Science.gov

Sample records for washington toxics coalition

  1. 75 FR 38417 - Carbaryl; Order Denying Washington Toxics Coalition Petition to Revoke Tolerances and Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...This order denies a petition requesting that EPA revoke all pesticide tolerances for carbaryl under section 408(d) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). The petition was filed on January 10, 2005 by the Washington Toxics Coalition (WTC). This order also informs the public of the availability of a response to WTC's petition to cancel all uses of...

  2. Creating a Community Coalition to Prevent Childhood Obesity in Yakima County, Washington: Rev It Up! 2008

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica; Bindler, Ruth C.; Miller, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Background One-third of the US population is obese, and childhood obesity has tripled since the late 1970s. Childhood obesity is a significant health issue requiring interventions on individual, interpersonal, community, organizational, and policy levels. Community coalitions offer successful strategies for engaging community partners with health improvement goals. Community Context In 2008, Yakima County, an agricultural community in eastern Washington, was ranked the eighth fattest city in the United States. Recognizing the obesity problem, the Yakima Health District (YHD) established 2 objectives: to decrease rates of childhood obesity in Yakima County and to recruit and establish a community coalition of key stakeholders and experts to help address the problem. Methods The YHD spearheaded a movement to create a community coalition. The coalition applied for and received state and federal grants. In September 2008, the YHD held the first recruitment event for Rev It Up!, its community-based effort to address the obesity problem in Yakima. YHD invited the Washington State Department of Health to advise the coalition-building and action-planning process. Outcome The community coalition achieved 5 of 7 objectives, including developing a common vision, creating an advisory committee, and conducting a community inventory, prioritization process, and action plan. However, unexpected public health challenges in the YHD delayed coalition efforts. Interpretation Creating the Rev It Up! coalition met a community need and engaged community partners. Some potential partners were dissuaded by the 6-month period required to establish the coalition. Rev It Up! continues as a community effort to reduce rates of obesity in Yakima County. PMID:22765932

  3. Safe Schools Report of the Anti-Violence Documentation Project from the Safe Schools Coalition of Washington. Will You Be There for Every Child? Fourth Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Beth

    The Safe Schools Coalition of Washington is a public-private partnership of 90 offices, agencies, and organizations, as well as many individuals. The Coalition's Anti-Violence Documentation Project is an ongoing statewide qualitative study examining the phenomenon of anti-gay sexual harassment and violence in kindergarten through grade 12. In the…

  4. Profiles in Excellence: Washington State. Using a Statewide Coalition to Transform Teaching through National Board Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 1998, Washington State had 51,512 classroom teachers, but only 29 of them were National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs). By 2009, the number of NBCTs in Washington had grown to 3,975--5th in the nation in total numbers, and 2nd in the nation in new teachers certifying that year. The state's successful strategy for increasing the number of…

  5. Emissions test report: air-toxics sampling at Reichhold Chemical, Tacoma, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    From July 22 to August 2, 1985, ES sampled five sources at two plants in the Seattle, Washington area to collect data on emission of toxic compounds. The report discusses the results of sampling the discharge from an afterburner on a coating line.

  6. Not a Pretty Picture: Toxics in Art Supplies in Washington, DC Area Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Pamela

    A study revealed that some of the art and craft supplies being used by most Washington, D.C. area public school districts (City of Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax counties--Virginia; Montgomery and Prince George's counties--Maryland; and the District of Columbia) contained toxic ingredients which could cause serious, long-term damage, sterility,…

  7. ACUTE TOXICITY OF SEDIMENT FROM EAGLE HARBOR, WASHINGTON, TO THE INFAUNAL AMPHIPOD RHEPOXYNIUS ABRONIUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creosote-contaminated sediment from one station (EH08) in Eagle Harbor, Washington, is among the most toxic sediment yet tested from U.S. estuaries and coastal waters. he total concentration of 13 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in EH08 sediment was 6,461 mg/kg (dry wt.). he cn...

  8. Osseous Scaphotrapezial Coalition

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, William M.; Spence, Susanna C.; Beckmann, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Osseous scaphotrapezial coalition is one of the rarest forms of carpal coalition of the hand. Often discovered incidentally, pain and functional limitation have not been reported. Carpal coalitions occurring across the carpal rows are thought to occur as a result of some insult or congenital anomaly. Isolated scaphotrapezial coalition calls into question the traditional thinking that fusion between the proximal and distal carpal rows must be acquired or associated with congenital syndromes. PMID:26783484

  9. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  10. The Cool Kids Coalition.

    PubMed

    Corrarino, J E; Walsh, P J; Boyle, M L; Anselmo, D

    2000-01-01

    The Cool Kids Coalition was initiated as a community response to more than 214 hospitalizations of children under the age of five for burns over a 6-year period in one township in Long Island, NY. The coalition was started by public health nurses in partnership with the local chapter of the National Safe Kids Campaign. Goals included: 1. parent education regarding scald burn prevention; 2. development of innovative interventions for those at risk; and 3, development of innovative community approaches to scald prevention. Coalition members had diverse backgrounds and the coalition integrated non-traditional partners in injury control. The coalition doubled in size due to overwhelming community interest, growing within a few months from an initial group of 15 to a well-represented group of 30. Innovative programs were implemented that reached more than 3,000 parents, both in the community and home. Teaching was conducted with parents in the target population in Head Start centers, homeless shelters, the home, libraries, child care centers, a shelter for teen parents, etc. Member agencies incorporated the booklet and materials into their individual programs. The development of the Cool Kids Coalition illustrates the power of nursing in community health. PMID:10676080

  11. New education coalition formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt Ireto, M. Frank

    The Coalition for Earth Science Education (CESE) was recently formed to promote Earth science education at all levels. Earth science is a diverse group of sciences and as a result, professional and academic organizations from the various areas, though united in their goal to stimulate student enthusiasm for the Earth sciences, have not had an effective way of reaching students or their precollege teachers. Over the past year, meetings sponsored by the National Academy of Science's Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and the National Science Foundation have paved the way for this coalition. Victor Mayer, Director of the Program for Leadership in Earth Systems Science (PLESE) project at the University of Ohio, has been the leader in initiating and promoting this effort for the last several years.The purpose of CESE is to promote communication among the member organizations and to coordinate projects in Earth science education. Individual organizations will continue to develop and run projects, but will be able to find out what types of projects others are working on or have completed through a coalition clearinghouse. The clearinghouse should aid organizations as they design projects and should afford opportunities for collaborative efforts. This will directly benefit teachers, who will be able to contact one source for information on the multitude of projects in the Earth and space sciences. The new coalition's steering committee is working on goals and guidelines, and will give a report at the next coalition meeting at the National Science Teachers Association annual convention in Boston.

  12. Subtalar coalition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Vincent S

    2015-06-01

    Subtalar tarsal coalition is an autosomal dominant developmental maldeformation that affects between 2% and 13% of the population. The most common locations are between the calcaneus and navicular and between the talus and calcaneus. If prolonged attempts at nonoperative management do not relieve the pain, surgery is indicated. The exact surgical technique(s) should be based on the location of the pain, the size and histology of the coalition, the health of the other joints and facets, the degree of foot deformity, and the excursion of the heel cord. PMID:26043243

  13. International Clean Energy Coalition

    SciTech Connect

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  14. Coalite faces dioxins prosecution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.

    1994-12-07

    The U.K.`s Her Majesty`s Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP), in what it calls its most important environmental case to date, is prosecuting Coalite Products (Bolsover, U.K.) for alleged failure to prevent emission of dioxins from an incinerator prior to 1992. The case, being brought under the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974, could establish legal precedents for the health effects of dioxin exposure and corporate liability for past exposures.

  15. Stone Soup: A Recipe for Successful Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joan

    1999-01-01

    Considers the implications of community connections by examining a coalition developed by the Pekin Public Library (Illinois): the Pekin Intergenerational Network (PIN). Highlights include recognizing the need for coalitions; developing a team; and evaluating the coalition's progress. (AEF)

  16. Measuring Coalition Functioning: Refining Constructs through Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Louis D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success…

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxicity of Anacostia River, Washington, DC, USA, sediment fed to mute swans (Cygnus olor)

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Melancon, M.J.; Sileo, L.

    2000-03-01

    Sediment ingestion is sometimes the principal route by which waterfowl are exposed to environmental contaminants, and at severely contaminated sites waterfowl have been killed by ingesting sediment. Mute swans (Cygnus olor) were fed a diet for 6 weeks with a high but environmentally realistic concentration (24%) of sediment from the moderately polluted Anacostia River in the District of Columbia, USA, to estimate the sediment's toxicity. Control swans were fed the same diet without the sediment. Five organochlorine compounds were detected in the treated diets, but none of 22 organochlorine compounds included in the analyses was detected in livers of the treated swans. The concentrations of 24 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons measured in the treated diet were as high as 0.80 mg/kg, and they were thought to have been responsible for the observed induction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in livers. A concentration of 85 mg/kg of lead in the diet was enough to decrease red blood cell ALAD activity but was not high enough to cause more serious effects of lead poisoning. The dietary concentrations of Al, Fe, V, and Ba were high compared to the concentrations of these elements known to be toxic in laboratory feeding studies. However, the lack of accumulation in the livers of the treated swans suggested that these elements were not readily available from the ingested sediment. The authors did not study all potential toxic effects, but, on the basis of those that they did consider, they concluded that the treated swans were basically healthy after a chronic exposure to the sediment.

  19. Management of coalition sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh Chandra; Brown, Theodore; Ortega, Carolyn

    2010-04-01

    The management of sensor networks in coalition settings has been treated in a piecemeal fashion in the current literature without taking a comprehensive look at the complete life cycle of coalition networks, and determining the different aspects of network management that need to be taken into account for the management of sensor networks in those contexts. In this paper, we provide a holistic approach towards managing sensor networks encountered in the context of coalition operations. We describe how the sensor networks in a coalition ought to be managed at various stages of the life cycle, and the different operations that need to be taken into account for managing various aspects of the networks. In particular, we look at the FCAPS model for network management, and assess the applicability of the FCAPS model to the different aspects of sensor network management in a coalition setting.

  20. CUBOID-NAVICULAR TARSAL COALITION

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Mendes, Alberto Abussamara Moreira; Olivi, Rogério; Amodio, Daniel Tassetto

    2015-01-01

    The authors present the case of a nine-year-old female patient who presented with pain in her right foot associated with physical activities. After this case was diagnosed as cuboid-navicular tarsal coalition, the patient was treated surgically with resection of the coalition, thereby resolving the symptoms. The literature was reviewed and the importance of adequate physical examination and imaging assessment for investigating foot pain in children and adolescents was discussed. PMID:27047815

  1. The Coalition and the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2010-01-01

    The UK's new Coalition Government looks as if it will make the narrow, traditional school curriculum we have now even narrower and more rooted in the past. The Labour government made timid moves to improve the National Curriculum, not least by equipping it with a few general aims, even though these meshed poorly on to intra-subject aims. Michael…

  2. Coalitions to engineer the climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Cruz, J. B.; Ricke, K.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Solar geoengineering is the deliberate reduction of the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by Earth's climate system with the aim of reducing impacts of anthropogenic climate change. The international politics of solar geoengineering differ markedly from those of greenhouse-gas emissions reductions. A central question is who will decide whether and how much solar geoengineering will be deployed. It is unlikely that a single small actor could implement and sustain global-scale geoengineering that harms much of the world without intervention from harmed world powers. Thus, in practice, some minimum amount of aggregate power would be needed to successfully impose will upon the rest of the world. Here we formulate a series of games, calibrated with physical and economic models of climate change, to evaluate how international coalitions to implement geoengineering may form. In the scenarios examined, climate models are assumed to correctly predict the future and damage is parameterized in terms of regional temperature and precipitation changes only, and do not consider other, possibly formidable, risks. The coalitions set the "global thermostat" to maximize benefit to coalition members. As a result, non-members would be better off under a global optimum solution, but would be worse off with no geoengineering at all. Nonetheless, it appears unlikely that solar geoengineering could be implemented by actors who are perceived in advance to be harming the interests of a majority of the world's powers.; Comparison of results under a globally optimal versus >50% military-spending power coalition over 6 decades of solar geoengineering implementation. (a) shows how the amount of solar geoengineering (in units of stratospheric aerosol optical depth, AOD) implemented by a Power Proportionate Distribution coalition under a military-spending-weighted power scheme (dotted), compared to the amount that minimizes net global damages (thick grey) (the population and GDP

  3. Calcaneonavicular Coalition with Naviculocuneiform and Cuneiform-First Metatarsal Coalitions A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vira, Shaleen; McCormack, Richard; Felder, Gabriel; Otsuka, Norman

    2016-06-01

    Coalitions involving three joints of the midfoot are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient having fibrocartilaginous coalition of the calcaneonavicular joint along with partial osseous fusion of the naviculocuneiform (Chopart's joint) and medial cuneiform-first metatarsal joints. These multi-coalition pathologies are challenging to address operatively as pain can persist even after recognizing and surgically addressing each coalition in a patient. PMID:27281323

  4. Health care coalitions: continuity and change.

    PubMed

    Mullner, R M; Young, G W; Andersen, R M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to investigate how coalitions have changed during 1983-1986, to describe the current characteristics of coalitions, and to speculate about their future roles and likely evolution. Several insights emerge from the empirical findings of this study. First, the number of operational health care coalitions has greatly expanded over the last several years to the point where almost every state and metropolitan area of the country has at least one. Second, the service area of most coalitions is generally county-wide, although there has been significant growth in the number of coalitions that serve states. Third, coalitions are expanding their membership composition and including not only business members but also hospitals, physicians, insurance companies, and labor organizations. Fourth, coalitions are becoming more financially secure; most have annual cash budgets, and most rely on dues. Fifth, coalitions are increasingly hiring and using paid professional staff. Last, coalitions are expanding their agendas beyond investigating direct health care costs to examine some of the underlying issues (such as hospital and medical professional liability issues, the financing of uncompensated care, and ethical issues) and are developing programs to address them. For the near future, the extension of recent trends suggests how coalitions will look and function. Further down the road, health care coalitions may evolve into health care public/private policy forums or associations of health benefits managers and/or associations for managed care purchasers. In conclusion, the trends we documented and the projections of the future of coalitions appear to be in keeping with the summary perspective of John T. Dunlop (1987) who indicates: Coalitions provide a continuing forum in which parties become more interested and informed about health care costs, utilization and the problems and operations of the other participants. The discourse encourages a more

  5. Data compilation for assessing sediment and toxic chemical loads from the Green River to the lower Duwamish Waterway, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Between February and June 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey collected representative samples of whole water, suspended sediment, and (or) bed sediment from a single strategically located site on the Duwamish River, Washington, during seven periods of different flow conditions. Samples were analyzed by Washington-State-accredited laboratories for a large suite of compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other semivolatile compounds, polychlorinated biphenyl Aroclors and the 209 congeners, metals, dioxins/furans, volatile organic compounds, pesticides, butyltins, hexavalent chromium, and total organic carbon. Chemical concentrations associated with bulk bed sediment (<2 mm) and fine bed sediment (<62.5 μm) fractions were compared to chemical concentrations associated with suspended sediment. Bulk bed sediment concentrations generally were lower than fine bed sediment and suspended-sediment concentrations. Concurrent with the chemistry sampling, additional parameters were measured, including instantaneous river discharge, suspended-sediment concentration, sediment particle-size distribution, and general water-quality parameters. From these data, estimates of instantaneous sediment and chemical loads from the Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway were calculated.

  6. Toward a social ecology of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, A; Valois, R; Ochs, L; de la Cruz, D S; Adkins, E; Goodman, R M

    1996-01-01

    This article is guided by several premises. First, community coalitions fit with a social ecology perspective of health promotion because they work with multiple domains and promote community change. Second, the community context affects the functioning of coalitions. Third, key leaders are an important part of the social fabric of a community and influence the social ecology of a community; therefore a coalition should include key leaders and influence them and their organizations. The purpose of this article is to advance an understanding of the social ecology of coalitions by describing concepts, variables and results from two national studies and by providing anecdotal evidence and a measure of key leaders from our own work. After briefly defining and describing community coalitions, we: (1) review literature on contextual variables and community coalitions, (2) provide examples of contextual variables influencing community coalition development, and (3) discuss the relationship of key leaders in multiple domains and community coalitions. The article concludes with a discussion of the need for a framework of contextual variables and a promising next step. PMID:10172711

  7. Campus and Community Coalitions. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on campus and community coalitions. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Campus and Community Coalitions: Implementing Environmental Prevention Strategies (John D. Clapp); (2) Campus Brief: University of Rhode Island; (3) International Town & Gown Association; (4) Q&A With Traci Toomey and…

  8. Building Effective Coalitions: Some Planning Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croan, Gerald M.; Lees, Joan F.

    Coalitions of service providers are playing increasingly large roles in developing policies and programs affecting youth. Community coalitions are cost-effective, efficient ways to expand services and to increase the capacity of the community to plan and program for young people. This manual provides a basis for examination of the coalition…

  9. Coalition Education Policy: Thatcherism's Long Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Coalition education policy threatens to transform the school system in England. A combination of public spending cuts, and the drive to making all schools Academies, represents a key moment in the restructuring of the education service along neo-liberal lines. This article argues that there is nothing distinctively "new" about Coalition schools…

  10. Resources, environment and population. The Global Tomorrow Coalition Conference.

    PubMed

    Olson, R K

    1983-01-01

    The challenge for environmental action has been direct and powerful for the Global Tomorrow Coalition. In June 1983 a major international conference was held by the Coalition in Washington, D.C., the Conference examined the issues of acid rain, biological diversity, foresight capability, hazardous exports, water resources, the oceans, sustainable development, population, and nuclear issues. The Conference presented a unique portrait of the US environmental movement, its problems and the possibilities for US leadership at the international level. The Coalition issued an indictment of the Reagan Administration, charging that it had reversed American domestic and international policies and was threatening the foundation on international cooperation which the US had worked hard to establish. Specifically, the Administration did the following: prevented cooperative international action on acid rain; destroyed the effectiveness of the Council on Environmental Quality by cutting its budget by 2/3 and replacing the entire professional staff with new personnel lacking environmental expertise; withdrew US participation from the Law of the Sea Conference; discouraged initiatives and programs on environment and resource trends by OECD; obstructed OECD's efforts to harmonize testing for new chemicals; sought more than a 25% reduction in US fiscal 1984 support for the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA); opposed UN efforts to control hazardous exports and removed US governmental restraints on this trade; withdrew support for the Internatioanl Man and the Biopshere program; proposed cutting the US voluntary contribution to the UN Environment Program by 2/3; proposed weakening the rules under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species and withdrew support for the World Heritage Convention and the Convention for the Protection of Nature and Preservation of Wildlife in the Western hemisphere; and withdrew funding for participation in US and international

  11. Defining elements of success: a critical pathway of coalition development.

    PubMed

    Downey, Laura M; Ireson, Carol L; Slavova, Svetla; McKee, Genia

    2008-04-01

    In recent decades, coalitions have been established to address many public health problems, including injury prevention. A partnership among the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center and four injury prevention coalitions has documented the developmental stages of successful coalitions. This developmental process was constructed through the analysis of participating coalition documents, such as each coalition's mission statement, bylaws or rules of operation, the use of committees within the organization, frequency of meetings, and additional historical documents. Themes from this analysis guided researchers in designing a critical pathway model that describes milestones in coalition formation. Critical components in coalition formation include a clear definition of the coalition structure, coalition enhancement, funding, community support, leadership, education and outreach to the community, membership, partnerships, data and evaluation, and publicity. These findings are applicable to public health professionals who work with community-based coalitions and citizens who participate in local coalitions. PMID:18340088

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Strength determines coalitional strategies in humans

    PubMed Central

    Benenson, Joyce F.; Markovits, Henry; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Coalitions enhance survival and reproductive success in many social species, yet they generate contradictory impulses. Whereas a coalition increases the probability of successfully obtaining rewards for its members, it typically requires a division of rewards among members, thereby diminishing individual benefits. Non-human primate data indicate that coalition formation is more likely when an individual's probability of success is low when competing alone. No comparable studies exist for humans. Here we show using a computerized competitive game that humans exhibit a systematic, intuitive strategy for coalition formation based on their own and others' levels of perceived strength, a pattern that resembles coalition formation in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. Despite equal expected pay-offs for all strategies, subjects were more likely to form coalitions as their own level of perceived strength waned. Those chosen as coalition partners tended to be stronger individuals or arbitrarily designated ‘friends’. Results suggest a heuristic for human coalitionary decisions that rests on the perception of relative power rather than on the assessment of pay-offs. PMID:19364733

  14. Economic model of OPEC coalition

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, H.

    1984-10-01

    Efforts to formulate the economic behavior of OPEC are complicated because the coalition is made up of member countries, each of which pursues a different objective, arrives at its own optimum price and quantity, and has an opportunity to participate in a group consensus. This requires a new cartel model that will explain the coalitionary process, yet remain flexible enough to consider the diverse objectives of individual members. The author analyzes the possibility of realizing this consensus in relation to the differing politico-economic structures of the members. He concludes that the long-run stability of OPEC requires reversing some historical patterns, although offsetting effects may avoid a short-term instability. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Coalition forms to support NEHRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A group of professional associations, including the Seismological Society of America and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, has formed a coalition to support the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Meeting in met on February 20, the group plans to actively support the research necessary to mitigate earthquake losses and to seek continued federal funding of the program.NEHRP was established by President Carter following the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977. Funding was originally authorized for 3 years and has been reauthorized by Congress each year. The program is funded through four federal agencies—the U.S. Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the National Institute of Stan dards and Technology. Its purpose is to address the nation's earthquake threat by reducing earthquake hazards.

  16. Coalition for photonics and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breault, Robert P.

    2002-05-01

    The Coalition for Optics and Photonics (CPO) happened for all the best of reasons, while born out of a somewhat tumultuous past that could not have predicted it. First, there were optical societies. Born from each other, or because of each other, they had their own agendas. Each felt strongly that they had the one and only right path. There was little cooperation and even, from time to time, some non-constructive competition among the professional societies and trade associations. The optical industry was still in its infancy stage for the most part. It was probably due to the combination of intelligent people from all societies, and the rapid growth of the industry and their conferences that made some coordination necessary. What started as high-level discussions, complete with some staff, led to a better understanding and cooperation between the societies and preceded the formation of CPO.

  17. Assessing Rural Coalitions That Address Safety and Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgus, Shari; Schwab, Charles; Shelley, Mack

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions can help national organizations meet their objectives. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids depends on coalitions of local people to deliver farm safety and health educational programs to children and their families. These coalitions are called chapters. An evaluation was developed to identify individual coalition's strengths and…

  18. A framework for cohesive healthcare coalition formation.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Yu-N; Chong, Yong Han; Neoh, Siew Lan

    2006-01-01

    The mobilisation of cohesive and effective groups of healthcare human resource is important in ensuring the success of healthcare organisations. However, forming the right team or coalition in healthcare organisations is not always straightforward due to various human factors. Traditional coalition formation approaches have been perceived as 'materialistic' or focusing too much on competency or pay-off. Therefore, to put prominence on the human aspects of working together, we present a cohesiveness-focused healthcare coalition formation methodology and framework that explores the possibilities of social networks, i.e. the relationship between various healthcare human resources, and adaptive resonance theory. PMID:17108579

  19. Developmental Stages and Work Capacities of Community Coalitions: How Extension Educators Address and Evaluate Changing Coalition Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Allison; Riffe, Jane; Peck, Terrill; Kaczor, Cheryl; Nix, Kelly; Faulkner-Van Deysen, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Extension educators provide resources to community coalitions. The study reported here adds to what is known about community coalitions and applies an assessment framework to a state-level coalition-based Extension program on healthy relationships and marriages. The study combines the Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy (ICOH) framework with four…

  20. Isolated Fifth Metatarsocuboid Coalition: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hayato; Kageyama, Yasunori; Shido, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Isolated tarsometatarsal coalitions are extremely rare, and the previous 5 documented cases involved the first and third metatarsocuneiform joints. We report the case of a 69-year-old female with symptomatic fifth metatarsocuboid coalition associated with ipsilateral varus-type ankle osteoarthritis and instability. The patient was successfully treated by arthrodesis of the fifth metatarsocuboid joint, resection of the hypertrophied tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal, advancement of the peroneus brevis tendon, opening wedge distal tibial osteotomy, and calcaneal displacement osteotomy. After 1 year, 6 months, she was able to walk well, although she complained of minor discomfort under the fifth metatarsal base, which resolved with the use of protective padding. Radiographs at this stage confirmed consolidation of both the arthrodesis and the osteotomy sites. Although isolated fifth metatarsocuboid coalition is less likely to be encountered than other tarsal coalitions, it can sometimes be painful enough to necessitate surgery. PMID:25135105

  1. The paradoxes and promise of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Chavis, D M

    2001-04-01

    Community coalitions, as they are currently applied, are unique organizations whose ability to promote community change is different from other types of community organizations. This article explores those differences and elaborates how community coalitions can use those differences to transform conflict into greater capacity, equity, and justice. Concerns are also raised in this article about how community coalitions can intentionally and unintentionally protect the status quo and contain the empowerment of grassroots leadership and those of marginalized groups. There is a need for more theory, research, and discourse on how community coalitions can transform conflict into social change and how they can increase the power of grassroots and other citizen-lead organizations. PMID:11446286

  2. Freedom for the Black: A Workable Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Speech dealing with the factors which prevent blacks and whites from working together outlines the basis for building an effective coalition of both groups to secure justice and equality for all. (DM)

  3. A Rare Combination of Ipsilateral Partial Talocalcaneal and Talonavicular Coalition

    PubMed Central

    James, Boblee

    2015-01-01

    Tarsal coalitions refer to fibrous, cartilaginous or osseous fusion between two tarsal bones. Commonly seen are talocalcaneal coalitions and calcaneonavicular coalitions. Talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and cubonavicular coalition are very uncommonly seen. Talocalcaneal and calcaneonavicular coalitions are generally symptomatic whereas talonavicular coalitions are asymptomatic. Special view radiography, CT and MRI will be helpful in diagnosing coalitions depending on nature of coalitions. In this case report, we present 24-year-old male patient with rare combination of talocalcaneal and talonavicular coalition on ipsilateral side. Patient also showed talar beak sign and arthritic changes at subtalar joint. Considering first time presentation to hospital and milder symptoms, we treated patient conservatively with short leg cast and foot orthoses. With course of treatment, symptoms were relieved significantly. PMID:26816958

  4. 78 FR 53235 - 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-21189 Filed 8-27-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9004 of August 23, 2013 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs... remember that the March on Washington was a demonstration for jobs as well as freedom. The coalition...

  5. Coalition command and control: a Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Robert; Demers, David; Gouin, Denis; McCann, Carol; Nourry, Gerard; Pigeau, Ross; Smith, Donald L.; Vezina, Guy; Walker, Robert S.

    1998-08-01

    Canada has been, and remains, committed to participating in coalition operations to promote peace and stability in the post-Cold War world. However, coalition operations challenge traditional command and control concepts, from both the technological and the human perspectives. In the short term, Canada is working closely with traditional NATO and ABCA allies to ensure that the next generation of automated C2 information systems are able to exchange information effectively through structured messages, gateways and standardized data models. Canada is also conducting R&D, and participating in collaborative experiments, to evolve the next generation of systems to permit richer, more dynamic information sharing, along the lines of the Internet and World Wide Web. However, information technology alone will not solve the problems of coalition operations. Research needs to be undertaken to understand task assignment and information flow among coalition partners at the process or operational level. Research is also required at the human level, where differences between coalition partners in culture, personal values, military expectations, religions, and societal values are proving to be less tractable than differences in message formats and communication protocols.

  6. Differential Challenges in Coalition Building among HIV Prevention Coalitions Targeting Specific Youth Populations

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Schrader, Grisel M.; Harper, Gary W.; Purnell, Marjorie; Monarrez, Veronica; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Coalitions provide the potential for merging the power, influence, and resources of fragmented individuals and institutions into one collective group that can more effectively focus its efforts on a specific community health issue. Connect to Protect® coalitions devote resources to address the HIV epidemic at a structural level. This research examines differential challenges in coalition processes that may facilitate/hinder coalition building to achieve HIV prevention through structural change. Qualitative interviews conducted with community partners participating across 10 coalitions were analyzed to compare responses of those individuals working on HIV prevention coalitions targeting adolescent and young adult gay and bisexual men versus those targeting adolescent and young adult heterosexual women. Community partner responses revealed differences across several key areas including: a) acceptability and goals in discussing sexual issues with adolescents, b) goals of sexual health promotion activities, and c) competition among collaborating agencies. Themes highlighted in this research can complement existing community intervention literature by helping community mobilizers, interventionists, and researchers understand how cultural norms affect youth-specific coalition work. PMID:24188354

  7. Impact of coalition interoperability on PKI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Edward J.

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines methods for providing PKI interoperability among units of a coalition of armed forces drawn from different nations. The area in question is tactical identity management, for the purposes of confidentiality, integrity and non-repudiation in such a dynamic coalition. The interoperating applications under consideration range from email and other forms of store-and-forward messaging to TLS and IPSEC-protected real-time communications. Six interoperability architectures are examined with advantages and disadvantages of each described in the paper.

  8. Rational instability in the natural coalition forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Galina; Galam, Serge

    2013-12-01

    The work aims to investigate a paradigm of instability in coalition forming among countries, using a model inspired from Statistical Physics. The instability is a consequence of decentralized maximization of the individual benefits where contradictory associations into coalitions occur due to independent evolution of pairwise propensity bonds. In contrast to the existing literature we analyze the phenomena within a long horizon rationality of actors. This allows to explore the complex behaviors and phenomena such as instability, infinite cycling and non-optimal stability. Along with the formal implementation, we illustrate the phenomena in a multi-thread simulation created for this aim, and provide analysis of several real cases including the Eurozone.

  9. Statewide Coalitions and State Systems. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on statewide coalitions and state systems. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Statewide Coalitions for Prevention; (2) Louisiana Higher Education Coalition; (3) Statewide Initiative Grantees; (4) The Ohio College Initiative; and (5) Higher Education Center Resources.

  10. Rethinking the Factors of Success: Social Support and Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa; DeWeese, Amanda; Goodman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coalitions are often the strategy of choice when needs are great, resources are few, and individual efforts have proven unsuccessful in addressing serious health issues. Despite the widespread use of coalitions and extensive research, no definitive list of factors predicting coalition success has been identified. One factor, social…

  11. Coalition Cooperation Defines Roadmap for E85 and Biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-06-01

    This Clean Cities success story relates how Colorado's Colorado Biofuels Coalition was formed and provides guidance on forming other such coalitions. This Colorado's coalition sucessfully increase the number of fueling stations providing biofuels and has goals to the number even more. Plans also include assisting with financing infrastructure, making alternative fuels available to more fleets, and educating about E85 and biodiesel use.

  12. Washington Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David M.; Boboltz, David

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Washington Correlator for 2012. The Washington Correlator provides up to 80 hours of attended processing per week plus up to 40 hours of unattended operation, primarily supporting Earth Orientation and astrometric observations. In 2012, the major programs supported include the IVS-R4, IVS-INT, APSG, and CRF observing sessions.

  13. The Coalition's Higher Education Reforms in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The Coalition Government of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats in office from 2010 until 2015 sharply increased the maximum tuition fees for UK and EU undergraduates at English universities to £9,000. Although this is often portrayed as a radical change, it is argued that the reform was an evolution rather than a revolution. Common pessimistic…

  14. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition. PMID:24132542

  15. Global alliances effect in coalition forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Galina; Galam, Serge

    2014-11-01

    Coalition forming is investigated among countries, which are coupled with short range interactions, under the influence of externally-set opposing global alliances. The model extends a recent Natural Model of coalition forming inspired from Statistical Physics, where instabilities are a consequence of decentralized maximization of the individual benefits of actors. In contrast to physics where spins can only evaluate the immediate cost/benefit of a flip of orientation, countries have a long horizon of rationality, which associates with the ability to envision a way up to a better configuration even at the cost of passing through intermediate loosing states. The stabilizing effect is produced through polarization by the global alliances of either a particular unique global interest factor or multiple simultaneous ones. This model provides a versatile theoretical tool for the analysis of real cases and design of novel strategies. Such analysis is provided for several real cases including the Eurozone. The results shed a new light on the understanding of the complex phenomena of planned stabilization in the coalition forming.

  16. Skilled migration policy under the Coalition.

    PubMed

    Birrell, B

    1998-01-01

    This article analyzed the review process and outcomes of the Australian Coalition Government since March 1996 on all major permanent skilled migration categories: Employment Nomination, Business Migration, Independent, and skilled. The Coalition Government followed after 13 years of Labor Government. Since 1996, there has been a slight rise in skilled immigrants. During the 1980s, the expansionist position on migration was widely supported. The 1988 CAAIP Report supported annual migration of 150,000 over 10 years with no occupational targeting. Migrants were drawn based on labor market skills, special/entrepreneurial talents, age, and language fluency. The Coalition Government dropped the 1989 program and expanded the Independent and Business groups, which focused on professional and trade credentials recognized in Australia, age, and English language fluency. The 1996 Recommendations were accepted in August 1998. A threshold level of skills was required. A point system was established in a two-tier system of all professional and trade occupations and credentials. A third tier applied to diploma-only occupations. Most are selected from the 60-point first tier, which will attract overseas applicants completing university studies. Applicants in the 50- and 40-point tiers will be accepted depending upon a ranked demand list, a firm job offer, a spouse meeting the threshold criteria, work experience, and educational levels. The effect is likely to increase overseas students in particular targeted fields. It is also likely that the country will benefit the most from trained residents. PMID:12294855

  17. How does community context influence coalitions in the formation stage? a multiple case study based on the Community Coalition Action Theory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Community coalitions are rooted in complex and dynamic community systems. Despite recognition that environmental factors affect coalition behavior, few studies have examined how community context impacts coalition formation. Using the Community Coalition Action theory as an organizing framework, the current study employs multiple case study methodology to examine how five domains of community context affect coalitions in the formation stage of coalition development. Domains are history of collaboration, geography, community demographics and economic conditions, community politics and history, and community norms and values. Methods Data were from 8 sites that participated in an evaluation of a healthy cities and communities initiative in California. Twenty-three focus groups were conducted with coalition members, and 76 semi-structured interviews were conducted with local coordinators and coalition leaders. Cross-site analyses were conducted to identify the ways contextual domains influenced selection of the lead agency, coalition membership, staffing and leadership, and coalition processes and structures. Results History of collaboration influenced all four coalition factors examined, from lead agency selection to coalition structure. Geography influenced coalition formation largely through membership and staffing, whereas the demographic and economic makeup of the community had an impact on coalition membership, staffing, and infrastructure for coalition processes. The influence of community politics, history, norms and values was most noticeable on coalition membership. Conclusions Findings contribute to an ecologic and theory-based understanding of the range of ways community context influences coalitions in their formative stage. PMID:20178633

  18. Lessons Learned and Challenges in Building a Filipino Health Coalition

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, David E.; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Ursua, Rhodora; Divino, Lily Ann M.; Cadag, Kara; Gavin, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, community-based coalitions have become an effective channel to addressing various health problems within specific ethnic communities. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to describe the process involved in building the Kalusugan Coalition (KC), a Filipino American health coalition based in New York City, and (b) to highlight the lessons learned and the challenges from this collaborative venture. The challenges described also offer insights on how the coalition development process can be greatly affected by the partnership with an academic institution on a community-based research project. Because each cultural group has unique issues and concerns, the theoretical framework used by KC offers creative alternatives to address some of the challenges regarding coalition infrastructures, leadership development, unexpected change of coalition dynamics, and cultural nuances. PMID:19098260

  19. Europa Uomo: the European Prostate Cancer Coalition.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Tom; Denis, Louis J

    2007-01-01

    Europa Uomo is a patient-led, non-governmental association (NGO), launched formally in Milan in 2004 with a legal base in Antwerp. As a coalition of prostate cancer patient groups with representation in 18 European countries, the NGO focusses on awareness, early detection, optimal treatment, multi-professional care and, above all, quality of life and patient advocacy. In the majority of European countries prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer affecting men beyond middle age. The incidence and substantial mortality rises with age, peaking in the seventh decade. Standards of diagnosis and treatment vary across Europe and attitudes differ. Information about the early detection and awareness of prostate cancer available to the public leaves much to be desired. Since 2002, involved individuals, patient support groups, patients, family members, physicians, urologists, oncologists and nurses joined in the formation of an independent, international, non-profit association of patient-led prostate cancer support groups from European countries known as Europa Uomo, the European Prostate Cancer Coalition. This Coalition was legally established as an NGO in June 2004 in Milan with the headquarters and secretariat in Antwerp, Belgium. Its membership represents 18 countries by the national or regional groups listed in Table 16.1 with their respective contact persons. The coalition is led by a steering committee under the control of the annual general assembly. The steering committee members and their co-ordinates are listed in Table 16.2. Scientific advice is given by a scientific committee chaired by Prof. H. Van Poppel as the liaison officer with the European Association of Urology (EAU). The support for EAU guidelines appears on the Web site and will be linked to all members in their own language (www.cancerworld.org/europauomo). The goals and activities of Europa Uomo have been condensed in a series of slides at the request of the Eurocan+Plus collaboration to

  20. Bilateral scaphotrapezium-trapezoid coalition with bipartite scaphoid: case report.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David Alexander; McCombe, David

    2013-09-01

    We report on a 15-year-old girl with bilateral scaphotrapezium-trapezoid coalitions and bipartite scaphoids. There was no history of trauma or any other associated pathology. Wrist pain was alleviated by arthrodesis of the pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid component of the coalitions. Coalition of the distal portions of the scaphoids may have interfered with union of 2 ossification centers of the scaphoid. It is also possible that the carpal coalitions predisposed the scaphoid to fracture and that this represents bilateral nonunion. PMID:23932812

  1. Workforce: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In Washington, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In the decade leading up to 2012, healthcare occupations will see growth of 20 percent. Teachers will be in demand: nearly 9,000 new elementary and middle-school educators will need to be hired. Computer fields will undergo growth of 24 percent,…

  2. State of Washington Department of Ecology criteria pollutants and toxic air polluntants phase II notice of construction for the Hanford Site spent nuclear fuel project--cold vacuum dryingfacility, Project W-441

    SciTech Connect

    Jansky, M.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1997-01-24

    This Phase 11 notice of construction (NOC) provides the additional information committed to in the Phase I NOC submittal (DOE/RL-96- 55) regarding the air toxic and criteria pollutants that could potentially be emitted during operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted to ensure the CVDF is in full compliance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-460-040(8), `Commencement of Construction`. The Phase I NOC (approved September 30, 1996) was defined as constructing the substructure, including but not limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor, and construction of the exterior. This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted for approval before installation and operation of the process equipment that will generate any potential air emissions at the CVDF, and installation and operation of the emissions control equipment.

  3. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  4. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  5. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  6. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  7. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  8. Coalition Building: Cultivating New Partners for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curva, Fely; Mosteller, James

    2010-01-01

    A coalition is about building power to accomplish change that no one group can reasonably accomplish on its own. A well-defined coalition not only builds power and influence, it broadens support, maximizes resources (e.g., time, money, people and connections), enhances legitimacy, creates synergy, and offers diverse perspectives on issues.…

  9. Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans A coalition of 13 countries or federal agencies participating in a new Global Partnership for Oceans (GPO) indicated its support for a “Declaration for Healthy and Productive Oceans to Help Reduce Poverty” on 16 June, just prior to the Rio+20 conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  10. Social Norms Tactics to Promote a Campus Alcohol Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinci, Debra M.; Philen, Robert C.; Walch, Susan E.; Kennedy, Rebecca; Harrell, Mica; Rime, Carla; Matthews, Jaclyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Social norms posters usually contain a normative message, branding, campaign tagline and sponsoring coalition/contact information. There are limited data on which campaign components promote recognition of Campus Alcohol Coalitions (CAC). Purpose: To determine the most effective media channels/incentives to promote recognition of CAC…

  11. The National Home Visiting Coalition: A History of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jane; Gavaghan, Bridget; Howard, Karen; Kelley, Melissa L.; Schwartz, Marvin; Walzer, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Home Visiting Coalition represents more than 75 organizations working together to articulate the effectiveness of home visiting to a range of policymakers and stakeholders in the early childhood field. Despite varying program goals and service delivery strategies, the Coalition participants share a commitment to expanding access to…

  12. Radionuclide bone scanning in subtalar coalitions: differential considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.B.; Pavlov, H.; Schneider, R.

    1982-03-01

    The radionuclide bone scan is a noninvasive screening procedure which can help in identifying or confirming subtalar coalitions in patients with foot and/or ankle pain of unknown origin in whom routine plain film studies are inconclusive. Five patients (seven symptomatic feet) with clinical and plain film findings suggesting a subtalar coalition are presented. The radionuclide bone scans in four patients (six feet) with documented subtalar coalitions demonstrated augmented uptake in the subtalar joint in all six feet and a secondary area of augmented concentration in the superior aspect of the talus or talonavicular joint in five feet. The radionuclide bone scan was normal in the one patient who was later proved not to have a coalition. The scans of 100 patients with foot pain of other etiologies were reviewed, and in no instance did the scan demonstrate the combination of subtalar and talus or talonavicular uptake observed in the patients with coalitions.

  13. Community Health Coalitions in Context: Associations between Geographic Context, Member Type and Length of Membership with Coalition Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, V.; Sanders, M.; Andrews, M. L.; Hale, R.; Carrillo, C.

    2014-01-01

    The coalition literature recognizes context (geography, demographics and history) as a variable of interest, yet few coalition evaluation studies have focused on it. This study explores the association between geographic context and structures (e.g. member type) with functional characteristics (e.g. decision making or levels of conflict) in a…

  14. Washington, DC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Citizens of the United States vote today (November 7, 2000) to determine who will be the next president and vice president of the country, as well as who will fill a number of congressional and senate seats that are up for election. This image of the U.S. capital city-Washington, D.C.-was acquired on June 1 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), a Japanese sensor flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The scene encompasses an area 14 km wide by 13.7 km tall, and was made using a combination of ASTER's visible and near-infrared channels. In this image, vegetation appears red, buildings and paved areas appear light blue, and the waters of the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers are dark grey. ASTER's 15-meter spatial resolution allows us to see individual buildings, including the White House, the Jefferson Memorial, and the Washington Monument with its shadow. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  15. The Influence of Community Context on How Coalitions Achieve HIV-Preventive Structural Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 "Connect to Protect" coalitions using inductive…

  16. Development of a Community Readiness Survey for Coalitions to Address Prescription Opioid Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2015-01-01

    A community readiness survey for coalitions to address the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse was developed in this four-part study. A total of 70 coalition members participated. 1) We conducted 30-minute phone interviews with coalition members (n = 30) and a literature review to develop an item list. 2) Coalition members rated these…

  17. Convergence and optimization of agent-based coalition formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze the model of agent-based coalition formation in markets. Our goal is to study the convergence of the coalition formation and optimize agents’ strategies. We show that the model has a unique steady state (equilibrium) and prove that all solutions converge to it in the case that the maximum size of coalitions is not larger than three. The stability of the steady state in other cases is not studied while numerical simulations are given to show the convergence. The steady state, which determines both the global system gain and the average gain per agent, is expressed by the agents’ strategies in the coalition formation. Through the steady state, we give the relationship between the gains and the agents’ strategies, and present a series of results for the optimization of agents’ strategies.

  18. Gove v. the Blob: The Coalition and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The author provides a year-by-year account of events during the period of the Conservative-led coalition government from 2010 to 2015 and concludes with some observations on the damage done to England's state education system.

  19. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  20. Optimizing Health Care Coalitions: Conceptual Frameworks and a Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Hupert, Nathaniel; Biala, Karen; Holland, Tara; Baehr, Avi; Hasan, Aisha; Harvey, Melissa

    2015-12-01

    The US health care system has maintained an objective of preparedness for natural or manmade catastrophic events as part of its larger charge to deliver health services for the American population. In 2002, support for hospital-based preparedness activities was bolstered by the creation of the National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, now called the Hospital Preparedness Program, in the US Department of Health and Human Services. Since 2012, this program has promoted linking health care facilities into health care coalitions that build key preparedness and emergency response capabilities. Recognizing that well-functioning health care coalitions can have a positive impact on the health outcomes of the populations they serve, this article informs efforts to optimize health care coalition activity. We first review the landscape of health care coalitions in the United States. Then, using principles from supply chain management and high-reliability organization theory, we present 2 frameworks extending beyond the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response's current guidance in a way that may help health care coalition leaders gain conceptual insight into how different enterprises achieve similar ends relevant to emergency response. We conclude with a proposed research agenda to advance understanding of how coalitions can contribute to the day-to-day functioning of health care systems and disaster preparedness. PMID:26545194

  1. The agencies method for coalition formation in experimental games

    PubMed Central

    Nash, John F.; Nagel, Rosemarie; Ockenfels, Axel; Selten, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    In society, power is often transferred to another person or group. A previous work studied the evolution of cooperation among robot players through a coalition formation game with a non-cooperative procedure of acceptance of an agency of another player. Motivated by this previous work, we conduct a laboratory experiment on finitely repeated three-person coalition formation games. Human players with different strength according to the coalition payoffs can accept a transfer of power to another player, the agent, who then distributes the coalition payoffs. We find that the agencies method for coalition formation is quite successful in promoting efficiency. However, the agent faces a tension between short-term incentives of not equally distributing the coalition payoff and the long-term concern to keep cooperation going. In a given round, the strong player in our experiment often resolves this tension approximately in line with the Shapley value and the nucleolus. Yet aggregated over all rounds, the payoff differences between players are rather small, and the equal division of payoffs predicts about 80% of all groups best. One reason is that the voting procedure appears to induce a balance of power, independent of the individual player's strength: Selfish subjects tend to be voted out of their agency and are further disciplined by reciprocal behaviors. PMID:23175792

  2. Model Checking Coalition Nash Equilibria in MAD Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Federico; Melatti, Igor; Salvo, Ivano; Tronci, Enrico; Alvisi, Lorenzo; Clement, Allen; Li, Harry

    We present two OBDD based model checking algorithms for the verification of Nash equilibria in finite state mechanisms modeling Multiple Administrative Domains (MAD) distributed systems with possibly colluding agents (coalitions) and with possibly faulty or malicious nodes (Byzantine agents). Given a finite state mechanism, a proposed protocol for each agent and the maximum sizes f for Byzantine agents and q for agents collusions, our model checkers return PASS if the proposed protocol is an ɛ-f-q-Nash equilibrium, i.e. no coalition of size up to q may have an interest greater than ɛ in deviating from the proposed protocol when up to f Byzantine agents are present, FAIL otherwise. We implemented our model checking algorithms within the NuSMV model checker: the first one explicitly checks equilibria for each coalition, while the second represents symbolically all coalitions. We present experimental results showing their effectiveness for moderate size mechanisms. For example, we can verify coalition Nash equilibria for mechanisms which corresponding normal form games would have more than 5 ×1021 entries. Moreover, we compare the two approaches, and the explicit algorithm turns out to outperform the symbolic one. To the best of our knowledge, no model checking algorithm for verification of Nash equilibria of mechanisms with coalitions has been previously published.

  3. Coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions.

    PubMed

    Fivaz-Depeursinge, Elisabeth; Lopes, Francesco; Python, Maryline; Favez, Nicolas

    2009-12-01

    The current study examined the coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions. According to structural family theory, boundaries between generations are clear in alliances, but disturbed in coalitions: the parents look to the child to regulate their conflictual relationship and the child attempts to meet this need. In a normative sample studied longitudinally during the Lausanne Trilogue Play situation (LTP, N=38), 15 coalition cases were detected. Styles of coparenting and of child's interactions were determined and compared in coalition and alliance cases at 18 months. Findings confirm the structural family model by showing the specific ways in which the coparenting and the toddler's interactive styles are associated in 3 different patterns of coalitions: binding, detouring, and triangulation. They illustrate how the child's triangular capacity, or her ability to simultaneously communicate with both parents, is used to regulate the parents' relationship. They suggest that the LTP observational paradigm is a promising assessment method of early family interactions. They point to the importance of assessing early the child's contribution to family coalitions. PMID:19930435

  4. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  5. Environmental politics and the coal coalition

    SciTech Connect

    Vietor, R.H.K.

    1980-01-01

    A history of environmental politics and coal is presented. Since the late nineteenth century coal has been essential to the industrial economy of the United States. But air pollution from burning coal damages health and property, and strip mining despoils the natural environment. As industry mushroomed after World War II, the social costs of air pollution and strip mining emerged as national problems, and by the late fifties public health officials, conservationists, and sportsmen began to call for federal regulation. Pressures mounted for federal rather than state control, for stringent health criteria, expensive technological solutions, and, by the 1970's, constraints on industrial growth. The coal industry resisted, concerned with the costs of cleanup and the need for larger, centralized systems to deliver ever more energy in what would become a crisis situation. Meanwhile, the coal industry was being absorbed by mergers with larger industries, including petroleum, electric utilities, railroads, steel, and equipment manufacturing; large commercial banks with energy interests and interlocking trade associations and government advisory councils provided a cohesive framework for political opposition to escalating regulation. By the 1970's environmentalists had also formed national coalitions. As the issues became more complex and highly technical, the conflict shifted from the legislative to the administrative arena. The result has been a degree of regulation and interface between business and government unimaginable in the Eisenhower era. Using both government and interest-group sources, the author documents the significant changes in both social values and the pluralist political process over two decades of reform.

  6. The Personalized Medicine Coalition: goals and strategies.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Silver, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The concept of personalized medicine--that medical care can be tailored to the genomic and molecular profile of the individual--has repercussions that extend far beyond the technology that makes it possible. The adoption of personalized medicine will require changes in healthcare infrastructure, diagnostics and therapeutics business models, reimbursement policy from government and private payers, and a different approach to regulatory oversight. Personalized medicine will shift medical practices upstream from the reactive treatment of disease, to proactive healthcare management including screening, early treatment, and prevention, and will alter the roles of both physician and patient. It will create a greater reliance on electronic medical records and decision support systems in an industry that has a long history of resistance to information technology. Personalized medicine requires a systems approach to implementation. But in a healthcare economy that is highly decentralized and market driven, it is incumbent upon the stakeholders themselves to advocate for a consistent set of policies and legislation that pave the way for the adoption of personalized medicine. To address this need, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) was formed as a nonprofit umbrella organization of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic, and information technology companies, healthcare providers and payers, patient advocacy groups, industry policy organizations, major academic institutions, and government agencies. The PMC provides a structure for achieving consensus positions among these stakeholders on crucial public policy issues, a role which will be vital to translating personalized medicine into widespread clinical practice. In this article, we outline the goals of the PMC, and the strategies it will take to foster communication, debate, and consensus on issues such as genetic discrimination, the reimbursement structures for pharmacogenomic drugs and diagnostics, regulation

  7. Strategic incentives for climate geoengineering coalitions to exclude broad participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine L.; Moreno-Cruz, Juan B.; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-03-01

    Solar geoengineering is the deliberate reduction in the absorption of incoming solar radiation by the Earth’s climate system with the aim of reducing impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Climate model simulations project a diversity of regional outcomes that vary with the amount of solar geoengineering deployed. It is unlikely that a single small actor could implement and sustain global-scale geoengineering that harms much of the world without intervention from harmed world powers. However, a sufficiently powerful international coalition might be able to deploy solar geoengineering. Here, we show that regional differences in climate outcomes create strategic incentives to form coalitions that are as small as possible, while still powerful enough to deploy solar geoengineering. The characteristics of coalitions to geoengineer climate are modeled using a ‘global thermostat setting game’ based on climate model results. Coalition members have incentives to exclude non-members that would prevent implementation of solar geoengineering at a level that is optimal for the existing coalition. These incentives differ markedly from those that dominate international politics of greenhouse-gas emissions reduction, where the central challenge is to compel free riders to participate.

  8. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Auer, S; Heitzig, J; Kornek, U; Schöll, E; Kurths, J

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation ("coalitions") on an acquaintance network. We include both the network's influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  9. Endoscopic resection of a talocalcaneal coalition using a posteromedial approach.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koji; Kumai, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-02-01

    Resection is a standard surgical procedure for a talocalcaneal coalition (TCC). A posterior approach is the representative technique for hindfoot endoscopy, and there is only 1 report of endoscopic resection of TCC using this approach. Disadvantages of the posterior approach for TCC are as follows: (1) the indication is limited to posterior-facet coalition, (2) the flexor hallucis longus can be an obstacle in approaching the coalition, (3) the acute insertion angle between the endoscope and instrument reduces operability, and (4) a position change and additional skin incision are essential for conversion to an open procedure. In contrast, a posteromedial approach for TCC with established portals at the entrance and exit of the flexor retinaculum is a useful technique because (1) the indication is allow to middle- and posterior-facet coalitions, (2) increased perfusion pressure allows the creation of sufficient working space, (3) operating the instrument only at the coalition site decreases the risk of tendon injury and neurovascular damage, (4) the obtuse insertion angle between the endoscope and instrument improves operability, and (5) a position change and additional skin incision are unnecessary for conversion to an open procedure. PMID:24749021

  10. Building successful coalitions to promote advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille; Fowler, Kathryn J; Kokanovic, Obrad

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the challenges and successes of an advance care planning (ACP) coalition formed at the University of Wisconsin called Life Planning 2000. Data were obtained from key informant interviews (n = 24) and grounded theory. Major themes included commitment (the need for leadership, recruitment of key persons, and funding); cohesiveness (disparate groups collaborating toward a common purpose); and outcomes (including educational tool development). Coalitions need to define short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals that result in measurable outcomes and an evaluation process. Resources must be commensurate with goals. Results indicate that strong leadership, paid staff adequate funding, and the collaboration of diverse groups working toward a common goal are essential if a coalition promoting end-of-life (EOL) care planning is to be successful. PMID:16323714

  11. MRI Findings of Talocalcaneal Coalition: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Umul, Ayşe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tarsal coalition is abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones and is a common cause of foot pain. There are osseous, cartilaginous and fibrous subtypes. Calcaneonavicular and talocalcaneal coalitions are more frequent. Radiography is the primary diagnostic tool, however CT and MRI are precious examinations for differential diagnosis of osseous /non-osseous coalitions separations. Furthermore, cross-sectional imaging methods indicate the extension and secondary degenerative joint changes. Case reports: The detection of bone marrow of edema in the articulation area is valuable for diagnosis Hereby, we present two cases, 24 years old female and 35 years old male, with the diagnosis of talocalcaneal coaliation. We also discuss MRI and radiographic findings. PMID:26483601

  12. Clean cities: Award winning coalition -- Paso del Norte

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, K.

    1999-10-25

    Designated the 41st Clean Cities coalition in November 1995, the Paso del Norte Clean Cities Coalition (PDNCCC) is the first in the country to gain international participation. Spanning the US-Mexico border; the coalition includes stakeholders from El Paso, Texas; Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; and Las Cruces, New Mexico. PDNCCC developed a comprehensive plan to jump-start its program place, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) on the road, and eliminate barriers inhibiting alternative fuel market growth. PDNCC raised more than $2.3 million for alternative fuel activities and clean air initiatives in less than 26 months. In 1998, the US Department of Energy (DOE) recognized that PDNCCC accomplishment with its Rainmaker Award for leveraging the most funds from outside sources. PDNCCC is proud of its efforts to drive the alternative fuels and AFV market in the El Paso/Juarez region.

  13. Faculty practice as partnership with a community coalition.

    PubMed

    Gale, B J

    1998-01-01

    Faculty practice as partnership with a community coalition can be a dynamic strategy for retooling the future of nursing. The Escalante ElderCARE Coalition was formed in 1991, with the Community Health Division of the Arizona State College of Nursing taking a leadership role. Since that time, more than 50 aging network and community agencies have become involved. More than $300,000 in grant funding has been awarded for Healthy WAY services with low-income seniors as health care and program partners. The conceptual model includes health-promotion services, participation of community elders in program planning and evaluation, and education of health professionals. Participation theory is the basis for the conceptual model. A large number of undergraduate and graduate nursing students have been involved in the nontraditional delivery of services provided by the coalition. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the Lifestyle Directions Questionnaire are the health status outcome measures, and elder satisfaction, coalition effectiveness, and cost-savings measures are the process indicators. Elders reported healthier scores in six of the eight SF-36 dimensions, including general health, than the older US general population, but they also report that their amount of physical exercise and fiber intake is less than adequate. Overall, the elders express great satisfaction with the Healthy WAY programs but do not perceive as much ownership as do the coalition's agency professionals. Coalitions are emerging as a force for change and a public health strategy, and faculty members are encouraged to take seriously the opportunities afforded by them for proactive, advanced practice roles. PMID:9775633

  14. Trust dynamics in multi-agent coalition formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulski, Dariusz G.; Lewis, Frank L.; Gu, Edward Y.; Hudas, Greg R.

    2011-05-01

    We present a rigorous treatment of coalition formation based on trust interactions in multi-agent systems. Current literature on trust in multi-agent systems primarily deals with trust models and protocols of interaction in noncooperative scenarios. Here, we use cooperative game theory as the underlying mathematical framework to study the trust dynamics between agents as a result of their trust synergy and trust liability in cooperative coalitions. We rigorously justify the behaviors of agents for different classes of games, and discuss ways to exploit the formal properties of these games for specific applications, such as unmanned cooperative control.

  15. Liking and Power as Factors Affecting Coalition Choices in the Triad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacci, Peter L.; Tedeschi, James T.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of resource capability and interpersonal attraction on coalition behavior were studied. Introductory psychology students role played across three experimental conditions. Subjects were asked to select a coalition partner, predict formation of coalition, estimate winnings distribution. Male and female choices and predictions differed.…

  16. Ecological Contexts in the Development of Coalitions for Youth Violence Prevention: An Organizational Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Kimberly D.; Speer, Paul W.; Perkins, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions are a recognized strategy for addressing pressing public health problems. Despite the promise of coalitions as an effective prevention strategy, results linking coalition efforts to positive community outcomes are mixed. To date, research has primarily focused on determining organizational attributes related to successful…

  17. Testing a Comprehensive Community Problem-Solving Framework for Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Evelyn; Foster-Fishman, Pennie; Collins, Charles; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    Community problem solving is believed to help coalitions achieve community changes and subsequent population-level reductions in targeted community health problems. This study empirically examined a community problem solving model used by CADCA, a national coalition training organization, to determine if the model explains how coalitions become…

  18. Lessons from the Field: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions as Catalysts for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Theresa M.; Lenczner, Sarah J.

    This document describes a study of the organization, operation, sustainability, and impact of community anti-drug coalitions nationwide. The study involved case studies of eight highly effective community coalitions and a cross-case analysis of characteristics shared among the coalitions. A consistent set of distinguishing features was examined…

  19. Strategies for Building Local Literacy Coalitions as Seen through a Social Capital Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewiss, Jennifer; Pickard, Larissa Vigue

    2010-01-01

    Literacy coalitions have been organized in various settings, from small towns and cities to counties and states. Coalitions are alliances "created for the purpose of joint action [and] drawn together by common interests." Literacy coalitions promote the power and pleasure of reading and stimulate community conversations about literacy. This…

  20. The Effects of Leadership and Governance Processes on Member Participation in Community Health Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Maureen E.; Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effects of coalition leadership and governance on member participation in voluntary community health coalitions. Path modeling was used to explore how leadership and governance processes in coalitions affect existing member costs, benefits, and levels of participation. It was hypothesized that the effects of coalition…

  1. An Assessment of the Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition: Outcomes and Implications of a Regional Coalition Internal and External Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Heckert, Karen A; Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee; Hedson, Johnny; Tamang, Suresh; Palafox, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Significance The Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition Signifi(PRCC) provides regional leadership in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to implement the Regional Comprehensive Control Plan: 2007–2012, and to evaluate its coalition and partnerships. The Pacific Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED), aims to reduce cancer disparities and conducts evaluation activities relevant to cancer prevention and control in the USAPI. Purpose The PRCC Self (internal) and Partner (external) Assessments were conducted to assess coalition functioning, regional and national partnerships, sustainability, and the role of regionalism for integrating all chronic disease prevention and control in the Pacific. Methods Self-administered questionnaires and key informant telephone interviews with PRCC members (N=20), and representatives from regional and national partner organizations were administered (N=26). Validated multi item measures using 5-point scales on coalition and partnership characteristics were used. Chronbach's alphas and averages for the measures were computed. Results Internal coalition measures: satisfaction (4.2, SD=0.48) communication (4.0, SD=0.56), respect (4.0, SD=0.60) were rated more highly than external partnership measures: resource sharing (3.5, SD=0.74), regionalism (3.9, SD=0.47), use of findings (3.9, SD=0.50). The PRCC specifically identified its level of “collaboration” with external partners including Pacific CEED. External partners identified its partnership with the PRCC in the “coalition” stage. Principal Conclusions PRCC members and external partners are satisfied with their partnerships. All groups should continue to focus on building collaboration with partners to reflect a truly regional approach to sustain the commitment, the coalitions and the programming to reduce cancer in the USAPI. PRCC and partners should also work together to integrate all chronic disease prevention and control efforts in the Pacific. PMID

  2. Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Guide to Performance Management for Community Literacy Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatry, Harry; Morley, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Coalitions have key roles in helping their communities accomplish the following: (1) Track the level of literacy in the community; (2) Use that information to help identify what, and how much, literacy assistance is needed; (3) Assess the extent to which community literacy programs are meeting the need, including how well existing literacy…

  4. Unusual coalition seeks tighter NOx standards in northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-08-25

    A coalition of environmentalists and major Northeast-based companies, including one utility, have called for stringent new regionwide controls on nitrogen oxides emissions from power plants and industrial facilities. A letter to the Northeastern Governors said the North east could not effectively address its urban smog problem with out significantly tighter limits.

  5. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  6. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  7. Hospital-Based Coalition to Improve Regional Surge Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Terndrup, Thomas E.; Leaming, James M.; Adams, R. Jerry; Adoff, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Surge capacity for optimization of access to hospital beds is a limiting factor in response to catastrophic events. Medical facilities, communication tools, manpower, and resource reserves exist to respond to these events. However, these factors may not be optimally functioning to generate an effective and efficient surge response. The objective was to improve the function of these factors. Methods Regional healthcare facilities and supporting local emergency response agencies developed a coalition (the Healthcare Facilities Partnership of South Central Pennsylvania; HCFP-SCPA) to increase regional surge capacity and emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. The coalition focused on 6 objectives: (1) increase awareness of capabilities and assets, (2) develop and pilot test advanced planning and exercising of plans in the region, (3) augment written medical mutual aid agreements, (4) develop and strengthen partnership relationships, (5) ensure National Incident Management System compliance, and (6) develop and test a plan for effective utilization of volunteer healthcare professionals. Results In comparison to baseline measurements, the coalition improved existing areas covered under all 6 objectives documented during a 24-month evaluation period. Enhanced communications between the hospital coalition, and real-time exercises, were used to provide evidence of improved preparedness for putative mass casualty incidents. Conclusion The HCFP-SCPA successfully increased preparedness and surge capacity through a partnership of regional healthcare facilities and emergency response agencies. PMID:23316266

  8. Strengthening Ecological Mindfulness through Hybrid Learning in Vital Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy "tool" used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice,…

  9. Omnishambles: Reactions to the Second Year of Coalition Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The UK's Coalition Government completed its second year in office in May 2012. Many of its policies and pronouncements have been divisive and are contributing to the dismantling of the state education system as we have known it. Here, reflecting George Orwell's observation that "Every joke against the established order is a tiny revolution", Colin…

  10. Coalition in New York studies improving access to capital.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1992-11-16

    A coalition convened by the Greater New York Hospital Association is studying ways to improve access to capital, an area of healthcare reform the group says has been largely overlooked. The group, including representatives from hospitals, investment banking, accounting firms and the state, will issue a report outlining its recommendations. The findings also will be presented to the White House. PMID:10122217

  11. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the…

  12. Patient Safety Coalition: A Focus on Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, Jennifer; Kingery, Joanna; Fuller, James H; Nazir, Arif

    2015-12-01

    Indianapolis Coalition for Patient Safety, Inc engaged a citywide effort to reduce hospital readmissions of patients diagnosed with heart failure within 30 days of discharge. An innovative collaboration among interdisciplinary representatives of hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and home care agencies resulted in reduction in readmissions for patients with heart failure. PMID:26567496

  13. Who's who in the crew? Exploring participant involvement in the Active Living Coalition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Priscilla A; Schaefer, Samantha; Middlestadt, Susan; Knoblock, Heidi

    2015-06-01

    Health coalitions serve as an important "vehicle" to strengthen horizontal and vertical ties between organizations, community groups, and individuals whose intent and purpose is to improve wellness. Having a strong and diverse group of participants is essential for highly effective coalitions to carry out their mission in an organized and participatory manner. However, the extent that individuals become involved in coalition operations and activities remains ambiguous. A grounded theory approach was used to explore expressions of participant involvement of a local health coalition known as the Active Living Coalition (ALC). Open, axial, as well as domain and taxonomic coding were used to analyze transcripts from four focus groups (n = 37 participants) in order to develop a participant continuum that captured six network aggregates within the coalition. Findings suggest that participation, for the most part, was heterogeneous and ever-changing given the expectations of the level of partnership that best individuals' personal and professional interests. Differentiating the type of participants in health coalitions can help coalition leaders more successfully "manage" new and existing relationships. Findings imply that health coalitions can maximize coalition capacity by drawing upon the full range of potential human and material resources by further understanding the types of individuals that make up their network. PMID:25812479

  14. Community Prevention Coalition Context and Capacity Assessment: Comparing the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louis D; Chilenski, Sarah M; Ramos, Rebeca; Gallegos, Nora; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    Effective planning for community health partnerships requires understanding how initial readiness-that is, contextual factors and capacity-influences implementation of activities and programs. This study compares the context and capacity of drug and violence prevention coalitions in Mexico to those in the United States. Measures of coalition context include community problems, community leadership style, and sense of community. Measures of coalition capacity include the existence of collaborative partnerships and coalition champions. The assessment was completed by 195 members of 9 coalitions in Mexico and 139 members of 7 coalitions in the United States. Psychometric analyses indicate the measures have moderate to strong internal consistency, along with good convergent and discriminant validity in both settings. Results indicate that members of Mexican coalitions perceive substantially more serious community problems, especially with respect to education, law enforcement, and access to alcohol and drugs. Compared to respondents in the United States, Mexican respondents perceive sense of community to be weaker and that prevention efforts are not as valued by the population where the coalitions are located. The Mexican coalitions appear to be operating in a substantially more challenging environment for the prevention of violence and substance use. Their ability to manage these challenges will likely play a large role in determining whether they are successful in their prevention efforts. The context and capacity assessment is a valuable tool that coalitions can use in order to identify and address initial barriers to success. PMID:26205249

  15. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition: Preparing K-12 Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2001-03-01

    The American Physical Society (APS), in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP), has received partial funding to dramatically improve the science preparation of physics, physical science, and elementary teachers, nation-wide. This project will increase the role of physics departments, in collaboration with education departments, to create more and better-prepared future teachers. Over the next five years, the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) will be established with an initial membership of more than twenty-five universities and colleges that share an increasing interest in revising their program in teacher preparation. The APS/AAPT/AIP will provide leadership to the Coalition and will promote access to and dissemination of information and results of the Coalition's activities through national and regional meetings, conferences, workshops, and publications (including electronic sites). With the support of a one-year development grant from the NSF, the PhysTEC Leadership Team made three-day site visits to nine universities each seeking to become Primary Program Institutions (PPIs) and closed the planning grant activities with a conference held at the American Center for Physics in November, 2000. Following the November Conference, the PhysTEC leadership selected six PPIs who will receive support through the grant beginning in Year One. Two additional institutions will be added beginning in Year Three. We will present an update on PhysTEC plus reports from the perspective of the PPI sites.

  16. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition: Preparing K-12 Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2001-04-01

    The American Physical Society (APS), in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP), has received partial funding to dramatically improve the science preparation of physics, physical science, and elementary teachers, nation-wide. This project will increase the role of physics departments, in collaboration with education departments, to create more and better-prepared future teachers. Over the next five years, the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) will be established with an initial membership of more than twenty-five universities and colleges that share an increasing interest in revising their program in teacher preparation. The APS/AAPT/AIP will provide leadership to the Coalition and will promote access to and dissemination of information and results of the Coalition's activities through national and regional meetings, conferences, workshops, and publications (including electronic sites). With the support of a one-year development grant from the NSF, the PhysTEC Leadership Team made three-day site visits to nine universities each seeking to become Primary Program Institutions (PPIs) and closed the planning grant activities with a conference held at the American Center for Physics in November, 2000. Following the November Conference, the PhysTEC leadership selected six PPIs who will receive support through the grant beginning in Year One. Two additional institutions will be added beginning in Year Three. We will present an update on PhysTEC plus reports from the perspective of the PPI sites.

  17. The regenerative medicine coalition. Interview with Frank-Roman Lauter.

    PubMed

    Lauter, Frank-Roman

    2012-11-01

    Frank-Roman Lauter, Secretary General of the recently launched Regenerative Medicine Coalition, explains how the coalition was formed and what they hope to achieve. Frank-Roman Lauter has served as Secretary General of the Regenerative Medicine Coalition since 2012, and as Head of Business Development at Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies since 2007. Frank-Roman Lauter's interest is the organization of academic infrastructures to promote efficient translation of research findings into new therapies. He co-organizes joined strategy development for regenerative medicine clusters from seven European countries (FP7-EU Project) and has initiated cooperation between the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the German Federal Ministry for Education & Research, resulting in a joined funding program. Recently, he cofounded the international consortium of Regenerative Medicine translational centers (RMC; www.the-rmc.org ). Trained as a molecular biologist at the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin-Dahlem and at Stanford, he has 16 years of experience as an entrepreneur and life science manager in Germany and the USA. PMID:23210813

  18. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution a key policy `tool' used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice, is analysed using a form of reflexive monitoring and evaluation. The example focuses on a multi-stakeholder learning process around the transformation of a somewhat sterile pre-school playground into an intergenerational green place suitable for play, discovery and engagement. Our analysis of the policy-framework and the case leads us to pointing out the importance of critical interventions at so-called tipping points within the transformation process and a discussion of the potential of hybrid learning in vital coalitions in strengthening ecological mindfulness. This paper does not focus on establishing an evidence base for the causality between this type of learning and a change in behavior or mindfulness among participants as a result contributing to a vital coalition but rather focusses on the conditions, processes and interventions that allow for such learning to take place in the first place.

  19. Political coalitions and working women: how the tobacco industry built a relationship with the Coalition of Labor Union Women

    PubMed Central

    Balbach, Edith D; Herzberg, Abby; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess how the tobacco industry established a political relationship with the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW) and to learn from this example how tobacco control advocates can work more effectively with organisations with which working class women are affiliated. Methods The study reviewed tobacco industry documents to determine Tobacco Institute strategy, using the CLUW News and other published material to corroborate our findings. Results The Tobacco Institute was effective at framing excise tax and smokefree worksite issues in a way that facilitated CLUW's support of industry positions on these issues. The Tobacco Institute was also willing to reciprocate by providing financial and other kinds of support to CLUW. Conclusions While tobacco control missed an opportunity to partner with CLUW on smokefree worksites and excise taxes in the 1980s and 1990s, tobacco control can also use issue framing and reciprocity to form coalitions with organisations representing the interests of working women. PMID:17708008

  20. Reciprocal Relations between Coalition Functioning and the Provision of Implementation Support

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Shapiro, Valerie B.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalitions have been promoted as a strategy to help overcome challenges to the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based prevention programs. This paper explores the characteristics of coalitions that enable the provision of implementation support for prevention programs in general, and for the implementation of evidence-based prevention programs with fidelity. Longitudinal cross-lagged panel models were used to study 74 Communities That Care (CTC) coalitions in Pennsylvania. These analyses provide evidence of a unidirectional influence of coalition functioning on the provision of implementation support. Coalition member knowledge of the CTC model best predicted the coalition’s provision of support for evidence-based program implementation with fidelity. Implications for developing and testing innovative methods for delivering training and technical assistance to enhance coalition member knowledge are discussed. PMID:24323363

  1. What coalition factors foster community capacity? Lessons learned from the Fighting Back Initiative.

    PubMed

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Guckenburg, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    Coalitions build community capacity by encouraging local organizations to expand services, programs, or policies (i.e., organizational capacity). The aim of the study was to identify coalition factors--resources, lead agency, governance, and leadership--that foster organizational capacity. Thirteen coalitions funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Fighting Back (FB) Initiative were examined in a multiple-site case study where coalition served as the unit of analysis. Organizational capacity was measured by creating a scale for each community based on changes in programs, services, or policies among eight types of organizations. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted to identify relationships among organizational capacity and coalition factors. FB sites with greater organizational capacity shared seven characteristics: received more funds for coalition building; delayed establishing new lead agencies; were housed in agencies supportive of FB; maintained stable, participatory decision-making bodies; cultivated active involvement of local government; practiced collaborative leadership; and had effective, long-serving project directors. PMID:16861592

  2. Booker T. Washington Rediscovered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieze, Michael Scott, Ed.; Gasman, Marybeth, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Booker T. Washington, a founding father of African American education in the United States, has long been studied, revered, and reviled by scholars and students. Born into slavery, freed and raised in the Reconstruction South, and active in educational reform through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Washington sought to use…

  3. An incidental talonavicular coalition in a diabetic patient: a podiatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Shtofmakher, Garry; Rozenstrauch, Adam; Cohen, Randy

    2014-01-01

    A tarsal coalition is a pathological union of two or more tarsal bones. The authors present an incidental finding of a unilateral talonavicular (TN) coalition that was overlooked in a 57-year-old diabetic female with signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. This case highlights the clinical implications and important teaching points in recognising a TN coalition. This is particularly relevant for new, upcoming clinicians who may have never been exposed to this diagnostic rarity during clinical training. PMID:24827664

  4. An incidental talonavicular coalition in a diabetic patient: a podiatric perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shtofmakher, Garry; Rozenstrauch, Adam; Cohen, Randy

    2014-01-01

    A tarsal coalition is a pathological union of two or more tarsal bones. The authors present an incidental finding of a unilateral talonavicular (TN) coalition that was overlooked in a 57-year-old diabetic female with signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. This case highlights the clinical implications and important teaching points in recognising a TN coalition. This is particularly relevant for new, upcoming clinicians who may have never been exposed to this diagnostic rarity during clinical training. PMID:24827664

  5. 78 FR 52933 - Strengthening the Operating Framework and Furthering the Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating Standards and Therapies Initiative (U24) AGENCY: Food and Drug... Objectives The CFAST Initiative aims to accelerate clinical research and medical product development...

  6. Coalition-based multimedia peer matching strategies for P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunggon; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of matching users for multimedia transmission in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks and identify strategies for fair resource division among the matched multimedia peers. We propose a framework for coalition formation, which enables users to form a group of matched peers where they can interact cooperatively and negotiate resources based on their satisfaction with the coalition, determined by explicitly considering the peer's multimedia attributes. In addition, our proposed approach goes a step further by introducing the concept of marginal contribution, which is the value improvement of the coalition induced by an incoming peer. We show that the best way for a peer to select a coalition is to choose the coalition that provides the largest division of marginal contribution given a deployed value-division scheme. Moreover, we model the utility function by explicitly considering each peer's attributes as well as the cost for uploading content. To quantify the benefit that users derive from a coalition, we define the value of a coalition based on the total utility that all peers can achieve jointly in the coalition. Based on this definition of the coalition value, we use an axiomatic bargaining solution in order to fairly negotiate the value division of the upload bandwidth given each peer's attributes.

  7. An approach for characterising a coalition C4ISR architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, Aase; Main, Paul

    2004-07-01

    There is increasingly a requirement for new capabilities to operate in a coalition rather than just within a country's own network centric (or platform centric) force. This paper discusses an approach for characterising a coalition C4ISR architecture in the future timeframe, for the purpose of analysing information exchange and interoperability issues that may occur when introducing a new system into a mix of future systems and legacy systems with the requirement to ensure NCW readiness. To characterise the C4ISR environment two timeframes, 2010 and 2020, are envisaged for the architecture. These two timeframes represent different types of models of the architecture. The closer timeframe represents a physical model of the C4ISR environment, with the assumption that the time is no further out than what is covered by defence capability plans and knowledge about legacy systems that will still be in use. Its purpose is to allow constructive information exchange with potential future coalition partners regarding interfaces and interoperability. The distant timeframe is set beyond the plans for future capability development. However, known capabilities will still be present at that time. This timeframe represents a requirement and functional concepts model of the architecture. Its purpose is to allow the development of new concepts perhaps more aligned to NCW thinking. The approach utilises systems engineering as a basis for the process and a combination of architecture products for documentation. The work is supported by the use of a collaborative engineering environment and a number of common systems engineering tools such as DOORS, CORE and Systems Architect.

  8. Coalitions and networks: facilitating global physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Matsudo, Sandra Mahecha; Matsudo, Victor Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to synthesise the experience of coalitions and networks working for physical activity promotion. By introducing the concept of partnerships, especially within the Brazilian context, the authors outline the factors that comprise a successful partnership, describing key elements, such as, financing, membership and methods of empowerment. Agita São Paulo, the Physical Activity Network of the Americas-RAFA-PANA and Agita Mundo are used as examples. The article shows that local, national and global programmes, partnerships and networks at all levels are essential to guarantee the success of physical activity promotion as a public health strategy. PMID:17017291

  9. The Washington Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The Washington Report identifies legislation of interest to Indian people, namely the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1977, Navajo/Hopi Relocation Amendments, HR 12860, Supreme Court summaries, and bills which failed in the Congress. (RTS)

  10. The DELTA PREP Initiative" Accelerating Coalition Capacity for Intimate Partner Violence Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakocs, Ronda; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The DELTA PREP Project aimed to build the prevention capacity of 19 state domestic violence coalitions by offering eight supports designed to promote prevention integration over a 3-year period: modest grant awards, training events, technical assistance, action planning, coaching hubs, the Coalition Prevention Capacity Assessment, an…

  11. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  12. Benefits and Challenges in Building a Community Youth Development Coalition. REACH Issue Brief Series. Number One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David; Erbstein, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    How can the field of youth development move from being an assortment of valuable but often disconnected programs to become a coordinated system or sector with greater policy relevance? One strategy for working toward this goal involves building a community youth development coalition. Successful coalitions can take various forms, but most are…

  13. Special Interest Group Coalitions: Ethical Standards for Broad-Based Support Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodensteiner, Carol A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines case studies of coalitions formed by a for-profit corporation, a trade association, and a foreign government. Finds: coalitions perform an important role when representing public interest; media play a role as watchdogs but do not always rise to responsibility; and the public relations profession bears the brunt of public and media…

  14. Seven Principles of Success: A Primer for Business-Led Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Audrey; Creticos, Peter; McMahon, Amanda

    Intended to help business-led coalitions master the seven principles of success in education and workforce development, this primer begins with a discussion of the problems stemming from the structural transition underway in the U.S. economy, an overview of the 21st century workforce system, and the potential role of business-led coalitions in…

  15. Changes in Capacity among Local Coordinated Community Response Coalitions (CCRs) Supported by the DELTA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Pamela J.; Finkelstein, Daniel M.; Perez, Victoria E.; Rosenbach, Margo L.

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions are often the means through which communities plan and coordinate services for individuals and address larger environmental issues associated with social problems. Since 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has supported local coordinated community response coalitions (CCRs) in 14 states to prevent intimate partner…

  16. Sustainability: Building Program and Coalition Support. A Prevention 101 Series Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glider, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Given the prevalence of alcohol and other drug abuse and violence on campuses and in communities, programs and coalitions developed to prevent or intervene in these problems are faced with a challenging and long-term task. While the development of coalitions or campus-based prevention programs is a healthy start, these efforts must be sustained…

  17. A Coalitional Game for Distributed Inference in Sensor Networks With Dependent Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the problem of collaborative inference in a sensor network with heterogeneous and statistically dependent sensor observations. Each sensor aims to maximize its inference performance by forming a coalition with other sensors and sharing information within the coalition. It is proved that the inference performance is a nondecreasing function of the coalition size. However, in an energy constrained network, the energy consumption of inter-sensor communication also increases with increasing coalition size, which discourages the formation of the grand coalition (the set of all sensors). In this paper, the formation of non-overlapping coalitions with statistically dependent sensors is investigated under a specific communication constraint. We apply a game theoretical approach to fully explore and utilize the information contained in the spatial dependence among sensors to maximize individual sensor performance. Before formulating the distributed inference problem as a coalition formation game, we first quantify the gain and loss in forming a coalition by introducing the concepts of diversity gain and redundancy loss for both estimation and detection problems. These definitions, enabled by the statistical theory of copulas, allow us to characterize the influence of statistical dependence among sensor observations on inference performance. An iterative algorithm based on merge-and-split operations is proposed for the solution and the stability of the proposed algorithm is analyzed. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the superiority of our proposed game theoretical approach.

  18. Conceptual models to guide best practices in organization and development of State Action Coalitions.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Lazure, Linda; Morris, Kathy J; Valerio, Marilyn; Morris, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    The RWJF/AARP National Campaign for Action established a goal of establishing Action Coalitions in every state by 2012. Last year, a small Steering Committee formed in Nebraska and used two conceptual models to guide the organization and development of its Action Coalition. The purpose of this article is to present the Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy (ICOH) model that guided development of partnership and coalition building. The second model, Determining Program Feasibility, provided a framework for data collection and analysis to identify the opportunities and challenges for strategic program planning to accomplish identified key priorities for Nebraska. A discussion of the models' applications is included and offered as best practices for others seeking to form partnership/coalitions and establish action plans and priorities. PMID:22921306

  19. When and why do territorial coalitions occur? Experimental evidence from a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Detto, Tanya; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2010-05-01

    Neighboring territory owners are often less aggressive toward each other than to strangers ("dear enemy" effect). There is, however, little evidence for territorial defense coalitions whereby a neighbor will temporarily leave his/her own territory, enter that of a neighbor, and cooperate in repelling a conspecific intruder. This is surprising, as theoreticians have long posited the existence of such coalitions and the circumstances under which they should evolve. Here we document territorial defense coalitions in the African fiddler crab Uca annulipes, which lives in large colonies wherein each male defends a burrow and its surrounding area against neighbors and "floaters" (burrowless males). Fights between a resident and a floater sometimes involve another male who has left his territory to fight the floater challenging his neighbor. Using simple experiments, we provide the first evidence of the rules determining when territorial coalitions form. Our results support recent models that suggest that these coalitions arise from by-product mutualism. PMID:20302425

  20. Eider females form non-kin brood-rearing coalitions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ost, M.; Vitikainen, E.; Waldeck, P.; Sundstrom, L.; Lindstrom, K.; Hollmen, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Kilpi, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    Kin selection is a powerful tool for understanding cooperation among individuals, yet its role as the sole explanation of cooperative societies has recently been challenged on empirical grounds. These studies suggest that direct benefits of cooperation are often overlooked, and that partner choice may be a widespread mechanism of cooperation. Female eider ducks (Somateria mollissima) may rear broods alone, or they may pool their broods and share brood-rearing. Females are philopatric, and it has been suggested that colonies may largely consist of related females, which could promote interactions among relatives. Alternatively, shared brood care could be random with respect to relatedness, either because brood amalgamations are accidental and nonadaptive, or through group augmentation, assuming that the fitness of all group members increases with group size. We tested these alternatives by measuring the relatedness of co-tending eider females in enduring coalitions with microsatellite markers. Females formed enduring brood-rearing coalitions with each other at random with respect to relatedness. However, based on previous data, partner choice is nonrandom and dependent on female body condition. We discuss potential mechanisms underlying eider communal brood-rearing decisions, which may be driven by the specific ecological conditions under which sociality has evolved in this species.

  1. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. C.; Mench, J. A.; Karcher, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. PMID:25737565

  2. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J C; Mench, J A; Karcher, D

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. PMID:25737565

  3. Extension Professionals and Community Coalitions: Professional Development Opportunities Related to Leadership and Policy, System, and Environment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smathers, Carol A.; Lobb, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions play an important role in community-wide strategies to promote health and wellbeing, and Extension professionals may provide leadership, technical assistance, and other support to coalitions. Extension professionals across a Midwestern state were invited to participate in an online survey about their coalition involvement and…

  4. Bilateral Tarsal Coalition in a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Basketball Player: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Suits, Julie M.; Oliver, Gretchen D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present a case of bilateral subtalar joint coalition in a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I basketball player and the treatment plan that was used to manage the coalition from the beginning of conference play through the postseason. Background A 20-year-old male basketball athlete (height = 182.8 cm, mass = 83.4 kg) presented with bilateral subtalar joint tarsal coalition that became symptomatic in 2006 and resulted in constant pain with any form of activity. Differential Diagnosis Traumatic injury of the talocalcaneal joint. Treatment Nonsurgical intervention of conservative therapy was elected. Uniqueness Less than 13% of the overall population is affected with tarsal coalition, so it is safe to assume that very few athletes competing at the collegiate or elite level suffer from this condition. This is the first report in the literature to document conservative manual therapies used to manage the symptoms of subtalar joint tarsal coalition in a Division I basketball player. Conclusions After the intensive treatment program for tarsal coalition was implemented, the patient experienced pain relief and was able to continue to compete at a competitive level. This case represents the need to further explore and document a conservative treatment protocol for tarsal coalition. PMID:23182021

  5. Building Local Infrastructure for Community Adoption of Science-Based Prevention: The Role of Coalition Functioning.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Valerie B; Hawkins, J David; Oesterle, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    The widespread adoption of science-based prevention requires local infrastructures for prevention service delivery. Communities That Care (CTC) is a tested prevention service delivery system that enables a local coalition of community stakeholders to use a science-based approach to prevention and improve the behavioral health of young people. This paper uses data from the Community Youth Development Study (CYDS), a community-randomized trial of CTC, to examine the extent to which better internal team functioning of CTC coalitions increases the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention within 12 communities, relative to 12 matched comparison communities. Specifically, this paper examines the potential of both a direct relationship between coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention and a direct relationship between functioning and the coalition capacities that ultimately enable the adoption of science-based prevention. Findings indicate no evidence of a direct relationship between four dimensions of coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of a science-based approach to prevention, but suggest a relationship between coalition functioning and coalition capacities (building new member skills and establishing external linkages with existing community organizations) that enable science-based prevention. PMID:26017632

  6. Global change information support: A north-south coalition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1993-01-01

    On a daily basis we become more aware that our planet, earth, exists in a delicate balance; we, its inhabitants, must be informed caretakers. Global change communities have emerged around the globe to address this multidisciplinary subject. Information systems that integrate text, bibliographic, numeric and visual data are needed to support these global change communities. No one information center can hope to collect all the relevant data. Rather, we must form a coalition, North and South, to collect and provide access to disparate, multidisciplinary sources of information, and to develop standardized tools for documenting and manipulating this data and information. International resources need to be mobilized in a coordinated manner to move us towards this goal. This paper looks at emerging information technologies that can be utilized to build such a system, and outlines some cooperative North/South strategies.

  7. Emergency contraception for sexual assault victims: an advocacy coalition framework.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Mavis N

    2005-11-01

    A bill was introduced into the Tennessee legislature in the 2005 session that would require emergency departments to offer and dispense emergency contraception to sexual assault survivors who are at risk of pregnancy. Several advocacy groups collaborated to form the Women's Health Safety Network for the purpose of communicating as one voice. The advocacy coalition framework of policy development is applied to the political system and is used as a model to discuss issues impacting policy development for this particular bill. Key actors, proponents, and opponents to this bill are presented along with constraints to policy acceptance. The challenge for emergency contraception advocates on a state and national level is to keep the focus on public health science, the health and well-being of women, and out of the abortion debate. PMID:16443990

  8. A Tailored Approach to Launch Community Coalitions Focused on Achieving Structural Changes: Lessons Learned From a HIV Prevention Mobilization Study.

    PubMed

    Chutuape, Kate S; Willard, Nancy; Walker, Bendu C; Boyer, Cherrie B; Ellen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Public health HIV prevention efforts have begun to focus on addressing social and structural factors contributing to HIV risk, such as unstable housing, unemployment, and access to health care. With a limited body of evidence-based structural interventions for HIV, communities tasked with developing structural changes need a defined process to clarify their purpose and goals. This article describes the adaptations made to a coalition development model with the purpose of improving the start-up phase for a second group of coalitions. Modifications focused on preparing coalitions to more efficiently apply structural change concepts to their strategic planning activities, create more objectives that met study goals, and enhance coalition procedures such as building distributed coalition leadership to better support the mobilization process. We report on primary modifications to the process, findings for the coalitions, and recommendations for public health practitioners who are seeking to start a similar coalition. PMID:26785397

  9. Discovery day: A community coalition for science awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, X.K.; Sanders, J.; Bull, E.

    1994-12-31

    This is a science awareness outreach program which drew approximately half a percent of Monterey County`s inhabitants for one day of hands-on science activities. Monterey County is about half the size of Massachusetts, but with a relatively small population (376,000). Yet, children from more than 120 rural and urban schools, along with their parents participated in DISCOVERY DAY 1993. Discovery Day is an outgrowth of a 1989 science fair workshop attended by about 60 students. Explosive growth came after changing from a goal-oriented workshop theme to an activity-based hands-on program emphasizing participation, enjoyment and the fascination value of science. Scaled to larger metropolitan areas, this six hour science program drew as many attendees as a professional sports team; the difference for our event being that participants far outnumbered spectators. The event is sponsored by the Monterey County Science and Engineering Fair Coalition, which includes the Monterey County Herald, First National Bank of Central California, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey County Office of Education, Lyceum of Monterey County, Junior League of Monterey County, Naval Postgraduate School and the California American Water Company. The ownership of this event has expanded to a truly community-wide coalition as members of other organizations interested in science education provide activities, experiments and personnel. These include teachers from local elementary, middle and high schools, both public and private, community colleges, staff from the community hospital and the Monterey City Library, members of MOOSE (Monterey Organization Of Science Educators) and the local Sigma Xi Club. Local merchants contributed to insure success of this science awareness day. It was gratifying to observe that support for science education extended beyond our parocial circle of scientists.

  10. Washington Community Colleges Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre; Story, Sherie

    Detailed information on the 27 state-supported community colleges in Washington is presented in six sections. The first section, containing general information, describes the state system organization, lists the individual colleges, and reviews the roles of state agencies and presents a history of the system. A section on student information…

  11. Washington Community Colleges Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre

    The 109 tables and graphs in this six-chapter factbook present a statistical profile of the Washington Community College System for Fall 1979. Chapter I presents background information on the history and organization of the 27 state-supported colleges. Chapter II outlines data on annual and quarterly enrollments from 1969 through 1979; student…

  12. GIARDIASIS IN WASHINGTON STATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to determine the potential for transmission of giardiasis through approved drinking water supplies in Washington State. The project consisted of five studies: the first was conducted during trapping seasons (1976-1979) and resulted in examining of 656 beaver sto...

  13. Washington: Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  14. Washington School Finance Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    The proportion of state funding for public schools in Washington is among the highest in the nation: about 75 percent of school-district General Fund revenue comes from the state. Almost 60 percent of all state General Fund expenditures are for education (about 46 percent for grades K-12 and 12 percent for higher education). The state…

  15. Washington Community College Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    The history, administration, and governance of the Washington Community College System (WCCS) are analyzed in this seven-part report prepared for the state legislature. Part I presents background information on the WCCS's role and mission, history, students, programs, personnel, facilities, finances, student costs, and future. Part II discusses…

  16. Washington's Can Do Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Community Development, Olympia.

    Conceived as a state-supported community-sponsored program for families, strengthened by business and service organization support, and designed to work with local educational, child care, and social service agencies, Washington State's Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP, pronounced e-cap) provides a "whole child" preventative…

  17. Washington's Bold Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2008-01-01

    For more than a year, the debate, press coverage, and buzz in Washington, D.C., have swirled over whether someone so different--and so relatively inexperienced--can deliver sweeping change. And presidential hopeful Barack Obama hasn't been the only one receiving that kind of unrelenting scrutiny. This article describes Michelle Rhee who became…

  18. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  19. 75 FR 56651 - ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition Annual Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition Annual Meeting AGENCY... the 9th day of September 2010. John Augustine, Managing Director, ITS Joint Program Office....

  20. 78 FR 69660 - Association of Businesses Advocating Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission Customers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Transmission Customers, Illinois Industrial Energy Consumers, Indiana Industrial Energy Consumers, Inc., Minnesota Large Industrial Group, Wisconsin Industrial Energy Group, v. Midcontinent Independent System... Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission Customers, Illinois Industrial Energy Consumers,...

  1. A kernel-oriented model for coalition-formation in general environments: Implementation and results

    SciTech Connect

    Shehory, O.; Kraus, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a model for coalition formation and payoff distribution in general environments. We focus on a reduced complexity kernel-oriented coalition formation model, and provide a detailed algorithm for the activity of the single rational agent. The model is partitioned into a social level and a strategic level, to distinguish between regulations that must be agreed upon and are forced by agent-designers, and strategies by which each agent acts at will. In addition, we present an implementation of the model and simulation results. From these we conclude that implementing the model for coalition formation among agents increases the benefits of the agents with reasonable time consumption. It also shows that more coalition formations yield more benefits to the agents.

  2. Coalition Policy-Making under Constraints: Examining the Role of Preferences and Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Schermann, Katrin; Ennser-Jedenastik, Laurenz

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written about the formation and termination of coalitions, comparatively little attention has been paid to the policy output of multiparty governments. The present study attempts to narrow this research gap by analysing policy-making in three Austrian coalition governments between 1999 and 2008. Drawing on the party mandate literature, a manually coded textual analysis of election manifestos is conducted that yields a dataset containing over 1,100 pledges. The fulfilment of these pledges is taken as the dependent variable in a multivariate analysis. The results indicate that institutional determinants (adoption in the coalition agreement, ministerial control, and policy status quo) significantly influence the chances of pledge fulfilment and thus present a powerful predictor of coalition policy output. By contrast, factors related to parties’ preferences (consensus between parties, policy distance, pledge saliency, and majority support in parliament) do not have an impact. PMID:26770004

  3. Smoke-free Coalition Cohesiveness in Rural Tobacco-growing Communities

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Karen M.; Begley, Kathy; Riker, Carol; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Anderson, Debra; Adkins, Sarah; Record, Rachael; Hahn, Ellen J.

    2014-01-01

    Promoting tobacco control policies in rural tobacco-growing communities presents unique challenges. The purpose of this study was to assess smoke-free coalition cohesiveness in rural communities and identify coalition members’ perceived barriers or divisive issues that impede the development of smoke-free policies. A secondary aim was to evaluate differences in coalition cohesiveness between advocates in communities receiving stage-based, tailored policy advocacy assistance vs. those without assistance. Tobacco control advocates from 40 rural Kentucky communities were interviewed by telephone during the final wave of a 5-year longitudinal study of community readiness for smoke-free policy. On average, five health advocates per county participated in the 45-minute interview. Participants rated coalition cohesiveness as not at all cohesive, somewhat cohesive, or very cohesive, and answered one open-ended question about potentially divisive issues within their coalitions. The mean age of the 186 participants was 48.1 years (SD=13.3). The sample was predominantly female (83.6%) and Caucasian (99.5%). Divisive concerns ranged from rights issues, member characteristics, type of law, and whether or not to allow certain exemptions. Three of the divisive concerns were significantly associated with their rankings of coalition cohesiveness: raising tobacco in the community, the belief that smoke-free would adversely affect the economy, and government control. Educating coalition members on the economics of smoke-free laws and the actual economic impact on tobacco-growing may promote smoke-free coalition cohesiveness. More resources are needed to support policy advocacy in rural tobacco-growing communities as well as efforts to reduce the divisive concerns reported in this study. PMID:24338076

  4. Smoke-free coalition cohesiveness in rural tobacco-growing communities.

    PubMed

    Butler, Karen M; Begley, Kathy; Riker, Carol; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Anderson, Debra; Adkins, Sarah; Record, Rachael; Hahn, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    Promoting tobacco control policies in rural tobacco-growing communities presents unique challenges. The purpose of this study was to assess smoke-free coalition cohesiveness in rural communities and identify coalition members' perceived barriers or divisive issues that impede the development of smoke-free policies. A secondary aim was to evaluate differences in coalition cohesiveness between advocates in communities receiving stage-based, tailored policy advocacy assistance versus those without assistance. Tobacco control advocates from 40 rural Kentucky communities were interviewed by telephone during the final wave of a 5-year longitudinal study of community readiness for smoke-free policy. On average, five health advocates per county participated in the 45-min interview. Participants rated coalition cohesiveness as not at all cohesive, somewhat cohesive, or very cohesive, and answered one open-ended question about potentially divisive issues within their coalitions. The mean age of the 186 participants was 48.1 years (SD = 13.3). The sample was predominantly female (83.6%) and Caucasian (99.5%). Divisive concerns ranged from rights issues, member characteristics, type of law, and whether or not to allow certain exemptions. Three of the divisive concerns were significantly associated with their rankings of coalition cohesiveness: raising tobacco in the community, the belief that smoke-free would adversely affect the economy, and government control. Educating coalition members on the economics of smoke-free laws and the actual economic impact on tobacco-growing may promote smoke-free coalition cohesiveness. More resources are needed to support policy advocacy in rural tobacco-growing communities as well as efforts to reduce the divisive concerns reported in this study. PMID:24338076

  5. Recent developments: Washington focus

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    November was a quiet month in Washington. Although Congress has recessed until 1991, the Senate filled vacancies in party leadership positions created by November`s elections. The House is expected to proceed with its changes in early December. The Nuclear Energy Forum was held in Washington, DC on November 11-14 to discuss the status of the nuclear industry in the USA. The Forum, held in conjunction with the American Nuclear Society`s annual meeting, assembled a large number of CEO`s from US, European, and Far Eastern utilities and vendors. The meeting concluded with an announcement by Philip Bayne, President of NYPA and chairman of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), of the results of a year-long NPOC study entitled a {open_quotes}Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants.{close_quotes}

  6. Podiatrists Licensed in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia. Health Manpower Project.

    This survey, based on a 95 0/0 response rate, determined that of all the podiatrists licensed in the state of Washington, 69 0/0 live within the state, 95 0/0 were actively employed in that profession, and almost all were in private practice. The primary work function of 83 0/0 was direct patient care, and over half of the respondents worked 40 to…

  7. TATOOSH ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and geochemical surveys of the Tatoosh Roadless Area in Washington were conducted. The results indicate that none of the four parts comprising the roadless area are likely to contain mineral or energy resources. The geology of this part of the Cascade Range is poorly known, and a regionally focussed program of geologic mapping and geochemical sampling might discover areas of promising mineralization perhaps extending into the roadless area beneath the surface.

  8. Libby South Fire, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 9, 2001, a fire burned about 15 miles south of Twisp, Washington, that officials believe was caused by human error. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on the Terra satellite observed the fire, indicated with a red dot in this image, on July 10, after the fire had already consumed about 1,240 acres. On July 10, another fire-called the Thirty Mile Fire-trapped 21 firefighters and 2 civilians in a narrow canyon in the Chewuch River Valley, north of Winthrop, WA. (That fire did not erupt until later in the day after this image was acquired and is therefore not visible.) Tragically, four firefighters were killed and six people were injured, including the two civilians. Rolling debris, rugged and steep terrain, and limited access are impeding efforts to contain the now 8,200-acre fire, which according to current fire incident reports, is completely uncontained. Nearly all the areas in the full-size image, including Washington (center), Idaho (right), Oregon (bottom) are in a state of severe drought, which means the region could be in for another devastating fire season. Another fire is visible in Idaho in the full-size image just east of where Idaho borders with Washington and Oregon. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  9. A university, community coalition, and town partnership to promote walking.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sarah F; Williams, Joel E; Hickman, Powell; Kirchner, Amber; Spitler, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Less than half of all US adults report meeting physical activity recommendations of 30 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity on at least 5 days per week. Thus, community-wide ecological initiatives are needed to create environments that support incorporating physical activity into residents' daily lives. In this article we describe an ongoing collaborative service-learning partnership between Clemson University, a community coalition, and a neighboring small rural town to address local social and physical environment supports for walking. Years 1 to 3 of this collaborative initiative were evaluated using a mixed-method approach to assess physical environment changes, social environment changes, community perceptions of support for walking, community perceptions of collaborating with university students, and students' skill development. Results revealed several key environmental changes such as mapping and marking 3 walking trails in the community, development of broad marketing efforts linked to the trails that promote community health and heritage, and annual community events to promote walking and the newly developed walking trails. Interview data with community leaders identified several key themes critical to facilitating and enhancing our university and community collaboration. Lastly, students developed skills in developing partnerships, mapping, advocacy, event planning, critical reflection, and qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. Through this process community members and students learn evidence-based public health skills for using data and planning frameworks to guide local initiatives, engage community members in decision making, and conducting evaluations. PMID:21617413

  10. Forecasting Austrian national elections: The Grand Coalition model

    PubMed Central

    Aichholzer, Julian; Willmann, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting the outcomes of national elections has become established practice in several democracies. In the present paper, we develop an economic voting model for forecasting the future success of the Austrian ‘grand coalition’, i.e., the joint electoral success of the two mainstream parties SPOE and OEVP, at the 2013 Austrian Parliamentary Elections. Our main argument is that the success of both parties is strongly tied to the accomplishments of the Austrian system of corporatism, that is, the Social Partnership (Sozialpartnerschaft), in providing economic prosperity. Using data from Austrian national elections between 1953 and 2008 (n=18), we rely on the following predictors in our forecasting model: (1) unemployment rates, (2) previous incumbency of the two parties, and (3) dealignment over time. We conclude that, in general, the two mainstream parties benefit considerably from low unemployment rates, and are weakened whenever they have previously formed a coalition government. Further, we show that they have gradually been losing a good share of their voter basis over recent decades. PMID:26339109

  11. The Coalition for Plasma Science: Bringing Plasmas to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2003-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science is a group of institutions, organizations, and companies that have joined forces to increase awareness and understanding of plasma science and its many applications and benefits for society. The CPS undertakes a range of activities to support this goal. Members include national laboratories, universities, industries, and individuals. The CPS maintains a web page (http://www.plasmacoalition.org), and has developed several types of plasma-related publications. The web page includes a compilation of evaluated plasma web sites. The evaluations were conducted by teachers and based on national teaching standards. The web site also contains copies of CPS publications including the brochure ''Plasmas are Everywhere.'' Thousands of these brochures are distributed each year, and a poster version is now available. Another publication is the ''About Plasmas'' series. Each of these two-page papers (which is written for a general audience) is about a specific plasma-related topic, such as lighting, fusion, space plasmas and plasma decontamination of biological hazards. Papers on other topics are under development. The CPS also organizes educational luncheon/seminars for Members of Congress and their staff. The most recent seminar was given by David Newman on January 28th of this year and was his ''state of the universe'' address. A second seminar is planned this year on the topic of semiconductor manufacturing. Activities under discussion include a topical science fair award for a project on plasmas and the development of a broad, history-based educational web site.

  12. Washington v. Glucksberg.

    PubMed

    1997-06-26

    The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Washington's ban against assisted suicide "as applied to competent, terminally ill adults who wish to hasten their deaths by obtaining medication prescribed by their doctors." The Court refused to expand the liberty interest under the Due Process Clause of the U.S. constitution to include a right to commit suicide under it, a right to assisted suicide. The state has prevailing interests in the preservation of human life, the prevention of suicide, the integrity of the medical profession, the protection of vulnerable groups, and avoidance of a slippery slope into euthanasia. PMID:12041284

  13. State of Washington Department of Ecology criteria pollutants and toxic air pollutants phase 1 notice of construction for the Hanford site spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the air toxic and criteria pollutants resulting from operation of the Hot: Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA will be, discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This Phase I NOC is defined as, constructing the substructure, including but not limited to pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and `exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister overpack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase 11 NOC, will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSE), air emissions control equipment and emissions monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the !U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins; spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was `originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing.

  14. A Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, L.; Hehn, J.; Kass, J.; O'Grady, R.; Scotchmoor, J.; Stucky, R.

    2006-12-01

    For many of the problems facing contemporary societies, such as potential impacts of climate change, coastal degradation, reductions of fisheries stocks, volcanic and earthquake hazards in densely populated areas, quality and availability of water, and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources and development of alternative energy sources, formulation of wise public policy depends on evaluation of the state of geoscientific research in the relevant areas. In a democratic society, public discourse about and input to policy decisions on key issues affecting the public welfare requires a public that understands the scientific research process, values the contribution of science to society, and has a working knowledge of what science can and cannot yet say about specific issues. Arguably, that ideal falls short in contemporary American society. Disturbing trends in science education, low public scientific literacy, and increasing alarms about U.S. competitiveness have all been prominent national news topics in recent years. (1) A recent National Science Board report indicated that two-thirds of Americans do not understand what science is, how it is conducted, and what one can expect from it. (2) A recent Gallup poll reports widespread and increasingly prevalent belief in pseudoscience. (3) There is a growing public complacency about and disengagement from science at the very moment when the impact of science on public life is greater than ever. (4) The Business Roundtable of major U.S. companies notes that the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength. In response, a Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science COPUS has been initiated. Essential to COPUS is the premise that public understanding of science and the scientific process and an awareness of the impacts of scientific advancements on our quality of life are necessary to increase student interest in science as a

  15. Parent child coalitions: innovative public-sector management and early childhood development in Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Cottes, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    This article considers a coalition model of governance as an innovative approach to public management. In general, the coalition governance model adopts key principles of new public management and inherits criticisms similar to those levelled against the new managerialism. Looking at a case study of parent child coalitions in Manitoba, this article explores some benefits and consequences of implementing and utilizing coalition governance as a model for social policy. It finds that the attempt to increase child-centred programming across the province required innovative adjustments to the management of this social policy issue, as well as a restructuring of the overarching policy structure. Innovative public management and the implementation of a coalition governance approach helped transform early childhood development in Manitoba from a private and personal family concern to a public policy issue. It has increased citizen engagement and has also increased government access to a previously inaccessible segment of society. Although these innovations resolved some key concerns, additional criticisms remain as yet unaddressed. PMID:22165164

  16. Naviculocuneiform Coalition: Case Reports of Two Sibling Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Fournier, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Tarsal coalitions are an abnormal union between 2 tarsal bones. They occur most commonly between the calcaneus and talus or the calcaneus and navicular but can also arise from other joints in the foot. Isolated cases of coalitions between the medial cuneiform and navicular are extremely rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Treatment recommendations are, therefore, sparse, and no long-term follow-up data have been reported. We present the case of 2 sisters, each diagnosed with a symptomatic naviculocuneiform coalition. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in 2 first-degree relatives. Both sisters were involved in sports and presented with pain during physical activities. After conservative treatment had failed, they were both treated successfully with surgical excision of the coalition and arthrodiastasis, followed by a progressive return to activities. At the last follow-up examination at 5 and 3 years postoperatively, they remained pain free and fully involved in college soccer, making excision of a naviculocuneiform coalition with arthrodiastasis a valid treatment in the young athletic population. PMID:26489490

  17. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. PMID:25922335

  18. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  19. Early Learning in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    About 80,000 children enter kindergarten in Washington each year, and many lack basic language and behavioral skills--such as knowing letters and colors, following directions, getting along with others, and exhibiting impulse-control. In 2006, based on the recommendation of the Washington Learns Commission, Governor Christine Gregoire created the…

  20. Coalition readiness management system preliminary interoperability experiment (CReaMS PIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Peter; Ryan, Peter; Zalcman, Lucien; Robbie, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    The United States Navy (USN) has initiated the Coalition Readiness Management System (CReaMS) Initiative to enhance coalition warfighting readiness through advancing development of a team interoperability training and combined mission rehearsal capability. It integrates evolving cognitive team learning principles and processes with advanced technology innovations to produce an effective and efficient team learning environment. The JOint Air Navy Networking Environment (JOANNE) forms the Australian component of CReaMS. The ultimate goal is to link Australian Defence simulation systems with the USN Battle Force Tactical Training (BFTT) system to demonstrate and achieve coalition level warfare training in a synthetic battlespace. This paper discusses the initial Preliminary Interoperability Experiment (PIE) involving USN and Australian Defence establishments.

  1. Dressed to kill? Visible markers of coalitional affiliation enhance conceptualized formidability.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Holbrook, Colin; Dashoff, David

    2016-05-01

    Displaying markers of coalitional affiliation is a common feature of contemporary life. In situations in which interaction with members of rival coalitions is likely, signaling coalitional affiliation may simultaneously constitute an implicit challenge to opponents and an objective commitment device, binding signalers to their coalitions. Individuals who invite conflict, and who cannot readily back out of conflict, constitute a greater threat than those who avoid conflict and preserve the option of feigning neutrality. As a consequence, the former should be viewed as more formidable than the latter. Recent research indicates that relative formidability is summarized using the envisioned physical size and strength of a potential antagonist. Thus, individuals who display markers of coalitional affiliation should be conceptualized as more physically imposing than those who do not. We tested this prediction in two experiments. In Study 1, conducted with U.S. university students, participants inspected images of sports fans' faces. In Study 2, conducted with U.S. Mechanical Turk workers, participants read vignettes depicting political partisans. In both studies, participants estimated the physical formidability of the target individuals and reported their own ability to defend themselves; in Study 2, participants estimated the target's aggressiveness. Consonant with predictions, targets depicted as signaling coalitional affiliation in situations of potential conflict were envisioned to be more physically formidable and more aggressive than were those not depicted as signaling thusly. Underscoring that the calculations at issue concern the possibility of violent conflict, participants' estimates of the protagonist's features were inversely correlated with their ability to defend themselves. Aggr. Behav. 42:299-309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26847927

  2. 31 CFR 576.207 - Exemption for property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.207 Section 576.207... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS... coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibitions in § 576.201(a)(1) and (a)(2) shall not apply to property...

  3. 31 CFR 576.511 - Property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.511 Section 576.511 Money and..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations... States and their coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibition in § 576.201(a)(3) that deals with...

  4. 31 CFR 576.207 - Exemption for property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.207 Section 576.207... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS... coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibitions in § 576.201(a)(1) and (a)(2) shall not apply to property...

  5. 31 CFR 576.511 - Property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.511 Section 576.511 Money and..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations... States and their coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibition in § 576.201(a)(3) that deals with...

  6. 31 CFR 576.511 - Property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.511 Section 576.511 Money and..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations... States and their coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibition in § 576.201(a)(3) that deals with...

  7. 31 CFR 576.207 - Exemption for property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.207 Section 576.207... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS... coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibitions in § 576.201(a)(1) and (a)(2) shall not apply to property...

  8. 31 CFR 576.207 - Exemption for property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.207 Section 576.207... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS... coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibitions in § 576.201(a)(1) and (a)(2) shall not apply to property...

  9. 31 CFR 576.511 - Property controlled by the military forces of the United States and their coalition partners in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... forces of the United States and their coalition partners in Iraq. 576.511 Section 576.511 Money and..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations... States and their coalition partners in Iraq. The prohibition in § 576.201(a)(3) that deals with...

  10. The National Coalition for Sustained Optimal Iodine intake (NSOI): a case study of a successful experience from India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kapil; Chakrabarty, Arijit; Rah, Jee Hyun; Kumar, Rakesh; Aguayo, Victor; Ansari, Mohammad Anas; Sankar, Rajan; Karmarkar, Madhu Ganesh; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2014-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) constitute the single most important preventable cause of mental handicap at global level. Recognizing the importance of coordination and synergy of the activities of wide range of universal salt iodisation (USI) stakeholders, WHO/ Unicef/ ICCIDD has prescribed a national multi-sectoral coalition as one of the ten indicators essential for attaining sustainable elimination of IDD at national level. Challenge for coordination among different stakeholders of IDD/USI is even greater in democratic and diverse country like India. In the present article we present successful experience from India regarding formation of a national coalition and contributions made by the coalition towards promoting USI in India. The activities of the national coalition in India are classified into three phases; 1) Phase 1- year 2006 to 2009- the inception; 2) Phase 2- year 2009 to 2012- consolidation; 3) Phase 3- year 2013 and ongoing- expansion. The National coalition for Sustained Optimal Iodine Intake (NSOI) has been instrumental in ensuring greater coordination and synergy amongst IDD and USI stakeholders in India and partially responsible for the current 71 percentage household level coverage of adequately iodised salt. The most significant contribution of the national coalition has been to act as a high level advocacy channel and provide a platform for regular dialogue for all partners of the coalition. With "mission" approach and allocation of optimal resource, India can achieve and should achieve USI by 2015, an apt culmination of a decade of existence of the national coalition. PMID:25384725

  11. Working in Partnership with Local Colleges and Universities. A Series of Technical Assistance Manuals for Community Coalitions. Strategizer 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, William; Epstein, Joel C.

    This guide for community coalitions is designed to help them assist college and university officials address alcohol and drug problems on their campuses. The guide answers: (1) "How do college officials think about alcohol and other drug prevention?"; (2) "Why should community-based prevention coalitions include campus representatives?"; (3) "Who…

  12. Implementing Education for All--Whose Agenda, Whose Change? The Case Study of the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutt, Courtney; Kepe, Thembela

    2010-01-01

    With the onset of the Education for All (EFA) agenda in 1990, the international development community has seen new forms of international cooperation forming around the pledge for EFA. This paper analyzes a case study of activities and challenges of a civil society coalition, the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition (GNECC), in pursuing the…

  13. Managed competition. An analysis of consumer concerns. Single-Payer Coalition for Health Security.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    This analysis of managed competition was written by the Single-Payer Coalition for Health Security, a broad-based coalition of groups representing for the most part consumers of health care, including American Public Health Association; Church Women United; Citizen Action; Consumers Union; National Association of Social Workers; National Council of Senior Citizens; Neighbor to Neighbor; NETWORK: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby; Oil, Chemical & Atomic Workers International Union; Older Women's League; Physicians for a National Health Program; Public Citizen; United Cerebral Palsy Associations; and United Church of Christ. What follows is a substantial excerpt from their working paper, issued in January 1993. PMID:10126171

  14. Joint Real-Time Energy and Demand-Response Management using a Hybrid Coalitional-Noncooperative Game

    SciTech Connect

    He, Fulin; Gu, Yi; Hao, Jun; Zhang, Jun Jason; Wei, Jiaolong; Zhang, Yingchen

    2015-11-11

    In order to model the interactions among utility companies, building demands and renewable energy generators (REGs), a hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game framework has been proposed. We formulate a dynamic non-cooperative game to study the energy dispatch within multiple utility companies, while we take a coalitional perspective on REGs and buildings demands through a hedonic coalition formation game approach. In this case, building demands request different power supply from REGs, then the building demands can be organized into an ultimate coalition structure through a distributed hedonic shift algorithm. At the same time, utility companies can also obtain a stable power generation profile. In addition, the interactive progress among the utility companies and building demands which cannot be supplied by REGs is implemented by distributed game theoretic algorithms. Numerical results illustrate that the proposed hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game scheme reduces the cost of both building demands and utility companies compared with the initial scene.

  15. Breast Cancer in Young Women: Research Priorities. A Report of the Young Survival Coalition Research Think Tank Meeting.

    PubMed

    Korde, Larissa A; Partridge, Ann H; Esser, Michelle; Lewis, Stacy; Simha, Joy; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer in young women is a significant issue-7% of all female breast cancer is diagnosed in women under 40 years of age. Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) face significant and unique challenges, including a higher likelihood of biologically aggressive disease and metastatic disease at diagnosis, leading to poorer prognosis, more aggressive treatment and long-term treatment-related toxicities, and unique psychosocial concerns. This article summarizes the Young Survival Coalition (YSC) Research Think Tank Meeting, held in Arlington, Virginia, in February 2013, and presents the process that led to YSC's priorities for YWBC research. The meeting's participants focused on six broad categories of investigation in which additional advancements in research on YWBC are crucial: risk factors; treatment; fertility; pregnancy-associated breast cancer; quality of life and survivorship; and metastasis. Several key themes emerged from this meeting. Researchers and advocates felt that a large-scale data registry focused on YWBC is necessary to collect quality information to guide future research for YWBC. This database should include clinical data, genomic profiling of primary tumor and metastatic sites, and an increased focus on fertility and pregnancy following breast cancer treatment. The participants also felt that more must be done to elucidate how and why YWBC develop more aggressive tumors, and to what degree treatment should be modified for young women. The discussions summarized here led to the formulation of YSC's Research Agenda, published in May 2014. PMID:26812429

  16. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  17. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Annual Report, Year 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Year 8 Annual Report of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). Contents include: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Response to Recommendations of Prior Review Teams; (3) Major Accomplishments; (4) Faculty Development; (5) Outcomes Assessment; (6) Student Transitions; (7)…

  18. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Annual Report, Year 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Year 9 Annual Report of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). Contents include: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Response to Recommendations of Prior Review Teams; (3) Major Accomplishments; (4) Faculty Development; (5) Outcomes Assessment; (6) Student Transitions; (7)…

  19. The Planning of a Communications Coalition for Educational Change. Final Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Louis J.

    To overcome communications failures which tend to impede useful educational change and to achieve the goal of an educationally informed public, the feasibility of a Communications Coalition was investigated. Two other long term goals were identified: to promote a national concern for educational change and to design a system which would be…

  20. Vocational Education and Training in the Spotlight: Back to the Future for the UK's Coalition Government?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Alison; Unwin, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Coalition Government's plans for vocational education and training for 14- to 19-year-olds in England. It argues that new types of educational institutions will enable the emergence of new forms of segmentation in which the vocational track is likely to become split into 'technical education' and lower level 'practical…

  1. Policy and System Change and Community Coalitions: Outcomes from Allies against Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Lachance, Laurie; Doctor, Linda Jo; Gilmore, Lisa; Kelly, Cindy; Krieger, James; Lara, Marielena; Meurer, John; Friedman Milanovich, Amy; Nicholas, Elisa; Rosenthal, Michael; Stoll, Shelley C.; Wilkin, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We assessed policy and system changes and health outcomes produced by the Allies Against Asthma program, a 5-year collaborative effort by 7 community coalitions to address childhood asthma. We also explored associations between community engagement and outcomes. Methods: We interviewed a sample of 1,477 parents of children with asthma…

  2. Practical Child Safety Education in England: A National Survey of the Child Safety Education Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Caroline A.; Watson, Michael C.; Walsh, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the provision of practical safety education by Child Safety Education Coalition (CSEC) organizations in England. Design: A postal survey. Setting: Providers of child practical safety education who were also part of CSEC. Methods: In February 2010 all CSEC organizations were sent a self-completion postal questionnaire which…

  3. Unconscious vigilance: worldview defense without adaptations for terror, coalition, or uncertainty management.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Colin; Sousa, Paulo; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    Individuals subtly reminded of death, coalitional challenges, or feelings of uncertainty display exaggerated preferences for affirmations and against criticisms of their cultural in-groups. Terror management, coalitional psychology, and uncertainty management theories postulate this "worldview defense" effect as the output of mechanisms evolved either to allay the fear of death, foster social support, or reduce anxiety by increasing adherence to cultural values. In 4 studies, we report evidence for an alternative perspective. We argue that worldview defense owes to unconscious vigilance, a state of accentuated reactivity to affective targets (which need not relate to cultural worldviews) that follows detection of subtle alarm cues (which need not pertain to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty). In Studies 1 and 2, death-primed participants produced exaggerated ratings of worldview-neutral affective targets. In Studies 3 and 4, subliminal threat manipulations unrelated to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty evoked worldview defense. These results are discussed as they inform evolutionary interpretations of worldview defense and future investigations of the influence of unconscious alarm on judgment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:21644809

  4. The Coming Black/Hispanic Coalition. A Black View and An Hispanic View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Lillian; Arias, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Two journalists discuss political, economic, and social issues which unite Blacks and Hispanics and consider the problems which impede the formation of a formal political coalition between the two groups. Among the common issues identified are police brutality, voter registration, unemployment, health, housing, and the media. (GC)

  5. The Public Employment Program: An Evaluation by the National Urban Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Coalition, Washington, DC.

    The National Urban Coalition conducted this evaluation to determine the manner in which the provisions of the Emergency Employment Act of 1971 have been carried out, the problems raised by legislative and administrative guidelines, and the difficulties experienced in implementing projects locally. Some major findings were: (1) The Labor Department…

  6. Member and Affiliate Contact Directory. Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, College Park, MD.

    This directory is designed to assist local action groups (existing local alliances; science mathematics, and technology teachers; superintendents, principals, and supervisors; guidance counselors and resource specialists; and university and college professors) in making contact with the local structure of the Triangle Coalition for Science and…

  7. Evaluation and Community Prevention Coalitions: Validation of an Integrated Web-Based/Technical Assistance Consultant Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Gomez, Brendan J.; Puddy, Richard W.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Community coalitions (CCs) have labored with some difficulty to demonstrate empirical evidence of effectiveness in preventing a wide range of adolescent problem behaviors. Training and technical assistance (TA) have been identified as important elements in promoting improved functioning of CCs. A reliable, valid, and inexpensive method to assess…

  8. Voting Behavior, Coalitions and Government Strength through a Complex Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dal Maso, Carlo; Pompa, Gabriele; Puliga, Michelangelo; Riotta, Gianni; Chessa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the network of relations between parliament members according to their voting behavior. In particular, we examine the emergent community structure with respect to political coalitions and government alliances. We rely on tools developed in the Complex Network literature to explore the core of these communities and use their topological features to develop new metrics for party polarization, internal coalition cohesiveness and government strength. As a case study, we focus on the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament, for which we are able to characterize the heterogeneity of the ruling coalition as well as parties specific contributions to the stability of the government over time. We find sharp contrast in the political debate which surprisingly does not imply a relevant structure based on established parties. We take a closer look to changes in the community structure after parties split up and their effect on the position of single deputies within communities. Finally, we introduce a way to track the stability of the government coalition over time that is able to discern the contribution of each member along with the impact of its possible defection. While our case study relies on the Italian parliament, whose relevance has come into the international spotlight in the present economic downturn, the methods developed here are entirely general and can therefore be applied to a multitude of other scenarios. PMID:25549351

  9. Faculty Workload: Hours and Activities in Christian College Coalition and Small Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherren, Ann C.

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of faculty workload at Christian College Coalition schools and public counterparts found unionized schools more likely to be public, but faculty hour assignments and number of faculty activities granted load status did not differ significantly. Hour assignments were similar across schools. On average, load credit is awarded for seven…

  10. False Dawns, Bleak Sunset: The Coalition Government's Policies on Career Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Coalition Government's policies on career guidance are analysed. Its rhetorical concern for career guidance provision is based largely on its support for social mobility, and its recognition of the role of career guidance in moving towards a demand-led skills system. Initial policy statements affirmed its intention to establish an all-age…

  11. Against the Backdrop of "Brown: Testimonios of Coalitions" to Teach Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oesterreich, Heather A.; Conway, Allison P.

    2009-01-01

    This article utilizes "Brown v. Board of Education," which is traditionally taught in college and K-12 history courses as the case that both started the discussion about and ended the practice of segregation in schools, to highlight "testimonios of coalition" as a framework for historical analysis. First, the authors demonstrate how the fight for…

  12. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Annual Report, Year 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document contains the annual report for Year 7 of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). It features an Executive Summary, a response to recommendations of prior review teams, a description of major accomplishments, future plans, an evaluation, and reports on dissemination, industrial…

  13. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Annual Report: Year 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document contains the annual report for Year 6 of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). It features an Executive Summary, a response to recommendations of prior review teams, a description of major accomplishments, future plans, an evaluation, and reports on dissemination, industrial…

  14. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1998 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. Focus Team strategic plans for faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  15. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  16. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  17. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1999 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. This plan overviews faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  18. A Comprehensive Response to the Coalition: How Should We Approach Current Government Policies on Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    In this article the author offers a few interim thoughts on how those of us campaigning for a comprehensive future should think about, and publicly respond to, the education policies of the current Coalition government and the new direction of the Labour Party. (Contains 1 note.)

  19. The Military Child Education Coalition[TM]: Supporting Military Families during Deployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surles, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC[TM]) has recently released a new support for military families facing deployment, with the addition of another kit to its "Growing, Learning, and Understanding: Making Meaning through Early Literacy"[TM] (GLU[TM]) initiative. The GLU initiative focuses on developing early literacy skills in children…

  20. Co-Producing Early Years Policy in England under the Coalition Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Eva

    2014-01-01

    During the first half of the current Coalition Government, co-production--a form of participatory governance--was implemented widely in the conceptualization, design and implementation of early years policies. Seen as a revolutionary approach to public service reform, resulting in more effective and more cost-effective public services, the joint…

  1. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  2. The Coalition Approach to Improved Services for Handicapped Children in the Baltimore Region. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickey, Jane M.; Hartman, Barbara L.

    Presented is the final report of a 1-year project designed to determine the possibility of coordinating services for handicapped children in the Baltimore (Maryland) region by providing technical assistance to coalitions of decision makers at the local and regional levels. Some of the findings and conclusions drawn from the project are listed such…

  3. Building and Maintaining an Effective Campus-Wide Coalition for Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaslow, Nadine J.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Moffitt, Lauren; McLeod, Mark; Zesiger, Heather; Ammirati, Rachel; Berg, John P.; McIntosh, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Preventing suicide is a commonly shared priority among college administrators, faculty, staff, students, and family members. Coalitions are popular health promotion mechanisms for solving community-wide problems and are valuable in campus-wide suicide prevention efforts. This article provides an example of an effective suicide prevention…

  4. Non-Profit Coalition Launches Campaign to Double Charitable Gifts to $160-Billion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Anne Lowrey

    1986-01-01

    A coalition of 650 grant-making and non-profit organizations has begun a drive to double charitable giving by individuals in the United States and increase by 50% their volunteer activities by 1991, using national advertising and grassroots activities and focusing on the current highest givers of time and money. (MSE)

  5. National Jump$tart Coalition for Financial Literacy Benchmarks: Curriculum Inclusion and Pedagogical Practice in Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemme, Diane

    2002-01-01

    A survey of middle and high school family and consumer sciences teachers (99 of 300 responded) about financial topics identified by the National Jump$tart Coalition indicated that most high schools provided more instruction time than middle schools. Problem solving and decision making were most frequent processes. Only 46 schools offered separate…

  6. Grassroots Responsiveness to Human Rights Abuse: History of the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Laura; Martinez, Ramiro; Harner, Margaret; Harner, Melanie; Horner, Pilar; Delva, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how a community agency based in Washtenaw County, the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigration Rights (WICIR), emerged in response to increasing punitive immigration practices and human rights abuses toward the Latino community. The article discusses how WICIR is engaged in advocacy, community…

  7. The Transformative Power of Youth Action Coalition's Multimodal Arts-for-Change Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat; Way, Kate; Gray, Robin R. R.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the potential of a series of Youth Action Coalition's (YAC) Arts-for-Change (AfC) youth programs for literacy and identity development, as well as for engaging youth in addressing issues of social justice. Drawing primarily on transcripts of interviews, surveys, and participant-observation fieldnotes inventorying changes in…

  8. 78 FR 21928 - Demand Response Coalition v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Demand Response Coalition v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of... formal complaint against the PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (Respondent or PJM), alleging that certain...

  9. Fantasies of Empowerment: Mapping Neoliberal Discourse in the Coalition Government's Schools Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The swift nature of school reform enacted by the new Conservative-led coalition government has sparked debate over the future of state education in Britain. While the government rhetoric suggests a decisive break with past policies, there is evidence to suggest that these reforms constitute the next stage of a long revolution in education reform,…

  10. The Social Construction of Young People within Education Policy: Evidence from the UK's Coalition Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Since assuming power in May 2010, the UK's Coalition government has devoted considerable energy to formulating its policies with respect to young people. Evidence of this can be found in "Positive for youth: a new approach to cross-government policy for young people aged 13-19", a policy text that outlines a wide range of measures to be…

  11. Coalition Theory in Praxis: A Comparative Politics Simulation of the Cabinet Formation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaarbo, Juliet; Lantis, Jeffrey S.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a political science class simulation where groups of students assumed the roles of political parties in a mythical country with a parliamentary system. Students developed party platforms, held mock elections, and put together coalitions to back cabinet ministers. Includes all pertinent information on the mythical country and political…

  12. Case studies from community coalitions: advancing local tobacco control policy in a preemptive state.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Malinda R; Manion, Candida A; Hall-Harper, Vanessa D; Terronez, Kristina M; Love, Corey A; Chan, Andie

    2015-01-01

    Policies that shield people from the harm of tobacco exposure are essential to protect the health of the population. Coalitions have often led the way in safeguarding community health by promoting social norm change though policy adoption. In some states, tobacco control laws are weak, in part because of a tobacco industry tactic of prohibiting or pre-empting communities from enacting ordinances that are more protective. In spite of strong state-level preemptions, local coalitions in Oklahoma have implemented hundreds of voluntary policies in tobacco control that have improved the protection and health of their communities while not violating preemption. Three case studies of policy change are presented that exemplify the key approach of local coalitions working with strong allies and informed decision makers to establish tobacco-free businesses, schools, and outdoor recreational areas. In each of the cases, the policy changes surpassed the protection provided by the state laws and inspired additional policy changes. The key strategies and lessons learned may help tobacco control coalitions in other states limited by preemption to garner more support and momentum for important policy changes within their communities and states. PMID:25528703

  13. Unconscious Vigilance: Worldview Defense Without Adaptations for Terror, Coalition, or Uncertainty Management

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Colin; Sousa, Paulo; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Individuals subtly reminded of death, coalitional challenges, or feelings of uncertainty display exaggerated preferences for affirmations and against criticisms of their cultural in-groups. Terror management, coalitional psychology, and uncertainty management theories postulate this “worldview defense” effect as the output of mechanisms evolved either to allay the fear of death, foster social support, or reduce anxiety by increasing adherence to cultural values. In 4 studies, we report evidence for an alternative perspective. We argue that worldview defense owes to unconscious vigilance, a state of accentuated reactivity to affective targets (which need not relate to cultural worldviews) that follows detection of subtle alarm cues (which need not pertain to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty). In Studies 1 and 2, death-primed participants produced exaggerated ratings of worldview-neutral affective targets. In Studies 3 and 4, subliminal threat manipulations unrelated to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty evoked worldview defense. These results are discussed as they inform evolutionary interpretations of worldview defense and future investigations of the influence of unconscious alarm on judgment. PMID:21644809

  14. Family Resource Coalition Report. Focus: Families of Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Resource Coalition Report, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This special issue of a periodical focuses on building support and resources for families of children with special needs. It contains 13 articles in addition to descriptions of 10 programs serving special needs families at the local level, a list of 15 resource organizations and 10 publications/audiovisual aids, and a message from the coalition's…

  15. Religion, Advocacy Coalitions, and the Politics of U.S. Public Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugg, Catherine A.; Robinson, Malila N.

    2009-01-01

    Employing the Advocacy Coalition Framework to ground the analysis, this article begins with an historical overview of the US Protestant Right and its involvement with the politics of public schooling. It then moves to a discussion of a few current legal and policy issues (intelligent design, evolution, the Kansas state board of education, school…

  16. The Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition Government's "Free Schools" in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Free schools are new state-funded but privately-run schools set up under the academies legislation. Free schools represent the most overtly market-oriented policy within the Conservative-led Coalition government's school reform programme in England and have provoked intense controversy, centering on issues of pupil attainment, social equality,…

  17. Some Observations--Early Years of Committee/Coalition of Adult Education Organizations (CAEO). MSS 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.

    The first meeting of the Coalition of Adult Education Organizations (CAEO) was held in Syracuse in 1964 as a Conference of Adult Education Organizations. Its purpose was to obtain input to help determine the development of the Library of Continuing Education (LCE). Presidents, other officers or leaders of 17 organizations in Canada and the United…

  18. More of the Same? New Labour, the Coalition and Education: Markets, Localism and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to draw out the continuities and ruptures in current English education policy. In particular it considers the relationship between Coalition policy rhetoric and that of the Labour Party. Although the paper is concerned with the British and more specifically English context, it examines a range of questions that move beyond that…

  19. Voting behavior, coalitions and government strength through a complex network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dal Maso, Carlo; Pompa, Gabriele; Puliga, Michelangelo; Riotta, Gianni; Chessa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the network of relations between parliament members according to their voting behavior. In particular, we examine the emergent community structure with respect to political coalitions and government alliances. We rely on tools developed in the Complex Network literature to explore the core of these communities and use their topological features to develop new metrics for party polarization, internal coalition cohesiveness and government strength. As a case study, we focus on the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament, for which we are able to characterize the heterogeneity of the ruling coalition as well as parties specific contributions to the stability of the government over time. We find sharp contrast in the political debate which surprisingly does not imply a relevant structure based on established parties. We take a closer look to changes in the community structure after parties split up and their effect on the position of single deputies within communities. Finally, we introduce a way to track the stability of the government coalition over time that is able to discern the contribution of each member along with the impact of its possible defection. While our case study relies on the Italian parliament, whose relevance has come into the international spotlight in the present economic downturn, the methods developed here are entirely general and can therefore be applied to a multitude of other scenarios. PMID:25549351

  20. Community Prevention Coalition Context and Capacity Assessment: Comparing the United States and Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Louis D.; Chilenski, Sarah M.; Ramos, Rebeca; Gallegos, Nora; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Effective planning for community health partnerships requires understanding how initial readiness--that is, contextual factors and capacity--influences implementation of activities and programs. This study compares the context and capacity of drug and violence prevention coalitions in Mexico to those in the United States. Measures of coalition…

  1. Washington: A DC Circuit Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2010-12-01

    I explore the history of physics in Washington, D.C., and its environs through a tour of notable sites and personalities. Highlights include visits to the Smithsonian and Carnegie Institutions, stops at the Einstein Memorial, George Washington University, the University of Maryland, and the American Center for Physics, and biographical sketches of physicists Joseph Henry, George Gamow, Edward Teller, and others who worked in the District of Columbia.

  2. Coalition formation to address structural determinants of methamphetamine use in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Willard, Nancy; Srirojn, Bangorn; Thomson, Nicholas; Aramrattana, Apinun; Sherman, Susan; Galai, Noya; Celentano, David D; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Despite two recent government-sponsored 'wars on drugs', methamphetamine use continues to be a pervasive problem in Thailand. Out of concern for reported human rights abuses, there has been a call from the international community to take a different approach from the government's 'zero tolerance'. This paper describes the adaptation of the Connect to Protect® coalition formation process from urban U.S. cities to three districts in northern Thailand's Chiang Mai province, aimed to reduce methamphetamine use by altering the risk environment. Project materials, including manuals and materials (e.g. key actor maps and research staff memos), were reviewed to describe partnering procedures and selection criteria. Potential community partners were identified from various government and community sectors with a focus on including representatives from health, police, district and sub-district government officials. Of the 64 potential partners approached, 59 agreed to join one of three district-level coalitions. Partner makeup included 25% from the health sector, 22% who were sub-district government officials and 10% were representatives from the police sector. Key partners necessary for endorsement of and commitment to the coalition work included district-level governors, police chiefs and hospital directors for each district. Initial coalition strategic planning has resulted in policies and programs to address school retention, youth development initiatives and establishment of a new drug treatment and rehabilitation clinic in addition to other developing interventions. Similarities in building coalitions, such as the need to strategically develop buy-in with key constituencies, as well as differences of whom and how partners were identified are explored. PMID:24493782

  3. Coalition possibility of riparian countries via game theory and fuzzy logic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucukmehmetoglu, Mehmet; ŞEn, Zekai; Ã-Zger, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    In many respects, water resources allocation problems have fuzzy characteristics owing to uncertainty and imprecision not only as numerical data but also as linguistic data, in addition to the political nature of resource allocation. All classical techniques require numerical data and cannot treat linguistic data, but fuzzy inference systems (FIS) can deal with both types of data. Hence, it is suitable to reflect the dynamic nature of country benefits, reflective variations in the main drainage and subdrainage basin flows, and various system parameters in search of a coalition among a few riparian countries. The size of core, which is generated from a series of linear programming (LP) optimization models and game theory concepts, shows the potential extra benefit advantage of being in grand coalition to all parties, but it does not provide a sufficient condition to assemble a robust coalition unless an agreeable allocation scheme or principle is provided. In this respect, there is a fuzzy link between being in the grand coalition and percentage share received from a core. Hence, a proper FIS is proposed, and the necessary steps are developed with the Shapley value and the core as game theory methods, which provide a methodological base in the evaluation of possible allocation schemes among the parties. The application of the methodology is presented to search for coalition possibilities among the riparian countries: Turkey, Syria, and Iraq. Basic results are generated over the application of the Inter-Temporal Euphrates and Tigris River Basin Model, which is an optimization model for the allocation of scarce water resources considering agricultural and urban uses, energy generation, and conveyance costs in the Euphrates-Tigris basin.

  4. Experimental model in cadavera of arthroscopic resection of calcaneonavicular coalition and its first in-vivo application: preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Molano-Bernardino, Carlos; Bernardino, Carlos Molano; Golanó, Pau; Garcia, Maria Angeles; López-Vidriero, Emilio

    2009-11-01

    Open surgical resection of calcaneonavicular coalition is indicated after the failure of conservative treatment. Our objectives are to develop the arthroscopic surgical technique and to check the feasibility of the arthroscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular coalition. We designed and performed endoscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular ligament and part of the anterior process of calcaneus as a simulation of the coalition resection on four cadaver specimens. After this procedure, we successfully performed the first resection in a 12-year-old girl, without any soft tissue interposition. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot Scale was 55 before surgery, 98 after 10 weeks, and 100 after 2 years without recurrence. PMID:19623084

  5. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  6. Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity studies in the animal models are done to determine the dose level recommended for the treatment of disease as drug. This guideline enables the characterization of adverse effects following repeated daily inhalation exposure to a test. This chapter includes oral and dermal toxicity studies which are discussed as per OECD guidelines. Both acute and subacute toxicity studies are given special emphasis. PMID:26939270

  7. Geodetic strain measurements in Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two new geodetic measurements of strain accumulation in the state of Washington for the interval 1972-1979 are reported. Near Seattle the average principal strain rates are 0.07 + or - 0.03 mu strain/yr N19oW and -0.13 + or - 0.02 mu strain/yr N71oE, and near Richland (south central Washington) the average principal strain rates are -0.02 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N36oW and -0.04 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N54oE. Extension is taken as positive, and the uncertainties quoted are standard deviations. A measurement of shear strain accumulation (dilation not determined) in the epoch 1914- 1966 along the north coast of Vancouver Island by the Geodetic Survey of Canada indicates a marginally significant accumulation of right-lateral shear (0.06 + or - 0.03 mu rad/yr) across the plate boundary (N40oW strike). Although there are significant differences in detail, these strain measurements are roughly consistent with a crude dislocation model that represents subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate. The observed accumulation of strain implies that large, shallow, thrust earthquakes should be expected off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. However, this conclusion is not easily reconciled with either observations of elevation change along the Washington coast or the focal mechanism solutions for shallow earthquakes in Washington. -Authors

  8. Power and uneven globalization: Coalitions and energy trade dependence in the newly independent states of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Corina Herron

    2000-10-01

    The economies of the European former Soviet Union were dependent upon energy subsidies in the form of virtually free oil and natural gas imports from Russia, the loss of which implied dramatic shocks to domestic production structures, and the maintenance of which implied continued policy concessions to Russia. Yet some of these states actively pursued integration into the global economy while others sought to maintain the shelter of domestic markets and Russian energy subsidies. While the economic costs of openness and restructuring would be high in all cases in the short term, it is the political costs of openness and restructuring that determine the policy of the state. Where the high costs of restructuring are borne by a politically disenfranchised group, a consensus coalition can emerge in favor of rapid restructuring and energy reorientation. Where the benefits of the status quo accrue to a well-organized coalition closely allied with the state, a consensus coalition emerges in favor of maintenance of energy subsidies from and political relationship with Russia. Where the costs of restructuring are borne broadly or by a well-organized minority group, power oscillation and fragmentation will lead to inconsistent policy and slow progress toward energy reorientation and reform. Integrating a state-in-society approach to coalition formation within the field of international political economy, the author argues that states dominated by globalist-liberalizing-nationalist coalitions were able to implement energy trade reorientation by politically disenfranchising the ethnic minorities who populated the sector most vulnerable to energy contraction, heavy industry. These "globalizers," Estonia and Latvia, bore the high costs of restructuring industries and importing energy at world prices. Belarus, dominated by pro-Moscow-statist-leftist coalitions, sought to preserve energy subsidies through political and economic reintegration with Russia. States ruled by divided

  9. Networking expertise: Discursive coalitions and collaborative networks of experts in a public creationism controversy in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Experts do play a particular role in public socio-scientific debates, even more so if they form heterogeneous coalition with other actors and experts. A case study about a public science education controversy surrounding the teaching of evolution/creationism in the UK press is used to investigate in detail how connections and coalitions between experts and other actors involved in the controversy emerged and played out. The research focuses on the question of what role collaborative and other networks of experts played in terms of influence, visibility, credibility, consensus and weight of argument. Issues that are considered in the research are the status of the members of the coalitions forming during the debate and how it is displayed in media representations and letters and petitions, and also how these networks and coalitions of experts perform in relation to each other. PMID:23045882

  10. Networking expertise: discursive coalitions and collaborative networks of experts in a public creationism controversy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Experts do play a particular role in public socio-scientific debates, even more so if they form heterogeneous coalition with other actors and experts. A case study about a public science education controversy surrounding the teaching of evolution/creationism in the UK press is used to investigate in detail how connections and coalitions between experts and other actors involved in the controversy emerged and played out. The research focuses on the question of what role collaborative and other networks of experts played in terms of influence, visibility, credibility, consensus and weight of argument. Issues that are considered in the research are the status of the members of the coalitions forming during the debate and how it is displayed in media representations and letters and petitions, and also how these networks and coalitions of experts perform in relation to each other. PMID:23045882

  11. SEATTLE AIR TOXICS MONITORING PILOT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since January, 2000, the Washington Department of Ecology has been monitoring for air toxics at two sites in Seattle, Beacon Hill and Georgetown. The Beacon Hill site is in an area of high population density that reflects conditions in a "typical" urban residential neighborhood a...

  12. State of Washington Population Trends, 1975. Washington State Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Program Planning and Fiscal Management, Olympia.

    As of April 1, 1975, Washington's population was estimated at 3,494,124--an increase of 80,874 since 1970. Prepared yearly, this report presents tabular data pertaining to: (1) current April 1 estimates for cities, towns, and counties; (2) current decline in household size; (3) the use of postal vacancy surveys in estimating vacancy rates; and (4)…

  13. State of Washington Population Trends, 1977. Washington State Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Program Planning and Fiscal Management, Olympia.

    As of April 1, 1977, Washington's population was estimated at 3,661,975--an increase of 248,725 since 1970. Prepared yearly, this report presents data on the official April 1 population estimates for cities, towns, and counties; components of population change; planned population forecasting activities; procedures which help make the housing unit…

  14. Implementing change in health professions education: stakeholder analysis and coalition building.

    PubMed

    Baum, Karyn D; Resnik, Cheryl D; Wu, Jennifer J; Roey, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    The challenges facing the health sciences education fields are more evident than ever. Professional health sciences educators have more demands on their time, more knowledge to manage, and ever-dwindling sources of financial support. Change is often necessary to either keep programs viable or meet the changing needs of health education. This article outlines a simple but powerful three-step tool to help educators become successful agents of change. Through the application of principles well known and widely used in business management, readers will understand the concepts behind stakeholder analysis and coalition building. These concepts are part of a powerful tool kit that educators need in order to become effective agents of change in the health sciences environment. Using the example of curriculum change at a school of veterinary medicine, we will outline the three steps involved, from stakeholder identification and analysis to building and managing coalitions for change. PMID:17446631

  15. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  16. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio From the Americas

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine. PMID:19008524

  17. The distribution of individual cabinet positions in coalition governments: A sequential approach

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas M.; Müller, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multiparty government in parliamentary democracies entails bargaining over the payoffs of government participation, in particular the allocation of cabinet positions. While most of the literature deals with the numerical distribution of cabinet seats among government parties, this article explores the distribution of individual portfolios. It argues that coalition negotiations are sequential choice processes that begin with the allocation of those portfolios most important to the bargaining parties. This induces conditionality in the bargaining process as choices of individual cabinet positions are not independent of each other. Linking this sequential logic with party preferences for individual cabinet positions, the authors of the article study the allocation of individual portfolios for 146 coalition governments in Western and Central Eastern Europe. The results suggest that a sequential logic in the bargaining process results in better predictions than assuming mutual independence in the distribution of individual portfolios. PMID:27546952

  18. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    Some six or so physiological systems, essential to normal mammalian life, are involved in poisoning; an intoxication that causes severe injury to any one of them could be life threatening. Reversible chemical reactions showing Scatchard-type binding are exemplified by CO, CN- and cyclodiene neurotoxin insecticide intoxications, and by antigen-antibody complex formation. Haemoglobin (Hb) molecular biology accounts for the allosteric co-operativity and other characteristics of CO poisoning, CN- acts as a powerful cytochrome oxidase inhibitor, and antigen binding in a deep antibody cleft between two domains equipped with epitopes for antigen-binding groups explains hapten-specific immune reactions. Covalent chemical reactions with second-order (SN2) kinetics characterize Hg and Cd poisonings, the reactions of organophosphates and phosphonates with acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase and the reaction sequence whereby Paraquat accepts electrons and generates superoxide under aerobic conditions. Indirect carcinogens require cytochrome P450 activation to form DNA adducts in target-organ DNA and cause cancer, but a battery of detoxifying enzymes clustered with the P450 system must be overcome. Thus, S-metabolism competes ineffectively with target DNA for reactive vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites, epoxide hydrolase is important to the metabolism and carcinogenicity of alfatoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, etc.), and the non-toxic 2-naphthylhydroxylamine N-glucuronide acts as a transport form in 2-naphthylamine bladder cancer. VC liver-cancer pathogenesis is explicable in terms of the presence of the glutathione S-transferase detoxifying system in hepatocytes and its absence from the fibroblastic elements, and of the VC concentrations reaching the liver by different administrative routes. In VC carcinogenicity, chemical reactions give imidazo-cyclization products with nucleoside residues of target DNA, and in benzene leukaemia, Z

  19. Reducing diabetes health disparities through community-based participatory action research: the Chicago Southeast Diabetes Community Action Coalition.

    PubMed Central

    Giachello, Aida L.; Arrom, Jose O.; Davis, Margaret; Sayad, Judith V.; Ramirez, Dinah; Nandi, Chandana; Ramos, Catalina

    2003-01-01

    To address disproportionately high rates of diabetes morbidity and mortality in some of Chicago's medically underserved minority neighborhoods, a group of community residents, medical and social service providers, and a local university founded the Chicago Southeast Diabetes Community Action Coalition, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention REACH 2010 Initiative. A community-based participatory action research model guided coalition activities from conceptualization through implementation. Capacity building activities included training on: diabetes, coalition building, research methods, and action planning. Other activities sought to increase coalition members' understanding of the social causes and potential solutions for health disparities related to diabetes. Trained coalition members conducted epidemiologic analyses, focus groups, a telephone survey, and a community inventory. All coalition members participated in decisions. The participatory process led to increased awareness of the complexities of diabetes in the community and to a state of readiness for social action. Data documented disparities in diabetes. The participatory action research approach (a) encouraged key stakeholders outside of the health care sector to participate (e.g., business sector, church groups); (b) permitted an examination of the sociopolitical context affecting the health of the community; (c) provided an opportunity to focus on preventing the onset of diabetes and its complications; (d) increased understanding of the importance of community research in catalyzing social action aimed at community and systems change and change among change agents. PMID:12815078

  20. Three-body interactions in sociophysics and their role in coalition forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.; Samaniego-Steta, F.; del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Vázquez, G. J.

    2007-06-01

    An study of the effects of three-body interactions in the process of coalition formation is presented. In particular, we modify a spin glass model of bimodal propensities and also a Potts model in order to include a particular three-body Hamiltonian that reproduces the main features of the required interactions. The model can be used to study conflicts, political struggles, political parties, social networks, wars and organizational structures. As an application, we analyze a simplified model of the Iraq war.

  1. A national program for injury prevention in children and adolescents: the injury free coalition for kids.

    PubMed

    Pressley, Joyce C; Barlow, Barbara; Durkin, Maureen; Jacko, Sally A; Dominguez, DiLenny Roca; Johnson, Lenita

    2005-09-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and a major source of preventable disability in children. Mechanisms of injury are rooted in a complex web of social, economic, environmental, criminal, and behavioral factors that necessitate a multifaceted, systematic injury prevention approach. This article describes the injury burden and the way physicians, community coalitions, and a private foundation teamed to impact the problem first in an urban minority community and then through a national program. Through our injury prevention work in a resource-limited neighborhood, a national model evolved that provides a systematic framework through which education and other interventions are implemented. Interventions are aimed at changing the community and home environments physically (safe play areas and elimination of community and home hazards) and socially (education and supervised extracurricular activities with mentors). This program, based on physician-community partnerships and private foundation financial support, expanded to 40 sites in 37 cities, representing all 10 US trauma regions. Each site is a local adaptation of the Injury Free Coalition model also referred to as the ABC's of injury prevention: A, "analyze injury data through local injury surveillance"; B, "build a local coalition"; C, "communicate the problem and raise awareness that injuries are a preventable public health problem"; D, "develop interventions and injury prevention activities to create safer environments and activities for children"; and E, "evaluate the interventions with ongoing surveillance." It is feasible to develop a comprehensive injury prevention program of national scope using a voluntary coalition of trauma centers, private foundation financial and technical support, and a local injury prevention model with a well-established record of reducing and sustaining lower injury rates for inner-city children and adolescents. PMID:15958785

  2. Coalition for a Healthier Community: Lessons learned and implications for future work.

    PubMed

    Khare, Manorama M; Núñez, Ana E; James, Barbara F

    2015-08-01

    The Coalition for a Healthier Community (CHC) initiative was implemented to improve the health and well-being of women and girls. Underpinning CHC is a gender-based focus that uses a network of community partners working collaboratively to generate relevant behavior change and improved health outcomes. Ten programs are trying to determine whether gender-focused system approaches are cost-effective ways to address health disparities in women and girls. Programs implemented through coalitions made up of academic institutions, public health departments, community-based organizations, and local, regional, and national organizations, are addressing health issues such as domestic violence, cardiovascular disease prevention, physical activity, and healthy eating. Although these programs are ongoing, they have made significant progress. Key factors contributing to their early success include a comprehensive needs assessment, robust coalitions, the diversity of populations targeted, programs based on findings of the needs assessments, evaluations taking into consideration the effect of gender, and strong academic-community partnerships. A noteworthy impact of these programs has been their ability to shape and impact public, social, and health policies at the state and local levels. However, there have been challenges associated with the implementation of such a complex program. Lessons learned are discussed in this paper. PMID:25703608

  3. Coccidioidomycosis acquired in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Goldoft, Marcia; Ralston, Cindy; Limaye, Ajit P; Chua, Jimmy; Hill, Heather; Jecha, Larry; Thompson, George R; Chiller, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Clinical, laboratory, and epidemiologic evidence suggest that 3 individuals with acute coccidioidomycosis were exposed in Washington State, significantly beyond previously identified endemic areas. Given the patients' lack of recent travel, coccidioidomycosis was not suspected, leading to delays in diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and consider the diagnosis. PMID:23223598

  4. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  5. Teaching the March on Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, William P.; Euchner, Charles; Hill, Norman; Hill, Velma Murphy

    2013-01-01

    One of the most historical events in American history, the non-violent protest "March on Washington," August 28, 1963, is detailed in an article of remembrance by William P. Jones. His article is crowned by highlights from the "I Have a Dream" speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but also highlights the lessor known role…

  6. Project IEP: Washington State Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Linda M.

    The document reports the Washington component of Project IEP (individualized education program), a project designed to identify and clarify perceptions related to roles in the IEP process as mandated by P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. It is explained that under Project IEP approximately 200 persons (including state and…

  7. Washington State 1995 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Financial Management, Olympia.

    This document is intended to present, in tables and graphs, a diversity of information on Washington State, its people, economy, and government. The information was obtained from state and federal agencies and from private businesses. The data are organized into 11 major chapters which cover the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses):…

  8. Washington Education Association Directory, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement and Support of Education, Washington, DC.

    This directory presents profiles of 73 higher education associations located in the Washington, DC (and northern Virginia) area. Preliminary information includes an alphabetical list of the associations by full name and an alphabetical list by organizational acronym. Each profile includes the organization's address, telephone numbers, e-mail and…

  9. Washington Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, T. J.; Schelling, J.

    2012-12-01

    Washington State has participated in the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) since its inception in 1995. We have participated in the tsunami inundation hazard mapping, evacuation planning, education, and outreach efforts that generally characterize the NTHMP efforts. We have also investigated hazards of significant interest to the Pacific Northwest. The hazard from locally generated earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, which threatens tsunami inundation in less than hour following a magnitude 9 earthquake, creates special problems for low-lying accretionary shoreforms in Washington, such as the spits of Long Beach and Ocean Shores, where high ground is not accessible within the limited time available for evacuation. To ameliorate this problem, we convened a panel of the Applied Technology Council to develop guidelines for construction of facilities for vertical evacuation from tsunamis, published as FEMA 646, now incorporated in the International Building Code as Appendix M. We followed this with a program called Project Safe Haven (http://www.facebook.com/ProjectSafeHaven) to site such facilities along the Washington coast in appropriate locations and appropriate designs to blend with the local communities, as chosen by the citizens. This has now been completed for the entire outer coast of Washington. In conjunction with this effort, we have evaluated the potential for earthquake-induced ground failures in and near tsunami hazard zones to help develop cost estimates for these structures and to establish appropriate tsunami evacuation routes and evacuation assembly areas that are likely to to be available after a major subduction zone earthquake. We intend to continue these geotechnical evaluations for all tsunami hazard zones in Washington.

  10. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  11. 33 CFR 117.1049 - Lake Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Washington. 117.1049 Section 117.1049 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1049 Lake Washington. The draw of...

  12. 33 CFR 117.1049 - Lake Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Washington. 117.1049 Section 117.1049 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1049 Lake Washington. The draw of...

  13. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washington office. 4.4 Section 4.4 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS, AVAILABILITY... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office. The Washington office of the OCC is the...

  14. [Toxic polyneuropathies].

    PubMed

    Neundörfer, B

    1992-08-01

    Toxic factors may have damaging effects on the peripheral nerves at different sites: on the axon, on the myelin sheath, on the cell bodies and on the vasa nervorum. The toxic neuropathies can be divided up into polyneuropathies induced by drugs, by industrial, environmental and stimulant poisons. Mostly symmetrical sensory symptoms and signs are the first disturbances, often followed by symmetrical motor pareses. Some polyneuropathies induced by amiodarone, benzene, lead, cimetidine, chloroquine, dapsone, gentamycin, gold, imipramine, hexacarbons, nialamide, penicillin, triorthocresylphosphate and vincristine are primarily dominated by motory losses. Polyneuropathies induced by amitriptyline, ethylene, oxide, lead, chlorprothixene, heroin, hydralazine, methaqualone, nialamide and penicillin show an asymmetrical distribution pattern of the neural losses. In some types of toxic polyneuropathies the cranial nerves and the autonomic nerves are particularly involved. The clinical symptomatology of the most important types of toxic neuropathies are described shortly. The best therapy is, of course, termination of exposure to the toxic substance concerned. PMID:1509644

  15. 75 FR 20776 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel... establishing a temporary security zone in certain waters of Washington Channel on the Potomac River. The... (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC'' in the...

  16. INTERIOR VIEW, WATERSIDE MALL Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, WATERSIDE MALL - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. CLOSE VIEW ALONG WATERFRONT TO SHOW BULKHEAD Southwest Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE VIEW ALONG WATERFRONT TO SHOW BULKHEAD - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. VIEW OF THE REAR OF WATERSIDE MALL Southwest Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE REAR OF WATERSIDE MALL - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Tsunami Preparedness in Washington (video)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Washington distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Washington Emergency Management Division (EMD) and with funding by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program.

  20. Father Secchi Goes to Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. F.

    1994-12-01

    In 1848 a small group of Jesuit refugees arrived at Georgetown College near Washington, D.C. Among them was a young priest, Angelo Secchi, who had finished theology studies in Rome, but had not been able to complete his final examinations. This done successfully, Secchi turned to astronomy and the new facilities of the Georgetown College Observatory, directed by its founder, Fr. James Curley. During his two years in Washington, Secchi studied physics, wrote an article on Electrical Rheometry for the Smithsonian Institution, and formed a friendship with Matthew Fontaine Maury of the U.S. Navy, who headed the Chart Service and in 1844 was named superintendent of the National Observatory. This was later named the U.S. Naval Observatory. Secchi's friendships formed during the Washington visit proved most helpful for relations between European astronomers and U.S. colleagues. Secchi, after his return to Rome constructed the Observatory of the Collegio Romano atop the baroque Church of St. Ignatius in Rome and began his work in spectral classification of stars.

  1. Evaluation of soil bioassays for use at Washington state hazardous waste sites: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Blakley, N.; Norton, D.; Stinson, M.; Boyer, R.

    1994-12-31

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) is developing guidelines to assess soil toxicity at hazardous waste sites being investigated under the Washington Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. To evaluate soil toxicity, Ecology selected five bioassay protocols -- Daphnia, Earthworm, Seedling, Fathead Minnow, and Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay Xenopus (FETAX) -- for use as screening level assessment tools at six State hazardous waste sites. Sites contained a variety of contaminants including metals, creosote, pesticides, and petroleum products (leaking underground storage tanks). Three locations, representing high, medium, and low levels of contamination, were samples at each site. In general, the high contaminant samples resulted in the highest toxic response in all bioassays. The order of site toxicity, as assessed by overall toxic response, is creosote, petroleum products, metals, and pesticides. Results indicate that human health standards, especially for metals, may not adequately protect some of the species tested. The FETAX bioassay had the greatest overall number of toxic responses and lowest variance. The seedling and Daphnia bioassays had lower and similar overall toxic response results, followed by the earthworm and fathead minnow. Variability was markedly highest for the seedling. The Daphnia and fathead minnow variability were similar to the FETAX level, while the earthworm variability was slightly higher.

  2. Testing the metals hypothesis in Spokane, Washington.

    PubMed Central

    Claiborn, Candis S; Larson, Timothy; Sheppard, Lianne

    2002-01-01

    A >7-year, time-series, epidemiologic study is ongoing in Spokane, Washington, to examine the associations between ambient particulate constituents or sources and health outcomes such as emergency department (ED) visits for asthma or respiratory problems. One of the hypotheses being tested is that particulate toxic metals are associated with these health outcomes. Spokane is a desirable city in which to conduct this study because of its relatively high concentrations of particulate matter, low concentrations of potentially confounding air pollutants, variability of particulate sources, and presence of several potential particulate metals sources. Daily fine- and coarse-fraction particulate samples are analyzed for metals via energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Particulate sources are determined using receptor modeling, including chemical mass balancing and positive matrix factorization coupled with partial source contribution function analysis. Principal component analysis has also been used to examine the influence of sources on the daily variability of the chemical composition of particulate samples. Based upon initial analyses using the EDXRF elemental analyses, statistically significant associations were observed between ED visits for asthma and increased combustion products, air stagnation, and fine particulate Zn. Although there is a significant soil particulate component, increased crustal particulate levels were not found to be associated with ED visits for asthma. Further research will clarify whether there is an association between specific health outcomes and either coarse or fine particulate metal species. PMID:12194884

  3. Mass insurgency: the ratepayers' revolt and the Washington Public Power Supply System crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Sugai, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This essay critically examines the conditions leading to the emergence of mass insurgency in the American political setting and expands the traditional debate over the influence of social discontent versus organizational infrastructure in the outbreak of mass insurgency. It focuses on the ratepayer unrest in Washington during the first half of 1982 as a case of mass insurgency, and describes both the influence of the preceding Initiative 394 campaign in triggering mass ratepayer protests and the subsequent attempt at formal coalition among the various groups. The essay includes an account of both the institutional development surrounding the Washington Public Power Supply System's nuclear-power-generating projects and the organized opposition by local anti-nuclear challengers in the series of public initiative campaigns between 1976 and 1981. The discussion of antinuclear opposition is highlighted by an analysis of the I-394 campaign that argues the influence of the structured campaign setting in establishing the triggering effect of the termination of WPPSS projects 4 and 5 for the ratepayer insurgency. Based upon empirical data showing a historically unique combination of severe rate escalation and high unemployment, comparison with earlier unsuccessful initiative campaigns suggests the underlying economic basis of I-394's passage.

  4. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  5. Digitalis toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    These are symptoms of digitalis toxicity: Confusion Irregular pulse Loss of appetite Nausea , vomiting , diarrhea Fast heartbeat Vision changes (unusual), including blind spots, blurred vision, changes in how colors look, or ...

  6. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  7. An advocacy coalition framework analysis of the development of offshore wind energy in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marines

    Offshore winds blow considerably harder and more uniformly than on land, and can thus produce higher amounts of electricity. Design, installation, and distribution of an offshore wind farm is more difficult and expensive, but is nevertheless a compelling energy source. With its relatively shallow offshore waters South Carolina has the potential to offer one of the first offshore wind farms in the United States, arguably ideal for wind-farm construction and presenting outstanding potential for the state's growth and innovation. This study analyzes the policy process involved in the establishment of an offshore wind industry in South Carolina through the use of Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) concepts. The ACF studies policy process by analyzing policy subsystems, understanding that stakeholders motivated by belief systems influence policy subsystem affairs, and recognizing the assembly of these stakeholders into coalitions as the best way to simplify the analysis. The study interviewed and analyzed responses from stakeholders involved to different but significant degrees with South Carolina offshore wind industry development, allowing for their categorization into coalitions. Responses and discussion analysis through the implementation of ACF concepts revealed, among other observations, direct relationships of opinions to stakeholder's belief systems. Most stakeholders agreed that a potential for positive outputs is real and substantial, but differed in opinion when discussing challenges for offshore wind development in South Carolina. The study importantly considers policy subsystem implications at national and regional levels, underlining the importance of learning from other offshore wind markets and policy arenas worldwide. In this sense, this study's discussions and conclusions are a step towards the right direction.

  8. Optimal control for competitive-cooperative systems: Modeling flexible coalitions in tomorrow`s competitive world

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.

    1994-09-01

    The last years have witnessed a dramatic shift of the world`s military, political, and economic paradigm from a bi-polar competitive gridlock to a more fluid, multi-player environment. This change has necessarily been followed by a re-evaluation of the strategic thinking and by a reassessment of mutual positions, options, and decisions. The essential attributes of the new situation are modeled by a system of nonlinear evolution equations with competitive/cooperative interactions. The mathematical setting is quite general to accommodate models related to military confrontation, arms control, economic competition, political negotiations, etc. Irrespective of the specific details, all these situations share a common denominator, namely the presence of various players with different and often changing interests and goals. The interests, ranging from conflicting to consensual, are defined in a context of interactions between the players that vary from competitive to cooperative. Players with converging interests tend to build up cooperative coalitions while coalitions with diverging interests usually compete among themselves, but this is not an absolute requirement (namely, one may have groups with converging interests and competitive interactions, and vice-versa). Appurtenance to a coalition may change in time according to the shift in one`s perceptions, interests, or obligations. During the time evolution, the players try to modify their strategies as to best achieve their respective goals. An objective functional quantifying the rate of success (payoff) vs. effort (cost) measures the degree of goal attainment for all players involved, thus selecting an optimal strategy based on optimal controls. While the technical details may vary from problem to problem, the general approach described here establishes a standard framework for a host of concrete situations that may arise from tomorrow`s {open_quotes}next competition{close_quotes}.

  9. From local development policies to strategic planning-Assessing continuity in institutional coalitions.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo Rinaldi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In the last two decades, EU policies have had a fundamental role in orienting regional/local development. The objective of this work is set in this context as it intends to analyze the local development programs activated in Sicily in the last three programming periods. The main aim is to explore whether the EU partnership principle influenced cooperation among local actors, assessing the continuity of local institutional coalition in managing different local development programs within the regional development policy system. We focus, in particular, on Strategic Plans (SP) promoted in Sicily in the transition phase between the 2000-2006 and the 2007-2013 periods. PMID:27065045

  10. Perceptions of the Role of West Virginia’s Cooperative Extension Service in Tobacco Control Coalitions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Donald; Lester, Dana; Danberry, Kathy; Fink, Peggy Lambert; Owens, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that the consequences of tobacco use are well identified and known, it remains the single most preventable cause of disease and death in the United States. In West Virginia alone, the adult prevalence of cigarette smoking is 26.8%. This study researches the perceptions of the Cooperative Extension Service’s involvement and role in county-level coalitions that address tobacco use in West Virginia. The research findings provide practical areas to increase the role of the Extension Service in these vital efforts to save lives, reduce economic hardships on families, and reduce the health-care burden on the state government. PMID:27200336

  11. Coalition Warfare Program (CWP): secure policy controlled information query and dissemination over a Bices network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Andrew; Pham, Tien; Karr, Todd; Bent, Graham; Harries, Dominic; Knox, Alan

    2013-05-01

    In 2006, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) established a collaborative research alliance with academia and industry, called the International Technology Alliance (ITA) to address fundamental issues concerning Network and Information Sciences. Under the ITA research program, a US-UK transition project on "ITA Policy Controlled Information Query and Dissemination" was funded in 2011 by OSD's Coalition Warfare Program (CWP). The goal of this CWP project is to develop an extensible capability of performing distributed federated query and information dissemination across a coalition network of distributed disparate data/information sources with access­ controlled policies. The CWP project is lead by US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl) with software development by IBM UK and IBM US. The CWP project exploits two key technology components developed within the ITA, namely the Gaian Database and integrated Access Policy Decision and Enforcement mechanisms. The Gaian Database (GaianDB) is a Dynamic Distributed Federated Database (DDFD) that addresses a need to share information among coalition members by providing a means for policy-controlled access to data across a network of heterogeneous data sources. GaianDB implements a SQL-compliant Store-Locally-Query-Anywhere (SLQA) approach providing software applications with global access to data from any node in the database network via standard SQL queries. Security policy is stored locally and enforced at the database node level, reducing potential for unauthorized data access and waste of network bandwidth. A key metric of success for a CWP project is the transition of coalition-related technology from TRL-3 or 4 to TRL-6 or higher. Thus, the end goal of this CWP project was to demonstrate the GaianDB and policy technology within an operational environment at the NATO Intelligence Fusion Centre (NIFC) at Molesworth RAF. An initial

  12. A fast track to zero nuclear weapons: the Middle Powers Initiative and the New Agenda Coalition.

    PubMed

    Green, R

    2000-01-01

    The Middle Powers Initiative is a network of international citizen organizations working to encourage the nuclear weapon states and their influential allies to move rapidly to eliminate nuclear weapons via practical steps including a Nuclear Weapons Convention. The New Agenda Coalition is a group of middle-ranking nations whose governments have also called for the early elimination of nuclear weapons via similar steps. The work of MPI and NAC at the United Nations and elsewhere is described, and their impact on NATO nuclear weapons policy discussed. PMID:10824520

  13. Lessons in community health activism: the maternity care coalition, 1970-1990.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This study employed historical methodologies to explore the means through which the Maternity Care Coalition used grassroots activism to dismantle the power structures and other obstacles that contributed to high infant mortality rates in Philadelphia's health districts 5 and 6 during the 1980s. Infant mortality within the black community has been a persistent phenomenon in the United States. Refusing to accept poverty as a major determinant of infant mortality within marginalized populations of women, activists during the 1980s harnessed momentum from a postcivil rights context and sought alternative methods toward change and improvement of infant mortality rates. PMID:24892861

  14. Grassroots responsiveness to human rights abuse: history of the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Laura; Martinez, Ramiro; Harner, Margaret; Harner, Melanie; Horner, Pilar; Delva, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how a community agency based in Washtenaw County, the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigration Rights (WICIR), emerged in response to increasing punitive immigration practices and human rights abuses toward the Latino community. The article discusses how WICIR is engaged in advocacy, community education on immigration issues, and political action toward a more humane immigration reform. Detailed examples of human rights abuses and the WICIR activities described in response to the abuses serve as illustrations of social work advocacy, education, and policy formulation that affect the general public, policymakers, and law enforcement officials. PMID:23724575

  15. Relating Coalition Capacity to the Adoption of Science-Based Prevention in Communities: Evidence from a Randomized Trial of Communities That Care

    PubMed Central

    Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J. David

    2015-01-01

    Coalition-based efforts that use a science-based approach to prevention can improve the wellbeing of community youth. This study measured several coalition capacities that are hypothesized to facilitate the adoption of a science-based approach to prevention in communities. Using data from 12 coalitions participating in a community-randomized trial of the prevention strategy Communities That Care (CTC), this paper describes select measurement properties of five salient coalition capacities (member substantive knowledge of prevention, member acquisition of new skills, member attitudes toward CTC, organizational linkages, and influence on organizations), as reported by coalition members, and examines the degree to which these capacities facilitated the community leader reports of the community-wide adoption of a science-based approach to prevention. Findings indicated that the five coalition capacities could be reliably measured using coalition member reports. Meta-regression analyses found that CTC had a greater impact on the adoption of a science-based prevention approach in 12 matched pairs of control and CTC communities where the CTC coalition had greater member (new skill acquisition) and organizational capacities (organizational linkages). PMID:25323784

  16. Bringing Psychological Science to the Forefront of Educational Policy: Collaborative Efforts of the American Psychological Association's Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollin, Stephen A.; Subotnik, Rena F.; Bassford, Maya; Smulson, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The following article details the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education (CPSE). First, a brief history of the background and creation of the coalition is described. The article then details the projects, completed and ongoing, of the CPSE. Those projects include a Teacher…

  17. View of southeastern Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A vertical view of southeastern Washington States as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. The Snake River flows into the Columbia River in the most southerly corner of the picture. The Wallula Lake is below the junction of the two rivers. The Yakima Valley is at the southwestern edge of the photograph. The Columbia Basin is in the center of the picture. The Cascade Range extends across the northwest corner of the photograph.

  18. Tobacco Control and Health Advocacy in the European Union: Understanding Effective Coalition-Building

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Jeff; Amos, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions of supporters of comprehensive tobacco control policy have been crucial in achieving policy success nationally and internationally, but the dynamics of such alliances are not well understood. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured, narrative interviews with 35 stakeholders involved in developing the European Council Recommendation on smoke-free environments. These were thematically analyzed to examine the dynamics of coalition-building, collaboration and leadership in the alliance of organizations which successfully called for the development of comprehensive European Union (EU) smoke-free policy. Results: An alliance of tobacco control and public health advocacy organizations, scientific institutions, professional bodies, pharmaceutical companies, and other actors shared the goal of fighting the harms caused by second-hand smoke. Alliance members jointly called for comprehensive EU smoke-free policy and the protection of the political debates from tobacco industry interference. The alliance’s success was enabled by a core group of national and European actors with long-standing experience in tobacco control, who facilitated consensus-building, mobilized allies and synchronized the actions of policy supporters. Representatives of Brussels-based organizations emerged as crucial strategic leaders. Conclusions: The insights gained and identification of key enablers of successful tobacco control advocacy highlight the strategic importance of investing into tobacco control at European level. Those interested in effective health policy can apply lessons learned from EU smoke-free policy to build effective alliances in tobacco control and other areas of public health. PMID:25634938

  19. Flexible procedural interoperability across security and coalition boundaries using rapidly reconfigurable boundary protection definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    Existing configuration of boundary protection devices, which validate the content and context of information crossing between security domains, uses a set of accreditor-agreed steps individually agreed for every situation. This has traditionally been a slow and exacting process of negotiation between integrators and accreditors. The Decentralized Operation Procedure (DOP) technique allows interoperability definitions of system interactions to be created as XML files and deployed across the battlefield environment. By extending the security information definitions within the DOP technique, it is intended to provide sufficient incorporated information to allow boundary protection devices to also immediately load and utilize a DOP XML file and then apply established standards of security. This allows boundary devices to be updated with the same dynamism as the deployment of new DOPs and DOP interoperability definitions to also exploit coalitional capabilities having crossed security boundaries. The proposal describes an open and published boundary definition to support the aims of the MOD 23-13 Generic Base Architecture Defense Standard when working with coalition partners. The research aims are; a) to identify each element within a DOP that requires security characteristics to be described; b) create a means to define security characteristics using XML; c) determine whether external validation of an approved DOP requires additional authentication; d) determine the actions that end users will have to perform on boundary protection devices in support of these aims. The paper will present the XML security extensions and the results of a practical implementation achieved through the modification of an existing accredited barrier device.

  20. Measuring the progress of capacity building in the Alberta Policy Coalition for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Raine, Kim D; Sosa Hernandez, Cristabel; Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Reed, Shandy; Montemurro, Genevieve; Lytvyak, Ellina; MacLellan-Wright, Mary-Frances

    2014-07-01

    The Alberta Policy Coalition for Cancer Prevention (APCCP) represents practitioners, policy makers, researchers, and community organizations working together to coordinate efforts and advocate for policy change to reduce chronic diseases. The aim of this research was to capture changes in the APCCP's capacity to advance its goals over the course of its operation. We adapted the Public Health Agency of Canada's validated Community Capacity-Building Tool to capture policy work. All members of the APCCP were invited to complete the tool in 2010 and 2011. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t tests. Qualitative comments were analyzed using thematic content analysis. A group process for reaching consensus provided context to the survey responses and contributed to a participatory analysis. Significant improvement was observed in eight out of nine capacity domains. Lessons learned highlight the importance of balancing volume and diversity of intersectoral representation to ensure effective participation, as well as aligning professional and economic resources. Defining involvement and roles within a coalition can be a challenging activity contingent on the interests of each sector represented. The participatory analysis enabled the group to reflect on progress made and future directions for policy advocacy. PMID:24334541

  1. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  2. Actor coalitions and implementation in strategic delta planning: Opening the Haringvliet sluices in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2016-04-01

    The sustained development of urbanizing deltas is influenced by natural and societal processes. These processes are characterized by their long time span, in which conflicting interests of different stakeholders have to be reconciled. Reaching consent between actors is a challenge itself, but maintaining this consent throughout different stages of strategic planning - from advocacy and agenda setting to implementation - over these long periods of time is even more difficult. The implementation stage still includes many different actors involved, some of which are different than the ones who agreed before, due to both the long run of the strategic delta planning, and to a shift of tasks and responsibilities. Thus, implementation of strategic plans often features delays, deviations of agreed plans and unintended outcomes. A key question therefore is how coalition dynamics in (pre-)planning stages influence and are influenced by the coalition dynamics during implementation. The different stages in strategic planning are often studied from either a plan formulation or an implementation perspective, but the connection between the two proves an important bottleneck for strategic planning in deltas. For instance, many building with nature solutions are still in their pilot-phase, and their upscaling can profit from lessons concerning past implementation efforts. The proposed contribution will use the case of the management of the Dutch Haringvliet sluices and the decision ('Kierbesluit') in 2000 to put these sluices ajar, to study the link between the different strategic delta planning stages and the role of the formation and change of actor coalitions herein. With the completion of the Haringvliet dam with outlet sluices in 1970, the Haringvliet estuary of the rivers Rhine and Meuse was closed off from the sea, creating a fresh water lake. This was done to make the Dutch Southwest delta safe from flooding, and had positive effects for agricultural water supply and

  3. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  4. Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver: A Tandem of Adult Educators at Tuskegee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Leo

    1984-01-01

    Shows how Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver espoused adult education principles through their efforts to eradicate illiteracy, teach practical knowledge to Black farmers and poor Blacks, and instill the value of education in Black adults. (SK)

  5. Contributors to Adult Education: Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, Alain L. Locke, and Ambrose Caliver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyant, LaVerne

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the lives and the contributions to adult education made by the following African American educators: (1) Booker T. Washington; (2) George Washington Carver; (3) Alain L. Locke; and (4) Ambrose Caliver. (BJV)

  6. Tarsal Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... cartilage, or fibrous tissue, may lead to limited motion and pain in one or both feet. The ... bones. These bones work together to provide the motion necessary for normal foot function. Causes Most often, ...

  7. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  8. Recommendations for research priorities in breast cancer by the Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups Scientific Leadership Council: systemic therapy and therapeutic individualization.

    PubMed

    Sparano, Joseph A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gralow, Julie R; Perez, Edith A; Comis, Robert L

    2010-02-01

    Over 9,000 women with breast cancer are enrolled annually on clinical trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), accounting for about one-third of all patients enrolled on NCI-sponsored trials. Thousands are also enrolled on pharmaceutical-sponsored studies. Although breast cancer mortality rates have recently declined for the first time in part due to systemic therapeutic advances, coordinated efforts will be necessary to maintain this trend. The Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups convened the Scientific Leadership Council in breast cancer (BC), an expert panel, to identify priorities for future research and current trials with greatest practice-changing potential. Panelists formed a consensus on research priorities for chemoprevention, development and application of molecular markers for predicting therapeutic benefit and toxicity, intermediate markers predictive of therapeutic effect, pathogenesis-based therapeutic approaches, utilization of adaptive designs requiring fewer patients to achieve objectives, special and minority populations, and effects of BC and treatment on patients and families. Panelists identified 13 ongoing studies as High Priority and identified gaps in the current trial portfolio. We propose priorities for current and future clinical breast cancer research evaluating systemic therapies that may serve to improve the efficiency of clinical trials, identify individuals most likely to derive therapeutic benefit, and prioritize therapeutic strategies. PMID:19526354

  9. "Troops to Teachers": Implications for the Coalition Government's Approach to Education Policy and Pedagogical Beliefs and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipping, Alan

    2013-01-01

    On taking power the coalition government embarked on what many commentators believe is a radical programme of public policy reform. Under Michael Gove, education policy has become totemic to those arguing that Britain's classrooms are mired in academic mediocrity and behavioural failure. One policy response by the government has been to…

  10. Should We Have Faith in the Churches? Ten-Point Coalition's Effect on Boston's Youth Violence. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrien, Jenny; Winship, Christopher

    This paper describes the role of religious institutions in reducing youth violence in the inner city. The paper focuses on the Ten-Point Coalition, a group of ministers in Boston who have contributed in specific ways to reducing youth violence in that city. It analyzes the effectiveness of the police in reducing violence, pointing to the…

  11. Excellent Companies and Coalition-Building among the Fortune 500: A Value- and Relationship-Based Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laurie J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways a revolution in business management emphasizing people, values, integrity, and communication should also change the approach to public relations. Reviews research to demonstrate that coalition companies possess the characteristics of excellent companies. Argues that perhaps this community relations function will lead from the…

  12. Theorizing a Coalition-Engendered Education: The Case of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective's Body Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birden, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Concurring with Cunningham's assessment of the need for a counter-hegemonic vision of critical pedagogy in adult education thought and practice, this article theorizes a coalition-engendered education as a specific type of emancipatory pedagogy common in North America. Examining the Boston Women's Health Book Collective's body education as an…

  13. Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium Proceedings (3rd, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 12-14, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Leo H., Ed.; Stringer, L. Allison, Ed.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.

    This proceedings includes 18 papers and abstracts of papers presented at the third biennial research symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Following an introduction, "Strengthening the Foundations of Outdoor Education" (Anderson B. Young, Leo H. McAvoy), the papers and abstracts are: "Research in Outdoor Education: Our Place on…

  14. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: A Project Aimed at Integrating Primary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence within State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Kimberley E.; Zakocs, Ronda; Le, Brenda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a public health problem since the late 20th century. To spur IPV prevention efforts nationwide, the DELTA PREP Project selected 19 state domestic violence coalitions to build organizational prevention capacity and catalyze IPV primary prevention strategies within their states.…

  15. Report from the Steering Committee for the Coalition for Cohesive Policy in Addressing Barriers to Development & Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Howard; Taylor, Linda

    The 1997 national summit on barriers to student learning led to a proposal for the creation of a policy-oriented coalition of organizations with a stake in addressing barriers to development, learning, and teaching. The School Mental Health Project/Center for Mental Health in Schools at the University of California, Los Angeles, offered to play a…

  16. Into the Fray: How a Funders Coalition Restored Momentum for Early Learning in Minnesota. FCD Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Dave

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, a coalition of Minnesota foundations commissioned a local research organization to assess the state's ability to undertake a major improvement in school readiness and early learning services for disadvantaged children. The findings were discouraging. Richard Chase, working at the research arm of St. Paul's Amherst H. Wilder…

  17. Mobilizing Communities around HIV Prevention for Youth: How Three Coalitions Applied Key Strategies to Bring about Structural Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Sanchez, Kenia; Straub, Diane M.; Ochoa, Tara N.; Howell, Kourtney; Rivera, Carmen; Ramos, Ibrahim; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts must focus on altering features of the social and physical environment to reduce risks associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. Community coalitions provide a vehicle for bringing about sustainable structural changes. This article shares lessons and key strategies regarding how three community…

  18. Transformation, Trust and the "Importance of Teaching": Continuities and Discontinuities in the Coalition Government's Discourse of Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The imperative of transforming education continues to permeate the discourse of UK education reform. Although the Coalition government's publications herald a "new school system", they reveal the same neo-liberal thinking as their New Labour predecessors. The context of the national budget deficit is now being brought to bear to promote greater…

  19. Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium Proceedings (4th, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 9-11, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Karen M., Ed.; Foti, Pamela E., Ed.; McAvoy, Leo H., Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.; Ryan, Sean, Ed.; Johnson, Rebecca, Ed.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 13 papers from the 1998 Research Symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Following a preface "Building the Research Foundations of Outdoor Education" (Karen M. Fox, Leo H. McAvoy, Anderson B. Young), the entries are: (1) "An Integrative Review of the Literature on Women in the Outdoors" (Karla A.…

  20. International Coalition of Library Consortia Statement of Current Perspective and Preferred Practices for the Selection and Purchase of Electronic Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Libraries and Microcomputers, 1998

    1998-01-01

    The International Coalition of Library Consortia statement on provision of electronic information addresses current problems, needs for the future, and preferred practices in the emerging electronic-information environment. Specific topics include increasing expectations, budgets, fair use, archiving, the scholarly communications system, pricing,…

  1. International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC): Guidelines for Technical Issues in Request for Proposal (RFP) Requirements and Contract Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Libraries and Microcomputers, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents guidelines developed by the ICOLC (International Coalition of Library Consortia) regarding vendor contracts and negotiations that involve electronic information resources. Highlights include content issues, including HTML, use of printers, and use of multimedia; and platform issues, including system architecture, access control, security…

  2. Washington State biomass data book

    SciTech Connect

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  3. Booker T. Washington: Rural West Virginia Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Althea M.

    1985-01-01

    The biographical sketch focuses on the early teaching career of Booker T. Washington at Tinkersville School in his hometown of Malden, West Virginia, from 1876-1878. Recollections of Washington's own education in Sunday school, the Tinkersville School, and Hampton Institute are included. (NEC)

  4. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  5. 77 FR 61466 - Washington Disaster #WA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Washington Disaster WA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  6. 21 CFR 808.97 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washington. 808.97 Section 808.97 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.97 Washington....

  7. Early Childhood Injury Deaths in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    This paper discusses data on the deaths of children aged 1-4 years in Washington State. A two-fold approach was used in the analysis. First, Washington State death certificate data for 1979-85 were used to characterize the deaths and identify hazardous situations. Second, death certificates were linked to birth certificates of children born in…

  8. Person in Washington: Should You Have One?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recer, J. Dan

    1980-01-01

    A Washington-based fund-seeker is seen as necessary for helping institutions get a share of the billions in federal funds spent yearly in education. Responsibilities of a Washington representative are discussed, including knowing an institution's strong areas, knowing the agencies with jurisdiction over those areas, and connecting the two. (MLW)

  9. Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia.

    The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created to collect information regarding a variety of adolescent health behaviors among students in the state of Washington. It expands on two previous administrations of a student tobacco, alcohol, and other drug survey and includes questions about medical care, safety,…

  10. Corrections Education. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Washington State Department of Corrections contracts with community colleges to provide basic education and job training at each of the state's 12 adult prisons so upon release, individuals are more likely to get jobs and less likely to return. Washington State community colleges build a bridge for offenders to successfully re-enter…

  11. Reshaping the Image of Booker T. Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrell, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute and the recognized leader of American black people from 1895 until his death in 1915, has been viewed as an accommodationist to segregation, an African-American leader who traded black equality and voting rights for his own influence among white bigots. Washington rose to national fame with a…

  12. 50 CFR 32.67 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Washington. 32.67 Section 32.67 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.67 Washington. The following refuge...

  13. 40 CFR 81.348 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Washington. 81.348 Section 81.348 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.348 Washington. Washington—TSP Designated area Does...

  14. 40 CFR 81.348 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Washington. 81.348 Section 81.348 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.348 Washington. Washington—TSP Designated area Does...

  15. 50 CFR 32.67 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Washington. 32.67 Section 32.67 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.67 Washington. The following refuge...

  16. Frustration at Heart of Washington Rally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of educators, parent activists, and others are expected to convene in the heat and humidity of Washington next month for a march protesting the current thrust of education policy in the United States, especially the strong emphasis on test-based accountability. Organizers of the Washington say U.S. policymakers are moving in the wrong…

  17. Washington's Asian American Studies: Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashima, Tetsuden

    An overview of Asian American studies in the State of Washington is provided in this report. Statistics on the number of Asian students in Washington's schools are used to illustrate the need for Asian American courses at all educational levels. The results of three questionnaires which were distributed to obtain information about respondents'…

  18. Beyond toxicity

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide’s role in signaling. PMID:24398435

  19. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  20. The Cleveland–Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: “We Have Evolved”

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A.; Trapl, Erika S.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city’s food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland–Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context. PMID:26043301

  1. Human dynamics of spending: Longitudinal study of a coalition loyalty program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Il Gu; Jeong, Hyang Min; Choi, Woosuk; Jang, Seungkwon; Lee, Heejin; Kim, Beom Jun

    2014-09-01

    Large-scale data of a coalition loyalty program is analyzed in terms of the temporal dynamics of customers' behaviors. We report that the two main activities of a loyalty program, earning and redemption of points, exhibit very different behaviors. It is also found that as customers become older from their early 20's, both male and female customers increase their earning and redemption activities until they arrive at the turning points, beyond which both activities decrease. The positions of turning points as well as the maximum earned and redeemed points are found to differ for males and females. On top of these temporal behaviors, we identify that there exists a learning effect and customers learn how to earn and redeem points as their experiences accumulate in time.

  2. Evaluation of the Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution Program of the Baltimore Student Harm Reduction Coalition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dinah A; Park, Ju Nyeong; Vail, Laura; Sine, Mark; Welsh, Christopher; Sherman, Susan G

    2016-07-01

    Although historically the majority of overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND) programs have targeted opioid users, states are increasingly passing laws that enable third-party prescriptions of naloxone to individuals who may be able to respond to an overdose, including friends and family members of individuals who use opioids. In this report, we discuss the Baltimore Student Harm Reduction Coalition (BSHRC) OEND program, Maryland's first community-based, state-authorized training program under a new law allowing third-party naloxone prescription. In an 8-month pilot period, 250 free naloxone kits were distributed, and 3 overdose reversals were reported to BSHRC. Trainings were effective in increasing self-efficacy surrounding overdose prevention and response, which appears to persist at up to 12 months following the training. PMID:27077351

  3. The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: "we have evolved".

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colleen C; Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A; Trapl, Erika S; Borawski, Elaine A

    2015-01-01

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city's food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context. PMID:26043301

  4. Safety, Threat, and Stress in Intergroup Relations: A Coalitional Index Model.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Pascal; Firat, Rengin; van Leeuwen, Florian

    2015-07-01

    Contact between people from different groups triggers specific individual- and group-level responses, ranging from attitudes and emotions to welfare and health outcomes. Standard social psychological perspectives do not yet provide an integrated, causal model of these phenomena. As an alternative, we describe a coalitional perspective. Human psychology includes evolved cognitive systems designed to garner support from other individuals, organize and maintain alliances, and measure potential support from group members. Relations between alliances are strongly influenced by threat detection mechanisms, which are sensitive to cues that express that one's own group will provide less support or that other groups are dangerous. Repeated perceptions of such threat cues can lead to chronic stress. The model provides a parsimonious explanation for many individual-level effects of intergroup relations and group-level disparities in health and well-being. This perspective suggests new research directions aimed at understanding the psychological processes involved in intergroup relations. PMID:26177946

  5. ASTER Washington, D.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The White House, the Jefferson Memorial, and the Washington Monument with its shadow are all visible in this image of Washington, D.C. With its 15-meter spatial resolution, ASTER can see individual buildings. Taken on June 1, 2000, this image covers an area 14 kilometers (8.5 miles) wide and 13.7 kilometers (8.2 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The combination of visible and near infrared bands displays vegetation in red and water in dark grays. The Potomac River flows from the middle left to the bottom center. The large red area west of the river is Arlington National Cemetery.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands

  6. View of book shop on elevator reboarding level Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of book shop on elevator reboarding level - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 21. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST TOWARDS LINCOLN MEMORIAL AND WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST TOWARDS LINCOLN MEMORIAL AND WASHINGTON MONUMENT - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument 1910 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument - 1910 Japanese Flowering Cherry Trees , East Potomac Golf Course, East Potomac Park, Hains Point vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Thallium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Galván-Arzate, S; Santamaría, A

    1998-09-30

    Thallium (T1+) is a toxic heavy metal which was accidentally discovered by Sir William Crookes in 1861 by burning the dust from a sulfuric acid industrial plant. He observed a bright green spectral band that quickly disappeared. Crookes named the new element 'Thallium' (after thallos meaning young shoot). In 1862, Lamy described the same spectral line and studied both the physical and chemical properties of this new element (Prick, J.J.G., 1979. Thallium poisoning. In: Vinkrn, P.J., Bruyn, G.W. (Eds.), Intoxication of the Nervous System, Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 36. North-Holland, New York. pp. 239-278). PMID:9801025

  10. Hydrocarbons in Washington coastal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Carpenter, Roy

    1984-06-01

    The sources and distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbons are characterized in seventeen sediments from a highly river-influenced sedimentary environment off the southwestern coast of Washington. The major hydrocarbons are land-derived, introduced as preformed compounds and display long-term stability in sediment cores. A series of PAH of anthropogenic origin and two naturally derived compounds, retene and perylene, dominate the PAH composition in these sediments. Plantwax n-alkanes are the major aliphatic hydrocarbon constituents. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of marine origin, pristane and a series of four acyclic, multibranched C 25 polyolefins, are also observed in many sediments. The concentrations of these marine-derived hydrocarbons decrease to negligible levels rapidly with sediment depth from the sea-sediment interface, suggesting degradation. In general, the major land-derived hydrocarbons are concentrated in the midshelf silt deposit which extends northwestward along the continental shelf from the Columbia River mouth. A quantitatively more minor, natural series of phenanthrene homologs, also of terrestrial origin, is preferentially advected further offshore and deposited in continental slope sediments. These distributions are consistent with recognized particle associations for these compounds and sediment dispersal processes in this coastal environment. Sediment core records suggest the present pattern of dispersal has persisted for at least the past century and possibly since the Late Pleistocene.

  11. Rise and fall of endrin usage in Washington state fruit orchards: Effects on wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Grove, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the effects of endrin on wildlife was conducted from 1981 to 1983 in fruit orchards in central Washington state. The single post-harvest application of endrin as a rodenticide resulted in both acute and chronic toxicity to a variety of avian species. Most mortality occurred soon after application, but several raptors died during the spring and summer. Most wildlife sampled in the orchard system contained residues of endrin. There was on evidence that endrin depressed reproductive success.

  12. Characterization of "Hydrocarbon" Dry Cleaning in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Stephen G; Taylor, Jessie; Van Hooser, Linda M

    2015-09-01

    In King County, Washington, the most frequently used alternative solvent to perchloroethylene is a hydrotreated petroleum hydrocarbon. The objectives of the authors' study were to 1) determine the frequency of use of process chemicals used in "hydrocarbon" dry cleaning and gather other operational information; 2) chemically characterize the process chemicals; 3) characterize the still bottoms and separator water wastes according to dangerous waste and wastewater discharge regulations; 4) identify linkages between work practices, process chemicals, and the chemical composition of the waste streams; and 5) evaluate the aquatic toxicity of the hydrocarbon solvent and detergent. Many hydrocarbon dry cleaners are using process chemicals that contain hazardous substances, including trichloroethylene. One sample of separator water contained 13,000 µg/L trichloroethylene. This sample was determined to be federal hazardous waste, state-only dangerous waste (i.e., according to Washington state-specific regulations), and failed wastewater discharge thresholds. All still bottoms were determined to be state-only dangerous wastes. Efforts should be directed towards replacing hazardous spot cleaning chemicals with safer alternatives and ensuring that wastes are disposed of appropriately. PMID:26502560

  13. Assessing the Educational and Support Needs of Nursing Staff Serving Older Adults: A Case Study of a Community Coalition/ University Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Tam E.; Ziemba, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Given expected changes in demography and dependent care ratios, communities are preparing for the needs of older populations. Sometimes communities form coalitions to address health care needs. This case study evaluates a coalition/university partnership formed to assess the educational and support needs of nursing staff who are taking care of older adults across all service settings in one geographically defined community. A community-based coalition of 17 service providers contracted with researchers from an external university to determine the perceptions of three key stakeholder groups: older adults and their families; all levels of nursing staff; and agency administrators. By applying principles of Participatory Action Research (PAR) this case study presents the challenges faced in the community-based coalition/university research team partnership. This community/research partnership is unique, differing from most academic examples of PAR because nursing professionals as community members initiated the partnership. PMID:24652930

  14. Toxic chemicals and toxic laws

    SciTech Connect

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1991-08-30

    Recently there was consternation when it was discovered that a program intended to help minorities and the underprivileged in Detroit might have to be canceled. The reason was that some of the land on which new buildings were built was thought to contain toxic chemicals and therefore fell under the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (or Superfund). This collision of two valuable programs illustrates how a program originally heralded to carry out a worthwhile goal can become flawed. Since 1980, when the Superfund Act was passed by an overwhelming majority in Congress, only 34 of 1,245 identified priority sites have been cleaned up while approximately 40% of the money has been spent in trial litigation and administrative oversight. Critics, many of them within the EPA, point out that if the chemical danger level had been scientifically determined, approximately 90% of the truly important sites could have been cleaned up by now and the money wisely spent. However, the program was designed so that Congress initially did not have to raise much money or raise taxes and instead could argue that the program would not cost the taxpayer anything because it soaked the corporations. What needs to be done First, priority decisions should be taken out of the hands of nonscientists and lawyers and placed in those of scientists who are knowledgeable about toxic agents, who can identify effective targets objectively and who can establish workable priorities for removal of toxic waste. Second, a significant fraction of the money should be dedicated to research and to new programs that are more cost-effective. The purpose is to get chemical manufacturers thinking about reducing pollutants and the cost of cleanup when they plan to manufacture a chemical.

  15. The 1932 Veterans' Bonus March on Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Illustrates an innovative approach to teaching the 1932 Veterans' Bonus March on Washington DC. The teacher used instructional packets with 1930 nostalgia, the Pete Seeger album, "American Industrial Ballads," and film clips. An instructional guide is included. (GG)

  16. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David;

    2013-05-29

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  17. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

    2011-01-01

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  18. A Special Treat Awaits Zoophiles in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Edwards

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Amazonia exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, in Washington DC. The exhibit provides an example of the plant and animal life that exist in a tropical rain forest. (MDH)

  19. The Washington Library Network's Computerized Bibliographic System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jane Pobst

    1975-01-01

    Describes the development of the state of Washington's computer-assisted bibliographic system, along with its present batch-mode cataloging support subsystem and efforts toward on-line integrated acquisitions and cataloging support. (LS)

  20. Toxic terror

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence to either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.

  1. Mobilizing communities around HIV prevention for youth: how three coalitions applied key strategies to bring about structural changes.

    PubMed

    Chutuape, Kate S; Willard, Nancy; Sanchez, Kenia; Straub, Diane M; Ochoa, Tara N; Howell, Kourtney; Rivera, Carmen; Ramos, Ibrahim; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2010-02-01

    Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts must focus on altering features of the social and physical environment to reduce risks associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. Community coalitions provide a vehicle for bringing about sustainable structural changes. This article shares lessons and key strategies regarding how three community coalitions located in Miami and Tampa, Florida, and San Juan, Puerto Rico engaged their respective communities in bringing about structural changes affecting policies, practices and programs related to HIV prevention for 12-24-year-olds. Outcomes of this work include increased access to HIV testing and counseling in the juvenile correctional system (Miami), increased monitoring of sexual abuse between young women and older men within public housing, and support services to deter age discordant relationships (Tampa) and increased access to community-based HIV testing (San Juan). PMID:20166784

  2. A case study of conflict management in bonobos: how does a bonobo (Pan paniscus) mother manage conflicts between her sons and her female coalition partner?

    PubMed

    Legrain, L; Stevens, J; Alegria Iscoa, J; Destrebecqz, A

    2011-01-01

    Female coalitions are an important part of the social organization of bonobos. The strength of the mother-son relationship is another essential part of this social structure. A bonobo mother is therefore facing a dilemma when a conflict arises between her sons and her female coalition partners. Will she take her coalition partner's side and favour the social organization of the group or support her son in order to defend her offspring? In order to address this issue, we performed an observational study of the captive group at Planckendael (Belgium) and used social grooming and proximity to assess the relationship between individuals. As a case study, we focused on the relationships between Hortense, one of the group's mothers, her 3 sons Redi, Vifijo and Zamba, and her coalition partner Hermien. Surprisingly, we observed that Hortense preferentially supported her female coalition partner. For Hortense's social status in the group, it may be more important to maintain the strong relationship with her higher-ranking female coalition partner than to support her sons. PMID:22286277

  3. Consensus Report of the Coalition for Clinical Research—Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.; Bergenstal, Richard; Blonde, Lawrence; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Church, Timothy S.; Gaffaney, Jenifer; Jovanovič, Lois; Kendall, David M.; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Leippert, Claudia; DDG, Diabetesberaterin; Owens, David R.; Polonsky, William H.; Reach, Gérard; Renard, Eric; Riddell, Michael C.; Rubin, Richard R.; Schnell, Oliver; Siminiero, Linda M.; Vigersky, Robert A.; Wilson, Darrell M.; Wollitzer, Alison Okada

    2008-01-01

    The Coalition for Clinical Research—Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Scientific Board, a group of nine academic clinicians and scientists from the United States and Europe, convened in San Francisco, California, on June 11–12, 2008, to discuss the appropriate uses of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and the measures necessary to accurately assess the potential benefit of this practice in noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirteen consultants from the United States, Europe, and Canada from academia, practice, and government also participated and contributed based on their fields of expertise. These experts represent a range of disciplines that include adult endocrinology, pediatric endocrinology, health education, mathematics, statistics, psychology, nutrition, exercise physiology, and nursing. This coalition was organized by Diabetes Technology Management, Inc. Among the participants, there was consensus that: protocols assessing the performance of SMBG in noninsulin treated T2DM must provide the SMBG intervention subjects with blood glucose (BG) goals and instructions on how to respond to BG data in randomized controlled trials (RCTs);intervention subjects in clinical trials of SMBG-driven interventions must aggressively titrate their therapeutic responses or lifestyle changes in response to hyperglycemia;control subjects in clinical trials of SMBG must be isolated from SMBG-driven interventions and not be contaminated by physician experience with study subjects receiving a SMBG intervention;the best endpoints to measure in a clinical trial of SMBG in T2DM include delta Hemoglobin A1c levels, hyperglycemic events, hypoglycemic events, time to titrate noninsulin therapy to a maximum necessary dosage, and quality of life indices;either individual randomization or cluster randomization may be appropriate methods for separating control subjects from SMBG intervention subjects, provided that precautions are taken to avoid bias and that the

  4. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Forest Practices Act, RCW 76.09. (5) Washington Water Code, RCW 90.03. (6) Washington Water Pollution Control Act, RCW 90.48. (7) Washington Minimum Water Flows and Levels Act, RCW 90.22. (8) Washington....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  5. Subtalar Joint Distraction Arthrodesis to Correct Calcaneal Valgus in Pediatric Patients with Tarsal Coalition: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jaclyn M; Kihm, Carl A; Camasta, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Subtalar joint middle facet coalitions commonly present in children who have a painful, rigid, pes planovalgus foot type. The middle facet coalition allows rearfoot forces to be distributed medially through the coalition, and this can result in arthritis or lateral tarsal wedging. The senior author has used a wedged bone graft distraction subtalar joint arthrodesis to correct calcaneal valgus and restore the talar height in these patients. The tight, press-fit nature of the tricortical iliac crest allograft provides stability and can negate the need for internal fixation. We retrospectively reviewed 9 pediatric subtalar joint distraction arthrodesis procedures performed on 8 patients during a 6-year period. All patients began weightbearing at 6 weeks after surgery. All patients had osseous union, and no complications developed that required a second surgery. The clinical outcomes, assessed at a mean of 25.5 (range, 6.3 to 75.8) months postoperatively, were satisfactory. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 90.1 (range, 79 to 94), on a 94-point scale. The wedged distraction arthrodesis technique has not been previously described for correction of pediatric patients with lateral tarsal wedging, but it is an effective option and yields successful outcomes. PMID:25704449

  6. Reducing disparities for African Americans with diabetes: progress made by the REACH 2010 Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Carolyn; McNary, Sara; Carlson, Barbara A.; King, Marilyn Givens; Hossler, Charles L.; Magwood, Gayenell; Zheng, Deyi; Hendrix, Katharine; Beck, Lorna Shelton; Linnen, Florene; Thomas, Virginia; Powell, Sheila; Ma'at, Imani

    2004-01-01

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH 2010) is a U.S.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstration program that responds to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' goal to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health status by the year 2010. As part of REACH 2010, community projects were funded to develop, implement, and evaluate community action plans to improve health care and outcomes for racial and ethnic populations. This article describes the program and details the progress of the REACH 2010: Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition in reducing disparities in care. Approaches employed by the Coalition included community development, empowerment, and education related to diabetes; health systems change associated with access, care, and education; and coalition advocacy. Racial disparities were identified for 12,000 African Americans with diabetes in this urban/rural South Carolina community. After 24 months, significant differences that initially ranged from 11% to 28% in African Americans (when compared with whites/others) were not observed on 270 chart audits for A1C, lipid and kidney testing, eye examinations, and blood pressure control. Future efforts will focus on maintaining progress, eliminating other disparities, and identifying the contributions of each intervention in eliminating racial disparities. PMID:15158111

  7. Conceptualization of a Health Care Coalition Framework in Georgia Based on the Existing Regional Coordinating Hospital Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Harris, Curtis; Waltz, Tawny; O'Neal, James Patrick; Nadeau, Kelly; Crumpton, Matthew; Ervin, Sara

    2016-02-01

    The watershed events of September 11, 2001; the anthrax attacks; Hurricane Katrina; and H1N1 necessitated that the United States define alternative mechanisms for disaster response. Specifically, there was a need to shift from a capacity building approach to a capabilities based approach that would place more emphasis on the health care community rather than just first responders. Georgia responded to this initiative by creating a Regional Coordinating Hospital (RCH) infrastructure that was responsible for coordinating regional responses within their individual geographic footprint. However, it was quickly realized that hospitals could not accomplish community-wide preparedness as a single entity and that siloed planning must come to an end. To reconcile this issue, Georgia responded to the 2012 US Department of Health and Human Services concept of coalitions. Georgia utilized the existing RCH boundaries to define its coalition regions and began inviting all medical and nonmedical response partners to the planning table (nursing homes, community health centers, volunteer groups, law enforcement, etc). This new collaboration effectively enhanced emergency response practices in Georgia, but also identified additional preparedness-related gaps that will require attention as our coalitions continue to grow and mature. PMID:27303765

  8. Captive-housed male cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus soemmeringii) form naturalistic coalitions: measuring associations and calculating chance encounters.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Carly L; Rees, Paul A; Stevens-Wood, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Cheetahs are known to reproduce poorly in captivity and research suggests that the reasons for this are behavioral, rather than physiological. In the wild, male cheetahs remain in stable groups, or coalitions, throughout their lifetime. Appropriate social group housing is important in enhancing welfare and reproductive success in captivity and this study examined the effect of changes in social group composition on the behavior of four male cheetahs: two siblings and two half siblings. During the study, the cheetahs were housed both in pairs and as a group of four, before one male was relocated. The remaining cheetahs were then housed in a trio. Affiliative behaviors were frequently shown within pairs and overt aggression was seldom observed. Association indices were calculated for each cheetah pair and corrected for chance encounters based on data generated from a Monte Carlo simulation. The indices showed that two coalitions existed before the relocated male departed. Following the relocation of one of the half siblings, the remaining cheetahs appeared to form a coalition of three, as the indices of association between the unrelated male and the siblings increased and allogrooming between unrelated individuals was observed. The findings of this study indicate that natural social groupings of male cheetahs can be successfully replicated in captivity, which could potentially improve the chances of reproductive success when they are introduced to female cheetahs. PMID:23813720

  9. Geologic datasets for weights of evidence analysis in Northeast Washington: 4. mineral industry activity in Washington, 1985-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boleneus, D.E.; Derkey, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    This report includes a table of 339 sites representing mineral activities for mining and mineral exploration in the State of Washington from 1985 through 1997. The table was primarily compiled from annual reports in Washington Geologic Newsletter and Washington Geology. The information was compiled for use in a weights-of-evidence analysis of mineral resources in northeastern Washington.

  10. In Preparation or Response: Examining Health Care Coalitions Amid a Changing Economic and Political Landscape.

    PubMed

    Dornauer, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response within the US Department of Health and Human Services leads the nation in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from the adverse health effects of public health emergencies, in part through formal collaborations between hospitals, health systems, community health centers, public health departments, and community organizations via health care coalitions (HCCs). HCCs endeavor to meet the medical surge demands inherent to disasters and to improve health outcomes before, during, and after public health emergencies. Nevertheless, significant changes in health economics and policy can impact the operations, capabilities, and scope of HCCs. Specifically, hospital consolidation and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are altering the national health care landscape, as well as the emergency preparedness sector, and are challenging HCCs to adapt to large-scale, industry-wide transformations. This article examines HCCs in the context of the developments of hospital consolidation and the ACA in order to facilitate future discourse regarding the strategy and policy of HCCs amid a changing economic and political landscape. PMID:26545191

  11. Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition

    PubMed Central

    Provan, Keith G.; Leischow, Scott J.; Keagy, Judith; Nodora, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    This study examines and evaluates collaborative network involvement among 18 organizations within the Arizona Cancer Coalition. All were involved in one or more of three types of research activity: discovery, development, and delivery, consistent with the 3D continuum developed by the National Cancer Institute. Data were collected in 2007 using surveys of key informants in each organization. Using network analysis methods, we examined the structure of each type of network as well as the relationship between network position and the importance of cancer research to each organization’s mission. Findings indicated that while both the discovery and delivery networks were comparably densely connected, their centrality structures were quite different. In contrast, the structures of both these networks were similar to the development network. Centrality in the discovery and development networks was positively related to the importance of cancer research to the organization, but not in the delivery network. Implications of the findings for future research, policy, and planning are discussed. PMID:20061027

  12. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  13. The social construction of occupational health and safety: barriers to environmental-labor health coalitions.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heather M

    2009-01-01

    Occupational and environmental health advocates promote the potential of alliances between workers and community members to address shared health problems resulting from industrial processes. Advocates recognize the need to overcome job blackmail, which has successfully pitted these groups against one another by threatening job loss in the face of calls for improved standards. This strategic form of issue management represents a dualism between good health and clean environments on one hand and jobs and tax bases on the other. The author argues that overcoming job blackmail requires attention not only to this dualism, but to the broader social construction of occupational and environmental health. The article describes a series of oppositional constructions, in both strategic organizational rhetoric and everyday cultural discourse, which reinforces job blackmail and impedes the development of solidarity among workers, neighbors, and environmental advocates. These dualisms polarize our views of work and environment, science, and social identity, thereby producing barriers to coalition formation. Understanding these reifications helps to build an activist agenda and identify potential resources for organizing to overcome these barriers. PMID:19778829

  14. Better Jobs, Brighter Futures, a Stronger Washington. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The world is changing rapidly. With changes in technology, demographics, and workforce trends, Washington needs colleges to not only keep pace, but lead the way. Washington's 34 community and technical colleges answer that call. The community and technical colleges have proven uniquely positioned to adapt to, embrace, and ignite change. Community…

  15. Dubois and Washington -- Opposite or Similar: An Evaluation of the Philosophies of Washington and Dubois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reedom, John Anthony

    Although comparative analysis of the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois reveals significant differences in preferred solutions to problems of blacks in the United States, the philosophies of the two men are not as diametrically opposed as scholars have generally maintained. Washington's philosophy was one of conciliation…

  16. Public Schools Energy Conservation Measures, Report Number 10: Washington Elementary School, Kennewick, Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Reported is an engineering study of energy conservation opportunities at Washington Elementary School, Kennewick, Washington. The investigation is a component of the first phase of a five-part Saving Schoolhouse Energy Project initiated by the American Association of School Administrators and funded in part by the Federal Energy Administration.…

  17. Skewed Riskscapes and Gentrified Inequities: Environmental Exposure Disparities in Seattle, Washington

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Few studies have considered the sociohistorical intersection of environmental injustice and gentrification; a gap addressed by this case study of Seattle, Washington. This study explored the advantages of integrating air toxic risk screening with gentrification research to enhance proximity and health equity analysis methodologies. It was hypothesized that Seattle's industrial air toxic exposure risk was unevenly dispersed, that gentrification stratified the city's neighborhoods, and that the inequities of both converged. Methods. Spatial characterizations of air toxic pollution risk exposures from 1990 to 2007 were combined with longitudinal cluster analysis of census block groups in Seattle, Washington, from 1990 to 2000. Results. A cluster of air toxic exposure inequality and socioeconomic inequity converged in 1 area of south central Seattle. Minority and working class residents were more concentrated in the same neighborhoods near Seattle's worst industrial pollution risks. Conclusions. Not all pollution was distributed equally in a dynamic urban landscape. Using techniques to examine skewed riskscapes and socioeconomic urban geographies provided a foundation for future research on the connections among environmental health hazard sources, socially vulnerable neighborhoods, and health inequity. PMID:21836115

  18. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  19. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  20. Geophysical constraints on Washington convergent margin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, C. )

    1990-11-10

    Gravity and magnetic maps of western Washington reveal the lateral structure and fabric of the Washington Coast Range, Puget Basin, and southern Washington Cascade Range. The magnetic and gravity maps show large amplitude positive anomalies associated with the shallow but largely buried section of Washington Coast Range mafic rocks which are separated by negative anomalies over deep sedimentary basins. The positive anomalies indicate that the Coast Range mafic basement extends farther east than previously thought, at least as far east as the longitude of Seattle. Linear and steep gravity and magnetic gradients indicate many unmapped, often buried faults in the Washington Coast Range Province. Magnetic highs are also associated with mapped batholiths in the Cascade arc. Two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling constrained with geological and other geophysical data indicate that the Coast Range Province rocks are about 1 km thick at the coast, thickening to as much as 30 km near their postulated eastern edge. A maximum boundary on the average density of the upper 15-20 km of the rocks that compose the Coast Range Province of 2,920 kg/m{sup 3} was established by the modeling, suggesting a composition largely of basalt and gabbro with little interbedded sediments. The author's Washington model requires that the proposed subduction complex be more dense than the trench sediments and, therefore, that material denser than sediments be incorporated within it. The absence of continental mantle and the modeled wedge shape of the Coast Range Province upper crust suggest that erosion of the bottom of the overriding plate by subduction processes may have occurred.

  1. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E. ); Bloomquist, R.G. )

    1994-11-01

    USDOE awarded a contract, by way of the University of Utah Research Institute and the Oregon Institute of Technology Geo-Heat Center, to the Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) to update the geothermal database for Washington. DGER with the Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) now assess and encourage geothermal energy uses, especially in the Columbia River basin where shallow geothermal sources are abundant. DGER and WSEO recommend developing existing thermal wells, do further exploration, and institute a long term effort to inform the public of the advantages economic value of utilizing geothermal resources over fossil fuels.

  2. Context-rich semantic framework for effective data-to-decisions in coalition networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grueneberg, Keith; de Mel, Geeth; Braines, Dave; Wang, Xiping; Calo, Seraphin; Pham, Tien

    2013-05-01

    In a coalition context, data fusion involves combining of soft (e.g., field reports, intelligence reports) and hard (e.g., acoustic, imagery) sensory data such that the resulting output is better than what it would have been if the data are taken individually. However, due to the lack of explicit semantics attached with such data, it is difficult to automatically disseminate and put the right contextual data in the hands of the decision makers. In order to understand the data, explicit meaning needs to be added by means of categorizing and/or classifying the data in relationship to each other from base reference sources. In this paper, we present a semantic framework that provides automated mechanisms to expose real-time raw data effectively by presenting appropriate information needed for a given situation so that an informed decision could be made effectively. The system utilizes controlled natural language capabilities provided by the ITA (International Technology Alliance) Controlled English (CE) toolkit to provide a human-friendly semantic representation of messages so that the messages can be directly processed in human/machine hybrid environments. The Real-time Semantic Enrichment (RTSE) service adds relevant contextual information to raw data streams from domain knowledge bases using declarative rules. The rules define how the added semantics and context information are derived and stored in a semantic knowledge base. The software framework exposes contextual information from a variety of hard and soft data sources in a fast, reliable manner so that an informed decision can be made using semantic queries in intelligent software systems.

  3. International Coalition for GeoInformatics" (iGeoInfo): Its origins, purpose, and future direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, R.

    2005-12-01

    The International Coalition for GeoInformatics" (iGeoInfo.org) was formed as an outgrowth of an inaugural workshop (attended by 35 scientists and 20 representatives of European, North American and Chinese funding organizations) held to launch a global forum on sedimentary geology and paleobiology at the 32nd International Geological Congress in Florence, Italy. A subsequent special session on geoinformatics was held at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) meeting in Vienna in April of 2005. iGeoInfo was founded to help build an international community that works together to promote data acquisition and sharing, to optimize IT concepts, to advance and advocate for geoinformatics in general, and to formulate a more coordinated approach to international funding agencies. What are the challenges confronting iGeoInfo and other internationally directed geoinformatics organizations? The main ones are the political, cultural, organizational, and technical diversity of the global science community that must be addressed to achieve a truly global cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences. Thus, the international communities must work together for the development, management and deployment of these data and products. A key point is that no single group or institution can do all of this in terms of physical or intellectual capacity. Furthermore, this is by nature a real community effort - real in the sense that a very large proportion of the community will be actively involved. With everything in place, GeoInformatics through iGeoInfo can become an engine to help drive the next generation of science.

  4. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. Methods: This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink) and of productive power (Shiffman). The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semi-structured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era, the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy coalitions. Results: The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. Conclusion: As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions of

  5. Mapping one strong 'Ohana: using network analysis and GIS to enhance the effectiveness of a statewide coalition to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Cardazone, Gina; U Sy, Angela; Chik, Ivan; Corlew, Laura Kate

    2014-06-01

    Network analysis and GIS enable the presentation of meaningful data about organizational relationships and community characteristics, respectively. Together, these tools can provide a concrete representation of the ecological context in which coalitions operate, and may help coalitions identify opportunities for growth and enhanced effectiveness. This study uses network analysis and GIS mapping as part of an evaluation of the One Strong 'Ohana (OSO) campaign. The OSO campaign was launched in 2012 via a partnership between the Hawai'i Children's Trust Fund (HCTF) and the Joyful Heart Foundation. The OSO campaign uses a collaborative approach aimed at increasing public awareness of child maltreatment and protective factors that can prevent maltreatment, as well as enhancing the effectiveness of the HCTF Coalition. This study focuses on three elements of the OSO campaign evaluation: (1) Network analysis exploring the relationships between 24 active Coalition member organizations, (2) GIS mapping of responses to a randomized statewide phone survey (n = 1,450) assessing awareness of factors contributing to child maltreatment, and (3) Combined GIS maps and network data, illustrating opportunities for geographically-targeted coalition building and public awareness activities. PMID:24682889

  6. Collaborating for consensus: Considerations for convening Coalition stakeholders to promote a gender-based approach to addressing the health needs of sex workers.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Basha; Champney, Joanna; Steber, Sara-Ann; Zubritsky, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    Women involved in sex work experience myriad challenges, such as poverty, illiteracy, low social status and gender inequity, as they struggle to access healthcare. These challenges place them at high risk for poor health outcomes. The purpose of this article is to describe the formation of a strong cross-system Coalition representing both the criminal justice and healthcare systems to address the health needs of sex workers in Delaware. The Delaware Coalition for Health and Justice implemented a Coalition-building strategy to design interventions and streamline systems to promote health and reduce criminal justice contact for sex workers. The sequential intercept model was utilized to organize Coalition membership and build consensus among varied stakeholders. The model assisted the Coalition in understanding differing primary objectives for key system programs, recognizing the limitations and barriers of each stakeholder group, sharing findings and discovering opportunities for partnership, and engaging stakeholders in designing and providing a comprehensive "systems" approach. This work suggests that aligning the criminal justice, healthcare, and community social services in a systemic process to build consensus can result in the implementation of effective systems change initiatives that address gender disparities and promote the health of justice-involved women. PMID:25559949

  7. A meta-analysis of direct and mediating effects of community coalitions that implemented science-based substance abuse prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Collins, David; Johnson, Knowlton; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2007-01-01

    This article reports results of a meta-analysis of the effects of a set of community coalitions that implemented science-based substance use prevention interventions as part of a State Incentive Grant (SIG) in Kentucky. The analysis included assessment of direct effects on prevalence of substance use among adolescents as well as assessment of what "risk" and "protective" factors mediated the coalition effects. In addition, we tested whether multiple science-based prevention interventions enhanced the effects of coalitions on youth substance use. Short-term results (using 8th-grade data) showed no significant decreases in six prevalence of substance use outcomes -- and, in fact, a significant though small increase in prevalence of use of one substance (inhalants). Sustained results (using 10th-grade data), however, showed significant, though small decreases in three of six substance use outcomes -- past month prevalence of cigarette use, alcohol use, and binge drinking. We found evidence that the sustained effects on these three prevalence outcomes were mediated by two posited risk factors: friends' drug use and perceived availability of drugs. Finally, we found that the number of science-based prevention interventions implemented in schools within the coalitions did not moderate the effects of the coalitions on the prevalence of drug use. Study limitations are noted. PMID:17613959

  8. Washington State Annual Rural Manpower Report, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Employment Security, Olympia.

    The annual report of the Rural Manpower Program, Employment Service Division, contains narrative and statistical data that describe important developments in Washington State during 1973. In terms of man-months of labor, rural counties provided less than 25% of the total seasonal farm employment in 1973, while urban Yakima County alone provided…

  9. Booker T. Washington and Cooperative Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenstein, Erwin H.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Booker T. Washington's contributions to cooperative extension activities which have been overlooked by many writers. Indicates that his work as educator, in conjunction with Seaman A. Knapp, served a vital purpose to rural Black farmers and homemakers in the late 1800s. (JS)

  10. Higher Education in Washington: An External Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Andrew; Vedder, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The State of Washington prides itself on having a relatively vibrant economy that centers on high technology businesses that depends on a relatively highly educated labor force. The state has been lavish in its support of higher education, and probably most citizens would agree that the state has a pretty good system of schools to serve the…

  11. Washington Community Colleges Fall Quarter Report, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Sherie; And Others

    This three-part report presents a series of 46 tables providing data about enrollments, student characteristics, and personnel in the Washington community college system for Fall Quarter 1980. After a summary of the statistical highlights of the study, Chapter I offers historical data on Fall Quarter, full-time equivalent (FTE) and student…

  12. Doctors of Osteopathy Licensed in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senters, Jo

    Based on information gathered by the Health Manpower Project through a survey cosponsored with the Washington Osteopathic Medical Association, this report begins with a statement of philosophy of osteopathic medicine and proceeds to comment on where such professional education is available. Remarks on the type of educational background of the…

  13. Washington: The State and Its Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold L.

    A profile of Washington is presented, which examines trends in the state's economy, environment, population, and educational system. A contradiction exists between the state's beautiful scenery and well-educated population and its high crime and suicide rates. The state is characterized by a highly educated work force, a less diversified economy,…

  14. Famous Americans: George Washington & Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    Introducing students in grade 1-3 to George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, this book presents thematic units that present biographical information, and literature links such as poems, songs, stories, cross-curricular activities, and hands-on reproducibles. Chapters in the book are: (1) Getting to Know George; (2) The Father and His Country; (3)…

  15. Famous Americans: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    This book provides background information and ideas for teaching about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln at the primary grade level. Cross-curricular activities include work in music, writing, art, research, plays, and games. A pull-out poster with a poem on "President's Day" is stapled in the center of the book. Chapters in the book are: (1)…

  16. Bilingual Story Times in North Central Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumiller, Marilyn

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the growth of the Spanish-speaking population served by the North Central Regional Library System (Washington) and the library's response which has included improving Spanish language collections, encouraging staff to learn Spanish, developing bilingual programs for children and families, improving publicity, and using translators. (LRW)

  17. Environmental Education in Washington: Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of environmental education in Washington schools in grades K-12. Determines how environmental education could be useful in advancing educational reform and where in-service programs in environmental education might be best directed. (Author/MM)

  18. Washington State Annual Rural Manpower Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Employment Security, Olympia.

    The report contains information on significant developments in the 1972 Washington State Farm Labor and Rural Manpower Program. Part I, the Annual Summary, recommends that farm labor programs be designed to insure an adequate number of efficient workers and that a means be developed to prolong employment periods for the worker, thus reducing…

  19. TRANSFER PROGRAMS FOR WASHINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERRY, STAN; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT IS IN THREE PARTS--(1) GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE STATE UNIVERSITY INCLUDES ADMISSION POLICY, APPLICATION PROCEDURES, TRANSFER OF CREDITS, HOUSING VISITATION PROGRAM, AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS. (2) THE GENERAL UNIVERSITY GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ARE DESCRIBED, AND, FOR EACH WASHINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE, ACCEPTABLE COURSES…

  20. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  1. State of Washington Strategic Information Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Information Services, Olympia. Policy and Regulation Div.

    The Strategic Information Technology Plan of Washington is introduced and explained. The plan is mandated by state law to create a new framework for communication and collaboration to bring together agency technology planning with the achievement of statewide information technology goals and strategies. It provides a point of reference for the…

  2. Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This user-friendly document asks and answers questions about institutions, faculty, students, costs, budgets, financial aid in Washington state. Data are provided for the six public comprehensive baccalaureate institutions, 34 public community and technical colleges, and 30 independent four-year institutions. Questions are grouped into sections…

  3. Alternative Maternity Services in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    The nature of maternity services has changed in the past 20 years, with a movement away from traditional (physician delivery in a hospital) towards other alternative services. This study examined alternative maternity services in Washington State, which ranks eighth in the country in the use of such services. Data were collected from birth and…

  4. Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Rhoda M.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

  5. Connect the Book. George Washington's Teeth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    February celebrates both National Children's Dental Health Month and President's Day (February 21), so this month's "Connect the Book" column features a book with connections to both events. George Washington, the first President of the United States (1789-1797) and known as the "Father of Our Country," had a serious dental health problem that…

  6. Laptop Circulation at Eastern Washington University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Doris; Malia, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, Eastern Washington University's Libraries began a laptop circulation program with seventeen laptops. Today, there are 150 laptops in the circulation pool, as well as seventeen digital cameras, eleven digital handycams, and thirteen digital projectors. This article explains how the program has grown to its present size, the growing pains…

  7. Washington School-to-Work Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Tom

    The extent and quality of school-to-work (STW) programs in the state of Washington were evaluated through a survey of all school districts receiving state STW funds and case studies of programs in four school districts (Bethel, Methow, Sumner, and Wapato), one consortium (Columbia River School-to-Work Consortium in Clark County), and two…

  8. The Successful Transfer Structure in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jane; Andreas, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    How did Washington create a clear organizational structure that assigns responsibility for each aspect of transfer policy to the group that is best suited to manage it (Kisker, Wagoner, and Cohen, 2011)? In this chapter, the authors will introduce the agencies, organizations, and entities that have played a key role in gathering information,…

  9. Organization and Financing of Washington Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This document is a handbook on school organization and finance in Washington State. It encompasses legislation passed during the 1990 and 1991 legislative sessions and school district fiscal data through the 1990-91 school year. The guide attempts to simplify the complex subject of school finance for use by educators, policy makers, and the…

  10. Indians of Washington State. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milhafer, Judith; And Others

    This unit supplements social studies curriculum in Washington state schools and is offered to help teachers design courses on Indians of the Pacific Northwest. The unit is designed to build understanding and appreciation for historical and contemporary Indian culture, and to examine how people meet their needs using natural resources and…

  11. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  12. Recidivism of Supermax Prisoners in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, David; Johnson, L. Clark; Cain, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    This study of recidivism among Washington supermax prisoners used a retrospective matched control design, matching supermax prisoners one-to-one with nonsupermax prisoners on mental illness status and up to eight recidivism predictors. Supermax prisoners committed new felonies at a higher rate than nonsupermax controls, but the difference was not…

  13. State of Washington Computer Use Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Jack L.; And Others

    This report presents the results of a spring 1982 survey of a random sample of Washington public schools which separated findings according to school level (elementary, middle, junior high, or high school) and district size (either less than or greater than 2,000 enrollment). A brief review of previous studies and a description of the survey…

  14. Guidelines for Science Curriculum in Washington Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Alyn, Ed.

    This document contains guidelines for science curriculum in Washington State schools. Statements of philosophy and program goals are presented and explained. Four major program goals (which address societal demands) operationally describe science education toward the learning of: (1) factual and theoretical knowledge; (2) applied science skills;…

  15. A NEW SPECIES FROM EASTERN WASHINGTON.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of Pythium isolated from wheat and apple roots in eastern Washington is described. Pythium abappressorium sp. nov. is characterized by abundant appressoria. Plerotic oospores and sporangia are formed from the appressoria and remnants of the appressoria remain attached to the base of s...

  16. Washington Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Corina Forson

    2015-12-15

    This file contains file geodatabases of the Mount St. Helens seismic zone (MSHSZ), Wind River valley (WRV) and Mount Baker (MB) geothermal play-fairway sites in the Washington Cascades. The geodatabases include input data (feature classes) and output rasters (generated from modeling and interpolation) from the geothermal play-fairway in Washington State, USA. These data were gathered and modeled to provide an estimate of the heat and permeability potential within the play-fairways based on: mapped volcanic vents, hot springs and fumaroles, geothermometry, intrusive rocks, temperature-gradient wells, slip tendency, dilation tendency, displacement, displacement gradient, max coulomb shear stress, sigma 3, maximum shear strain rate, and dilational strain rate at 200m and 3 km depth. In addition this file contains layer files for each of the output rasters. For details on the areas of interest please see the 'WA_State_Play_Fairway_Phase_1_Technical_Report' in the download package. This submission also includes a file with the geothermal favorability of the Washington Cascade Range based off of an earlier statewide assessment. Additionally, within this file there are the maximum shear and dilational strain rate rasters for all of Washington State.

  17. Teaching about George Washington. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontz, Thomas S.; Nixon, William A.

    No generation in U.S. history has matched that of the founding era for its array of talented and influential political thinkers and actors. These individuals (such as George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison) possessed traits of character and intellect that significantly shaped the…

  18. George Washington Carver: A Most Inventive Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marci

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the life of George Washington Carver. Explains how he achieved his goals of educating a better southern farmer and creating a better southern citizen based on his principles of agriculture economics. Discusses Carver's educational and teaching experiences that eventually lead to an expansion of human potential. (JS)

  19. 2. View of Mainline elevated structure, parallel to Washington Street, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Mainline elevated structure, parallel to Washington Street, crossing over the Massachusetts Turnpike and the B&A R.R. tracks - looking North. - Boston Elevated Railway, Elevated Mainline, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  20. 3. Photocopy of photograph (from Hilyard R. Robinson, architect Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (from Hilyard R. Robinson, architect Washington, D.C.) ca. 1941, Photographer unknown WEST AND SOUTH FACADES - Ralph J. Bunche House, 1510 Jackson Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. View of inside second floor stairwell of George Washington Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of inside second floor stairwell of George Washington Junior High School looking at double doors, facing north. - George Washington Junior High School, 707 Columbus Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  2. Photocopy of original blackandwhite silver gelatin print, VIEW FROM WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original black-and-white silver gelatin print, VIEW FROM WASHINGTON MONUMENT, October 3, 1929, photography Commercial Photo - Internal Revenue Service Headquarters Building, 1111 Constitution Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, DC. Date and photographer unknown. CLOSE UP OF ARMILLARY SPHERE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 6. DETAIL OF BRIDGE BALUSTRADE, NORTH SIDE, TOP OF WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF BRIDGE BALUSTRADE, NORTH SIDE, TOP OF WASHINGTON MONUMENT VISIBLE AT TOP-CENTER. - Tidal Reservoir, Inlet Bridge, Ohio Drive, spanning Inlet of Tidal Basin, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 54. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN JUST SOUTH OF WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN JUST SOUTH OF WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  6. 174. WIDE MEDIAN BETWEEN NORTH END OF ALEXANDRIA AND WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    174. WIDE MEDIAN BETWEEN NORTH END OF ALEXANDRIA AND WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  7. 56. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN NEXT TO WASHINGTON SAILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN NEXT TO WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  8. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2nd and/or 3rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2nd carpometacarpal (metacarpal–trapezoid) joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss. PMID:26288522

  9. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  10. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  11. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  12. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  13. The Tuskegee Connection: Booker T. Washington and Robert E. Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, St. Clair

    1983-01-01

    Explores the interpersonal and intellectual relationship between Booker T. Washington and Robert Ezra Park, a White sociologist who travelled, worked, and wrote with Washington before becoming well known as an expert on race relations. Focuses on their voyage to Europe which resulted in the publication of Washington's "The Man Farthest Down." (GC)

  14. 76 FR 78915 - Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 13, 2011, Washington 10 Storage Corporation (Washington 10) filed a Statement of...

  15. 76 FR 26719 - Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 29, 2011, Washington 10 Storage Corporation (Washington 10) filed a revised Statement of...

  16. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Washington Federal program. 947.700 Section 947.700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.700 Washington Federal program. (a) This part...

  17. 75 FR 73073 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing November 18, 2010. Take notice that on November 15, 2010, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed its annual...

  18. 75 FR 53964 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing August 27, 2010. Take notice that on August 24, 2010, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed to revise the Statement...

  19. 76 FR 16323 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington; Continuance Referendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 946 Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington; Continuance Referendum AGENCY... referendum be conducted among eligible Washington potato growers to determine whether they favor continuance of the marketing order regulating the handling of Irish potatoes grown in Washington. DATES:...

  20. 2011 Pest Management Guide for Grapes in Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2011 Pest Management Guide for Grapes in Washington presents all the various chemicals and their uses against pest problems common to Washington vineyards. While the recommendations are based on eastern Washington conditions, the information may often be applied to similar pest problems found t...

  1. Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington. 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington" provides vital data to chart higher education's progress and challenges. First published in 2002 by the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, this annual report highlights "Key Facts" about Washington's postsecondary institutions--including faculty, students,…

  2. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  3. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  4. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  5. The Washington Monument: Tribute in Stone. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopin, Stephanie A.

    The Washington Monument (District of Columbia) is one of the most recognizable structures in the United States. Its prominence comes because it commemorates George Washington, who remains one of this country's most admired leaders. The history of the monument reflects Washington's contributions to the development of the United States and shows how…

  6. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  7. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  8. Getting Veterans Back to Work. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Each year about 13,000 military personnel leave the service and select Washington state as their home, bringing with them a wealth of experience and a wide range of skills. Washington ranks among the top five most popular states for military personnel separating from the service. Washington's 34 community and technical colleges are a perfect fit…

  9. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  10. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  11. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  12. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  13. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  14. 78 FR 46258 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation Lake Washington, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation Lake Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY... (State Route 520 across Lake Washington) at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to accommodate the... the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge (State Route 520 across Lake Washington) remain closed to...

  15. The Digital Universe Coalition: Building a Prototype NVO E/PO Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, B.; Craig, N.; Haisch, B.; Lindblom, J.; Hanisch, R.; Summers, F.; Abbott, B.

    2004-05-01

    The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) holds tremendous potential for Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) opportunities. The possibilities for E/PO with the NVO, which promises to make widely available the great majority of the world's astronomical data, are too numerous for any one E/PO effort to ever hope to develop. Therefore, it is critical that the NVO E/PO program develop an infrastructure and tools flexible enough that any E/PO program can make use of it. In response to the recommendations of the NVO science definition team, UC Berkeley's SEGway program conducted needs assessment surveys of potential non-traditional (i.e. non-scientist) NVO user communities. The SEGway team wished to use the results of these surveys to design a demonstration website that could show some of the potential capabilities of NVO E/PO. SEGway established an informal partnership with STScI, AMNH/Hayden Planetarium, and ManyOne Network to explore how to assemble the infrastructure and tools for NVO E/PO and to construct a demonstration portal that makes use of NVO resources. We called this partnership The Digital Universe Coalition. This prototype displays AMNH/Hayden's Digital Universe star catalog of approximately 100,000 stars, based largely on HIPPARCOS parallaxes, in a virtual three-dimensional space. Three types of user-interactive data display and/or navigation are possible: an Earth-based view of the sky with the option of displaying constellations; a spaceship-based view moving through space; and a "god's-eye" view of the local neighborhood from an external vantage point. One key feature of this demo is the linking of user-selectable locations in the sky to the online Digitized Sky Survey data sets. A second feature is a set of links for educational content on a handful of selected objects. Both of these capabilities will be extended further as we plan to begin development of a much more robust and complete E/PO portal for the NVO.

  16. The Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks; Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Joel

    2015-04-01

    outcome of the conference is the formation of a working group: Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences by publishers and data facilities and consortia that will establish a permanent international coordinating conference on Earth science data publication. Marking the launch of the partnership is a joint statement of commitment (to be be released in January 2015), signed by the major Earth and space science publishers and many data facilities, to ensure that Earth science data will, to the greatest extent possible, be stored in community approved repositories that can provide additional data services. The development of a functional directory of Earth and space science repositories is underway that can be used by journals as part of their information to authors, and by authors to identify rapidly which repositories are the best homes for specific data types and how to structure such deposition.

  17. Thermal stress and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Aydin, Cenk

    2014-07-01

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at sub-thermoneutral temperatures of ~22∘C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress can nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable task attributed in part to the interspecies differences in thermoregulatory response to the toxicants and to thermal stress. PMID:24944028

  18. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  19. Corporate coalitions and policy making in the European Union: how and why British American Tobacco promoted "Better Regulation".

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine Elizabeth; Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B; Collin, Jeff; Weishaar, Heide

    2015-04-01

    Over the past fifteen years, an interconnected set of regulatory reforms, known as Better Regulation, has been adopted across Europe, marking a significant shift in the way that European Union policies are developed. There has been little exploration of the origins of these reforms, which include mandatory ex ante impact assessment. Drawing on documentary and interview data, this article discusses how and why large corporations, notably British American Tobacco (BAT), worked to influence and promote these reforms. Our analysis highlights (1) how policy entrepreneurs with sufficient resources (such as large corporations) can shape the membership and direction of advocacy coalitions; (2) the extent to which "think tanks" may be prepared to lobby on behalf of commercial clients; and (3) why regulated industries (including tobacco) may favor the use of "evidence tools," such as impact assessments, in policy making. We argue that a key aspect of BAT's ability to shape regulatory reform involved the deliberate construction of a vaguely defined idea that could be strategically adapted to appeal to diverse constituencies. We discuss the theoretical implications of this finding for the Advocacy Coalition Framework, as well as the practical implications of the findings for efforts to promote transparency and public health in the European Union. PMID:25646389

  20. Gender-based health interventions in the United States: An overview of the coalition for healthier community initiative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephanie; Walker, Elaine M

    2015-08-01

    Health disparities by gender constitute an important yet often overlooked aspect of health around the globe. Within the United States, there is both a paucity of research as well as planned programs that take into account how socio-cultural roles and expectations for men and women may differentially affect symptoms, access to care, and treatment. Viewing women's health exclusively as a function of sex (i.e., biological) differences represents a narrow understanding that does not fully explain gaps in health disparities between men and women. In September 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) launched a national initiative entitled the Coalition for a Healthier Community (CHC) to employ a gender-based framework in several urban, suburban and rural communities across the nation. The Office on Women's Health (OWH) within the DHHS funded 10 coalitions to ultimately improve the health of women and girls utilizing a gender-based approach. This article provides an overview of the initiative and the focus of the special issue. PMID:25773577

  1. Corporate coalitions and policymaking in the European Union: How and why British American Tobacco promoted ‘Better Regulation’

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine E.; Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B.; Collin, Jeff; Weishaar, Heide

    2015-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, an inter-connected set of regulatory reforms, known as Better Regulation, has been adopted across Europe, marking a significant shift in the way European Union (EU) policies are developed. There has been little exploration of the origins of these reforms, which include mandatory ex-ante impact assessment. Drawing on documentary and interview data, this paper discusses how and why large corporations, notably British American Tobacco (BAT), worked to influence and promote these reforms. Our analysis highlights: (i) how policy entrepreneurs with sufficient resources (such as large corporations) can shape the membership and direction of advocacy coalitions; (ii) the extent to which ‘think tanks’ may be prepared to lobby on behalf of commercial clients; and (iii) why regulated industries (including tobacco) may favour the use of ‘evidence-tools’, such as impact assessments, in policymaking. We argue a key aspect of BAT’s ability to shape regulatory reform involved the deliberate construction of a vaguely defined idea that could be strategically adapted to appeal to diverse constituencies. We discuss the theoretical implications of this finding for the ‘Advocacy Coalition Framework’, as well as the practical implications of the findings for efforts to promote ‘transparency’ and public health in the EU. PMID:25646389

  2. Optimization algorithm of digital watermarking anti-coalition attacks in DWT-domain based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Dashun; Li, Gang; Yue, Peng

    2007-12-01

    An adaptive optimization watermarking algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is proposed in this paper. The core of this algorithm is the fitness function optimization model for digital watermarking based on GA. The embedding intensity for digital watermarking can be modified adaptively, and the algorithm can effectively ensure the imperceptibility of watermarking while the robustness is ensured. The optimization model research may provide a new idea for anti-coalition attacks of digital watermarking algorithm. The paper has fulfilled many experiments, including the embedding and extracting experiments of watermarking, the influence experiments by the weighting factor, the experiments of embedding same watermarking to the different cover image, the experiments of embedding different watermarking to the same cover image, the comparative analysis experiments between this optimization algorithm and human visual system (HVS) algorithm and etc. The simulation results and the further analysis show the effectiveness and advantage of the new algorithm, which also has versatility and expandability. And meanwhile it has better ability of anti-coalition attacks. Moreover, the robustness and security of watermarking algorithm are improved by scrambling transformation and chaotic encryption while preprocessing the watermarking.

  3. The December 1872 Washington state earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Haugerud, R.A.; Hopper, M.G.; Ludwin, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    The largest historical earthquake in eastern Washington occurred on 15 December 1872. We used Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) assignments for 12 twentieth-century earthquakes to determine attenuation relations for different regions in the Pacific Northwest. MMI attenuation for propagation paths east and west of the Cascade Mountains differs significantly only for epicentral distances greater than about 225 km. We used these attenuation relations and the MMI assignments for the 15 December 1872 earthquake to conclude that its epicentral region was east of the Cascade Mountains near Lake Chelan, Washington, and most probably near the south end of Lake Chelan. The intensity magnitude, M1, is 6.8 and moment magnitude, M, is 6.5-7.0 at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Petroleum geology of the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.Y.; Tennyson, M.E.; Lingley, W.S.; Law, B.E.

    1997-12-31

    Washington is a petroleum exploration frontier, but there is no current petroleum production in the State. Several possible petroleum systems may be present, hosted by sedimentary rocks deposited in Eocene strike-slip basins and late Eocene and younger intra-arc, fore-arc, and trench basins. Eight conventional petroleum plays, three coal-bed gas plays, and two continuous-type gas plays are delineated in order to analyze and assess the resource potential. In these plays, the potential for significant petroleum accumulations appears greatest in the Columbia Plateau region of eastern Washington. On a regional scale, the absence of high-quality source rocks is probably the most important factor limiting development of large accumulations, although development of suitable reservoirs and an inability to map trays also limits the potential of some plays.

  5. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  6. 40 CFR 81.434 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Washington. 81.434 Section 81.434... manager Alpine Lakes Wild 303,508 94-357 USDA-FS Glacier Peak Wild 464,258 88-577 USDA-FS Goat Rocks Wild 82,680 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Adams Wild 32,356 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Rainer NP 235,239 (1)...

  7. 40 CFR 81.434 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Washington. 81.434 Section 81.434... manager Alpine Lakes Wild 303,508 94-357 USDA-FS Glacier Peak Wild 464,258 88-577 USDA-FS Goat Rocks Wild 82,680 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Adams Wild 32,356 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Rainer NP 235,239 (1)...

  8. 40 CFR 81.434 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Washington. 81.434 Section 81.434... manager Alpine Lakes Wild 303,508 94-357 USDA-FS Glacier Peak Wild 464,258 88-577 USDA-FS Goat Rocks Wild 82,680 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Adams Wild 32,356 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Rainer NP 235,239 (1)...

  9. 40 CFR 81.434 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Washington. 81.434 Section 81.434... manager Alpine Lakes Wild 303,508 94-357 USDA-FS Glacier Peak Wild 464,258 88-577 USDA-FS Goat Rocks Wild 82,680 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Adams Wild 32,356 88-577 USDA-FS Mount Rainer NP 235,239 (1)...

  10. ALPINE LAKES WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gualtieri, J.L.; Thurber, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Alpine Lakes Wilderness study area, located in the central part of the Cascade Mountains of Washington was examined for its mineral-resource potential. On the basis of that study the area was found to contain deposits of copper, other base metals, and gold and silver. Probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential exists for these commodities in the southwest-central, northwest, and southeast-central parts of the area. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  11. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-01-01

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  12. Opioid Prescribing Laws and Emergency Department Guidelines for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Skaer, Tracy L; Nwude, Azuka C

    2016-06-01

    Rising mortality rates, increased opioid prescription abuse, and a perceived need to provide practitioners with structured guidance in opioid prescribing have prompted the Washington State Legislature to establish new legal standards of practice regarding chronic non-cancer pain management. Clinicians are required to conduct a detailed physical examination and health history prior to treatment. Risk assessments for abuse and detailed periodic reviews of treatment are required at least every 6 months. Those considered "high risk" or who have significant psychiatric comorbidities will be required to sign and follow a written agreement or pain contract, obtain their pain prescriptions from a single provider, and submit to biological drug screening. Unless an exemption exists, patients prescribed > 120 mg of morphine-equivalents daily, considered severe pain nonresponders, necessitating dosage escalation, diagnosed with multifaceted mental health-related comorbidities, demonstrating diagnostic ambiguity, and/or requiring significant treatment individualization are referred to a pain specialist. Episodic care settings should refrain from supplying opioids to chronic pain patients whenever possible. The ER is for Emergencies coalition instituted the Seven Best Practices program throughout the state to reduce unnecessary visits, coordinate prescribing practice, reduce Medicaid expenditures, and improve overall patient care. The state reported approximately $33.65 million in savings in 2013 through the use of these practices and converting Medicaid participants from fee-for-service to managed care plans. Similar legislation to complement clinical practice guidelines is expected to be enacted in other states. It is vital that practitioners comprehend the new guidelines and make appropriate adjustments in their opioid prescribing habits. PMID:26369588

  13. Mechanisms underlying Children's susceptibility to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed Central

    Faustman, E M; Silbernagel, S M; Fenske, R A; Burbacher, T M; Ponce, R A

    2000-01-01

    An important public health challenge has been the need to protect children's health. To accomplish this goal, the scientific community needs scientifically based child-specific risk assessment methods. Critical to their development is the need to understand mechanisms underlying children's sensitivity to environmental toxicants. Risk is defined as the probability of adverse outcome and when applied to environmental risk assessment is usually defined as a function of both toxicity and exposure. To adequately evaluate the potential for enhanced health risks during development, both child-specific factors affecting toxicity and exposure need to be considered. In the first section of this article, example mechanisms of susceptibility relevant for toxicity assessment are identified and discussed. In the second section, examples of exposure factors that help define children's susceptibility are presented. Examples of pesticide research from the newly funded Child Health Center at the University of Washington will be given for illustration. The final section discusses the importance of putting these considerations of children's susceptibility into an overall framework for ascertaining relevancy for human risk assessment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10698720

  14. Washington v. Glucksberg was tragically wrong.

    PubMed

    Chemerinsky, Erwin

    2008-06-01

    Properly focused, there were two questions before the Supreme Court in Washington v. Glucksberg. First, in light of all of the other non-textual rights protected by the Supreme Court under the "liberty" of the Due Process Clause, is the right to assisted death a fundamental right? Second, if so, is the prohibition of assisted death necessary to achieve a compelling interest? Presented in this way, it is clear that the Court erred in Washington v. Glucksberg. The right of a terminally ill person to end his or her life is an essential aspect of autonomy, comparable to aspects of autonomy that the Court has protected in decisions concerning family autonomy, reproductive autonomy, and autonomy to engage in sexual activity. Moreover, the government's general interest in protecting life and preventing suicide has far less force when applied to a terminally ill patient. The tragedy of Washington v. Glucksberg is that every day across the country, terminally ill patients are being forced to suffer longer and being denied an essential aspect of their autonomy and personhood. PMID:18595212

  15. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummans, J.E.; Collings, Michael R.; Nasser, Edmund George

    1975-01-01

    Relations are provided to estimate the magnitude and frequency of floods on Washington streams. Annual-peak-flow data from stream gaging stations on unregulated streams having 1 years or more of record were used to determine a log-Pearson Type III frequency curve for each station. Flood magnitudes having recurrence intervals of 2, 5, i0, 25, 50, and 10years were then related to physical and climatic indices of the drainage basins by multiple-regression analysis using the Biomedical Computer Program BMDO2R. These regression relations are useful for estimating flood magnitudes of the specified recurrence intervals at ungaged or short-record sites. Separate sets of regression equations were defined for western and eastern parts of the State, and the State was further subdivided into 12 regions in which the annual floods exhibit similar flood characteristics. Peak flows are related most significantly in western Washington to drainage-area size and mean annual precipitation. In eastern Washington-they are related most significantly to drainage-area size, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forest cover. Standard errors of estimate of the estimating relations range from 25 to 129 percent, and the smallest errors are generally associated with the more humid regions.

  16. Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

  17. Environmental Assessment: Waste Tank Safety Program, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action in the near-term, to accelerate resolution of waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and reduce the risks associated with operations and management of the waste tanks. The DOE has conducted nuclear waste management operations at the Hanford Site for nearly 50 years. Operations have included storage of high-level nuclear waste in 177 underground storage tanks (UST), both in single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank configurations. Many of the tanks, and the equipment needed to operate them, are deteriorated. Sixty-seven SSTs are presumed to have leaked a total approximately 3,800,000 liters (1 million gallons) of radioactive waste to the soil. Safety issues associated with the waste have been identified, and include (1) flammable gas generation and episodic release; (2) ferrocyanide-containing wastes; (3) a floating organic solvent layer in Tank 241-C-103; (4) nuclear criticality; (5) toxic vapors; (6) infrastructure upgrades; and (7) interim stabilization of SSTs. Initial actions have been taken in all of these areas; however, much work remains before a full understanding of the tank waste behavior is achieved. The DOE needs to accelerate the resolution of tank safety concerns to reduce the risk of an unanticipated radioactive or chemical release to the environment, while continuing to manage the wastes safely.

  18. Winter-spring phytoplankton blooms in Dabob Bay, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Rita A.; Postel, James R.; Halsband-Lenk, Claudia; Pierson, James J.; Pohnert, Georg; Wichard, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Scientific investigations in Dabob Bay, Washington State, USA, have been extensive since the early 1960s, but phytoplankton blooms have been studied mostly with regard to chlorophyll concentrations and little is known about the phytoplankton species themselves. Here we provide information on the species present, their abundances during blooms, their contribution to organic carbon concentrations and the ability of some phytoplankton species to produce toxic aldehydes that may impact metazoan grazers. Multiple blooms of phytoplankton, dominated by diatoms, occurred in the late winter-early spring period, with depth-integrated chlorophyll levels ranging from <20 to 230 mg m -2 and peaks in February and April. The major bloom species included Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira spp. and Chaetoceros spp; Phaeocystis cf. pouchetii occurred in 2002 and 2004. Other taxa or groups of organisms that were sometimes abundant included unidentified small flagellates <10 μm in size and unidentified heterotrophic dinoflagellates. Large diatoms usually comprised most of the cell carbon, but a large, heterotrophic dinoflagellate, identified only as Gyrodinium “tear” because of its shape, was a major contributor to the microplankton carbon when present even in small numbers. Five Thalassiosira species and S. costatum were found to produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA) that are known to affect copepod reproduction and hatching success. Our findings are similar to the few previous studies in the last four decades that included phytoplankton species and suggest long-term similarities and relative stability in the phytoplankton species present and their timing in Dabob Bay.

  19. TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

  20. Toxic substances handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  1. Addressing barriers to perinatal care: a case study of the Access to Maternity Care Committee in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Schleuning, D; Rice, G; Rosenblatt, R A

    1991-01-01

    Access to obstetrical services has deteriorated in recent years, as large numbers of physicians have discontinued or restricted obstetrical practice. In Washington State, one response to this access crisis has been the establishment of the Access to Maternity Care Committee (AMCC), an ad hoc group composed primarily of private sector obstetrical providers and representatives of State government responsible for the delivery of health care to women and children. The major objectives of the AMCC is to improve access to obstetrical services for socially vulnerable women, both rural inhabitants and the medically indigent. The committee has been successful in serving as a forum in which to resolve many of the administrative problems that have arisen between private sector obstetrical providers and the State's Medicaid Program, the major source of payment for the one-third of pregnant women who are medically indigent. Building upon the trust that the committee members developed in working together, the AMCC served as a major force in persuading the State legislature to expand substantially its investment in perinatal care by increasing Medicaid eligibility, raising provider reimbursement, and improving social service for pregnant women. Such ad hoc coalitions between the private and public sector may be quite effective in addressing obstetrical access problems in other States. PMID:1899939

  2. How Toxic Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relative danger from toxicity of some typical chemicals. Notes that some materials in solutions have low toxicity, but in dust form have high toxicity. Suggests that more chemical compounds should be treated as the dangerous compounds they are. Lists common compounds found in the lab. (MVL)

  3. Examining the Support of Modern Athletic Reform Proposals Developed by the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics in Response to Higher Education Athletic Reform: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Wade W.; Wickersham, Leah E.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the success for the diffusion of the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics (COIA) white paper Framing the Future: Reforming Intercollegiate Athletics. The Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ) and personal interviews were utilized to collect data and purposeful sampling was used to identify one NCAA Division…

  4. An unusual cause of ankle pain: fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition as a differential diagnosis in an acute ankle sprain: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries seen in trauma departments. Ankle sprains have an incidence of about one injury per 10 000 people a day. In contrast tarsal coalition is a rare condition occurring in not more than one percent of the population. Case presentation We present the case of a 23 year old male patient with pain and local swelling after an acute ankle sprain. Initial clinical and radiological examination showed no pathologies. Due to prolonged pain, swelling and the inability of the patient to weight bear one week after trauma further diagnostics was performed. Imaging studies (MRI and CT) revealed a fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition. To the knowledge of the authors no fracture of a coalition was reported so far. Conclusion This report highlights the presentation of symptomatic coalitions following trauma and furthermore, it points out the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of a rare entity after a common injury. A diagnostic algorithm has been developed to ensure not to miss a severe injury. PMID:23530869

  5. From Read Ahead to Literacy Coalition: The Leadership Role of the Central New York Community Foundation in the Creation of a Local Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridzi, Frank; Carmody, Virginia; Byrnes, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the lens of recent literature on neoinstitutionalism and institutional entrepreneurship to understand the stages of growth in a new community Literacy Coalition. It explores the interactional, technical and cultural phases of institution building identified in other case studies as they emerge in this community study. Finally,…

  6. Formation of the Literacy Coalition of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. A "How-to" Guide for Small Urban Communities. Developed July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Beverly J.; Carl, Linda S.

    This report describes the formation of the Literacy Coalition of Harrisburg, which sought to allow for the pooling of resources, elimination of service duplication, and establishment of a referral system. Chapter I focuses on activities prior to submitting a grant proposal and includes correspondence. Chapter II covers writing and submitting the…

  7. Transnational Activist Coalition Politics and the De/Colonization of Pedagogies of Mobilization: Learning from Anti-Neoliberal Indigenous Movement Articulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudry, Aziz

    2007-01-01

    This article will demonstrate that (a) neoliberal globalization is a process of re/colonization; (b) the prospects for decolonization face considerable challenges from national and global political and economic power elites, and also from within networks of non-government organizations (NGOs) and transnational movements/coalitions ostensibly…

  8. Implementing the Children's Agenda: Critical Elements of System-Wide Reform. A Statement of the National Coalition for an Urban Children's Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Janice; Kysilko, David

    The National Coalition for an Urban Children's Agenda (NCUCA) is an association of 10 organizations that are concerned with the plight of urban children and families. This statement represents the results of a year's debate and discussion drawing on the experience of staff members of these organizations. It is argued that America's education and…

  9. The Chicago Coalition for Education and Training for Employment (CCETE) Project of the Education Network for Older Adults (ENOA). Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Network for Older Adults, Chicago, IL.

    This report contains an outline of the major activities of the Chicago Coalition for Education and Training for Employment (CCETE) program during the period from July 1, 1985, to June 30, 1986; a description of and materials from the CCETE's Minority Entrepreneurship (ME) Program; and a detailed description of the structure, organization,…

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of fecal coliform in the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel, Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sen; Lung, Wu-Seng

    2006-01-01

    Fecal coliform are widely used as bacterial indicator in the United States and around the world. Fecal coliform impaired water is highly possible to be polluted by pathogenic bacteria. The Tidal Basin and Washington Channel in Washington, DC are on the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) list due to the high fecal coliform level. To support TMDL development, a three-dimensional numerical model of fecal coliform was developed using the EFDC framework. The model calculates the transport of fecal coliform under the influences of flap gate operations and tidal elevation. The original EFDC code was modified to calculate the die-off of fecal coliform under the impact of temperature and solar radiation intensity. The watershed contribution is expressed as storm water inflow and the load carried by the runoff. Model results show that fecal coliform vary strongly in space in both the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel. The storm water only impacts a small area around the storm water outfall in the Tidal Basin and the impacts are negligible in the Washington Channel due to dilution. The water from the Potomac River may affect the fecal coliform level in the area close to the flap gate in the Tidal Basin. The fecal coliform level in the Washington Channel is mainly controlled by the fecal coliform level in the Anacostia River, which is located at the open boundary of the Washington Channel. The potential sediment layer storage of fecal coliform was analyzed and it was found that the sediment layer fecal coliform level could be much higher than the water column fecal coliform level and becomes a secondary source under high bottom shear stress condition. The developed model built solid connection of fecal coliform source and concentration in the water column and has been used to develop TMDL. PMID:16854806

  11. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  12. Estimated Water Use in Washington, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Water use in the State of Washington has evolved in the past century from meager domestic and stock water needs to the current complex requirements of domestic-water users, large irrigation projects, industrial plants, and numerous other uses such as fish habitat and recreational activities. Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has, at 5-year intervals, compiled data on the amount of water used in homes, businesses, industries, and on farms throughout the State. This water-use data, combined with other related USGS information, has facilitated a unique understanding of the effects of human activity on the State's water resources. As water availability continues to emerge as an important issue in the 21st century, the need for consistent, long-term water-use data will increase to support wise use of this essential natural resource. This report presents state and county estimates of the amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power purposes in the State of Washington during 2005. Offstream fresh-water use was estimated to be 5,780 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Domestic water use was estimated to be 648 Mgal/d or 11 percent of the total. Irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,520 Mgal/d, or 61 percent of the total. Industrial fresh-water use was estimated to be 520 Mgal/d, or 9 percent of the total. These three categories accounted for about 81 percent (4,690 Mgal/d) of the total of the estimated offstream freshwater use in Washington during 2005.

  13. Landslide Hazards in the Seattle, Washington, Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex; Harp, Ed; Highland, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    The Seattle, Washington, area is known for its livability and its magnificent natural setting. The city and nearby communities are surrounded by an abundance of rivers and lakes and by the bays of Puget Sound. Two majestic mountain ranges, the Olympics and the Cascades, rim the region. These dramatic natural features are products of dynamic forces-landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis, glaciers, volcanoes, and floods. The same processes that formed this beautiful landscape pose hazards to the ever-growing population of the region. Landslides long have been a major cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Seattle area.

  14. Capitol Lake, Washington, 2004 data summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshleman, Jodi; Ruggiero, Peter; Kingsley, Etienne; Gelfenbaum, Guy; George, Doug

    2006-01-01

    At the request of the Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE), the US Geological Survey (USGS) collected bathymetry data in Capital Lake, Olympia, Wash., on September 21, 2004. The data are to be used to calculate sediment infilling rates within the lake as well as for developing the bottom boundary conditions for numerical models of water quality, sediment transport, and morphological change. In addition, the USGS collected sediment samples in Capitol Lake in February, 2005, to help characterize bottom sediment for numerical model calculations and substrate assessment.

  15. Building alliances in unlikely places: progressive allies and the Tobacco Institute's coalition strategy on cigarette excise taxes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard B; Balbach, Edith D

    2009-07-01

    The tobacco industry often utilizes third parties to advance its policy agenda. One such utilization occurred when the industry identified organized labor and progressive groups as potential allies whose advocacy could undermine public support for excise tax increases. To attract such collaboration, the industry framed the issue as one of tax fairness, creating a labor management committee to provide distance from tobacco companies and furthering progressive allies' interests through financial and logistical support. Internal industry documents indicate that this strategic use of ideas, institutions, and interests facilitated the recruitment of leading progressive organizations as allies. By placing excise taxes within a strategic policy nexus that promotes mutual public interest goals, public health advocates may use a similar strategy in forging their own excise tax coalitions. PMID:19443832

  16. Eradication of hepatitis B: a nationwide community coalition approach to improving vaccination, screening, and linkage to care.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Chari; Caballero, Jeffrey; Martin, Melinda; Weerasinghe, Isha; Ninde, Michelle; Block, Joan

    2013-10-01

    Infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a significant public health concern in the US, disproportionately affecting Americans of Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander descent, despite the availability of a simple blood test, approved treatments, and an effective vaccine. Hep B United, a national campaign to support and leverage the success of community-based HBV coalitions, convened a partner summit in 2012 to develop a strategic response to the HHS Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis. The resulting community action plan focuses on advancing three areas of the HHS plan: educating providers and communities to reduce health disparities; improving testing and linkage to care to prevent HBV-related liver disease and cancer; and eliminating perinatal HBV transmission. PMID:23715963

  17. Safe sex: male-female coalitions and pre-copulatory mate-guarding in a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Milner, Richard N C; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2010-04-23

    In fiddler crabs both males and females defend territories that are essential for survival. Given pronounced sexual dimorphism in weaponry, how do weaponless females defend their territory from well-armed males? Using observational data and two simple experiments, we test whether male Uca annulipes protect their female neighbours from conspecific intruders. We show that males defend their female neighbours against male but not female intruders. We also show that females sometimes mate with their immediate neighbours. Male defence of female neighbours appears to represent both pre-copulatory mate-guarding and a territorial coalition. Males who ensure that their neighbour remains female could benefit through increased opportunity for future reproductive success and lower boundary maintenance costs. PMID:19889695

  18. Safe sex: male–female coalitions and pre-copulatory mate-guarding in a fiddler crab

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Richard N. C.; Jennions, Michael D.; Backwell, Patricia R. Y.

    2010-01-01

    In fiddler crabs both males and females defend territories that are essential for survival. Given pronounced sexual dimorphism in weaponry, how do weaponless females defend their territory from well-armed males? Using observational data and two simple experiments, we test whether male Uca annulipes protect their female neighbours from conspecific intruders. We show that males defend their female neighbours against male but not female intruders. We also show that females sometimes mate with their immediate neighbours. Male defence of female neighbours appears to represent both pre-copulatory mate-guarding and a territorial coalition. Males who ensure that their neighbour remains female could benefit through increased opportunity for future reproductive success and lower boundary maintenance costs. PMID:19889695

  19. Building Alliances in Unlikely Places: Progressive Allies and the Tobacco Institute's Coalition Strategy on Cigarette Excise Taxes

    PubMed Central

    Balbach, Edith D.

    2009-01-01

    The tobacco industry often utilizes third parties to advance its policy agenda. One such utilization occurred when the industry identified organized labor and progressive groups as potential allies whose advocacy could undermine public support for excise tax increases. To attract such collaboration, the industry framed the issue as one of tax fairness, creating a labor management committee to provide distance from tobacco companies and furthering progressive allies' interests through financial and logistical support. Internal industry documents indicate that this strategic use of ideas, institutions, and interests facilitated the recruitment of leading progressive organizations as allies. By placing excise taxes within a strategic policy nexus that promotes mutual public interest goals, public health advocates may use a similar strategy in forging their own excise tax coalitions. PMID:19443832

  20. WASHINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGES COMPOSITE, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRANSFER PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    THIS ARTICULATION STATEMENT IS IN THREE PARTS--(1) GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON INCLUDES ADMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES, TRANSFER POLICIES, STUDENT AID, AND ARTICULATION PROCESSES. (2) PROGRAMS AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS ARE DESCRIBED FOR EACH OF THE UNIVERSITY'S COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS, AND…