Science.gov

Sample records for warm magnetized atomic

  1. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Gradient Echo Quantum Memory in Warm Atomic Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Sparkes, Ben M.; Everett, Jesse L.; Higginbottom, Daniel; Campbell, Geoff T.; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben C.

    2013-01-01

    Gradient echo memory (GEM) is a protocol for storing optical quantum states of light in atomic ensembles. The primary motivation for such a technology is that quantum key distribution (QKD), which uses Heisenberg uncertainty to guarantee security of cryptographic keys, is limited in transmission distance. The development of a quantum repeater is a possible path to extend QKD range, but a repeater will need a quantum memory. In our experiments we use a gas of rubidium 87 vapor that is contained in a warm gas cell. This makes the scheme particularly simple. It is also a highly versatile scheme that enables in-memory refinement of the stored state, such as frequency shifting and bandwidth manipulation. The basis of the GEM protocol is to absorb the light into an ensemble of atoms that has been prepared in a magnetic field gradient. The reversal of this gradient leads to rephasing of the atomic polarization and thus recall of the stored optical state. We will outline how we prepare the atoms and this gradient and also describe some of the pitfalls that need to be avoided, in particular four-wave mixing, which can give rise to optical gain. PMID:24300586

  3. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2013-07-23

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales which rises de possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger's proper time method.

  4. Magnetic Control of Atomic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Tom; Bannerman, Travis; Chavez, Isaac; Clark, Rob; Libson, Adam; Raizen, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Using a sequence of pulsed electromagnetic coils, known as the atomic coilgun, we slowed supersonic beams of atomic neon and molecular oxygen. We report our progress toward adapting the atomic coilgun for magnetically trapping hydrogen isotopes. This work has motivated us to investigate other methods for magnetic control of atomic motion. We describe these techniques, and present calculations suggesting their utility in controlling atomic motion. We then outline our plans for using these methods in certain applications.

  5. Magnetic remanence in single atoms.

    PubMed

    Donati, F; Rusponi, S; Stepanow, S; Wäckerlin, C; Singha, A; Persichetti, L; Baltic, R; Diller, K; Patthey, F; Fernandes, E; Dreiser, J; Šljivančanin, Ž; Kummer, K; Nistor, C; Gambardella, P; Brune, H

    2016-04-15

    A permanent magnet retains a substantial fraction of its saturation magnetization in the absence of an external magnetic field. Realizing magnetic remanence in a single atom allows for storing and processing information in the smallest unit of matter. We show that individual holmium (Ho) atoms adsorbed on ultrathin MgO(100) layers on Ag(100) exhibit magnetic remanence up to a temperature of 30 kelvin and a relaxation time of 1500 seconds at 10 kelvin. This extraordinary stability is achieved by the realization of a symmetry-protected magnetic ground state and by decoupling the Ho spin from the underlying metal by a tunnel barrier. PMID:27081065

  6. Mass loss from warm giants: Magnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Among warm giant stars, rapid mass loss sets in along a well defined velocity dividing line (VDL). Hot corona also disappear close to the VDL and thermal pressure cannot drive the observed rapid mass loss in these stars. The VDL may be associated with magnetic fields changing from closed to open. Such a change is consistent with the lack of X-rays from late-type giants. A magnetic transition locus based on Pneuman's work on helmet streamer stability agrees well with the empirical VDL. The change from closed to open fields not only makes rapid mass loss possible, but also contributes to energizing the mass loss in the form of discrete bubbles.

  7. The first single atom magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Fabio; Rusponi, Stefano; Wäckerlin, Christian; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Fernandes, Edgar; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan; Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Kummer, Kurt; Stepanow, Sebastian; Persichetti, Luca; Nistor, Corneliu; Gambardella, Pietro

    The prime feature of a magnet is to retain a significant fraction of its saturation magnetization in the absence of an external magnetic field. Realizing magnetic remanence in a single atom would allow storing and processing information in the smallest unit of matter. Here we show that individual rare-earth atoms on ultrathin insulating layers grown on non-magnetic metal substrates exhibit magnetic remanence and, therefore, are the first magnets formed by a single surface adsorbed atom. These magnets have a magnetic lifetime of 1500 s and a coercive field of 3.7 T at 10 K. In addition, their hysteresis loop remains open up to 30 K. This first example of a single atom magnet shows bistability at a temperature which is significantly higher than the best single molecule magnets reported so far. Its extraordinary stability is achieved by a suitable combination of magnetic ground state and adsorption site symmetry, and by decoupling the 4 f spin from the underlying metal by a tunnel barrier.

  8. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  9. Atomic and optical properties of warm dense copper.

    PubMed

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    The emission of x rays from warm dense matter is of great interest for both spectroscopic diagnostics and development of intense x-ray sources. We report the results from the collisional-radiative steady-state (CRSS) modeling of atomic and optical properties of copper plasmas at near-solid and solid-state density for a range of temperatures. The CRSS model is validated against the available data on the average charge state and shifts of energy levels in aluminum and the opacity and emissivity spectra of carbon and aluminum plasmas. The average charge states, number density of ion species, and free electrons as a function of temperature are investigated for the solid-density copper plasma. Due to the dense plasma environment the four outer electrons are found to be unbounded even in the low-temperature limit ∼1eV. As the temperature changes from 1 to 100 eV, the predominant species vary from fivefold- to twelvefold-ionized copper ions. The opacity and emissivity spectra of dense copper plasmas are studied using the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE approaches. It is found that the non-LTE effects are important in the spectral region of soft x rays emitted from the K shell. The emissivity in spectral lines is completely suppressed, indicating the importance of the energy-dissipating radiative processes in this soft x-ray region. Line broadening and redshifts of the K- and L-shell spectral lines toward higher wavelengths are observed with the increase of plasma density. These results have important implications for understanding the radiative properties of warm dense copper and can be useful for future experimental studies. PMID:26465577

  10. Topological Superconductivity with Magnetic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazman, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    Chains of magnetic impurities embedded in a conventional s-wave superconductor may induce the formation of a topologically non-trivial superconducting phase. If such a phase is formed along a chain, then its ends carry Majorana fermions. We investigate this possibility theoretically by developing a tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes description, starting from the Shiba bound states induced by the individual magnetic impurities. While the resulting Hamiltonian has similarities with the Kitaev model for one-dimensional spinless p-wave superconductors, there are also important differences, most notably the long-range (power-law) nature of hopping and pairing as well as the complex hopping amplitudes. We develop an analytical theory, complemented by numerical approaches, which accounts for the electron long-range pairing and hopping along the chain, inhomogeneous magnetic order in the chain of embedded impurities or spin-orbit coupling in the host superconductor, and the possibility of direct electron hopping between the impurity atoms. This allows us to elucidate the domain of parameters favoring the formation of a topological phase and to find the spatial structure of Majorana states appearing in that phase. This talk is based on joint work with F. von Oppen, Falko Pientka, and Yang Peng.

  11. Warm inflation in the presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Sánchez, Ángel; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of primordial magnetic fields on the inflationary potential in the context of a warm inflation scenario. The model, based on global supersymmetry with a new-inflation-type potential and a coupling between the inflaton and a heavy intermediate superfield, is already known to preserve the flatness required for slow-roll conditions even after including thermal contributions. Here we show that the magnetic field makes the potential even flatter, retarding the transition and rendering it smoother.

  12. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  13. Warm and dense stellar matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the equation of state of warm stellar matter as it may occur in a protoneutron star. Both neutrino-free and neutrino-trapped matter at a fixed entropy per baryon are analyzed. A relativistic mean-field nuclear model, including the possibility of hyperon formation, is considered. A density-dependent magnetic field with a magnitude of 10{sup 15} G at the surface and not more than 3x10{sup 18} G at the center is considered. The magnetic field gives rise to a neutrino suppression, mainly at low densities, in matter with trapped neutrinos. It is shown that a hybrid protoneutron star will not evolve into a low-mass black hole if the magnetic field is strong enough and the magnetic field does not decay. However, the decay of the magnetic field after cooling may give rise to the formation of a low-mass black hole.

  14. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  15. Cold atom reflection from curved magnetic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ifan G.; Barton, P. A.; Boshier, M. G.; Hinds, Edward A.

    1997-05-01

    Multiple bounces of cold rubidium atoms have been observed for times up to one second in a trap formed by gravity and a 2 cm-diameter spherical mirror made from a sinusoidally magnetized floppy disk. We have studied the dynamics of the atoms bouncing in this trap from several different heights up to 40.5 mm and we conclude that the atoms are reflected specularly and with reflectivity 1.01(3). Slight roughness of the mirror is caused by harmonics in the magnetization of the surface and by discontinuities at the boundaries between recorded tracks. As the next step in this atom optics program we propose using a magnetic mirror to create a 2D atomic gas. We discuss how cold atoms can be loaded into the ground state of a static magnetic potential well that exists above the surface of the mirror as a consequence of the intermediate-field Zeeman effect.

  16. Large spin magnetism with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laburthe-Tolra, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The properties of quantum gases made of ultra-cold atoms strongly depend on the interactions between atoms. These interactions lead to condensed-matter-like collective behavior, so that quantum gases appear to be a new platform to study quantum many-body physics. In this seminar, I will focus on the case where the atoms possess an internal (spin) degrees of freedom. The spin of atoms is naturally larger than that of electrons. Therefore, the study of the magnetic properties of ultra-cold gases allows for an exploration of magnetism beyond the typical situation in solid-state physics where magnetism is associated to the s = 1/2 spin of the electron. I will describe three specific cases: spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, where spin-dependent contact interactions introduce new quantum phases and spin dynamics; large spin magnetic atoms where strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to exotic quantum magnetism; large spin Fermi gases.

  17. Magnetic whispering-gallery mirror for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, R. P.; Merimeche, H.; Mützel, M.; Metcalf, H.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Rosenbusch, P.; Hinds, E. A.

    2001-05-01

    Videotape with a sinusoidal magnetization of 31 μm wavelength is used to reflect Cs atoms with unit reflectivity in a 75 m/s atomic beam. The atoms serve as a probe, allowing us to measure the magnetic field at the surface. A technique is presented for mounting the videotape so that its surface can be curved to a specific shape or made flexible. We show that such a reflector provides high-quality grazing-incidence atom optics and we demonstrate deflections as large as 23 ° in a whispering-gallery geometry.

  18. Warm Magnetic Field Measurements of LARP HQ Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S; Cheng, D; Deitderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Hafalia, R; Joseph, J; Lizarazo, J; Martchevskii, M; Nash, C; Sabbi, G L; Vu, C; Schmalzle, J; Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; DiMarco, J; Kashikhin, V

    2011-03-28

    The US-LHC Accelerator Research Program is developing and testing a high-gradient quadrupole (HQ) magnet, aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb{sub 3}Sn technologies for the LHC luminosity upgrade. The 1 m long HQ magnet has a 120 mm bore with a conductor-limited gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field of 15 T. HQ includes accelerator features such as alignment and field quality. Here we present the magnetic measurement results obtained at LBNL with a constant current of 30 A. A 100 mm long circuit-board rotating coil developed by FNAL was used and the induced voltage and flux increment were acquired. The measured b{sub 6} ranges from 0.3 to 0.5 units in the magnet straight section at a reference radius of 21.55 mm. The data reduced from the numerical integration of the raw voltage agree with those from the fast digital integrators.

  19. Atom optics with permanent magnetic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Dieter; Bloch, Immanuel; Goepfert, A.; Haubrich, D.; Kreis, M.; Lison, F.; Schuetze, R.; Wynands, Robert

    1997-05-01

    We have fabricated and investigated efficient magnetic lenses, waveguides, and mirrors from rare earth permanent materials. They are affordable and maintenance free. In contrast to corresponding light force components they do not need any supplies, they have large apertures, high reflectivity, and there is no spontaneous emission. The cylindrical shape of magnetic components is furthermore well suited to steer atomic beams.

  20. Ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency using nanofiber-guided light in a warm atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. E.; Franson, J. D.; Pittman, T. B.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofiber suspended in a warm rubidium vapor. The signal and control fields are both guided along the nanofiber, which enables strong nonlinear interactions with the surrounding atoms at relatively low powers. Transit-time broadening is found to be a significant EIT decoherence mechanism in this tightly confined waveguiding geometry. Nonetheless, we observe significant EIT and controlled polarization rotation using control-field powers of only a few microwatts in this relatively robust warm-atom nanofiber system.

  1. Analysis of a magnetically trapped atom clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kadio, D.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-11-15

    We consider optimization of a rubidium atom clock that uses magnetically trapped Bose condensed atoms in a highly elongated trap, and determine the optimal conditions for minimum Allan variance of the clock using microwave Ramsey fringe spectroscopy. Elimination of magnetic field shifts and collisional shifts are considered. The effects of spin-dipolar relaxation are addressed in the optimization of the clock. We find that for the interstate interaction strength equal to or larger than the intrastate interaction strengths, a modulational instability results in phase separation and symmetry breaking of the two-component condensate composed of the ground and excited hyperfine clock levels, and this mechanism limits the clock accuracy.

  2. Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particledetection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Pines, Alexander; Rochester,Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2006-09-17

    We demonstrate the detection of magnetic particles carriedby water in a continuous flow using an atomic magnetic gradiometer.Studies on three types of magnetic particles are presented: a singlecobalt particle (diameter ~;150 mum, multi-domain), a suspension ofsuperparamagnetic magnetite particles (diameter ~;1 mum), andferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (diameter ~;10 nm, 120 kA/mmagnetization). Estimated detection limits are 20 mum diameter for asingle cobalt particle at a water flow rate 30 ml/min, 5x103 magnetiteparticles at 160 ml/min, and 50 pl for the specific ferromagnetic fluidat 130 ml/min. Possible applications of our method arediscussed.

  3. Cold Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. R.; Choi, J.-H.; Povilus, A.; Raithel, G.

    2003-05-01

    The combination of laser-cooling and trapping methods with Rydberg-atom spectroscopy has opened the door to the study of novel ultracold atomic and plasma systems. In particular, the study of Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields, which has previously been restricted to optically accessible low azimuthal quantum numbers |m|, has been expanded to include high azimuthal quantum numbers |m| through new collisional and recombinative processes which can play a role in this regime. We describe our efforts to realize this new regime experimentally with a superconducting atom and plasma trap. In theoretical work, we have implemented an efficient method to calculate the spectra of Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields. We use adiabatic basis sets that reflect the disparate time scales of the electronic motion parallel and transverse to the magnetic field. We find that, with increasing absolute value of |m|, non-adiabatic corrections become negligible, the adiabatic basis states and their energies become exact solutions, and the level statistics evolve from a Wigner to a Possonian distribution of the nearest-neighbor energy separations. The analogy between the adiabatically separable regime of large |m| and the behavior of charged particles in Penning traps will be discussed.

  4. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  5. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  6. Atomic Calculations and Laboratory Measurements Relevant to X-ray Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim; Bautista, M.; Palmeri, P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the atomic calculations and the measurements from the laboratory that are relevant to our understanding of X-Ray Warm Absorbers. Included is a brief discussion of the theoretical and the experimental tools. Also included is a discussion of the challenges, and calculations relevant to dielectronic recombination, photoionization cross sections, and collisional ionization. A review of the models is included, and the sequence that the models were applied.

  7. A new miniaturized atomic magnetic gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Dong; Perry, Abigail; Krzyzewski, Sean; Geller, Shawn; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-05-01

    We report the development of a new miniaturized magnetic gradiometer using alkali atoms. The gradiometer, with the length of 5 cm and cross section diameter of 11 mm, is made of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers placed on a printed optical bench with a defined separation. Both magnetometers work in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, share the same beam for pumping and probing to reduce the common mode noises from the lasers, and atom temperature is independently controlled by heating beams at telecom wavelength. With 2 cm baseline, 1 mW pumping beam power, and less than 400 mW input heating beam power, we measure a noise level of 15 fT/ Hz1/2 from the subtraction of two magnetometer outputs, which corresponds to a gradient field sensitivity of 7.5 fT/ Hz1/2/cm. The maximum common mode magnetic field noise rejection is up to 1000 within the gradiometer bandwidth. This device is useful in many fields that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common mode noise cancellation. We are also developing a new hybrid system based on this device to improve its dynamical range.

  8. Tailoring the chiral magnetic interaction between two individual atoms

    PubMed Central

    Khajetoorians, A. A.; Steinbrecher, M.; Ternes, M.; Bouhassoune, M.; dos Santos Dias, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral magnets are a promising route towards dense magnetic storage technology due to their inherent nano-scale dimensions and energy efficient properties. Engineering chiral magnets requires atomic-level control of the magnetic exchange interactions, including the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, which defines a rotational sense for the magnetization of two coupled magnetic moments. Here we show that the indirect conduction electron-mediated Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction between two individual magnetic atoms on a metallic surface can be manipulated by changing the interatomic distance with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We quantify this interaction by comparing our measurements to a quantum magnetic model and ab-initio calculations yielding a map of the chiral ground states of pairs of atoms depending on the interatomic separation. The map enables tailoring the chirality of the magnetization in dilute atomic-scale magnets. PMID:26902332

  9. Tailoring the chiral magnetic interaction between two individual atoms.

    PubMed

    Khajetoorians, A A; Steinbrecher, M; Ternes, M; Bouhassoune, M; dos Santos Dias, M; Lounis, S; Wiebe, J; Wiesendanger, R

    2016-01-01

    Chiral magnets are a promising route towards dense magnetic storage technology due to their inherent nano-scale dimensions and energy efficient properties. Engineering chiral magnets requires atomic-level control of the magnetic exchange interactions, including the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which defines a rotational sense for the magnetization of two coupled magnetic moments. Here we show that the indirect conduction electron-mediated Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between two individual magnetic atoms on a metallic surface can be manipulated by changing the interatomic distance with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We quantify this interaction by comparing our measurements to a quantum magnetic model and ab-initio calculations yielding a map of the chiral ground states of pairs of atoms depending on the interatomic separation. The map enables tailoring the chirality of the magnetization in dilute atomic-scale magnets. PMID:26902332

  10. Tailoring the chiral magnetic interaction between two individual atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajetoorians, A. A.; Steinbrecher, M.; Ternes, M.; Bouhassoune, M.; Dos Santos Dias, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral magnets are a promising route towards dense magnetic storage technology due to their inherent nano-scale dimensions and energy efficient properties. Engineering chiral magnets requires atomic-level control of the magnetic exchange interactions, including the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which defines a rotational sense for the magnetization of two coupled magnetic moments. Here we show that the indirect conduction electron-mediated Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between two individual magnetic atoms on a metallic surface can be manipulated by changing the interatomic distance with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We quantify this interaction by comparing our measurements to a quantum magnetic model and ab-initio calculations yielding a map of the chiral ground states of pairs of atoms depending on the interatomic separation. The map enables tailoring the chirality of the magnetization in dilute atomic-scale magnets.

  11. Hydrogen atom in intense magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Kelly, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen atom situated in an intense magnetic field is investigaged. Three approaches are employed. An elementary Bohr picture establishes a crucial magnetic field strength, H sub a approximately equal to 5 x 10 to the 9th G. Fields in excess of H sub a are intense in that they are able to modify the characteristic atomic scales of length and binding energy. A second approach solves the Schrodinger equation by a combination of variational methods and perturbation theory. It yields analytic expressions for the wave functions and energy eigenvalues. A third approach determines the energy eigenvalues by reducing the Schrodinger equation to a one-dimensional wave equation, which is then solved numerically. Energy eigenvalues are tabulated for field strengths of 2 x 10 to the 10th G and 2 x 10 to the 12th G. It is found that at 2 x 10 to the 12th G the lowest energy eigenvalue is changed from -13.6 to about -180 eV in agreement with previous variational computations.

  12. Studies of Interstellar and Circumstellar Magnetic Field with Aligned Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, H.

    2004-12-01

    Population of levels of the hyperfine and fine split ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a new tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We provide calculations for several atoms and ions that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medius, circumstellar regions and quasars.

  13. Observation of Magnetically Induced Trap Loss of Ultracold Thulium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalganova, E. S.; Vishnyakova, G. A.; Golovizin, A. A.; Tregubov, D. O.; Sukachev, D. D.; Akimov, A. V.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    We report the observation of influence of homogeneous magnetic field on an optical lattice losses of ultracold thulium atoms. The atomic cloud temperature was T = 15 mK. The dependence of trap population on a value of magnetic field has a broad resonance in the low-field region with a center at B = 0.4 G. We also have measured a decrease of optical lattice lifetime in a presence of resonance magnetic field. The observed magnetically-induced trap losses are assumed to be Feshbach resonance which is a dependence of an atomic scattering length on magnetic field.

  14. Average-atom model combined with the hypernetted chain approximation applied to warm dense matter.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yong; Bredow, Richard; Yuan, Jianmin; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We have combined the average-atom model with the hypernetted chain approximation (AAHNC) to describe the electronic and ionic structure in the warm dense matter regime. On the basis of the electronic and ionic structures, the x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectrum is calculated using the random-phase approximation. While the electronic structure is described within the average-atom model, the effects of other ions on the electronic structure are considered using an integral equation method of the theory of liquids, namely the hypernetted chain approximation. The ion-ion pair potential is calculated using the modified Gordon-Kim model based on the electronic density distribution. Finally, the electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently. The XRTS spectrum is calculated according to the Chihara formula, where the scattering contributions are divided into three components: elastic, bound-free, and free-free. Comparison of the present AAHNC results with other theoretical models and experimental data shows very good agreement. Thus the AAHNC model can give a reasonable description of the electronic and ionic structure in warm dense matter. PMID:25871231

  15. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-22

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20-millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions. PMID:27102478

  16. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M.; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20–millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions.

  17. Magnetism and spin-polarized transport in carbon atomic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. Y.; Sheng, W.; Ning, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. H.; Yang, Z. Q.; Guo, H.

    2009-09-01

    We report ab initio calculations of magnetic and spin-polarized quantum transport properties of pure and nitrogen-doped carbon atomic wires. For finite-sized wires with even number of carbon atoms, total magnetic moment of 2μB is found. On the other hand, wires with odd number atoms have no net magnetic moment. Doped with one or two nitrogen atom(s), the carbon atomic wires exhibit a spin-density-wave-like state. The magnetic properties can be rationalized through bonding patterns and unpaired states. When the wire is sandwiched between Au electrodes to form a transport junction, perfect spin filtering effect can be induced by slightly straining the wire.

  18. Effect of Transverse Magnetic Fields on Cold-Atom Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Kunz, Paul; Fatemi, Fredrik; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    We investigate nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) in cold atoms in the presence of a transverse magnetic field where alignment-to-orientation conversion (AOC) dominates. The AOC mechanism, which relies on AC-Stark shifts generated by a strong, off-resonant probe beam, significantly alters the NMOR resonance. When an additional magnetic field is present, parallel to the electric field of the light, a nested feature within this NMOR resonance manifests. Unlike similar features observed with lower optical power in warm vapors, attributed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels, this feature is due solely to the AOC mechanism. Using numerical simulations, a perturbative solution, and experimental observations we characterize the feature with respect to optical power, optical polarization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction. These results shed further light on the AOC mechanism common to NMOR-based experiments and we demonstrate a potential application to measure transverse DC magnetic fields and spatial gradients.

  19. Angular Momentum of a Magnetically Trapped Atomic Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Jen, H. H.; Sun, C. P.; You, L.

    2007-01-19

    For an atomic condensate in an axially symmetric magnetic trap, the sum of the axial components of the orbital angular momentum and the hyperfine spin is conserved. Inside an Ioffe-Pritchard trap (IPT) whose magnetic field (B field) is not axially symmetric, the difference of the two becomes surprisingly conserved. In this Letter we investigate the relationship between the values of the sum or difference angular momentums for an atomic condensate inside a magnetic trap and the associated gauge potential induced by the adiabatic approximation. Our result provides significant new insight into the vorticity of magnetically trapped atomic quantum gases.

  20. Dynamical Generation of Topological Magnetic Lattices for Ultracold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Lü, Rong; You, Li

    2016-04-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically synthesize a space-periodic effective magnetic field for neutral atoms by time-periodic magnetic field pulses. When atomic spin adiabatically follows the direction of the effective magnetic field, an adiabatic scalar potential together with a geometric vector potential emerges for the atomic center-of-mass motion, due to the Berry phase effect. While atoms hop between honeycomb lattice sites formed by the minima of the adiabatic potential, complex Peierls phase factors in the hopping coefficients are induced by the vector potential, and these phase factors facilitate a topological Chern insulator. With further tuning of external parameters, both a topological phase transition and topological flat bands can be achieved, highlighting realistic prospects for studying strongly correlated phenomena in this system. Our Letter presents an alternative pathway towards creating and manipulating topological states of ultracold atoms by magnetic fields. PMID:27104703

  1. Dynamical Generation of Topological Magnetic Lattices for Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Lü, Rong; You, Li

    2016-04-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically synthesize a space-periodic effective magnetic field for neutral atoms by time-periodic magnetic field pulses. When atomic spin adiabatically follows the direction of the effective magnetic field, an adiabatic scalar potential together with a geometric vector potential emerges for the atomic center-of-mass motion, due to the Berry phase effect. While atoms hop between honeycomb lattice sites formed by the minima of the adiabatic potential, complex Peierls phase factors in the hopping coefficients are induced by the vector potential, and these phase factors facilitate a topological Chern insulator. With further tuning of external parameters, both a topological phase transition and topological flat bands can be achieved, highlighting realistic prospects for studying strongly correlated phenomena in this system. Our Letter presents an alternative pathway towards creating and manipulating topological states of ultracold atoms by magnetic fields.

  2. Spin sensing and magnetic design at the single atom level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajetoorians, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Unraveling many of the current dilemmas in nanoscience hinges on the advancement of techniques which can probe the spin degrees of freedom with high spatial, energy, and ultimately high temporal resolution. With the development of sub-Kelvin high-magnetic field STM, two complementary methods, namely spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy (SP-STS) and inelastic STS (ISTS), can address single spins at the atomic scale with unprecedented precession. While SP-STS reads out the projection of the impurity magnetization, ISTS detects the excitations of this magnetization as a function of an external magnetic field. They are thus the analogs of magnetometry and spin resonance measurements pushed to the single atom limit. I have recently demonstrated that it is possible to reliably combine single atom magnetometry with an atom-by-atom bottom-up fabrication to realize complex atomic-scale magnets with tailored properties on metallic surfaces. I will discuss the current state of the art of this growing field as it pertains to single spin information storage, and how the functionality of coupled magnetic adatoms can be tailored on surfaces. Finally, I will present an outlook on future perspectives in the field of single atom magnetism and the promising application of single spin detection to broader scopes in nanoscience as a whole.

  3. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  4. Quantum molecular dynamics study of expanded beryllium: Evolution from warm dense matter to atomic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dafang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Siliang; Wang, Cong; Wu, Zeqing; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    By performing quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, we investigate the equation of states, electrical and optical properties of the expanded beryllium at densities two to one-hundred lower than the normal solid density, and temperatures ranging from 5000 to 30000 K. With decreasing the density of Be, the optical response evolves from the one characteristic of a simple metal to the one of an atomic fluid. By fitting the optical conductivity spectra with the Drude-Smith model, it is found that the conducting electrons become localized at lower densities. In addition, the negative derivative of the electrical resistivity on temperature at density about eight lower than the normal solid density demonstrates that the metal to nonmetal transition takes place in the expanded Be. To interpret this transition, the electronic density of states is analyzed systematically. Furthermore, a direct comparison of the Rosseland opacity obtained by using QMD and the standard opacity code demonstrates that QMD provides a powerful tool to validate plasma models used in atomic physics approaches in the warm dense matter regime. PMID:25081816

  5. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  6. Tailoring the chiral magnetic interaction between two individual atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, J.; Khajetoorians, A. A.; Steinbrecher, M.; Ternes, M.; Bouhassoune, M.; Dos Santos Dias, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiesendanger, R.

    Chiral magnets are a promising route toward dense magnetic storage technology due to their inherent nano-scale dimensions and energy efficient properties. Engineering chiral magnets requires atomic-level control of the magnetic exchange interactions, including the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which defines a rotational sense for the magnetization of two coupled magnetic moments. Here we show that the indirect conduction electron mediated Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between two individual magnetic atoms on a metallic surface can be manipulated by changing the interatomic distance with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. We quantify this interaction by comparing our measurements to a quantum magnetic model and ab-initio calculations yielding a map of the chiral ground states of pairs of atoms depending on the interatomic separation. The map enables tailoring the chirality of the magnetization in dilute atomic-scale magnets. Acknowledgements: SFB668, GrK1286, SFB767, LO 1659 5-1, Emmy Noether Program of the DFG, FOM of NWO, VH-NG-717.

  7. Detection of brain magnetic fields with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hui; Hoffman, Dan; Baranga, Andrei; Romalis, Michael

    2006-05-01

    We report detection of magnetic fields generated by evoked brain activity with an atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed with a high-density potassium magnetometer operating in a spin-exchange relaxation free regime. Compared to SQUID magnetometers which so far have been the only detectors capable of measuring the magnetic fields from the brain, atomic magnetometers have the advantages of higher sensitivity and spatial resolution, simple multi-channel recording, and no need for cryogenics. Using a multi-channel photodetector array we recorded magnetic fields from the brain correlated with an audio tone administered with a non-magnetic earphone. The spatial map of the magnetic field gives information about the location of the brain region responding to the auditory stimulation. Our results demonstrate the atomic magnetometer as an alternative and low cost technique for brain imaging applications, without using cryogenic apparatus.

  8. Improved trapping and transport of cold atoms for magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadge, Amruta; James, T.; Li, X.; Lu, Bo; Garridogonzalez, N.; Finke, A.; Mellor, C.; Fromhold, M.; Koller, C.; Orucevic, F.; Kruger, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Using cold atoms, a very sensitive and high resolution magnetic and electric field sensor can be realised. Ultra-close trapping of atoms would improve the resolution of cold-atom based surface probes. The limitation on the trapping distance arises from strongly distance-dependent effects such as Casimir force, Johnson noise etc. We are constructing an experimental system to trap atoms at surface separations of less than a micron. We will demonstrate the possibility of using special surfaces such as silicon nitride membranes and graphene for sub-micron trapping. We have designed a 10-layer printed circuit board, which can magnetically trap the cold atom cloud and transport it precisely to a desired location. This gives us the ability to study multiple samples within the same vacuum environment. In order to achieve higher atom number in the initial trapping stages, we use a dual-color MOT technique for Rb-87 atoms. Using this technique we achieve a significant increase in atom number and decrease in temperature. In this talk, I will present the results of the dual color MOT. I will also report on results related to magnetic transport and sub-micron trapping of atoms.

  9. Single-impulse magnetic focusing of launched cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Matthew J.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Smith, David A.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2004-11-01

    We have theoretically investigated the focusing of a launched cloud of cold atoms. Time-dependent spatially-varying magnetic fields are used to impart impulses leading to a three-dimensional focus of the launched cloud. We discuss possible coil arrangements for a new focusing regime: isotropic 3D focusing of atoms with a single-impulse magnetic lens. We investigate focusing aberrations and find that, for typical experimental parameters, the widely used assumption of a purely harmonic lens is often inaccurate. The baseball lens offers the best possibility for isotropically focusing a cloud of weak-field-seeking atoms in 3D.

  10. Quantum magnetism of alkali Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a method to control dynamics in many-body spin states of 87Rb Rydberg atoms. The method permits excitation of cold gases and form ordered structures of alkali atoms. It makes use of a two-photon excitation scheme with circularly polarized and linearly chirped pulses. The method aims for controlled quantum state preparation in large ensembles. It is actual for experiments studding the spin hopping dynamics and realization of quantum random walks.

  11. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  12. Emerging magnetic order in platinum atomic contacts and chains

    PubMed Central

    Strigl, Florian; Espy, Christopher; Bückle, Maximilian; Scheer, Elke; Pietsch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The development of atomic-scale structures revealing novel transport phenomena is a major goal of nanotechnology. Examples include chains of atoms that form while stretching a transition metal contact or the predicted formation of magnetic order in these chains, the existence of which is still debated. Here we report an experimental study of the magneto-conductance (MC) and anisotropic MC with atomic-size contacts and mono-atomic chains of the nonmagnetic metal platinum. We find a pronounced and diverse MC behaviour, the amplitude and functional dependence change when stretching the contact by subatomic distances. These findings can be interpreted as a signature of local magnetic order in the chain, which may be of particular importance for the application of atomic-sized contacts in spintronic devices of the smallest possible size. PMID:25649440

  13. Atomic micromotion and geometric forces in a triaxial magnetic trap

    PubMed

    Muller; Morsch; Ciampini; Anderlini; Mannella; Arimondo

    2000-11-20

    Nonadiabatic motion of Bose-Einstein condensates of rubidium atoms arising from the dynamical nature of a time-orbiting-potential (TOP) trap was observed experimentally. The orbital micromotion of the condensate in velocity space at the frequency of the rotating bias field of the TOP was detected by a time-of-flight method. A dependence of the equilibrium position of the atoms on the sense of rotation of the bias field was observed. We have compared our experimental findings with numerical simulations. The nonadiabatic following of the atomic spin in the trap rotating magnetic field produces geometric forces acting on the trapped atoms. PMID:11082569

  14. Magnetism and surface structure of atomically controlled ultrathin metal films.

    SciTech Connect

    Shiratsuchi, Yu.; Yamamoto, M.; Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division; Osaka Univ.

    2007-01-01

    We review the correlation of magnetism and surface structure in ultrathin metal films, including the tailoring of novel magnetic properties using atomic scale control of the nanostructure. We provide an overview of modern fabrication and characterization techniques used to create and explore these fascinating materials, and highlight important phenomena of interest. We also discuss techniques that control and characterize both the magnetic and structural properties on an atomic scale. Recent advances in the development and applications of these techniques allow nanomagnetism to be investigated in an unprecedented manner. A system cannot necessarily retain a two-dimensional structure as it enters the ultrathin region, but it can transform into a three-dimensional, discontinuous structure due to the Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. This structural transformation can give rise to superparamagnetism. During this evolution, competing factors such as interparticle interactions and the effective magnetic anisotropy govern the magnetic state. These magnetic parameters are influenced by the nanostructure of the film. In particular, controlling the magnetic anisotropy is critical for determining the magnetic properties. Surface effects play especially important roles in influencing both the magnitude and direction of the magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin films. By properly altering the surface structure, the strength and direction of the magnetic anisotropy are controlled via spin-orbit and/or dipole interactions.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk GalaxyFormation: the Magnetization of The Cold and Warm Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-12-18

    Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we study the formation and early evolution of disk galaxies with a magnetized interstellar medium. For a 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} halo with initial NFW dark matter and gas profiles, we impose a uniform 10{sup -9} G magnetic field and follow its collapse, disk formation and evolution up to 1 Gyr. Comparing to a purely hydrodynamic simulation with the same initial condition, we find that a protogalactic field of this strength does not significantly influence the global disk properties. At the same time, the initial magnetic fields are quickly amplified by the differentially rotating turbulent disk. After the initial rapid amplification lasting {approx} 500 Myr, subsequent field amplification appears self-regulated. As a result, highly magnetized material begin to form above and below the disk. Interestingly, the field strengths in the self-regulated regime agrees well with the observed fields in the Milky Way galaxy both in the warm and the cold HI phase and do not change appreciably with time. Most of the cold phase shows a dispersion of order ten in the magnetic field strength. The global azimuthal magnetic fields reverse at different radii and the amplitude declines as a function of radius of the disk. By comparing the estimated star formation rate (SFR) in hydrodynamic and MHD simulations, we find that after the magnetic field strength saturates, magnetic forces provide further support in the cold gas and lead to a decline of the SFR.

  16. Neutral Atom Nanolithography Using a Pulsed Magnetic Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anciaux, Erik; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Gardner, Jamie; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We present the status of a method of neutral atom lithography that achieves sub-10nm resolution. This method is based on the nanoscale imaging of a beam of metastable atoms with an aberration-corrected hexapole lens. The lens creates a magnetic field gradient that increases with the distance from the center of the lens so as to focus divergent low field seeking atoms toward a single focal spot past the lens. The scheme takes advantage of the narrow velocity distribution of a pulsed supersonic beam as well as an optical pumping and cooling scheme that selects the magnetic state of the atoms and further reduces its velocity dispersion. This method can be used not only to pattern but to spectroscopically probe surfaces with spatial resolution below 10nm. . M. G. R. acknowledges support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the R. A. Welch Foundation (Grant F-1258), and the Sid W. Richardson Foundation.

  17. Hexapole magnet system for thermal energy 3He atom manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. P.; Fouquet, P.; Ellis, J.; Allison, W.

    2001-10-01

    We present design and construction details for a novel high field, small bore permanent hexapole magnet. The design is intended for focusing atomic beams of 3He at thermal energies. The magnet uses an optimized polepiece design which includes vacuum gaps to enable its use with high intensity atomic and molecular beams. The 0.3 m long, 1 mm internal radius magnet achieves a polepiece tip field of 1.1 T using NdFeB permanent magnets and Permendur 49 polepieces. The polepiece shanks are designed to saturate so that the hexapole properties are determined predominantly by the shape of the polepiece tip. The performance of the hexapole assembly is demonstrated with an 8 meV 3He beam in the beam source of the Cambridge spin echo spectrometer and the measured focused beam results show excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and negligible beam attenuation.

  18. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D.; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-02-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (~0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement.

  19. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  20. A Warm Bore Anticryostat for Series Magnetic Measurements of LHC Superconducting Dipole and Short-Straight-Section Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, O.; Legrand, P.; Sievers, P.

    2004-06-01

    All LHC twin aperture magnets will be tested under operating conditions to verify their performance. The field measurement equipment works at ambient temperature and pressure. Each magnet is therefore equipped with two warm bore anticryostats. As a consequence a total of nearly 80 anticryostats of different lengths have to be assembled, handled and serviced during the test period. Two main constraints determine the frame for the design of these anticryostats: inside a given beam pipe aperture of 50 mm kept at 1.9 K, a warm bore aperture of 40 mm must provide the highest possible mechanical stability and robustness for numerous mounting cycles as well as the lowest possible heat losses towards the cryogenic system. In addition, compatibility with high magnetic fields and an insulation vacuum of about 10-7 mbar have to be maintained. This paper describes how a satisfactory mechanical stability as well as heat losses in the order of 0.8 W/m are achieved with a design based on very careful space and material optimization. Other aspects like assembly, installation, thermal behavior and temperature control during the operation are described.

  1. Magnetic shielding of the cold atom space clock PHARAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moric, Igor; Laurent, Philippe; Chatard, Philippe; de Graeve, Charles-Marie; Thomin, Stephane; Christophe, Vincent; Grosjean, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    The space clock PHARAO is an atomic clock based on laser cooled cesium atoms. In order to attenuate magnetic field fluctuation in orbit, PHARAO clock uses three concentric Mumetal magnetic shields combined with several coils to improve the field homogeneity. We have characterized the attenuation and magnetic field homogeneity of the shields used to build the flight model. The average value of attenuation inside the three shields is around 18,000 when the external field is similar to the orbit field (30 μT) and the field homogeneity is lower than 10 nT. These values have not changed after vibrations and thermal tests for the space qualification. Permeability variation of the shields as a function of the intercepted flux has been analyzed.

  2. Average-atom treatment of relaxation time in x-ray Thomson scattering from warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. R.; Nilsen, J.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of finite relaxation times on Thomson scattering from warm dense plasmas is examined within the framework of the average-atom approximation. Presently most calculations use the collision-free Lindhard dielectric function to evaluate the free-electron contribution to the Thomson cross section. In this work, we use the Mermin dielectric function, which includes relaxation time explicitly. The relaxation time is evaluated by treating the average atom as an impurity in a uniform electron gas and depends critically on the transport cross section. The calculated relaxation rates agree well with values inferred from the Ziman formula for the static conductivity and also with rates inferred from a fit to the frequency-dependent conductivity. Transport cross sections determined by the phase-shift analysis in the average-atom potential are compared with those evaluated in the commonly used Born approximation. The Born approximation converges to the exact cross sections at high energies; however, differences that occur at low energies lead to corresponding differences in relaxation rates. The relative importance of including relaxation time when modeling x-ray Thomson scattering spectra is examined by comparing calculations of the free-electron dynamic structure function for Thomson scattering using Lindhard and Mermin dielectric functions. Applications are given to warm dense Be plasmas, with temperatures ranging from 2 to 32 eV and densities ranging from 2 to 64 g/cc.

  3. Spin nutation induced by atomic motion in a magnetic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Shiraishi, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.

    2010-12-15

    An atom moving in a spatially periodic field experiences a temporally periodic perturbation and undergoes a resonance transition between atomic internal states when the transition frequency is equal to the atomic velocity divided by the field period. We demonstrated that spin nutation was induced by this resonant transition in a polarized rubidium (Rb) atomic beam passing through a magnetic lattice. The lattice was produced by current flowing through an array of parallel wires crossing the beam. This array structure, reminiscent of a multiwire chamber for particle detection, allowed the Rb beam to pass through the lattice at a variety of incident angles. The dephasing of spin nutation was reduced by varying the incident angle.

  4. Magnetic-field-assisted atomic polarization spectroscopy of 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Haidong; Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Cream Team

    2016-05-01

    Atomic polarization spectroscopy (PS) is a high resolution sub-Doppler atomic spectroscopic technique with free modulation. It is always desirable to obtain a PS signal with zero background as it can provide a more preferable laser frequency stabilization performance. There are many factors that can affect the PS signal background, i.e., the laser power, the laser polarization and the magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method for observing and analyzing the effects on the PS signal of 4 He under different magnetic fields. At the beginning, under nearly zero magnetic field, the large asymmetrical PS signal background has been observed and cannot be eliminated by only optically adjusting. Then, we find that the PS signal profile can be changed and controlled by varying the magnetic field with transverse or longitudinal direction and different intensity. The optimized PS signal with symmetrical dispersive profile and zero background is obtained when the magnetic field is chosen and controlled in the transverse direction and more than 20000nT intensity. Similar phenomenon cannot be observed under the longitudinal magnetic field. A theoretical model is also presented, which explains and agrees well with our experimental results.

  5. Dynamics of neutral atoms in artificial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zi-Fa; Hu, Fang-Qi; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-02-01

    Cyclotron dynamics of neutral atoms in a harmonic trap potential with artificial magnetic field is studied theoretically. The cyclotron orbit is obtained analytically and confirmed numerically. When the external harmonic potential is absent, artificial magnetic field can result in the singly periodic circular motion of Bose gas with the emergence of a Lorentz-like force, which is similar to particles with electric charge moving in a magnetic field. However, the coupling between artificial magnetic field and harmonic trap potential leads to rich and complex cyclotron trajectory, which depends on √{B2 + 1 }, where B is the rescaled artificial magnetic field. When √{B2 + 1 } is a rational number, the cyclotron orbit is multiply periodic and closed. However, when √{B2 + 1 } is an irrational number, the cyclotron orbit is quasiperiodic, i.e., the cyclotron motion of Bose gas is limited in a annular region, and eventually, the motion is ergodic in this region. Furthermore, the cyclotron orbits also depend on the initial conditions of Bose gas. Thus, the cyclotron dynamics of Bose gas can be manipulated in a controllable way by changing the artificial magnetic field, harmonic trap potential and initial conditions. Our results provide a direct theoretical evidence for the cyclotron dynamics of neutral atoms in the artificial gauge field.

  6. Influence of noise on a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desavage, Sara A.; Srinivasan, Arvind; Davis, Jon P.; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim; Rasel, Ernst; Schleich, Wolfgang; Welch, George R.; Mimih, Jihane; Narducci, Frank A.

    2016-05-01

    The inherent sensitivity of atom interferometer sensors has been well established and much progress has been made in the development of atom interferometer gravimeters, gravity gradiometers and gyroscopes e.g.. These interferometers use the ``clock'' transition which is magnetically insensitive. When considering interferometers with magnetically sensitive transitions operating in unshielded environments additional noise sources must be considered. The frequency content of the noise from these sources can vary dramatically, depending on the environment. In this talk, we will discuss these various noise sources and their impact on the performance of magnetically sensitive interferometers. Specifically, we identify three ways by which noise can be introduced into the system and their effect: fluctuating detuning, leading to a randomness of the interference pattern; fluctuating Rabi frequency, leading to pulse errors; non-uniformity of the magnetic field across the atom cloud, which can, under certain circumstances lead to a complete washing out of the interference pattern. Implications for our current experiments will be discussed. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. Ultrasensitive magnetic field detection using a single artificial atom.

    PubMed

    Bal, M; Deng, C; Orgiazzi, J-L; Ong, F R; Lupascu, A

    2012-01-01

    Efficient detection of magnetic fields is central to many areas of research and technology. High-sensitivity detectors are commonly built using direct-current superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic systems. Here we use a single artificial atom to implement an ultrasensitive magnetometer with micron range size. The artificial atom, a superconducting two-level system, is operated similarly to atom and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centre-based magnetometers. The high sensitivity results from quantum coherence combined with strong coupling to magnetic field. We obtain a sensitivity of 3.3 pT Hz(-1/2) for a frequency at 10 MHz. We discuss feasible improvements to increase sensitivity by one order of magnitude. The intrinsic sensitivity of this detector at frequencies in the 100 kHz-10 MHz range compares favourably with direct-current superconducting quantum interference devices and atomic magnetometers of equivalent spatial resolution. This result illustrates the potential of artificial quantum systems for sensitive detection and related applications. PMID:23271657

  8. Atomically thin dilute magnetism in Co-doped phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seixas, L.; Carvalho, A.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    Two-dimensional dilute magnetic semiconductors can provide fundamental insights into the very nature of magnetic order and their manipulation through electron and hole doping. Besides the fundamental interest, due to the possibility of control of charge density, they can be extremely important in spintronics applications such as spin valve and spin-based transistors. In this paper, we studied a two-dimensional dilute magnetic semiconductor consisting of a phosphorene monolayer doped with cobalt atoms in substitutional and interstitial defects. We show that these defects can be stabilized and are electrically active. Furthermore, by including holes or electrons by a potential gate, the exchange interaction and magnetic order can be engineered, and may even induce a ferromagnetic-to-antiferromagnetic phase transition in p -doped phosphorene. At a Co concentration of 2.7%, we estimate a Curie temperature of TCMF A=466 K in the mean-field approximation.

  9. Reinventing atomic magnetic simulations with spin-orbit coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N.; Eisenbach, Markus; Nicholson, Don M.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Landau, David P.

    2016-02-10

    We propose a powerful extension to the combined molecular and spin dynamics method that fully captures the coupling between the atomic and spin subsystems via spin-orbit interactions. Moreover, the foundation of this method lies in the inclusion of the local magnetic anisotropies that arise as a consequence of the lattice symmetry breaking due to phonons or crystallographic defects. By using canonical simulations of bcc iron with the system coupled to a phonon heat bath, we show that our extension enables the previously unachievable angular momentum exchange between the atomic and spin degrees of freedom.

  10. Environmental magnetic evidence for a dynamic Taylor Glacier during the mid-Pliocene warm period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohneiser, Christian; Wilson, Gary; Florindo, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    of McMurdo Volcanic material to the signal. At ~200 meters in DVDP-11 and ~155 m in DVDP-10 a major mid-Pliocene hiatus truncates a ~40 meter thick interval (Interval II) of muds and diamicts which represents the mid-Pliocene warm period. Magnetically, this interval is unique within the cores because it has relatively low concentrations of magnetite and an upward fining of the magnetic grainsize. We suggest that this interval represents a retreated Taylor Glacier system under warm conditions followed by a re-advance under cooler conditions. The glacial advance immediately prior to the unconformity is marked by increasing magnetite concentration in parallel with decreasing magnetic grain size. The unconformity itself marks a switch from Taylor Valley or EAIS-derived sediments below to Ross Sea Ice or WAIS-derived sediments above. Below Interval II and to the base of each core are mid-Pliocene to latest Miocene Taylor Valley derived diamicts. Magnetic grainsizes and concentrations are variable over this interval indicating a dynamic Taylor Glacier which underwent multiple advances and retreats. Efforts are underway to correlate the magnetic properties of these cores with comparable interval in the ANDRILL MIS and SMS cores in order to build a more comprehensive regional understanding of this period.

  11. Soft magnetic composites manufactured by warm co-extrusion of bulk metallic glass and steel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Francis; Raber, Thomas R.; Zabala, Robert J.; Buresh, Steve J.; Tanico, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Soft magnetic composites of Fe-based bulk metallic glass and low-alloy steel have been manufactured by warm co-extrusion of precursor powders at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region of the glass. Composites were manufactured with amorphous volume fractions of 75%, 67%, and 100%. Full consolidation of the constituent powders was observed with the bulk metallic glass remaining substantially amorphous. The composite electrical resistivity was observed to be anisotropic with a resistivity of 79 μΩ cm measured transverse to the extrusion axis in a sample with 75% amorphous volume fraction. A 0-3 connectivity pattern with the low-resistivity steel phase embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected high-resistivity bulk metallic glass phase was observed with scanning electron microscopy. This confirms that the flow characteristics of the bulk metallic glass and the steel powders were comparable during extrusion at these temperatures. The saturation magnetization of 1.3 T was consistent with the volume weighted average of the saturation magnetization of the two phases. A relatively high quasistatic coercivity of 8 Oe was measured and is likely due to slight crystallization of the bulk metallic glass as well as domain wall pinning at prior particle boundaries. Careful control of the thermal environment during the extrusion process is required to minimize glass crystallization and achieve the desired balance of magnetic and electrical properties.

  12. Soft magnetic composites manufactured by warm co-extrusion of bulk metallic glass and steel powders

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Francis; Raber, Thomas R.; Zabala, Robert J.; Buresh, Steve J.; Tanico, Brian

    2013-05-07

    Soft magnetic composites of Fe-based bulk metallic glass and low-alloy steel have been manufactured by warm co-extrusion of precursor powders at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region of the glass. Composites were manufactured with amorphous volume fractions of 75%, 67%, and 100%. Full consolidation of the constituent powders was observed with the bulk metallic glass remaining substantially amorphous. The composite electrical resistivity was observed to be anisotropic with a resistivity of 79 {mu}{Omega} cm measured transverse to the extrusion axis in a sample with 75% amorphous volume fraction. A 0-3 connectivity pattern with the low-resistivity steel phase embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected high-resistivity bulk metallic glass phase was observed with scanning electron microscopy. This confirms that the flow characteristics of the bulk metallic glass and the steel powders were comparable during extrusion at these temperatures. The saturation magnetization of 1.3 T was consistent with the volume weighted average of the saturation magnetization of the two phases. A relatively high quasistatic coercivity of 8 Oe was measured and is likely due to slight crystallization of the bulk metallic glass as well as domain wall pinning at prior particle boundaries. Careful control of the thermal environment during the extrusion process is required to minimize glass crystallization and achieve the desired balance of magnetic and electrical properties.

  13. Atomic magnetometer-based ultra-sensitive magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-03-01

    An atomic magnetometer (AM) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells is currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic-field sensor. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high resolution, high sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this need we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free AM with a flux guide (FG) to produce an ultra-sensitive FG-AM magnetic microscope. The FG serves to transmit the target magnetic flux to the AM thus enhancing both the sensitivity and resolution for tiny magnetic objects. In this talk, we will describe a prototype FG-AM device and present experimental and numerical tests of its sensitivity and resolution. We also demonstrate that an optimized FG-AM achieves high resolution and high sensitivity sufficient to detect a magnetic field of a single neuron in a few seconds, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience. We anticipate that this unique device can be applied to the detection of a single neuron, the detection of magnetic nano-particles, which in turn are very important for detection of target molecules in national security and medical diagnostics, and non-destructive testing.

  14. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-04-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  15. Designing Frustrated Quantum Magnets with Laser-Dressed Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaetzle, Alexander W.; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1 /2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1 /2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments.

  16. Designing frustrated quantum magnets with laser-dressed Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Glaetzle, Alexander W; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1/2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1/2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments. PMID:25978228

  17. Helium atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that the neutron star surface may be composed of helium or heavier elements as hydrogen may be quickly depleted by diffuse nuclear burning Chang Bildsten However while Hydrogen atmospheres have been studied in great details atomic data for helium is available only for He ion Pavlov Bezchastnov 2005 We performed Hartree-Fock type calculation for Helium atom and molecules and computed their binding ionization and dissociation energies in strong magnetic fields B sim10 12 -- 10 15 G We will present ionization balance of Helium atmospheres at typical magnetic field strengths and temperatures to radio-quiet neutron stars and AXPs We will also discuss several implications of helium atmosphere to X-ray data of isolated neutron stars focusing on the detected spectral features

  18. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOEpatents

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  19. Understanding atomic disorder in polar and magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.

    The functional properties of materials rely upon the composition, coordination, and connectivity of their constituent atoms. Understanding the atomic structure of condensed materials permits an understanding of how that structure influences macroscopic properties. The field of crystallography seeks to define the repeating lattice of periodic materials using a unit cell model with the minimum number of specified atomic positions. For magnetic and electronic materials, the arrangement of atoms and dipoles are often both ordered over long ranges and amenable to a traditional crystallographic description. However, interesting phenomena emerge when materials experience disorder due to chemical substitution, phase competition, nanostructuring, interfaces, or valence disproportionation. In those cases, the long-range symmetry of the material is interrupted and traditional crystallographic methods struggle to incorporate disorder into the unit cell model. I will discuss how disorder can be identified and quantified in functional materials. Each study includes examination of the real-space pair distribution function (PDF), which provides a weighted histogram of all atom-atom distances in a sample. Models are created by simultaneous fits to the Bragg profile and the PDF, thereby constraining the atomic positions by reciprocal- and real-space scattering descriptions. The reverse Monte Carlo method drives stochastic fits to scattering data using tens of thousands of atoms. Once simulation is complete, crystallographic metrics can be extracted from the supercell in real space. This approach is discussed in the case of site mixing and valence disproportionation in the Jahn-Teller active spinel CuMn2O4, local Jahn-Teller distortions of CuO4 tetrahedra in the solid solution Mg 1-xCuxCr 2O4, nanoscale phase co-existence at the metal-insulator transition in VO2, and static displacements and lone-pair activity in the pyrochlores Bi2Ti2O6O' and Bi 2Ru2O6O'.

  20. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-08-15

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10{sup −4} % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  1. Atom interferometry in space: thermal management and magnetic shielding.

    PubMed

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-08-01

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10(-4) % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10(5). We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space. PMID:25173244

  2. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-08-01

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10-4 % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 105. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  3. Atomic spin chains as testing ground for quantum magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Sander

    2015-03-01

    The field of quantum magnetism aims to capture the rich emergent physics that arises when multiple spins interact, in terms of elementary models such as the spin 1/2 Heisenberg chain. Experimental platforms to verify these models are rare and generally do not provide the possibility to detect spin correlations locally. In my lab we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to design and build artificial spin lattices with atomic precision. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy enables us to identify the ground state and probe spin excitations as a function of system size, location inside the lattice and coupling parameter values. Two types of collective excitations that play a role in many dynamic magnetic processes are spin waves (magnons) and spinons. Our experiments enable us to study both types of excitations. First, we have been able to map the standing spin wave modes of a ferromagnetic bit of six atoms, and to determine their role in the collective reversal process of the bit (Spinelli et al., Nature Materials 2014). More recently, we have crafted antiferromagnetic spin 1/2 XXZ chains, which allow us to observe spinon excitations, as well as the stepwise transition to a fully aligned phase beyond the critical magnetic field (Toskovic et al., in preparation). These findings create a promising experimental environment for putting quantum magnetic models to the test. Research funded by NWO and FOM.

  4. Nonlocal electron transport in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Bendib, A.

    2006-09-15

    The numerical solution of the steady-state electron Fokker-Planck equation perturbed with respect to a global equilibrium is presented in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and the electron-electron collisions are described by the Landau collision operator. The solution is derived in the Fourier space and in the framework of the diffusive approximation which captures the spatial nonlocal effects. The transport coefficients are deduced and used to close a complete set of nonlocal electron fluid equations. This work improves the results of A. Bendib et al. [Phys. Plasmas 9, 1555 (2002)] and of A. V. Brantov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 4633 (2003)] restricted to the local and nonlocal high-Z plasma approximations, respectively. The influence of the magnetic field on the nonlocal effects is discussed. We propose also accurate numerical fits of the relevant transport coefficients with respect to the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L and the atomic number Z, where L is the typical scale length and {lambda}{sub ei} is the electron-ion mean-free-path.

  5. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic sensing using atomic defects in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinolds, Michael

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized modern medicine by providing non-invasive, chemically selective, three-dimensional imaging of living organisms. Industrial-scale MRI has the capability to image with millimeter-scale spatial resolution and has the sensitivity to detect as few as 1014 nuclear spins. Increasing spatial resolution to the atomic scale and sensitivity to the single-spin level would enable a wide array of applications most notably including imaging molecular structur. However, conventional MRI methods are already highly optimized, and further order-of-magnitude-scale improvements cannot be reasonably expected without employing fundamentally different technologies. This thesis presents an alternative approach to conventional MRI that pushes resolution and sensitivity to the individual atom and molecular level. The guiding principle for achieving multiple order-of-magnitude improvements is to miniaturize the key components of MRI: the detector and the source of magnetic-field gradients. By scaling down the physical size of these components to the nano- and atomic- scales, the signals from individual spins become measurable and resolvable. To miniature the detector, we employ an optically-active, paramagnetic atomic defect in diamond---a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center---as our sensor. Owing to its optical readout, long coherence times, atomic-size, and room-temperature compatibility, NV centers in diamond have the capability to measure the magnetic fields from individual spins, provided the sensor can be placed sufficiently close to a target to be measured. This thesis describes the experimental realization of a microscope that can perform sensitive magnetometry experiments using a single NV center that magnetically images by spatially scanning the NV center within a few nanometers of magnetic targets. With this technique we are able to demonstrate the first room-temperature magnetic imaging of individual electron spins. For miniaturizing

  6. Spin-polarized currents generated by magnetic Fe atomic chains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe; Chen, Xi

    2014-06-13

    Fe-based devices are widely used in spintronics because of high spin-polarization and magnetism. In this work, freestanding Fe atomic chains, the thinnest wires, were used to generate spin-polarized currents due to the spin-polarized energy bands. By ab initio calculations, the zigzag structure was found to be more stable than the wide-angle zigzag structure and had a higher ratio of spin-up and spin-down currents. By our theoretical prediction, Fe atomic chains have a sufficiently long thermal lifetime only at T ≦̸ 150 K, while C atomic chains are very stable even at T = 1000 K. This means that the spintronic devices based on Fe chains could work only at low temperatures. A system constructed by a short Fe chain sandwiched between two graphene electrodes could be used as a spin-polarized current generator, while a C chain could not be used in this way. The present work may be instructive and meaningful to further practical applications based on recent technical developments on the preparation of metal atomic chains (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107 9055 (2010)). PMID:24849670

  7. First principles calculation of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Au-Pd atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, Mudra R.; Sharma, A. C.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of free standing Au-Pd bimetallic atomic chain is studied using ab-initio method. It is found that electronic and magnetic properties of chains depend on position of atoms and number of atoms. Spin polarization factor for different atomic configuration of atomic chain is calculated predicting a half metallic behavior. It suggests a total spin polarised transport in these chains.

  8. Extended Bose-Hubbard models with ultracold magnetic atoms.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Mark, M J; Petter, D; Aikawa, K; Chomaz, L; Cai, Z; Baranov, M; Zoller, P; Ferlaino, F

    2016-04-01

    The Hubbard model underlies our understanding of strongly correlated materials. Whereas its standard form only comprises interactions between particles at the same lattice site, extending it to encompass long-range interactions is predicted to profoundly alter the quantum behavior of the system. We realize the extended Bose-Hubbard model for an ultracold gas of strongly magnetic erbium atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Controlling the orientation of the atomic dipoles, we reveal the anisotropic character of the onsite interaction and hopping dynamics and their influence on the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition. Moreover, we observe nearest-neighbor interactions, a genuine consequence of the long-range nature of dipolar interactions. Our results lay the groundwork for future studies of exotic many-body quantum phases. PMID:27124454

  9. Extended Bose-Hubbard models with ultracold magnetic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Mark, M. J.; Petter, D.; Aikawa, K.; Chomaz, L.; Cai, Z.; Baranov, M.; Zoller, P.; Ferlaino, F.

    2016-04-01

    The Hubbard model underlies our understanding of strongly correlated materials. Whereas its standard form only comprises interactions between particles at the same lattice site, extending it to encompass long-range interactions is predicted to profoundly alter the quantum behavior of the system. We realize the extended Bose-Hubbard model for an ultracold gas of strongly magnetic erbium atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Controlling the orientation of the atomic dipoles, we reveal the anisotropic character of the onsite interaction and hopping dynamics and their influence on the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition. Moreover, we observe nearest-neighbor interactions, a genuine consequence of the long-range nature of dipolar interactions. Our results lay the groundwork for future studies of exotic many-body quantum phases.

  10. Magnetic blackbody shift of hyperfine transitions for atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; King-Lacroix, J.

    2009-12-15

    We derive an expression for the magnetic blackbody shift of hyperfine transitions such as the cesium primary reference transition which defines the second. The shift is found to be a complicated function of temperature, and has a T{sup 2} dependence only in the high-temperature limit. We also calculate the shift of ground-state p{sub 1/2} hyperfine transitions which have been proposed as new atomic clock transitions. In this case interaction with the p{sub 3/2} fine-structure multiplet may be the dominant effect.

  11. Microfabricated atomic vapor cell arrays for magnetic field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woetzel, S.; Schultze, V.; IJsselsteijn, R.; Schulz, T.; Anders, S.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2011-03-15

    We describe a method for charging atomic vapor cells with cesium and buffer gas. By this, it is possible to adjust the buffer gas pressure in the cells with good accuracy. Furthermore, we present a new design of microfabricated vapor cell arrays, which combine silicon wafer based microfabrication and ultrasonic machining to achieve the arrays of thermally separated cells with 50 mm{sup 3} volume. With cells fabricated in the outlined way, intrinsic magnetic field sensitivities down to 300 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are reached.

  12. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  13. Magnetic induction measurements using an all-optical {sup 87}Rb atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Tricot, François; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2013-12-09

    In this work we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, the use of a self-oscillating all-optical atomic magnetometer for magnetic induction measurements. Given the potential for miniaturization of atomic magnetometers, and their extreme sensitivity, the present work shows that atomic magnetometers may play a key role in the development of instrumentation for magnetic induction tomography.

  14. Precession Control on Precipitation in the Western Pacific Warm Pool Inferred from Environmental Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) has highest water temperature in the global ocean, and its spatiotemporal variations have significant impacts on large-scale atmospheric circulation and global hydrology. An environmental magnetic study was conducted on sediment cores of late Pleistocene age taken from the West Caroline Basin (WCB) offshore northern New Guinea in order to constrain hydrological variability over the WPWP on orbital timescales. Magnetite dominates magnetic mineral assemblages of the sediments. This is evidenced by that IRM acquisition curves are mostly explained by a low-coercivity component, and that the Verwey transition was obvious in low-temperature measurements. Existence of the sharp central ridges on FORC diagrams and TEM images indicate the occurrence of biogenic magnetite. Compared with pelagic sediments from other regions, however, FORC diagrams show a larger contribution of an interacting PSD and MD component, and the ratios of ARM susceptibility to SIRM (kARM/SIRM) are lower, which suggests a larger proportion of the terrigenous component. This is probably due to a large terrigenous sediment input from nearby land, New Guinea, induced by high precipitation in the intertropical convergence zone. Magnetic susceptibility (k) and kARM/SIRM well correlate with northern-hemisphere summer insolation. Maxima in k and minima in kARM/SIRM correspond to insolation minima, which suggests a larger terrigenous input caused by higher precipitation at these times. Interestingly, in the western part of WCB, k variations are dominated by the eccentricity periodicity and mimic δ18O curves, but the precession periodicity prevails in kARM/SIRM. These cores were taken at depths close to the CCD, and thus the k variations cannot be explained by dilution with carbonates. Sedimentation influenced by global sea-level changes may control the k variations; this part of the basin is adjacent to a wider continental shelf compared with the eastern part of WCB.

  15. A Strongly-Coupled Average Atom Model for Warm Dense Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Cimarron Project Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    We present a new average atom model to determine the properties of dense, multi-component plasmas. Strong ion correlations are taken into account through the quantum Ornstein-Zernike relations and hypernetted-chain closures, while an orbital-free density functional theory is employed to calculate electronic structure. The formalism is derived without reference to a mean ionization state of the system which allows for a more consistent generalization to mixtures. Applications to EOS and XRTS are discussed, and numerical simulations are compared with other methods and experimental data. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Artificial Staggered Magnetic Field for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2011-03-01

    Uniform magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature, but this is not the case for staggered magnetic fields. In this talk, I will discuss an experimental set-up for cold atoms recently proposed by us, which allows for the realization of a ``staggered gauge field'' in a 2D square optical lattice. If the lattice is loaded with bosons, it may be described by an effective Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, with complex and anisotropic hopping coefficients. A very rich phase diagram emerges: besides the usual Mott-insulator and zero-momentum condensate, a new phase with a finite momentum condensate becomes the ground-state at strong gauge fields. By using the technique of Feshbach resonance, the dynamics of a coherent superposition of a vortex-carrying atomic condensate and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate can also be studied within the same scheme. On the other hand, if the lattice is loaded with fermions, a highly tunable, graphene-like band structure can be realized, without requiring the honeycomb lattice symmetry. When the system is loaded with a mixture of bosons and two-species fermions, several features of the high-Tc phase diagram can be reproduced. A dome-shaped unconventional superconducting region arises, surrounded by a non-Fermi liquid and a Fermi liquid at low and high doping, respectively. We acknowledge financial support from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  17. Magnetic nanodots from atomic Fe: can it be done?

    PubMed

    te Sligte, E; Bosch, R C M; Smeets, B; van der Straten, P; Beijerinck, H C W; van Leeuwen, K A H

    2002-04-30

    Laser focusing of Fe atoms offers the possibility of creating separate magnetic structures on a scale of 10 nm with exact periodicity. This can be done by using the parabolic minima of the potential generated by a standing light wave as focusing lenses. To achieve the desired 10-nm resolution, we need to suppress chromatic and spherical aberrations, as well as prevent structure broadening caused by the divergence of the incoming beam. Chromatic aberrations are suppressed by the development of a supersonic Fe beam source with speed ratio S = 11 +/- 1. This beam has an intensity of 3 x 10(15) atoms sr(-1) s(-1). The spherical aberrations of the standing light wave will be suppressed by aperturing with beam masks containing 100-nm slits at 744-nm intervals. The beam divergence can be reduced by application of laser cooling to reduce the transverse velocity. We have constructed a laser system capable of delivering over 500 mW of laser light at 372 nm, the wavelength of the (5)D(4) --> (5)F(5) atomic transition of (56)Fe we intend to use for laser cooling. Application of polarization spectroscopy to a hollow cathode discharge results in a locking system holding the laser continuously within 2 MHz of the desired frequency. PMID:11917133

  18. Magnetic nanodots from atomic Fe: Can it be done?

    PubMed Central

    te Sligte, E.; Bosch, R. C. M.; Smeets, B.; van der Straten, P.; Beijerinck, H. C. W.; van Leeuwen, K. A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Laser focusing of Fe atoms offers the possibility of creating separate magnetic structures on a scale of 10 nm with exact periodicity. This can be done by using the parabolic minima of the potential generated by a standing light wave as focusing lenses. To achieve the desired 10-nm resolution, we need to suppress chromatic and spherical aberrations, as well as prevent structure broadening caused by the divergence of the incoming beam. Chromatic aberrations are suppressed by the development of a supersonic Fe beam source with speed ratio S = 11 ± 1. This beam has an intensity of 3 × 1015 atoms sr−1 s−1. The spherical aberrations of the standing light wave will be suppressed by aperturing with beam masks containing 100-nm slits at 744-nm intervals. The beam divergence can be reduced by application of laser cooling to reduce the transverse velocity. We have constructed a laser system capable of delivering over 500 mW of laser light at 372 nm, the wavelength of the 5D4 → 5F5 atomic transition of 56Fe we intend to use for laser cooling. Application of polarization spectroscopy to a hollow cathode discharge results in a locking system holding the laser continuously within 2 MHz of the desired frequency. PMID:11917133

  19. Cold and Warm Atomic Gas around the Perseus Molecular Cloud. I. Basic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanimirović, Snežana; Murray, Claire E.; Lee, Min-Young; Heiles, Carl; Miller, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    Using the Arecibo Observatory, we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases, allowing us to estimate spin temperature (Ts ) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual H I clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium (CNM and WNM), respectively) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium H I survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have, on average, a higher total H I column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold H I relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temperature are in stark contrast with the recent attempt at using Planck data to estimate properties of the optically thick H I. Only ~15% of lines of sight in our study have a column density weighted average spin temperature lower than 50 K, in comparison with >~ 85% of Planck's sky coverage. The observed CNM fraction is inversely proportional to the optical depth weighted average spin temperature, in excellent agreement with the recent numerical simulations by Kim et al. While the CNM fraction is, on average, higher around Perseus relative to a random interstellar field, it is generally low, between 10%-50%. This suggests that extended WNM envelopes around molecular clouds and/or significant mixing of CNM and WNM throughout molecular clouds are present and should be considered in the models of molecule and star formation. Our detailed comparison of H I absorption with CO emission spectra shows that only 3 of the 26 directions are clear candidates for

  20. Cold and warm atomic gas around the Perseus molecular cloud. I. Basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stanimirović, Snežana; Murray, Claire E.; Miller, Jesse; Lee, Min-Young

    2014-10-01

    Using the Arecibo Observatory, we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases, allowing us to estimate spin temperature (T{sub s} ) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual H I clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium (CNM and WNM), respectively) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium H I survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have, on average, a higher total H I column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold H I relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temperature are in stark contrast with the recent attempt at using Planck data to estimate properties of the optically thick H I. Only ∼15% of lines of sight in our study have a column density weighted average spin temperature lower than 50 K, in comparison with ≳ 85% of Planck's sky coverage. The observed CNM fraction is inversely proportional to the optical depth weighted average spin temperature, in excellent agreement with the recent numerical simulations by Kim et al. While the CNM fraction is, on average, higher around Perseus relative to a random interstellar field, it is generally low, between 10%-50%. This suggests that extended WNM envelopes around molecular clouds and/or significant mixing of CNM and WNM throughout molecular clouds are present and should be considered in the models of molecule and star formation. Our detailed comparison of H I absorption with CO emission spectra shows that only 3 of the 26 directions are clear

  1. Reaching the magnetic anisotropy limit of a 3d metal atom.

    PubMed

    Rau, Ileana G; Baumann, Susanne; Rusponi, Stefano; Donati, Fabio; Stepanow, Sebastian; Gragnaniello, Luca; Dreiser, Jan; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Albertini, Oliver R; Macfarlane, Roger M; Lutz, Christopher P; Jones, Barbara A; Gambardella, Pietro; Heinrich, Andreas J; Brune, Harald

    2014-05-30

    Designing systems with large magnetic anisotropy is critical to realize nanoscopic magnets. Thus far, the magnetic anisotropy energy per atom in single-molecule magnets and ferromagnetic films remains typically one to two orders of magnitude below the theoretical limit imposed by the atomic spin-orbit interaction. We realized the maximum magnetic anisotropy for a 3d transition metal atom by coordinating a single Co atom to the O site of an MgO(100) surface. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals a record-high zero-field splitting of 58 millielectron volts as well as slow relaxation of the Co atom's magnetization. This striking behavior originates from the dominating axial ligand field at the O adsorption site, which leads to out-of-plane uniaxial anisotropy while preserving the gas-phase orbital moment of Co, as observed with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. PMID:24812206

  2. Magnetic conveyor belt transport of ultracold atoms to a superconducting atomchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minniberger, Stefan; Diorico, Fritz; Haslinger, Stefan; Hufnagel, Christoph; Novotny, Christian; Lippok, Nils; Majer, Johannes; Koller, Christian; Schneider, Stephan; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    We report the realization of a robust magnetic transport scheme to bring >3 × 108 ultracold 87Rb atoms into a cryostat. The sequence starts with standard laser cooling and trapping of 87Rb atoms, transporting first horizontally and then vertically through the radiation shields into a cryostat by a series of normal- and superconducting magnetic coils. Loading the atoms in a superconducting microtrap paves the way for studying the interaction of ultracold atoms with superconducting surfaces and quantum devices requiring cryogenic temperatures.

  3. Determination of the line shapes of atomic nitrogen resonance lines by magnetic scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, G. M.; Stone, E. J.; Kley, D.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is given for calibrating an atomic nitrogen resonance lamp for use in determining column densities of atoms in specific states. A discharge lamp emitting the NI multiplets at 1200 A and 1493 A is studied by obtaining absorption by atoms in a magnetic field (0-2.5 T). This magnetic scanning technique enables the determination of the absorbing atom column density, and an empirical curve of growth is obtained because the atomic f-value is known. Thus, the calibrated lamp can be used in the determination of atomic column densities.

  4. Chern Insulators from Heavy Atoms on Magnetic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Chern insulators, or quantum anomalous Hall insulators, would display a variety interesting and potentially useful properties; however, existing methods for constructing Chern insulators have proven challenging, and have thus far been limited to low temperatures. We propose a new method for searching for Chern insulators by depositing atomic layers of elements with large spin-orbit coupling (e.g., Bi) on the surface of a magnetic insulator. We argue that such systems will typically have isolated surface bands with nonzero Chern numbers. If these bands overlap in energy, a metallic surface with large anomalous Hall conductivity will result; if not, a Chern-insulator state will typically occur. We use first principles calculations to verify this search strategy by considering heavy atoms on the surfaces of MnTe, MnSe, and EuS, as well as more recent results on several promising oxide and nitride surfaces. We find many Chern insulators in both cases, including examples with large band gaps.

  5. Magnetic Slowing Down of Spin Relaxation due to Binary Collisions of Alkali-Metal Atoms with Buffer-Gas Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Griffith, W. M.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first studies of magnetic decoupling of the spin relaxation of alkali-metal atoms due to binary collisions with buffer gases. When binary collisions are the dominant relaxation mechanism, the relaxation and its magnetic decoupling are well described by the S-damping rate ΓSD due to the spin-rotation interaction γN˙S, the spin exchange rate ΓEX for collisions between alkali atoms, and a new ``Carver rate'' ΓC, due to the pressure-shift interaction δAİS, which can substantially broaden the magnetic decoupling curve while having no influence on the zero-field rates.

  6. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui

    2010-05-15

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  8. Magnetic levitation for effective loading of cold cesium atoms in a crossed dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Xu, Rundong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Chen, Gang; Dai, Xingcan; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-05-01

    We report a detailed study of effective magnetically levitated loading of cold atoms in a crossed dipole trap: an appropriate magnetic field gradient precisely compensates for the destructive gravitational force of the atoms and an additional bias field simultaneously eliminates the antitrapping potential induced by the magnetic field gradient. The magnetic levitation is required for a large-volume crossed dipole trap to form a shallow but very effective loading potential, making it a promising method for loading and trapping more cold atoms. For cold cesium atoms in the F =3 , m F =3 state prepared by three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling, a large number of atoms ˜3.2 ×106 have been loaded into a large-volume crossed dipole trap with the help of the magnetic levitation technique. The dependence of the number of atoms loaded and trapped in the dipole trap on the magnetic field gradient and bias field, respectively, is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The optimum magnetic field gradient of 31.13 G/cm matches the theoretical value of 31.3 G/cm well. This method can be used to obtain more cold atoms or a large number of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms for many atomic species in high-field seeking states.

  9. Atomic site sensitivity of the energy loss magnetic chiral dichroic spectra of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Calmels, L.; Rusz, J.

    2011-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of magnetic oxide core level spectra can become complicated when the magnetic atoms are located at several nonequivalent atomic sites in the crystal. This is, for instance, the case for Fe atoms in magnetite, which are located in tetrahedral and octahedral atomic sites; in this case, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroic (XMCD) spectra recorded at the L{sub 2,3} edge of Fe contain contributions from the different nonequivalent atomic sites, which unfortunately cannot be separated. Energy loss magnetic chiral dichroic (EMCD) spectra are the transmission electron microscope analogies of the XMCD spectra. One of the important differences between these two techniques of magnetic analysis is that EMCD uses a fast electron beam instead of polarized light. The fast electrons behave like Bloch states in the sample, and the fine structure of the EMCD spectra is strongly influenced by channeling and dynamical diffraction effects. These effects can be adjusted by changing the experimental configuration. We use theoretical calculations, which include dynamical diffraction effects and in which electronic transitions are treated in the atomic multiplet formalism, to show that the relative weight of the Fe atoms in different nonequivalent atomic sites can be changed by a proper choice of the position of the detector and of the magnetite sample orientation and thickness. We conclude that EMCD spectra could be used to isolate the magnetic contribution of atoms in each of the nonequivalent atomic sites, which would not be possible with XMCD techniques.

  10. Effect of magnetism and atomic order on static atomic displacements in the Invar alloy Fe-27 at.% Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sax, C. R.; Schönfeld, B.; Ruban, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    Fe-27 at.% Pt was aged at 1123 K and quenched to room temperature (RT) to set up a state of thermal equilibrium. The local atomic arrangement was studied by diffuse x-ray scattering above (at 427 K) and below (at RT) the Curie temperature as well as at RT under a saturating magnetic field. The separated short-range order scattering remained unchanged for all three states, with maxima at 100 positions. Effective pair interaction parameters determined by the inverse Monte Carlo method gave an order-disorder transition temperature of about 1088 K, close to direct experimental findings. The species-dependent static atomic displacements for the first two shells show large differences, with a strong increase in magnitude from the state at 427 K over RT to the state under saturating magnetic field. This outcome is in agreement with an increase in atomic volume of Fe with increasing local magnetic moment. Electronic-structure calculations closely reproduce the values for the static atomic displacements in the ferromagnetic state, and predict their dependence on the atomic configuration. They also reveal a strong dependence of the magnetic exchange interactions in Fe-Pt on the atomic configuration state and lattice parameter. In particular, the increase of the Curie temperature in a random state relative to that in the ordered one is demonstrated to be related to the corresponding change of the magnetic exchange interactions due to the different local atomic chemical environment. There exists a similar strong concentration dependence of the chemical interactions as in the case of magnetic exchange interactions. Theoretical effective interactions for Fe-27 at.% Pt alloy are in good agreement with experimental results, and they also reproduce well the L1 2-A1 transition temperature.

  11. Manipulation of magnetic anisotropy in Irn+1 clusters by Co atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Gui-Xian; Yan, Hong-Xia; Yang, Jue-Ming; Zhou, Long; Wan, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Ji-Jun; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2016-07-01

    Based on the first principles calculations, we have investigated the magnetic properties of Irn+1 clusters modulated by Co atoms. The research conclusions show that the amplitude of magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and magnetization direction of the small Irn+1 can be manipulated by Co atom if we can control the size very precisely. Such regulatory mechanism of MAE is ascribed to the distributing variation of Ir-5d orbits around the Fermi level induced by Co atom. More importantly, the colossal MAE values, 67.4 meV/atom, 40.26 meV/atom and 91.37 meV/atom, can be obtained for Ir2, Ir4, and CoIr clusters, respectively. Such high values provide a promising avenue for developing high-density magnetic storage units at sub-nanometer size.

  12. Observation of individual neutral atoms in magnetic and magneto-optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, D.; Schadwinkel, H.; Strauch, F.; Ueberholz, B.; Wynands, R.; Meschede, D.

    1996-06-01

    We have identified and photographed individual cesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap with steep magnetic gradients. By switching off the trapping light fields, single atoms were released to a bound state of the magnetic potential. A storage time of 38 s was measured for purely magnetic trapping, whereas a storage time of 147 s was observed in the corresponding magneto-optical trap.

  13. Magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics modeling for line polarization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of polarized X-ray line emission in plasmas, its connection to plasma anisotropy, and introduce an atomic kinetics model and code (POLAR) based on the population kinetics of magnetic sublevels. POLAR represents a multi-level, multi-process approach to the problem of polarized spectra in plasmas, and hence it is well suited for plasma applications where cascade effects and alignment transfer can become important. Polarization degrees of X-ray spectral lines computed with POLAR were successfully benchmarked against calculations done with other formalisms, and experimental results obtained at the EBIT facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We also investigated the polarization of He-like Si X-ray satellite lines as spectral signatures of anisotropy in the electron distribution function. A comprehensive modeling study was performed taking into account hydrodynamics and electron kinetics. We find that two satellite lines connecting singlet states develop a noticeable polarization while the triplet lines remain unpolarized. These results suggest a scenario where triplet lines could be used as a reference while the singlets could be used as polarized markers of plasma anisotropy.

  14. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  15. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO.

    PubMed

    Baumann, S; Donati, F; Stepanow, S; Rusponi, S; Paul, W; Gangopadhyay, S; Rau, I G; Pacchioni, G E; Gragnaniello, L; Pivetta, M; Dreiser, J; Piamonteze, C; Lutz, C P; Macfarlane, R M; Jones, B A; Gambardella, P; Heinrich, A J; Brune, H

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0±0.3  meV/atom. This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment. PMID:26684139

  16. Effects of warm temper rolling on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of strip-casting 6.5 wt% Si electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao-Ze; Liu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Yi; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Guang-Ming; Luo, Zhong-Han; Zhang, Feng-Quan; Chen, Sheng-Lin; Lyu, Li; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2014-12-01

    6.5 wt% Si electrical steel thin sheets were produced by a processing route including strip casting, hot rolling, warm rolling, intermediate annealing, warm temper rolling and final annealing, in which the warm temper rolling reduction varied from 2.7% to 14.4%. A detailed study of the microstructural and textural evolutions through the whole processing route was carried out by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. The findings revealed that the final recrystallization microstructure, texture and magnetic properties relied heavily on the warm temper rolling reduction. As the warm temper rolling reduction increased from 2.7% to 14.4%, the finally recrystallized microstructures were more homogeneous and the average grain size was decreased. At the warm temper rolling reduction lower than 7.0%, the occurrence of the exaggeratedly large annealing grains which dominated the whole sheet thickness resulted in strong <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND fiber and many other strong hard-magnetization texture components. By contrast, at the warm temper rolling reduction higher than 7.0%, the recrystallization textures were characterized by weak <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND texture, together with fewer and weak hard-magnetization texture components. The mechanism responsible for the finally microstructural and textural changes was explained by strain induced boundary migration. As warm temper rolling reduction increased, the magnetic properties at high frequency were gradually improved due to smaller grain sizes and more desirable textures. The highest magnetic inductions of 1.383 T (B8), 1.484 T (B25) and 1.571 T (B50) in combination with the lowest iron losses at high frequencies of 19.11 W/Kg (W10/400) and 3.824 W/Kg (W2/1000) were obtained at 14.4% warm temper rolling reduction under the applied condition.

  17. Magnetic coupling of laser-cooled atoms to a micro-resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew; Wang, Ying-Ju; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Kitching, John

    2009-05-01

    The direct coupling of the spin-degrees of freedom of an atomic vapor to the vibrational motion of a magnetic cantilever tip has recently been demonstrated [1], and prospects for coupling a BEC on an atom-chip to a nano- mechanical resonator have been recently discussed [2]. Possible applications include chip-scale atomic devices, in which localized interactions with magnetic cantilever tips selectively influence or probe atomic spins. As a next step towards the realization of a strongly coupled ultra-cold atom- resonator system, we have constructed an apparatus to study the direct coupling between the spins of trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and a magnetic tip on a micro-cantilever. The atoms will be loaded into a magnetic trap formed by the cantilever tip and external magnetic fields. The cantilever will be driven capacitively at its resonance frequency, resulting in a coherent precession of the trapped atomic spins with a matching Larmor frequency. Prospects for measuring the back-action of the ensemble of atomic spins on a cantilever beam will also be discussed. [1] Y.-J. Wang,M. Eardley, S. Knappe, J. Moreland, L. Hollberg, and J. Kitching, PRL 97, 227602 (2006). [2] P. Treutlein,D. Hunger, S. Camerer, T. W. Hansch, and J. Reichel, PRL 99, 140403 (2007).

  18. Magnetic dipole-dipole sensing at atomic scale using electron spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T.; Paul, W.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, S.; MacDonald, A.; Yang, K.; Natterer, F. D.; Lutz, C. P.; Heinrich, A. J.

    Magnetometry having both high magnetic field sensitivity and atomic resolution has been an important goal for applications in diverse fields covering physics, material science, and biomedical science. Recent development of electron spin resonance STM (ESR-STM) promises coherent manipulation of spins and studies on magnetic interaction of artificially built nanostructures, leading toward quantum computation, simulation, and sensors In ESR-STM experiments, we find that the ESR signal from an Fe atom underneath a STM tip splits into two different frequencies when we position an additional Fe atom nearby. We measure an ESR energy splitting that decays as 1/r3 (r is the separation of the two Fe atoms), indicating that the atoms are coupled through magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. This energy and distance relation enables us to determine magnetic moments of atoms and molecules on a surface with high precision in energy. Unique and advantageous aspects of ESR-STM are the atom manipulation capabilities, which allow us to build atomically precise nanostructures and examine their interactions. For instance, we construct a dice cinque arrangement of five Fe atoms, and probe their interaction and energy degeneracy. We demonstrate the ESR-STM technique can be utilized for quantum magnetic sensors.

  19. Planar hydrogen-like atom in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: Exactly or quasi-exactly solvable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyan; Hao, Qinghai

    2015-05-01

    We use a simple mathematical method to solve the problem of a two-dimensional hydrogen-like atom in the inhomogeneous magnetic fields B = ( k/ r)z and B = ( k/ r 3)z. We construct a Hamiltonian that takes the same form as the Hamiltonian of a hydrogen-like atom in the homogeneous magnetic fields and obtain the energy spectrum by comparing the Hamiltonians. The results show that the whole spectrum of the atom in the magnetic field B = ( k/ r)z can be obtained, and the problem is exactly solvable in this case. We find analytic solutions of the Schrödinger equation for the atom in the magnetic field B = ( k/ r 3)z for particular values of the magnetic strength k and thus present a quasi-exactly solvable model.

  20. The effect of grading the atomic number at resistive guide element interface on magnetic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alraddadi, R. A. B.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Woolsey, N. C.; Pasley, J.

    2016-07-01

    Using 3 dimensional numerical simulations, this paper shows that grading the atomic number and thus the resistivity at the interface between an embedded high atomic number guide element and a lower atomic number substrate enhances the growth of a resistive magnetic field. This can lead to a large integrated magnetic flux density, which is fundamental to confining higher energy fast electrons. This results in significant improvements in both magnetic collimation and fast-electron-temperature uniformity across the guiding. The graded interface target provides a method for resistive guiding that is tolerant to laser pointing.

  1. Efficient magnetic guiding and deflection of atomic beams with moderate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goepfert, A.; Lison, F.; Schütze, R.; Wynands, R.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    We have studied guidance and deflection of a beam of cesium atoms by a strong toroidal magnetic quadrupole field. The beam guide is made from permanent magnets sustaining a radial field gradient of 2.8 T/cm. Atoms with moderate longitudinal velocities ranging from 30 m/s to 70 m/s were inserted across the 10-mm-diameter aperture of a 24.5° arc with radius 300 mm. We have measured transmission and beam divergence and find good agreement with ray-tracing calculations and analytical estimates. The magnetic beam guide allows for 100% transmission of heavy atoms over large angles.

  2. Simultaneous differential measurement of a magnetic-field gradient by atom interferometry using double fountains

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zhongkun; Duan Xiaochun; Zhou Minkang; Sun Buliang; Zhao Jinbo; Huang Maomao; Luo Jun

    2011-07-15

    Precisely measuring the magnetic-field gradient within a vacuum chamber is important for many precision experiments and can be realized by atom interferometry using magnetically sensitive sublevels at different times to make a differential measurement, which had been demonstrated in our previous work. In this paper, we demonstrate a differential method to measure the magnetic-field gradient by means of two simultaneously operated atom interferometers using double atomic fountains. By virtue of this simultaneous differential measurement to reject common-mode noise, the resolution can be improved by one order of magnitude for about a 1000-s integration time.

  3. Extracting the differential phase in dual atom interferometers by modulating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhong, Jia-Qi; Chen, Xi; Li, Run-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Song, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    We present a new scheme for measuring the differential phase in dual atom interferometers. The magnetic field is modulated in one interferometer, and the differential phase can be extracted without measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field by combining the ellipse and linear fitting methods. The gravity gradient measurements are discussed based on dual atom interferometers. Numerical simulation shows that the systematic error of the differential phase measurement is largely decreased when the duration of the magnetic field is symmetrically modulated. This combined fitting scheme has a high accuracy for measuring an arbitrary differential phase in dual atom interferometers.

  4. Magnetic Resonance in an Atomic Vapor Excited by a Mechanical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ju; Eardley, Matthew; Knappe, Svenja; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate a direct resonant interaction between the mechanical motion of a mesoscopic resonator and the spin degrees of freedom of a sample of neutral atoms in the gas phase. This coupling, mediated by a magnetic particle attached to the tip of the miniature mechanical resonator, excites a coherent precession of the atomic spins about a static magnetic field. The novel coupled atom-resonator system may enable development of low-power, high-performance sensors, and enhance research efforts connected with the manipulation of cold atoms, quantum control, and high-resolution microscopy.

  5. Laser cooling of an indium atomic beam enabled by magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöter, B.; Weber, C.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Metcalf, H.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate magnetic field enabled optical forces on a neutral indium atomic beam in a light field consisting of five frequencies. The role of dark magnetic ground state sublevels is studied and enables us to cool the atomic beam transversely to near the Doppler limit with laser frequencies tuned above the atomic resonance. The effect of laser cooling can be explained with transient effects in the light potential created by the standing wave light field where the atoms are optically pumped into the dark states and recycled by Larmor precession.

  6. Association of atoms into universal dimers using an oscillating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2015-03-13

    In a system of ultracold atoms near a Feshbach resonance, pairs of atoms can be associated into universal dimers by an oscillating magnetic field with a frequency near that determined by the dimer binding energy. We present a simple expression for the transition rate that takes into account many-body effects through a transition matrix element of the contact. In a thermal gas, the width of the peak in the transition rate as a function of the frequency is determined by the temperature. In a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms, the width is determined by the inelastic scattering rates of a dimer with zero-energy atoms. Near an atom-dimer resonance, there is a dramatic increase in the width from inelastic atom-dimer scattering and from atom-atom-dimer recombination. The recombination contribution provides a signature for universal tetramers that are Efimov states consisting of two atoms and a dimer. PMID:25815927

  7. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  8. Designing and building a permanent magnet Zeeman slower for calcium atoms using a 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsagian, Alexandria; Kleinert, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    We present the design of a Zeeman slower for calcium atoms using permanent magnets instead of more traditional electromagnets and the novel technique of 3D printing to create a very robust and flexible structure for these magnets. Zeeman slowers are ideal tools to slow atoms from several hundreds of meters per second to just a few tens of meters per second. These slower atoms can then easily be trapped in a magneto-optical trap, making Zeeman slowers a very valuable tool in many cold atom labs. The use of permanent magnets and 3D printing results in a highly stable and robust slower that is suitable for undergraduate laboratories. In our design, we arranged 28 magnet pairs, 2.0 cm apart along the axis of the slower and at varying radial distances from the axis. We determined the radial position of the magnets by simulating the combined field of all magnet pairs using Mathematica and comparing it to the ideal theoretical field for a Zeeman slower. Finally, we designed a stable, robust, compact, and easy-to-align mounting structure for the magnets in Google Sketchup, which we then printed using a commercially available 3D printer by Solidoodle. The resulting magnetic field is well suited to slow calcium atoms from the 770 m/s rms velocity at a temperature of 950 K, down to the capture velocity of the magneto-optical trap.

  9. Characterization of laser cooling in a high-magnetic-field atom trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, E.; Zigo, S.; Hu, K. Z.; Raithel, G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe cooling and trapping of both 85Rb and 87Rb in a range of magnetic fields up to 2.6 T. Atoms are injected from a low-field pyramidal magneto-optical trap and recaptured in a high-magnetic-field atom trap. The atoms are cooled and trapped by a six-beam optical molasses via the 5S1/2|mI,mJ= 1/2>→ 5P3/2|mI,mJ= 3/2> transition (mI= 5/2 for 85Rb and mI= 3/2 for 87Rb). We study the trap fluorescence spectra, atom temperatures, density distributions, and lifetimes as a function of magnetic field and detuning parameters. The trap fluorescence spectra are both narrow and asymmetric, as is characteristic for laser cooling of atoms in an external trapping potential. The trap is modeled using a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation technique.

  10. Optical Polarization From Aligned Atoms As A Diagnostic Of Interstellar And Circumstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Lazarian, A.

    2005-12-01

    Population among sublevels of the ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a perspective tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We discuss the process of alignment that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medium, circumstellar regions and quasars. To exemplify what atomic alignment can provide to the observers we consider synthetic data obtained with MHD simulations of comet wake.

  11. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    We report the resonant coupling of laser cooled trapped Rb atoms to a micro-cantilever with a magnetic tip. An atom chip is used to trap, cool, and transport the atoms to the tip of the cantilever. The capacitively-driven cantilever oscillation produces Zeeman state transitions which result in a loss of population in the trap. In a suitably scaled setup, mechanical resonators could be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity; this technique may enable new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  12. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-24

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. Here we present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  13. Effects of strong magnetic fields on the electron distribution and magnetisability of rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2004-12-01

    Strong uniform static magnetic fields compress the electronic distribution of rare gas atoms and cause a 'spindle effect', which can be illustrated by plotting charge-density functions which depend quadratically on the flux density of the applied field. The fourth rank hypermagnetisabilities of He, Ne, Ar and Kr are predicted to have small positive values. Accordingly, the diamagnetism of rare gas atoms diminishes by a very little amount in the presence of intense magnetic field.

  14. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of an electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. We present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  15. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  16. A simple model for optical capture of atoms in strong magnetic quadrupole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, D.; Höpe, A.; Meschede, D.

    1993-10-01

    The radiative capture of cesium atoms from the gas phase in a magnetooptic trap with strong magnetic field gradients is studied. A simplified analytic model is used to derive an upper limit for capture velocities. The resulting scaling law agrees well with the observed number of atoms and with the density as a function of field gradient.

  17. Decoherence-governed magnetic-moment dynamics of supported atomic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás

    2015-11-01

    Due to the quantum evolution of molecular magnetic moments, the magnetic state of nanomagnets can suffer spontaneous changes. This process can be completely quenched by environment-induced decoherence. However, we show that for typical small supported atomic objects, the substrate-induced decoherence does change the magnetic-moment evolution but does not quell it. To be specific and to compare with experiment, we analyze the spontaneous switching between two equivalent magnetization states of atomic structures formed by Fe on Cu2N/Cu (1 0 0), measured by Loth et al (2012 Science 335 196-9). Due to the substrate-induced decoherence, the Rabi oscillations proper to quantum tunneling between magnetic states are replaced by an irreversible decay of long characteristic times leading to the observed stochastic magnetization switching. We show that the corresponding switching rates are small, rapidly decreasing with system’s size, with a 1/T thermal behavior and in good agreement with experiments. Quantum tunneling is recovered as the switching mechanism at extremely low temperatures below the μK range for a six-Fe-atom system and exponentially lower for larger atomic systems. The unexpected conclusion of this work is that experiments could detect the switching of these supported atomic systems because their magnetization evolution is somewhere between complete decoherence-induced stability and unobservably fast quantum-tunneling switching.

  18. Decoherence-governed magnetic-moment dynamics of supported atomic objects.

    PubMed

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás

    2015-11-18

    Due to the quantum evolution of molecular magnetic moments, the magnetic state of nanomagnets can suffer spontaneous changes. This process can be completely quenched by environment-induced decoherence. However, we show that for typical small supported atomic objects, the substrate-induced decoherence does change the magnetic-moment evolution but does not quell it. To be specific and to compare with experiment, we analyze the spontaneous switching between two equivalent magnetization states of atomic structures formed by Fe on Cu2N/Cu (1 0 0), measured by Loth et al (2012 Science 335 196-9). Due to the substrate-induced decoherence, the Rabi oscillations proper to quantum tunneling between magnetic states are replaced by an irreversible decay of long characteristic times leading to the observed stochastic magnetization switching. We show that the corresponding switching rates are small, rapidly decreasing with system's size, with a 1/T thermal behavior and in good agreement with experiments. Quantum tunneling is recovered as the switching mechanism at extremely low temperatures below the μK range for a six-Fe-atom system and exponentially lower for larger atomic systems. The unexpected conclusion of this work is that experiments could detect the switching of these supported atomic systems because their magnetization evolution is somewhere between complete decoherence-induced stability and unobservably fast quantum-tunneling switching. PMID:26471260

  19. Interlayer Exchange Coupling: A General Scheme Turning Chiral Magnets into Magnetic Multilayers Carrying Atomic-Scale Skyrmions.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Ashis Kumar; Kiselev, Nikolai S; Blügel, Stefan

    2016-04-29

    We report on a general principle using interlayer exchange coupling to extend the regime of chiral magnetic films in which stable or metastable magnetic Skyrmions can appear at a zero magnetic field. We verify this concept on the basis of a first-principles model for a Mn monolayer on a W(001) substrate, a prototype chiral magnet for which the atomic-scale magnetic texture is determined by the frustration of exchange interactions, impossible to unwind by laboratory magnetic fields. By means of ab initio calculations for the Mn/W_{m}/Co_{n}/Pt/W(001) multilayer system we show that for certain thicknesses m of the W spacer and n of the Co reference layer, the effective field of the reference layer fully substitutes the required magnetic field for Skyrmion formation. PMID:27176536

  20. Interlayer Exchange Coupling: A General Scheme Turning Chiral Magnets into Magnetic Multilayers Carrying Atomic-Scale Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Ashis Kumar; Kiselev, Nikolai S.; Blügel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    We report on a general principle using interlayer exchange coupling to extend the regime of chiral magnetic films in which stable or metastable magnetic Skyrmions can appear at a zero magnetic field. We verify this concept on the basis of a first-principles model for a Mn monolayer on a W(001) substrate, a prototype chiral magnet for which the atomic-scale magnetic texture is determined by the frustration of exchange interactions, impossible to unwind by laboratory magnetic fields. By means of ab initio calculations for the Mn /Wm/Con/Pt /W (001 ) multilayer system we show that for certain thicknesses m of the W spacer and n of the Co reference layer, the effective field of the reference layer fully substitutes the required magnetic field for Skyrmion formation.

  1. Detection of magnetic-labeled antibody specific recognition events by combined atomic force and magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Liu, Yanmei; Li, Jun; Guo, Wei; Bai, Yubai

    2009-09-01

    Atomic force (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were developed to detect biomolecular specific interaction. Goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) was covalently attached onto gold substrate modified by a self-assembly monolayer of thioctic acid via 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide (EDC) activation. Magnetic-labeled IgG then specifically adsorbed onto anti-IgG surface. The morphological variation was identified by AFM. MFM was proved to be a fine assistant tool to distinguish the immunorecognized nanocomposites from the impurities by detection of the magnetic signal from magnetic-labeled IgG. It would enhance the understanding of biomolecular recognition process.

  2. Reflection of a slow cesium atomic beam from a naturally magnetized Nd-Fe-B surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Schuh, P.; Meschede, D.

    We have demonstrated the partly directed reflection of a slow cesium atomic beam by using the natural magnetic stray field above a Nd-Fe-B surface. From these experiments we determine the reflectivity and a minimum value for the magnetic stray field directly at the surface.

  3. The UKB prescription and the heavy atom effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding of vicinal heavy atoms.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2009-07-21

    Fully relativistic calculations of NMR magnetic shielding on XYH3 (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn; Y = Br, I), XHn (n = 1-4) molecular systems and noble gases performed with a fully relativistic polarization propagator formalism at the RPA level of approach are presented. The rate of convergence (size of basis set and time involved) for calculations with both kinetic balance prescriptions, RKB and UKB, were investigated. Calculations with UKB makes it feasible to obtain reliable results for two or more heavy-atom-containing molecules. For such XYH3 systems, the influence of heavy vicinal halogen atoms on sigma(X) is such that heavy atom effects on heavy atoms (vicinal plus their own effects or HAVHA + HAHA effects) amount to 30.50% for X = Sn and Y = I; being the HAHA effect of the order of 25%. So the vicinal effect alone is of the order of 5.5%. The vicinal heavy atom effect on light atoms (HALA effect) is of the order of 28% for X = C and Y = I. A similar behaviour, but of opposite sign, is observed for sigma(Y) for which sigmaR-NR (I; X = C) (HAHA effect) is around 27% and sigmaR-NR(I; X = Sn) (HAVHA + HAHA effects) is close to 21%. Its electronic origin is paramagnetic for halogen atoms but both dia- and paramagnetic for central atoms. The effect on two bond distant hydrogen atoms is such that the largest variation of sigma(H) within the same family of XYH3 molecules appears for X = Si and Y = I: around 20%. In this case sigma(H; X = Sn, Y = I) = 33.45 ppm and sigma(H; X = Sn, Y = H) = 27.82 ppm. PMID:19842479

  4. Atomic structure and magnetic properties of Fe1-xCox alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Ji, Min; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Harmon, Bruce; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-03-09

    Using genetic algorithm with first-principle calculations, we searched for low-energy crystal structures of Fe1−xCox alloys. We found that Fe1−xCox alloys are highly configurationally degenerate with many additional off-stoichiometric stable structures to the well-known B2 structure. The average magnetic moment of Fe atom increases with concentration of Co in the alloy, while that of Co atom is almost constant, which are consistent with experiments and earlier studies. The magnetic moment of Fe atom is strongly dependent on the number of Co nearest neighbor and it increases with this number.

  5. Giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of an individual atom on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-08-01

    Exploring magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, is at the heart of spintronics research. Herein, using first-principles calculations we explore the possibility of reaching an atomic-scale perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by carefully exploring the large spin-orbit coupling, orbital magnetism, and ligand field in a suitable choice of a two-dimensional structure with transition metal adatoms. More specifically, we demonstrate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies up to an order of 100 meV per atom in individual ruthenium and osmium adatoms at a monosulfur vacancy in molybdenum disulfide. We further propose a phenomenological model where a spin state transition that involves hybridization between molybdenum a1 and adatomic e' orbitals is a possible mechanism for magnetization reversal from an in-plane to perpendicular orientation.

  6. Direct visualization and identification of biofunctionalized nanoparticles using a magnetic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Block, Stephan; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner; Helm, Christiane A

    2011-09-14

    Because of its outstanding ability to image and manipulate single molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) established itself as a fundamental technique in nanobiotechnology. (1) We present a new modality that distinguishes single nanoparticles by the surrounding magnetic field gradient. Diamagnetic gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles become discernible under ambient conditions. Images of proteins, magnetolabeled with nanoparticles, demonstrate the first steps toward a magnetic analogue to fluorescence microscopy, which combines nanoscale lateral resolution of AFM with unambiguous detection of magnetic markers. PMID:21819124

  7. Bidirectional propagation of cold atoms in a 'stadium'-shaped magnetic guide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Saijun; Rooijakkers, Wilbert; Striehl, Pierre; Prentiss, Mara

    2004-07-01

    We demonstrate the bidirectional propagation of more than 10{sup 7} atoms ({sup 87}Rb) around a 'stadium'-shaped magnetic ring that encloses an area of 10.9 cm{sup 2}, with a flux density exceeding 10{sup 11} atom s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. Atoms are loaded into the guide from a two-dimensional (and higher) magneto-optical trap at one side of the 'stadium'. An optical standing wave pulse is applied to increase the propagation velocity of atoms along the waveguide. The atom sample fills the entire ring in 200 ms when counterpropagating atom sections of the original atom cloud recombine at their initial positions after a full revolution.

  8. Properties of the warm magnetized ISM, as inferred from WSRT polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, M.; Katgert, P.; de Bruyn, A. G.

    2004-11-01

    We describe a first attempt to derive properties of the regular and turbulent Galactic magnetic field from multi-frequency polarimetric observations of the diffuse Galactic synchrotron background. A single-cell-size model of the thin Galactic disk is constructed which includes random and regular magnetic fields and thermal and relativistic electrons. The disk is irradiated from behind with a uniform partially polarized background. Radiation from the background and from the thin disk is Faraday rotated and depolarized while propagating through the medium. The model parameters are estimated from a comparison with 350 MHz observations in two regions at intermediate latitudes done with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. We obtain good agreement between the estimates for the random and regular magnetic field strengths and typical scales of structure in the two regions. The regular magnetic field strength found is a few μG, and the ratio of random to regular magnetic field strength Bran/Breg is 0.7 ± 0.5, for a typical scale of the random component of 15 ± 10 pc. Furthermore, the regular magnetic field is directed almost perpendicular to the line of sight. This modeling is a potentially powerful method to estimate the structure of the Galactic magnetic field, especially when more polarimetric observations of the diffuse synchrotron background at intermediate latitudes become available.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of a cesium atom beam in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiang Zhu, Hongwei; Ma, Yinguang; Li, Detian; Liu, Zhidong; Wang, Ji

    2015-03-07

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of the deflection of a beam of {sup 133}Cs atoms in a two wire magnetic field. Our results reveal the relationship between transmission rate of the atoms and incident parameters. Incident angle and position of the beam with maximum transmission are obtained from the simulations. The effect of the deflection field on the spatial distribution (beam profile) of {sup 133}Cs is derived. The method will help with the design of magnetic deflection experiments and to extract the magnetic properties from such experiments.

  10. Magnetic state selection in atomic frequency and time standards. [hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic standards such as those based upon cesium and hydrogen rely upon magnetic state selection to obtain population inversion in the hyperfine transition levels. Use of new design approaches and improved magnetic materials has made it possible to fabricate improved state selectors of small size, and thus the efficiency of utilization of beam flux is greatly improved and the size and weight of the standard is reduced. The sensitivity to magnetic perturbations is also decreased, so that the accuracy and stability of the standard is improved. Several new state selector designs are illustrated and the application to standards utilizing different atomic species is analyzed.

  11. Magnetic-field-tunable Kondo effect in alkaline-earth cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Leonid; Rey, Ana Maria

    We study quantum magnetism and emergent Kondo physics in strongly interacting fermionic alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice with two Bloch bands: one localized and one itinerant. For a fully filled narrow band (two atoms per lattice site) we demonstrate that an applied magnetic field provides an efficient control of the ground state degeneracy due to the field-induced crossing of singlet and triplet state of the localized atomic pairs. We exploit this singlet-triplet resonance, as well as magnetically tunable interactions of atoms in different electronic states via the recently-discovered inter-orbital Feshbach resonance, and demonstrate that the system exhibits a magnetic field-induced Kondo phase characterized by delocalization of local singlets and a large Fermi surface. We also determine the phase diagram of the system within an effective low-energy model that incorporates the above magnetic-field effect as well as atomic interactions in the two optical lattice bands. Our results can be tested with ultracold 173 Yb , and provide a model for the magnetic field-induced heavy-fermion state in filled skutterudites such as PrOs4Sb12 . This work was supported by the NSF (PIF-1211914 and PFC-1125844), AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, NIST and ARO individual investigator awards.

  12. Cooling by Spontaneous Decay of Highly Excited Antihydrogen Atoms in Magnetic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Nagata, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-11-24

    An efficient cooling mechanism of magnetically trapped, highly excited antihydrogen (H) atoms is presented. This cooling, in addition to the expected evaporative cooling, results in trapping of a large number of H atoms in the ground state. It is found that the final fraction of trapped atoms is insensitive to the initial distribution of H magnetic quantum numbers. Expressions are derived for the cooling efficiency, demonstrating that magnetic quadrupole (cusp) traps provide stronger cooling than higher order magnetic multipoles. The final temperature of H confined in a cusp trap is shown to depend as {approx}2.2T{sub n{sub 0}}n{sub 0}{sup -2/3} on the initial Rydberg level n{sub 0} and temperature T{sub n{sub 0}}.

  13. Precisely mapping the magnetic field gradient in vacuum with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Minkang; Hu Zhongkun; Duan Xiaochun; Sun Buliang; Zhao Jinbo; Luo Jun

    2010-12-15

    The magnetic field gradient has been measured with an atom interferometer using the magnetic sublevels of {sup 87}Rb atoms. The Doppler-insensitive measurement effectively eliminates the contribution from gravity and background vibration noise, and the differential measurement also can reject some systematic errors. A resolution of 300 pT/mm has been demonstrated with a 90-s integration time and a spatial resolution of 1.4 mm. The gradiometer was then used to measure the magnetic field gradient in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment. The technique will also be very useful to subtract the systematic error arising from the magnetic field inhomogeneity in precision atom-interferometry experiments, such as gravity measurement.

  14. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutional transition-metal atoms in GaN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Shi, Jun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the transition-metal (TM) atoms (Sc—Zn, Pt and Au) doped zigzag GaN single-walled nanotubes (NTs) are investigated using first-principles spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our results show that the bindings of all TM atoms are stable with the binding energy in the range of 6-16 eV. The Sc- and V-doped GaN NTs exhibit a nonmagnetic behavior. The GaN NTs doped with Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Pt are antiferromagnetic. On the contrary, the Cr-, Fe-, Co-, Zn- and Au-doped GaN NTs show the ferromagnetic characteristics. The Mn- and Co-doped GaN NTs induce the largest local moment of 4μB among these TM atoms. The local magnetic moment is dominated by the contribution from the substitutional TM atom and the N atoms bonded with it.

  15. Atomic structure, alloying behavior, and magnetism in small Fe-Pt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittari, Bheema Lingam; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-09-01

    We report results of the atomic structure, alloying behavior, and magnetism in F emP tn(m +n =2 -10 ) clusters using projector augmented wave (PAW) pseudopotential method and spin-polarized generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. These results are compared with those obtained by using HCTH exchange-correlation functional and LANL2DZ basis set in the Gaussian program and the overall trends are found to be similar. As in bulk Fe-Pt alloys, clusters with equal composition of Fe and Pt have the largest binding energy and the largest heat of nanoalloy formation for a given number of atoms in the cluster. There are some deviations due to the different symmetries in clusters and in cases where the total number of atoms is odd. The lowest energy isomers tend to maximize bonds between unlike atoms with Fe (Pt) atoms occupying high (low) coordination sites in the core (surface) of the cluster. The binding energy, heat of formation, and the second order difference of the total energy show F e2P t2 , F e4P t4 , and F e4P t6 clusters to be the most stable ones among the different clusters we have studied. The magnetic moments on Fe atoms are high in Pt-rich clusters as well as in small Fe-rich clusters and decrease as the aggregation of Fe atoms and the cluster size increases. The maximum value of the magnetic moments on Fe atoms is ˜3.8 μB , whereas for Pt atoms it is 1 μB. These are quite high compared with the values for bulk Fe as well as bulk FePt and F e3Pt phases while bulk Pt is nonmagnetic. There is significant charge transfer from those Fe atoms that interact directly with Pt atoms. We discuss the hybridization between the electronic states of Pt and Fe atoms as well as the variation in the magnetic moments on Fe and Pt atoms. Our results provide insight into the understanding of the nanoalloy behavior of Fe-Pt and we hope that this would help to design Fe based nanoalloys and their assemblies with high magnetic moments for

  16. Magnetic merging of ultracold atomic gases of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Haendel, S.; Wiles, T. P.; Marchant, A. L.; Hopkins, S. A.; Adams, C. S.; Cornish, S. L.

    2011-05-15

    We report the magnetic merging of ultracold atomic gases of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb by the controlled overlap of two initially spatially separated magnetic traps. We present a detailed analysis of the combined magnetic-field potential as the two traps are brought together that predicts a clear optimum trajectory for the merging. We verify this prediction experimentally using {sup 85}Rb and find that the final atom number in the merged trap is maximized with minimal heating by following the predicted optimum trajectory. Using the magnetic-merging approach allows us to create variable-ratio isotopic Rb mixtures with a single laser-cooling setup by simply storing one isotope in a magnetic trap before jumping the laser frequencies to the transitions necessary to laser cool the second isotope.

  17. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  18. Electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoou; Li, Qingfang

    2015-08-14

    The stable configurations and electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms (H, N, P, O, S, F, and Cl) adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers have been investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that H, O, S, F, and Cl prefer to occupy the peak sites of S atoms, while both N and P atoms favor the valley sites of S atoms. The ReS{sub 2} sheet exhibits a good adsorption capability to nonmetal atoms. The reconstruction of the surface is pronounced in N- and P-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers. In H-adsorbed case, the Fermi level is pulled into the conduction band, which results in the semiconductor-metal transition. The same magnetic moment of 1μ{sub B} is found in the N-, P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers, while the mechanisms of forming magnetic moment for N (P)- and F (Cl)-adsorbed cases are different. In addition, the spatial extensions of spin density in P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed cases are larger than that in N-adsorbed case, which is more suitable to achieve long-range magnetic coupling interaction at low defect concentrations. Our results provide insight for achieving metal-free magnetism and a tunable band gap for various electronic and spintronic devices based on ReS{sub 2}.

  19. Electronic structures and magnetic properties of rare-earth-atom-doped BNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Juan; Zhang, Ning-Chao; Wang, Peng; Ning, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Peng, Xiao-Juan

    2016-04-01

    Stable geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties of (8,0) and (4,4) single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNTs) doped with rare-earth (RE) atoms are investigated using the first-principles pseudopotential plane wave method with density functional theory (DFT). The results show that these RE atoms can be effectively doped in BNNTs with favorable energies. Because of the curvature effect, the values of binding energy for RE-atom-doped (4,4) BNNTs are larger than those of the same atoms on (8,0) BNNTs. Electron transfer between RE-5 d, 6 s, and B-2 p, N-2 p orbitals was also observed. Furthermore, electronic structures and magnetic properties of BNNTs can be modified by such doping. The results show that the adsorption of Ce, Pm, Sm, and Eu atoms can induce magnetization, while no magnetism is observed when BNNTs are doped with La. These results are useful for spintronics applications and for developing magnetic nanostructures.

  20. Structure of magnetic resonance in 87Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. N.; Zibrov, S. A.; Zibrov, A. A.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Tsygankov, E. A.; Zibrov, A. S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Velichansky, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance at the F g = 1 rightleftarrows F e = 1 transition of the D 1 line in 87Rb has been studied with pumping and detection by linearly polarized radiation and detection at the double frequency of the radiofrequency field. The intervals of allowed values of the static and alternating magnetic fields in which magnetic resonance has a single maximum have been found. The structure appearing beyond these intervals has been explained. It has been shown that the quadratic Zeeman shift is responsible for the three-peak structure of resonance; the radiofrequency shift results in the appearance of additional extrema in resonance, which can be used to determine the relaxation constant Γ2. The possibility of application in magnetometry has been discussed.

  1. Wireless power transfer based on magnetic metamaterials consisting of assembled ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Li, Y. H.; Gao, N.; Yang, F.; Chen, Y. Q.; Fang, K.; Zhang, Y. W.; Chen, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this letter, a potential way to transfer power wirelessly based on magnetic metamaterials (MMs) assembled by ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms is proposed. Frequency-domain simulation and experiments are performed for accurately obtaining effective permeability of magnetic metamaterials. The results demonstrate that MMs possess great power for enhancing the wireless power transfer efficiency between two non-resonant coils. Further investigations on the magnetic-field distribution demonstrate that a large-area flattened magnetic field in near range can be effectively realized, exhibiting great flexibility in assembling.

  2. Realizing exactly solvable SU (N ) magnets with thermal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverland, Michael E.; Alagic, Gorjan; Martin, Michael J.; Koller, Andrew P.; Rey, Ana M.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2016-05-01

    We show that n thermal fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms in a flat-bottom trap allow one to robustly implement a spin model displaying two symmetries: the Sn symmetry that permutes atoms occupying different vibrational levels of the trap and the SU (N ) symmetry associated with N nuclear spin states. The symmetries make the model exactly solvable, which, in turn, enables the analytic study of dynamical processes such as spin diffusion in this SU (N ) system. We also show how to use this system to generate entangled states that allow for Heisenberg-limited metrology. This highly symmetric spin model should be experimentally realizable even when the vibrational levels are occupied according to a high-temperature thermal or an arbitrary nonthermal distribution.

  3. Atomic-Scale Interfacial Magnetism in Fe/Graphene Heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. Q.; Wang, W. Y.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, F. Q.; Lu, C.; Jin, F.; Zhang, A.; Zhang, Q. M.; Laan, G. van der; Xu, Y. B.; Li, Q. X.; Zhang, R.

    2015-01-01

    Successful spin injection into graphene makes it a competitive contender in the race to become a key material for quantum computation, or the spin-operation-based data processing and sensing. Engineering ferromagnetic metal (FM)/graphene heterojunctions is one of the most promising avenues to realise it, however, their interface magnetism remains an open question up to this day. In any proposed FM/graphene spintronic devices, the best opportunity for spin transport could only be achieved where no magnetic dead layer exists at the FM/graphene interface. Here we present a comprehensive study of the epitaxial Fe/graphene interface by means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experiment has been performed using a specially designed FM1/FM2/graphene structure that to a large extent restores the realistic case of the proposed graphene-based transistors. We have quantitatively observed a reduced but still sizable magnetic moments of the epitaxial Fe ML on graphene, which is well resembled by simulations and can be attributed to the strong hybridization between the Fe 3dz2 and the C 2pz orbitals and the sp-orbital-like behavior of the Fe 3d electrons due to the presence of graphene. PMID:26145155

  4. Excitation of simple atoms by slow magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.; Parke, S.J.; Ganapathi, V.; Drell, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    We present a theory of excitation of simple atoms by slow moving massive monopoles. Previously presented results for a monopole of Dirac strength on hydrogen and helium are reviewed. The hydrogen theory is extended to include arbitrary integral multiples of the Dirac pole strength. The excitation of helium by double strength poles and by dyons is also discussed. It is concluded that a helium proportional counter is a reliable and effective detector for monopoles of arbitrary strength, and for negatively charged dyons.

  5. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Jin

    2015-08-19

    The PowerPoint presentation focused on research goals, specific information about the atomic magnetometer, response and resolution factors of the SERF magnetometer, FC+AM systems, tests of field transfer and resolution on FC, gradient cancellation, testing of AM performance, ideas for a multi-channel AM, including preliminary sensitivity testing, and a description of a 6 channel DAQ system. A few ideas for future work ended the presentation.

  6. Magnetic-field-mediated hybridization of ultracold atoms and a nanostring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Andrei; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Leblanc, Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Through nanofabrication, mechanical elements can be engineered with vibration frequencies near the hyperfine and Zeeman resonances in an atomic system. By including magnetic elements as part of this mechanical object, we can couple the vibrational modes of the oscillator to the spin states of the atoms. The nanostring design offers new options for creating magnetic fields using dc and ac currents. Here, we consider and compare different ways to provide magnetic coupling between this mechanical motion and the spin states of an ultracold 87 Rb gas, and discuss methods of manipulating the quantum state of a mechanical oscillator using cold atoms, such as mechanical cooling. Finally, we discuss our progress towards the experimental realization of this system, including a system for optically transferring at cold 87 Rb gas from a remote 3D MOT, and constructing a versatile load-lock type UHV system for rapidly prototyping new devices.

  7. Coupled-cluster theory for atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stopkowicz, Stella Lange, Kai K.; Tellgren, Erik I.; Helgaker, Trygve; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-08-21

    An implementation of coupled-cluster (CC) theory to treat atoms and molecules in finite magnetic fields is presented. The main challenges for the implementation stem from the magnetic-field dependence in the Hamiltonian, or, more precisely, the appearance of the angular momentum operator, due to which the wave function becomes complex and which introduces a gauge-origin dependence. For this reason, an implementation of a complex CC code is required together with the use of gauge-including atomic orbitals to ensure gauge-origin independence. Results of coupled-cluster singles–doubles–perturbative-triples (CCSD(T)) calculations are presented for atoms and molecules with a focus on the dependence of correlation and binding energies on the magnetic field.

  8. Coupled-cluster theory for atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stopkowicz, Stella; Gauss, Jürgen; Lange, Kai K; Tellgren, Erik I; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-08-21

    An implementation of coupled-cluster (CC) theory to treat atoms and molecules in finite magnetic fields is presented. The main challenges for the implementation stem from the magnetic-field dependence in the Hamiltonian, or, more precisely, the appearance of the angular momentum operator, due to which the wave function becomes complex and which introduces a gauge-origin dependence. For this reason, an implementation of a complex CC code is required together with the use of gauge-including atomic orbitals to ensure gauge-origin independence. Results of coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples (CCSD(T)) calculations are presented for atoms and molecules with a focus on the dependence of correlation and binding energies on the magnetic field. PMID:26298118

  9. Automatic compensation of magnetic field for a rubidium space cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Jingwei, Ji; Wei, Ren; Xin, Zhao; Xiangkai, Peng; Jingfeng, Xiang; Desheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-07-01

    When the cold atom clock operates in microgravity around the near-earth orbit, its performance will be affected by the fluctuation of magnetic field. A strategy is proposed to suppress the fluctuation of magnetic field by additional coils, whose current is changed accordingly to compensate the magnetic fluctuation by the linear and incremental compensation. The flight model of the cold atom clock is tested in a simulated orbital magnetic environment and the magnetic field fluctuation in the Ramsey cavity is reduced from 17 nT to 2 nT, which implied the uncertainty due to the second order Zeeman shift is reduced to be less than 2×10‑16. In addition, utilizing the compensation, the magnetic field in the trapping zone can be suppressed from 7.5 μT to less than 0.3 μT to meet the magnetic field requirement of polarization gradients cooling of atoms. Project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11034008 and 11274324).

  10. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system. In a dense ensemble, the field does not affect the early-time superradiant signal but amplifies intensity oscillations at intermediate times and induces a very slow, nonexponential long-time decay. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. Our results therefore pave a way towards experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  11. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, V. Y. F.; Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.; Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E.; Folman, R.

    2014-05-15

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  12. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation. PMID:24880348

  13. Magnetic-field-tunable Kondo effect in alkaline-earth cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Leonid; Rey, Ana Maria

    2015-05-01

    We study quantum magnetism in strongly interacting fermionic alkaline-earth atoms (AEAs). Due to the decoupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, AEAs in two lowest electronic states (1S0 and 3P0) obey an accurate SU(N 2 I + 1) symmetry in their two-body collisions (I is the nuclear spin). We consider a system that realizes the simplest SU(2) case (for atoms prepared in two nuclear-spin states) in an optical lattice with two bands: one localized and one itinerant. For the fully filled narrow band (two atoms per lattice site) we demonstrate that an applied magnetic field provides an efficient control of the local ground state degeneracy due to mixing of spin and orbital two-body states. We derive an effective low-energy model that includes this magnetic-field effect as well as atomic interactions in the two optical lattice bands, and show that it exhibits a peculiar phenomenon of a magnetic field-induced Kondo effect, so far observed only in Coulomb blockaded quantum dots. We expect that our results can be tested with ultracold 173 Yb or 87 Sr atoms. Supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  14. An atomic coilgun: using pulsed magnetic fields to slow a supersonic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevicius, E.; Parthey, C. G.; Libson, A.; Narevicius, J.; Chavez, I.; Even, U.; Raizen, M. G.

    2007-10-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a novel method to slow atoms and molecules with permanent magnetic moments using pulsed magnetic fields. In our experiments, we observe the slowing of a supersonic beam of metastable neon from 461.0 ± 7.7 to 403 ± 16 m s-1 in 18 stages, where the slowed peak is clearly separated from the initial distribution. This method has broad applications as it may easily be generalized, using seeding and entrainment into supersonic beams, to all paramagnetic atoms and molecules.

  15. Density-functional-theory calculations of matter in strong magnetic fields. I. Atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Lai Dong

    2006-12-15

    We present calculations of the electronic structure of various atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10{sup 12} G to 2x10{sup 15} G, appropriate for radio pulsars and magnetars. For these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function which is tested to be reliable in the strong field regime. Numerical results of the ground-state energies are given for H{sub N} (up to N=10), He{sub N} (up to N=8), C{sub N} (up to N=5), and Fe{sub N} (up to N=3), as well as for various ionized atoms. Fitting formulae for the B dependence of the energies are also given. In general, as N increases, the binding energy per atom in a molecule, vertical bar E{sub N}|/N, increases and approaches a constant value. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon molecules are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x10{sup 12} G, carbon molecules are very weakly bound relative to individual atoms). Iron molecules are not bound at B < or approx. 10{sup 13} G, but become energetically more favorable than individual atoms at larger field strengths.

  16. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  17. Twilight Observations of Thermospheric Atomic Oxygen Density during Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogan, T.; Meriwether, J. W.; Brown, L. B.

    2005-12-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) observations of the 732-nm doublet emission during evening and morning twilights have been made regularly at Arequipa, Peru (16.5 S, 71.4 W) since April, 2005. Arequipa is a site located 4 degrees south of the magnetic equator. Excitation of this emission is a result of the EUV photoionization of [O] to generate the 2P metastable state of O+. Variation of this emission intensity during twilight occurs as the twilight terminator passes through the thermosphere during evening or morning twilights. Consequently, the 732-nm emission intensity is proportional to the [O] abundance illuminated by the Sun along the line-of-sight path from the Arequipa FPI through the thermosphere. Contamination of the FPI spectra by OH mesospheric emissons does appear but can be treated by appropriate scaling and subtraction of the OH emission spectrum. These twilight profiles can be compared with model predictions based upon the MSIS-00 empirical model, and absolute thermospheric [O] densities can be retrieved by comparison with the model predictions. Examination of these twilight profiles during periods of magnetic storm activity will show how the thermospheric [O] density responds to the initiation and recovery of the magnetic storm, and several examples of such behavior will be presented.

  18. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects-quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma-have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects. PMID:26868084

  19. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-02-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects—quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma—have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects.

  20. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects—quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma—have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects. PMID:26868084

  1. The response of thermospheric atomic nitrogen to magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutral composition data obtained by the open-source neutral-mass spectrometer on the polar orbiting Atmosphere Explorer D satellite during the periods October 31 to November 15, 1975, and January 5 to 15, 1976, are used to characterize the response of thermospheric atomic nitrogen densities to geomagnetic activity. These periods provided nearly simultaneous polar and low-latitude data coverage. At low and middle latitudes near dawn and at all latitudes on the dayside, N densities at 400 km appear to vary like those of a species of atomic mass 14: N is observed to increase with increasing geomagnetic activity in a manner similar to that of O. At auroral latitudes near dawn, however, there is a more complex dependence on the amplitude of the disturbance. For substorm-scale activity, N tends to increase during periods of auroral heating but exhibits a sharp temporary decrease afterward. During large storms there is a significant but short-lived increase of N at auroral latitudes. The present results support current models showing that N is produced and transported out of the auroral zone during geomagnetic disturbances.

  2. Magnetic-sublevel-independent magic wavelengths: Application to Rb and Cs atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhjit; Sahoo, B. K.; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-06-01

    A generic scheme to trap atoms at the magic wavelengths λmagic that are independent of vector and tensor components of the interactions of the atoms with the external electric field is presented. The λmagic for the laser cooling D2 lines in the Rb and Cs atoms are demonstrated and their corresponding polarizability values without vector and tensor contributions are given. Consequently, these λmagic are independent of magnetic sublevels and hyperfine levels of the atomic states involved in the transition, thus, they can offer unique approaches to carrying out many high-precision measurements with minimal systematics. Inevitably, the proposed technique can also be used for electronic or hyperfine transitions in other atomic systems.

  3. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  4. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms doped blue phosphorene: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hongxia; Du, Xiaobo; Yan, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the geometrical structure, electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutionally doped blue phosphorene with a series of nonmetallic atoms, including F, Cl, B, N, C, Si and O. The calculated formation energies and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that F, Cl, B, N, C, Si and O doped blue phosphorene are stable. Moreover, the substitutional doping of F, Cl, B and N cannot induce the magnetism in blue phosphorene due to the saturation or pairing of the valence electron of dopant and its neighboring P atoms. In contrast, ground states of C, Si and O doped blue phosphorene are spin-polarized and the magnetic moments induced by a doping atom are all 1.0 μB, which is attributed to the appearance of an unpaired valence electron of C and Si and the formation of a nonbonding 3p electron of a neighboring P atom around O. Furthermore, the magnetic coupling between the moments induced by two C, Si and O are found to be long-range anti-ferromagnetic and the origin of the coupling can be attributed to the p-p hybridization interaction involving polarized electrons.

  6. Irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintgen, D.; Hoenig, A.

    1989-01-01

    The highly excited irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field are investigated analytically, with wave function scarring by periodic orbits considered quantitatively. The results obtained confirm that the contributions of closed classical orbits to the spatial wave functions vanish in the semiclassical limit. Their disappearance, however, is slow. This discussion is illustrated by numerical examples.

  7. Atomic Scale Study of Interfaces Involved in Epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieu, S.; Serra, R.; Bonell, F.; Tiusan, C.; Calmels, L.; Snoeck, E.; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J; Walls, M.; Colliex, C.

    2009-01-01

    Epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy have been studied by using spatially resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). The structure, the chemical composition as well as the bonding variations across the interfaces were investigated up to the atomic scale.

  8. Irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wintgen, D. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-6900 Heidelberg, ); Honig, A. )

    1989-10-02

    We study the irregular wave functions of a highly excited hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field. The scarring of wave functions by periodic orbits is quantitatively investigated. The shape of unperturbed scars is in good agreement with recent semiclassical predictions.

  9. Photoionization microscopy for a hydrogen atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, M.; Gao, W.; Lu, Rong; Delos, J. B.; You, L.; Liu, H. P.

    2016-06-01

    In photoionization microscopy experiments, an atom is placed in static external fields, it is ionized by a laser, and an electron falls onto a position-sensitive detector. The current of electrons arriving at various points on the detector depends upon the initial state of the atom, the excited states to which the electron is resonantly or nonresonantly excited, and the various paths leading from the atom to the final point on the detector. We report here quantum-mechanical computations of photoionization microscopy in parallel electric and magnetic fields. We focus especially on the patterns resulting from resonant excited states. We show that the magnetic field substantially modifies some of these resonant states, confining them in the radial direction, and that it has a strong effect on the interference pattern at the detector.

  10. Resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between cold Rydberg atoms in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, Kourosh; Bohlouli-Zanjani, Parisa; Carter, Jeffery; Mugford, Ashton; Martin, James D. D.

    2006-05-01

    Laser cooled Rb atoms were optically excited to 46d5/2 Rydberg states. A microwave pulse transferred a fraction of the atoms to the 47p3/2 Rydberg state. The resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between atoms in these two states were probed using the linewidth of the two-photon microwave transitions 46d5/2 -- 47d5/2. The presence of a weak magnetic field (roughly 1 G) reduced the observed line broadening, indicating that the interaction is suppressed by the field. The field removes some of the energy degeneracies responsible foe the resonant interaction, and this is the basis for a quantitative model of the resulting suppression. A technique for the calibration of magnetic field strengths using the 34s1/2 -- 34p1/2 one-photon transition is also presented.

  11. Resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between cold Rydberg atoms in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, K.; Bohlouli-Zanjani, P.; Carter, J. D.; Mugford, A.; Martin, J. D. D.

    2006-06-01

    Laser-cooled Rb85 atoms were optically excited to 46d5/2 Rydberg states. A microwave pulse transferred a fraction of the atoms to the 47p3/2 Rydberg state. The resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between atoms in these two states were probed using the linewidth of the two-photon microwave transition 46d5/2-47d5/2 . The presence of a weak magnetic field ≈0.5G reduced the observed line broadening, indicating that the interaction is suppressed by the field. The field removes some of the energy degeneracies responsible for the resonant interaction, and this is the basis for a quantitative model of the resulting suppression. A technique for the calibration of magnetic field strengths using the 34s1/2-34p1/2 one-photon transition is also presented.

  12. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  13. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  14. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  15. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  17. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures. PMID:19453164

  18. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  19. Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer for studying magnetization fields produced by hyperpolarized helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Xi-yuan; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi; Hu, Zhao-hui; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jian-cheng

    2016-04-01

    An ingenious approach to acquire the absolute magnetization fields produced by polarized atoms has been presented in this paper. The method was based on detection of spin precession signal of the hyperpolarized helium-3 with ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer of potassium by referring to time-domain analysis. At first, dynamic responses of the mixed spin ensembles in the presence of variant external magnetic fields have been analyzed by referring to the Bloch equation. Subsequently, the relevant equipment was established to achieve the functions of hyperpolarizing helium-3 and detecting the precession of spin-polarized noble gas. By analyzing the transient response of the magnetometer in time domain, we obtained the relevant damping ratio and natural frequency. When the value of damping ratio reached the maximum value of 0.0917, the combined atomic magnetometer was in equilibrium. We draw a conclusion from the steady response: the magnetization fields of the polarized electrons and the hyperpolarized nuclei were corresponding 16.12 nT and 90.74 nT. Under this situation, the nuclear magnetization field could offset disturbing magnetic fields perpendicular to the orientation of the electronic polarization, and it preserved the electronic spin staying in a stable axis. Therefore, the combined magnetometer was particularly attractive for inertial measurements.

  20. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  1. Average atom transport properties for pure and mixed species in the hot and warm dense matter regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Starrett, C. E.; Kress, J. D.; Collins, L. A.; Hanson, D. E.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.

    2012-10-15

    The Kubo-Greenwood formulation for calculation of optical conductivities with an average atom model is extended to calculate thermal conductivities. The method is applied to species and conditions of interest for inertial confinement fusion. For the mixed species studied, the partial pressure mixing rule is used. Results including pressures, dc, and thermal conductivities are compared to ab initio calculations. Agreement for pressures is good, for both the pure and mixed species. For conductivities, it is found that the ad hoc renormalization method with line broadening, described in the text, gives best agreement with the ab initio results. However, some disagreement is found and the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  2. Atomic moments in Mn2CoAl thin films analyzed by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jamer, M. E.; Assaf, B. A.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Arena, D. A.; Heiman, D.

    2014-12-05

    Spin gapless semiconductors are known to be strongly affected by structural disorder when grown epitaxially as thin films. The magnetic properties of Mn2CoAl thin films grown on GaAs (001) substrates are investigated here as a function of annealing. This study investigates the atomic-specific magnetic moments of Mn and Co atoms measured through X-ray magnetic circular dichroism as a function of annealing and the consequent structural ordering. Results indicate that the structural distortion mainly affects the Mn atoms as seen by the reduction of the magnetic moment from its predicted value.

  3. Atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment: The magnetic moment effect

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, S. G.; Ginges, J. S. M.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-04-15

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM d{sub N} with the hyperfine interaction, the ''magnetic moment effect''. We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms {sup 129}Xe, {sup 171}Yb, {sup 199}Hg, {sup 211}Rn, and {sup 225}Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of {sup 129}Xe and {sup 199}Hg we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d{sub N}({sup 129}Xe)|<1.1x10{sup -21}|e|cm and |d{sub N}({sup 199}Hg)|<2.8x10{sup -24}|e|cm.

  4. Construction and applications of an atomic magnetic gradiometerbased on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Rochester, Simon M.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Budker, Dmitry

    2006-06-28

    We report on the design, characterization, and applicationsof a sensitive atomic magnetic gradiometer. The device is based onnonlinear magneto-optical rotation in alkali-metal (87Rb) vapor, and usesfrequency-modulated laser light. The magnetic field produced by a sampleis detected by measuring the frequency of a resonance in optical rotationthat arises when the modulation frequency equals twice the Larmorprecession frequency of the Rb atoms. The gradiometer consists of twoatomic magnetometers. The rotation of light polarization in eachmagnetometer is detected with a balanced polarimeter. The sensitivity ofthe gradiometer is 0.8 nG/Hz1/2 for near-DC (0.1 Hz) magnetic fields,with a baseline of 2.5 cm. For applications in nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long solenoid that piercesthe magnetic shields provides a ~;0.5 G leading field for the nuclearspins in the sample. Our apparatus is particularly suited for remotedetection of NMR and MRI. We demonstrate a point-by-point free inductiondecay measurement and a spin echo reconstructed with a pulse sequencesimilar to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse. Additionalapplications and future improvements are also discussed.

  5. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-27

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe2O3with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulatormore » transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. Finally, the ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.« less

  6. Energetics, diffusion, and magnetic properties of cobalt atom in a monolayer graphene: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, Abdulrafiu T.; Lombardi, Enrico B.

    2015-09-21

    We use ab initio methods to study the binding, diffusion, and magnetic properties of cobalt atom embedded in graphene vacancies. We investigate the diffusion of Co-monovacancy (Co-MV) and Co-divacancy (Co-DV) defect complexes, and determine the minimum energy path (MEP), as well as the activation energy barrier of migration. We obtained similar activation energy barriers, of ∼5.8 eV, for Co-MV and Co-DV diffusion, respectively. Our calculations also suggest that, at electron–irradiation energy of 200 keV as used in a related experiment, the maximum energy transfer to the Co atom, of approximately 9.0 eV is sufficiently high to break metal-carbon bonding. The incident electron energy is also high enough to displace graphene's carbon atoms from their lattice positions. The breaking of metal-carbon bonding and the displacement of graphene atoms may act to facilitate the migration of Co. We conclude therefore that the detrapping and diffusion of cobalt as observed experimentally is likely to be radiation-induced, similar to what has been observed for Au and Fe in electron-irradiated graphene. Furthermore, we show that Co migration in graphene is such that its magnetic moment varies along the diffusion path. The magnetic moment of Co is consistently higher in Co-DV diffusion when compared to that of Co-MV diffusion.

  7. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.

  8. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications. PMID:26813143

  9. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications. PMID:26813143

  10. Controlling the magnetic-field sensitivity of atomic-clock states by microwave dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sárkány, L.; Weiss, P.; Hattermann, H.; Fortágh, J.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate control of the differential Zeeman shift between clock states of ultracold rubidium atoms by means of nonresonant microwave dressing. Using the dc field dependence of the microwave detuning, we suppress the first- and second-order differential Zeeman shift in magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. By dressing the state pair 5 S1 /2 F =1 , mF=-1 and F =2 , mF=1 , a residual frequency spread of <0.1 Hz in a range of 100 mG around a chosen magnetic offset field can be achieved. This is one order of magnitude smaller than the shift of the bare states at the magic field of the Breit-Rabi parabola. We further identify double magic points, around which the clock frequency is insensitive to fluctuations both in the magnetic field and in the dressing Rabi frequency. The technique is compatible with chip-based cold-atom systems and allows the creation of clock and qubit states with reduced sensitivity to magnetic-field noise.

  11. Magnetic Relaxometry with an Atomic Magnetometer and SQUID Sensors on Targeted Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cort; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly L.; Debbie M, Lovato; Larson, Richard; Schwindt, Peter D.D.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AM) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. PMID:22773885

  12. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Polycrystalline Bismuth Ferrite Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Pasi; Tuboltsev, Vladimir; Marchand, Benoît; Savin, Alexander; Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Vehkamäki, Marko; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Kemell, Marianna; Hatanpää, Timo; Rogozin, Valentin; Räisänen, Jyrki; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2014-12-18

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) method was applied to grow thin polycrystalline BiFeO3 (BFO) films on Pt/SiO2/Si substrates. The 50 nm thick films were found to exhibit high resistivity, good morphological integrity, and homogeneity achieved by the applied ALD technique. Magnetic characterization revealed saturated magnetization of 25 emu/cm(3) with temperature-dependent coercivity varying from 5 to 530 Oe within the temperature range from 300 to 2 K. Magnetism observed in the films was found to change gradually from ferromagnetic spin ordering to pinned magnetic domain interactions mixed with weak spin-glass-like behavior of magnetically frustrated antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (AFM-FM) spin ordering depending on the temperature and magnitude of the applied magnetic field. Antiferromagnetic order of spin cycloids was broken in polycrystalline films by crystal sizes smaller than the cycloid length (∼60 nm). Uncompensated spincycloids and magnetic domain walls were found to be the cause of the high magnetization of the BFO films. PMID:26273981

  14. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains.

    PubMed

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-28

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied. PMID:27475355

  15. Inducing Resonant Interactions in Ultracold Atoms with a Modulated Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. Hudson

    2015-11-01

    In systems of ultracold atoms, pairwise interactions can be resonantly enhanced by a new mechanism that does not rely upon a magnetic Feshbach resonance. In this mechanism, interactions are controlled by tuning the frequency of an oscillating parallel component of the magnetic field close to the transition frequency between the scattering atoms and a two-atom bound state. The real part of the resulting s -wave scattering length a is resonantly enhanced when the oscillation frequency is close to the transition frequency. The resonance parameters can be controlled by varying the amplitude of the oscillating field. The amplitude also controls the imaginary part of a , which arises because the oscillating field converts atom pairs into molecules. The real part of a can be made much larger than the background scattering length without introducing catastrophic atom losses from the imaginary part. For the case of a shallow bound state in the scattering channel, the dimensionless resonance parameters are universal functions of the dimensionless oscillation amplitude.

  16. Richard L. Greene Dissertation Award in Experimental Condensed Matter or Materials Physics Talk: Towards single atom magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Susanne

    Magnetic anisotropy is a fundamental property of magnetic materials that governs the stability and directionality of their magnetization. At the atomic level, magnetic anisotropy originates from anisotropy in the orbital angular momentum (L) and the spin-orbit coupling that connects the spin moment of a magnetic atom to the spatial symmetry of its ligand field environment. Generally, the ligand field, that is necessary for the anisotropy, also quenches the orbital moment and reduces the total magnetic moment of the atom to its spin component. However, careful design of the coordination geometry of a single atom can restore the orbital moment while inducing uniaxial anisotropy, as we present here for single atoms deposited on top of a thin MgO film. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements show a large magnetic anisotropy of 19 meV for iron and 58 meV for cobalt, as well as relaxation times of many milliseconds. These results offer a strategy, based on symmetry arguments and careful tailoring of the interaction with the environment, for the rational design of nanoscopic permanent magnets and single atom magnets.

  17. Conductance of ferro- and antiferro-magnetic single-atom contacts: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhi-Yun; Zheng, Xiao-long; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-Huang

    2013-08-14

    We present a first-principles study on the spin dependent conductance of five single-atom magnetic junctions consisting of a magnetic tip and an adatom adsorbed on a magnetic surface, i.e., the Co-Co/Co(001) and Ni-X/Ni(001) (X = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) junctions. When their spin configuration changes from ferromagnetism to anti-ferromagnetism, the spin-up conductance increases while the spin-down one decreases. For the junctions with a magnetic adatom, there is nearly no spin valve effect as the decreased spin-down conductance counteracts the increased spin-up one. For the junction with a nonmagnetic adatom (Ni-Cu/Ni(001)), a spin valve effect is obtained with a variation of 22% in the total conductance. In addition, the change in spin configuration enhances the spin filter effect for the Ni-Fe/Ni(001) junction but suppresses it for the other junctions.

  18. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  19. Uniform synthetic magnetic field and effective mass for cold atoms in a shaken optical lattice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sols, Fernando; Creffield, Charles E.; Pieplow, Gregor; Goldman, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms can be made to experience synthetic magnetic fields when placed in a suitably driven optical lattice. For coherent systems the switching protocol plays an essential role in determining the long time behavior. Relatively simple driving schemes may generate a uniform magnetic flux but an inhomogeneous effective mass. A two-stage split driving scheme can recover a uniform effective mass but at the price of rendering the magnetic field space dependent. We propose a four-stage split driving that generates uniform field and mass of arbitrary values for all driving amplitudes. Finally, we study a modified two-stage split driving approach that enables uniform field and mass for most of but not all values of the magnetic field. Work supported by MINECO (Spain) under Grant FIS2013-41716-P, by FRS-FNRS (Belgium), and by BSPO under PAI Project No. P7/18 DYGEST.

  20. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  1. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Savukov, I.; Karaulanov, T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min. PMID:23964134

  2. Magnetically driven anisotropic structural changes in the atomic laminate M n2GaC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, M.; Ingason, A. S.; Alling, B.; Magnus, F.; Thore, A.; Petruhins, A.; Mockute, A.; Arnalds, U. B.; Sahlberg, M.; Hjörvarsson, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Rosen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherently layered magnetic materials, such as magnetic Mn +1A Xn (MAX) phases, offer an intriguing perspective for use in spintronics applications and as ideal model systems for fundamental studies of complex magnetic phenomena. The MAX phase composition Mn+1A Xn consists of Mn +1Xn blocks separated by atomically thin A -layers where M is a transition metal, A an A-group element, X refers to carbon and/or nitrogen, and n is typically 1, 2, or 3. Here, we show that the recently discovered magnetic M n2GaC MAX phase displays structural changes linked to the magnetic anisotropy, and a rich magnetic phase diagram which can be manipulated through temperature and magnetic field. Using first-principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations, an essentially one-dimensional (1D) interlayer plethora of two-dimensioanl (2D) Mn-C-Mn trilayers with robust intralayer ferromagnetic spin coupling was revealed. The complex transitions between them were observed to induce magnetically driven anisotropic structural changes. The magnetic behavior as well as structural changes dependent on the temperature and applied magnetic field are explained by the large number of low energy, i.e., close to degenerate, collinear and noncollinear spin configurations that become accessible to the system with a change in volume. These results indicate that the magnetic state can be directly controlled by an applied pressure or through the introduction of stress and show promise for the use of M n2GaC MAX phases in future magnetoelectric and magnetocaloric applications.

  3. Static electric and magnetic multipole susceptibilities for Dirac one-electron atoms in the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmytkowski, Radosław; Łukasik, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    We present tabulated data for several families of static electric and magnetic multipole susceptibilities for hydrogenic atoms with nuclear charge numbers from the range 1 ⩽ Z ⩽ 137. Atomic nuclei are assumed to be point-like and spinless. The susceptibilities considered include the multipole electric polarizabilities α E L → E L and magnetizabilities (magnetic susceptibilities) χ M L → M L with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4 (i.e., the dipole, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole ones), the electric-to-magnetic cross-susceptibilities α E L → M(L - 1) with 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 5 and α E L → M(L + 1) with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4, the magnetic-to-electric cross-susceptibilities χ M L → E(L - 1) with 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 5 and χ M L → E(L + 1) with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4 (it holds that χ M L → E(L ∓ 1) =α E(L ∓ 1) → M L), and the electric-to-toroidal-magnetic cross-susceptibilities α E L → T L with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4. Numerical values are computed from general exact analytical formulas, derived by us elsewhere within the framework of the Dirac relativistic quantum mechanics, and involving generalized hypergeometric functions 3F2 of the unit argument.

  4. Structural and Magnetic Evolution of Bimetallic MnAu Clusters Driven by Asymmetric Atomic Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaohui; Zhou, Rulong; Lefebvre, Williams; He, Kai; Le Roy, Damien; Skomski, Ralph; Li, Xingzhong; Shield, Jeffrey E; Kramer, Matthew J; Chen, Shuang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Sellmyer, David J

    2014-03-12

    The nanoscale structural, compositional, and magnetic properties are examined for annealed MnAu nanoclusters. The MnAu clusters order into the L10 structure, and monotonic size-dependences develop for the composition and lattice parameters, which are well reproduced by our density functional theory calculations. Simultaneously, Mn diffusion forms 5 Å nanoshells on larger clusters inducing significant magnetization in an otherwise antiferromagnetic system. The differing atomic mobilities yield new cluster nanostructures that can be employed generally to create novel physical properties.

  5. Quantum beats in the field ionization of Rydberg atoms in the presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Hastings, Hannah; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    By exciting a coherent superposition and varying its phase evolution, quantum beats in the selective field ionization of Rydberg atoms have been observed. Here, we present a study exploring the effect of electric and magnetic fields on quantum beats. Beginning with a single excited state, a coherent superposition is created by a short electric field pulse in the presence of a static magnetic field. The resulting quantum beats are then observed in the field ionization spectrum. Additionally, millimeter-wave spectroscopy is used to probe the state populations in this superposition. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  6. Experimentally attainable example of chaotic tunneling: The hydrogen atom in parallel static electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2003-12-01

    Statistics of tunneling rates in the presence of chaotic classical dynamics is discussed on a realistic example: a hydrogen atom placed in parallel, uniform, static electric, and magnetic fields, where tunneling is followed by ionization along the fields direction. Depending on the magnetic quantum number, one may observe either a standard Porter-Thomas distribution of tunneling rates or, for strong scarring by a periodic orbit parallel to the external fields, strong deviations from it. For the latter case, a simple model based on random matrix theory gives the correct distribution.

  7. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  8. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  9. Born–Oppenheimer Approximation for an Atom in Constant Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Sohei

    2016-08-01

    We obtain a reduction scheme for the study of the quantum evolution of an atom in constant magnetic fields using the method developed by Martinez, Nenciu and Sordoni based on the construction of almost invariant subspace. In Martinez-Sordoni \\cite{MaSo2} such a case is also studied but their reduced Hamiltonian includes the vector potential terms. In this paper, using the center of mass coordinates and constructing the almost invariant subspace different from theirs, we obtain the reduced Hamiltonian which does not include the vector potential terms. Using the reduced evolution we also obtain the asymptotic expantion of the evolution for a specific localized initial data, which verifies the straight motion of an atom in constatnt magnetic fields.

  10. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  11. Hydrogen atom in a magnetic field: Ghost orbits, catastrophes, and uniform semiclassical approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Main, J.; Wunner, G.

    1997-03-01

    Applying closed-orbit theory to the recurrence spectra of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field, one can interpret most, but not all, structures semiclassically in terms of closed classical orbits. In particular, conventional closed-orbit theory fails near bifurcations of orbits where semiclassical amplitudes exhibit unphysical divergences. Here we analyze the role of ghost orbits living in complex phase space. The ghosts can explain resonance structures in the spectra of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field at positions where no real orbits exist. For three different types of catastrophes, viz. fold, cusp, and butterfly catastrophes, we construct uniform semiclassical approximations and demonstrate that these solutions are completely determined by classical parameters of the real orbits and complex ghosts. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Ionization of an Highly Excited Hydrogen atom in parallel Electric and Magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topçu, T.&Ürker; Robicheaux, Francis

    2006-05-01

    In a recent paper, Mitchell et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 073001 (2004)] investigated the ionization of a classical hydrogen atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields. They reported epistrophic self- similar pulse trains of ionized electrons attributed to the classical chaos induced by the magnetic field. We study hydrogen atom in an excited state with n˜80 in parallel external fields as an example of an open, chaotic quantum system in the time domain. We investigate the effect of interference between the outgoing pulse trains which is absent in the classical picture. We look at interference effect as a function of the energy since Schr"odinger equation does not scale as the classical equations of motion do. We compare and contrast our quantum results with the classical results of Mitchell et al.

  13. Assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneuf, R. A.

    Cross-section data for ion-atom collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, He, Li, Be, C, O, Ne, Al, Si, Ar, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and their ions. The most important ion-atom collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and ionization processes are also considered. The scope is limited to atomic species and to collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 2 to 200 eV range. Sources of evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible, and deficiencies in the data base are indicated.

  14. The migration behavior of atomic clusters in early nanocrystalline process of soft magnetic Finemet alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxin; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guannan; Yan, Biao; Lu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    The Finemet alloys are commonly used as cores in transformers and generators, stress and field sensors in technological application for their excellent soft magnetic characteristics. To clarify the nanocrystallization mechanism of Finemet especially about the atomic migration in early stage is very essential for developing their distinctive characteristics. In this study, we investigate the migration behavior of atoms in order to clarify the mechanism of the early-stage nanocrystallization in amorphous Finemet alloys. The Fe(73.5)Si(13.5)B9Nb3Cu1 amorphous ribbons were prepared by single-roller melt-spinning process in argon atmosphere, and then annealed at 350 degrees C-400 degrees C for 10 minutes in vacuum. The atom force microscope (AFM) and the coincidence Doppler broadening spectra (CDB) were used to characterize the migration behavior of different atoms in Fe(73.5)Si(13.5)B9Nb3Cu1 amorphous alloy during the early-stage nanocrystallization. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that all annealed samples are in the amorphous state. But the AFM observation shows clearly that there are many small atomic clusters (nuclei) which distribute in the amorphous matrix of the annealed samples. With increasing annealing temperature, there is a significant increase in the amount of atomic clusters and a dramatic drop in the average size of clusters with very limited Cu contention in the samples, which reflect the structural evolution into more homogeneity. The CDB spectrum indicates that the peaks of positron annihilation spectrum are gradually reduced, which means the number of grain boundary and the defects in samples are gradually increased. It can be concluded that more defects are introduced by the formation of atomic clusters through atomic migration during the early-stage nanocrystallization in Fe(73.5)Si(13.5)B9Nb3Cu1 amorphous alloys. PMID:21137965

  15. Magnetic induction imaging with optical atomic magnetometers: towards applications to screening and surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach, based on optical atomic magnetometers and magnetic induction tomography (MIT), for remote and non-invasive detection of conductive targets. Atomic magnetometers overcome the main limitations of conventional MIT instrumentation, in particular their poor low-frequency sensitivity, their large size and their limited scalability. Moreover, atomic magnetometers have been proven to reach extremely high sensitivities, with an improvement of up to 7 orders of magnitude in the 50 MHz to DC band, with respect to a standard pick-up coil of the same size. In the present scheme, an oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in a conductive target and laser-pumped atomic magnetometers, either stand-alone or in an array, detect the response of the objects. A phase-sensitive detection scheme rejects the background, allowing remote detection of the secondary field and, thus, mapping of objects, hidden in cargos, underwater or underground. The potential for extreme sensitivity, miniaturization, dynamic range and array operation paves the way to a new generation of non-invasive, active detectors for surveillance, as well as for real-time cargo screening.

  16. Atomic scale study of magnetic phase transitions in (Co,Ti;Sc) substituted nanosize barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhov, Kiril

    BaFe12O19 and related isostructural (M-type) hexaferrites derived by single or double cation substitution for Fe3+ with preservation of the formal valence are a recognized group of oxides for their remarkable properties. The magnetic interactions may be tuned by suitable substitutions resulting in notable magnetic properties utilized extensively for permanent magnets, microwave devices and perpendicular recording media. We report on the magnetic structure evolution accompanying the magnetic anisotropy change, from a combined magnetic (SQUID), x-ray and neutron diffraction, and magnetic field dependent 57Fe Mössbauer study on BaFe12O19 at selected cation substitutions. The short and long range atomic and magnetic order in powder samples of nanosize particles prepared by soft chemistry routes were studied and compared with own and literature data for the parent BaFe12O19 compound prepared by solid state reaction. Refinements based on diffraction data show that the magnetic structures of BaFe12-xXxO19 (X=Co,Ti; Sc) hexaferrites are largely temperature and substitution dependent. Between 200 and 300K the (Co,Ti)-hexaferrites (x=0.4, 0.7, 0.8, 0.85) display ferrimagnetic structures where the canting of the magnetic moments depends on the substitution rate. When lowering the temperature the magnetic structure for x=0.45 remains ferrimagnetic down to 10 K, while for x=0.7 and x=0.8 a complex conical magnetic structures is finally established. For x=0.85 significant distortions in the local oxygen surrounding of ferric cation sites were established, while the grain-size effect on the structural parameters was considerably smaller. The thermal expansion coefficient exhibits a strong anisotropy. The refined magnetic moments are considerably lower than the theoretical spin only moments, especially for the 4e and 12k sites, indicating a local noncollinearity with short-range ordering. The five-cation sublattice collinear ferrimagnetic structure of uniaxial type known as

  17. High-frequency magnetization dynamics of individual atomic-scale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Sonntag, A.; Hermenau, J.; Friedlein, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetization dynamics of individual nanomagnets is studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, combining real-time telegraphic noise analysis with pump-probe schemes. A transition between two Arrhenius regimes is observed as a function of temperature. The switching rates at high temperature are found to be orders of magnitude lower than expected from the extrapolation from the low-temperature regime. A four-state hopping model of magnetization reversal is developed to interpret the experimental results in terms of nucleation, annihilation, and propagation.

  18. Magnetic-field-induced quadrupole coupling in the nuclear magnetic resonance of noble-gas atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha; Pyykkoe, Pekka

    2004-10-01

    An analytic response theory formulation for the leading-order magnetic field-induced and field-dependent quadrupole splitting in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra is presented and demonstrated with first-principles calculations for {sup 21}Ne, {sup 36}Ar, and {sup 83}Kr in noble gas atoms. The case of molecules was studied for {sup 33}S in the sulphur hexafluoride molecule, as well as for {sup 47/49}Ti, {sup 91}Zr, and {sup 177,179}Hf in group(IV) tetrahalides. According to our calculations, the hitherto experimentally unknown field-induced quadrupole splitting in molecules rises to 10{sup 2} Hz for {sup 177,179}Hf nuclei in HfF{sub 4} and 10{sup 1} Hz for {sup 47/49}Ti in TiCl{sub 4}, and is hence of observable magnitude.

  19. Time-dependent atomic diffusion in magnetic ApBp stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stift, M. J.; Alecian, G.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical modelling of surface abundance distributions in ApBp star atmospheres constitutes a challenging astrophysical problem. This paper is intended to deepen our understanding of how atomic diffusion affects the atmospheric structure of magnetic ApBp stars, and in particular how time-dependent calculations may be compared to the alternative method of estimating equilibrium stratifications. Our numerical calculations - with the stellar atmosphere adjusted self-consistently to the abundance profiles - show that final stationary solutions of the time-dependent diffusion problem (constant particle flux throughout the stellar atmosphere) are seemingly at variance with equilibrium stratifications (zero particle flux). In this work, we will provide some understanding of the origin of these differences and try to elucidate the as yet little explored behaviour of time-dependent atomic diffusion. To this purpose, we assess the influence of the boundary condition at the bottom of the atmosphere, we investigate how the stratifications depend on magnetic field angle and strength, and we have a look at possible interactions between different chemical elements. Based on a grid of atmospheric models and stratifications reflecting dipolar magnetic geometries, we also present predicted line profiles for different oblique rotator models. Finally, we shortly discuss the consequences of our findings for the interpretation of abundance maps of magnetic ApBp stars.

  20. THE IMPRINT OF THE VERY LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD IN SIMULATED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Prested, C.; Schwadron, N.; Opher, M. E-mail: nathanas@bu.ed

    2010-06-10

    The interaction of the solar wind with the very local interstellar medium (VLISM) forms the boundaries of the heliosphere. A strong asymmetry of the heliosphere was found both directly by the Voyager probes and indirectly from measurements of the deflection of neutral hydrogen. The most likely source of this asymmetry is from the interstellar magnetic field, the properties of which are highly unconstrained. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images will provide an additional method to view the heliosphere and infer the interstellar magnetic field. This paper investigates the imprint of the interstellar magnetic field on simulated energetic neutral atom all-sky maps. We show that a significant source of 0.5-1 keV ENAs may originate from the outside of the heliopause, if a strong suprathermal population exists in the VLISM. In simulations, a strong outer heliosheath ENA feature appears near the nose of the heliosphere. A weaker, complementary feature is also present consisting entirely of inner heliosheath ENAs. From this feature the direction of the interstellar magnetic field can be easily inferred.

  1. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  2. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  3. Tunable atomic spin-orbit coupling synthesized with a modulating gradient magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xinyu; Wu, Lingna; Chen, Jiyao; Guan, Qing; Gao, Kuiyi; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, L.; Wang, Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of synthesized spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for ultracold spin-1 87Rb atoms. Different from earlier experiments where a one dimensional (1D) atomic SOC of pseudo-spin-1/2 is synthesized with Raman laser fields, the scheme we demonstrate employs a gradient magnetic field (GMF) and ground-state atoms, thus is immune to atomic spontaneous emission. The strength of SOC we realize can be tuned by changing the modulation amplitude of the GMF, and the effect of the SOC is confirmed through the studies of: 1) the collective dipole oscillation of an atomic condensate in a harmonic trap after the synthesized SOC is abruptly turned on; and 2) the minimum energy state at a finite adiabatically adjusted momentum when SOC strength is slowly ramped up. The condensate coherence is found to remain very good after driven by modulating GMFs. Our scheme presents an alternative means for studying interacting many-body systems with synthesized SOC. PMID:26752786

  4. Tunable atomic spin-orbit coupling synthesized with a modulating gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xinyu; Wu, Lingna; Chen, Jiyao; Guan, Qing; Gao, Kuiyi; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, L.; Wang, Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of synthesized spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for ultracold spin-1 87Rb atoms. Different from earlier experiments where a one dimensional (1D) atomic SOC of pseudo-spin-1/2 is synthesized with Raman laser fields, the scheme we demonstrate employs a gradient magnetic field (GMF) and ground-state atoms, thus is immune to atomic spontaneous emission. The strength of SOC we realize can be tuned by changing the modulation amplitude of the GMF, and the effect of the SOC is confirmed through the studies of: 1) the collective dipole oscillation of an atomic condensate in a harmonic trap after the synthesized SOC is abruptly turned on; and 2) the minimum energy state at a finite adiabatically adjusted momentum when SOC strength is slowly ramped up. The condensate coherence is found to remain very good after driven by modulating GMFs. Our scheme presents an alternative means for studying interacting many-body systems with synthesized SOC.

  5. Atomic Regime in Which the Magnetic Interaction Dominates the Coulomb Interaction for Highly Excited States of Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Ronald O.; Hughes, Vernon W.

    1974-01-01

    The atomic regime in which the interaction of the electron with an external magnetic field dominates the Coulomb interaction with the nucleus, relevant to pulsars, can be realized at laboratory magnetic fields for discrete autoionized states of hydrogen, at energies above the ionization limit. Approximate wave functions, energy levels, and electric dipole transition probabilities are presented for hydrogen, and an atomic beam absorption spectroscopy experiment at 50 kG is proposed to study this new regime. PMID:16578723

  6. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, C.; Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D.; Rossi, M.; Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C.; Pantanella, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C.; Sorbo, A.

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  7. Entangled states of trapped ions allow measuring the magnetic field gradient produced by a single atomic spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Gerritsma, R.

    2012-09-01

    We propose detecting the magnetic field gradient produced by the magnetic dipole moment of a single atom by using ions in an entangled state trapped a few μm from the dipole. This requires measuring magnetic field gradients of order 10-13 tesla/μm. We discuss applications in determining magnetic moments of a wide variety of ion species, for investigating the magnetic substructure of ions with level structures that are not suitable for laser cooling and detection, and for studying exotic or rare ions, and molecular ions. The scheme may also be used for measuring spin imbalances of neutral atoms or atomic ensembles trapped by optical dipole forces. As the proposed method relies on techniques that are well established in ion trap quantum information processing, it is within reach of current technology.

  8. Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance of Alkali Atoms Isolated on Helium Nano-Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2009-06-01

    Sharp, hyperfine-resolved, ESR spectra of alkali atoms isolated on helium nanodroplets are measured by optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). A net spin polarization is created inside a magnetic field (B=0.2 to 4.2 T) by a pump laser beam. Microwave radiation in a resonant cavity at 9.4 GHz causes a spin transition which is detected by a probe laser beam. For ultimate precision the spectrum of free atoms is concurrently measured and serves as a reference. The shift of the ESR lines on the droplet with respect to free atoms directly reflects the distortion of the valence-electron wavefunction due to the He nanodroplet. While the electron g-factor remains unchanged within experimental uncertainties (<5 ppm), the increase of the hyperfine constant (typically +400 ppm) is consistent with an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. We are able to follow this change as a function of droplet size attesting the sensitivity of the method for the measurement of chemical shifts. The observation of Rabi oscillations indicates a long decoherence time and proves our ability to perform coherent manipulation of the spin.

  9. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  10. Experimental study of linear magnetic dichroism in photoionization satellite transitions of atomic rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenkaelae, K.; Alagia, M.; Feyer, V.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.

    2011-11-15

    Laser orientation in the initial state has been used to study the properties of satellite transitions in inner-shell photoionization of rubidium atoms. The linear magnetic dichroism in the angular distribution (LMDAD) has been utilized to probe the continuum waves of orbital angular momentum conserving monopole, and angular momentum changing conjugate satellites, accompanying the 4p ionization of atomic Rb. We show experimentally that LMDAD of both types of satellite transitions is nonzero and that LMDAD of monopole satellites, measured as a function of photon energy, mimics the LMDAD of direct photoionization, whereas the LMDAD of conjugate transitions deviates drastically from that trend. The results indicate that conjugate transitions cannot be described theoretically without explicit inclusion of electron-electron interaction. The present data can thus be used as a very precise test of current models for photoionization.