occurs most commonly following pterygium (71.4%) and scleral buckling (97.2%) surgery. Hypopyon is uncommon (10.0%) in patients with postoperative scleral necrosis, but when present is a strong predictor of infection (odds ratio, 21.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-157.5). Rates of underlying autoimmune disease are generally low (0.0-12.5%) except following cataract and lens procedures, where the occurence of SINS heralds systemic illness in 42.9% of cases. PMID:23410842

  11. Prucalopride-associated acute tubular necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivabalasundaram, Vithika; Habal, Flavio; Cherney, David

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of acute renal failure secondary to prucalopride, a novel agent for the treatment of chronic constipation. The 75 years old male patient was initiated on prucalopride after many failed treatments for constipation following a Whipple’s procedure for pancreatic cancer. Within four months of treatment his creatinine rose from 103 to 285 ?mol/L (eGFR 61 decrease to 19 mL/min per 1.73 m2). He was initially treated with prednisone for presumed acute interstitial nephritis as white blood casts were seen on urine microscopy. When no improvement was detected, a core biopsy was performed and revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. The presence of oxalate and calcium phosphate crystals were also noted. These findings suggest acute tubular necrosis which may have been secondary to acute interstitial nephritis or hemodynamic insult. The use of prednisone may have suppressed signs of inflammation and therefore the clinical diagnosis was deemed acute interstitial nephritis causing acute tubular necrosis. There are no previous reports of prucalopride associated with acute renal failure from the literature, including previous Phase II and III trials. PMID:25133152

  12. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  13. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  14. Renal cortical necrosis complicating laundry detergent ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Riella, Leonardo Vidal; Golla, Sunitha; Dogaru, Grigore; Rennke, Helmut G.; Christopher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Accidental oral detergent ingestion usually causes mild gastrointestinal manifestations including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea as well as upper airway irritation. There are a limited number of reported oral detergent ingestions leading to acute kidney injury, mainly due to rhabdomyolysis. We present an ultimately fatal case of laundry detergent ingestion leading to biopsy proven severe cortical necrosis and irreversible renal damage. Detergent ingestion was associated with widespread endothelial injury leading to a picture of thrombotic microangiopathy. Among the detergent ingredients ingested by the patient, sodium borate raised the highest concern as a potential toxin exacerbated further by severe hypovolaemia and consequent decrease in renal toxin excretion. As sodium borate is dialyzable, haemodialysis should be a consideration early after laundry detergent ingestion. PMID:25949283

  15. Eosinophilic Gastritis Presenting as Tissue Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Min; Jang, Jin Seok; Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Jae; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is very rare disorder that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of any definite causes of eosinophilia. It is associated with various clinical gastrointestinal manifestations, and depends on the involved layer and site. We report a case of eosinophilic gastritis presenting with severe necrosis. The symptoms disappeared immediately after beginning steroid treatment, and the eosinophil count decreased to the reference range. The patient showed eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis. It is a unique presentation of eosinophilic gastritis. To the best of our knowledge, no case of eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis has been previously reported in Korea. PMID:26668805

  16. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  17. Skin Cancer Trends

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Skin Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Lung Ovarian Prostate Cancer Home Skin Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  18. Laser Skin Renewal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a combination of skin dressings, ointments, and diluted vinegar compresses applied around the clock. Antibiotic and antiviral ... moderately intense skin care (often ointments and diluted vinegar compresses) for 2–3 days, as microscopic areas ...

  19. Polymer photonic sensing skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Zhang, C.; Webb, D. J.; Van Hoe, B.; Van Steenberge, G.; Kalli, K.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.; Urbanczyk, W.; Sugden, K.; Peng, G.-D.

    2010-09-01

    A highly flexible sensing skin with embedded polymer optical fibre Bragg gratings is characterised The response to pressure and strain compare favourably to a similar skin instrumented with silica fibre Bragg grating sensors.

  20. Layers of the Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over the entire body, these glands regulate body temperature by bringing water via the pores to the surface of the skin, where it evaporates and reduces skin temperature. These glands can produce up to two liters ...

  1. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Actinic Keratosis Basal Cell Carcinoma Dysplastic Nevi Melanoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Facts Ask the Experts Early Detection ... Actinic Keratosis Basal Cell Carcinoma Dysplastic Nevi Melanoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Facts Early Detection Mohs Surgery Ask ...

  2. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  3. Tuberculin skin test (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... evaluate whether a person has been exposed to tuberculosis. If there has been a prior exposure, antibodies ... in the body. During the skin test, the tuberculosis antigen is injected under the skin and if ...

  4. Black esophagus: Acute esophageal necrosis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E

    2010-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), commonly referred to as “black esophagus”, is a rare clinical entity arising from a combination of ischemic insult seen in hemodynamic compromise and low-flow states, corrosive injury from gastric contents in the setting of esophago-gastroparesis and gastric outlet obstruction, and decreased function of mucosal barrier systems and reparative mechanisms present in malnourished and debilitated physical states. AEN may arise in the setting of multiorgan dysfunction, hypoperfusion, vasculopathy, sepsis, diabetic ketoacidosis, alcohol intoxication, gastric volvulus, traumatic transection of the thoracic aorta, thromboembolic phenomena, and malignancy. Clinical presentation is remarkable for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Notable symptoms may include epigastric/abdominal pain, vomiting, dysphagia, fever, nausea, and syncope. Associated laboratory findings may reflect anemia and leukocytosis. The hallmark of this syndrome is the development of diffuse circumferential black mucosal discoloration in the distal esophagus that may extend proximally to involve variable length of the organ. Classic “black esophagus” abruptly stops at the gastroesophageal junction. Biopsy is recommended but not required for the diagnosis. Histologically, necrotic debris, absence of viable squamous epithelium, and necrosis of esophageal mucosa, with possible involvement of submucosa and muscularis propria, are present. Classification of the disease spectrum is best described by a staging system. Treatment is directed at correcting coexisting clinical conditions, restoring hemodynamic stability, nil-per-os restriction, supportive red blood cell transfusion, and intravenous acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Complications include perforation with mediastinal infection/abscess, esophageal stricture and stenosis, superinfection, and death. A high mortality of 32% seen in the setting of AEN syndrome is usually related to the underlying medical co-morbidities and diseases. PMID:20614476

  5. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  6. [Cytokines level in patients with drug-induced jaw necrosis].

    PubMed

    Ivaniushko, T P; Gankovskaia, L V; Kartashov, D D; Basin, E M; Balykin, R A

    2014-01-01

    The study included 15 patients with purulent inflammatory diseases of maxillofacial area and 25 patients with facial bone necrosis induced by synthetic drugs. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels in saliva and wound fluid were analyzed in two groups. The results proved cytokines to play important role in jaw necrosis induced by drugs containing red phosphorus. PMID:24990783

  7. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  8. Atraumatic Pantalar Avascular Necrosis in a Patient With Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Callachand, Fayaz; Milligan, David; Wilson, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 new cases of avascular necrosis are diagnosed each year. We present an unusual case of atraumatic avascular necrosis with widespread hindfoot and midfoot involvement. A 62-year-old female with a history of alcohol dependence and smoking, who had previously been treated for avascular necrosis of the knee, presented with right-sided foot pain and difficulty weightbearing. Imaging studies revealed extensive avascular necrosis of the hindfoot and midfoot, which precluded simple surgical intervention. The patient was followed up for 18 months. In the last 8 months of the 18-month period, the patient managed her symptoms using an ankle-foot orthosis. A diagnosis of avascular necrosis should be considered in patients with atraumatic foot and ankle pain, especially in the presence of risk factors such as alcohol excess and smoking. PMID:26387059

  9. Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Fecal Peritonitis following Ostomy Necrosis and Detachment by Using NPT and Flexi-Seal

    PubMed Central

    Yet???r, Fahri; ?arer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Management of necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis following ostomy in elderly patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report management of frozen Open Abdomen (OA) with colonic fistula following ostomy necrosis and detachment in an elderly patient with comorbid disease and malignancy. 78-year-old woman with high stage rectum carcinoma was admitted to emergency department and underwent operation for severe peritonitis and sigmoid colonic perforation. Loop sigmoidostomy was performed. At postoperative 15th day, she was transferred to our clinic with necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis due to ostomy necrosis and detachment. Enteric effluent was removed from the OA wound by using the Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System (FMS) (ConvaTec) and pesser tube in deeply located colonic fistula in conjunction with Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT). Maturation of ostomy was facilitated by using second NPT on ostomy side. After source control, delayed abdominal closure was achieved by skin flap approximation. PMID:26448894

  10. Upper eyelid necrosis and reconstruction after spider byte: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, D; Serratore, F; Famiglietti, M; Greco, M; Fois, F; Atzori, L; Pau, M; Aste, N

    2012-03-01

    Spider bites are not very common, especially in the Mediterranean area, and those affecting the ocular-palpebral region involving reconstructive surgery are particularly rare. In May 2010, the case of a Caucasian 24-year-old female patient was brought to the attention of the Dermatology Department, University of Cagliari, Italy. The patient reported she woke up feeling an intense pain with itching and that also she had noticed a spider of an unknown species on her bed. The dermatosis had affected the right orbital region, where there was a considerable red and violet erythema and a hard edema, not foldable. When the necrosis appeared the patient was treated at the Plastic Surgery Unit where she underwent a reconstruction of the eyelid with a full thickness skin graft from the retroauricular area. The post-operative course was regular with a perfect in-take of the skin graft. When the patient was discharged she was sent to an Entomological University Centre to identify the spider species and the possible venom which caused the skin lesion. The spider which caused the injury has been a Loxosceles rufescens (Dufour, 1820). Loxoscelism is a necrotic arachnoidism caused by the poisonous bite of spiders belonging to the Loxosceles species. It is very important to identify what sort of lesion it is and to treat it in a combined way in order to choose the proper timing for surgery to avoid damages to the eyelid functioning. PMID:22530360

  11. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals. PMID:23254724

  12. Four energy levels device for skin punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastru, D.; Ristici, Esofina; Mustata, Marina; Miclos, S.; Rusu, M. I.; Radu, C.; Savu, V.

    2007-03-01

    Generally, the beam distribution in the tissue in interaction with a pulsed laser is defined by optical properties (effective scattering and absorption coefficient). In 2900 nm range, the effective scattering coefficient is much smaller than the absorption coefficient. An Er:YAG skin puncher is presented. Thermal action of a laser beam can be described as one of three types: hyperthermia, coagulation and volatilization, depending on the degree and the duration of tissue heating. We are interested in the volatilization process that means a loss of material. The various constituents of the tissue disappear in smoke at above 100 0C in a relatively short time of around one tenth of a second. At the edges of the volatilization zone there is a region of coagulation necrosis. In presented case of an Er:YAG laser operating in a free generation mode, the mechanical effects can result from explosive vaporization. When the exposure time of the laser is lower than the characteristic time of the thermal diffusion in the tissue, it produces a thermal containment with an accumulation of heat without diffusion and an explosive vaporization of the target. The Er:YAG laser device has the pulse length of about 160 microseconds and four emitted energy levels. This device is used to punch the skin for blood sampling for different kinds of analysis. The front panel of the device has four keys to select the desired energy according to the skin type.

  13. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  14. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease. PMID:9270850

  15. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  16. Lichenoid Reactions in Association with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Amy; Bair, Brooke; Fivenson, David

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, a clinical case of a patient treated with adalimumab for Behcet’s disease develops lichen planopilaris. A variety of mucocutaneous lichenoid eruptions have recently been described in association with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. The authors briefly discuss the clinical and pathological presentation of lichen planopilaris as well as a potential pathogenesis of cutaneous adverse effects seen as the result of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy. They review all case reports of lichen planopilaris occurring on tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and suggest its classification as a fourth recognized pattern on this therapy. PMID:26155327

  17. Role of Agents other than Tumor Necrosis Factor Blockers in the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by possible peripheral and axial joint involvement, enthesitis, dactylitis, and skin and nail disease. It affects up to one-third of psoriatic patients, and may be associated with comorbidities such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The usually prescribed initial treatment of moderate-severe PsA is methotrexate, which may be accompanied or replaced by a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor such as etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab. However, some patients may become unresponsive (or have contraindications) to available anti-TNF agents and require alternative treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential role of some new immunomodulatory agents. PMID:26523064

  18. Warfarin-induced Eosinophilia in a Child with urkitt Lymphoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzipour, Kourosh; Ghazizadeh, Farid; Hoseini Tavassol, Hesameddin; Behnam, Behdad

    2015-01-01

    An important complication of chemotherapy is thromboembolic events that can occur during treatment course. In this way, Warfarin can be used as an efficient prophylactic agent to prevent these complications. Although bleeding is a common adverse effect of Warfarin, eosinophilia is a rare side effect of this drug. We have reported a 5-year-old boy with Burkitt lymphoma who underwent chemotherapy. In the course of chemotherapy, because of thrombosis of the left jugular vein, we initiated Warfarin as a prophylactic drug for TEE secondary to chemotherapy. Following Warfarin initiation, eosinophilia appeared and subsequent to cessation of drug, eosinophilia disappeared. This case is presented to point out physicians to consider eosinophilia as a rare adverse-effect of Warfarin and monitor blood cell differentiation regularly during the course of treatment with this drug. PMID:26330877

  19. Treatment of Hyaluronic Acid Filler-Induced Impending Necrosis With Hyaluronidase: Consensus Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Biesman, Brian S; Dayan, Steven H; DeLorenzi, Claudio; Lambros, Val S; Nestor, Mark S; Sadick, Neil; Sykes, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Injection-induced necrosis is a rare but dreaded consequence of soft tissue augmentation with filler agents. It usually occurs as a result of injection of filler directly into an artery, but can also result from compression or injury. We provide recommendations on the use of hyaluronidase when vascular compromise is suspected. Consensus recommendations were developed by thorough discussion and debate amongst the authors at a roundtable meeting on Wednesday June 18, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV as well as significant ongoing written and verbal communications amongst the authors in the months prior to journal submission. All authors are experienced tertiary care providers. A prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment with high doses of hyaluronidase (at least 200 U) are critically important. It is not felt necessary to do a skin test in cases of impending necrosis. Some experts recommend dilution with saline to increase dispersion or lidocaine to aid vasodilation. Additional hyaluronidase should be injected if improvement is not seen within 60 minutes. A warm compress also aids vasodilation, and massage has been shown to help. Some experts advocate the use of nitroglycerin paste, although this area is controversial. Introducing an oral aspirin regimen should help prevent further clot formation due to vascular compromise. In our experience, patients who are diagnosed promptly and treated within 24 hours will usually have the best outcomes. PMID:25964629

  20. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  1. About Skin: Your Body's Largest Organ

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  2. Anomalous Skin Effect Igor Kaganovich

    E-print Network

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Anomalous Skin Effect Revisited Igor Kaganovich Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12 to explain "simply" anomalous skin effect without abusing physics. #12;3 Outline Skin effect (Inductively Coupled Plasmas/ Lasers) ­ Normal skin effect ­ Concept of phase-mixing and scale ­ Anomalous skin effect

  3. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  4. Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice

    E-print Network

    Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

    2013-10-03

    Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

  5. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a fungus infection that can affect the skin, nails, or scalp. Fungi called dermatophytes can infect the skin and related ... is called tinea corporis; and ringworm of the nails is called tinea unguium. With tinea corporis, the fungi can cause scaly, ring-like lesions anywhere on ...

  6. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Bleeding under the skin can occur from broken blood vessels that form tiny pinpoint red dots (called ... Aside from the common bruise, bleeding into the skin or mucous membranes is a very significant sign and should always be checked out by a health care ...

  7. Skin Problems in Construction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3 Keep skin clean Wash with soap and clean water if your skin comes in contact with hazardous ... caustics like wet cement. DO NOT use the water in the bucket used to clean your tools. DO NOT use hand sanitizers. Wash ...

  8. Skin problems in children.

    PubMed

    Verbov, J L

    1976-09-01

    Common skin problems in 340 children routinely seen during a winter period, included napkin rashes in infants, atopic eczema throughout childrhood, and acne vulgaris in late childhood. Skin infections and psoriasis were also commonly seen. If possible, when topical steroid preparations more potent than hydrocortisone cream BPC are used in children, they should be used sparingly and for short periods only. PMID:135974

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  10. The Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Blockers in Psoriatic Disease. Therapeutic Options in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Addimanda, Olga; Possemato, Niccolò; Caruso, Andrea; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting peripheral and axial joints, usually associated with psoriasis (PsO) and involving various systems and organs (eye inflammation, such as uveitis; and involvement of nail and enthesis), and it usually requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) is overexpressed in psoriatic synovium and skin plaques and its selective inhibition by anti-TNF-? agents has been demonstrated to reduce TNF-? levels in the articular environment, reversing the synovial hyperproliferative phenotype. Studies performed on anti-TNF-? agents in PsA demonstrated that they are able to reduce neutrophil and macrophage infiltration as well as vascular cell adhesion protein 1 expression with ensuing synovial thickness normalization. The efficacy of anti-TNF-? agents for all PsA manifestations (peripheral arthritis, axial involvement, enthesopathy, and skin disease) suggests that anti-TNF-? efficacy might be related to the ability to influence angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, reduce synovial inflammation, and slow radiological disease progression. This review describes the role of anti-TNF-? in each manifestation of PsA. PMID:26523063

  11. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. PMID:24267423

  12. Skin disorders at sea.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ray; Boniface, Keith; Hite, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the types of skin disorders occurring at sea requiring acute treatment. The case logs of a tele-medicine service for US flagged ships at sea were reviewed from March 1, 2006 until March 1, 2009. Of 1844 total cases, 10% (n = 183) were for skin disorders. Sixty-eight percent (n = 125) were infections, 14% (n = 25) were inflammatory, 7% (n = 13) were environmental, and 11% (n = 20) were non-specific rashes. Cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis (n = 84) were the most common acute skin disorders encountered. In some cases (n = 81), still digital photographs aided in the diagnosis. PMID:20496321

  13. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  14. Effect of bevacizumab on radiation necrosis of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Javier; Kumar, Ashok J.; Conrad, Charles A.; Levin, Victor A. . E-mail: vlevin@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Because blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from reaching leaky capillaries is a logical strategy for the treatment of radiation necrosis, we reasoned that bevacizumab might be an effective treatment of radiation necrosis. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with bevacizumab or bevacizumab combination for their tumor on either a 5 mg/kg/2-week or 7.5 mg/kg/3-week schedule. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed in 8 of these patients on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biopsy. MRI studies were obtained before treatment and at 6-week to 8-week intervals. Results: Of the 8 patients with radiation necrosis, posttreatment MRI performed an average of 8.1 weeks after the start of bevacizumab therapy showed a reduction in all 8 patients in both the MRI fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) abnormalities and T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities. The average area change in the T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities was 48% ({+-}22 SD), and the average change in the FLAIR images was 60% ({+-}18 SD). The average reduction in daily dexamethasone requirements was 8.6 mg ({+-}3.6). Conclusion: Bevacizumab, alone and in combination with other agents, can reduce radiation necrosis by decreasing capillary leakage and the associated brain edema. Our findings will need to be confirmed in a randomized trial to determine the optimal duration of treatment.

  15. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25676469

  16. [Treatment results in aseptic necrosis of the femur head].

    PubMed

    Cozma, T; Alexa, O; Cozma, L; Corcaci, R

    1999-01-01

    Between 1.01.1987 and 31.12.1997, 40 patients (52 hips) were diagnosed with avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) and treated in the Emergencies Hospital of Ia?i. ANFH was detected by clinical findings, plain radiographs and computed tomographic scans. We used the classification of Ficat and Arlet and the choice of treatment between core decompression (20 hips), flexion osteotomy (10), rotation osteotomy (4) or total hip arthroplasty (18) was determined by the stage and location of the area of necrosis. Core decompression has been attempted in patients with Ficat stages I and II, trochanteric osteotomy has been used in Ficat stages II and III, and in the most advanced stages of necrosis (Ficat stage III and stage IV) total hip arthroplasty was the procedure of choice. We reviewed the patients at 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. The results were evaluated using Merle D'Aubigne score. We noted good and very good results in 75% of our patients which were diagnosed in the early stages of necrosis. We concluded that the earlier diagnostic and the correct indication of treatment (determined by the stage of necrosis) are the premise for the amelioration of the severe prognostic of ANFH. PMID:10756901

  17. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  18. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... outside. What are stretch marks? As your belly grows during pregnancy, your skin may become marked with reddish lines called stretch marks. By the third trimester , many pregnant women commonly have stretch marks ...

  19. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  20. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  1. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hematomas ) may form after even a minor injury. Pressure ulcers can be caused by skin changes, loss of ... up to 4 times slower. This contributes to pressure ulcers and infections. Diabetes , blood vessel changes, lowered immunity, ...

  2. Skin diseases in musicians.

    PubMed

    Crépy, Marie-Noelle

    2015-10-01

    Instrumental musicians are a risk group for skin diseases. A systematic review was performed on Pubmed database and in the musical literature. Most publications on dermatoses in musicians are case reports. The exact prevalence of skin diseases in musicians is unknown but high rates have been reported. The most at-risk musicians are percussionists, string and wind instrumentalists. Repeated physical trauma is a frequent cause of skin conditions in musicians (callosities, fiddler's neck syndrome…). The allergens most often reported in musicians' allergic contact dermatitis are metals (nickel, dichromate), exotic woods and cane reed components, colophony and propolis. The key preventive measures are early management of the skin disease, specific tests and avoidance of the causative allergens, together with better adjustment of playing techniques to reduce trauma. PMID:25905552

  3. Designing building skins

    E-print Network

    Desai, Arjun

    1992-01-01

    This thesis involves framing criteria and discerning issues to be considered in the design of building skins in an urban environment. The 'information age' has paradoxically seen the demise of the facade as an important ...

  4. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  5. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Tests or procedures that examine the skin ... and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are ...

  6. Genetics and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Bekou, Vassiliki; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex process and underlies multiple influences with the probable involvement of heritable and various environmental factors. Several theories have been conducted regarding the pathomechanisms of aged skin, however fundamental mechanisms still remain poorly understood. This article addresses the influence of genetics on skin aging and in particular deals with the differences observed in ethnic populations and between both genders. Recent studies indicate that male and female aged skin differs as far as the type, the consistency and the sensitivity to external factors is concerned. The same has been also documented between elderly people of different origin. Consequently, the aging process taking place in both genders and in diverse ethnic groups should be examined separately and products specialized to each population should be developed in order to satisfy the special needs. PMID:23467395

  7. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by medical conditions, such as atopic dermatitis and malnutrition. Dry skin develops due to a decrease in ... Diabetes Hypothyroidism Down syndrome Liver or kidney disease Malnutrition HIV/AIDS Lymphoma Signs and Symptoms The most ...

  8. Skin picking disorder.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Keuthen, Nancy J; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2012-11-01

    Although skin picking has been documented in the medical literature since the 19th century, only now is it receiving serious consideration as a DSM psychiatric disorder in discussions for DSM-5. Recent community prevalence studies suggest that skin picking disorder appears to be as common as many other psychiatric disorders, with reported prevalences ranging from 1.4% to 5.4%. Clinical evaluation of patients with skin picking disorder entails a broad physical and psychiatric examination, encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to evaluation and treatment. Approaches to treatment should include cognitive-behavioral therapy (including habit reversal or acceptance-enhanced behavior therapy) and medication (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, N-acetylcysteine, or naltrexone). Based on clinical experience and research findings, the authors recommend several management approaches to skin picking disorder. PMID:23128921

  9. Skin conditions of musicians.

    PubMed

    Adams, R M

    2000-01-01

    Although skin conditions among musicians are uncommon, when they do occur, they may cause considerable discomfort and disability. The pattern of the condition very often indicates the instrument played. PMID:10664874

  10. [Skin-picking disorder].

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Peters, E; Gieler, U

    2015-10-01

    The disorder is characterized by compulsive repetitive skin-picking (SP), resulting in skin lesions. The patients must have undertaken several attempts to reduce or stop SP. The disorder must have led to clinically significant limitations in social, professional, or other important areas of life. The symptoms cannot be better explained by another emotional disorder or any other dermatological disease. In the new DSM-V, skin-picking disorder has been included in the diagnostic system as an independent disorder and describes the self-injury of the skin by picking or scratching with an underlying emotional disorder. SP is classified among the impulse-control disorders and is, thus, differentiated from compulsive disorders as such. There are often emotional comorbidities. In cases of pronounced psychosocial limitation, interdisciplinary cooperation with a psychotherapist and/or psychiatrist is indicated. PMID:26391325

  11. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  12. Chemical regulation of signaling pathways to programmed necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Hyun; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Young Sik

    2014-06-01

    Necroptosis is an active and well-orchestrated necrosis, distinctive from apoptosis in microscopic structure, and biochemical and molecular features. Unlike apoptosis-undergoing cells, which are removed by macrophage or neighboring cells, necrotic cell death releases danger signals and provokes inflammation, and further a severe damage to neighbor tissue. A regulated necrosis, termed as necroptosis or programmed necrosis, is emerging as a new paradigm of cell death that can be activated when apoptotic machinery is genetically or pathogenically defective. It plays biological significances in pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases as well as in a beneficial innate immune defense mechanism. This review highlights the identification of hits against necroptosis, and comprehensive approaches to discovery of small molecules that regulate necroptotic cell death. Also, the signaling molecular mechanism of necroptosis and future clinical uses of necroptosis inhibitor will be described in brief. PMID:24715577

  13. [Photoaging of a skin].

    PubMed

    Galus, Ryszard; Zandecki, ?ukasz; Antiszko, Marek; Borowska, Katarzyna; Zabielski, Stanis?aw

    2007-06-01

    Photoaging is a skin aging caused by long-term exposure to the ultraviolet radiations of the sun. Ultraviolet activates activating protein-1 and generate reactive oxygen species which play a substantial role in collagen degradation. Clinically, photoaged skin appears as a coarse with deep wrinkles. Presently there are available several agents to reverse the photodamage. There is conclusive evidence that synthetic vitamin A derivatives are the most effective in the treatment of photoaging. Erythema and scaling may be experienced initially. PMID:17874634

  14. Skin pigmentation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A

    2001-10-01

    The highest incidences of cancer are found in the skin, but endogenous pigmentation is associated with markedly reduced risk. Agents that enhance skin pigmentation have the potential to reduce both photodamage and skin cancer incidence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate agents that have the potential to increase skin pigmentation. These include topically applied substances that simulate natural pigmentation: dihydroxyacetone and melanins; and substances that stimulate the natural pigmentation process: psoralens with UVA (PUVA), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), L-tyrosine, L-Dopa, lysosomotropic agents, diacylglycerols, thymidine dinucleotides, DNA fragments, melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) analogs, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), nitric oxide donors, and bicyclic monoterpene (BMT) diols. These agents are compared with regards to efficacy when administered to melanoma cells, normal human epidermal melanocytes, animal skin, and human skin. In addition, mechanisms of action are reviewed since these may reveal issues related to both efficacy and safety. Both dihydroxyacetone and topically applied melanins are presently available to the consumer, and both of these have been shown to provide some photoprotection. Of the pigmentation stimulators, only PUVA and MSH analogs have been tested extensively on humans, but there are concerns about the safety and side effects of both. At least some of the remaining pigmentation stimulators under development have the potential to safely induce a photoprotective tan. PMID:11684462

  15. What Causes Our Skin to Age?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skin What causes aging skin What causes our skin to age? Sun protection essential: Dermatologists agree that ... on our skin. 11 ways to reduce premature skin aging The sun plays a major role in ...

  16. Possible Mechanism of Liver Necrosis Caused by Aromatic Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Bernard B.; Reid, Watson D.; Cho, Arthur K.; Sipes, Glenn; Krishna, Gopal; Gillette, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Treatment of rats with phenobarbital, which stimulates the activity of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver, potentiates hepatic necrosis elicited by bromobenzene and a number of other chemically inert halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. Radioautographic studies indicate that [14C]bromobenzene is covalently bound at the sites of necrosis. From these results, it is inferred that the hepatotoxic effects of the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are mediated by chemically active metabolites formed in hepatocytes. In accord with this view, a number of aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons are converted by microsomes in vitro to active intermediates which form covalent complexes with glutathione (GSH). Images PMID:4395686

  17. A new geographic and host record for infectious pancreatic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Yasutake, W.T.; Bressler, V.

    1963-01-01

    The occurrence of infectious pancreatic necrosis in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) has been experimentally authenticated for the first time in the western United States. The cutthroat trout represents a new host. Brook trout fin tissue culture inoculated with bacteria-free filtrate from the diseased fish tissue showed marked degenerative changes after 24 hours. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), kokanee (O. nerka), and silver salmon (O. kisutch) were not susceptible to the virus when inoculated. Histologically, extensive pancreatic necrosis was observed in the original and experimental materials, but striated muscle hyalinization was detected only in the original material.

  18. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin absorption coefficient of human skin of various pigmentation and races will be presented.

  19. Characterization of hyaluronan and TSG-6 in skin scarring: differential distribution in keloid scars, normal scars and unscarred skin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, KT; McGrouther, DA; Day, AJ; Milner, CM; Bayat, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Hyaluronan (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) with increased synthesis during tissue repair. Tumour necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is known to catalyze the covalent transfer of heavy chains (HC1 and HC2) from inter-?-inhibitor (I?I) onto HA, and resultant HC•HA complexes have been implicated in physiological and pathological processes related to remodelling and inflammation. Objective The aims of this study were to determine the expression of HA, TSG-6 and the I?I polypeptides in unscarred skin, normal scars and keloid scars. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of unscarred skin, normal scars and keloid scars were prepared from patient samples collected during scar revision surgery. Haematoxylin and eosin, as well as immunofluorescent staining for HA, TSG-6 and the three polypeptide chains of I?I (i.e. HC1, HC2 and bikunin) were performed. Results All skin types stained positive for TSG-6, HC1, HC2 and bikunin, associated with keratinocytes, fibroblasts and skin appendages all in close proximity to HA. Keloid lesions showed altered HA organization patterns compared with unscarred skin and normal scars. TSG-6 staining was significantly more intense in the epidermis compared with the dermis of all sample types. There was a significant reduction in TSG-6 levels within keloid lesions compared with the dermis of unscarred skin (P = 0.017). Conclusion TSG-6 is expressed in unscarred skin, where its close association with HA and I?I could give rise to TSG-6-mediated HC•HA formation within this tissue. A reduction in the beneficial effects of TSG-6, caused by diminished protein levels in keloid lesions, could contribute to this abnormal scarring process. PMID:20642475

  20. The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner. PMID:22719176

  1. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  2. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  3. Skin cleansing in children.

    PubMed

    Gelmetti, C

    2001-09-01

    The problems of skin cleansing in infants have been re-evaluated in recent years on the basis of current understanding of cosmetology and skin physiology. The anatomical and functional peculiarities of infant's skin have been elucidated and, although it is known that the barrier function is established at birth in normal babies, it remains the case that children's skin is more delicate and therefore more prone to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. These factors determine the choice of cleansing agents during infancy. The products available on the market differ markedly. Indeed detergents, bath oils, bath powders, due to their distinctive properties, have different indications and different benefits. The method of cleansing the skin, i.e. bathing or showering, is also important. The frequency of cleansing should take into account the age and the degree of exposure to pollutants. For special purposes, e.g. impetiginized dermatoses, antiseptics such as potassium permanganate or chlorhexidine can be added to the water in appropriate concentrations. The ideal paediatric detergent should be very mild to avoid irritant dermatitis, and very simple to avoid allergic dermatitis. PMID:11720072

  4. Exploring Theranostic Potentials of Radioiodinated Hypericin in Rodent Necrosis Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Chen, Feng; Feng, Yuanbo; Zhou, Lin; Yu, Jie; Nuyts, Johan; de Witte, Peter; Zhang, Jian; Himmelreich, Uwe; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present animal experiments were conducted to evaluate radioiodinated Hypericin (Hyp) for its regional distribution as well as theranostic potentials. Materials and Methods: Rat models of reperfused liver infarction (RLI) and hepatic rhabdomyosarcoma (R1) were surgically induced. R1 models received Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) intravenously at 10 mg/kg 24 h prior to radioiodinated Hyp. Three groups of 6 rats each containing 3 RLI and 3 R1 models received iv injections of 123I-Hyp at 37, 74, and 185 MBq/kg respectively and followed by 0.1 ml of 1% Evans blue solution were sacrificed at 4, 24 and 48 hour post injection immediately after in vivo examination of MRI and planar gamma scintigraphy. Besides, two groups of 6 R1 models that received either 300 MBq/kg of 131I-Hyp or vehicle intravenously were examined using MRI to compare tumor growth for 12 days. Autoradiography, gamma counting, and histopathology were performed for postmortem verifications and quantification. Results: Necrosis as seen in vivo on contrast-enhanced MRI corresponded well with the hot spots on planar scintigraphy. Autoradiography and gamma counting revealed intense accumulation of 123I-Hyp in necrotic liver (3.94 ± 1.60, 5.38 ± 1.04, and 6.03 ± 2.09 %ID/g ± SD) and necrotic tumor (4.27 ± 0.76, 5.57 ± 0.76, and 5.68 ± 1.33 %ID/g ± SD) relative to normal liver (1.76 ± 0.54, 0.41 ± 0.18, and 0.16 ± 0.07 %ID/g ± SD), with a high necrosis-to-liver ratio of 2.3, 14.0, and 37.0 at 4, 24 and 48 h respectively. Tumor volumes in R1 models that received 131I-Hyp and vehicle changed from 0.45 ± 0.09, and 0.47 ± 0.12 cm3 (p > 0.05) on day 0 to1.32 ± 0.76 and 3.63 ± 0.72 cm3 (p < 0.001) on day 12, with the corresponding necrosis ratios from 73 ± 12 %, and 76 ± 17 % to 47 ± 18% and 17 ± 13 % (p < 0.01), and with the tumor DT of 7.3 ± 1.0 and 4.2 ± 0.7 days, respectively. Conclusions: Radioiodinated Hyp as a necrosis avid tracer appears promising for non-invasive imaging diagnosis of necrosis-related pathologies. Its prominent targetability to necrosis allows targeted radiotherapy for malignancies on top of a prior necrosis-inducing treatment. PMID:23139728

  5. The effects of treatment the avascular necrosis of the femoral head with extracorporeal focused shockwave therapy.

    PubMed

    Kusz, Damian; Franek, Andrzej; Wilk, Robert; Dolibog, Pawe?; B?aszczak, Edward; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Król, Piotr; Dolibog, Patrycja; Kusz, B?a?ej

    2012-01-01

    Background.Avascular necrosis of the femoral head continues to represent a major challenge for the orthopaedist and trauma surgeon. A fully effective method of treatment is yet to be introduced. After femoral head collapse, only total hip replacement can help the patient. Our study aims to assess the effects of treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with extra corporeal focused shockwave therapy.Material and methods. A prospective study was carried out in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head, ARCO stage I-III, diagnosed by MRI imaging. Shock waves are applied under x-ray guidance. Four points are marked on the skin above the lesion. Each spot receives a dose of 1500 pulses at an energy flux density of 0.4 mJ/mm2 and a frequency of 4 Hz. Each patient undergoes 5 therapy sessions. A posturometric and stabilometric assessment is carried out before and after the therapy. Other examinations include a tensometric evaluation of the strength of the treated limb, and an assessment of pain intensity (VAS scale)and hip function (Harris hip score). Follow-up visits are scheduled at 6 weeks and 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment.Results. Nine patients were treated with shockwave therapy at the Department of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Traumatology, Medical Faculty, Medical University of Silesia, between 5 May 2011 and 1 June 2012. The patients demonstrated pain reduction and improved mobility of the treated joint (VAS score decreasing from 6.75 +/- 0.71 to 2.5 +/- 1.7; Harris hip score increasing from 55.21 +/- 15.45 to 89.21 +/- 8.26). Tensometric platform testing carried out after the treatment revealed a statistically significant difference between mean velocity of the centre of pressure (CoP) movement when walking with eyes open and closed (p<0.05) and mean CoP movement along the x (walking with eyes closed) and y (free standing with eyes closed) axes.Conclusions. 1. Extracorporeal focused shockwave therapy resulted in considerable improvement in the patients' quality of life at 6 weeks' follow-up. 2. At 6 months some patients reported intensified pain and worse hip function. PMID:23208935

  6. Skin conditions: common skin rashes in infants.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Infants exhibit many skin rashes. Erythema toxicum neonatorum presents as erythematous macules, papules, and pustules on the face, trunk, and extremities; it typically resolves spontaneously within 1 week. Neonatal acne presents as comedones or erythematous papules on the face, scalp, chest, and back. Infantile acne is similar but starts after the neonatal period. Both conditions typically resolve spontaneously; failure to resolve within 1 year warrants evaluation for androgen excess. Neonatal cephalic pustulosis is an acne variant caused by hypersensitivity to Malassezia furfur. It is typically self-limited, but severe cases are managed with topical ketoconazole. Miliaria and milia are caused by sweat retention and present as tiny vesicles or papules; they resolve spontaneously. Contact diaper dermatitis is managed by keeping the diaper area clean and with open air exposure. Diaper dermatitis due to Candida albicans is managed with topical antifungals. Seborrheic dermatitis causes scaling on the scalp. Management involves shampooing and removing scales with a soft brush after applying mineral oil or petrolatum; severe cases are managed with tar or ketoconazole shampoo. Atopic dermatitis is related to food allergy in approximately one-third of children. Food allergy can be confirmed with oral food challenges or skin prick tests. Management includes elimination of irritants and triggers and use of low-potency topical steroids. PMID:23600337

  7. Histopathological Analysis of UVB and IR Interaction in Rat Skin.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Vinícius C; Beheregaray, Ana C M; Peres, Bárbara M; Sallis, Eliza S V; Varela Junior, Antônio S; Trindade, Gilma S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the chronic skin effects caused by the interaction of infrared and ultraviolet B radiations, male Rattus norvegicus (Wistar) (2 months old) were exposed for 15 days to infrared radiation (600-1500 nm, with a peak at 1000 nm, n = 12) for 30 min (1080 J cm(-2) ) (IRo); to ultraviolet B radiation (peak emission at 313 nm, n = 9) for 90 min (55.08 J cm(-2) ) (UVB); to infrared radiation followed after 90 min by ultraviolet B (n = 6) (IRUVB) and to ultraviolet B followed after 90 min by infrared radiation (n = 9) (UVBIR). Skin samples were collected and histopathological analysis showed the presence of acanthosis, parakeratotic and orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, intraepidermal pustules, keratin pearls, detachment of epidermis, collagen necrosis, inflammatory infiltrate, vasodilation, basal cell vacuolization and superficial dermis degeneration both in UVB and UVBIR treatments. IRUVB animals showed the same characteristics as above except for parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, keratin pearls and superficial dermis degeneration. To conclude, infrared radiation exposure after ultraviolet B irradiation increases skin damage without protecting the tissue, while infrared radiation exposure before ultraviolet B irradiation showed a protective effect against ultraviolet skin damage. PMID:25682891

  8. Polymeric membrane dressings for radiotherapy-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Scott, Audrey

    Radiotherapy is one of the mainline treatments for cancer. One of the side effects associated with radiotherapy includes skin problems, which range from mild (dull erythema and tightening of the skin) to severe (moist desquamation resulting in open wounds that can be very painful associated with sloughy and, in some severe cases, necrosis). The increased use of advanced radical treatments, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment (IMRT), can also result in a higher number of patients experiencing skin reactions. It is estimated that approximately 87% of patients will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction (Harris et al, 2011) An evaluation was undertaken in 20 patients with head and neck cancer following a prescribed treatment of radiotherapy to compare a polymeric membrane dressing (PolyMem®) against the standard treatment. The standard treatment consisted of topical aqueous cream at the start of radiotherapy with the addition of paraffin gauze when moist desquamation occurred. A bespoke evaluation form was completed for a period of 4 weeks or until healed. Patients were asked to complete both qualitative descriptions and numerical scores of pain for symptoms and procedural pain. Analgesia and sleep patterns were logged and, in addition, free text diaries were provided for up to 4 weeks. Common themes were identified and qualitative data analysed. PMID:24851807

  9. Sprayed skin turbine component

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  10. Environment and the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suskind, R.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The skin is an important organ of defense adaptation and a portal of entry for xenobiotics. It is vulnerable to physical, chemical, and biologic agents and capable of expressing responses to these agents in a variety of pathologic patterns. These patterns are characterized by morphologic and functional features which are elicited by careful examination and test procedures. Cutaneous cancer may result from exposure to nonionizing as well as ionizing radiation, to specific identifiable chemical hazards, and may be enhanced by trauma. Cutaneous hazards of chemical sources are largely found in the workplace and among consumer products, including drugs and toilet goods. Environmental skin diseases and injuries are preventable. Prior to use assessment for safety and for possible risks from exposure to an agent, product, or process is of primary importance in the prevention and control of environmental skin disease and injury.

  11. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  12. Limitations of skin protection.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Sibylle

    2007-01-01

    Skin protection products and gloves are essential constituents of personal protective equipment at workplaces, which can be used in a complementary way, each offering particular benefits and disadvantages. In many workplace situations, both measures are being used either in an alternating or in a combined manner, typically in professions with exposures to mild irritants and a high wet-work load, such as hairdressers, healthcare workers or employees in the food-processing industry. Skin protection creams can be used to reduce unnecessarily long glove usage in order to reduce occlusion-related effects on the skin barrier. Whenever rotating machines are used, these products are the only option due to safety regulations. However, some particular requirements can be postulated for skin-protective products claimed especially to be used in combination with gloves. Reduction of glove-induced perspiration, of stratum corneum swelling, and postocclusive barrier impairment are intended attributes of such products, which have been already successfully implemented in some commercially available products. On the other hand it has to be proven that the ingredients do not interfere with the glove material, neither in the way of degrading the material, thus making it permeable for harmful substances, nor by enhancing the potential release of rubber allergens. Examples out of the literature are reviewed showing that skin products can exhibit unpredictable effects on the allergen release of rubber materials, if not thoroughly tested for this purpose beforehand. Some raw materials should be avoided in protection products, though they are of established value when used in afterwork emollients to accelerate barrier recovery. Usage of moisturizers, in contrast to special barrier products, at the workplace together or even under gloves is therefore judged critically, although selected products showed beneficial effects in particular experimental settings. Another future option is the implementation of 'active gloves' that are intended to gradually release ingredients that help to strengthen and preserve skin barrier integrity. PMID:17312367

  13. Macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? deficiency delays skin wound healing through impairing apoptotic cell clearance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Shi, R; Luo, B; Yang, X; Qiu, L; Xiong, J; Jiang, M; Liu, Y; Zhang, Z; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Skin wound macrophages are key regulators of skin repair and their dysfunction causes chronic, non-healing skin wounds. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) regulates pleiotropic functions of macrophages, but its contribution in skin wound healing is poorly defined. We observed that macrophage PPAR? expression was upregulated during skin wound healing. Furthermore, macrophage PPAR? deficiency (PPAR?-knock out (KO)) mice exhibited impaired skin wound healing with reduced collagen deposition, angiogenesis and granulation formation. The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) expression in wounds of PPAR?-KO mice was significantly increased and local restoration of TNF-? reversed the healing deficit in PPAR?-KO mice. Wound macrophages produced higher levels of TNF-? in PPAR?-KO mice compared with control. In vitro, the higher production of TNF-? by PPAR?-KO macrophages was associated with impaired apoptotic cell clearance. Correspondingly, increased apoptotic cell accumulation was found in skin wound of PPAR?-KO mice. Mechanically, peritoneal and skin wound macrophages expressed lower levels of various phagocytosis-related molecules. In addition, PPAR? agonist accelerated wound healing and reduced local TNF-? expression and wound apoptotic cells accumulation in wild type but not PPAR?-KO mice. Therefore, PPAR? has a pivotal role in controlling wound macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells to ensure efficient skin wound healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic target for skin wound healing. PMID:25590807

  14. Smoking and the skin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Arisa; Grando, Sergei A

    2012-03-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with significant morbidity affecting all systems of the body, including the integumentary system. We review the many dermatologic hazards of tobacco use. It is important to distinguish between the effects of tobacco smoke from effects of pure nicotine on the skin. All skin cells express several subtypes of the nicotinic class of acetylcholine receptors, including the ?7 receptor. Many chronic dermatoses are affected by smoking either negatively or positively. Elucidation of positive associations with a particular disease can lead to improvement from smoking cessation, whereas inverse correlation may lead to development of a disease-specific treatment with nicotinergic agonists. PMID:22348557

  15. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care ... overcrowded hospitals. Mothers were instructed to hold their diaper-clad premature infants beneath their clothing, skin-to- ...

  16. Immunopathology of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Khan, N; Maheshwari, V; Trivedi, I; Kalam, A

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted on 130 patients suffering from skin lesions which included psoriasis, lichen planus, DLE, pemphigus, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Forty age-and-sex-matched healthy individuals served as control. Serum IgG, IgM, and circulating immune complexes (CIC) were estimated. Significant increase in serum IgG (1937.2 +/- 1030.43 mg%) and IgM (232.12 +/- 136.98 mg%) was observed in all the skin lesions when compared with controls except in lichen planus where they were significantly lowered, values being 580.61+/- 77.35 mg% and 66.88 +/- 6.59 mg% respectively. CIC levels were significantly raised (P< 0.00 1) in various skin lesions (40.49+/-23.29) when compared with controls (17.68+/- 3.21), but no significance was observed in lichen planus( 17.72 +/- 4.28). Serum IgG, IgM and CIC were statistically significantly altered depending on the extent of the lesion and lowered significantly to almost normal values following treatment, thereby confirming the role of immunity in the pathogenesis of these skin disorders. PMID:17664758

  17. Healthy Skin Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are many false ideas about what causes acne. Acne Most teenagers get a skin disease called acne (AK-nee). The blackheads and pimples can be ... that almost everyone gets them at some point. Acne isn’t usually serious, but severe cases can ...

  18. Noninvasive Skin Tightening Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive skin tightening has become one of the most common cosmetic aesthetic procedures being performed today. The use of radiofrequency devices for these procedures has been at the forefront of this trend for the past several years. Newer and more sophisticated radiofrequency devices are being brought to the market and presented here are the Venus Freeze and Venus Legacy. PMID:26155322

  19. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy. PMID:25182982

  20. Noninvasive Skin Tightening Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive skin tightening has become one of the most common cosmetic aesthetic procedures being performed today. The use of radiofrequency devices for these procedures has been at the forefront of this trend for the past several years. Newer and more sophisticated radiofrequency devices are being brought to the market and presented here are the Venus Freeze and Venus Legacy. PMID:26155322

  1. Immunity and skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.B.; Brysk, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations in humans and animal studies support the theory that immunologic surveillance plays an important role in limiting the development of skin malignancies. These immune responses undergo progressive diminution with age. In addition, other factors, such as bereavement, poor nutrition, and acute and chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, can further diminish immune mechanisms.

  2. Improved electrodes for skin contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, J. G.; Lattanzi, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of thick, flexible electrodes with appropriate metal surfaces which prevent unnecessary skin motion. Electrodes provide sufficient radial pressure directed toward body surface to depress skin a noticeable portion of its normal resilient thickness.

  3. Staining of skin with dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    WITTGENSTEIN, E; BERRY, H K

    1960-09-30

    The reaction of skin with dihydroxyacetone to produce a brown "artificial tan" appears to proceed through combination with free amino groups in skin proteins, and particularly by combination of dihydroxyacetone with the free guanido group in arginine. PMID:13845496

  4. Taking Care of Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Puberty Video: Am I Normal? (Girls and Puberty) Movie: Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page ... Your Skin Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions Movie: Skin Eek! It's Eczema! Fungal Infections How Stitches ...

  5. Skin Cancer: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skin cancer appears in many shapes and sizes. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) This is a very common type of ... lip; skin on the lip can get thick Squamous cell carcinoma . These patients all have forms of squamous cell ...

  6. Inflammatory response and neuronal necrosis in rats with cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Kunnan; Hu, Guozhu; Yan, Haiyu; Xie, Chen; Wu, Xiaomu

    2014-01-01

    In the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic injury, inflammation primarily occurs in the infarct and peripheral zones. In the ischemic zone, neurons undergo necrosis and apoptosis, and a large number of reactive microglia are present. In the present study, we investigated the pathological changes in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal necrosis appeared 12 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the peak of neuronal apoptosis appeared 4 to 6 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Inflammatory cytokines and microglia play a role in damage and repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Serum intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were positively correlated with the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings indicate that intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 may be involved in blood-brain barrier injury, microglial activation, and neuronal apoptosis. Inhibiting blood-brain barrier leakage may alleviate neuronal injury following ischemia. PMID:25422636

  7. Acute retinal necrosis following intravitreal dexamethasone (Ozurdex®) implant.

    PubMed

    Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; Eren, Mustafa; Yolcu, Umit; Sobaci, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman undergoing azathioprine treatment for rheumatoid arthritis developed acute retinal necrosis a month after intravitreal dexamethasone (Ozurdex ®) implantation for posterior uveitis in the left eye. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA was detected in the anterior chamber and vitreous samples on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Retinal detachment occurred despite systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy. Favorable structural and functional outcomes were achieved after retinal surgery with silicone oil. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of acute retinal necrosis following placement of an Ozurdex® implant. Physicians practicing Ozurdex® implantations should be aware of this unusual but devastating complication. Extra caution and frequent follow-up are required in all immunocompromised patients receiving Ozurdex® implantation. PMID:25945535

  8. Facial necrosis after endovascular Onyx-18 embolization for epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grandhi, Ramesh; Panczykowski, David; Zwagerman, Nathan T.; Gehris, Robin; Villasenor-Park, Jennifer; Ho, Jonhan; Grandinetti, Lisa; Horowitz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Evolution in techniques and equipment has expanded the role, effectiveness, and safety of endovascular transarterial embolization for the treatment of severe epistaxis. Risks from this treatment approach include major ischemic complications. To date, there have been only a few reports of soft tissue necrosis following endovascular embolization for severe epistaxis; none involve the use of Onyx-18. Case Description: We report the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with epistaxis that was refractory to medical and surgical management, which lead to endovascular intervention and embolization with Onyx-18. The patient subsequently developed nasal ala and facial necrosis as a result of the procedure. Conclusion: We report the use of Onyx-18 for the endovascular embolization of a patient with severe epistaxis and subsequent complications. In cases of severe epistaxis that warrant intervention in the form of embolization, ischemic complications are rare; however, ischemic complications may be unavoidable and should factor into the discussion regarding procedural risks. PMID:23956938

  9. Diagnostic ultrasonography in cattle with abdominal fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the ultrasonographic findings in 14 cows with abdominal fat necrosis. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed the presence of heterogeneous hyperechoic masses and hyperechoic omentum with localized masses floating in a hypoechoic peritoneal fluid. A hyperechogenic rim was imaged around both kidneys. The intestines were coated with hyperechoic capsules and the intestinal lumens were constricted. Ultrasonographic examination of the pancreatic parenchyma showed an overall increased echogenicity which was homogenously distributed in 3 cases. A diagnosis of abdominal fat necrosis was made with ultrasound-guided biopsy of the echogenic masses, and thereafter at postmortem examination. Results from this study demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasonography as an imaging modality for antemortem diagnosis of abdominal lipomatosis in cattle. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first that illustrates ultrasonographic findings in cattle affected with abdominal lipomatosis. PMID:22753961

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. PMID:25948844

  11. Brain-Skin Connection: Stress, Inflammation and Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lyga, John

    2014-01-01

    The intricate relationship between stress and skin conditions has been documented since ancient times. Recent clinical observations also link psychological stress to the onset or aggravation of multiple skin diseases. However, the exact underlying mechanisms have only been studied and partially revealed in the past 20 years or so. In this review, the authors will discuss the recent discoveries in the field of “Brain-Skin Connection”, summarizing findings from the overlapping fields of psychology, endocrinology, skin neurobiology, skin inflammation, immunology, and pharmacology. PMID:24853682

  12. Dynamic Skin Triangulation (extended abstract)

    E-print Network

    Sullivan, John M.

    Dynamic Skin Triangulation (extended abstract) Ho-Lun Cheng , Tamal K. Dey , Herbert Edelsbrunner small and large angles. Skin Surfaces. The approach to deforming surfaces taken in this paper is based on the technical notion of skin surfaces, as introduced in [3]. The main reason for this choice is the existence

  13. Polyamines and nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Susan K.

    2007-11-01

    Elevated levels of polyamines have long been associated with skin tumorigenesis. Tightly regulated metabolism of polyamines is critical for cell survival and normal skin homeostasis, and these controls are dysregulated in skin tumorigenesis. A key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is upregulated in skin tumors compared to normal skin. Use of transgenic mouse models has demonstrated that polyamines play an essential role in the early promotional phase of skin tumorigenesis. The formation of skin tumors in these transgenic mice is dependent upon polyamine biosynthesis, especially putrescine, since treatment with inhibitors of ODC activity blocks the formation of skin tumors and causes the rapid regression of existing tumors. Although the mechanism by which polyamines promote skin tumorigenesis are not well understood, elevated levels of polyamines have been shown to stimulate epidermal proliferation, alter keratinocyte differentiation status, increase neovascularization, and increase synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in a manner similar to that seen in wound healing. It is becoming increasingly apparent that elevated polyamine levels activate not only epidermal cells but also underlying stromal cells in the skin to promote the development and progression of skin tumors. The inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis has potential to be an effective chemoprevention strategy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  14. AT NORTHWESTERN SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    six Skin Disease Research Centers as designated by the National Institutes of Health." Joan GuitartTHE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "Through the Skin Cancer Institute, we are endeavoring

  15. Sun Safety: Save Your Skin!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sunburn. To remind ever yone to protect their skin and health while enjoying the outdoors, the National Council on ... for skin cancer •a family member who’shad skin cancer If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care pre- cautions; some ...

  16. Physiological skin changes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kelly H

    2015-03-01

    Physicians may often mistake normal physiological skin changes in pregnancy for pathologic changes, so being able to recognize the skin manifestations unique to pregnancy is of the utmost importance to avoid unnecessary testing and stress for the obstetric patient. Most physiological skin changes will resolve postpartum, so reassurance and expectant management is indicated in almost all cases. PMID:25517755

  17. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resemble non-cancerous skin tumors or benign ulcers. Squamous Cell Carcinoma : Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on ... skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous cell carcinoma are confined to the skin and do not ...

  18. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  19. [Skin manifestations of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Néel, A; Connault, J; Graveleau, J; Durant, C; Decaux, O; Hamidou, M

    2014-01-01

    Whatever their aetiology, monoclonal gammopathies can be associated to several clinical features. Mechanisms are various and sometimes unknown. Skin is frequently involved and may represent a challenging diagnosis. Indeed, skin manifestations are either the presenting features and isolated, or at the background of a systemic syndrome. Our objective was to review the various skin manifestations that have been associated with monoclonal gammopathies. PMID:24070793

  20. Carrot yellow leaf virus Is Associated with Carrot Internal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ian P.; Skelton, Anna; Macarthur, Roy; Hodges, Tobias; Hinds, Howard; Flint, Laura; Nath, Palash Deb; Boonham, Neil; Fox, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Internal necrosis of carrot has been observed in UK carrots for at least 10 years, and has been anecdotally linked to virus infection. In the 2009 growing season some growers had up to 10% of yield with these symptoms. Traditional diagnostic methods are targeted towards specific pathogens. By using a metagenomic approach with high throughput sequencing technology, other, as yet unidentified causes of root necrosis were investigated. Additionally a statistical analysis has shown which viruses are most closely associated with disease symptoms. Carrot samples were collected from a crop exhibiting root necrosis (102 Affected: 99 Unaffected) and tested for the presence of the established carrot viruses: Carrot red leaf virus (CtRLV), Carrot mottle virus (CMoV), Carrot red leaf associated viral RNA (CtRLVaRNA) and Parsnip yellow fleck virus (PYFV). The presence of these viruses was not associated with symptomatic carrot roots either as single viruses or in combinations. A sub-sample of carrots of mixed symptom status was subjected to MiSeq sequencing. The results from these tests suggested Carrot yellow leaf virus (CYLV) was associated with symptomatic roots. Additionally a novel Torradovirus, a novel Closterovirus and two novel Betaflexiviradae related plant viruses were detected. A specific diagnostic test was designed for CYLV. Of the 102 affected carrots, 98% were positive for CYLV compared to 22% of the unaffected carrots. From these data we conclude that although we have yet to practically demonstrate a causal link, CYLV appears to be strongly associated with the presence of necrosis of carrots. PMID:25365290

  1. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  2. Use of a polymerase chain reaction assay to detect bovine herpesvirus type 2 DNA in skin lesions from cattle suspected to have pseudo-lumpy skin disease.

    PubMed

    d'Offay, Jean M; Floyd, James G; Eberle, Richard; Saliki, Jerry T; Brock, Kenny V; D'Andrea, George H; McMillan, Kenneth L

    2003-05-15

    Beef cattle from a herd in north Alabama were examined because of an outbreak of nonfatal skin disease characterized by discrete circumscribed areas of inflammation that developed on the skin from the neck to the hips. Areas of inflammation, which tended to be superficial, underwent necrosis and scabbed over. The scabs eventually dropped off leaving discrete, round, whitish, hairless lesions that were 1.2 to 2.5 cm diameter. Because clinical signs were consistent with those expected with pseudo-lumpy skin disease (PLSD) caused by bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BHV-2), samples from 16 representative animals were submitted for BHV-2 testing. All 16 animals were seropositive for BHV-2, but the virus could not be isolated from skin biopsy specimens or buffy coat samples. Results of a polymerase chain reaction assay incorporating primers designed to amplify 2 DNA sequences from BHV-2 were positive for 3 of the 10 cattle, suggesting that skin lesions in these cattle were a result of PLSD. Our findings suggest that PLSD may be more common and widespread in the United States than suggested by the frequency with which BHV-2 has been isolated from cattle with PLSD-like skin lesions. PMID:12762387

  3. Autophagy protects C. elegans against necrosis during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Dai, Li-Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a conserved pathway that delivers intracellular materials into lysosomes for degradation, is involved in development, aging, and a variety of diseases. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that autophagy plays a protective role against infectious diseases by diminishing intracellular pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates innate immunity remains largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is involved in host defense against a pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans. P. aeruginosa infection induces autophagy via a conserved extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Intriguingly, impairment of autophagy does not influence the intestinal accumulation of P. aeruginosa, but instead induces intestinal necrosis. Inhibition of necrosis results in the survival of autophagy-deficient worms after P. aeruginosa infection. These findings reveal a previously unidentified role for autophagy in protection against necrosis triggered by pathogenic bacteria in C. elegans and implicate that such a function of autophagy may be conserved through the inflammatory response in diverse organisms. PMID:25114220

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Acral peeling skin syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Acral peeling skin syndrome On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... definitions Reviewed April 2014 What is acral peeling skin syndrome? Acral peeling skin syndrome is a skin ...

  5. Identification of dirty necrosis in colorectal carcinoma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Chen, Zhifen; Feng, Changyin; Li, Hongsheng; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-06-01

    Dirty necrosis within glandular lumina is often considered as a characteristic of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) that is a diagnostically useful feature of CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability (MSI). Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is based on the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence signals, was used to identify dirty necrosis. Our results demonstrated that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of dirty necrosis and the signal intensity as well as an emission spectrum that can help to differentiate dirty necrosis from cancer cells. These findings indicate that MPM may be helpful in distinguishing MSI colorectal carcinoma via the identification of dirty necrosis.

  6. Comparative Genomic Profiling of Synovium Versus Skin Lesions in Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Belasco, Jennifer; Louie, James S; Gulati, Nicholas; Wei, Nathan; Nograles, Kristine; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Krueger, James G

    2015-01-01

    Objective To our knowledge, there is no broad genomic analysis comparing skin and synovium in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Also, there is little understanding of the relative levels of cytokines and chemokines in skin and synovium. The purpose of this study was to better define inflammatory pathways in paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue in patients with PsA. Methods We conducted a comprehensive analysis of cytokine and chemokine activation and genes representative of the inflammatory processes in PsA. Paired PsA synovial tissue and skin samples were obtained from 12 patients on the same day. Gene expression studies were performed using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Confirmatory quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on selected transcripts. Cell populations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results Globally, gene expression in PsA synovium was more closely related to gene expression in PsA skin than to gene expression in synovium in other forms of arthritis. However, PsA gene expression patterns in skin and synovium were clearly distinct, showing a stronger interleukin-17 (IL-17) gene signature in skin than in synovium and more equivalent tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-? gene signatures in both tissues. These results were confirmed with real-time PCR. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive molecular comparison of paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue samples in PsA. Our results support clinical trial data showing that PsA skin and joint disease are similarly responsive to TNF antagonists, while IL-17 antagonists have better results in PsA skin than in PsA joints. Genes selectively expressed in PsA synovium might direct future therapies for PsA. PMID:25512250

  7. Skin contamination dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  8. Newborn skin care.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jonathan A

    2013-02-01

    Many organ systems undergo significant and rapid changes during the transition from an intrauterine to an extrauterine environment, especially those which serve as interfaces between the infant and the external environment. Historically the skin care methods employed during and after this period of rapid physiologic change have been derived from individual anecdotal experience or cultural tradition, rather than evidence-based or pathomechanistically derived data. While research in this area has historically been limited, it is increasing in scope and volume, and recent work has shed light on the changes experienced by the cutaneous organ during this period of transition. This increased understanding has driven new recommendations in skin care protocols for newborn infants and neonates. PMID:23419756

  9. Flies With Skin Blisters.

    PubMed

    Simons, Matias

    2015-08-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) belongs to a family of genetic conditions that cause the skin to be fragile and to blister easily. Although most of the genes involved are known, the molecular mechanisms underlying keratin aggregation remain obscure. In this issue of the Journal, Bohnekamp et al. report on a novel EBS model that is based on the de novo formation of keratin filaments in "keratin null flies." PMID:26174537

  10. Detection of cytomegalovirus in an immunocompetent adult presenting with acute retinal necrosis due to varicella-zoster virus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoko; Daikoku, Tohru; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background To report a case of simultaneous detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in acute retinal necrosis (ARN) due to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in an immunocompetent adult. Methods A 65-year-old healthy woman presented with necrotizing retinitis. Vitreous, tears, saliva, and swabs of the auricular and forehead skin areas were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction analysis at various time points during the treatment period. Results VZV and CMV DNA were detected in the vitreous, tears, saliva, and skin. CMV was present in fewer copies than VZV in the vitreous. The retinal lesion clinically improved rapidly only by acyclovir. According to the clinical findings and the clinical responses to acyclovir, CMV seems not to cause ARN in this case. Conclusion VZV and CMV DNA were detected in the vitreous of a patient with VZV ARN. CMV reactivation appeared to be asymptomatic. PMID:25999692

  11. [Dry skin and black skin: what are the facts?].

    PubMed

    Mahé, A

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the data in the literature on the potential specificities of the stratum corneum of so-called "black" skin, together with the afferent cutaneous hydration regulation process. The methodology of the studies is often debatable, not only for basic (absence of definition of "black skin") but also for technical reasons. Their results are often contradicting. Other than certain subtle differences, related to potentially enhanced preservation of the epidermis of dark skin from heliodermal xerosis, we conclude in the similarity of the physicochemical characteristics of the stratum corneum in the different color of skin. Moreover, the data available do not suggest a predisposition of certain skin colors to the occurrence of pathological states involving the stratum corneum. However, dark skin is characterized by its semiologic capacity of taking on a "ashy" aspect related to a better assessment of normal or xerotic stratum corneum because of melanic pigmentation. PMID:11976544

  12. Skin moisturization mechanisms: new data.

    PubMed

    Bonté, F

    2011-05-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances and excessive water loss. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, called the stratum corneum, which is composed of corneocytes, originating from the keratinocytes differentiation process, embedded in organized complex lipid domains. Moisturizing of the skin is recognized as the first anti-aging skin care. Skin moisturization is essential for its appearance, protection, complexion, softness and the reinforcement of its barrier properties against deleterious and exogenous environmental factors. The intrinsic water binding capacity of skin is not only due to the complex natural moisturizing factor present in corneocytes, but also to hyaluronic acid and a regulated water transport within the skin. Recent data shows that the water movements between the cells at the different levels of the epidermis are due to dedicated water and glycerol transport proteins named aquaporins. Their role in the skin moisturization is completed by corneodesmosomes and tight junctions. Water and pH are now shown to be of prime importance in the regulation of the epidermal enzymes linked to corneocytes desquamation and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, the level of moisturization of the skin is important in its protection against repeated exposure to various irritant agents or phenomena such as very frequent washing with strong tensioactive materials. PMID:21570537

  13. Diarachidonoylphosphoethanolamine induces necrosis/necroptosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshiko; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kanno, Takeshi; Nakano, Takashi; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated 1,2-diarachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DAPE)-induced cell death in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells. DAPE reduced cell viability in NCI-H28, NCI-H2052, NCI-H2452, and MSTO-211H MPM cell lines in a concentration (1-100?M)-dependent manner. In the flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and annexin V (AV), DAPE significantly increased the population of PI-positive and AV-negative cells, corresponding to primary necrosis, and that of PI-positive and AV-positive cells, corresponding to late apoptosis/secondary necrosis, in NCI-H28 cells. DAPE-induced reduction of NCI-H28 cell viability was partially inhibited by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of RIP1 kinase to induce necroptosis, or knocking-down RIP1. DAPE generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) followed by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potentials in NCI-H28 cells. DAPE-induced mitochondrial damage was attenuated by cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of cyclophilin D (CypD). DAPE did not affect expression and mitochondrial localization of p53 protein in NCI-H28 cells. DAPE significantly decreased intracellular ATP concentrations in NCI-H28 cells. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that DAPE induces necroptosis and necrosis of MPM cells; the former is mediated by RIP1 kinase and the latter is caused by generating ROS and opening CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore, to reduce intracellular ATP concentrations. PMID:26004138

  14. Clinical Manifestation of Self-Limiting Acute Retinal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Borkowski, Piotr; Szczepanik, Szymon; Moneta-Wielgo?, Joanna; K?cik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper was to present a case series of self-limiting, peripheral acute retinal necrosis and to demonstrate efficacy of treatment with valacyclovir in patients resistant to acyclovir. The diagnosis was made on ophthalmoscopic examination and positive serum tests for herpes viruses. Material/Methods Ten patients (6F and 4M) aged 19–55 years were diagnosed and treated for self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The following endpoints were reported: visual outcomes, clinical features, disease progression, treatment, and complications. Patients received only symptomatic treatment because they did not consent to vitreous puncture. Results Peripheral, mild retinitis was diagnosed in all eyes at baseline. Initially, all patients were treated with systemic acyclovir (800 mg, 5 times a day), prednisone (typically 40–60 mg/day), and aspirin in an outpatient setting. In 6 patients, treatment was discontinued at 6 months due to complete resolution of the inflammatory process. Four patients with immune deficiency showed signs and symptoms of chronic inflammation. Two patients did not respond to acyclovir (2 non-responders); however, those patients were successfully treated with valacyclovir. Complete resolution of inflammatory lesions was observed in 8 patients. In 2 patients, the disease progressed despite treatment – 1 female patient after kidney transplant who stopped the prescribed medications, and 1 male patient with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome who experienced breakthrough symptoms on-treatment. He died due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Neurological complications (encephalitis and meningitis) were observed in 2 female patients. Prophylactic laser photocoagulation was performed in 1 subject. Conclusions A series of cases of self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is presented. This clinical form of ARN can resemble toxoplasmic retinitis in some cases. Oral antiviral medications provide an effective alternative to intravenous formulations in patients with self-limiting ARN. Retinitis is associated with the risk of encephalitis. PMID:25356955

  15. Feasibility of skin surface elastography by tracking skin surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutts, Louise V.; Miller, Naomi R.; Harland, Christopher C.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances have led to a multitude of image modalities being used for visualization of tissue stiffness. High-resolution images of tissue stiffness are desirable, as they have the potential to provide useful diagnostic information. A noncontact optical imaging method has the attractions of low cost, simplicity, and utility when skin contact is undesirable. However, previous optical techniques have required the application of paint or ink to the surface of the skin and so have required contact. Therefore, the present study assessed the feasibility of tracking skin surface topography to produce elastograms. The study showed, by analyzing a variety of silicone skin surface replicas from various body sites of subjects of different ages, that skin surface elastography by tracking surface topography would be feasible. The study further showed that the quality of the strain images can be optimized by measuring skin line pattern frequency. Skin samples with high skin line frequency will achieve best spatial resolution, in the order of 1 mm, comparable to contact techniques reported previously. A mechanically inhomogeneous silicone replica was then imaged, illustrating the technique's ability to detect strain contrast. Finally, the feasibility of implementing the technique in vivo was illustrated using a single pigmented skin lesion.

  16. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  17. Facial Fat Necrosis Following Autologous Fat Transfer and its Management

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Sweta; Marsland, Alexander M; Madan, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer (AFT) is an increasingly popular cosmetic procedure practiced by dermatologic surgeons worldwide. As this is an office based procedure performed under local or tumescent anaesthesia with fat transferred within the same individual and limited associated down time its is considered relatively safe and risk free in the cosmetic surgery arena. We describe a case of AFT related fat necrosis causing significant facial dysmorphia and psychosocial distress. We also discuss the benefits and risks of AFT highlighting common causes of fat graft failure. PMID:25538442

  18. The Possible Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-? in Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yagihashi, Soroku; Toyota, Takayoshi

    2003-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide evidences that imply the role of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, especially diabetic polyneuropathy. Under chronic hyperglycemia, endogenous TNF-? production is accelerated in microvascular and neural tissues, which may undergo an increased microvascular permeability, hypercoagulability, and nerve damage, thus initiating and promoting the development of characteristic lesions of diabetic microangiopathy and polyneuropathy. Enhanced TNF-? production may also promote atherosclerosis due to increased insulin resistance and the expression of adhesion molecules. Clinical application of specific agents that suppress production and/or activity of TNF-? may inhibit the development and exacerbation of chronic diabetic complications. PMID:14630568

  19. Climate change and skin.

    PubMed

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many dermatoses. PMID:23407083

  20. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  1. Low temperature skin treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipping, G.; Krishna, A.; Ruppert, U.; Srinivasan, R.; Walter, H.

    Although freezing has been a successful method of curing various kinds of skin lesions for at least 80 years, little progress has been made regarding the techniques and instruments available to the dermatoligist for applying cold. The attempts to improve this technique are reviewed, and the requirements is for successful cryotreatment are discussed taking warts as an example. With these requirements in mind, a simple and effective cryoprobe has been developed by the authors. Its design is described, and the experiences from a year's routine application of the probe to the treatment of warts are discussed.

  2. Coriander alleviates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced contact dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Lee, Wonil; Sim, Yeomoon; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-08-01

    Contact dermatitis (CD) is a pattern of inflammatory responses in the skin that occurs through contact with external factors. The clinical picture is a polymorphic pattern of skin inflammation characterized by a wide range of clinical features, including itching, redness, scaling, and erythema. Coriandrum sativum L. (CS), commonly known as coriander, is a member of the Apiaceae family and is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional and culinary values. Linoleic acid and linolenic acid in CS have various pharmacological activities. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of CS on CD has been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effect of CS against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced CD-like skin lesions. CS, at doses of 0.5-1%, applied to the dorsal skin inhibited the development of CD-like skin lesions. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines, immunoglobulin E, tumor necrosis factor-?, interferon-?, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, and IL-13, were significantly reduced. In addition, CS increased the levels of total glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 protein. Thus, CS can inhibit the development of CD-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators and may be an effective alternative therapy for contact diseases. PMID:24963872

  3. Coriander Alleviates 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Contact Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Lee, Wonil; Sim, Yeomoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Contact dermatitis (CD) is a pattern of inflammatory responses in the skin that occurs through contact with external factors. The clinical picture is a polymorphic pattern of skin inflammation characterized by a wide range of clinical features, including itching, redness, scaling, and erythema. Coriandrum sativum L. (CS), commonly known as coriander, is a member of the Apiaceae family and is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional and culinary values. Linoleic acid and linolenic acid in CS have various pharmacological activities. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of CS on CD has been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effect of CS against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced CD-like skin lesions. CS, at doses of 0.5–1%, applied to the dorsal skin inhibited the development of CD-like skin lesions. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines, immunoglobulin E, tumor necrosis factor-?, interferon-?, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, and IL-13, were significantly reduced. In addition, CS increased the levels of total glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 protein. Thus, CS can inhibit the development of CD-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators and may be an effective alternative therapy for contact diseases. PMID:24963872

  4. Plant polyphenols effectively protect HaCaT cells from ultraviolet C-triggered necrosis and suppress inflammatory chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Saveria; Potapovich, Alla; Kostyuk, Vladimir; Mariani, Valentina; Lulli, Daniela; De Luca, Chiara; Korkina, Liudmila

    2009-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a common response of epidermal cells to a variety of noxious stimuli such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation from solar light and proinflammatory cytokines from skin-infiltrating leukocytes. Here, we report that two types of plant-derived antioxidants, the phenylpropanoid glycoside verbascoside as well as the flavonoids rutin and quercetin possess protective effects against UVC-induced cell damage and proinflammatory activation. The molecules under investigation were effective against the loss of cell integrity associated with necrosis in doses consistent with their antioxidant activity, whereas they did not significantly oppose UVC-induced proliferation arrest and apoptosis. By contrast, only verbascoside effectively inhibited cytokine-induced release of proinflammatory mediators in a dose-dependent fashion. Verbascoside and its homologue teupolioside dramatically impaired NF-kappaB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. These results suggest that plant polyphenols with antioxidant properties have distinct mechanisms in the suppression of oxidative stress induced in keratinocytes by different stimuli. Verbascoside and teupolioside are hence of potential interest in the protection of the skin from both environmental and inflammatory insults. PMID:19723070

  5. [Youth Healthcare guideline 'Skin disorders'].

    PubMed

    Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Gameren-Oosterom, Helma B M; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    There is a high incidence of skin disorders; these are also frequently encountered within Youth Healthcare (YHC). Some skin disorders are caused by an underlying disease, syndrome or child abuse. Therefore, detection of these causes in an early stage is important. Skin disorders can have a huge psychosocial impact on both child and parents. This is one of the reasons why prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, referral, and uniform advice and guidance are of great importance. The YHC Guideline examines counselling and advice, criteria for referral to primary or secondary healthcare, and skincare in general. It also describes the disorders that should be actively detected. The Guideline also looks at specific aspects of dark skins and ethnic diversity, and the impact of skin disorders on general wellbeing. The accompanying web-based tool includes argumentation and opinions from experts on more than 75 skin disorders, including illustrations and decision trees, to aid the drawing up of a treatment plan. PMID:23151335

  6. Improvement of skin wound healing in diabetic mice by kinin B2 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Desposito, Dorinne; Chollet, Catherine; Taveau, Christopher; Descamps, Vincent; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine; Waeckel, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a major medical problem in diabetic subjects. Kinins exert a number of vascular and other actions limiting organ damage in ischaemia or diabetes, but their role in skin injury is unknown. We investigated, through pharmacological manipulation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors (B1R and B2R respectively), the role of kinins in wound healing in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Using two mouse models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice) and non-diabetic mice, we assessed the effect of kinin receptor activation or inhibition by subtype-selective pharmacological agonists (B1R and B2R) and antagonist (B2R) on healing of experimental skin wounds. We also studied effects of agonists and antagonist on keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. Levels of Bdkrb1 (encoding B1R) and Bdkrb2 (encoding B2R) mRNAs increased 1-2-fold in healthy and wounded diabetic skin compared with in non-diabetic skin. Diabetes delayed wound healing. The B1R agonist had no effect on wound healing. In contrast, the B2R agonist impaired wound repair in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice, inducing skin disorganization and epidermis thickening. In vitro, B2R activation unbalanced fibroblast/keratinocyte proliferation and increased keratinocyte migration. These effects were abolished by co-administration of B2R antagonist. Interestingly, in the two mouse models of diabetes, the B2R antagonist administered alone normalized wound healing. This effect was associated with the induction of Ccl2 (encoding monocyte chemoattractant protein 1)/Tnf (encoding tumour necrosis factor ?) mRNAs. Thus stimulation of kinin B2 receptor impairs skin wound healing in mice. B2R activation occurs in the diabetic skin and delays wound healing. B2R blockade improves skin wound healing in diabetic mice and is a potential therapeutic approach to diabetic ulcers. PMID:26443866

  7. [Skin expansion. Material and technique].

    PubMed

    Bardot, J; Paulhe, P; Magalon, G

    1996-10-01

    Skin expansion material has progressed and now covers all needs in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Breast reconstruction occupies a special place among expansion techniques and requires specific material. The skin expansion technique was approved by French Social Security in 1995 and is now covered in both the public and private sectors. The skin expansion protocol is rigorous with no room for improvisation. It is only in this way that the quality of the result justifies the use of this technique. PMID:9687603

  8. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination. PMID:22851522

  9. Skin segmentation using multiple thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Francesca; Schettini, Raimondo

    2006-01-01

    The segmentation of skin regions in color images is a preliminary step in several applications. Many different methods for discriminating between skin and non-skin pixels are available in the literature. The simplest, and often applied, methods build what is called an "explicit skin cluster" classifier which expressly defines the boundaries of the skin cluster in certain color spaces. These binary methods are very popular as they are easy to implement and do not require a training phase. The main difficulty in achieving high skin recognition rates, and producing the smallest possible number of false positive pixels, is that of defining accurate cluster boundaries through simple, often heuristically chosen, decision rules. In this study we apply a genetic algorithm to determine the boundaries of the skin clusters in multiple color spaces. To quantify the performance of these skin detection methods, we use recall and precision scores. A good classifier should provide both high recall and high precision, but generally, as recall increases, precision decreases. Consequently, we adopt a weighted mean of precision and recall as the fitness function of the genetic algorithm. Keeping in mind that different applications may have sharply different requirements, the weighting coefficients can be chosen to favor either high recall or high precision, or to satisfy a reasonable tradeoff between the two, depending on application demands. To train the genetic algorithm (GA) and test the performance of the classifiers applying the GA suggested boundaries, we use the large and heterogeneous Compaq skin database.

  10. Gastric necrosis after fundoplication: a novel approach for esophageal preservation.

    PubMed

    Bass, K D; Meagher, D P; Haase, G M

    1998-11-01

    An 11-year-old boy presented moribund, with massive abdominal distension. A Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy tube had been established at age 2 years. After attempts to pass a nasogastric tube were unsuccessful, the old gastrostomy site was used to gain percutaneous access to the stomach resulting in release of gastric contents and stabilization of blood pressure and perfusion. During operation, massive gastric distention with gastric necrosis was found. Subtotal gastrectomy was performed with stapled closure of the distal intraabdominal esophagus and prepyloric region. Sump suction was placed in the proximal esophagus and the abdomen was drained widely. A distal esophageal perforation was apparent on postoperative day 19 confirmed by imaging and endoscopy. A nasoesophageal tube was passed into the abdomen, tied to a Jackson-Pratt drain, and the composite tube repositioned in the midesophagus allowing controlled proximal and distal drainage. Six months later, a Hunt-Laurence esophagojejunal pouch was created. At age 13, the child is clinically well, and enjoys 50% of his nutritional needs orally, with the remainder delivered overnight via tube feedings. This case describes gastric necrosis after gas bloat syndrome as a late complication of Nissen fundoplication. A novel approach to the management of distal esophageal perforation allowed preservation of a functional, intact native esophagus. PMID:9856904

  11. Serine racemase: a key player in apoptosis and necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Canu, Nadia; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2014-01-01

    A fine balance between cell survival and cell death is required to sculpt the nervous system during development. However, an excess of cell death can occur following trauma, exposure to neurotoxins or alcohol, and some developmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) support synaptic plasticity and survival of many neuronal populations whereas inappropriate activation may promote various forms of cell death, apoptosis, and necrosis representing the two extremes of a continuum of cell death processes both “in vitro” and “in vivo.” Hence, by identifying the switches controlling pro-survival vs. apoptosis and apoptosis vs. pro-excitotoxic outcome of NMDAR stimulation, NMDAR modulators could be developed that selectively block the cell death enhancing pro-survival signaling or synaptic plasticity mediated by NMDAR. Among these modulators, a role is emerging for the enzyme serine racemase (SR) that synthesizes D-serine, a key co-agonist with glutamate at NMDAR. This review summarizes the experimental evidence from “in vitro” neuronal cultures—with special emphasis on cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs)—and “in vivo” models of neurodegeneration, where the dual role of the SR/D-serine pathway as a master regulator of apoptosis and the apoptosis-necrosis shift will be discussed. PMID:24795622

  12. Porphyrin-laser photodynamic induction of focal brain necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stroop, W.G.; Battles, E.J.; Townsend, J.J.; Schaefer, D.C.; Baringer, J.R.; Straight, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    A noninvasive photodynamic method has been developed to produce focal brain necrosis using porphyrin activated in vivo with laser light. After peripheral injection of the photosensitive porphyrin derivative, Photofrin I, mice were irradiated on the posterior lateral aspect of the head through the intact depilated scalp with 632 nm argon-dye laser light. Animals were studied at one, two and seven days after irradiation. Blood-brain barrier damage was detected by the intravenous injection of Evans blue, horseradish peroxidase and heterologous immunoglobulins. At one and two days after irradiation, the lesions were characterized by extravasation of immunoglobulin and Evans blue, and by edema, ischemia and infiltration by monocytes. On the seventh day after irradiation, the lesion was smaller than it had been two days after irradiation, and had reactive changes at its edges and coagulative necrosis at its center. Extravasation of Evans blue and immunoglobulin was markedly reduced by the seventh day after irradiation, but uptake of horseradish peroxidase by macrophages located at the periphery of the lesion was evident.

  13. Effects of vinpocetine on random skin flap survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Xiao, Tao; Sen-Min, Wu; Ding-Sheng, Lin

    2013-07-01

    The effect of vinpocetine on flap survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were evaluated in this study. The McFarlane flap model was established in 20 rats and evaluated within two groups. Postoperative celiac injection was given for 7 days in the two groups: vinpocetine was applied in Group 1, and the same volume of saline was applied in Group 2. Flap necrosis was measured on day 7 by cellophane in all groups. VEGF expression was determined using immunohistochemical methods on tissue samples taken after 7 days of injections. SOD and MDA contents were examined according to the Kit (reagent instructions). Vinpocetine significantly reduced necrosis area in Group 1 (p < 0.05). VEGF expression and SOD contents were significantly increased in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p < 0.01), whereas MDA level was reduced (p < 0.05). This experimental study demonstrates that vinpocetine improves survival of random skin flaps, promotes neovascularization, and increases VEGF expression. Meanwhile, vinpocetine has a protective effect against ischemia-reperfusion injury by improving SOD vitality and decreasing MDA value. PMID:23588551

  14. Characteristics of the Aging Skin

    PubMed Central

    Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Although most researches into the changes in skin with age focus on the unwelcome aesthetic aspects of the aging skin, skin deterioration with age is more than a merely cosmetic problem. Although mortality from skin disease is primarily restricted to melanoma, dermatological disorders are ubiquitous in older people with a significant impact on quality of life. The structural and functional deterioration of the skin that occurs with age has numerous clinical presentations, ranging from benign but potentially excruciating disorders like pruritus to the more threatening carcinomas and melanomas. Recent Advances The degenerative changes that occur in the aging skin are increasingly understood at both the molecular and cellular level, facilitating a deeper understanding of the structural and functional deterioration that these changes produce. Critical Issues A loss of both function and structural stability in skin proceeds unavoidably as individuals age, which is the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. Intrinsic aging proceeds at a genetically determined pace, primarily caused by the buildup of damaging products of cellular metabolism as well as an increasing biological aging of the cells. Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity in women as well; falling levels in midlife, therefore, produce premature aging as compared with similarly aged men. Extrinsic insults from the environment add to the dermatological signs of aging. Future Directions A deeper understanding of the physiological basis of skin aging will facilitate progress in the treatment of the unwelcome sequelae of aging skin, both cosmetic and pathogenic. PMID:24527317

  15. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance...

  16. Localized radiation necrosis model in mouse brain using proton ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Takata, Takushi; Takai, Nobuhiko; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Kume, Kyo; Toho, Taichiro; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Ono, Koji

    2015-12-01

    Brain radiation necrosis is the most serious late adverse event that occurs after 6 months following radiation therapy. Effective treatment for this irreversible brain necrosis has not been established yet. This study tries to establish brain radiation necrosis mouse model using proton or helium beam. The right cerebral hemispheres of C57BL/6J mouse brains were irradiated at doses of 40, 50, 60Gy with charged particles. In 60Gy group, brain necrosis that recapitulates human disease was detected after 8 months. PMID:26260449

  17. Non-injection-site necrotic skin lesions complicating postoperative heparin thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tassava, Twylla; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2015-08-01

    The patient case we present is a definite case of HIT from both clinical and serological perspectives. The 4Ts score was eventually 8/8 (maximum) based upon thrombocytopenia (88% platelet count fall to nadir of 58 × 109/L), appropriate timing (onset on Day 5 post-intraoperative UFH exposure), thrombosis (right lower limb DVTs, skin necrosis, anaphylactoid reaction to IV heparin, right hallux ischemic necrosis), and no plausible alternative explanation for thrombocytopenia. In addition, the patient had a strong positive SRA and PF4-dependent ELISA. Although necrotizing skin lesions distant from heparin injection sites are not a common consequence of HIT, their occurrence in this patient—along with previous supportive literature [11-13]—indicate that these lesions should be considered rare manifestations of HIT. Moreover, the distinct localization of the unusual necrotic skin rash to the right limb suggests that a low flow state due to the arterial obstruction or perhaps even as a result of an underlying venous thrombus, both of which were present in our patient, could play a key pathophysiological role in predisposing to this unusual complication of HIT. PMID:25808584

  18. The Effect of Enoxaparin and Clopidogrel on Survival of Random Skin Flap in Rat Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; S Forootan, Kamal; S Jalali, Seyed Ziaaddin; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Pedram, Mir Sepehr

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrosis of skin flaps is considered as an important complication in reconstructive surgery. We conducted an experimental study to investigate the efficacy of low-molecular weight heparin, clopidogrel and their combination to improve the flap survival. METHODS Forty male, adult Sprague-Dawlay rats were divided randomly into 4 groups. Standard rectangular, distally based dorsal random pattern skin flap was elevated. To prevent the graft effect, a sterile sheet was put under the flap. No pharmacological agent was administered for the control group. In group 2, single subcutaneous dose of enoxaparin (3.2 mg/kg) was immediately administrated after surgery. In group 3, clopidogrel (25 mg/kg) was given orally for 7 days. In group 4, both enoxaparin and clopidogrel were administrated. The rats were evaluated on post-operative day 7 for viable and necrotic portions of flaps. RESULTS The mean and SD of necrosis was 17.79+2.5 cm in the control group, 16.20±3.1 cm in low-molecular weight heparin, 15.25+3.8 cm in combined therapy group and 13.69+2.7 cm in clopidogrel group. Clopidogrel was the only pharmaceutical agent that produced a significant increase in the flap survival area. CONCLUSION Clopidogrel may be an effective pharmaceutical agent that significantly increases viability of random skin flaps in rats, but low-molecular weight heparin and their combination did not have any significant beneficial effects. PMID:25734046

  19. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  20. Pain-induced skin autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Francesca; Neuhuber, Winfried; Flügel, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    A recent paper published in Nature reports sensory nerve fibers in the skin that give local immune cells important instructions for the organization of an immune response; in this particular case the cooperation between the nervous and immune systems had disastrous consequences, namely an auto-destruction of the skin. PMID:24946740

  1. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  2. Moisturizing Different Racial Skin Types

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ involved in thermoregulation, gas exchange, protection against pathogens, and barrier function to maintain proper hydration. When dry, the ability for skin to execute these tasks becomes impaired. Dry skin affects almost everyone as we age, but it is also dependent on external factors, such as dry climate, colder temperatures, and repeated washing. In addition, increasing evidence has shown racial variability in the physiological properties of skin, which directly impacts water content of the stratum corneum and sensitivity to exogenously applied agents. A multitude of products have been developed to treat dry skin, and as a group, moisturizers have been designed to either impart or restore hydration in the stratum corneum. Given the large number of moisturizers presently available, depending on individual components, several different mechanisms may be employed to promote skin hydration. As there exists dramatic racial variability in skin properties, certain moisturizers may thus be more effective in some and less effective in others to treat the common condition of dry skin. PMID:25013536

  3. Rheological behaviour of reconstructed skin.

    PubMed

    Pailler-Mattei, C; Laquièze, L; Debret, R; Tupin, S; Aimond, G; Sommer, P; Zahouani, H

    2014-09-01

    Reconstructed skins have been developed to replace skin when the integrity of tissue has been compromised following severe injury, and to provide alternative methods validating the innocuousness and effectiveness of dermatological and cosmetic products. However the functional properties of tissue substitutes have not been well characterised, mainly since mechanical measurement devices have not been designed to test cell culture materials in vitro. From the mechanical standpoint, reconstructed skin is a heterogeneous multi-layer viscoelastic material. To characterise the time-dependent behaviour of reconstructed skin, spherical indentation load-relaxation tests were performed with a specific original device adapted to measure small soft tissue samples. Load-relaxation indentation tests were performed on a standard reconstructed skin model and on sub-components of the reconstructed skin (3D-scaffold alone and dermal equivalent). Generalised Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt rheological models are proposed for analysing the mechanical behaviour of each biological tissue. The results indicated a modification of the rheological behaviour of the samples tested as a function of their biological structure. The 3D-scaffold was modelled using the one-branch Maxwell model, while the dermis equivalent and the reconstructed skin were modeled using a one-branch and a two-branch Kelvin-Voigt model, respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that skin cells contribute to global mechanical behaviour through an increase of the instantaneous relaxation function, while the 3D-scaffold alone influences the mechanical response of long relaxation times. PMID:24956159

  4. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  5. Original inhibition method of excessive synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokine of tumour necrosis factor ?

    PubMed Central

    Zinchuk, AleXander; Holubovska, Olga; Shkurba, Andrij; Hrytsko, Roman; Vorozhbyt, Olga; Richniak, Mykhailo

    2015-01-01

    Influence on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines of an ill person is an urgent aspect of treatment of many diseases. For inhibition of synthesis of a high level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, medications which are recombinant monoclonal antibodies, especially to tumour necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), are used. However, these methods of treatment require further improvement by elaborating new approaches with a wider spectrum of influence on the immune system. A completely new method of reduction in high activity of TN F-? with the method of intradermal autoleukocyte immunization is presented in the article. Investigation was performed in a group of patients with psoriasis (24) with a high level of TNF-? in the blood (over 30 pg/ml). Simultaneously such investigation was performed on patients with psoriasis (9) without TNF-? detected (0 pg/ml). As a result of immunization, a significant reduction in TNF-? occurred in all patients with its high level, in 16 (66.7%) from 24 patients – to 0-5 pg/ml. The level of reduction and duration of the achieved effect was of an individual character and requires further investigation. However, the achieved results prove the expediency of administration of this immunization method for patients requiring reduction of TNF-? synthesis. However, the content of TNF-? in blood serum could not be detected in most patients with a low level of cytokine (in 6 from 9) after immunization (as well as before immunization), but an increase in its level from 0 to 5-8 pg/ml was observed in 3 patients. On the basis of the conducted research, the authors suggest that the influence of immunization on cytokine synthesis depends on the condition of immune cells and correlation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in a patient's skin. PMID:26648779

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha release during systemic reaction in cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Gosset, P; Janin, A; Dalenne, R; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1994-02-01

    Primary cold urticaria (PCU) characterized by the association of urticaria, angioedema, and sometimes a shock-like reaction after cold exposure, is usually considered to be linked with histamine and prostaglandin D2 release by mast cells. To determine the involvement of cytokines, we studied the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the blood of the efferent vein after immersion of the hand in chilled water. Five patients with PCU were compared with a control population (three patients with nonphysical urticaria and three healthy subjects). Among patients with PCU who underwent the cold immersion test, two exhibited a shock-like reaction with a large urticarial plaque (patients 1 and 2), one had only a mild cutaneous reaction, and two had no reaction. Patient 1 was reevaluated after 6 months of treatment with H1 and H2 antihistamines: he did not respond to this challenge. All controls were strictly negative. Histamine was released within the first minute after the challenge in the three patients with PCU, but at a higher level for the two patients who had a systemic reaction. TNF-alpha was undetectable in the blood of the patient with only a mild cutaneous reaction, whereas TNF-alpha release was observed for the two patients with a systemic reaction, 2 and 6 minutes after the end of the cold immersion test. The two other patients and the control subjects released neither histamine nor TNF-alpha. In parallel, pathologic and immunohistochemical (with a rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antibody) studies were performed on skin biopsy specimens collected 10 minutes after ice-cube test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7509821

  7. Incidences of Serious Infections and Tuberculosis among Patients Receiving Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, In Kyung; Hyun, Jong Jin; Kim, Seung Young; Jung, Sung Woo; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jai Hyun; Kim, Ho; Lee, Hong Sik; Keum, Bora; Kim, Eun Sun; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) medications represent a major advancement in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. However, these agents are associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) and other serious infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidences of such disease among tertiary hospitals in Korea. Materials and Methods We retrospectively studied patients who received anti-TNF-? therapy; we reviewed serious infections including TB that developed within 6 months after initiation of anti-TNF-? therapy. Data concerning patient demographics, types of anti-TNF-? agents, concomitant immunosuppressive drugs use, and infection details were collected. Results A total 175 patients treated with infliximab (n=72) or adalimumab (n=103) with the following conditions were enrolled: Crohn's disease, 34 (19.4%); ulcerative colitis, 20 (11.4%); ankylosing spondylitis, 82 (46.9%); and rheumatoid arthritis, 39 (22.2%). There were 18 cases (6.0%) of serious infections. The most common site of serious infection was the intra-abdomen (n=6), followed by TB (n=3), skin and soft tissue (n=3), bone and joints (n=2), ocular neurons (n=2), lower respiratory tract (n=1), and urinary tract (n=1). Of the 175 patients, only 3 cases showed development of TB. Furthermore, of all those who developed TB, none had taken anti-TB chemoprophylaxis prior to treatment with an anti-TNF agent due to negative screening results. Conclusion Serious infections with anti-TNF-? therapy were uncommon among tertiary hospitals in Korea; TB was the second most frequent infection. Nevertheless, there were no TB reactivations after anti-TB chemoprophylaxis. Accordingly, physicians should be aware of TB in subjects undergoing anti-TNF-? therapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB. PMID:24532516

  8. [Travel and skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1992-02-20

    The problem "travelling and dermatological diseases" is presented as a temporary change of place with associated changes in ecological conditions. Latent dermatoses may be provoked--but full-blown dermatoses may also improve with no specific treatment (climatic therapy of neurodermatitis). Physiological changes at the surface of the skin brought about by, for example, temperature or the effects of solar radiation, may allow fungal, bacterial or viral infections to develop. Direct contact with the living environment on land or in the water, in particular in the tropics, can lead to the development of diseases. Some dermatoses have a lengthy latency and develop only later at home. Recommendations for general and specific prophylaxis and treatment are made. PMID:1544613

  9. Skin cancer chemoprevention by ?-santalol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-santalol, a naturally occurring terpenoid, has been shown to have chemopreventive effects on both 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O- tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin cancer development in CD-1 and SENCAR mice, and UVB-induced skin cancer developments in SKH-1 hairless mice in a concentration-dependent manner. Studies have demonstrated that ?-santalol could be effective against skin carcinogenesis through both induction of apoptosis via caspase activation together with dissipation of mitochondria membrane potential and cytochrome c release in A431 cells, and inhibition of cell growth via induction of G2/M phase arrest in both A431 cells and melanoma UACC-62 cells by altering multiple cell cycle regulatory proteins and complexes. This review summarizes the chemopreventive effects and molecular mechanisms of ?-santalol on skin cancer development in both animal models and skin cancer cell lines. PMID:21196411

  10. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  11. Usefulness of rat skin as a substitute for human skin in the in vitro skin permeation study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yoko; Terasaka, Shuichi; Sakurai, Takanobu; Furuya, Atsushi; Urano, Hidetoshi; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are broadly used in preclinical studies for drug development, so a lot of information for the rats can be obtained especially from pharmacokinetic, pharmacological and toxicological studies. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether SD rat skin can be used to predict human skin permeability. In vitro permeation studies of the three model drugs, nicorandil, isosorbide dinitrate, and flurbiprofen, through human skin and SD rat skin were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. The permeation rates of the three model drugs through human skin and SD rat skin were determined, and their variations were evaluated. The inter-individual variations in SD rat skin permeability of the three model drugs were much lower than that in human skin permeability, although the permeation rates of the three model drugs through the SD rat skin were about twice those through human skin. In addition, no difference in the skin permeability coefficients of the three model drugs was obtained between fresh SD rat skin and frozen SD rat skin. The markedly smaller variation in the permeability through SD rat skin compared with that through human skin indicated that in vitro permeation studies using SD rat skin would be especially useful for evaluating differences in the skin permeability of the three model drugs as well as for predicting human skin permeability. PMID:21791877

  12. Skin ultrastructure in senile lentigo.

    PubMed

    Noblesse, E; Nizard, C; Cario-André, M; Lepreux, S; Pain, C; Schnebert, S; Taïeb, A; Kurfurst, R

    2006-01-01

    Senile lentigo is a common component of photoaged skin. It is characterized by hyperpigmented macules which affect chronically irradiated skin mostly after the age of 50. This study was undertaken to assess the morphology of senile lentigo on the dorsum of the hands. A systematic comparison between lesional and perilesional skin using histology and transmission electron microscopy was done to determine whether melanocytes or keratinocytes are affected in the evolution of lesions and which tissue structure is modified. The histology study showed that lesional skin is characterized by a hyperpigmented basal layer and an elongation of the rete ridges, which seem to drive deeply into the dermis. The epidermis contained clusters of keratinocytes, which retained and accumulated the melanin pigment. Electron microscopy studies showed important modifications in the lesional skin ultrastructure in comparison with perilesional skin. In melanocytes from perilesional and lesional skin, we observed normal size melanosomes at all stages of maturation in the cytoplasm and in migration within dendrites. No pigment accumulation was observed. However, the morphology of melanocytes in lesional skin revealed an activated status with numerous mitochondria and a well-developed endoplasmic reticulum, which could reflect intense protein synthesis. In basal keratinocytes from lesional skin, we observed numerous melanosome complexes called polymelanosomes, which formed massive caps on the nuclei. Observations in colored semi-thin sections also revealed perturbed structures in the basal layer region, which could explain the skin perturbation. Indeed, we observed keratinocytes that presented important microinvaginations and pendulum melanocytes, which sank into the dermis, beneath the basal layer of keratinocytes. These cell modifications seemed to be due to a perturbation of the dermal-epidermal junction, which appeared disorganized and disrupted and could directly disturb the basal support of the cells. PMID:16685148

  13. The Usefulness of Leukosan SkinLink for Simple Facial Laceration Repair in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Jaehoon; Jung, Woonhyuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Repair of facial laceration in the emergency department can pose a number of difficulties. Children can be uncooperative, but adults can also be if they have sustained head trauma or are intoxicated. Leukosan SkinLink consists of topical adhesive and adhesive tape that can be applied easily to long or tense wounds. In this study, the authors compared conventional suturing with Leukosan SkinLink for facial laceration patients in the emergency department. Methods The prospective study was carried out from March 2013 to September 2013 with linear facial laceration patients visiting the emergency department. Exclusion criteria were open fractures, joint injuries, skin defects, hairy skin, and mucosa. The author used Leukosan SkinLink for skin closure in the experimental group and used conventional suturing in the control group. The scar evaluation using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) along with satisfaction scores, procedure times, and complications were compared. Results A total of 77 patients (30 in the control group and 47 in the experimental group) participated and underwent follow-up for 6 months postoperatively. The scar assessment using the POSAS and the satisfaction score in both groups were similar. The average procedure time in the experimental group was shorter. In the control group, there were four cases of wound dehiscence, two of infection, and one of skin necrosis, whereas four cases of wound dehiscence and one allergic reaction occurred in the experimental group. Conclusions With a simple application technique, Leukosan SkinLink is a new effective method for facial laceration repair especially useful for children and uncooperative adults. PMID:26217563

  14. Phosphatidylcholine liposomes as carriers to improve topical ascorbic acid treatment of skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Gabriel; Almudéver, Patricia; Serrano, Juan-Manuel; Milara, Javier; Torrens, Ana; Expósito, Inmaculada; Cortijo, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes have been intensively investigated as carriers for different applications in dermatology and cosmetics. Ascorbic acid has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties preventing photodamage of keratinocytes; however, due to its instability and low skin penetration, an appropriate carrier is mandatory to obtain desirable efficacy. The present work investigates the ability of a specific ascorbate phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposome to overcome the barrier of the stratum corneum and deliver the active agent into the dermis to prevent photodamage. Abdominal skin from ten patients was used. Penetration of PC liposomes was tested ex vivo in whole skin, epidermis, and dermis by means of fluorescein and sodium ascorbate. Histology and Franz diffusion cells were used to monitor the percutaneous absorption. Ultraviolet (UV)-high performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze diffusion of sodium ascorbate through the different skin layers, while spectrofluorimetry and fluorescent microscopy were used for fluorescein monitoring. UVA/UVB irradiation of whole skin was applied to analyze the antioxidant capacity by Trolox assay and anti-inflammatory effects by tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta enzyme-linked immunoassay. PC liposomal formulation improved skin penetration of fluorescein and ascorbate. Fluorescein PC liposomes showed better diffusion through epidermis than dermis while ascorbate liposomes showed better diffusion through the dermis than the epidermis. Ascorbate PC liposomes showed preventive antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties on whole human skin irradiated with UVA/UVB. In summary, ascorbate PC liposomes penetrate through the epidermis and allow nonstable hydrophilic active ingredients reach epidermis and dermis preventing skin photodamage. PMID:26719718

  15. Capturing skin properties from dynamic mechanical analyses

    E-print Network

    Sandford, Erika J. (Erika Jaye)

    2012-01-01

    Existing skin mechanical testing devices focus on measuring skin elasticity and are not tailored to assess the dynamic behavior of skin. The mathematical techniques used to analyze data collected using these devices are ...

  16. Laser speckle and skin cancer: skin roughness assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Incidence of skin cancer has been increasing rapidly since the last few decades. Non-invasive optical diagnostic tools may improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, skin structure, skin cancer statistics and subtypes of skin cancer are briefly reviewed. Among the subtypes, malignant melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous; early detection dramatically improves the prognosis. Therefore, a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant melanoma is especially needed. In addition, in order for the diagnostic tool to be useful, it must be able to differentiate melanoma from common skin conditions such as seborrheic keratosis, a benign skin disease that resembles melanoma according to the well known clinical-assessment ABCD rule. The key diagnostic feature between these two diseases is surface roughness. Based on laser speckle contrast, our research team has recently developed a portable, optical, non-invasive, in-vivo diagnostic device for quantifying skin surface roughness. The methodology of our technique is described in details. Examining the preliminary data collected in a pilot clinical study for the prototype, we found that there was a difference in roughness between melanoma and seborrheic keratosis. In fact, there was a perfect cutoff value for the two diseases based on our initial data.

  17. Humoral Sleep Regulation; Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Kathryn A.; Krueger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Two substances, the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL1?) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?), known for their many physiological roles, for example, cognition, synaptic plasticity, and immune function, are also well characterized in their actions of sleep regulation. These substances promote non-rapid eye movement sleep and can induce symptoms associated with sleep loss such as sleepiness, fatigue, and poor cognition. IL1? and TNF? are released from glia in response to extracellular ATP. They bind to their receptors on neurons resulting in neuromodulator and neurotransmitter receptor up/downregulation (e.g., adenosine and glutamate receptors) leading to altered neuronal excitability and function, that is, a state change in the local network. Synchronization of state between local networks leads to emergent whole brain oscillations, such as sleep/wake cycles. PMID:22640617

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  19. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor-ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor-ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  20. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head: Are Any Genes Involved?

    PubMed Central

    Pouya, Farzaneh; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2015-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a pathologic process that results from interruption of blood supply to the femur bone resulting in the death of bone cells and collapse of the femoral head. Nontraumatic ANFH continues to be a significant challenge to orthopedic surgeons. While the exact mechanisms remain elusive, many new insights have emerged from research in the last decade that has given us a clearer picture of the pathogenesis of nontraumatic ANFH. Progression to the end stage of ANFH appears to be related to five main mechanisms: hypercoagulable conditions, angiogenesis suppressions, hyperadipogenesis, heritable states, and switching the bone remodelling into bone resorption. Researchers have been examining the pathogenic mechanisms of ANFH but none of these theories have been firmly confirmed although some appear more plausible than the others. All of these factors can switch bone remodelling into bone resorption, which can further lead to ANFH progression ending up to femoral head collapse. PMID:26213697

  1. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  2. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  3. Progressive outer retinal necrosis in immunocompromised kidney allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Turno-Kr?cicka, A; Boraty?ska, M; Tomczyk-Socha, M; Mazanowska, O

    2015-06-01

    Ocular complications in patients who underwent renal transplantation are attributed to side effects of the immunosuppressive regimen. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy and it occurs almost exclusively in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We present a case of a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient who underwent renal transplant and, after a few years, developed bilateral PORN associated with viral infections. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) and BK virus were identified by polymerase chain reaction from the vitreous fluid. It is unclear which of the viruses identified had the dominant role in the pathogenesis of PORN and other organ damage, or whether their actions were synergistic. Adequate antiviral immune surveillance, as well as pre-transplant vaccination against VZV, may reduce the incidence of VZV infection and its complications. PMID:25846017

  4. Progressive outer retinal necrosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, K; Inoue, M; Ishida, S; Kawashima, S; Wakabayashi, T; Suzuki, S; Katsura, H

    2001-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome (PORN) is a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy and the majority of the described cases were related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We present a patient who is HIV negative with nephrotic syndrome and prednisolone use for 4 months who showed clinical features of PORN. Low CD4 counts and lymphocytopenia suggested immunosuppression. In the left eye, tractional retinal detachment at the posterior pole followed by incomplete posterior vitreous detachment developed. In addition to intravenous administration of acyclovir, vitreous surgeries including stripping of the posterior hyaloid and silicone-oil tamponade were successfully performed to repair the retinal detachment in the left eye and to prevent it in the right eye. PMID:11195746

  5. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-? therapy in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Sobrin, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Since the first reported use in 2001 of an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) agent, infliximab, for the treatment of uveitis, several new anti-TNF-? agents have emerged for the treatment of refractory noninfectious uveitides, although their use remains off-label in the US. These agents have demonstrated remarkable clinical antiinflammatory efficacy and a potential immunoregulatory role in selected uveitis patients, but it is currently unclear whether they can modify the natural history of disease. We review the rationale and clinical indications for this therapy, the differences between agents, how to manage dosing and intervals, and how to screen for and identify potential side effects. We also present a summary of the science behind the use of anti-TNF-? agents in ocular inflammation and the evidence for their efficacy. PMID:26164735

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor treatment for sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; López-Pérez, Lourdes; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disease of unknown etiology, characterized by noncaseating granulomatous infiltration of virtually any organ system. Treatment is often undertaken in an attempt to resolve symptoms or prevent progression to organ failure. Previous studies have suggested a prominent role for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) in the inflammatory process seen in sarcoidosis. TNF-? and interleukin-1 are released by alveolar macrophages in patients with active lung disease. Corticosteroids have proved to be efficacious in the treatment of sarcoidosis, possibly by suppressing the production of TNF-? and other cytokines. Three agents are currently available as specific TNF antagonists: etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab. Although data from noncomparative trials suggest that all three have comparable therapeutic effects in rheumatoid arthritis, their effects in a granulomatous disease such as sarcoidosis are less consistent. In this review, current data on the effectiveness are summarized. PMID:19337437

  7. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head: Are Any Genes Involved?

    PubMed

    Pouya, Farzaneh; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2015-07-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a pathologic process that results from interruption of blood supply to the femur bone resulting in the death of bone cells and collapse of the femoral head. Nontraumatic ANFH continues to be a significant challenge to orthopedic surgeons. While the exact mechanisms remain elusive, many new insights have emerged from research in the last decade that has given us a clearer picture of the pathogenesis of nontraumatic ANFH. Progression to the end stage of ANFH appears to be related to five main mechanisms: hypercoagulable conditions, angiogenesis suppressions, hyperadipogenesis, heritable states, and switching the bone remodelling into bone resorption. Researchers have been examining the pathogenic mechanisms of ANFH but none of these theories have been firmly confirmed although some appear more plausible than the others. All of these factors can switch bone remodelling into bone resorption, which can further lead to ANFH progression ending up to femoral head collapse. PMID:26213697

  8. Age-related skin changes.

    PubMed

    Levakov, Aleksandra; Vuckovi?, Nada; Dolai, Matilda; Ka?anski, Mihaela Mocko; Bozani?, Snezana

    2012-01-01

    Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity. PMID:22730701

  9. Fibrin depletion decreases inflammation and delays the onset of demyelination in a tumor necrosis factor

    E-print Network

    Fibrin depletion decreases inflammation and delays the onset of demyelination in a tumor necrosis) In multiple sclerosis, in which brain tissue becomes permeable to blood proteins, extravascular fibrin of fibrin in neuroinflammatory demyelination, we de- pleted fibrin in two tumor necrosis factor transgenic

  10. Solution Structure of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Death Domain

    E-print Network

    Powers, Robert

    Solution Structure of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Death Domain Steven F. Sukits1 , Lih 02140, USA Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 death domain (TNFR-1 DD) is the intra- cellular functional members of the death domain superfamily. The secondary structure and three- dimensional structure of R347K

  11. p53 activity contributes to defective interfollicular epidermal differentiation, in hyperproliferative murine skin

    E-print Network

    Cottle, Denny L.; Kretzschmar, Kai; Gollnick, Harald P.; Quist, Sven R.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF?) and Interleukin-17 (IL-17) have shown therapeutic efficacy, although relapse can occur1. While there is no definitive mouse model for psoriasis, some do present with abnormal skin phenotypes that have revealed... 1476, IF 1:50; rabbit anti mouse-Keratin 6 (K6) Covance, NJ USA, catalogue PRB-169P, IHC 1:250, IF 1:500; rabbit anti mouse-Keratin 10 (K10) Covance, NJ USA, catalogue PRB-159P, IF 1:500; mouse anti-Keratin 14 (K14) in house Clone LL002 IF 1...

  12. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bend your elbows. Look carefully at your fingernails, palms, forearms (including the undersides), and upper arms . Check ... new flesh-colored firm bump Write down the dates of your skin self-exams and make notes ...

  13. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  14. Skin and fascia staple closure.

    PubMed

    Waldron, D R

    1994-03-01

    Skin stapling is the fastest method of closure for long skin incisions. In addition, clean-contaminated wounds closed by staples have a greater resistance to infections than wounds closed with suture. It is important to realize that staples are a particular modality of suturing live tissues and if used properly they add speed and precision to wound closure. Many skin staplers are available to the veterinary surgeon and most perform satisfactorily. Stapling may be economically feasible when the reduced cost of surgical time and anesthesia is considered. PMID:8197678

  15. [Smoking and the skin].

    PubMed

    Just-Sarobé, M

    2008-04-01

    Smoking is the main modifiable cause of disease and death in the developed world. Tobacco consumption is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, chronic bronchitis, and many malignant diseases. Tobacco also has many cutaneous effects, most of which are harmful. Smoking is closely associated with several dermatologic diseases such as psoriasis, pustulosis palmoplantaris, hidrosadenitis suppurativa, and systemic and discoid lupus erythematosus, as well as cancers such as those of the lip, oral cavity, and anogenital region. A more debatable relationship exists with melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma, and acne. In contrast, smoking seems to protect against mouth sores, rosacea, labial herpes simplex, pemphigus vulgaris, and dermatitis herpetiformis. In addition to the influence of smoking on dermatologic diseases, tobacco consumption is also directly responsible for certain dermatoses such as nicotine stomatitis, black hairy tongue, periodontal disease, and some types of urticaria and contact dermatitis. Furthermore, we should not forget that smoking has cosmetic repercussions such as yellow fingers and fingernails, changes in tooth color, taste and smell disorders, halitosis and hypersalivation, and early development of facial wrinkles. PMID:18358192

  16. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  17. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    PubMed Central

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Nazemi, Berouz; Choe, Chun Sik; Darvin, Maxim E; Hadam, Sabrina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Loza, Kateryna; Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica) versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide) or antiseptics (silver). Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles. PMID:25551064

  18. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  19. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  20. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  1. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  2. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  3. Skin Diseases and the Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Marjorie

    1970-01-01

    Discusses such concerns as acne, syphilis, drug abuse, and tatoos. Indicates need for physician not only to treat skin diseases but to help adolescents to accept themselves and find constructive directions. (CJ)

  4. Intertrigo and secondary skin infections.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Kinney, Bruce S

    2014-04-01

    Intertrigo is a superficial inflammatory dermatitis occurring on two closely opposed skin surfaces as a result of moisture, friction, and lack of ventilation. Bodily secretions, including perspiration, urine, and feces, often exacerbate skin inflammation. Physical examination of skin folds reveals regions of erythema with peripheral scaling. Excessive friction and inflammation can cause skin breakdown and create an entry point for secondary fungal and bacterial infections, such as Candida, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. Candidal intertrigo is commonly diagnosed clinically, based on the characteristic appearance of satellite lesions. Diagnosis may be confirmed using a potassium hydroxide preparation. Resistant cases require oral fluconazole therapy. Bacterial superinfections may be identified with bacterial culture or Wood lamp examination. Fungal lesions are treated with topical nystatin, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, oxiconazole, or econazole. Secondary streptococcal infections are treated with topical mupirocin or oral penicillin. Corynebacterium infections are treated with oral erythromycin. PMID:24695603

  5. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma . Basal cells : Round cells under the squamous cells. ... in the United States. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are also called nonmelanoma skin cancer and are ...

  6. Sun Safety: Save Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... member who's had skin cancer If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care ... from National Institutes of Health's National Library of Medicine Sunscreen More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's ...

  7. Tips for Relieving Dry Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rather than hot water Wash with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser Apply enough cleanser to remove dirt ... Deodorant soaps Skin care products that contain alcohol, fragrance, retinoids, or alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA) Avoiding these ...

  8. [Atraumatic skin closure with Fasterzip].

    PubMed

    Carcoforo, P; Sortini, A; Navarra, G; Occhionorelli, S; Sartori, A; Pozza, E

    1996-01-01

    The Authors report their experience of skin closure using a new device, a surgical "zipper", without applying any sort of sutures. The application of this device, the functional and aesthetic advantages and the results obtained are described. PMID:8679416

  9. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  10. Common Skin Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Taradash, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Six common pediatric skin problems are discussed through the use of case histories. Problems of differential diagnosis are outlined, and the various steps and pitfalls in therapy itemized. PMID:21308018

  11. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. TRP channels in the skin.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöll?si, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as 'polymodal cellular sensors' on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24372189

  13. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  14. Protective Skins for Composite Airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.; Boone, Richard L.; Jones, Shannon; Pendse, Vandana; Hayward, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Traditional composite aircraft structures are designed for load bearing and then overdesigned for impact damage and hot humid environments. Seeking revolutionary improvement in the performance and weight of composite structures, Cessna Aircraft Company, with sponsorship from the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program/Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, has developed and tested a protective skin concept which would allow the primary composite structure to carry only load and would meet the impact, hot and humid, and other requirements through protective skins. A key requirement for the protective skins is to make any impact damage requiring repair visible. Testing from the first generation of skins helped identify the most promising materials which were used in a second generation of test articles. This report summarizes lessons learned from the first generation of protective skins, the design and construction of the second-generation test articles, test results from the second generation for impact, electromagnetic effects, aesthetics and smoothing, thermal, and acoustic (for the first time), and an assessment of the feasibility of the protective skin concept.

  15. Scaly-skinned Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The style of erosion along the highlands-lowlands boundary of southern Elysium Planitia has produced a strange pattern of troughs that look like the skin of a reptile. In reality, a very clear process of landscape degradation is evident in this image. Some process has produced polygon-shaped troughs that create zones of weakness in the uppermost crust. It is likely that wind-blown particles deepen and widen the troughs, producing isolated knobs and mesas. Ultimately, the erosional reworking of the landscape is so complete that all signs of the upper layer are removed, leaving the smooth lowland surface to the north.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. The stereoscan observations of the skin of catfish, Saccobranchus fossilis, following chromium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Tripathi, D.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The surface morphology of the skin of air-breathing catfish, Saccobranchus fossilis (Bloch) was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in both fish exposed for seven days to 5.6 mg/L chromium in water and unexposed fish. In the control fish, the epidermis have several hexa or polygonal mucous goblet cells which are uniform in shape and size, and microvilli-like structures are present in the mucous cells. An SEM study of the Cr-exposed epidermis revealed an increased number of active mucous cells having a dilated flask or cylindrical shape; they had lost their hexa or polygonal shape. Chromium exposure also caused focal necrosis and hypersecretion in these cells. The accumulation of excess mucus suggests a molecular interaction between mucus glycoprotein and toxic chromium ions. Such changes may result in osmoregulation failure and a loss resistance by the skin surface to a wide variety of fish pathogens.

  17. Electron microscopic study on black pig skin irradiated with pulsed dye laser (504 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yukio; Tan, Oon T.; Kurban, Amal K.; Tsukada, Sadao

    1991-06-01

    Selective damage of epidermal pigment cells induced by 504 nm pulsed dye laser at different pulse durations and fluence on black pig skin was examined electron microscopically. Epidermal melanosomes were satisfactorily disrupted at shorter pulse duration (100 ns). Epidermal blister formation and necrosis were seen at 2 days postirradiation, and reepithelization was evident at 7 days postirradiation in all specimens. Repigmentation was evident 21 to 56 days after irradiation. Histological pigmentary incontinence was evident at 2 days and persisted until 56 days postirradiation. This phenomenon was observed more frequently in skin exposed to longer pulse duration and at low fluences. Optimal parameters required to induce epidermal melanosome disruption using the 504 nm pulsed dye laser will be discussed.

  18. T-helper 22 cells as a new player in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Simhag, Anita; El Rouby, Nadia M M; Azizi, Gholamreza

    2015-08-01

    T-helper 22 (Th22) cell is a new subset of CD4+ T cells that secrets interleukin (IL)-22 but not IL-17 or interferon-?. Th22 is distinct from Th17 and other known CD4+ T-cell subsets with distinguished gene expression and function. Th22 subsets have chemokine receptors CCR6+ CCR4+ CCR10+ phenotype and aryl hydrocarbon receptor as the key transcription factor. This T-helper subset, by producing cytokines such as IL-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-?, is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorder. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. PMID:26183243

  19. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  3. Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum

    E-print Network

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    Modeling skin permeation revisited Gabriel Wittum Computing diffusion through human skin is usually diffusion through human skin using two and three dimensional models. First computations for this problem were made a decade ago, yielding new insight into permeation pathways through human skin, which were

  4. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like device intended to be used to write on the patient's skin, e.g., to outline...

  8. Methods to Differentiate Radiation Necrosis and Recurrent Disease in Gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewell, Lars

    2007-03-01

    Given the difficulty in differentiating Radiation Induced Necrosis (RIN) and recurrent disease in glioma patients using conventional techniques (CT scans, MRI scans), researchers have looked for different imaging modalities. Among these different modalities are Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DWMRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). In DWMRI, an Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) is calculated for a Region Of Interest (ROI), and then monitored over time (longitudinally). In the brain, different anatomical features can complicate the interpretation of ADCs. In particular, the density and spatial variation of the cerebral spinal fluid filled fissures known as sulci can influence how a change in an ADC is explained. We have used the covariance of pixel intensity in T1 weighted MRI scans to study how intra-patient and inter-patient sulci density varies, and will present these results. MRS uses the shift in the MR signal due to the local chemical environment to determine the concentration of brain metabolites like choline and creatin. The ratio of metabolites such as these has been shown to have the power to discriminate between RIN and recurrent disease in glioma patients. At our institution, we have initiated a protocol whereby we will use DWMRI and MRS to study how best to utilize these complimentary forms of imaging.

  9. [Lens epithelium necrosis factor for prevention lens opacity].

    PubMed

    Hunold, W; Wirtz, M; Kreiner, C; Greite, J H; Kaden, P

    1991-01-01

    Posterior capsule opacification is a common postoperative complication after extracapsular cataract extraction and lens implantation. If the patient's visual acuity is reduced markedly, a capsulotomy with a Nd-YAG laser may become necessary. Various attempts have been made with the aim of developing an injectable solution capable of damaging the epithelial cells of the capsule bag irreversibly and thereby avoiding posterior capsule opacification. This solution should be applied for a short time during the operation. In tissue culture we tested the influence of two injectable solutions [lens epithelial necrosis factor (LENF)] and aqua bidest. on cellular growth. Balanced salt solution served as control. We used human epithelial carcinoma cells, type HEp-2. The results were evaluated by vital staining (ethidium bromide and acridin orange), hemotoxylin staining, autoradiography and measurement of protein and DNA synthesis. The results showed that LENF is capable of damaging 100% of the epithelial cells irreversibly if it is applied for 20 s or longer. The influence of each of these solutions was tested on 20 human capsular flaps, which were excised during the operation. The flaps were immersed for 30 s in the different solutions. Vital staining of these flaps led to the following results: LENF causes a 100% cell damage of all epithelial cells of the capsular flaps. No vital cells remained. On the other hand Aqua bidest. cannot guarantee 100% cell damage of the capsular flap epithelia. Sixty percent of the capsular flaps treated with aqua bidest, showed differing amounts of remaining vital cells. PMID:1786927

  10. Immunomagnetic reduction assay for nervous necrosis virus extracted from groupers.

    PubMed

    Lu, M W; Yang, S Y; Horng, H E; Yang, C C; Chieh, J J; Hong, Y W; Hong, C Y; Yang, H C; Wu, J L

    2012-04-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is the cause of viral nervous disease, which is a serious constraint on production for grouper aquaculture. Real-time PCR is commonly used to detect and quantify NNV, has the disadvantages of being expensive and technically demanding. In this study, an immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay was developed as a rapid and cost-effective alternative to real-time PCR. This method used magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies specific for viral surface antigens to detect NNV in grouper tissue samples. The association of NNV with the antibody-conjugated magnetic particles resulted in a reduction in magnetic signal, which was strongly correlated with the concentration of NNV, as determined by real-time PCR. Grouper larvae were prepared for testing using a viral extraction buffer which provided a rapid, 15-min method of extracting viral antigens and had an extraction efficiency of higher than 80%. In addition, this study proposes using magnetic nanoparticles as labeling markers and as an assaying reagent for NNV. The magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with antibodies against the viral surface of NNV and are able to associate specifically with NNV. The reduction of the magnetic signals comes from the association between magnetic particles and NNV, and relates to the concentration of NNV. The results show that the detected concentrations of NNV are highly correlated to those detected by real-time PCR. PMID:22335935

  11. Vaccinia Virus Induces Programmed Necrosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Balkwill, Frances R; Öberg, Daniel; McNeish, Iain A

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which oncolytic vaccinia virus induces tumor cell death are poorly understood. We have evaluated cell death pathways following infection of ovarian cancer cells with both wild-type and thymidine kinase-deleted (dTK) Lister strain vaccinia. We show that death does not rely upon classical apoptosis despite the appearances of some limited apoptotic features, including phosphatidylserine externalization and appearance of sub-G1 DNA populations. Vaccinia infection induces marked lipidation of LC3 proteins, but there is no general activation of the autophagic process and cell death does not rely upon autophagy induction. We show that vaccinia induces necrotic morphology on transmission electron microscopy, accompanied by marked by reductions in intracellular adenosine triphosphate, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. This necrotic cell death appears regulated, as infection induces formation of a receptor interacting protein (RIP1)/caspase-8 complex. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of both RIP1 and substrates downstream of RIP1, including MLKL, significantly attenuate cell death. Blockade of TNF-?, however, does not alter virus efficacy, suggesting that necrosis does not result from autocrine cytokine release. Overall, these results show that, in ovarian cancer cells, vaccinia virus causes necrotic cell death that is mediated through a programmed series of events. PMID:23985697

  12. Macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor-? mediates diabetic renal injury.

    PubMed

    Awad, Alaa S; You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Cooper, Timothy K; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Vacher, Jean; Wilkinson, Patrick F; Farrell, Francis X; Brian Reeves, W

    2015-10-01

    Monocyte/macrophage recruitment correlates strongly with the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) is produced by monocytes/macrophages but the direct role of TNF-? and/or macrophage-derived TNF-? in the progression of diabetic nephropathy remains unclear. Here we tested whether inhibition of TNF-? confers kidney protection in diabetic nephropathy via a macrophage-derived TNF-?-dependent pathway. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, blockade of TNF-? with a murine anti-TNF-? antibody conferred kidney protection in Ins2(Akita) mice as indicated by reductions in albuminuria, plasma creatinine, histopathologic changes, kidney macrophage recruitment, and plasma inflammatory cytokine levels at 18 weeks of age. To assess the direct role of macrophage-derived TNF-? in diabetic nephropathy, we generated macrophage-specific TNF-?-deficient mice (CD11b(Cre)/TNF-?(Flox/Flox)). Conditional ablation of TNF-? in macrophages significantly reduced albuminuria, the increase in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen, histopathologic changes, and kidney macrophage recruitment compared to diabetic TNF-?(Flox/Flox) control mice after 12 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thus, production of TNF-? by macrophages plays a major role in diabetic renal injury. Hence, blocking TNF-? could be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26061548

  13. Identification of phylogenetic footprints in primate tumor necrosis factor-? promoters

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jessica Y.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Uglialoro, Adele M.; Flores-Villanueva, Pedro O.; Sorkin, Barbara C.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) gene encodes a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in basic immunologic processes. To investigate the TNF-? regulatory region in the primate lineage, we isolated TNF-? promoters from representative great apes, Old World monkeys, and New World monkeys. We demonstrate that there is a nonuniform distribution of fixed human differences in the TNF-? promoter. We define a “fixed human difference” as a site that is not polymorphic in humans, but which differs in at least one of the seven primate sequences examined. Furthermore, we identify two human TNF-? promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms that are putative ancestral polymorphisms, because each of the human polymorphic nucleotides was found at the identical site in at least one of the other primate sequences. Strikingly, the largest conserved region among the primate species, a 69-nt “phylogenetic footprint,” corresponds to a region of the human TNF-? promoter that forms the transcriptionally active nucleoprotein–DNA complex, essential for gene regulation. By contrast, other regions of the TNF-? promoter, which exhibit a high density of variable sites, are nonessential for gene expression, indicating that distinct TNF-? promoter regions have been subjected to different evolutionary constraints depending on their function. TNF-? is the first case in which a promoter region dissected by functional analyses can be correlated with nucleotide polymorphism and variability in primate lineages. The results suggest that patterns of polymorphism and divergence are likely to be useful in identifying candidate regions important for gene regulation in other immune-response genes. PMID:10841560

  14. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: clinical utility in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R

    2015-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production is amplified in several autoimmune disorders. In the 1990s, it became a validated therapeutic target used for the treatment of conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Biologic drugs targeting TNF include engineered monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. Currently, there are 5 Food and Drug Administration-approved TNF inhibitors (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab, and golimumab), representing close to $20 billion in sales. Clinical trials remain open to test their efficacy and safety compared with one another, as well as to measure clinical outcomes in different conditions and patient populations. The industry is also eager to develop biotherapeutics that are similar but cheaper than the currently existing biologics or are safer with higher efficacy; these are the so-called "biosimilars." Clinical utility of TNF inhibitors and indications of mono- or combined therapy with immunomodulators are reviewed here. Pharmacokinetics of the TNF inhibitors is affected by routes of administration, clearance mechanisms of immunoglobulins, and immunogenicity. Finally, strategies for management of treatment efficacy and increasing evidence for monitoring of serum concentration of TNF inhibitors are discussed, assessing for the presence of the antidrug antibodies and the different analytical methods available for laboratory testing. As clinical applications of the TNF inhibitors expand, and other classes join the revolution in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders, therapeutic drug monitoring of biologics will become increasingly important, with the potential to dramatically improve patient care and management. PMID:25305470

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-? antagonists: Side effects and their management.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Sunil; Khullar, Geeti

    2013-07-01

    As elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) are associated with disease severity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, TNF-? antagonists are being used to treat moderate to severe disease in patients who have contraindications, fail to respond or develop side effects to conventional systemic therapies. It is of utmost importance to be well versed with the possible adverse effects and contraindications of TNF-? antagonists so that they can be used effectively and safely. Many of their adverse effects have been well studied in patients of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may not be completely applicable in psoriasis. This is because patients with RA and IBD are on multiple immunosuppressants while those with psoriasis are mostly receiving single systemic therapy and often have comorbidities that distinguish them from those with RA or IBD. Also, some of the side effects are still controversial and debated. Long-term prospective randomized controlled studies are needed to better understand the associated risk in patients of psoriasis. Baseline screening and periodic monitoring during treatment can reduce and help in early identification and appropriate management of the adverse outcomes. This article reviews the side effects known to be associated with TNF-? antagonists, their pathomechanisms and management guidelines. Some of the common side effects include infusion and injection site reactions, infections particularly reactivation of tuberculosis, autoantibody formation and drug induced lupus erythematosus, liver function abnormalities, hematological, and solid organ malignancies. PMID:23974693

  16. Distribution of endogenous tumour necrosis factor alpha in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Maruno, M; Kovach, J S; Kelly, P J; Yanagihara, T

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the distribution and cellular origin of endogenous tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) in the cellular components of human gliomas. METHODS: Frozen sections of 26 gliomas (four astrocytomas (As); two oligoastrocytomas (OA); one ansplastic astrocytoma (AA); one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA); 18 glioblastomas (GB)) were examined immunohistochemically using antihuman TNF alpha and anti-Leu-M5 (CD11c) antibodies. Additional studies with double immunohistocchemical procedures were performed with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein and anti-neurofilament antibodies. RESULTS: Eighty per cent of the AA, AOA, and GB (16 of 20) had a positive reaction for TNF alpha, but only 17% of As and OA (one of six) were positive. Positive cells were seen in both the tumour tissue and adjacent brain tissues. TNF alpha protein was detected not only in the tumour cells but also in the endothelium of tumour vessels as well as reactive astrocytes and neurons. CONCLUSIONS: Endogenous TNF alpha is present in cells of various origins in glial tumours including tumour vessels; however, the role of TNF alpha may be different in different types of cells or altered microenvironment. Images PMID:9306934

  17. Azacytidine induces necrosis of multiple myeloma cells through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tian, Enbing; Tang, Haiping; Xu, Renhua; Liu, Chongdong; Deng, Haiteng; Wang, Qingtao

    2013-01-01

    Azacytidine is an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase and is known to be an anti-leukemic agent to induce cancer cell apoptosis. In the present study, multiple myeloma cells were treated with azacytidine at clinically relevant concentrations to induce necrosis through oxidative stress. Necrotic myeloma cells exhibit unique characteristics, including enrichment of the cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549, and Hoc1a. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 is the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial specific chaperone, and azacytidine-induced overexpression of HSP60 is confirmed by western blot analysis. In contrast, expression levels of cytosolic chaperones such as HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in azacytidine-treated myeloma cells, concomitant with an increase of these chaperones in the cell culture medium, suggesting that mitochondrial chaperones and cytosolic chaperones behave differently in necrotic myeloma cells; ER- and mitochondrial-chaperones being retained, and cytosolic chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. Our data suggest that HSP60 is potentially a new target for multiple myeloma chemotherapy. PMID:23764212

  18. Tumour necrosis factor-? inhibition can stabilize disease in progressive vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Webb, K C; Tung, R; Winterfield, L S; Gottlieb, A B; Eby, J M; Henning, S W; Le Poole, I C

    2015-09-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-?, a proinflammatory cytokine central to many autoimmune diseases, has been implicated in the depigmentation process in vitiligo. We review its role in vitiligo by exploring its pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and examine the effects of blocking its actions with TNF-? antagonist therapeutics in reports available in the literature. We found that TNF-? inhibition halts disease progression in patients with progressive vitiligo but that, paradoxically, treatment can be associated with de novo vitiligo development in some patients when used for other autoimmune conditions, particularly when using adalimumab and infliximab. These studies reinforce the importance of stating appropriate outcomes measures, as most pilot trials propose to measure repigmentation, whereas halting depigmentation is commonly overlooked as a measure of success. We conclude that TNF-? inhibition has proven useful for patients with progressive vitiligo, where TNF-? inhibition is able to quash cytotoxic T-cell-mediated melanocyte destruction. However, a lingering concern for initiating de novo disease will likely prevent more widespread application of TNF inhibitors to treat vitiligo. PMID:26149498

  19. Bevacizumab as Therapy for Radiation Necrosis in Four Children With Pontine Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K.; Macy, Margaret E.; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pontine gliomas are a pediatric brain tumor that is fatal in nearly all patients. Given the poor prognosis for patients with this tumor, their quality of life is very important. Radiation therapy provides some palliation, but can result in radiation necrosis and associated neurologic decline. The typical treatment for this necrosis is steroid therapy. Although the steroids are effective, they have numerous side effects that can often significantly compromise quality of life. Bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, has been suggested as a treatment for radiation necrosis. We report on our initial experience with bevacizumab therapy for radiation necrosis in pediatric pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods: Four children with pontine gliomas treated at the Children's Hospital in Denver and the University of Colorado Denver developed evidence of radiation necrosis both clinically and on imaging. Those 4 children then received bevacizumab as a treatment for the radiation necrosis. We reviewed the clinical outcome and imaging findings. Results: After bevacizumab therapy, 3 children had significant clinical improvement and were able to discontinue steroid use. One child continued to decline, and, in retrospect, had disease progression, not radiation necrosis. In all cases, bevacizumab was well tolerated. Conclusions: In children with pontine gliomas, bevacizumab may provide both therapeutic benefit and diagnostic information. More formal evaluation of bevacizumab in these children is needed.

  20. Skin Transcriptome Profiles Associated with Skin Color in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqin; Liu, Fuzhu; Cao, Junting; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional and medicinal benefits have been attributed to the consumption of tissues from the black-boned chickens in oriental countries. Lueyang black-boned chicken is one of the native chicken breeds. However, some birds may instead have white or lighter skin, which directly causes economic losses every year. Previous studies of pigmentation have focused on a number of genes that may play important roles in coat color regulation. Illumina2000 sequencing technology was used to catalog the global gene expression profiles in the skin of the Lueyang chicken with white versus black skin. A total of 18,608 unigenes were assembled from the reads obtained from the skin of the white and black chickens. A total of 649 known genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, with 314 genes that were up regulated and 335 genes that were down-regulated, and a total of 162 novel genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, consisting of 73 genes that were up-regulated (including 4 highly expressed genes that were expressed exclusively in the skin of the black chickens) and 89 genes that were down-regulated. There were also a total of 8 known coat-color genes expressed in previous studies (ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R). In this study, 4 of which showed greater expression in the black chickens, and several were up-regulated, such as KIT, ASIP, TYR and OCA2. To our surprise, KITLG, MITF and MC1R showed no significant difference in expression between the black- and white-skinned chickens, and the expression of TYRP1 was not detected in either skin color. The expression of ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R was validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the results of the qPCR were consistent with the RNA-seq. This study provides several candidate genes that may be associated with the development of black versus white skin. More importantly, the fact that the MC1R gene showed no significant difference in expression between the black and white chickens is of particular interest for future studies that aim to elucidate its functional role in the regulation of skin color. PMID:26030885

  1. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  2. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  3. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  4. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  5. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste...sewed together and utilized as dressed fur shall not be subject to the...

  6. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development. PMID:25594039

  7. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development. PMID:25594039

  8. Removing bonded skin from a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    Metal skin is peeled off like sardine-can cover with key. Method is useful in removing bonded skins from any substrate where substrate is strong enough not to buckle or tear when bonded skin is rolled free. Also, it is useful for removing sections of damaged skin where bladders of other equipment below substrate might be damaged if saw or router were used to cut completely through skin.

  9. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:24063883

  10. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  11. Skin Treatments and Dermatological Procedures to Promote Youthful Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sator, Paul G

    2006-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is the organ in which changes associated with aging are most visible. With increasing frequency, patients are requesting information and treatments that improve the appearance of their skin. Corresponding to this trend, there is an increasing number of products and methods available that claim to aid this pursuit. First, a change of the patient's lifestyle (eg, sun behavior, nicotine abuse, and nutrition) must take place. Only then may other methods be used. This article reflects on the following topics: topical retinoids, peels, botulinum neurotoxin, soft tissue fillers, lasers, topical and systemic endocrinological therapies, and phytohormones. A thorough knowledge of the properties (benefits, limitations, and complications) of the expanding array of possibilities for rejuvenation of the skin is essential for any physician treating patients with cosmetic complaints. PMID:18047257

  12. Photonic skin-depth engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2015-07-01

    Recently we proposed a paradigm shift in light confinement strategy showing how relaxed total internal reflection and photonic skin-depth engineering can lead to sub-diffraction waveguides without metal (S. Jahani and Z. Jacob, "Transparent sub-diffraction optics: nanoscale light confinement without metal," Optica 1, 96-100 (2014)). Here, we show that such extreme-skin-depth (e-skid) waveguides can counter-intuitively confine light better than the best-case all-dielectric design of high index silicon waveguides surrounded by vacuum. We also analytically establish that figures of merit related to light confinement in dielectric waveguides are fundamentally tied to the skin depth of waves in the cladding, a quantity surprisingly overlooked in dielectric photonics. We contrast the propagation characteristics of the fundamental mode of e-skid waveguides and conventional waveguides to show that the decay constant in the cladding is dramatically larger in e-skid waveguides, which is the origin of sub-diffraction confinement. We also propose an approach to verify the reduced photonic skin depth in experiment using the decrease in the Goos-Hanschen phase shift. Finally, we provide a generalization of our work using concepts of transformation optics where the photonic-skin depth engineering can be interpreted as a transformation on the momentum of evanescent waves.

  13. Malignant skin melanoma in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Materljan, Eris; Zamolo, Gordana; Petkovi?, Marija; Ivosevi?, Dejan; Popovi?, Branislava; Materljan, Mauro; Katunari?, Miljenko; Jurisi?, Davor

    2009-12-01

    Global heating and increased solar ultraviolet irradiance have caused an increase in number of many diseases, particularly skin malignant diseases. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of climate changes on the health of the population of the Primorsko-goranska and Istria Counties. We gathered and analyzed data about the frequency of skin malignant melanoma in the period of eight years (1998-2005). The data were collected from the Croatian cancer registry. The incidence of malignant skin cancer was estimated overall, by age group and gender. We found that the incidence of the skin melanoma was approximately the same in both counties during the period 1998-2005. However, significant increase has been noted when compared to the situation in the period 1977-1996 (p = 4.95 E-13) The incidence of malignant skin melanoma has risen during the last ten years. It is differently distributed between gender and age groups in Primorsko-goranska and Istria County. It can be related to climate changes, but also to different ways way of life between these two counties. PMID:20102094

  14. Melatonin and human skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Kleszczynski, Konrad; Fischer, Tobias W.

    2012-01-01

    Like the whole organism, skin follows the process of aging during life-time. Additional to internal factors, several environmental factors, such as solar radiation, considerably contribute to this process. While fundamental mechanisms regarding skin aging are known, new aspects of anti-aging agents such as melatonin are introduced. Melatonin is a hormone produced in the glandula pinealis that follows a circadian light-dependent rhythm of secretion. It has been experimentally implicated in skin functions such as hair cycling and fur pigmentation, and melatonin receptors are expressed in many skin cell types including normal and malignant keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts. It possesses a wide range of endocrine properties as well as strong antioxidative activity. Regarding UV-induced solar damage, melatonin distinctly counteracts massive generation of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial and DNA damage. Thus, there is considerable evidence for melatonin to be an effective anti-skin aging compound, and its various properties in this context are described in this review. PMID:23467217

  15. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  16. Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna; Aoki, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Research about the skin barrier and its properties has increased significantly since the 60s, with studies that indicated its resistance when isolated, as well as its particularities in relation to skin permeability. At the same time, description of Odland bodies helped to understand how stratum corneum stability is maintained. The âbrick and mortarâ model is the most accepted so far. In this analogy, the corneocytes are the bricks and the intercellular lipids are the mortar. Currently, there is concrete evidence that the stratum corneum is an active metabolic structure that holds adaptive functions, interacting dynamically with the underlying epidermal layers. The skin barrier also plays a role in the inflammatory response through melanocyte activation, angiogenesis, and fibroplasia. The intensity of this response will essentially depend on the severity of the injury. Skin barrier abnormalities in atopic dermatitis are clinically observed by the presence of dry skin, a common and significant symptom which constitutes a diagnostic and monitoring parameter. The stratum corneum hydration level and transepidermal water loss are associated with the level of damage to the barrier, representing biophysical parameters. These parameters help doctors monitor patients in a less invasive and more sensitive manner. PMID:20520934

  17. Hyperspectral imaging of bruised skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Baarstad, Ivar; Løke, Trond; Kaspersen, Peter; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-02-01

    Bruises can be important evidence in legal medicine, for example in cases of child abuse. Optical techniques can be used to discriminate and quantify the chromophores present in bruised skin, and thereby aid dating of an injury. However, spectroscopic techniques provide only average chromophore concentrations for the sampled volume, and contain little information about the spatial chromophore distribution in the bruise. Hyperspectral imaging combines the power of imaging and spectroscopy, and can provide both spectroscopic and spatial information. In this study a hyperspectral imaging system developed by Norsk Elektro Optikk AS was used to measure the temporal development of bruised skin in a human volunteer. The bruises were inflicted by paintball bullets. The wavelength ranges used were 400 - 1000 nm (VNIR) and 900 - 1700 nm (SWIR), and the spectral sampling intervals were 3.7 and 5 nm, respectively. Preliminary results show good spatial discrimination of the bruised areas compared to normal skin. Development of a white spot can be seen in the central zone of the bruises. This central white zone was found to resemble the shape of the object hitting the skin, and is believed to develop in areas where the impact caused vessel damage. These results show that hyperspectral imaging is a promising technique to evaluate the temporal and spatial development of bruises on human skin.

  18. Histopathological detection of entry and exit holes in human skin wounds caused by firearms.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marcus Vinícius; d'Ávila, Solange C G P; d'Ávila, Antônio Miguel M P

    2014-07-01

    The judiciary needs forensic medicine to determine the difference between an entry hole and an exit hole in human skin caused by firearms for civilian use. This important information would be most useful if a practical and accurate method could be done with low-cost and minimal technological resources. Both macroscopic and microscopic analyses were performed on skin lesions caused by firearm projectiles, to establish histological features of 14 entry holes and 14 exit holes. Microscopically, in the abrasion area macroscopically observed, there were signs of burns (sub-epidermal cracks and keratinocyte necrosis) in the entrance holes in all cases. These signs were not found in three exit holes which showed an abrasion collar, nor in other exit holes. Some other microscopic features not found in every case were limited either to entry holes, such as cotton fibres, grease deposits, or tattooing in the dermis, or to exit holes, such as adipose tissue, bone or muscle tissue in the dermis. Coagulative necrosis of keratinocytes and sub-epidermal cracks are characteristic of entry holes. Despite the small sample size, it can be safely inferred that this is an important microscopic finding, among others less consistently found, to define an entry hole in questionable cases. PMID:24931861

  19. Evaluation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Polymorphism Frequencies in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Abutorabi, Roshanak; Baradaran, Azar; Sadat Mostafavi, Fatemeh; Zarrin, Yasaman; Mardanian, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), is a pathogenic element for a number of disorders. Previous studies have reported that the -1031 T/C and -238 G/A polymorphisms in the promoter region of the TNF-? gene are important factors in reproductive-related disorders. One of the most common gynecological diseases of women during the reproductive years is endometriosis. This study aims to assess an association between the -1031 T/C, -238 G/A and -308 G/A polymorphisms of the TNF-? gene promoter region to endometriosis. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, we enrolled 65 endometriosis patients and 65 matched healthy control women by simple sampling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to analyze -1031 T/C, -238 G/A and -308 G/A polymorphisms in the TNF-? gene promoter region. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results We found a strong association between the -1031 T/C polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNF-? gene with endometriosis (P=0.001). There were no significant associations between the -238 G/A (P=0.243) and -308 G/A (P=1) polymorphisms with endometriosis and again endometriosis stages have no association with these polymorphisms. Conclusion The -1031 T/C polymorphism and CC genotype can be used as a relevant marker to identify women at risk of developing endometriosis. PMID:26644856

  20. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-O; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  1. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts. PMID:25573799

  2. Tropical skin infections among Israeli travelers.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Michal; Benenson, Shmuel; Baum, Sharon; Schwartz, Eli

    2011-11-01

    Infectious skin disorders are common dermatologic illnesses in travelers. Knowledge of post-travel-related infectious skin disorders will allow for effective pre- and post-travel counseling. All cases of returning travelers seen in our center seeking care for infectious skin diseases were included in this study. For a comparison, data on returned travelers with non-infectious skin diseases and healthy travelers who had pre-travel consultations in our institution were also analyzed. Altogether, skin-related diagnosis was reported in 540 ill travelers, and among them, 286 (53%) had infectious skin diseases. Tropical skin infection was diagnosed in 64% of the infectious cases. Travelers returning from Latin America were significantly more ill with tropical skin infections than those traveling to Asia and Africa, The most common diagnoses were cutaneous leishmaniasis, myiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans. In conclusion, tropical skin infections are common among Israeli travelers, especially among those who visited Latin America. PMID:22049040

  3. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing 'keyhole' mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Peyser, P. M.; Abel, J. A.; Straker, V. F.; Hall, V. L.; Rainsbury, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The popularity of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) which preserves the breast skin envelope is increasing, but the risks and benefits of this approach are only beginning to emerge. A technique involving ultra-conservative SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been evaluated to establish the surgical and oncological sequelae of skin conservation. Between 1994-1998, 67 consecutive patients underwent 71 SSM and expander-assisted immediate latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstructions (follow up, 24.1 months; range, 2-52 months). Breast resection, axillary dissection and reconstruction were performed through a 5-6 cm circular peri-areolar 'keyhole' incision. Patients were discharged 6.5 days (range, 5-15 days) after the 3.9 h (range, 3.0-5.5 h) procedure, and expansion was completed by 4.0 months (range, 0-10 months). Local recurrence occurred in 3% of breasts at risk, skin envelope necrosis occurred in 10%, and contralateral surgery was required to achieve symmetry in 14%. SSM and IBR is an oncologically safe, minimal-scar procedure which can be performed by surgeons trained in 'oncoplastic' techniques. It results in low rates of local recurrence and complication, and reduces the need for contralateral surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10932655

  4. Innate sensing of microbial products promotes wound-induced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoste, Esther; Arwert, Esther N.; Lal, Rohit; South, Andrew P.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Donati, Giacomo; Watt, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The association between tissue damage, chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we characterize a mouse model in which constitutive epidermal extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-MAP-kinase signalling results in epidermal inflammation, and skin wounding induces tumours. We show that tumour incidence correlates with wound size and inflammatory infiltrate. Ablation of tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-1/-2, Myeloid Differentiation primary response gene 88 or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5, the bacterial flagellin receptor, but not other innate immune sensors, in radiosensitive leukocytes protects against tumour formation. Antibiotic treatment inhibits, whereas injection of flagellin induces, tumours in a TLR-5-dependent manner. TLR-5 is also involved in chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis in wild-type mice. Leukocytic TLR-5 signalling mediates upregulation of the alarmin HMGB1 (High Mobility Group Box 1) in wound-induced papillomas. HMGB1 is elevated in tumours of patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa, a disease characterized by chronic skin damage. We conclude that in our experimental model the combination of bacteria, chronic inflammation and wounding cooperate to trigger skin cancer. PMID:25575023

  5. Direct Measurements of Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Satish

    1953-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure local skin friction on a flat plate by measuring the force exerted upon a very small movable part of the surface of the flat plate. These forces, which range from about 1 milligram to about 100 milligrams, are measured by means of a reactance device. The apparatus was first applied to measurements in the low-speed range, both for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The measured skin-friction coefficients show excellent agreement with Blasius' and Von Karman's results. The device was then applied to high-speed subsonic flow and the turbulent-skin-friction coefficients were determined up to a Mach number of about 0.8. A few measurements in supersonic flow were also made. This paper describes the design and construction of the device and the results of the measurements.

  6. Mosquito repellents in frog skin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.R; Smith, B.P.C; Best, S.M; Tyler, M.J

    2006-01-01

    The search for novel insect repellents has been driven by health concerns over established synthetic compounds such as diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). Given the diversity of compounds known from frog skin and records of mosquito bite and ectoparasite infestation, the presence of mosquito repellents in frogs seemed plausible. We investigated frog skin secretions to confirm the existence of mosquito repellent properties. Litoria caerulea secretions were assessed for mosquito repellency by topical application on mice. The secretions provided protection against host-seeking Culex annulirostris mosquitoes. Olfactometer tests using aqueous washes of skin secretions from L. caerulea and four other frog species were conducted to determine whether volatile components were responsible for repellency. Volatiles from Litoria rubella and Uperoleia mjobergi secretions were repellent to C. annulirostris, albeit not as repellent as a DEET control. The demonstration of endogenous insect repellents in amphibians is novel, and demonstrates that many aspects of frog chemical ecology remain unexplored. PMID:17148373

  7. A case of spontaneous myocardial necrosis and cerebral ischemic lesions in a laboratory beagle dog

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kohei; Kohara, Yukari; Ito, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Makoto; Kitaura, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A beagle dog treated with saline as a control animal in a preclinical study was euthanized due to sudden systemic deterioration. On histopathological examination, contraction band necrosis of myocardial cells was observed widely in the left ventricular wall, including the papillary muscle and apex, and observed slightly in the ventricular septum and left atrium. In the brain, necrosis was observed in neurons and glia of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal pyramidal cells, glial cells of the rostral commissure and Purkinje cells of the cerebellar vermis. It is highly probable that the marked systemic deterioration was caused by cardiac dysfunction due to the spontaneous contraction band necrosis of the myocardial cells, although the pathogenesis of the myocardial lesions remains unclear. Given the distribution of neuronal necrosis in the brain, it is likely that these lesions resulted from the ischemia responsible for acute cardiac failure. PMID:26538814

  8. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits both mitochondria-mediated necrosis and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Satoko; Nakanomyo, Ikuko; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2015-11-27

    In various pathological events, particularly in oxygen radical-mediated cell injury, both apoptosis and necrosis play essential roles. Apoptosis and some types of necrosis are induced via increases in mitochondrial membrane permeability, called mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) and permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, respectively. To search for small compounds that inhibit both MOMP-mediated apoptosis and PTP-mediated necrosis, we performed a mitochondria-based high-throughput screening of a chemical library. We identified TMD#7538, a small compound that inhibits both MOMP and PTP opening. Consistent with the fact that this compound inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis, it efficiently suppressed H2O2-induced cell death in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. PMID:26456656

  9. EARLY DIVERSIFICATION OF THE TUMOR NECROSIS SUPERFAMILY IN TELEOSTS: GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION AND EXPRESSION ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) are cytokines involved in diverse immunological and developmental pathways. Little is known about their evolution or expression in lower vertebrate species. Bioinformatic searches of available teleost databases including Zebrafish, Tetroadon...

  10. Severe necrosis of the palate and nasal septum resulting from intranasal abuse of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Scott A; Marcum, Kristin K; Lintzenich, Catherine Rees

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal drug abuse frequently leads to sinonasal complications, particularly sinus, nasal, and palatal necrosis. Classically, this type of necrosis has been linked to cocaine use, but the intranasal abuse of prescription narcotics and other pain medications can also lead to severe damage to the sinonasal tract. We describe a case of palatal and nasal septal necrosis resulting from intranasal acetaminophen abuse. The patient was a 34-year-old man with a remote history of polysubstance abuse who presented to the emergency department with worsening dysphagia and a recent history of exclusive intranasal acetaminophen abuse. He had an existing palatal fistula that was found to have dramatically increased in size. Examination revealed complete destruction of the soft palate and nasal septum and partial destruction of the hard palate. The areas of necrosis were surgically debrided. We describe the general clinical presentation and surgical outcome of this case. PMID:26535831

  11. T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue 

    E-print Network

    Van Hyfte, John Bruce

    1997-01-01

    phantoms following heating from physiologic levels into temperature regions used to induce coagulative necrosis. All samples were heated from physiologic levels to hyperthermic levels at specific intervals and imaged using a closed-loop water bath. Signal...

  12. Sun exposure and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, B K; Kricker, A; English, D R

    1997-06-01

    By 1927 for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and by 1955 for melanoma, the broad grounds for relating sun exposure to skin cancer had been established: that these are more frequent in residents of areas of high ambient solar irradiance, are more frequent in sun-sensitive people, occur mainly on sun-exposed body sites, are more frequent in people with high sun exposure, and are more frequent in people with benign sun-related skin conditions. The past 40 years have added both quantity and quality to the epidemiological evidence and, most recently, provided direct evidence that sun exposure is the cause of mutations in critical tumour suppressor genes in BCC, SCC and melanoma. Complete or more convincing answers are still needed to many questions of detail. They include whether the pattern of sun exposure is really important in, and acts independently of amount of sun exposure in, affecting the risk of melanoma and BCC; what the shape of the relationship between the amount of sun exposure and risk of BCC and melanoma is when the pattern of exposure is held constant; whether there really is a plateau in risk of BCC and melanoma beyond some level of the amount of exposure; whether this exposure-response relationship depends on cutaneous sensitivity to the sun and in what way; whether sunburn makes a specific contribution to the risk of skin cancer independent of the amount of sun exposure; whether sun exposure close to the time of diagnosis of skin cancer contributes anything to the development of the cancer; what the solar radiation action spectrum is for each kind of skin cancer; and whether sunscreens are effective in protecting against skin cancer. PMID:10994463

  13. Prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins stabilize pancreatic mitochondria and protect against necrosis in experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kai-Feng; Odinokova, Irina V.; Mareninova, Olga A.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Pandol, Stephen J.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S.

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cells in pancreatitis die through apoptosis and necrosis, the roles of which are different. The severity of experimental pancreatitis correlates directly with the extent of necrosis and inversely, with apoptosis. Apoptosis is mediated by the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol followed by caspase activation, whereas necrosis is associated with the mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) loss leading to ATP depletion. Here, we investigate the role of Bcl-2 proteins in apoptosis and necrosis in pancreatitis. We found up-regulation of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in pancreas in various experimental models of acute pancreatitis, most pronounced for Bcl-xL. This up-regulation translated into increased levels of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 in pancreatic mitochondria. Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors induced ??m loss and cytochrome c release in isolated mitochondria. Corroborating the results on mitochondria, Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors induced ??m loss, ATP depletion and necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells, both untreated and hyperstimulated with CCK-8 (in vitro pancreatitis model). Together Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors and CCK induced more necrosis than either treatment alone. Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors also stimulated cytochrome c release in acinar cells leading to caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. However, different from their effect on pronecrotic signals, the stimulation by Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors of apoptotic responses was less in CCK-treated than control cells. Therefore, Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibitors potentiated CCK-induced necrosis but not apoptosis. Correspondingly, transfection with Bcl-xL siRNA stimulated necrosis but not apoptosis in the in vitro pancreatitis model. Further, in animal models of pancreatitis Bcl-xL up-regulation inversely correlated with necrosis, but not apoptosis. Results indicate that Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 protect acinar cells from necrosis in pancreatitis by stabilizing mitochondria against death signals. We conclude that Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 inhibition would aggravate acute pancreatitis, whereas Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 up-regulation presents a strategy to prevent or attenuate necrosis in pancreatitis. PMID:19331832

  14. Psychosocial aspects of aging skin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2005-10-01

    Many older individuals use products and procedures to conceal or delay the signs of aging. For most, this provides a helpful ego boost, but some suffer from pathologies such as eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorder. The impact of aging skin may include social anxiety and social isolation. Poor self-image is associated with chronic illness and fewer preventive health behaviors, such as exercise. Aged appearance, especially in women, is also associated with workplace discrimination. Patients should therefore be offered treatments for aging skin, ensured that society's negative views not be unnecessarily reinforced, and maintain a realistic treatment expectations. PMID:16112440

  15. Topical Steroid-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anil; Roga, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Topical steroids, commonly used for a wide range of skin disorders, are associated with side effects both systemic and cutaneous. This article aims at bringing awareness among practitioners, about the cutaneous side effects of easily available, over the counter, topical steroids. This makes it important for us as dermatologists to weigh the usefulness of topical steroids versus their side effects, and to make an informed decision regarding their use in each individual based on other factors such as age, site involved and type of skin disorder. PMID:25284849

  16. Skin cancer in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    Skin cancer is a major concern in geriatric populations. Cumulative exposure to carcinogens and age-related factors both contribute to the high prevalence of cutaneous malignancy in the elderly. Although mortality rates from skin cancer are relatively low, morbidity can be significant, particularly if lesions are neglected. Physicians can have a major impact on the course of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma by nurturing a high index of suspicion for malignancy when unexplained cutaneous lesions are encountered. 56 references.

  17. Skin anti-aging strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall “well-being” and the perception of “health” in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in hand, including including preventive measurements, cosmetological strategies, topical and systemic therapeutic agents and invasive procedures. PMID:23467476

  18. [Intracardiac mass: Why not a liquefaction necrosis of a mitral annulus calcification?].

    PubMed

    Leddet, P; Couppié, P; De Poli, F; Uhry, S; Hanssen, M

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 70-year-old woman with a liquefaction necrosis of mitral annulus calcification. This mass was discovered incidentally during an echocardiographic examination. Additional treatment was not performed because liquefaction necrosis of mitral calcification usually has a benign prognosic. A scheduled clinical review with an echocardiographic examination and cardiac MRI was planified. The patient is actually healthy without any complication. PMID:26482628

  19. Localized dose delivering by ion beam irradiation for experimental trial of establishing brain necrosis model.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kume, Kyo; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Localized dose delivery techniques to establish a brain radiation necrosis model are described. An irradiation field was designed by using accelerated protons or helium ions with a spread-out Bragg peak. Measurement of the designed field confirmed that a high dose can be confined to a local volume of an animal brain. The irradiation techniques described here are very useful for establishing a necrosis model without existence of extraneous complications. PMID:26454176

  20. Structural and immunological effects of skin cryoablation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cryoablation is therapeutically applied for various disorders in several organs, and skin diseases are typical targets as this cryotherapy has been widely used for viral warts, benign tumors, and actinic keratosis. The main mechanisms of cryoablation consist of direct freezing effect on skin constituents, thrombosis formation in microcirculation, and subsequent immunological responses. Among them, however, the immunological mechanism remains unelucidated, and it is an issue how the direct freezing injury induces immunological consequences. We established a mouse cryoablation model with liquid nitrogen applied to the shaved back skin, and used this system to study the immunological excitement. After application of liquid nitrogen, the thermal decrease ratio was -25°C/sec or less and the lowest temperature was less than -100°C, which was sufficient to induce ulceration. Destruction of cornified layer and necrosis of epidermal cells were observed in transmission electron microscopy image, and increased transepidermal water loss and skin permeability were detected by the functional measurements. By flow cytometry, antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), including PDCA1+B220+CD19- plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and CD11c+ myeloid DCs, as well as neutrophils and macrophages were increased in subcutaneous tissue. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of interferon ?1 which are known as pDC-producing cytokines, was elevated. We also found marked degranulation of mast cells, providing a possibility that released histamine attracts pDCs. Finally, FITC migration assay revealed that pDCs and CD11c+ DCs emigrated from the cryoablated skin to the draining lymph nodes. Our study suggests that cryoablation induces destruction of the barrier/epidermis, accumulation of pDCs and CD11c+ DCs to the skin, and migration of DCs to regional lymph nodes. Viral elements or tumor cell lysates released from damaged keratinocytes may stimulate the DCs, thereby leading to antiviral or antitumor effect. PMID:25821968

  1. Structural and Immunological Effects of Skin Cryoablation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cryoablation is therapeutically applied for various disorders in several organs, and skin diseases are typical targets as this cryotherapy has been widely used for viral warts, benign tumors, and actinic keratosis. The main mechanisms of cryoablation consist of direct freezing effect on skin constituents, thrombosis formation in microcirculation, and subsequent immunological responses. Among them, however, the immunological mechanism remains unelucidated, and it is an issue how the direct freezing injury induces immunological consequences. We established a mouse cryoablation model with liquid nitrogen applied to the shaved back skin, and used this system to study the immunological excitement. After application of liquid nitrogen, the thermal decrease ratio was -25°C/sec or less and the lowest temperature was less than -100°C, which was sufficient to induce ulceration. Destruction of cornified layer and necrosis of epidermal cells were observed in transmission electron microscopy image, and increased transepidermal water loss and skin permeability were detected by the functional measurements. By flow cytometry, antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), including PDCA1+B220+CD19- plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and CD11c+ myeloid DCs, as well as neutrophils and macrophages were increased in subcutaneous tissue. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of interferon ?1 which are known as pDC-producing cytokines, was elevated. We also found marked degranulation of mast cells, providing a possibility that released histamine attracts pDCs. Finally, FITC migration assay revealed that pDCs and CD11c+ DCs emigrated from the cryoablated skin to the draining lymph nodes. Our study suggests that cryoablation induces destruction of the barrier/epidermis, accumulation of pDCs and CD11c+ DCs to the skin, and migration of DCs to regional lymph nodes. Viral elements or tumor cell lysates released from damaged keratinocytes may stimulate the DCs, thereby leading to antiviral or antitumor effect. PMID:25821968

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis to Reveal Genes Involved in Wheat Hybrid Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Guo, Jiahui; Yang, Ennian; Liu, Cheng; Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Kejun; Zhou, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon that is found frequently and results in gradual death or loss of productivity of wheat. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms of this genetic phenomenon are still not well understood. In this study, the transcriptomes of wheat hybrid necrosis F1 and its parents (Neimai 8 and II469) were investigated using digital gene expression (DGE). A total of 1300 differentially expressed genes were identified, indicating that the response to hybrid necrosis in wheat is complicated. The assignments of the annotated genes based on Gene Ontology (GO) revealed that most of the up-regulated genes belong to “universal stress related”, “DNA/RNA binding”, “protein degradation” functional groups, while the down-regulated genes belong to “carbohydrate metabolism” and “translation regulation” functional groups. These findings suggest that these pathways were affected by hybrid necrosis. Our results provide preliminarily new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of hybrid necrosis and will help to identify important candidate genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis. PMID:25522166

  3. Dependency of tissue necrosis on gelatin sponge particle size after canine hepatic artery embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Ryusaku; Kishi, Kazushi; Nishida, Norifumi; Yang, Ren J.; Sato, Morio

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To determine the optimal size of gelatin sponge particles (GSPs) to produce maximum tumor necrosis with minimum side effects after canine hepatic artery embolization (HAE). Methods. GSPs were separated into four size ranges: A, up to 200 {mu}m (mean 152) as Gelfoam powder; B, 200-500 {mu}m (mean 336) as Gelfoam powder; C, 500-1000 {mu}m (mean 649) as Spongel; and D, 1000-2000 {mu}m (mean 1382) as Spongel. Three mongrel dogs were assigned randomly to HAE with each particle size. On day 7 after HAE, the livers were removed and subjected to pathological examination. Results. The mean volume of liver necrosis was 11% after embolization, with particle size A, 36.3% with B, 0% with C, and 1% with D. Coagulation necrosis was found in all livers with particles of sizes A and B, and in 1 of 6 with sizes C and D. Bile duct injury was found in five of six dogs with sizes A and B and in none with sizes C and D. Gallbladder necrosis was found in one dog with size B and pancreas necrosis in one with size A. Conclusion. GSPs of 500 {mu}m are considered optimally effective for tissue necrosis according to this model.

  4. Semi-Automated Volumetric Quantification of Tumor Necrosis in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Using Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    MONSKY, WAYNE L.; JIN, BEDRO; MOLLOY, CHRIS; CANTER, ROBERT J.; LI, CHIN SHANG; LIN, TC; BORYS, DANIEL; MACK, WALTER; KIM, ISAAC; BUONOCORE, MICHAEL H.; CHAUDHARI, ABHIJIT J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) defined measurements are limited when evaluating soft tissue sarcoma (STS) response to therapy. Histopathologic assessment of STS response requires a determination of necrosis following resection. A novel semiautomated technique for volumetric measurement of tumor necrosis, using enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI), is described. Patients and Methods Eighteen patients with STS were treated with neoadjuvant therapy and then resected. CE-MRI, obtained prior to resection, were evaluated by two observers using semi-automated segmentation. Tumor volume and percent necrosis was compared with histology and RECIST measurements. Results The median percent necrosis, determined histologically and from CE-MRI, was 71.9% and 67.8%, respectively. Accuracy of these semiautomated measurements was confirmed, being statistically similar to those obtained at histopathologic assessment of the resected tumor. High Intra-class correlation coefficients suggest good inter-observer reproducibility. Tumor necrosis did not correlate with RECIST measurements. Conclusion Semi-automated determination of tumor volume and necrosis, using CE-MRI, is suggested to be accurate and reproducible. PMID:23155265

  5. Response-driven Imaging Biomarkers for Predicting Radiation Necrosis of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Chenevert, Thomas; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy. Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) and concurrent temozolamide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Results Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p=0.05 and p=0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose-volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Conclusions Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid in predicting delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials. PMID:24778364

  6. Pig ear skin as an in-vitro model for human skin permeability.

    PubMed

    Dick, I P; Scott, R C

    1992-08-01

    Pig skin has been shown to have similar histological and physiological properties to human skin and has been suggested as a good model for human skin permeability. In this series of experiments, the in-vitro permeability of pig ear skin was compared with human (abdominal) skin and rat (dorsal) skin using both hydrophilic (water, mannitol, paraquat) and lipophilic (aldrin, carbaryl, fluazifop-butyl) penetrants. Pig skin was found to have a closer permeability character than rat skin to human skin, particularly for lipophilic penetrants. Electrical conductivity measurements across pig skin membranes showed that skin conductivity could be a useful method for assessing the integrity of membranes, particularly when used in conjunction with water permeability assessments. PMID:1359086

  7. Enhanced chlorhexidine skin penetration with eucalyptus oil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) is a widely used skin antiseptic, however it poorly penetrates the skin, limiting its efficacy against microorganisms residing beneath the surface layers of skin. The aim of the current study was to improve the delivery of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) when used as a skin antiseptic. Method Chlorhexidine was applied to the surface of donor skin and its penetration and retention under different conditions was evaluated. Skin penetration studies were performed on full-thickness donor human skin using a Franz diffusion cell system. Skin was exposed to 2% (w/v) CHG in various concentrations of eucalyptus oil (EO) and 70% (v/v) isopropyl alcohol (IPA). The concentration of CHG (?g/mg of skin) was determined to a skin depth of 1500 ?m by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results The 2% (w/v) CHG penetration into the lower layers of skin was significantly enhanced in the presence of EO. Ten percent (v/v) EO in combination with 2% (w/v) CHG in 70% (v/v) IPA significantly increased the amount of CHG which penetrated into the skin within 2 min. Conclusion The delivery of CHG into the epidermis and dermis can be enhanced by combination with EO, which in turn may improve biocide contact with additional microorganisms present in the skin, thereby enhancing antisepsis. PMID:20860796

  8. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the cytokine on other cells. PMID:2165128

  9. TRP channels in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöll?si, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as ‘polymodal cellular sensors’ on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24372189

  10. [Skin signs of systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, St

    2009-02-01

    Many aspects of cutaneous signs are of importance to nondermatologists, as skin manifestations can reflect internal disease states, either directly or as a result of a complication or treatment and therefore can lead to the diagnosis of systemic illness. Serious morbidity and mortality can be avoided by early recognition of only minor cutaneous manifestations signaling internal problems. Limited forms of collagen vascular disease exemplify the important marker function of the skin for diagnosis as well as for prognosis with their typically favorable course permitting a less aggressive treatment. The utmost important prerequisite of diagnosing skin conditions is an accurate and thorough examination of the skin, the adjacent mucous membranes and the integumentary appendages. In a first step, the primary site of the cutaneous condition should be identified (e.g. epidermal, dermal or subdermal) and then the form, the pattern, and distribution should be recognized. There are many comprehensive and excellent textbooks available for guidance. This article focuses on the more common dermatologic conditions linked to different organ systems involved (excluding infectious diseases, metabolic diseases and drug induced conditions). PMID:19096815

  11. Skin Rashes and Other Changes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming? Yes This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION. Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash ...

  12. Moon Technology for Skin Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Estee Lauder uses digital image analyzer and software based on NASA lunar research in evaluation of cosmetic products for skincare. Digital image processing brings out subtleties otherwise undetectable, and allows better determination of product's effectiveness. Technique allows Estee Lauder to quantify changes in skin surface form and structure caused by application of cosmetic preparations.

  13. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  14. X-ray microanalysis of psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Grundin, T.G.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.; Lindberg, M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Electron probe x-ray microanalysis was used to study elemental distribution in uninvolved and involved skin from patients with psoriasis, and in skin from healthy controls. Significant differences were found between the involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin. In the involved skin, the concentrations of Mg, P, and K were higher in the stratum germinativum, spinosum, and granulosum, compared to the corresponding strata in uninvolved skin. Neither involved nor uninvolved psoriatic stratum germinativum differed markedly from nonpsoriatic control stratum germinativum. In uninvolved psoriatic skin only a lower level of K was noted. In comparison to uninvolved psoriatic skin, the elemental composition of the various strata of involved psoriatic skin shows a pattern typical for highly proliferative, nonneoplastic cells.

  15. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  16. Skin Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Skin Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Uterine Cancer Home Skin Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English ...

  17. [Skin sampling for the general practitioner].

    PubMed

    André, J; Richert, B

    2015-09-01

    Skin samplings are easily performed in general practice. They include skin biopsies, nail clippings, skin scrappings, hair pluckings as well as trichograms. The different types of skin biopsies are curetage, shaving, punch and elliptic biopsies. They are most commonly used for the diagnosis of inflammatory skin conditions and cutaneous tumors. The biopsies are performed under local anesthesia and each has specific indications. Their complications are minimal. In order to obtain as much information as possible the lesion to be biopsied should be judiciously selected, harvested without being harmed and sent to a skin-oriented pathologist. Nail clippings, skin scrapings and hair plucking allow diagnosis of superficial skin mycosis (tinea, pityriasis versicolor) and are mandatory before prescribing systemic treatment. Scrapping of an itch mite burrow may sometimes reveal the sarcopte. Trichogram may be useful in the work up of a hair loss. PMID:26591312

  18. Sunscreens, Skin Cancer, and Your Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Terence M.; Wolfe, Dana P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of sunlight on skin are described. The principal types of sunscreens and their properties are discussed. The three types of skin tumors, their cure rates, and treatment methods are examined. (Author/MT)

  19. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction 

    E-print Network

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01

    capitalizes on recent advances in active turbulent drag reduction and active material based actuation to develop an active or "smart" skin for turbulent drag reduction in realistic flight conditions. The skin operation principle is based on computational...

  20. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and over time, ... off. Too much exposure to ultraviolet or UV rays can cause sunburn. UV rays penetrate the outer ...

  1. Oxidation events and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Kammeyer, A; Luiten, R M

    2015-05-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in intrinsic and extrinsic (photo-) aging are described. Since photoaging is recognized as an important extrinsic aging factor, we put special emphasize on the effects of UV exposure on aging, and its variable influence according to global location and skin type. We here summarise direct photochemical effects of UV on DNA, RNA, proteins and vitamin D, the factors contributing to UV-induced immunosuppression, which may delay aging, the nature and origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as indirect contributors for aging, and the consequences of oxidative events for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, such as that of collagen. We conclude that conflicting data on studies investigating the validity of the free radical damage theory of aging may reflect variations in the level of ROS induction which is difficult to quantify in vivo, and the lack of targeting of experimental ROS to the relevant cellular compartment. Also mitohormesis, an adaptive response, may arise in vivo to moderate ROS levels, further complicating interpretation of in vivo results. We here describes how skin aging is mediated both directly and indirectly by oxidative degeneration.This review indicates that skin aging events are initiated and often propagated by oxidation events, despite recently recognized adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:25653189

  2. Automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Matorin, Oleg V.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the clinical symptoms and the malignization signs of pigmented skin neoplasms. We have estimated the complex of clinical parameters which could be measured for the purpose of skin screening diagnostic via digital image processing. Allowable errors of clinical parameter characterization have been calculated, and the origin of these errors has been discussed. Proposed technique for automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms should become an effective tool for early skin diagnostics.

  3. E-LearningEvent SKIN & WOUND

    E-print Network

    Peak, Derek

    E-LearningEvent SKIN & WOUND CARE REFRESHER For Long Term Care Thursday Nov. 19 9 am - 12 pm and other allied health professional who work with older adults will: - gain a better understanding of skin and wound assessments - understand best practice for assessment and treatment of skin tears - have increased

  4. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of...

  5. Dynamic Skin Triangulation Ho-Lun Cheng

    E-print Network

    Sullivan, John M.

    Dynamic Skin Triangulation Ho-Lun Cheng , Tamal K. Dey , Herbert Edelsbrunner§ and John Sullivan- tallizations. Skin Surfaces. The approach to deforming surfaces taken in this paper is based on the technical notion of skin surfaces, as introduced in [8]. The main reason for this choice is the existence of fast

  6. PERCEPTIONS OF RISK OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    PERCEPTIONS OF RISK OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN CANCER FROM SUNLIGHT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YOUNG OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA SKIN CANCER FROM SUNLIGHT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE UK AND NEW ZEALAND Research Council (ESRC) ISSN 0967-8875 #12;Abstract Malignant melanoma skin cancer has been increasing

  7. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A skin marker is a pen-like...

  13. African American Adolescents and Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Tracy L.; Ward, Janie V.

    1995-01-01

    Determines if skin-color perception in the lives of African American adolescents affects self-esteem and dating relationships. Findings from 123 adolescents show the existence of relationships between satisfaction of skin color and self-esteem and dating. Findings also show more males than females desired lighter skin tone. Implications are…

  14. Protecting Our Children from Skin Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Skin cancer in the United States is epidemic. About 90% of skin cancers are caused by sun exposure. The age of patients developing melanoma is dropping dramatically. Parents must protect their children from the sun during all outdoor activities year round. The article presents recommendations for preventing skin cancer. (SM)

  15. Itchy, Scaly Skin? Living with Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issue Features Rough Up Your Diet Itchy, Scaly Skin? Health Capsules Think Twice Before Eating White Rice? Touch Affects Impressions, Decisions Featured Web Site: Advances in HIV/AIDS Research Past Issues Most Viewed ... Itchy, Scaly Skin? Living With Psoriasis The thick, red, scaly skin ...

  16. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Facts About Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. Every year, more than 2 million ... cell and squamous cell—can usually be cured when they are ...

  17. Achieving skin to skin contact in theatre for healthy newborns.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The evidence base is supportive of early skin to skin contact (SSC) for optimal newborn-physiological adaptation, bonding and breastfeeding, and national guidelines encourage SSC as soon as possible, regardless of mode of birth. With an ever-rising caesarean (CS) rate, implementing SSC in theatre stands to benefit an increasing number of mothers and babies. While it may be best practice, in reality there is a lot of variation from trust to trust, and many hospitals do not facilitate it, citing numerous reasons as to why it is not possible. Midwives may feel that they should focus on norma birth, but it is our role to provide holistic care and normalise birth in all settings. This article looks at current evidence and the role of the midwife around facilitating SSC in theatre with an example from practice of how change has been implemented so that mothers and babies get the best start in life. PMID:26320329

  18. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer: Information for Hispanics

    Cancer.gov

    Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer: Information for Hispanics. This article addresses myths about skin cancer and discusses how everyone can protect their skin. It also introduces an NCI publication for minorities: Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer.

  19. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer: Information for African Americans

    Cancer.gov

    Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer: Information for African Americans. This article addresses myths about skin cancer and discusses how everyone can protect their skin. It also introduces an NCI publication for minorities: Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer.

  20. Macrophages express osteopontin during repair of myocardial necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Murry, C. E.; Giachelli, C. M.; Schwartz, S. M.; Vracko, R.

    1994-01-01

    Osteopontin is a secreted glycoprotein implicated in a variety of functions, including cell adhesion and migration. Because these functions may be of general importance in the response of tissue to injury, we examined osteopontin expression after experimental cardiac injury and human myocardial infarction. Rat hearts were injured by transdiaphragmatic freeze-thaw and examined from 1 to 28 days after injury. Osteopontin was absent from normal myocardium by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. On days 1 and 2 after injury, osteopontin mRNA and protein were expressed at high levels by macrophages infiltrating necrotic myocardium. Double labeling with the macrophage marker ED1, however, demonstrated that only a subset of macrophages expressed osteopontin. Western blot analysis showed a single 66-kd band in injured myocardium that was absent from control tissue. Although macrophages remained abundant in the ensuing granulation response and scar tissue formation, the expression of osteopontin was diminished on day 4 and markedly downregulated at 1 and 4 weeks after injury, with only rare cells expressing the message or protein. In a human heart with an 8-day-old myocardial infarct, there was abundant expression of osteopontin mRNA and protein in macrophages within the necrotic and granulation tissue. Transient expression of osteopontin was also observed in a subset of macrophages infiltrating lung, skin, and skeletal muscle injured during the experiment, indicating the response was not limited to the heart. Thus, synthesis of osteopontin by macrophages appears to be a generalized response in the reaction to tissue injury. Although macrophages persist in these lesions, osteopontin is dramatically downregulated as healing proceeds. These results provide the first evidence that osteopontin may be important in healing after tissue injury, possibly in cellular adhesion, chemotaxis, and/or phagocytosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7992848

  1. Occlusion, carbon dioxide, and fungal skin infections.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M; King, R D

    1978-02-18

    Occlusion of the skin renders it susceptible to acute fungal skin infections (dermatophytosis and candidiasis). Occlusion also raised carbon-dioxide (CO2) tensions at the skin's surface. Comparable CO2 tnesions have a pronounced effect on the morphology and metabolism of dermatophytes in vitro. It is postulated that dermatophyte conida and hyphae produce infective units under conditions of raised CO2 tensions, and that occlusion of the skin produces the concentrations of CO2 required for the conversion. Fungal skin infections might be prevented or controlled by interference with the action of CO2 or by prevention of its accumulation under wet, occlusive clothing. PMID:75398

  2. The Oncogenic MicroRNA miR-21 Promotes Regulated Necrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Li, Fenge; Dai, Zhongping; Hua, Xiang; Li, Yan; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Young, Ken H.; Xiong, Wei; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate apoptosis, yet their role in regulated necrosis remains unknown. miR-21 is overexpressed in nearly all human cancer types and its role as an oncogene is suggested to largely depend on its anti-apoptotic action. Here we show that miR-21 is overexpressed in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, a pathologic condition involving RIP3-dependent regulated necrosis (necroptosis). Therefore, we investigate the role of miR-21 in acute pancreatitis injury and necroptosis. miR-21 deficiency protects against caerulein- or L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. miR-21 inhibition using locked-nucleic-acid-modified oligonucleotide effectively reduces pancreatitis severity. miR-21 deletion is also protective in tumor necrosis factor-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These data suggest that miRNAs are critical participants in necroptosis, and miR-21 enhances cellular necrosis by negatively regulating tumor suppressor genes associated with the death-receptor-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway and could be a therapeutic target for preventing pathologic necrosis. PMID:25990308

  3. Identification of Novel miRNAs and miRNA Expression Profiling in Wheat Hybrid Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianping; Cheng, Yan; Yin, Meiqi; Yang, Ennian; Gong, Wenping; Liu, Cheng; Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Kejun; Ren, Zhenglong; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in a vast array of biological processes, including growth and development, defense against viral infection, and responses to environmental changes in plant. Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon observed frequency and it is lethal or semi lethal, resulting in gradual death or loss of productivity. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms associated with hybrid necrosis in wheat are still not well understood. Here, we report the population and expression profiles of miRNAs in wheat hybrid necrosis. We identified a total of 57 conserved miRNA families as well as 182 putative novel miRNAs. Expression profiling revealed that expression of 49 known miRNAs and 165 novel miRNAs was changed in hybrid necrosis. And the expression levels of some miRNAs and their predicated targets have been confirmed by qRT-PCR. These results indicate that these miRNAs, especially miR159, miR166, miR167 and miR5072 could be involved in the extensive regulation of gene expression in response to hybrid necrosis. PMID:25706289

  4. Beethoven's renal disease based on his autopsy: a case of papillary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A

    1993-06-01

    The autopsy report of Ludwig van Beethoven written by Dr Johann Wagner in 1827 reveals that he had renal calculi that had not been diagnosed during his lifetime, together with perirenal fibrosis. The most comprehensive interpretation of this autopsy finding is that the regular calcareous deposits in every one of his renal calices represented calcified necrotic papillae. Severe urinary obstruction or diabetes as possible causes of papillary necrosis were not present. Analgesic abuse because of headaches, back pain, and attacks of rheumatism or gout may be presumed on the basis of Beethoven's uncontrolled way of taking medication. Salicin, a commonly used analgesic substance of that time (dried and powdered willow bark), is able to cause papillary necrosis. Perirenal fibrosis may be due to chronic infection or drug intake. Beethoven's other well-known diseases are deafness caused by otosclerosis of the inner ear, relapsing attacks of diarrhea as the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and liver cirrhosis following viral hepatitis and chronic alcohol consumption. Liver cirrhosis also may cause papillary necrosis. In Beethoven's case, renal papillary necrosis was most probably the consequence of analgesic abuse together with decompensated liver cirrhosis. The autopsy report of Beethoven is the first case of papillary necrosis recorded in the literature. PMID:8503419

  5. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  6. High-fat diet exacerbates inflammation and cell survival signals in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Singh, Tripti; Nagy, Tim R.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2009-12-15

    Inflammation induced by chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases. We formulated the hypothesis that a high-fat diet may influence the UV-induced inflammatory responses in the skin. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet or control diet and exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm{sup 2}) three times/week for 10 weeks. The mice were then sacrificed and skin and plasma samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. We found that the levels of inflammatory biomarkers were increased in the UVB-exposed skin of the mice fed the high-fat diet than the UVB-exposed skin of the mice fed the control diet. The levels of inflammatory biomarkers of early responses to UVB exposure (e.g., myeloperoxidase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin-E{sub 2}), proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser{sup 473}) were higher in high-fat-diet-fed mouse skin than control-diet-fed mouse skin. The plasma levels of insulin growth factor-1 were greater in the UVB-irradiated mice fed the high-fat diet than the UVB-irradiated mice fed the control diet, whereas the levels of plasma adiponectin were significantly lower. This pronounced exacerbation of the UVB-induced inflammatory responses in the skin of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that high-fat diet may increase susceptibility to inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  7. Hedgehog signaling in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengxin; Chi, Sumin; Xie, Jingwu

    2011-01-01

    An increasing progress on the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling for carcinogenesis has been achieved since the link of Hh pathway to human cancer was firstly established. In particular, the critical role of Hh signaling in the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been convincingly demonstrated by genetic mutation analyses, mouse models of BCCs, and successful clinical trials of BCCs using Hh signaling inhibitors. In addition, the Hh pathway activity is also reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), melanoma and Merkel Cell Carcinoma. These findings have significant new paradigm on Hh signaling transduction, its mechanisms in skin cancer and even therapeutic approaches for BCC. In this review, we will summarize the major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling transduction, the roles of Hh signaling in skin cancer development, and the current implications of “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21397013

  8. Skin phototype: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Vittoria; Flori, Enrica; Picardo, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    Cutaneous phototype is considered mainly related to cutaneous pigmentation and to the eumelanin/pheomelanin ratio, which is mostly genetically determined by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) polymorphisms. However, data in literature indicate that, in addition to stimulation of eumelanin synthesis, the MC1R signalling activates antioxidant, DNA repair and survival pathways. New emerging aspects regarding photoprotection and skin phototypes are going beyond those features connected to the melanin content in the skin. Important new findings link the MC1R to nuclear receptors activation, shedding light on new extra-melanogenic effects dependent on the ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH) activity and new ways through which such functions are modulated. These evidences indicate that several factors including melanin play a part in defining the basis for individual sun sensitivity, suggesting that the cutaneous phototype represents a 'biochemical fingerprint'. PMID:25786343

  9. Mycologic disorders of the skin.

    PubMed

    Outerbridge, Catherine A

    2006-08-01

    Cutaneous tissue can become infected when fungal organisms contaminate or colonize the epidermal surface or hair follicles. The skin can be a portal of entry for fungal infection when the epithelial barrier is breached or it can be a site for disseminated, systemic fungal disease. The two most common cutaneous fungal infections in small animals are dermatophytosis and Malassezia dermatitis. Dermatophytosis is a superficial cutaneous infection with one or more of the fungal species in the keratinophilic genera Microsporum, Trichophyton, or Epidermophyton. Malassezia pachydermatis is a nonlipid dependent fungal species that is a normal commensal inhabitant of the skin and external ear canal in dogs and cats. Malassezia pachydermatis is the most common cause of Malassezia dermatitis. The diagnosis and treatment of these cutaneous fungal infections will be discussed. PMID:16933479

  10. Robot Skin Based on Touch-Area-Sensitive Tactile Element

    E-print Network

    Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    Robot Skin Based on Touch-Area-Sensitive Tactile Element Takayuki Hoshi and Hiroyuki Shinoda propose a new tactile sensor skin ("Skin by Touch Area Receptor" or STAR). The skin consists of two robot skin including no long wires. Index Terms - Tactile sensor, Robot skin, Haptic interface, Contact

  11. Mutagenicity of skin tanning lotions.

    PubMed

    Pham, H N; DeMarini, D M; Brockmann, H E

    1979-12-01

    Two lotions that tan skin in the absence of sunlight and their active ingredient, dihydroxyacetone (DHA), are mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 without metabolic activation. However, addition of S-9 mix that contains Aroclor 1254-induced rat hepatic microsomes enhances significantly the mutagenic activity of all three agents. Both lotions and DHA also cause primary DNA damage as determined by the rec-assay in Bacillus subtilis. The potential human health hazard of these lotions is discussed. PMID:121138

  12. Skin problems in the traveler.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E

    1998-06-01

    Skin lesions are common in travelers and include a mix of mundane dermatologic problems and rare diseases acquired only in remote or tropical regions. The morphology, distribution, and progression of the lesions are useful in assessing possible causes. Early in the evaluation it is important to determine whether the patient might have a process that is rapidly progressive, treatable, or transmissible. In addition to routine laboratory studies, biopsy and serologic tests are often necessary to confirm a specific diagnosis. PMID:9658254

  13. Skin manifestations of internal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Irwin M

    2002-02-01

    This article concentrates on the major signs and syndromes that are associated with internal malignancies in the geriatric population. Included are cutaneous metastases, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing syndromes, and disorders arising from APUD cell tumors. The major paraneoplastic disorders of dermatomyositis, generalized pruritus, Bazex's syndrome, and acanthosis nigricans also are discussed. Also included are Bowen's disease of skin; arsenical toxicity; and the Peutz-Jeghers', Gardner's, and Torre's syndromes, which are indicative of systemic or organ-related carcinogens. PMID:11913734

  14. [Skin ageing and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Passeron, Thierry; Ortonne, Jean-Paul

    2003-09-27

    INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC FACTORS: Skin ageing is due to the conjunction of intrinsic (chronological ageing) and extrinsic factors (fundamentally photo-ageing). The physiopathological mechanisms of intrinsic ageing rejoin those of the ageing of all the other organs. Among the intrinsic causes, tobacco and above all ultra-violet radiation, UVB and also UVA, play a preponderant role. Photo-ageing is secondary to complex mechanisms that are increasingly known. The UVB directly interact with the DNA of the cutaneous cells. The deleterious effects of UVA are principally due to the formation of free radical oxygen, which result in an alteration in the nuclear and also mitochondrial DNA, but also an activation of the enzymes, metalloproteinase, capable of damaging the extra-cellular matrix. DELETERIOUS CONSEQUENCES: The phenomena of ageing provoke the decline in defence, healing and perception mechanisms and in the thermoregulation of the skin tissue. There are numerous and often unsightly clinical manifestations. Photo-ageing can be considered as a marker of risk of photo-carcinogenesis requiring increased clinical surveillance. PREVENTIVE AND CURATIVE MEASURES: The prevention of skin ageing must be based on the use of sunscreens protecting against both UVB and UVA, but, in order for them to be effective, they require a change in general life style. There are many efficient therapeutic means, but the possible side effects must be known and explained to the patient. Retinoids, in view of their innocuousness and efficacy not only in prevention but also treatment of skin ageing, should be considered as a therapeutic option of choice. PMID:14534483

  15. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  16. Near real-time skin deformation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenjar, Steve; Chen, Suzie; Jafri, Madiha; Wall, Brian; Pedersen, Richard; Bezozo, Richard

    2013-02-01

    A novel in vivo approach is described that provides large area mapping of the mechanical properties of the skin in human patients. Such information is important in the understanding of skin health, cosmetic surgery[1], aging, and impacts of sun exposure. Currently, several methods have been developed to estimate the local biomechanical properties of the skin, including the use of a physical biopsy of local areas of the skin (in vitro methods) [2, 3, and 4], and also the use of non-invasive methods (in vivo) [5, 6, and 7]. All such methods examine localized areas of the skin. Our approach examines the local elastic properties via the generation of field displacement maps of the skin created using time-sequence imaging [9] with 2D digital imaging correlation (DIC) [10]. In this approach, large areas of the skin are reviewed rapidly, and skin displacement maps are generated showing the contour maps of skin deformation. These maps are then used to precisely register skin images for purposes of diagnostic comparison. This paper reports on our mapping and registration approach, and demonstrates its ability to accurately measure the skin deformation through a described nulling interpolation process. The result of local translational DIC alignment is compared using this interpolation process. The effectiveness of the approach is reported in terms of residual RMS, image entropy measures, and differential segmented regional errors.

  17. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  18. Fibroblast heterogeneity: more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, J Michael; Caplan, Arnold I

    2004-02-15

    Dermal fibroblasts are a dynamic and diverse population of cells whose functions in skin in many respects remain unknown. Normal adult human skin contains at least three distinct subpopulations of fibroblasts, which occupy unique niches in the dermis. Fibroblasts from each of these niches exhibit distinctive differences when cultured separately. Specific differences in fibroblast physiology are evident in papillary dermal fibroblasts, which reside in the superficial dermis, and reticular fibroblasts, which reside in the deep dermis. Both of these subpopulations of fibroblasts differ from the fibroblasts that are associated with hair follicles. Fibroblasts engage in fibroblast-epidermal interactions during hair development and in interfollicular regions of skin. They also play an important role in cutaneous wound repair and an ever-increasing role in bioengineering of skin. Bioengineered skin currently performs important roles in providing (1) a basic understanding of skin biology, (2) a vehicle for testing topically applied products and (3) a resource for skin replacement. PMID:14754903

  19. Common Skin Rashes in Children.

    PubMed

    Allmon, Amanda; Deane, Kristen; Martin, Kari L

    2015-08-01

    Because childhood rashes may be difficult to differentiate by appearance alone, it is important to consider the entire clinical presentation to help make the appropriate diagnosis. Considerations include the appearance and location of the rash; the clinical course; and associated symptoms, such as pruritus or fever. A fever is likely to occur with roseola, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), and scarlet fever. Pruritus sometimes occurs with atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, erythema infectiosum, molluscum contagiosum, and tinea infection. The key feature of roseola is a rash presenting after resolution of a high fever, whereas the distinguishing features in pityriasis rosea are a herald patch and a bilateral and symmetric rash in a Christmas tree pattern. The rash associated with scarlet fever usually develops on the upper trunk, then spreads throughout the body, sparing the palms and soles. Impetigo is a superficial bacterial infection that most commonly affects the face and extremities of children. Erythema infectiosum is characterized by a viral prodrome followed by the "slapped cheek" facial rash. Flesh-colored or pearly white papules with central umbilication occur with molluscum contagiosum, a highly contagious viral infection that usually resolves without intervention. Tinea is a common fungal skin infection in children that affects the scalp, body, groin, feet, hands, or nails. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition that may present with a variety of skin changes. PMID:26280141

  20. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  1. Febrile Illness with Skin Rashes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Skin rashes that appear during febrile illnesses are in fact caused by various infectious diseases. Since infectious exanthematous diseases range from mild infections that disappear naturally to severe infectious diseases, focus on and basic knowledge of these diseases is very important. But, these include non-infectious diseases, so that comprehensive knowledge of these other diseases is required. Usually, early diagnostic testing for a febrile illness with a rash is inefficient. For clinical diagnosis of diseases accompanied by skin rash and fever, a complete history must be taken, including recent travel, contact with animals, medications, and exposure to forests and other natural environments. In addition, time of onset of symptoms and the characteristics of the rash itself (morphology, location, distribution) could be helpful in the clinical diagnosis. It is also critical to understand the patient's history of specific underlying diseases. However, diagnostic basic tests could be helpful in diagnosis if they are repeated and the clinical course is monitored. Generally, skin rashes are nonspecific and self-limited. Therefore, it could be clinically meaningful as a characteristic diagnostic finding in a very small subset of specific diseases. PMID:26483989

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression and wound healing in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M.; Houglum, K.; Chojkier, M.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for impaired wound healing in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. As tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is elevated in these diseases, and TNF-alpha inhibits collagen alpha1(I) gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, we analyzed whether chronically elevated serum TNF-alpha affects collagen metabolism in vivo by inoculating nude mice with Chinese hamster ovary cells secreting TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha mice) or control Chinese hamster ovary cells (control mice). Before the onset of weight loss, TNF-alpha mice had a selective decrease in collagen synthesis and collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in the skin. In addition, TNF-alpha mice displayed impaired healing of incisional and excisional skin wounds, compared with control animals, before the onset of cachexia. The expression of transforming growth factor-beta1, a potent fibrogenic factor, was inhibited by TNF-alpha in the skin. In studies with transgenic mice expressing the human growth hormone under the direction of 5' regulatory regions of the human collagen alpha1(I) gene, TNF-alpha treatment inhibited the expression of the collagen alpha1(I) human growth hormone transgene containing -2.3 kb of the 5' region, whereas transgene expression directed by -0.44 kb of the 5' region was not affected. These experiments suggest that TNF-alpha may play an important role in the impaired wound healing of chronic diseases that are characterized by a high production of this cytokine and provide insights for potential therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8686743

  3. A custom tailored model to investigate skin penetration in porcine skin and its comparison with human skin.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Michael E; Houdek, Pia; Gorissen, Sascha; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Wladykowski, Ewa; Volksdorf, Thomas; Grzybowski, Stephan; Kolios, Georgios; Willers, Christoph; Mallwitz, Henning; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M

    2015-09-01

    Reliable models for the determination of skin penetration and permeation are important for the development of new drugs and formulations. The intention of our study was to develop a skin penetration model which (1) is viable and well supplied with nutrients during the period of the experiment (2) is mimicking human skin as far as possible, but still is independent from the problems of supply and heterogeneity, (3) can give information about the penetration into different compartments of the skin and (4) considers specific inter-individual differences in skin thickness. In addition, it should be quick and inexpensive (5) and without ethical implications (6). Using a chemically divers set of four topically approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), namely diclofenac, metronidazole, tazarotene, and terbinafine, we demonstrated that the model allows reliable determination of drug concentrations in different layers of the viable epidermis and dermis. For APIs susceptible for skin metabolism, the extent of metabolic transformation in epidermis and dermis can be monitored. Furthermore, a high degree of accordance in the ability for discrimination of skin concentrations of the substances in different layers was found in models derived from porcine and human skin. Viability, proliferation, differentiation and markers for skin barrier function were surveyed in the model. This model, which we call 'Hamburg model of skin penetration' is particularly suited to support a rational ranking and selection of dermatological formulations within drug development projects. PMID:25857837

  4. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  5. Delayed-type Necrosis after Soft-tissue Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Klotz De Almeida Balassiano, Laila; Roos Mariano Da Rocha, Camila; Barbosa De Sousa Padilha, Carolina; Martinezt Torrado, Carolina; Teixeira Da Silva, Roberta; Carlos Regazzi Avelleira, João

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of dermal fillers, specifically the use of hyaluronic acid, can be explained by their effectiveness and versatility as well as their favorable safety profiles. Nevertheless, early and late complications with varying levels of severity may occur. The incidence of complications is low and the majority of adverse events are mild (edema, erythema, and local ecchymosis) and of limited duration. However, more severe events, such as ischemia and necrosis, may occur. The symptoms of ischemia can occur immediately after the injection or several hours after the procedure. Here, the authors report three cases of necrosis after hyaluronic acid injection with the first symptoms presenting only several hours after the procedure. The patients were treated immediately after the diagnosis. The aim of this review is to communicate the possibility of the delayed-type presentation of necrosis, present the signs and symptoms that lead to early diagnosis, and review the treatment possibilities of this severe complication. PMID:26705447

  6. Zonated induction of autophagy and mitochondrial spheroids limits acetaminophen-induced necrosis in the liver.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong-Min; Williams, Jessica A; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the US and many western countries. It is well known that APAP induces mitochondrial damage to trigger centrilobular necrosis. Emerging evidence suggests that autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria may protect against APAP-induced liver injury. Electron and confocal microscopy analysis of liver tissues revealed that APAP overdose triggers unique biochemical and pathological zonated changes in the mouse liver, which includes necrosis (zone 1), mitochondrial spheroid formation (zone 2), autophagy (zone 3) and mitochondrial biogenesis (zone 4). In this graphic review, we discuss the role of autophagy/mitophagy in limiting the expansion of necrosis and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and liver regeneration for the recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. We also discuss possible mechanisms that could be involved in regulating APAP-induced autophagy/mitophagy and the formation of mitochondrial spheroids. PMID:24191236

  7. Extensive Bone Marrow Necrosis in a Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformed from a Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Roman; Rizkalla, Kamilia; Lam, Selay

    2015-01-01

    Extensive necrosis affecting more than 50%percnt; of the bone marrow is an extremely rare histopathological finding. Relatively little is known about its clinical significance because it is most commonly identified at autopsy – whether it is an independent prognostic marker or whether it is a surrogate marker of underlying disease burden remains unclear. We describe herein a case of a 66-year-old patient with acute myeloid leukemia who presented with acute bone marrow failure and was found to have extensive necrosis. We include presenting clinical features, pathology attained at biopsy, and the challenge of treatment. Bone marrow necrosis is a rare but important clinicopathological entity whose recognition may herald the way for more effective prognostication of underlying disease. PMID:26351444

  8. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

  9. Transplanted Bone Marrow–Derived Circulating PDGFR?+ Cells Restore Type VII Collagen in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Mouse Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Iinuma, Shin; Aikawa, Eriko; Fujita, Ryo; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Chino, Takenao; Kikuta, Junichi; McGrath, John A.; Uitto, Jouni; Ishii, Masaru; Iizuka, Hajime; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an intractable genetic blistering skin disease in which the epithelial structure easily separates from the underlying dermis because of genetic loss of functional type VII collagen (Col7) in the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Recent studies have demonstrated that allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) ameliorates the skin blistering phenotype of RDEB patients by restoring Col7. However, the exact therapeutic mechanism of BMT in RDEB remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the roles of transplanted bone marrow–derived circulating mesenchymal cells in RDEB (Col7-null) mice. In wild-type mice with prior GFP-BMT after lethal irradiation, lineage-negative/GFP-positive (Lin?/GFP+) cells, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor ?-positive (PDGFR?+) mesenchymal cells, specifically migrated to skin grafts from RDEB mice and expressed Col7. Vascular endothelial cells and follicular keratinocytes in the deep dermis of the skin grafts expressed SDF-1?, and the bone marrow–derived PDGFR?+ cells expressed CXCR4 on their surface. Systemic administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 markedly decreased the migration of bone marrow–derived PDGFR?+ cells into the skin graft, resulting in persistent epidermal detachment with massive necrosis and inflammation in the skin graft of RDEB mice; without AMD3100 administration, Col7 was significantly supplemented to ameliorate the pathogenic blistering phenotype. Collectively, these data suggest that the SDF1?/CXCR4 signaling axis induces transplanted bone marrow–derived circulating PDGFR?+ mesenchymal cells to migrate and supply functional Col7 to regenerate RDEB skin. PMID:25601922

  10. Comparison of fixation and processing methods for hairless guinea pig skin following sulfur mustard exposure. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, M.A.; Braue Jr, E.H.

    1992-12-31

    Ten anesthetized hairless guinea pigs Crl:IAF(HA)BR were exposed to 10 pi of neat sulfur mustard (HD) in a vapor cup on their skin for 7 min. At 24 h postexposure, the guinea pigs were euthanatized and skin sections taken for histologic evaluation. The skin was fixed using either 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF), McDowell Trump fixative (4CF-IG), Zenker`s formol-saline (Helly`s fluid), or Zenker`s fluid. Fixed skin sections were cut in half: one half was embedded in paraffin and the other half in plastic (glycol methacrylate). Paraffin-embedded tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin; plastic-embedded tissue was stained with Lee`s methylene blue basic fuchsin. Skin was also frozen unfixed, sectioned by cryostat, and stained with pinacyanole. HD-exposed skin was evaluated histologically for the presence of epidermal and follicular necrosis, microblister formation, epidermitis, and intracellular edema to determine the optimal fixation and embedding method for lesion preservation. The percentage of histologic sections with lesions varied little between fixatives and was similar for both paraffin and plastic embedding material. Plastic-embedded sections were thinner, allowing better histologic evaluation, but were more difficult to stain. Plastic embedding material did not infiltrate tissue fixed in Zenker`s fluid or Zenker`s formol-saline. Frozen tissue sections were prepared in the least processing time and lesion preservation was comparable to fixed tissue. It was concluded that standard histologic processing using formalin fixation and paraffin embedding is adequate for routine histopathological evaluation of HD skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig.... Sulfur mustard, Vesicating agents, Pathology, Hairless guinea pig model, Fixation.

  11. EFFECTS OF HORMONES ON THE ADRENAL NECROSIS PRODUCED BY BESNOITIA JELLISONI IN GOLDEN HAMSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, J. K.

    1956-01-01

    Adrenal necrosis has been described in golden hamsters where it occurs during the course of infection with Besnoilia jellisoni. This necrosis results directly from the active intracellular proliferation by this obligate intracellular protozoan organism. After infection, adrenal necrosis is rarely observed in hypophysectomized hamsters. In unoperated animals adrenal necrosis is suppressed to varying degrees by cortisone (E), hydrocortisone (F), corticosterone (B), 11-dehydrocorticosterone (A), and possibly by 11-desoxycorticosterone (DOCA). Besnoitia organisms proliferate in otherwise "immune" hamsters around the subcutaneous deposits of the acetates of cortisone (E), hydrocortisone (F), and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (A); a marked depression of general immunity follows the administration of pharmacologic doses of the former two hormones. Organisms do not proliferate around the sites of corticosterone acetate (B) and 11desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) injection, nor next to deposits of testosterone propionate, 11-desoxy-17-hydroxycorticosterone acetate (Reichstein's compound S) and epinephrine in oil. It is postulated that certain glucocorticoids can so modify immunity mechanisms locally, that general immunity becomes ineffective; this occurs in the adrenal glands owing to endogenous corticoid production, at the sites of exogenous corticoid injection, and proximal to that in the lungs. A comparison is made with the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and histoplasmosis of the adrenal gland which results in Addison's disease in man, and it is concluded that a similar pathogenetic mechanism is operative. The use of glucocorticoids for replacement therapy is discussed in reference to their relative resistance-depressing activities in pharmacologic doses. These undesirable side effects would appear to be less pronounced, if not absent, if corticosterone (B) rather than cortisone (E) and hydrocortisone (F) therapy were used. Porcine adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) appearsto depress the incidence of adrenal necrosis in unoperated hamsters, and supports proliferation of organisms in the adrenal cortex with subsequent necrosis in only a small proportion of hypophysectomized hamsters. The possibility is discussed that ACTH from a different species (hog) might lead to a change in the secretory activity of the hamster adrenal gland. PMID:13295493

  12. Human-Specific Bacterial Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Programmed Necrosis in Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Timothy J.; Stivison, Elizabeth A.; Hod, Eldad A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Cowan, Peter J.; Randis, Tara M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A subgroup of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family of pore-forming toxins (PFTs) has an unusually narrow host range due to a requirement for binding to human CD59 (hCD59), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked complement regulatory molecule. hCD59-specific CDCs are produced by several organisms that inhabit human mucosal surfaces and can act as pathogens, including Gardnerella vaginalis and Streptococcus intermedius. The consequences and potential selective advantages of such PFT host limitation have remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to species restriction, PFT ligation of hCD59 triggers a previously unrecognized pathway for programmed necrosis in primary erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]) from humans and transgenic mice expressing hCD59. Because they lack nuclei and mitochondria, RBCs have typically been thought to possess limited capacity to undergo programmed cell death. RBC programmed necrosis shares key molecular factors with nucleated cell necroptosis, including dependence on Fas/FasL signaling and RIP1 phosphorylation, necrosome assembly, and restriction by caspase-8. Death due to programmed necrosis in RBCs is executed by acid sphingomyelinase-dependent ceramide formation, NADPH oxidase- and iron-dependent reactive oxygen species formation, and glycolytic formation of advanced glycation end products. Bacterial PFTs that are hCD59 independent do not induce RBC programmed necrosis. RBC programmed necrosis is biochemically distinct from eryptosis, the only other known programmed cell death pathway in mature RBCs. Importantly, RBC programmed necrosis enhances the growth of PFT-producing pathogens during exposure to primary RBCs, consistent with a role for such signaling in microbial growth and pathogenesis. PMID:25161188

  13. Exploring Valrubicin's Effect on Propionibacterium Acnes-Induced Skin Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Rottboell, Louise; de Foenss, Sarah; Thomsen, Kenneth; Christiansen, Helle; Andersen, Stine M; Dam, Tomas N; Rosada, Cecilia; Stenderup, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Acne is a common skin disease involving colonization with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), hyperproliferation of the follicular epithelium and inflammatory events. Valrubicin is a second-generation anthracycline, non-toxic upon contact, and available in a topical formulation. Valrubicin's predecessor doxorubicin possesses antibacterial effects and previously we demonstrated that valrubicin inhibits keratinocyte proliferation and skin inflammation suggesting beneficial topical treatment of acne with valrubicin. This study aims to investigate valrubicin's possible use in acne treatment by testing valrubicin's antibacterial effects against P. acnes and P. acnes-induced skin inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Valrubicin was demonstrated not to possess antibacterial effects against P. acnes. Additionally, valrubicin was demonstrated not to reduce mRNA and protein expression levels of the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in vitro in human keratinocytes co-cultured with P. acnes. Moreover, in vivo, valrubicin, applied both topically and intra-dermally, was not able to reduce signs of inflammation in mouse ears intra-dermally injected with P. acnes. Taken together, this study does not support beneficial antibacterial and anti inflammatory effects of topical valrubicin treatment of acne. PMID:26734122

  14. Morphologic accounts of a human skin equivalent exposed to mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrali, J.P.; Oglesby, S.B.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    TESTSKIN, a commercially available human skin equivalent, was used as a model system to study the temporal anatomical-pathological effects of a single vesicating vapor dose of sulfur mustard (HD). Samples were exposed to 10 ul HD vapor for 8 min and harvested at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr following exposure. Control samples not exposed to HD were harvested at 0 and 24 hr. light and electron microscopic analysis revealed that the basal cell of the stratum germinativum was selectively affected beginning at 36 hr. These early basal cell changes included, an apparent widening of intercellular spaces; a disabling of desmosomal attachments; rounding of cells, nuclear condensations, and pyknosis; rearrangement of cytoplasmic tonofflaments to a perinuclear position; and perinuclear blebbing. At 12 and 24 hr, the cytopathology progressed to cytoplasmic vacuolation, swollen endoplasmic reticulum, electron opacities, and necrosis that now involved suprabasal cell layers as well. At the basement membrane zone, cellular debris and cellular fragments accumulated in the area of the lamina lucida that appeared to widen this space, resulting in the formation of a cleft. These results are largely consistent with those reported for animal models and cells in culture. In the course of this morphologic study it was observed that skin structures normally present in vivo were absent or incomplete in the human skin equivalent specimens. These included hemidesmosomes, a basement membrane, anchoring filaments, and anchoring fibrils.

  15. A case report of hydralazine-induced skin reaction: Probable toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)

    PubMed Central

    Mahfouz, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Naguib; Ashfaq, Patel Ahmad; Siyabi, Khalid Hamed Al

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 75 Final Diagnosis: Hypertensive crisis with multi organ failure Symptoms: Anemia • general weakness • hypokalemia • nausea • tachycardia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unexpected drug reaction Background: Skin reactions are common adverse drug reactions and may include angioedema, erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). TEN is a rare but serious reaction characterized by widespread erythema, necrosis, and bullous detachment of the epidermis and mucous membranes. Case Report: An elderly woman presented with generalized weakness and nausea, associated with a hypertensive crisis. Following the initiation of hydralazine, well-demarcated erythematous maculopapular rashes appeared on her right forearm and left leg, which transformed into a bullous rash. Subsequently, a similar patch appeared on her left forearm, with a similar progression and associated with generalized edema of the extremities. A clinical diagnosis of drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis was made and hydralazine was discontinued. Following this, the skin lesions improved, with complete subsequent resolution. Skin biopsy was not performed due to the rapid resolution of the lesions. A negative screen for autoantibodies ruled out systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and other undifferentiated connective tissue disorders. After re-administration of hydralazine, the same lesions appeared again, which again resolved after its discontinuation, thus confirming our initial clinical suspicion. Treatment is immediate discontinuation of the offending drug and supportive care. Conclusions: Clinical awareness with close monitoring is important for the identification of a rare adverse drug reaction, which can be fatal if not diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:24719674

  16. Abrogation of protein phosphatase 6 promotes skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Momoi, Y; Tanuma, N; Kishimoto, A; Ogoh, H; Kato, H; Suzuki, M; Sakamoto, Y; Inoue, Y; Nomura, M; Kiyonari, H; Sakayori, M; Fukamachi, K; Kakugawa, Y; Yamashita, Y; Ito, S; Sato, I; Suzuki, A; Nishio, M; Suganuma, M; Watanabe, T; Shima, H

    2015-08-27

    Somatic mutations in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 6 (Ppp6c) have been identified in malignant melanoma and are thought to function as a driver in B-raf- or N-ras-driven tumorigenesis. To assess the role of Ppp6c in carcinogenesis, we generated skin keratinocyte-specific Ppp6c conditional knockout mice and performed two-stage skin carcinogenesis analysis. Ppp6c deficiency induced papilloma formation with 7,12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene (DMBA) only, and development of those papillomas was significantly accelerated compared with that seen following DMBA/TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) treatment of wild-type mice. NF-?B activation either by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? or interleukin (IL)-1? was enhanced in Ppp6c-deficient keratinocytes. Overall, we conclude that Ppp6c deficiency predisposes mice to skin carcinogenesis initiated by DMBA. This is the first report showing that such deficiency promotes tumor formation in mice. PMID:25486434

  17. Exploring Valrubicin's Effect on Propionibacterium Acnes-Induced Skin Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rottboell, Louise; de Foenss, Sarah; Thomsen, Kenneth; Christiansen, Helle; Andersen, Stine M.; Dam, Tomas N.; Rosada, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common skin disease involving colonization with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), hyperproliferation of the follicular epithelium and inflammatory events. Valrubicin is a second-generation anthracycline, non-toxic upon contact, and available in a topical formulation. Valrubicin’s predecessor doxorubicin possesses antibacterial effects and previously we demonstrated that valrubicin inhibits keratinocyte proliferation and skin inflammation suggesting beneficial topical treatment of acne with valrubicin. This study aims to investigate valrubicin’s possible use in acne treatment by testing valrubicin’s antibacterial effects against P. acnes and P. acnes-induced skin inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Valrubicin was demonstrated not to possess antibacterial effects against P. acnes. Additionally, valrubicin was demonstrated not to reduce mRNA and protein expression levels of the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in vitro in human keratinocytes co-cultured with P. acnes. Moreover, in vivo, valrubicin, applied both topically and intra-dermally, was not able to reduce signs of inflammation in mouse ears intra-dermally injected with P. acnes. Taken together, this study does not support beneficial antibacterial and anti inflammatory effects of topical valrubicin treatment of acne.

  18. The “Starfield” Pattern of Cerebral Fat Embolism From Bone Marrow Necrosis in Sickle Cell Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Laxmi P.; Bourgeois, Kirk; Barrett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease may manifest with cerebrovascular and systemic complications. Sickle crisis that results in avascular necrosis of long bones with resultant cerebral fat embolism syndrome is rare and has a characteristic “starfield” pattern on MRI. This “starfield” MRI pattern should raise suspicion for sickle cell crisis in patients without a known history of the disease, which can lead to earlier sickle cell red blood cell exchange transfusion and treatment. We present a case of a male who presented emergently with acute seizure, coma with a characteristic MRI pattern, which lead to the diagnosis of avascular bone marrow necrosis and cerebral fat embolism syndrome from sickle cell crisis PMID:25829988

  19. Alcohol-Dependent Liver Cell Necrosis in vitro: A New Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Francis A. X.; Zucker, Amy H.; Farber, John L.; Rubin, Emanuel

    1981-04-01

    In alcoholic liver injury, necrosis is involved in the progression from benign fatty liver to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. However, there is no practical model of alcohol-dependent liver cell necrosis. The calcium-dependent killing of cultured rat hepatocytes by two different membrane-active hepatotoxins, galactosamine and phalloidin, is potentiated by ethyl alcohol. This indicates that some general physical effect of alcohol on cellular membranes renders cells susceptible to otherwise nonlethal injuries. The in vitro model described in this report may thus be used to search for a general mechanism underlying alcohol-related tissue injury.

  20. Total hip arthroplasty in avascular necrosis of the femoral head in a patient with transplanted heart.

    PubMed

    Samardži?, Ivan; Samardži?, Jure; Mili?i?, Davor; Kolundži?, Robert

    2012-02-01

    With the improvement of transplantation techniques and immunosupresive treatment of transplanted patients, the number of heart transplantations increases worldwide including Croatia. The survival of such patients is significantly increased. Therefore, the prevalence of known complications is high, one of which is avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This paper presents a case of the first patient in Croatia who underwent bilateral hip arthroplasty due to bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head as a side effect of corticosteroid therapy after heart transplantation. PMID:22634933

  1. Viral encephalitis complicated by acute retinal necrosis syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, ZHI-GANG; LIU, ZHU-LI; SUN, XU-WEN; TAO, MAN-LI; YU, GUO-PING

    2015-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis syndrome (ARN) is a viral infection characterized by focal retinal necrosis. Viral meningitis complicated by ARN is relatively rare. In the present case study, a 44-year-old male presented with fever, headache and mental disorder. After four days, the patient developed blurred vision. The patient was diagnosed with viral encephalitis complicated by bilateral ARN, based on the examination results. After treatment with antivirals and systemic glucocorticoids, the symptoms of the patient improved. Viral encephalitis may be an important risk factor for ARN. For a patient with viral encephalitis who experiences decreased visual acuity or vitreous opacification, the possibility of ARN should be considered.

  2. Antitumor necrosis factor-induced neutropenia: a case report with double positive rechallenges.

    PubMed

    Montané, E; Sallés, M; Barriocanal, A; Riera, E; Costa, J; Tena, X

    2007-09-01

    A 50-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis who developed neutropenia after treatment of etanercept, with two positive rechallenges, and after the first infliximab infusion, is described. Although leukopenia and neutropenia related to etanercept and infliximab have been described as rare adverse events from clinical trials data, their mechanism of action are unknown. This patient developed recurrent mild neutropenia after exposition of two different antitumor necrosis factors; therefore, it seems to be an adverse reaction related to the therapeutic group. Doctors should be aware of this potentially severe adverse effect in patients treated with antitumor necrosis factor. PMID:17031483

  3. Preparation of Inactivated Human Skin Using High Hydrostatic Pressurization for Full-Thickness Skin Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liem, Pham Hieu; Morimoto, Naoki; Mahara, Atsushi; Jinno, Chizuru; Shima, Koji; Ogino, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Kakudo, Natsuko; Inoie, Masukazu; Kusumoto, Kenji; Fujisato, Toshia; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    We have reported that high-hydrostatic-pressure (HHP) technology is safe and useful for producing various kinds of decellularized tissue. However, the preparation of decellularized or inactivated skin using HHP has not been reported. The objective of this study was thus to prepare inactivated skin from human skin using HHP, and to explore the appropriate conditions of pressurization to inactivate skin that can be used for skin reconstruction. Human skin samples of 8 mm in diameter were packed in bags filled with normal saline solution (NSS) or distilled water (DW), and then pressurized at 0, 100, 150, 200 and 1000 MPa for 10 minutes. The viability of skin after HHP was evaluated using WST-8 assay. Outgrowth cells from pressurized skin and the viability of pressurized skin after cultivation for 14 days were also evaluated. The pressurized skin was subjected to histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining of type IV collagen for the basement membrane of epidermis and capillaries, and immunohistochemical staining of von Willebrand factor (vWF) for capillaries. Then, human cultured epidermis (CE) was applied on the pressurized skin and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; specimens were subsequently obtained 14 days after implantation. Skin samples pressurized at more than 200 MPa were inactivated in both NSS and DW. The basement membrane and capillaries remained intact in all groups according to histological and immunohistological evaluations, and collagen fibers showed no apparent damage by SEM. CE took on skin pressurized at 150 and 200 MPa after implantation, whereas it did not take on skin pressurized at 1000 MPa. These results indicate that human skin could be inactivated after pressurization at more than 200 MPa, but skin pressurized at 1000 MPa had some damage to the dermis that prevented the taking of CE. Therefore, pressurization at 200 MPa is optimal for preparing inactivated skin that can be used for skin reconstruction. PMID:26226373

  4. Preparation of Inactivated Human Skin Using High Hydrostatic Pressurization for Full-Thickness Skin Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Pham Hieu; Morimoto, Naoki; Mahara, Atsushi; Jinno, Chizuru; Shima, Koji; Ogino, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Kakudo, Natsuko; Inoie, Masukazu; Kusumoto, Kenji; Fujisato, Toshia; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    We have reported that high-hydrostatic-pressure (HHP) technology is safe and useful for producing various kinds of decellularized tissue. However, the preparation of decellularized or inactivated skin using HHP has not been reported. The objective of this study was thus to prepare inactivated skin from human skin using HHP, and to explore the appropriate conditions of pressurization to inactivate skin that can be used for skin reconstruction. Human skin samples of 8 mm in diameter were packed in bags filled with normal saline solution (NSS) or distilled water (DW), and then pressurized at 0, 100, 150, 200 and 1000 MPa for 10 minutes. The viability of skin after HHP was evaluated using WST-8 assay. Outgrowth cells from pressurized skin and the viability of pressurized skin after cultivation for 14 days were also evaluated. The pressurized skin was subjected to histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining of type IV collagen for the basement membrane of epidermis and capillaries, and immunohistochemical staining of von Willebrand factor (vWF) for capillaries. Then, human cultured epidermis (CE) was applied on the pressurized skin and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; specimens were subsequently obtained 14 days after implantation. Skin samples pressurized at more than 200 MPa were inactivated in both NSS and DW. The basement membrane and capillaries remained intact in all groups according to histological and immunohistological evaluations, and collagen fibers showed no apparent damage by SEM. CE took on skin pressurized at 150 and 200 MPa after implantation, whereas it did not take on skin pressurized at 1000 MPa. These results indicate that human skin could be inactivated after pressurization at more than 200 MPa, but skin pressurized at 1000 MPa had some damage to the dermis that prevented the taking of CE. Therefore, pressurization at 200 MPa is optimal for preparing inactivated skin that can be used for skin reconstruction. PMID:26226373

  5. Principles of skin care in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Surber, C; Brandt, S; Cozzio, A; Kottner, J

    2015-12-01

    With aging, skin undergoes progressive structural and functional degeneration that leaves it prone to a wide variety of bothersome and even serious conditions and diseases. As skin conditions and diseases may affect all ages from cradle to grave, a disproportionate burden will clearly fall on the elderly and may significantly impact on quality of life (QoL). With a reduced ability of the skin to regenerate, the elderly are at an increased risk of skin breakdowns from even the simplest insults. It is therefore vital that skin care in the late adulthood is seen as a priority among both clinicians and caregivers. The scientific literature on diagnosing and assessing age-related skin conditions and diseases is vast; however, when it comes to preventive care and treatment, the scientific data available is less profound, and the recommendations are often based on personal experience, opinions or at best on consensus documents rather than on scientific data retrieved from controlled clinical trials. In addition to the absence of the scientific data, the imprecise terminology to describe the topical products, as well as the lack of understanding the essence of the vehicle, contributes to vague and often unhelpfully product recommendations. This paper aims to elucidate some basic principles of skincare, the choice of skincare products and their regulatory status. The paper discusses adherence to topical therapies, percutaneous absorption in the elderly, and skin surface pH and skin care. Lastly, it also discusses skin care principles in selected age related skin conditions and diseases. PMID:26349927

  6. Comparison of topical anesthesia and subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia with regard to effect of plasma skin regeneration system.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yacong; Guo, Leiyang; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Yaling

    2015-12-01

    The plasma skin regeneration (PSR) system is a safe device for skin regeneration, which is usually carried out under local anesthetic to control the pain. Topical anesthesia and subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia are the common and safe anesthetizations. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of PSR after using topical anesthetization as compared with subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia, thereby inquiring into the effect of subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia in PSR and increasing electivity for clinical work. 14 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly utilized in this experiment. After adequate sedation and depilation, the rat's back was randomly divided into three experimental regions marked as A, B, and C. A and B were treated with lidocaine cream and lidocaine hydrochloride, respectively, before PSR. C was treated solely with PSR without any anesthesia. Biopsies were taken from all treatment sites at 4 and 30 days after treatment to observe the skin necrosis and thickness of new collagen fiber. Histopathologic examination was performed by observers blinded to the treatment conditions. In this analysis, there was a statistically significant reduction (P < 0.01) in the skin necrosis and thickness of new collagen fiber in the topical anesthesia group compared with that in the other two groups, while a statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in the subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia group. The results suggest that subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia group showed a deeper range of tissue effects via the treatment of PSR as compared with the topical anesthesia and the control groups. Meanwhile, the effect of the topical anesthesia was the lowest. So we conclude that subcutaneous infiltration anesthesia for PSR treatment was superior to that of the topical anesthesia. PMID:25803677

  7. [S3 Guideline. Part 3: Non-Traumatic Avascular Necrosis in Adults - Surgical Treatment of Atraumatic Avascular Femoral Head Necrosis in Adults].

    PubMed

    Maus, U; Roth, A; Tingart, M; Rader, C; Jäger, M; Nöth, U; Reppenhagen, S; Heiss, C; Beckmann, J

    2015-10-01

    The present article describes the guidelines for the surgical treatment of atraumatic avascular necrosis (aFKN). These include joint preserving and joint replacement procedures. As part of the targeted literature, 43 publications were included and evaluated to assess the surgical treatment. According to the GRADE and SIGN criteria level of evidence (LoE), grade of recommendation (EC) and expert consensus (EK) were listed for each statement and question. The analysed studies have shown that up to ARCO stage III, joint-preserving surgery can be performed. A particular joint-preserving surgery currently cannot be recommended as preferred method. The selection of the method depends on the extent of necrosis. Core decompression performed in stage ARCO I (reversible early stage) or stage ARCO II (irreversible early stage) with medial or central necrosis with an area of less than 30?% of the femoral head shows better results than conservative therapy. In ARCO stage III with infraction of the femoral head, the core decompression can be used for a short-term pain relief. For ARCO stage IIIC or stage IV core decompression should not be performed. In these cases, the indication for implantation of a total hip replacement should be checked. Additional therapeutic procedures (e.g., osteotomies) and innovative treatment options (advanced core decompression, autologous bone marrow, bone grafting, etc.) can be discussed in the individual case. In elective hip replacement complications and revision rates have been clearly declining for decades. In the case of an underlying aFKN, however, previous joint-preserving surgery (osteotomies and grafts in particular) can complicate the implantation of a THA significantly. However, the implant life seems to be dependent on the aetiology. Higher revision rates for avascular necrosis are particularly expected in sickle cell disease, Gaucher disease, or kidney transplantation patients. Furthermore, the relatively young age of the patient with avascular necrosis should be seen as the main risk factor for higher revision rate. The results after resurfacing (today with known restricted indications) and cemented as well as cementless THA in aFKN are comparable for the appropriate indication to those in coxarthrosis or other diagnoses. Regardless of the underlying disease endoprosthetic treatment in aFKN leads to good results. Both cemented and cementless fixation techniques can be recommended. PMID:26244939

  8. HSP27 as a biomarker for predicting skin irritation in human skin and reconstructed organotypic skin model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxia; Li, Shuhua; Meng, Tian; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Taoli; Xiang, Qi; Su, Zhijian; Zhang, Qihao; Huang, Yadong

    2014-04-21

    In vitro alternative tests aiming at replacing the traditional animal test for predicting the irritant potential of chemicals have been developed, but the assessing parameters or endpoints are still not sufficient. To discover novel endpoints for skin irritation responses, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human skin exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) following the test protocol of the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) in the present study. HSP27 was up-regulated most significantly among the eight identified proteins, consistent with our previous reports. Acid and basic chemicals were applied on human skin for further validation and results showed that the up-regulated expression of HSP27 was induced in 24h after the exposure. Skin-equivalent constructed with fibroblasts, basement membrane and keratinocytes was used to investigate the potential of HSP27 as a biomarker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation. Our skin-equivalent (Reconstructed Organotypic Skin Model, ROSM) had excellent epidermal differentiation and was suitable for the skin irritation test. HSP27 also displayed an up-regulated expression in the ROSM in 24h after the irritants exposure for 15min. All these results suggest that HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products. PMID:24503015

  9. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  10. The optics of human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    An integrated review of the transfer of optical radiation into human skin is presented, aimed at developing useful models for photomedicine. The component chromophores of epidermis and stratum corneum in general determine the attenuation of radiation in these layers, moreso than does optical scattering. Epidermal thickness and melanization are important factors for UV wavelengths less than 300 nm, whereas the attenuation of UVA (320-400 nm) and visible radiation is primarily via melanin. The selective penetration of all optical wavelengths into psoriatic skin can be maximized by application of clear lipophilic liquids, which decrease regular reflectance by a refractive-index matching mechanism. Sensitivity to wavelengths less than 320 nm can be enhanced by prolonged aqueous bathing, which extracts urocanic acid and other diffusible epidermal chromophores. Optical properties of the dermis are modelled using the Kubelka-Munk approach, and calculations of scattering and absorption coefficients are presented. This simple approach allows estimates of the penetration of radiation in vivo using noninvasive measurements of cutaneous spectral remittance (diffuse reflectance). Although the blood chromophores Hb, HbO/sup 2/, and bilirubin determine dermal absorption of wavelengths longer than 320 nm, scattering by collagen fibers largely determines the depths to which these wavelengths penetrate the dermis, and profoundly modifies skin colors. An optical ''window'' exists between 600 and 1300 nm, which offers the possibility of treating large tissue volumes with certain long-wavelength photosensitizers. Moreover, whenever photosensitized action spectra extend across the near UV and/or visible spectrum, judicious choice of wavelengths allows some selection of the tissue layers directly affected.

  11. [Diagnostic problems in skin tumors].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1979-09-15

    Several starting-points for improvement of diagnostic accuracy in skin tumors are illustrated by examples: Frequencies and direction of diagnostic errors, as well as the value of diagnostic criteria need further investigations. Frequent "customary" diseases need more attention in medical textbooks, compared with less frequent "interesting" syndromes. Erroneous denominations and historical false classifications which are handed down in the literature demand correction. The possibility continues, that apparently clearly defined entities may decay; they may be replaced by new entities in consequence of new perceptions. PMID:539026

  12. Flexible Skins Containing Integrated Sensors and Circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang

    2007-01-01

    Artificial sensor skins modeled partly in imitation of biological sensor skins are undergoing development. These sensor skins comprise flexible polymer substrates that contain and/or support dense one- and two-dimensional arrays of microscopic sensors and associated microelectronic circuits. They afford multiple tactile sensing modalities for measuring physical phenomena that can include contact forces; hardnesses, temperatures, and thermal conductivities of objects with which they are in contact; and pressures, shear stresses, and flow velocities in fluids. The sensor skins are mechanically robust, and, because of their flexibility, they can be readily attached to curved and possibly moving and flexing surfaces of robots, wind-tunnel models, and other objects that one might seek to equip for tactile sensing. Because of the diversity of actual and potential sensor-skin design criteria and designs and the complexity of the fabrication processes needed to realize the designs, it is not possible to describe the sensor-skin concept in detail within this article.

  13. What impacts skin color in digital photos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Albrecht; Winkler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Skin colors are important for a broad range of imaging applications to assure quality and naturalness. We discuss the impact of various metadata on skin colors in images, i.e. how does the presence of a metadata attribute influence the expected skin color distribution for a given image. For this purpose we employ a statistical framework to automatically build color models from image datasets crawled from the web. We assess both technical and semantic metadata and show that semantic metadata has a more significant impact. This suggests that semantic metadata holds important cues for processing of skin colors. Further we demonstrate that the refined skin color models from our automatic framework improve the accuracy of skin detection.

  14. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of rabbit dorsal skin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Yahao; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Rabbits are often preferred to be experimental animals during the skin research. The visualizing and understanding the full-thickness structure of rabbit skin has significance in biology, medicine, and animal husbandry. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was employed to examine the rabbit skin on the back, which was based on second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence. High-resolution images were achieved from the fresh, unfixed, and unstained tissues, showing detailed microstructure of the skin without the administration of exogenous contrast agents. The morphology and distribution of the main components of epidermis and dermis, such as keratin, collagen fibers, elastic fibers, and hair follicles, can be distinctly identified in MPM images. Since the changes in these components are tightly related to skin diseases and wound healing, the noninvasive nature of MPM enables it become a valuable tool in skin research for detecting and monitoring. PMID:25521496

  15. Adaptive skin detection based on online training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Tang, Liang; Zhou, Jie; Rong, Gang

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a widely used cue for porn image classification. Most conventional methods are off-line training schemes. They usually use a fixed boundary to segment skin regions in the images and are effective only in restricted conditions: e.g. good lightness and unique human race. This paper presents an adaptive online training scheme for skin detection which can handle these tough cases. In our approach, skin detection is considered as a classification problem on Gaussian mixture model. For each image, human face is detected and the face color is used to establish a primary estimation of skin color distribution. Then an adaptive online training algorithm is used to find the real boundary between skin color and background color in current image. Experimental results on 450 images showed that the proposed method is more robust in general situations than the conventional ones.

  16. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  17. Methylene blue diffusion in skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-07-01

    The study of Methylene Blue penetration in both skin and subcutaneous fat is presented. Experiments have been carried out with both rat skin and human adipose tissue in vitro at room temperature. Microscopic analysis with digital imaging system has been applied for visualizing and investigation of the Methylene Blue diffusion in the epidermal, dermal and adipose tissue. Diffusion coefficient of Methylene Blue in skin in vitro has been estimated.

  18. Skin Microbiome: Looking Back to Move Forward

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Heidi H.; Segre, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    Trillions of bacteria, fungi, viruses, archaea and small arthropods colonize the skin surface, collectively comprising the skin microbiome. Generations of researchers have classified these microbes as transient versus resident, beneficial versus pathogenic, collaborators versus adversaries. Culturing and direct sequencing of microbial inhabitants identified distinct populations present at skin surface sites. Herein, we explore the history of this field, describe findings from the current molecular sequencing era, and consider the future of investigating how microbes and antimicrobial therapy contribute to human health. PMID:22189793

  19. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies. PMID:21176105

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Fish Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sea Perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a fish nervous necrosis virus isolated from diseased sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in Guangdong Province, China. The virus genome contains RNA1 (3,103 bp) and RNA2 (1,433 bp). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the virus belongs to the redspotted grouper nervous necrosis virus genotype of betanodavirus. PMID:26044411

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Fish Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sea Perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Peng; Jia, Kun-Tong; Yi, Mei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a fish nervous necrosis virus isolated from diseased sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in Guangdong Province, China. The virus genome contains RNA1 (3,103 bp) and RNA2 (1,433 bp). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the virus belongs to the redspotted grouper nervous necrosis virus genotype of betanodavirus. PMID:26044411

  2. Maize Chlorotic Mottle Machlomovirus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Rymovirus Concentrations Increase in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis

    E-print Network

    Scheets, Kay

    in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis Kay Scheets1 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics for revision October 20, 1997; accepted December 8, 1997 Corn lethal necrosis (CLN) is caused cereals. Interactions between MCMV and wheat streak mosaic rymovirus (WSMV) in N28Ht corn produced MCMV

  3. Drilling and Microfracture Lead to Different Bone Structure and Necrosis during Bone-Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    channels to marrow stroma. Our second hypothesis that drilling would cause greater osteocyte death than microfracture due to heat necrosis was not substantiated, because more empty osteocyte lacunae were associated structure and osteocyte necrosis. Additional ongoing studies suggest these differences significantly affect

  4. Block copolymer nanotemplating of tobacco mosaic and tobacco necrosis viruses q

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Block copolymer nanotemplating of tobacco mosaic and tobacco necrosis viruses q Arthur V. Cresce This paper examines the interaction between a block copolymer and a virus. A poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) block copolymer was loaded with nickel, and cast from a selective solvent mixture to form a cylindrical

  5. Rhein Induces a Necrosis-Apoptosis Switch in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianlin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Shifeng; Liu, Yiling; Zhao, Jianlei; Wan, Meihua; Tang, Wenfu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The Chinese herbal medicine Da-Cheng-Qi decoction can regulate a necrosis-apoptosis switch in injured pancreatic acinar cells. This study investigated the effects of rhein, a component of this medicine, on a necrosis-apoptosis switch in pancreatic rat AR42J cells. Methods. Cerulein-treated AR42J cells were used. After pretreatment with 479, 119.8, or 29.9??g/L rhein, cells were cocultured with rhein and cerulein (10?8?M) for 4, 8, or 16?h. Apoptosis and necrosis were examined using annexin V and propidium iodide costaining. Mitochondria-dependent apoptosis-associated proteins were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western blotting. Results. Few cells died in untreated samples. The number was significantly higher in 16-h-cerulein-treated samples and treatment with 479??g/L rhein most effectively increased the apoptotic-to-necrotic cell ratio (P < 0.05). In cerulein-treated cells, rhein increased the concentrations of p53, cytochrome C, and caspase-3, and increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the maximum effect in cells treated with 479??g/L rhein for 16?h (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Rhein induces the necrosis-apoptosis switch in injured pancreatic acinar cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mitochondria-dependent apoptosis signaling pathways might play an important role in this effect. PMID:24959186

  6. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation and Necrosis Detection Using Adaptive Sobolev Snakes.

    PubMed

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-21

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at different points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D diffusion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation. PMID:25302005

  7. MRI brain tumor segmentation and necrosis detection using adaptive Sobolev snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at di erent points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D di usion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation.

  8. Functional Characterization of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 15(TNFSF15) Induced by Lipopolysaccharides and Eimeria Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A full-length cDNA encoding chicken tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) was isolated and its functional role was investigated. TNFSF15 transcripts were primarily expressed in spleen, liver, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), peripheral blood lymphocytes and bursa. In vitro inf...

  9. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of an Isolate of Coleus vein necrosis virus from Verbena

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant of 'Taylor Town Red' verbena exhibiting mottling, necrosis and low vigor was tested for the presence of viruses by extracting double-stranded RNA which is indicative of infection with an RNA virus. The dsRNA was cloned and sequenced and a novel carlavirus identified. The new virus was dete...

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: a missed diagnosis and a blind, young woman

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Parth; Oldfield, Edward C; Marik, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with a history significant for HIV/AIDS (CD4 count of 17) and diabetes mellitus who was diagnosed as having progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) after presenting with peripheral vision loss. This case provided a diagnostic challenge and demonstrates the devastating effects of a misdiagnosis as it pertains to PORN. PMID:23608868

  11. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii Strain SH-14, Which Causes Shrimp Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyuan; Xiao, Jinzhou; Xia, Xiaoming; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced Vibrio owensii strain SH-14, which causes serious acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. Sequence analysis showed a large extrachromosomal plasmid, which encoded pir toxin genes and shared highly sequence similarity with the one observed in AHPND-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains. The results suggest that this plasmid appears to play an important role in shrimp AHPND. PMID:26634753

  13. Sulfide toxicity: Mechanical ventilation and hypotension determine survival rate and brain necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldelli, R.J.; Green, F.H.Y.; Auer, R.N. )

    1993-09-01

    Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide is one of the leading causes of sudden death in the workplace, especially in the oil and gas industry. High-dose exposure causes immediate neurogenic apnea and death; lower doses cause [open quotes]knockdown[close quotes] (transient loss of consciousness, with apnea). Because permanent neurological sequelae have been reported, the authors sought to determine whether sulfide can directly kill central nervous system neurons. Ventilated and unventilated rats were studied to allow administration of higher doses of sulfide and to facilitate physiological monitoring. It was extremely difficult to produce cerebral necrosis with sulfide. Only one of eight surviving unventilated rats given high-dose sulfide (a dose that was lethal in [ge]50% of animals) showed cerebral necrosis. Mechanical ventilation shifted the dose that was lethal in 50% of the animals to 190 mg/kg from 94 mg/kg in the unventilated rats. Sulfide was found to potently depress blood pressure. Cerebral necrosis was absent in the ventilated rats (n = 11), except in one rat that showed profound and sustained hypotension to [le]35 Torr. Electroencephalogram activity ceased during exposure but recovered when the animals regained consciousness. The authors conclude that very-high-dose sulfide is incapable of producing cerebral necrosis by a direct histotoxic effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  14. The HMGB1/RAGE axis triggers neutrophil-mediated injury amplification following necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Huebener, Peter; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Hernandez, Celine; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Caviglia, Jorge Matias; Mu, Xueru; Loike, John D.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to microbially triggered inflammation, mechanisms promoting sterile inflammation remain poorly understood. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are considered key inducers of sterile inflammation following cell death, but the relative contribution of specific DAMPs, including high–mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is ill defined. Due to the postnatal lethality of Hmgb1-knockout mice, the role of HMGB1 in sterile inflammation and disease processes in vivo remains controversial. Here, using conditional ablation strategies, we have demonstrated that epithelial, but not bone marrow–derived, HMGB1 is required for sterile inflammation following injury. Epithelial HMGB1, through its receptor RAGE, triggered recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, toward necrosis. In clinically relevant models of necrosis, HMGB1/RAGE-induced neutrophil recruitment mediated subsequent amplification of injury, depending on the presence of neutrophil elastase. Notably, hepatocyte-specific HMGB1 ablation resulted in 100% survival following lethal acetaminophen intoxication. In contrast to necrosis, HMGB1 ablation did not alter inflammation or mortality in response to TNF- or FAS-mediated apoptosis. In LPS-induced shock, in which HMGB1 was considered a key mediator, HMGB1 ablation did not ameliorate inflammation or lethality, despite efficient reduction of HMGB1 serum levels. Our study establishes HMGB1 as a bona fide and targetable DAMP that selectively triggers a neutrophil-mediated injury amplification loop in the setting of necrosis. PMID:25562324

  15. Perspectives on the therapeutic modulation of an alternative cell death, programmed necrosis (review).

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Sik

    2014-06-01

    In response to overwhelming external stimuli, cells are forced to die in different ways. By default, cells are prone to apoptosis, a programmed cell death through the activation of the caspase cascade. However, this process would be blocked if one of the proteins involved in executing apoptosis was genetically impaired or chemically inhibited, or if the apoptotic machinery was not properly operated under specific conditions, such as ischemia and microbial infection. To address these issues, the paradigm of programmed cell death needs to be revised; thus, an alternative form of cell death, programmed necrosis (termed necroptosis, through the caspase-independent pathway), which is distinct from apoptosis in many aspects, has recently been adopted. There is much interest in programmed necrosis as it is very closely associated with pathophysiological conditions, such as stroke, heart attack and septic shock. In an effort to identify target molecules of small compounds interfering with the signaling downstream of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) was first identified to be a selective allosteric inhibitor of the death domain receptor-associated adaptor kinase, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) in vitro. Since then, some novel scaffolds with selective and distinctive activity have been proposed. In this review, the significant advancement and state-of-art direction for the development of small molecules that can control programmed necrosis is discussed. Furthermore, the perspectives on novel strategies harnessing therapeutic targets identified thus far, are also discussed. PMID:24676489

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Converting Enzyme (ADAM17) Mediates GPIb Shedding From Platelets

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Tumor Necrosis Factor- ­Converting Enzyme (ADAM17) Mediates GPIb Shedding From Platelets In Vitro of a hemostatic plug. Proteolytic cleavage (shedding) of the GPIb subunit was first described 25 years ago reported recently that shedding of GPIb induced by platelet storage or mitochondrial injury involves

  17. Genetic resistance to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in pedigreed atlantic salmon (salmo salar) 

    E-print Network

    Guy, Derrick Richard

    2011-06-27

    Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN), due to infection with the IPN virus (IPNv), continues to cause heavy mortalities and is endemic across the major Atlantic salmon farming regions of the world. Prevalances of 0.3-0.8 or more at the freshwater...

  18. Endoscopic transgastric debridement and drainage for splenic necrosis following an acute episode in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Binek, J; Fretz, C; Meyenberger, C

    2006-06-01

    Management of the complications and sequelae of acute and chronic pancreatitis is a clinical challenge. We report a case of successful transgastric drainage of splenic necrosis after occlusion of the splenic vessels during an acute episode in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16802272

  19. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  20. Focal parietal necrosis of the sigmoid due to atypical neuroleptics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devresse, Arnaud; Maldague, Philippe; Coulier, Bruno; Pierard, Frédéric; Gielen, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    We present the case of a 26-year-old man with schizoid personality disorder who suffered from a very focal and transparietal necrosis of the sigmoid after an overdose of atypical neuroleptics. This is a singular, rather unknown and potentially lethal side effect of these drugs. The physiopathology of this complication is multifactorial. PMID:22870793