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1

E-waste scenario in India, its management and implications.  

PubMed

Electronic waste or E-waste comprises of old, end-of-life electronic appliances such as computers, laptops, TVs, DVD players, refrigerators, freezers, mobile phones, MP3 players, etc., which have been disposed of by their original users. E-waste contains many hazardous constituents that may negatively impact the environment and affect human health if not properly managed. Various organizations, bodies, and governments of many countries have adopted and/or developed the environmentally sound options and strategies for E-waste management to tackle the ever growing threat of E-waste to the environment and human health. This paper presents E-waste composition, categorization, Global and Indian E-waste scenarios, prospects of recoverable, recyclable, and hazardous materials found in the E-waste, Best Available Practices, recycling, and recovery processes followed, and their environmental and occupational hazards. Based on the discussion, various challenges for E-waste management particularly in India are delineated, and needed policy interventions were discussed. PMID:20151189

Wath, Sushant B; Dutt, P S; Chakrabarti, T

2010-02-12

2

Global warming factors modelled for 40 generic municipal waste management scenarios.  

PubMed

Global warming factors (kg CO(2)-eq.-tonne(-1) of waste) have been modelled for 40 different municipal waste management scenarios involving a variety of recycling systems (paper, glass, plastic and organics) and residual waste management by landfilling, incineration or mechanical-biological waste treatment. For average European waste composition most waste management scenarios provided negative global warming factors and hence overall savings in greenhouse gas emissions: Scenarios with landfilling saved 0-400, scenarios with incineration saved 200-700, and scenarios with mechanical-biological treatment saved 200- 750 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne(- 1) municipal waste depending on recycling scheme and energy recovery. Key parameters were the amount of paper recycled (it was assumed that wood made excessive by paper recycling substituted for fossil fuel), the crediting of the waste management system for the amount of energy recovered (hard-coal-based energy was substituted), and binding of biogenic carbon in landfills. Most other processes were of less importance. Rational waste management can provide significant savings in society's emission of greenhouse gas depending on waste composition and efficient utilization of the energy recovered. PMID:19837711

Christensen, Thomas H; Simion, Federico; Tonini, Davide; Møller, Jacob

2009-10-16

3

Scenario of solid waste management in present Indian context  

Microsoft Academic Search

A trend of significant increase in municipal solid waste generation has been recorded worldwide. This has been found due to over population growth rate, industrialization, urbanization and economic growth. Consumerism speed has been found very high covering around more then 50% of total population since last decade due to higher economic growth, which has ultimately resulted in increased solid waste

R. Rajput; G. Prasad; A. K. Chopra

4

Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Composition, and Management: The World Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the abridgment of the waste generated from domestic, commercial, and construction activities by natural persons that is collected and treated by municipalities. Exponential growth of population and urbanization, and the development of social economy, coupled with the improvement of living standard, have resulted in an increase in the amount of MSW generation throughout the world.

Tanmoy Karak; R. M. Bhagat; Pradip Bhattacharyya

2012-01-01

5

Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Composition and Management: The World Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the abridgment of the waste generated from domestic, commercial and construction activities by natural persons which is collected and treated by municipalities. Exponential growth of population, urbanization, development of social economy, coupled with improvement of living standard have resulted in an increase in the amount of MSW generation throughout the world. On an average the

TANMOY KARAK; R. M. BHAGAT; PRADIP BHATTACHARYYA

2011-01-01

6

Electronic waste management cost: a scenario-based analysis for Greece.  

PubMed

Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is recognized as a priority waste stream internationally, mostly due to their volume and hazardousness. This paper presents an analysis for the quantification of WEEE management cost for Greece, taking into consideration scenarios for reverse logistics network's development and WEEE volume scenarios. Transportation cost, which represents a major cost element for any reverse logistics network, is modelled with the use of mathematical programming, targeting towards the optimization of locations for the development of required intermediate storage infrastructures. Additionally, overall operational cost and recycling fees are estimated. PMID:21242175

Achillas, Ch; Vlachokostas, Ch; Moussiopoulos, N; Perkoulidis, G; Banias, G; Mastropavlos, M

2011-01-17

7

Topical Report on Release Scenario Analysis of Long-Term Management of High-Level Defense Waste at the Hanford Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Potential release scenarios for the defense high-level waste (HLW) on the Hanford Site are presented. Presented in this report are the three components necessary for evaluating the various alternatives under consideration for long-term management of Hanfo...

R. W. Wallace D. K. Landstrom S. C. Blair B. W. Howes M. A. Robkin

1980-01-01

8

Topical report on release scenario analysis of long-term management of high-level defense waste at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Potential release scenarios for the defense high-level waste (HLW) on the Hanford Site are presented. Presented in this report are the three components necessary for evaluating the various alternatives under consideration for long-term management of Hanford defense HLW: identification of scenarios and events which might directly or indirectly disrupt radionuclide containment barriers; geotransport calculations of waste migration through the site media; and consequence (dose) analyses based on groundwater and air pathways calculations. The scenarios described in this report provide the necessary parameters for radionuclide transport and consequence analysis. Scenarios are categorized as either bounding or nonbounding. Bounding scenarios consider worst case or what if situations where an actual and significant release of waste material to the environment would happen if the scenario were to occur. Bounding scenarios include both near-term and long-term scenarios. Near-term scenarios are events which occur at 100 years from 1990. Long term scenarios are potential events considered to occur at 1000 and 10,000 years from 1990. Nonbounding scenarios consider events which result in insignificant releases or no release at all to the environment. Three release mechanisms are described in this report: (1) direct exposure of waste to the biosphere by a defined sequence of events (scenario) such as human intrusion by drilling; (2) radionuclides contacting an unconfined aquifer through downward percolation of groundwater or a rising water table; and (3) cataclysmic or explosive release of radionuclides by such mechanisms as meteorite impact, fire and explosion, criticality, or seismic events. Scenarios in this report present ways in which these release mechanisms could occur at a waste management facility. The scenarios are applied to the two in-tank waste management alternatives: in-situ disposal and continued present action.

Wallace, R.W.; Landstrom, D.K.; Blair, S.C.; Howes, B.W.; Robkin, M.A.; Benson, G.L.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Walters, W.H.; Zimmerman, M.G.

1980-11-01

9

A study on the comparison of the various waste management scenarios for PET bottles using the life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison study on the various waste management scenarios of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles has been carried out using the life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The energy and material balances were set up to account for all the energy consumed and the emissions released by each stage of the production and waste management phases of the life-cycle of the PET bottles,

Hyun-Seob Song; Jae Chun Hyun

1999-01-01

10

Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China  

SciTech Connect

A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-11-15

11

Scenario management and automated scenario generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The military planning process utilizes simulation to determine the appropriate course of action (COA) that will achieve a campaign end state. However, due to the difficulty in developing and generating simulation level COAs, only a few COAs are simulated. This may have been appropriate for traditional conflicts but the evolution of warfare from attrition based to effects based strategies, as well as the complexities of 4th generation warfare and asymmetric adversaries have placed additional demands on military planners and simulation. To keep pace with this dynamic, changing environment, planners must be able to perform continuous, multiple, "what-if" COA analysis. Scenario management and generation are critical elements to achieving this goal. An effects based scenario generation research project demonstrated the feasibility of automated scenario generation techniques which support multiple stove-pipe and emerging broad scope simulations. This paper will discuss a case study in which the scenario generation capability was employed to support COA simulations to identify plan effectiveness. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of using multiple simulation runs to evaluate the effectiveness of alternate COAs in achieving the overall campaign (metrics-based) objectives. The paper will discuss how scenario generation technology can be employed to allow military commanders and mission planning staff to understand the impact of command decisions on the battlespace of tomorrow.

McKeever, William; Gilmour, Duane; Lehman, Lynn; Stirtzinger, Anthony; Krause, Lee

2006-06-01

12

Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Productivity Commission?s inquiry report into ?Waste Management? was released in December 2006. The Australian Government asked the Commission to identify policies that would enable Australia to address market failures and externalities associated with the generation and disposal of waste, and recommend how resource efficiencies can be optimised to improve economic, environmental and social outcomes. In the final report, the

Anonymous

2006-01-01

13

Future waste treatment and energy systems - examples of joint scenarios.  

PubMed

Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project. PMID:23932196

Münster, M; Finnveden, G; Wenzel, H

2013-08-08

14

Management of keratoconus: current scenario.  

PubMed

Keratoconus is an ectatic corneal dystrophy and is a leading indication for corneal transplantation surgery worldwide. The disease was first described in detail more than 150 years ago by Dr John Nottingham, but the understanding of the disease and its management have undergone significant changes over the last few decades. Corneal specialists have adopted new techniques and technologies for the effective management of keratoconus, while adhering to the age-old concepts of contact lens fitting and penetrating keratoplasty. Lamellar keratoplasty has been revived with improved outcomes and devices such as intracorneal ring segments are being used to treat cases of early keratoconus effectively. This review article discusses the current scenario on the surgical as well as non-surgical management of keratoconus with a focus on the established, novel and emerging treatment modalities. PMID:20693553

Jhanji, Vishal; Sharma, Namrata; Vajpayee, Rasik B

2010-08-07

15

Scenarios, Real Options and Integrated Risk Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1970s, scenario planning gained prominence as a strategic management tool. Scenario planning encourages managers to envision plausible future states of the world and consider how to take advantage of opportunities and avoid potential threats. In the last decade, finance researchers have developed real option analysis as a way to value investments under uncertainty. Scenario planning and real option

Kent D. Miller; H. Gregory Waller

2003-01-01

16

Life cycle impact assessment and interpretation of municipal solid waste management scenarios based on the midpoint and endpoint approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Few studies have examined differing interpretations of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) results between midpoints and endpoints\\u000a for the same systems. This paper focuses on the LCIA of municipal solid waste (MSW) systems by taking both the midpoint and\\u000a endpoint approaches and uses LIME (Life Cycle Impact Assessment Method based on Endpoint Modeling, version 2006). With respect\\u000a to global and

Sora Yi; Kiyo H. Kurisu; Keisuke Hanaki

17

Environmental performance of construction waste: Comparing three scenarios from a case study in Catalonia, Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this paper is to evaluate environmental impacts of construction wastes in terms of the LIFE 98 ENV\\/E\\/351 project. Construction wastes are classified in accordance with the Life Program Environment Directive of the European Commission. Three different scenarios to current waste management from a case study in Catalonia (Spain) have been compared: landfilling, recycling and incineration, and

O. Ortiz; J. C. Pasqualino; F. Castells

2010-01-01

18

Crises, scenarios and the strategic management process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of this exploratory paper is to consider the strategic importance of crisis management and integration of crisis planning with the organisation's strategy processes, in particular the utilisation of scenario planning as a crisis planning activity. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A review of the crisis management literature was undertaken and key issues identified, subsequently strategic aspects of crisis management

David Pollard; Sabine Hotho

2006-01-01

19

Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.  

SciTech Connect

A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

2008-08-01

20

Climate impact analysis of waste treatment scenarios--thermal treatment of commercial and pretreated waste versus landfilling in Austria.  

PubMed

A major challenge for modern waste management lies in a smart integration of waste-to-energy installations in local energy systems in such a way that the energy efficiency of the waste-to-energy plant is optimized and that the energy contained in the waste is, therefore, optimally utilized. The extent of integration of thermal waste treatment processes into regular energy supply systems plays a major role with regard to climate control. In this research, the specific waste management situation looked at scenarios aiming at maximizing the energy recovery from waste (i.e. actual scenario and waste-to-energy process with 75% energy efficiency [22.5% electricity, 52.5% heat]) yield greenhouse gas emission savings due to the fact that more greenhouse gas emissions are avoided in the energy sector than caused by the various waste treatment processes. Comparing dedicated waste-to-energy-systems based on the combined heat and power (CHP) process with concepts based on sole electricity production, the energy efficiency proves to be crucial with regard to climate control. This underlines the importance of choosing appropriate sites for waste-to-energy-plants. This research was looking at the effect with regard to the climate impact of various waste management scenarios that could be applied alternatively by a private waste management company in Austria. The research is, therefore, based on a specific set of data for the waste streams looked at (waste characteristics, logistics needed, etc.). Furthermore, the investigated scenarios have been defined based on the actual available alternatives with regard to the usage of treatment plants for this specific company. The standard scenarios for identifying climate impact implications due to energy recovery from waste are based on the respective marginal energy data for the power and heat generation facilities/industrial processes in Austria. PMID:19748941

Ragossnig, A M; Wartha, C; Pomberger, R

2009-09-11

21

Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the

A. Policastro; J. Roglans-Ribas; D. Marmer; M. Lazaro; C. Mueller; W. Freeman

1994-01-01

22

Enrollment Management Study: Five Scenarios.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of enrollment level changes on the long-range future of Western Washington University are investigated. Due to the high rate of Washington state in-migration, declining enrollments are not projected for Western Washington University. The impact of managed enrollment goals was examined to help the university determine the most…

Albers, James R.; Burns, James A.

23

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03

24

Social assessment of waste energy utilization scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Center of Technology Assessment in Stuttgart (Germany) constructed four energy scenarios for the year 2005 and 2020 referring to the German State of Baden-Württemberg. All these scenarios are based on the promise of the German government to reduce Carbon dioxide emissions by 25% in the year 2005, and there is a commitment of a 45% reduction for the year

Ortwin Renn

2003-01-01

25

CHAPTER 16. WASTE MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The chapter discusses global methane (CH4) emissions from waste management. t begins with a brief overview of how CH4 is generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste and then discusses in detail landfills, wastewater treatment lagoons, and livestock waste management. urren...

26

Waste management overview  

SciTech Connect

This article is a review of ongoing low and high-level radioactive waste management efforts in the major waste-generating areas of the world. Low-level waste disposal efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia are discussed, while high-level waste disposal efforts in the Unite States, Canada, Europe, and Asia are noted.

NONE

1994-12-31

27

Environmental evaluation of waste treatment scenarios for the towns Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut, Russia.  

PubMed

Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug - Ugra in Siberia has recently started to play a major role in the Russian economy because key oil and gas extraction sites are located in this region. As a result, the extensions of infrastructure and higher incomes have been leading to an accelerated population growth and consequent increase in the generation of solid household waste. The current methods of waste disposal have now reached their limits, especially in the towns Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut. The key objectives of this study were to identify the influence of waste composition and transport routes on the life cycle assessment (LCA) results and to assess the current waste treatment option for solid household waste and to compare it with proposed scenarios. Furthermore, recommendations for an optimal use of LCA within a decision-making process for a waste management plan are presented. LCA methodology was used to evaluate different waste management scenarios such as landfilling and incineration. One result was that the options 'incineration with recycling' and 'anaerobic mechanical-biological treatment with recycling' demonstrated lower environmental impact in both Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut. Another finding was that there were hardly any differences in the ranking of the scenarios for Surgut and Khanty-Mansiysk. However, the special socio-cultural circumstances and location of each town have to be considered seriously in the development of a sustainable waste management plan. PMID:23381971

Kaazke, Julia; Meneses, Montse; Wilke, Berndt-Michael; Rotter, Vera Susanne

2013-02-04

28

Biosolids - a fuel or a waste? An integrated appraisal of five co-combustion scenarios with policy analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated appraisal of five technology scenarios for the co-combustion of biosolids in the UK energy and waste management policy context is presented. Co-combustion scenarios with coal, municipal solid waste, wood, and for cement manufacture were subject to thermodynamic and materials flow modeling and evaluated by 19 stakeholder representatives. All scenarios provided a net energy gain (0.58-5.0 kWh\\/kg dry solids),

Elise Cartmell; Peter Gostelow; Drusilla Riddell-Black; Nigel Simms; John Oakey; Joe Morris; Paul Jeffrey; Peter Howsam; Simon J. Pollard

2006-01-01

29

'WISP' A Simple Radioactive Waste Management Computer Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the radioactive waste management program WISP. WISP was developed for rapid comparative assessment of different nuclear scenarios and fuel reprocessing strategies. It provides tables and graphs of low, intermediate and high level wast...

G. Beavan

1987-01-01

30

Intruder Scenarios for Site-Specific Waste Classification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently revising its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities that support defense missions. The draft DOE policy calls for DOE LLW operations to ...

W. E. Kennedy

1988-01-01

31

Nuclear waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A. M.; Powell, J. A.

1980-09-01

32

Activation/waste management  

SciTech Connect

The selection of materials and the design of the blankets for fusion reactors have significant effects upon the radioactivity generated by neutron activation in the materials. This section considers some aspects of materials selection with respect to waste management. The activation of the materials is key to remote handling requirements for waste, to processing and disposal methods for waste, and to accident severity in waste management operations. In order to realize the desirable evnironmental potentials of fusion power systems, there are at least three major goals for waste management. These are: (a) near-surface burial; (b) disposal on-site of the fusion reactor; (c) acceptable radiation doses at least cost during and after waste management operations.

Maninger, C.

1984-10-01

33

Characterization and inventories of nuclear materials and wastes for possible future energy scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Awareness of the total materials inventory and materials balance associated with differing methods for energy generation is part of present day concerns associated with disparate areas that include atmospheric emissions, resource utilization, health effects, and both current and long term hazards and risks. Nuclear energy, for a number of decades, has been the recipient of significant scrutiny concerning the materials and wastes it generates, particularly in the context of long term solutions to such issues. This paper examines the nuclear materials and waste generation for nuclear energy scenarios spanning the coming century. The paper also briefly addresses wastes (in the form of emissions) from other energy sources and examines requirements associated with backend energy system materials management. Possible future requirements pertaining to CO{sub 2} management are found to place conditions upon waste management generally similar to those for nuclear waste. One example of material flows for the case of coal generation of electricity coupled with carbon sequestration is also given.

Arthur, E.D.

1997-10-01

34

[Environmental management: critical analysis, scenarios and challenges].  

PubMed

This article discusses the limits, alternatives and challenges of environmental management in contemporary globalized capitalist societies. It is based on a critical analysis supported by authors from social sciences, political ecology and public health. To this end, we systematize the meaning of hegemonic environmental management in terms of eco-efficiency and its limits to tackle environmental risks and construct democratic processes and societies. We developed four ideal scenarios involving possible combinations of environmental management and democracy. This model served as a base, together with academic studies and the theoretical and militant experience of the authors, for a reflection on the current characteristics and future trends of environmental management and democracy, with emphasis on the reality of Latin America, specifically Brazil. Lastly, we discuss possibilities for social transformation taking into consideration the contradictions and emancipatory alternatives resulting from confrontations between hegemonic tendencies of the market and counter-hegemonic utopias and social movements. The latter assume principles of environmental justice, economic solidarity, agro-ecology and sustainability as well as the construction of new epistemologies. PMID:22699636

Porto, Marcelo Firpo de Souza; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo

2012-06-01

35

Scenario Tools For Efficient Eutrophication Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several possible measures are available to reduce diffuse (non-point source) nutri- ent load to surface water and thereby reduce eutrophication. Such measures include changed arable practices and constructions of wetlands and buffer zones in the land- scape, as well as managing lake ecosystems. In some cases, such as for wetlands, there is an intense debate regarding the efficiency of their nutrient reducing capability. In ad- dition, the combined effect of several measures in a catchment is not necessarily equal to their sum. It is therefore important to apply a holistic and integrated catchment approach when applying and evaluating different management strategies. To facili- tate such catchment analyses, the Swedish water management research programme (VASTRA) develop modelling tools addressing both phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in catchments. During the last three years decision support tools for N man- agement in rivers and lakes have been developed (e.g., HBV-N, BIOLA) and applied in scenarios to demonstrate the effect of various reducing measures. At present, similar tools for P are under development. This presentation will demonstrate the VASTRA tool-box and its applications for efficient eutrophication management.

Arheimer, B.; Vastra SP3 Team

36

MULTI SCENARIO PELLET FUEL MANUFACTURING OPERATION UTILIZING COTTON WASTE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Prior work demonstrated the economic feasibility of gin waste based pellet fuel operations. The goal of this project was expand the original economic model to include a multi-scenario manufacturing approach to improve the economics of the process. The objectives required a complete and comprehensive...

37

Decision-making methodology for management of hazardous waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

A decision-making methodology is presented that combines systems and risk analysis techniques to evaluate hazardous waste management practices associated with DOE weapon production operations. The methodology provides a systematic approach to examining waste generation and waste handling practices in addition to the more visible disposal practices. Release-exposure scenarios for hazardous waste operations are identified and operations risk is determined. Comparisons

J. S. Philbin; R. M. Cranwell

1988-01-01

38

Solid-Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

Science Teacher, 1973

1973-01-01

39

Solid-Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

Science Teacher, 1973

1973-01-01

40

Radioactive Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Management of radioactive wastes is necessary to protect public health, public safety, and the environment from radioactive materials resulting from national defense programs, energy research and development, and commercial activities. Access to informati...

1990-01-01

41

Nuclear waste management worldwide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous countries around the world are tackling the task of managing nuclear waste. By considering their approaches, we gain a broader perspective on the US program.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Charles McCombie

1997-01-01

42

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01

43

[Recommendations for waste management].  

PubMed

Laboratory waste management must ensure the safety of patients and staff, limiting the environmental impacts and control waste disposal budget. Sorting of waste must be carried out at the source. The packaging must be adapted, allowing easy identification of specific disposal routes. With regard to wastes for human or animal health care and/or related research (DASRI), packages must comply with the regulations, standards and ADR if necessary. Storage provisions differ according to the amount of DASRI produced. Waste collection is carried out directly on the place of activity by a certified service provider. Non pre-treated DASRI is incinerated in specific approved plants for a T ° > 1,200 °C. Special provisions also exist for chemical waste and radioactive waste, the latter being regulated by ANDRA. PMID:23765028

Vinner, E; Odou, M F; Fovet, B; Ghnassia, J C

2013-06-01

44

Managing solvent wastes  

SciTech Connect

There are economic and regulatory incentives for considering alternatives to the direct land disposal of solvent-bearing hazardous waste streams (EPA Hazardous Waste Codes: F001, F002, F003, F004, and F005). These alternatives include recycle/reuse (including use as a fuel substitute), destruction of a stream's solvent component, and treatment prior to land disposal. This paper reviews these three waste management alternatives and discusses their applicability to solvent waste streams having various physical characteristics. Seven waste treatment techniques which may be used to handle solvent wastes are described: incineration, agitated thin-film evaporation, fractional distillation, steam stripping, wet oxidation, carbon adsorption, and activated sludge biological treatment.3 tables.

Blaney, B.L.

1986-03-01

45

SUSTAINABILITY AND WASTE MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a need to move toward a more sustainable use of resources. Concern for the environment and future generations is leading us to shift the focus from waste management to resource management. This paper provides an overview of a decision support tool that provides a holis...

46

Environmental performance of construction waste: Comparing three scenarios from a case study in Catalonia, Spain  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to evaluate environmental impacts of construction wastes in terms of the LIFE 98 ENV/E/351 project. Construction wastes are classified in accordance with the Life Program Environment Directive of the European Commission. Three different scenarios to current waste management from a case study in Catalonia (Spain) have been compared: landfilling, recycling and incineration, and these scenarios were evaluated by means of Life Cycle Assessment. The recommendations of the Catalan Waste Catalogue and the European Waste Catalogue have been taken into account. Also, the influence of transport has been evaluated. Results show that in terms of the Global Warming Potential, the most environmentally friendly treatment was recycling, followed by incineration and lastly landfilling. According to the influence of treatment plants location on the GWP indicator, we observe that incineration and recycling of construction wastes are better than landfilling, even for long distances from the building site to the plants. This is true for most wastes except for the stony types, than should be recycled close to the building site. In summary, data from construction waste of a Catalan case study was evaluated using the well established method of LCA to determine the environmental impacts.

Ortiz, O., E-mail: oscarortiz@unipamplona.edu.c [Rovira i Virgili University, Environmental Analysis and Management Group (AGA), Chemical Engineering Department, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007, Tarragona (Spain); University of Pamplona, Department of Industrial Engineering, Km 1 Via Bucaramanga, Pamplona, N de S (Colombia); Pasqualino, J.C.; Castells, F. [Rovira i Virgili University, Environmental Analysis and Management Group (AGA), Chemical Engineering Department, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007, Tarragona (Spain)

2010-04-15

47

Scenario of solid waste reuse in Khulna city of Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect

The reuse and recycling of waste materials are now sincerely considered to be an integral part of solid waste management in many parts of the world. In this context, a vast number of options ranging from small scale decentralized to larger scale centralized plants have been adopted. This study aimed at investigating the waste reuse schemes in Khulna city located in the southern part of Bangladesh and ranked third largest city in the country. The shops for reusable material (SRM) were mostly situated around railway, waterway, and truck station markets which provided easy transportation to further locations. For the reuses of waste materials and products, a chain system was found to collect reusable wastes under a total number of 310 identified SRM with 859 persons directly or indirectly involved in the scheme. This was a decentralized waste management system with self sufficient (autonomous) management. According to mass balance, about 38.52 tons d{sup -1} solid wastes were reused in Khulna city area, accounting for 7.65% of the total generated wastes. This study revealed that apparently a silent, systematic, smooth, and clean reuse chain has been established in Khulna city area under private initiatives, whose sustainability was confirmed over the years in the country without any official or formal funds. However, proper adjustment between the higher and lower chain in the materials flow path, as well as personal hygiene training for the workers, would further improve the achievements of the established reuse scheme.

Bari, Quazi H., E-mail: qhbari@yahoo.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technology, Khulna 9203 (Bangladesh); Mahbub Hassan, K. [Department of Civil Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technology, Khulna 9203 (Bangladesh); Haque, R. [Project Builders Ltd., Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

2012-12-15

48

Biosolids - a fuel or a waste? An integrated appraisal of five co-combustion scenarios with policy analysis  

SciTech Connect

An integrated appraisal of five technology scenarios for the co-combustion of biosolids in the UK energy and waste management policy context is presented. Co-combustion scenarios with coal, municipal solid waste, wood, and for cement manufacture were subject to thermodynamic and materials flow modeling and evaluated by 19 stakeholder representatives. All scenarios provided a net energy gain (0.58-5.0 kWh/kg dry solids), having accounted for the energy required for transportation and sludge drying. Co-combustion within the power generation and industrial (e.g., cement) sectors is most readily implemented but provides poor water utility control, and it suffers from poor public perception. Co-combustion with wastes or biomass appears more sustainable but requires greater investment and presents significant risks to water utilities. Incongruities within current energy and waste management policy are discussed and conclusions for improved understanding are drawn. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Elise Cartmell; Peter Gostelow; Drusilla Riddell-Black; Nigel Simms; John Oakey; Joe Morris; Paul Jeffrey; Peter Howsam; Simon J. Pollard [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Sustainable Systems Department, School of Industrial and Manufacturing Science

2006-02-01

49

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2013-07-01

50

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2013-07-01

51

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2010-07-01

52

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2010-07-01

53

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2009-07-01

54

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2009-07-01

55

Intruder scenarios for site-specific low-level radioactive waste classification  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has revised its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities supporting defense missions. Specifically, draft DOE Order 5820.2A, Chapter 3 describes the purpose, policy, and requirements necessary for the management of defense LLW. The draft DOE policy calls for LLW operations to be managed to protect the health and safety of the public, preserve the environment, and ensure that no remedial action will be necessary after termination of operations. The basic approach used by DOE is to establish overall performance objectives, in terms of groundwater protection and public radiation dose limits, and to require site-specific performance assessments to determine compliance. As a result of these performance assessments, each site will develop waste acceptance criteria that define the allowable quantities and concentrations of specific radioisotopes. Additional limitations on waste disposal design, waste form, and waste treatment will also be developed on a site-specific basis. As a key step in the site-specific performance assessments, an evaluation must be conducted of potential radiation doses to intruders who may inadvertently move onto a closed DOE LLW disposal site after loss of institutional controls. This report (1) describes the types of intruder scenarios that should be considered when performing this step of the site-specific performance assessment, (2) provides the results of generic calculations performed using unit concentrations of various radionuclides as a comparison of the magnitude of importance of the various intruder scenarios, and (3) shows the relationship between the generic doses and waste classification limits for defense wastes.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

1988-09-01

56

Waste Management Process Improvement Project  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle.

Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

2002-02-25

57

Agricultural Waste Management Field Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The manual is intended primarily for use by SCS field personnel in planning and installing agricultural waste management systems. Major emphasis is on management of wastes from concentrated livestock operations although recycling or disposal of solid and ...

1975-01-01

58

Waste Management Technical Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Manual has been prepared to provide a documented compendium of the technical bases and general physical features of Isochem Incorporated's Waste Management Program. The manual is intended to be used as a means of training and as a reference handbook ...

J. S. Buckingham

1967-01-01

59

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26

60

Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

61

Simulating Household Waste Management Behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reports the outcome of research to demonstrate the proof of concept for simulating individual, collective and interactive household waste management behaviours to provide a tool for efficient integrated waste management planning. The developed model simulates whole communities as distributions of individual households engaged in managing their own domestic waste, through home composting or recycling activities. The research addresses

Peter Tucker; Duncan Smith

1999-01-01

62

The holistic impact of integrated solid waste management on greenhouse gas emissions in Phuket  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continually increasing amounts of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the limited capacity of the existing waste management system in Phuket have led to the consideration of integrated waste management system (IWMS). Life cycle assessment (LCA) was employed to compare the greenhouse gas emissions expressed as global warming potential (GWP) of the existing waste management system (the base scenario) and other

Chalita Liamsanguan; Shabbir H. Gheewala

2008-01-01

63

Modeling potential outcomes of fire and fuel management scenarios ...  

Treesearch

... management scenarios and compared vegetation trends against the natural range of ... thinning, prescribed fire) resulted in total area of closed-canopy large- and ... Lynx canadensis, Interior Northwest Landscape Analysis System (INLAS),  ...

64

Radioactive Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Issues related to the management of radioactive wastes are presented with specific emphasis on high-level wastes generated as a result of energy and materials production using nuclear reactors. The final disposition of these high-level wastes depends on which nuclear fuel cycle is pursued, and range from once-through burning of fuel in a light water reactor followed by direct disposal in a geologic repository to more advanced fuel cycles (AFCs) where the spent fuel is reprocessed or partitioned to recover the fissile material (primarily 235U and 239Pu) as well as the minor actinides (MAs) (neptunium, americium, and curium) and some long-lived fission products (e.g., 99Tc and 129I). In the latter fuel cycle, the fissile materials are recycled through a reactor to produce more energy, the short-lived fission products are vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository, and the minor actinides and long-lived fission products are converted to less radiotoxic or otherwise stable nuclides by a process called transmutation. The advantages and disadvantages of the various fuel cycle options and the challenges to the management of nuclear wastes they represent are discussed.

Baisden, P. A.; Atkins-Duffin, C. E.

65

Scenarios for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios describing representative exposure cases associated with the disposal of low activity waste from the Hanford Waste Tanks have been defined. These scenarios are based on guidance from the Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and previous Hanford waste disposal performance assessments.

MANN, F.M.

1999-03-17

66

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2013-07-01

67

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2010-07-01

68

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2009-07-01

69

Waste Classification: A Management Approach.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A waste classification system designed to quantify the total hazard of a waste has been developed by the Low-Level Waste Management Program. As originally conceived, the system was designed to deal with mixed radioactive waste. The methodology has been de...

L. E. Wickham

1984-01-01

70

Management of municipal solid waste incineration residues  

SciTech Connect

The management of residues from thermal waste treatment is an integral part of waste management systems. The primary goal of managing incineration residues is to prevent any impact on our health or environment caused by unacceptable particulate, gaseous and/or solute emissions. This paper provides insight into the most important measures for putting this requirement into practice. It also offers an overview of the factors and processes affecting these mitigating measures as well as the short- and long-term behavior of residues from thermal waste treatment under different scenarios. General conditions affecting the emission rate of salts and metals are shown as well as factors relevant to mitigating measures or sources of gaseous emissions.

Sabbas, T.; Polettini, A.; Pomi, R.; Astrup, T.; Hjelmar, O.; Mostbauer, P.; Cappai, G.; Magel, G.; Salhofer, S.; Speiser, C.; Heuss-Assbichler, S.; Klein, R.; Lechner, P

2003-07-01

71

Fernald waste management and disposition  

SciTech Connect

Historically waste management within the Department of Energy complex has evolved around the operating principle of packaging waste generated and storing until a later date. In many cases wastes were delivered to onsite waste management organizations with little or no traceability to origin of generation. Sites then stored their waste for later disposition offsite or onsite burial. While the wastes were stored, sites incurred additional labor costs for maintaining, inspecting and repackaging containers and capital costs for storage warehouses. Increased costs, combined with the inherent safety hazards associated with storage of hazardous material make these practices less attractive. This paper will describe the methods used at the Department of Energy`s Fernald site by the Waste Programs Management Division to integrate with other site divisions to plan in situ waste characterization prior to removal. This information was utilized to evaluate and select disposal options and then to package and ship removed wastes without storage.

West, M.L.; Fisher, L.A.; Frost, M.L. [Fernald Environmental Management Project, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rast, D.M.

1995-01-30

72

Modeling municipal solid waste management system under uncertainty.  

PubMed

In this study, a dynamic inexact waste management (DIWM) model is developed for identifying optimal waste-flow-allocation and facility-capacity-expansion strategies under uncertainty and is based on an inexact scenario-based probabilistic programming (ISPP) approach. The DIWM model can handle uncertainties presented as interval values and probability distributions, and it can support assessing the risk of violating system constraints. Several violation levels for facility-capacity and waste-diversion constraints are examined. Solutions associated with different risks of constraint violation were generated. The modeling results are valuable for supporting the planning of the study city's municipal solid waste (MSW) management practices, the long-term capacity expansion for waste management system, and the identification of desired policies regarding waste diversion. Sensitivity analyses are also undertaken to demonstrate that the violations of different constraints have varied effects on the planning of waste-flow allocation, facility expansion, and waste management cost. PMID:20437779

Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe

2010-04-01

73

Healthcare waste management in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-care waste management in India is receiving greater attention due to recent regulations (the Biomedical Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998). The prevailing situation is analysed covering various issues like quantities and proportion of different constituents of wastes, handling, treatment and disposal methods in various health-care units (HCUs). The waste generation rate ranges between 0·5 and 2·0kg bed?1day?1. It is

A. D. Patil; A. V. Shekdar

2001-01-01

74

ACCELERATOR TRANSMUTATION OF WASTE TECHNOLOGY AND IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIOS  

SciTech Connect

During 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy, in conjunction with its nuclear laboratories, a national steering committee, and a panel of world experts, developed a roadmap for research, development, demonstration, and deployment of Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW). The ATW concept that was examined in this roadmap study was based on that developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during the 1990s. The reference deployment scenario in the Roadmap was developed to treat 86,300 tn (metric tonnes initial heavy metal) of spent nuclear fuel that will accumulate through 2035 from existing U.S. nuclear power plants (without license extensions). The disposition of this spent nuclear reactor fuel is an issue of national importance, as is disposition of spent fuel in other nations. The U.S. program for the disposition of this once-through fuel is focused to characterize a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for a geological repository for spent fuel and high-level waste. The ATW concept is being examined in the U.S. because removal of plutonium minor actinides, and two very long-lived isotopes from the spent fuel can achieve some important objectives. These objectives include near-elimination of plutonium, reduction of the inventory and mobility of long-lived radionuclides in the repository, and use of the remaining energy content of the spent fuel to produce power. The long-lived radionuclides iodine and technetium have roughly one million year half-lives, and they are candidates for transport into the environment via movement of ground water. The scientists and engineers who contributed to the Roadmap Study determined that the ATW is affordable, doable, and its deployment would support all the objectives. We report the status of the U.S. ATW program describe baseline and alternate technologies, and discuss deployment scenarios to support the existing U.S. nuclear capability and/or future growth with a variety of new fuel cycles.

D. BELLER; G. VAN TUYLE

2000-11-01

75

Waste management systems model for energy systems sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a model on the Oak Ridge Reservation which provides requirements for determining capacities and capabilities related to low-level, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In FY 1987, the model will be sufficiently advanced to provide various waste management scenarios. These scenarios will be compared technically, operationally, and financially by use of waste characterization data and process simulators that are currently

B. R. Rodgers; J. W. Jr. Nehls; A. L. Rivera; W. H. Pechin; R. K. Genung

1986-01-01

76

Agricultural waste utilization and management  

SciTech Connect

These papers were presented at a symposium on the management and use of agricultural waste products, including food industry wastes. Topics covered include fat and protein recovery from fish wastes, treatments for straw to improve its digestibility, using food industry wastes as animal feeds, various manure treatments and studies of its combustion properties, fermentation, methane and ethanol production, hemp waste water treatment, and heat recovery from manure combustion.

Not Available

1985-01-01

77

Medical waste management in Korea.  

PubMed

The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed of in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities (e.g. inadequately controlled incinerators) in Korea. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better manage the waste from healthcare facilities. This paper presents an overview of the current management practices of medical waste in Korea. Information regarding generation, composition, segregation, transportation, and disposal of medical wastes is provided and discussed. Medical waste incineration is identified as the most preferred disposal method and will be the only available treatment option in late 2005. Faced with increased regulations over toxic air emissions (e.g. dioxins and furans), all existing small incineration facilities that do not have air pollution control devices will cease operation in the next few years. Large-scale medical waste incinerators would be responsible for the treatment of medical waste generated by most healthcare facilities in Korea. It is important to point out that there is a great potential to emit air toxic pollutants from such incinerators if improperly operated and managed, because medical waste typically contains a variety of plastic materials such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Waste minimization and recycling, control of toxic air emissions at medical waste incinerators, and alternative treatment methods to incineration are regarded to be the major challenges in the future. PMID:16338054

Jang, Yong-Chul; Lee, Cargro; Yoon, Oh-Sub; Kim, Hwidong

2005-12-09

78

Waste Management Process Improvement Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need

J. Atwood; G. Borden; G. R. Rangel

2002-01-01

79

Waste management units - Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

Not Available

1989-10-01

80

WebGIS-Based Flood Emergency Management Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

WebGIS provides key decision support capabilities for disaster and emergency management community. Perspective visualization and simultaneous access to emergency management data are among those capabilities that WebGIS provide in support of informed disaster management decisions-making process. This paper presents a WebGIS application for flood modeling for a section of the Don Valley watershed in Toronto, Canada. Different flooding scenarios under

Rifaat Abdalla; Keith Niall

2009-01-01

81

Waste management news: Automobile dealers obtain professional waste management services  

SciTech Connect

It started six years ago with the detection of oil oozing from the ground about 200 yards from a local auto dealership in a residential community. The problem was a leak in the dealership's waste disposal tank. This prompted the Dayton Area Automobile Dealers Association (DAADA) to contact Clark Processing, Inc. - a professional waste management company - to manage its waste disposal problem. This single incident marked the beginning of an environmentally sound program for managing hazardous and non-hazardous wastes by Dayton area dealerships. As an experienced leader in oil recovery, fuels blending and wastewater treatment, Clark collects liquid and solid organic wastes and converts them into usable, energy-efficient, high BTU combustible fuels for energy recovery or incineration. This recycling process reduces a significant amount of waste materials from landfills and provides environmentally sound procedures to recycle waste into fuel products.

Not Available

1989-12-01

82

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN TEHRAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the present status of solid waste management in Tehran, and subsequently, to draw up a policy regarding their generation, collection, on-site handling, storage, processing, recycling, transportation and safe disposal. Through a detailed survey, all functional elements of the present solid waste management system in Tehran were studied. Factors affecting the important

M. A. Abduli

1995-01-01

83

Waste management plan for the APT.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This revision of the APT Waste Management Plan details the waste management requirements and issues specific to the APT plant for design considerations, construction, and operation. The APT Waste Management Plan is by its nature a living document and will...

J. L. England

1997-01-01

84

Process simulation in waste management  

SciTech Connect

Waste minimization is an important component of any organization`s waste management program and is being increasingly demanded by upper management. The major objective of waste minimization is to reduce the amount of waste, the hazard of waste, or the difficulty in managing the waste by modifying raw materials, feed preparation, and the generating process, or altering effluent streams. Thus, waste management process simulation programs are a real necessity for conducting appropriate analyses of the existing processes that produce waste or modifying the existing processes to diminish waste production. This paper discusses the simulation package being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. An effort to develop a new simulation package has started at ORNL in the Chemical Technology Division. The purpose of developing this package is to make it available to all DOE installations for their own use in waste management and process analysis. One of the necessary features of the simulation package is user friendliness. User friendliness, for the development of this program is understood as a characteristic of the computer program that provides easy access to the process unit operations, a simple question-answer interface for data input, and straightforward program execution commands.

Ferrada, J.J.; Jackson, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leach, P.V. [University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States)

1992-05-01

85

Process simulation in waste management  

SciTech Connect

Waste minimization is an important component of any organization's waste management program and is being increasingly demanded by upper management. The major objective of waste minimization is to reduce the amount of waste, the hazard of waste, or the difficulty in managing the waste by modifying raw materials, feed preparation, and the generating process, or altering effluent streams. Thus, waste management process simulation programs are a real necessity for conducting appropriate analyses of the existing processes that produce waste or modifying the existing processes to diminish waste production. This paper discusses the simulation package being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. An effort to develop a new simulation package has started at ORNL in the Chemical Technology Division. The purpose of developing this package is to make it available to all DOE installations for their own use in waste management and process analysis. One of the necessary features of the simulation package is user friendliness. User friendliness, for the development of this program is understood as a characteristic of the computer program that provides easy access to the process unit operations, a simple question-answer interface for data input, and straightforward program execution commands.

Ferrada, J.J.; Jackson, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Leach, P.V. (University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1992-01-01

86

Using scenario analysis to determine managed care strategy.  

PubMed

In today's volatile healthcare environment, traditional planning tools are inadequate to guide financial managers of provider organizations in developing managed care strategies. These tools often disregard the uncertainty surrounding market forces such as employee benefit structure, the future of Medicare managed care, and the impact of consumer behavior. Scenario analysis overcomes this limitation by acknowledging the uncertain healthcare environment and articulating a set of plausible alternative futures, thus supplying financial executives with the perspective to craft strategies that can improve the market position of their organizations. By being alert for trigger points that might signal the rise of a specific scenario, financial managers can increase their preparedness for changes in market forces. PMID:11066387

Krentz, S E; Gish, R S

2000-09-01

87

Scenarios for the Hanford immobilized Low-Activity waste (ILAW) performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the next version of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is to provide an updated estimate of the long-term human health and environmental impact of the disposal of ILAW and to compare these estimates against performance objectives displayed in Tables 1,2, and 3 (Mann 1999a). Such a radiological performance assessment is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on radioactive waste management (DOE 1988a and DOE 1999a). This document defines the scenarios that will be used for the next update of the PA that is scheduled to be issued in 2001. Since the previous performance assessment (Mann 1998) was issued, considerable additional data on waste form behavior and site-specific soil geotechnical properties have been collected. In addition, the 2001 ILAW PA will benefit from improved computer models and the experience gained from the previous performance assessment. However, the scenarios (that is, the features, events, and processes analyzed in the Performance assessment) for the next PA are very similar to the ones in the 1998 PA.

MANN, F.M.

1999-09-09

88

Operational and regulatory impacts of regional management on transportation of commercial low-level radioactive waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current US low-level waste management situation and the conditions and requirements for management on a regional basis were examined. Using 1979 low-level waste volumes shipped to commercial burial grounds and six management regions, transportation requirements were estimated and compared for the two management scenarios in terms of cumulative shipping distance and transportation cost. Effects of these results on the

C. G. Shirley; E. L. Wilmot; E. W. Shepherd

1981-01-01

89

Human factors in waste management  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the role of human factors in radioactive waste management. Although few problems and ergonomics are special to radioactive waste management, some problems are unique especially with long term storage. The entire sociotechnical system must be looked at in order to see where improvement can take place because operator errors, as seen in Chernobyl and Bhopal, are ultimately the result of management errors.

Moray, N. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1994-10-01

90

Change Ahead: Transient Scenarios for Long-term Water Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the use of an ensemble of transient scenarios is common in climate change studies, they are rarely used in water management studies. Present planning studies on long-term water management often use a few plausible futures for one or two projection years, ignoring the dynamic aspect of adaptation through the interaction between the water system and society. Over the course of time society experiences, learns and adapts to changes and events, making policy responses part of a plausible future, and thus the success of a water management strategy. Exploring transient scenarios and policy options over time can support decision making on water management strategies in an uncertain and changing environment. We have developed and applied such a method, called exploring adaptation pathways (Haasnoot et al., 2012; Haasnoot et al., 2011). This method uses multiple realisations of transient scenarios to assess the efficacy of policy actions over time. In case specified objectives are not achieved anymore, an adaptation tipping point (Kwadijk et al., 2010) is reached. After reaching a tipping point, additional actions are needed to reach the objectives. As a result, a pathway emerges. In this presentation we describe the development of transient scenarios for long term water management, and how these scenarios can be used for long term water management under uncertainty. We illustrate this with thought experiments, and results from computational modeling experiment for exploring adaptation pathways in the lower Rhine delta. The results and the thought experiments show, among others, that climate variability is at least just as important as climate change for taking decisions in water management. References Haasnoot, M., Middelkoop, H., Offermans, A., Beek, E., Deursen, W.A.v. (2012) Exploring pathways for sustainable water management in river deltas in a changing environment. Climatic Change 115, 795-819. Haasnoot, M., Middelkoop, H., van Beek, E., van Deursen, W.P.A. (2011) A Method to Develop Sustainable Water Management Strategies for an Uncertain Future. Sustainable Development 19, 369-381. Kwadijk, J.C.J., Haasnoot, M., Mulder, J.P.M., Hoogvliet, M.M.C., Jeuken, A.B.M., van der Krogt, R.A.A., van Oostrom, N.G.C., Schelfhout, H.A., van Velzen, E.H., van Waveren, H., de Wit, M.J.M. (2010) Using adaptation tipping points to prepare for climate change and sea level rise: a case study in the Netherlands. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change 1, 729-740.

Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Beersma, Jules; Schellekens, Jaap

2013-04-01

91

Waste management models and their application to sustainable waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to review the types of models that are currently being used in the area of municipal waste management and to highlight some major shortcomings of these models. Most of the municipal waste models identified in the literature are decision support models and for the purposes of this research, are divided into three categories—those based

A. J. Morrissey; J Browne

2004-01-01

92

Life cycle assessment (LCA) of waste management strategies: Landfilling, sorting plant and incineration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of four waste management strategies: landfill without biogas utilization; landfill with biogas combustion to generate electricity; sorting plant which splits the inorganic waste fraction (used to produce electricity via Refuse Derived Fuels, RDF) from the organic waste fraction (used to produce biogas via anaerobic digestion); direct incineration of waste. These scenarios

Francesco Cherubini; Silvia Bargigli; Sergio Ulgiati

2009-01-01

93

Waste Management at WAK.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

After a short description of the WAK plant and its reprocessing and intervention activities, types and sources of WAK wastes are described. Roughly half of the waste volume is generated during reprocessing, the other half during intervention periods. Most...

K. D. Kuhn H. O. Willax

1986-01-01

94

Waste management units - Savannah River Site. Volume 1, Waste management unit worksheets  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

Not Available

1989-10-01

95

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273.52...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal...

2012-07-01

96

Waste Management Project Contingency Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this report is to provide the office of Waste Management (WM) with recommended contingency calculation procedures for typical WM projects. Typical projects were defined as conventional construction-type activities that use innovative elements when necessary to meet the project objectives. Projects involve treatment, storage, and disposal of low level, mixed low level, hazardous, transuranic, and high level waste.

Edward L. Parsons

1999-01-01

97

Waste heat: Utilization and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book is a presentation on waste heat management and utilization. Topics covered include cogeneration, recovery technology, low grade heat recovery, heat dispersion models, and ecological effects. The book focuses on the significant fraction of fuel energy that is rejected and expelled into the environment either as industrial waste or as a byproduct of installation\\/equipment operation. The feasibility of retrieving

S. Sengupta; S. S. Lee

1983-01-01

98

Waste Management Project Contingency Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to provide the office of Waste Management (WM) with recommended contingency calculation procedures for typical WM projects. Typical projects were defined as conventional construction-type activities that use innovative elemen...

E. L. Parsons

1999-01-01

99

Waste management models and their application to sustainable waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to review the types of models that are currently being used in the area of municipal waste management and to highlight some major shortcomings of these models. Most of the municipal waste models identified in the literature are decision support models and for the purposes of this research, are divided into three categories--those based on cost benefit analysis, those based on life cycle assessment and those based on multicriteria decision making. Shortcomings of current waste management models include that they are concerned with refinements of the evaluation steps (e.g. stage four of AHP or the improvement of weight allocations in ELECTRE) rather than addressing the decision making process itself. In addition, while many models recognise that for a waste management model to be sustainable, it must consider environmental, economic and social aspects, no model examined considered all three aspects together in the application of the model.

Morrissey, A.J.; Browne, J

2004-07-01

100

Occupational Analysis: Waste Management Specialist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) has provided this document which includes an overview of general required competencies for waste management specialists. General areas of competence such as analyzing, auditing and managing waste streams are included, as well as specific tasks in each category. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

2011-03-11

101

Diagnostic health risk assessment of electronic waste on the general population in developing countries' scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-waste is the generic name for technological waste. Even though aspects related to e-waste environmental pollution and human exposure are known, scientific assessments are missing so far on the actual risks for health sustainability of the general population exposed to e-waste scenarios, such as illicit dumping, crude recycling and improper treatment and disposal. In fact, further to occupational and direct

Chiara Frazzoli; Orish Ebere Orisakwe; Roberto Dragone; Alberto Mantovani

2010-01-01

102

Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-12-29

103

Multi-criteria analysis for the determination of the best WEEE management scenario in Cyprus  

SciTech Connect

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) constitutes one of the most complicated solid waste streams in terms of its composition, and, as a result, it is difficult to be effectively managed. In view of the environmental problems derived from WEEE management, many countries have established national legislation to improve the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of this waste stream so as to apply suitable management schemes. In this work, alternative systems are examined for the WEEE management in Cyprus. These systems are evaluated by developing and applying the Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method PROMETHEE. In particular, through this MCDM method, 12 alternative management systems were compared and ranked according to their performance and efficiency. The obtained results show that the management schemes/systems based on partial disassembly are the most suitable for implementation in Cyprus. More specifically, the optimum scenario/system that can be implemented in Cyprus is that of partial disassembly and forwarding of recyclable materials to the native existing market and disposal of the residues at landfill sites.

Rousis, K.; Moustakas, K. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece); Malamis, S. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: smalamis@central.ntua.gr; Papadopoulos, A.; Loizidou, M. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece)

2008-07-01

104

Multi-criteria analysis for the determination of the best WEEE management scenario in Cyprus.  

PubMed

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) constitutes one of the most complicated solid waste streams in terms of its composition, and, as a result, it is difficult to be effectively managed. In view of the environmental problems derived from WEEE management, many countries have established national legislation to improve the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of this waste stream so as to apply suitable management schemes. In this work, alternative systems are examined for the WEEE management in Cyprus. These systems are evaluated by developing and applying the Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method PROMETHEE. In particular, through this MCDM method, 12 alternative management systems were compared and ranked according to their performance and efficiency. The obtained results show that the management schemes/systems based on partial disassembly are the most suitable for implementation in Cyprus. More specifically, the optimum scenario/system that can be implemented in Cyprus is that of partial disassembly and forwarding of recyclable materials to the native existing market and disposal of the residues at landfill sites. PMID:18262405

Rousis, K; Moustakas, K; Malamis, S; Papadopoulos, A; Loizidou, M

2008-02-08

105

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

Not Available

1992-12-01

106

Solid Waste Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Duncan, D.R.

1990-08-01

107

Waste heat management guidebook  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven papers on sources of waste heat in industrial processes and the technical and economic aspects of heat recovery are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each chapter; one chapter, Economics of Waste Heat Recovery, by R. Ruegg of NBS, is included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (LCL)

K. G. Kreider; M. B. McNeil

1977-01-01

108

Waste Heat Management Guidebook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sources of waste (i.e., discarded) heat in industrial processes are reviewed, and an overview of off-the-shelf technology available for its use is given. Discussions of waste heat measurement technology and economics are included, as are fourteen case stu...

K. G. Kreider M. B. McNeil

1977-01-01

109

Compostable cutlery and waste management: an LCA approach.  

PubMed

The use of disposable cutlery in fast food restaurants and canteens in the current management scenario generates mixed heterogeneous waste (containing food waste and non-compostable plastic cutlery). The waste is not recyclable and is disposed of in landfills or incinerated with or without energy recovery. Using biodegradable and compostable (B&C) plastic cutlery, an alternative management scenario is possible. The resulting mixed homogeneous waste (containing food waste and compostable plastic cutlery) can be recycled through organic recovery, i.e., composting. This LCA study, whose functional unit is "serving 1000 meals", shows that remarkable improvements can be obtained by shifting from the current scenario to the alternative scenario (based on B&C cutlery and final organic recovery of the total waste). The non-renewable energy consumption changes from 1490 to 128MJ (an overall 10-fold energy savings) and the CO(2) equivalents emission changes from 64 to 22 CO(2) eq. (an overall 3-fold GHG savings). PMID:18952413

Razza, Francesco; Fieschi, Maurizio; Innocenti, Francesco Degli; Bastioli, Catia

2008-10-25

110

Preliminary identification of scenarios for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is being evaluated as a location for the disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste. One of the criteria to be used to determine the suitability of the disposal system is compliance with the Containment Requirements established by the Us Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify the combinations of events and processes (scenarios) defining possible future states of the disposal system that may affect the escape of radionuclides from the repository and transport to the accessible environment. A list of previously identified events and processes was adapted to a scenario-selection procedure that develops a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios through the use of a logic diagram. Four events resulted in the development of 16 scenarios. Preliminary analyses indicate that four scenarios result in no releases. Six scenarios consist of combinations of drilling into a waste-filled room, drilling into a room and an underlying brine reservoir, and emplacement of withdrawal wells downgradient from the repository. Six additional scenarios consist of these same six combinations with the addition of potash mining and the associated surface subsidence. The 12 retained scenarios will be screened based on consequence and/or probability of occurrence. During the course of performance assessment, additional data and information will be used to revise and update these preliminary scenarios where appropriate. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-07-01

111

Guide for Industrial Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Guide is to provide facility managers, state and tribal regulators, and the interested public with recommendations and tools to better address the management of land-disposed, non-hazardous industrial wastes. The Guide can help facilit...

2004-01-01

112

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

2011-09-15

113

Waste management 86. Volume 3: Low level waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the management of low-level radioactive wastes. Topics considered at the symposium included the impact of 1985 amendments to the Low-Level Waste Policy Act, implementing the Low-Level Waste Policy Act, site development, low-level waste licensing and classification, alternatives to shallow land burial for low-level radioactive wastes, low-level waste management by utilities,

Post

1986-01-01

114

Prospects For Sustainable Waste Management In Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Waste management in Georgia is a largely neglected field of environmental management. Since neither a comprehensive waste\\u000a management system nor a co-ordinating authority existed in the Soviet times, it has been usual pract ice to dispose of waste\\u000a without due consideration for environmental protection. Municipal waste was frequently mixed with industrial waste for disposal,\\u000a and disposal of hazardous waste from

Maka Tzereteli; Tinatin Tetvadze

115

A wasted opportunity? Civil society and waste management in Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of Ireland's household waste is a key environmental area where systems of governance can be identified. However, while policy statements clearly support public–private partnerships and have encouraged householders to modify their waste management behaviour, civil society remains on the periphery of waste policy development and implementation. Two contrasting areas of waste-related civil society activities are examined to establish

Anna Davies

2007-01-01

116

Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on

G. M. Lopez-Escobedo; K. M. Hargis; C. R. Douglass

2007-01-01

117

Coolside waste management research  

SciTech Connect

Sample collection - soils, base sand, and conventional fly ash for loading the field lysimeter calls were selected and either obtained or in process of being delivered. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of the Waste - This activity is proceeding with proximate and ultimate analysis of the materials being completed. In addition the major and minor element analysis was performed by several analytical techniques. The protocol for rapid, thick-target proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and proton induced gamma emission (PIGE) spectroscopy were developed. Analysis of 97 Coolside waste samples from Run 3 and 77 samples from Run 1 showed a wide range of concentration values were observed for most of the values. In Run 3 calcium content increased with time and titanium content decreased. Likewise, a change in sodium content occurred with average concentrations being 1.26 [plus minus] 0.03 wt% during the first half of the run while it dropped to 1.18 [plus minus] 0.03 wt% in the latter part of the run. Vanadium and bromine directly correlate with the calcium content indicating these elements are either introduced in the hydrated lime or their capture efficiency depends on the calcium concentration in the waste. The other elements whose concentrations increase with time are zinc, germanium, arsenic, gallium and lead but do not appear to be introduced with the lime or have capture efficiencies that are affected by the calcium content in the ash.

Not Available

1992-10-01

118

WASTE MANAGEMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND POLLUTION PREVENTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Management and Environmental Compliance Group within the Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for managing all waste generated in NMT facilities from operations with, or that support, actinide processing. These operations result in the generation of a variety of waste forms, from sanitary and salvage to radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste.

James J. Balkey; Ronald E. Wieneke

2000-01-01

119

Assessment of LANL waste management site plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this report is to present findings from evaluating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Management Plan to determine if it meets applicable DOE requirements. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, sets forth requireme...

R. L. Black K. D. Davis S. S. Hoevemeyer E. A. Jennrich D. M. Lund

1991-01-01

120

International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R&D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US, four multinational agencies a...

I. W. Leigh

1994-01-01

121

System for decision analysis support on complex waste management issues  

SciTech Connect

A software system called the Waste Flow Analysis has been developed and applied to complex environmental management processes for the United States Department of Energy (US DOE). The system can evaluate proposed methods of waste retrieval, treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal. Analysts can evaluate various scenarios to see the impacts to waste slows and schedules, costs, and health and safety risks. Decision analysis capabilities have been integrated into the system to help identify preferred alternatives based on a specific objectives may be to maximize the waste moved to final disposition during a given time period, minimize health risks, minimize costs, or combinations of objectives. The decision analysis capabilities can support evaluation of large and complex problems rapidly, and under conditions of variable uncertainty. The system is being used to evaluate environmental management strategies to safely disposition wastes in the next ten years and reduce the environmental legacy resulting from nuclear material production over the past forty years.

Shropshire, D.E.

1997-10-01

122

Zero waste coolant management strategy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In June of 1992 the Waste Minimization Program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) began a study to determine the best methods of managing water-based industrial metalworking fluids in the plant's Tool Manufacturing Shop. The shop was faced with the challenge of m...

M. A. Kennicott

1994-01-01

123

Healthcare waste management in Asia.  

PubMed

The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management. PMID:19726174

Ananth, A Prem; Prashanthini, V; Visvanathan, C

2009-09-01

124

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22

125

An Economic Analysis of Household Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a comprehensive model of household waste management policy incorporating the possibility of waste reduction effort by the firm and the household and of illegal waste disposal by the household. When household waste reduction effort is insignificant, the first-best optimum can be achieved using various combinations of environmental tax on the firm and waste collection charge on the

Chongwoo Choe; Iain Fraser

1999-01-01

126

Implementation of SAP Waste Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) assumed responsibility for newly generated waste on October 1, 2005. To ensure effective management and accountability of newly generated waste, Y-12 has opted to utilize SAP, Y-12's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tool, to track low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), hazardous waste, and non-regulated waste from generation through acceptance and disposal. SAP Waste

M. L. Frost; C. M. LaBorde; C. D. Nichols

2008-01-01

127

National waste management infrastructure in Ghana.  

PubMed

Radioactive materials have been used in Ghana for more than four decades. Radioactive waste generated from their applications in various fields has been managed without adequate infrastructure and any legal framework to control and regulate them. The expanded use of nuclear facilities and radiation sources in Ghana with the concomitant exposure to human population necessitates effective infrastructure to deal with the increasing problems of waste. The Ghana Atomic Energy Act 204 (1963) and the Radiation Protection Instrument LI 1559 (1993) made inadequate provision for the management of waste. With the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act, PNDCL 308, a radioactive waste management centre has been established to take care of all waste in the country. To achieve the set objectives for an effective waste management regime, a waste management regulation has been drafted and relevant codes of practice are being developed to guide generators of waste, operators of waste management facilities and the regulatory authority. PMID:9915643

Darko, E O; Fletcher, J J

1998-12-01

128

Coolside waste management research  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to produce sufficient information on physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste (Coolside No.1, 3 at Edgewater power plant) to design and construct stable, environmentally safe landfills. Progress during this period was centered on analytical method development, elemental and mineralogical analysis of samples, and field facilities preparation to receive lysimeter fill. Sample preparation techniques for thick target PIXE/PIGE were investigated; good agreement between measured and actual values for standard fly ash were obtained for all elements except Fe, Ba, K (PIXE).

Not Available

1991-01-01

129

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-12-31

130

Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

Turner, J.W. [ed.

1995-02-01

131

Integrated solid waste management in Germany  

SciTech Connect

This report covers Germany`s experience with integrated solid waste management programs. The municipal solid waste practices of four cities include practices and procedures that waste facility managers with local or state governments may consider for managing their own day-to-day operations.

NONE

1995-07-01

132

Generation and management of CESQG waste  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes existing data on the waste generation and management practices of Conditionally-Exempt Small Quantity Generators (CESQGs). It includes data on the number of CESQGs and the CESQG waste volume. Discussion comprises major CESQG waste generating industries, major CESQG waste types, and CESQG waste management practices. Appendix A contains detailed information on the sources of information. Appendix B lists the reuqirements for CESQGs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Appendix C lists available federal and state documents that encourage pollution prevention and proper waste management by CESQGs in some CESQG waste generating industries.

NONE

1994-07-01

133

Waste management in an environmental chemistry laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a safe and efficient waste management system in an environmental chemistry laboratory is a technically and administratively challenging task. Such a system must provide a safe working environment, satisfy regulatory requirements, and minimize both waste quantities and handling costs, all without adversely affecting the quality of the laboratory`s chemical analysis activities. The waste management system of EG&G Idaho`s Environmental Chemistry Unit is designed to accomplish the required system objectives through an organization structure of six major subsytems: Operation description, Waste identification, Waste storage, Waste handling, Waste characterization, and Waste disposition.

Bennett, J.T. Espinosa, J.M.

1992-09-01

134

Coolside waste management research  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to produce sufficient information on the physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste to design and construct physically stable and environmentally safe landfills. No additional swell on samples reported last month has been observed. The permeability of a specimen remolded near 100% of standard dry density and optimum moisture content and aged 14 days was 7.43 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm/sec. Unconfined compressive strength tests and unconsolidated undrained triaxial tests were also performed and are reported. Work has been initiated toward filling the field lysimeters. Materials, equipment and supplies are being specified and ordered including 30,000 lbs of Ottawa sand to serve as the base layer in the lysimeters.

Not Available

1992-07-23

135

Nuclear waste management  

SciTech Connect

Several recent congressional and executive proposals address the political problem posed by nuclear wastes. The proposals are divided into three categories on the basis of the degree of authority granted to state officials in siting decisions: those granting states a veto power, those providing for consultation with state officials during planning, and those leaving plenary authority in the hands of the Federal goverment. Legislative proposals are discussed under these categories. The most-balanced approach provides a formal role for state officials without granting the states an absolute veto. This solution provides a political outlet for local concern and ensures a wider range of views. It also avoids the problem, inherent in the state veto, of sacrificing the national interest in selecting the safest possible disposal site. 69 references.

Frankel, D.R.

1980-01-01

136

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating compliance with the applicable regulations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) requires an assessment of the long-term performance of the disposal system. Scenario development is one starting point of this assessment, and generates inquiry about the present state and future evolution of the disposal system. Scenario development consists of four tasks: (1) identifying and classifying features, events and processes (FEPs), (2) screening FEPs according to well-defined criteria, (3) forming scenarios (combinations of FEPs) in the context of regulatory performance criteria and (4) specifying of scenarios for consequence analysis. The development and screening of a comprehensive FEP list provides assurance that the identification of significant processes and events is complete, that potential interactions between FEPs are not overlooked, and that responses to possible questions are available and well documented. Two basic scenarios have been identified for the WIPP: undisturbed performance (UP) and disturbed performance (DP). The UP scenario is used to evaluate compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Individual Dose (40 CFR Section 191-15) and Groundwater Protection (40 CFR Section 191-24) standards and accounts for all natural-, waste- and repository-induced FEPs that survive the screening process. The DP scenario is required for assessment calculations for the EPA's cumulative release standard (Containment Requirements, 40 CFR Section 191-13) and accounts for disruptive future human events, which have an uncertain probability of occurrence, in addition to the UP FEPs.

GALSON,D.A.; SWIFT,PETER N.; ANDERSON,D. RICHARD; BENNETT,D.G.

1998-09-23

137

Use of a Knowledge Management System in Waste Management Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Germany the knowledge management system 'WasteInfo' about waste management and disposal issues has been developed and implemented. Beneficiaries of 'WasteInfo' are official decision makers having access to a large information pool. The information pool is fed by experts, so called authors This means compiling of information, evaluation and assigning of appropriate properties (metadata) to this information. The knowledge management

D. Gruendler; W. U. Boetsch; U. Holzhauer; R. A. Nies

2006-01-01

138

US Department of Energy: Waste Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management's goals include minimizing the waste generated by DOE, and pursuing compliance with all applicable environmental regulations. The Waste Management Web site contains information on how the DOE directs the treatment, storage, and disposal of waste generated by DOE's activities, nuclear and otherwise. A whole host of reports and other informational products such as the Standard Operating Practices and Procedures link and Waste Management Privatization information is available.

139

Assessment of LANL liquid waste management documentation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to determine the present status of operations of the Liquid Waste Section of The Waste Management Group (HSE-7) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with respect to preparation and maintenance of necessary criteria, plans and procedures. Particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented will be identified. The requirements being assessed in this report, for the Liquid Waste Section, are: Waste acceptance criteria, Waste acceptance procedures, Waste certification program plan, Waste certification procedures, Waste characterization program, Waste characterization procedures, Training procedures, and Recordkeeping procedures.

Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M. (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S. (Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-04-01

140

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31

141

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01

142

Application of processed organic municipal solid waste on agricultural land – a scenario analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Source separation, composting and anaerobic digestion, with associated land application, are increasingly being considered\\u000a as alternative waste management strategies to landfilling and incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW). Environmental life\\u000a cycle assessments are a useful tool in political decision-making about waste management strategies. However, due to the diversity\\u000a of processed organic MSW and the situations in which it can be

Sander Bruun; Trine Lund Hansen; Thomas H. Christensen; Jakob Magid; Lars S. Jensen

2006-01-01

143

Nuclear waste management in France  

SciTech Connect

A General Waste Management and Research and Development Program has been presented for approval by CEA to the government indicating the short and long-term objectives. This report entails: objectives related to long-term waste management and objectives related to R and D on treatment, conditioning, and storage processes. As far as the near and mean terms are concerned, i.e., the conditioning and disposal of low and intermediate-level wastes, and the primary conditioning and the intermediate storage of alpha-bearing and high-level waste, the processes are available and give every wished for quality and safety assurances. Improvements are always possible, such as better performing, simpler, or cheaper processes, or safer from the point of view of lowering personnel exposure or long-term behavior, and work is therefore still going on. A shallow land final disposal site will have to be started soon, to reserve the use of LA MANCHE to LA HAGUE. As far as the long term is concerned, solutions exist and work is underway to select the most suitable geological formations and sites which entails sustained research efforts in order to identify and quantify the leading parameters. This type of research effort is particularly suited to international cooperation, which can also cover site exploration, transfer modelling and conditioned waste qualification. However, the results will only be proved through actual demonstration sites. The small volume of the long term wastes, and the more than satisfactory safety of their intermediate storage may seem to make their long term disposal less than urgent: this is a fallacy. The highest standard of safety at the lowest cost - i.e., optimization - will only be attained through pursuing the effort to the end, which is, the commissioning and running of a disposal site. The time has come - not to rush blindly headlong, certainly, but to get on with it.

Lefevre, J.; Sugier, A.

1983-01-01

144

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous\\/radioactive waste, and sanitary\\/industrial waste. Scrap metal

R. E. Watts; T. Allen; S. A. Castle; J. P. Hopper; R. L. Oelrich

1986-01-01

145

How to improve scenario analysis as a strategic management tool?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scenarios are claimed to support strategic decision makers. They are especially effective in dealing with uncertainties. This paper addresses some drawbacks of the conventional scenario method, which is especially directed at handling these uncertainties, and indicates possible avenues for methodological adaptations. We take the approach, which rests in the Shell tradition, as exemplary for our discussion on the mainstream scenario

Theo J. B. M. Postma; Franz Liebl

2005-01-01

146

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.

Waste Management Group

2006-08-14

147

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

Not Available

1991-12-01

148

An Integrated Framework for Evaluating Leaching in Waste Management and Utilization of Secondary Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

A framework for the evaluation of inorganic constituent leaching from wastes and secondary materials is presented. The framework is based on the measurement of intrinsic leaching properties of the material in conjunction with mathematical modeling to estimate release under field management scenarios. Site specific and default scenarios are considered, which may be selected based on the evaluation context. A tiered

D. S. Kosson; F. Sanchez; A. C. Garrabrants

2002-01-01

149

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...available additional waste management measures, taking into account the effectiveness of waste management measures already in place...Prevention: Waste Reduction Strategies for Health Care Facilities...the development of the waste management plan. The owner or...

2013-07-01

150

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order...

2010-10-01

151

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order...

2009-10-01

152

Management of hazardous waste in Thailand: present situation and future prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the present scenario of hazardous waste management practices in Thailand, and gives some insights into\\u000a future prospects. Industrialization in Thailand has systematically increased the generation of hazardous waste. The total\\u000a hazardous waste generated in 2001 was 1.65 million tons. It is estimated that over 300 million kg\\/year of hazardous waste\\u000a is generated from nonindustrial, community sources

H. Ozaki; K. Sharma; C. Phanuwan; K. Fukushi; C. Polprasert

2003-01-01

153

Solid waste management in Abuja, Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new city of Abuja provided an opportunity to avoid some of the environmental problems associated with other major cities in Africa. The current status of solid waste management in Abuja has been reviewed and recommendations for improvements are made. The existing solid waste management system is affected by unfavourable economic, institutional, legislative, technical and operational constraints. A reliable waste

A. Imam; B. Mohammed; D. C. Wilson; C. R. Cheeseman

2008-01-01

154

FY 2001 Hanford Waste Management Strategic Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are pleased to present the 2001 Hanford Waste Management Program Strategic Plan. This plan supports the newly developed U. S. Department of Energy Site outcomes strategy. The 2001 Plan reflects current and projected needs for Waste Management Program services in support of Hanford Site cleanup, and updates the objectives and actions using new waste stream oriented logic for the

2001-01-01

155

Solid waste management in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of an on-going programme to consider the current waste management and pollution prevention framework in New Zealand, the Ministry for the Environment, in collaboration with Auckland Regional Council and Zero Waste New Zealand, requested the author to undertake a survey of organisations involved in the waste management industry. The objective of the survey was to gain information about

C. A Boyle

2000-01-01

156

INTEGRATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT: A MULTICRITERIA APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the first results of a long term research aimed at producing a decision support system to deal with the integrated solid waste management planning at regional level. In the last years urban waste management has received a strong attention from the public authority in Italy culminating in a new national law, which has priorities such as waste

Guido Maria Bazzani

1998-01-01

157

An Economic Analysis of Household Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a comprehensive model of household waste management policy with three interacting parties: a firm, a household and an environmental regulator. The regulator chooses the environmental tax, the household waste collection charge, monitoring of illegal waste disposal by the household and the penalty for illegal waste disposal.

Chongwoo Choe; Iain Fraser

1997-01-01

158

A hybrid simulation\\/optimisation scenario model for asset\\/liability management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we desciibe a decision support model to sustain management of pension-funds in the strategic planning of the available asset- and liability policy instruments. A main characteristic of the approach is that the relevant risk-drivers are modelled by scenarios, rather than by probability distributions. We will describe the scenario generation methodology, and how the scenarios are used by

Guus C. E. Boender

1997-01-01

159

A DSS for water resources management under uncertainty by scenario analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: In this paper we present a scenario analysis approach to perform water system planning and management under climatic and hydrological uncertainty friendly data - input phase and results analysis Different generation techniques can be used to set up and analyze a number of scenarios modeled by a scenario - tree in a multistage environment, which includes different possible configurations

Stefano Pallottino; Giovanni M. Sechi; Paola Zuddas

2005-01-01

160

Calculation of projected waste loads for transuranic waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The level of treatment and the treatment and interim storage site configurations (decentralized, regional, or centralized) impact transuranic (TRU) waste loads at and en route to sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Other elements that impact waste loads are the volume and characteristics of the waste and the unit operation parameters of the technologies used to treat it. Projected annual complexwide TRU waste loads under various TRU waste management alternatives were calculated using the WASTE{underscore}MGMT computational model. WASTE{underscore}MGMT accepts as input three types of data: (1) the waste stream inventory volume, mass, and contaminant characteristics by generating site and waste stream category; (2) unit operation parameters of treatment technologies; and (3) waste management alternative definitions. Results indicate that the designed capacity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, identified under all waste management alternatives as the permanent disposal facility for DOE-generated TRU waste, is sufficient for the projected complexwide TRU waste load under any of the alternatives.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1995-06-01

161

Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

2007-07-01

162

Disaster waste management: A review article  

SciTech Connect

Depending on their nature and severity, disasters can create large volumes of debris and waste. The waste can overwhelm existing solid waste management facilities and impact on other emergency response and recovery activities. If poorly managed, the waste can have significant environmental and public health impacts and can affect the overall recovery process. This paper presents a system overview of disaster waste management based on existing literature. The main literature available to date comprises disaster waste management plans or guidelines and isolated case studies. There is ample discussion on technical management options such as temporary storage sites, recycling, disposal, etc.; however, there is little or no guidance on how these various management options are selected post-disaster. The literature does not specifically address the impact or appropriateness of existing legislation, organisational structures and funding mechanisms on disaster waste management programmes, nor does it satisfactorily cover the social impact of disaster waste management programmes. It is envisaged that the discussion presented in this paper, and the literature gaps identified, will form a basis for future comprehensive and cohesive research on disaster waste management. In turn, research will lead to better preparedness and response to disaster waste management problems.

Brown, Charlotte, E-mail: charlotte.brown@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Milke, Mark, E-mail: mark.milke@canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Seville, Erica, E-mail: erica.seville@canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand)

2011-06-15

163

Y-12 Waste Management Division Process Waste Assessment (PWA) report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Process Waste Assessment (PWA) methodology used by the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) Y-12 Waste Management Division (WMD) was based on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Model Process Waste Assessment Plan, which in turn, was ba...

1992-01-01

164

Residual Waste Management Research and Planning Projects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Residual Waste Management Research and Planning Projects Handbook contains selected abstracts of projects that are underway or have been completed, and publications that are available on the subject of residual wastes and their impact on ground and s...

M. L. Rucker A. K. Vitberg

1977-01-01

165

HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young

Sebastian Puente

1998-01-01

166

Management of municipal solid waste incineration residues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of residues from thermal waste treatment is an integral part of waste management systems. The primary goal of managing incineration residues is to prevent any impact on our health or environment caused by unacceptable particulate, gaseous and\\/or solute emissions. This paper provides insight into the most important measures for putting this requirement into practice. It also offers an

T. Sabbas; A. Polettini; R. Pomi; T. Astrup; O. Hjelmar; P. Mostbauer; G. Cappai; G. Magel; S. Salhofer; C. Speiser; S. Heuss-Assbichler; R. Klein; P Lechner

2003-01-01

167

Operational and regulatory impacts of regional management on transportation of commercial low-level radioactive waste  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current US low-level waste management situation and the conditions and requirements for management on a regional basis were examined. Using 1979 low-level waste volumes shipped to commercial burial grounds and six management regions, transportation requirements were estimated and compared for the two management scenarios in terms of cumulative shipping distance and transportation cost. Effects of these results on the demand for transportation services and equipment and on population risks were considered. Finally, current regulatory issues and the potential effects of regional management on regulation of low-level waste transportation were reviewed.

Shirley, C. G.; Wilmot, E. L.; Shepherd, E. W.

1981-09-01

168

Scenario planning approach to strategic management of small travel business in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scenario planning, an alternative strategic management tool, has given a new meaning and dimension to the way strategy should be thought, discussed and implemented in organizations. This paper introduces scenario planning in the way the turbulent world should be better managed by looking for possible futures and not predicting the only future. No matter how rational strategic planners are, the

Nithi Sevaguru; Mohammad Samaun Safa

2005-01-01

169

Municipal solid waste management under decentralisation in Uganda  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines municipal solid waste management in Uganda under the decentralisation policy. The aim is to analyse devolved solid waste management and the constraints on achieving sustainable waste management. To achieve the objectives, waste characteristics, generation rate, collection, disposal and stakeholder roles and waste management responsibilities were analysed. Results indicate the waste is predominantly biodegradable (78%) with generation rate of

James Okot-Okumu; Richard Nyenje

2011-01-01

170

Proceedings: Radioactive Low Level Waste Management Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on low level waste management. The workshop was the fifth in a series to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of low level waste management as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. Workshop information will help utilities assess benefits of waste management, select technologies for their individual projects, and reduce decommissioning costs.

None

2000-05-01

171

Innovative Waste Management Through the Use of Waste Management Plans on Construction Projects in Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity and dynamism of construction projects require innovative approaches to ensure stakeholders' satisfaction. Construction waste management is no doubt a sine qua non to sustainability and needs innovation to ensure waste minimization. The application of a waste management plan (WMP) in previous projects has shown that it can lead to waste minimization. A survey was therefore conducted using a

Olatunji J. Oladiran

2009-01-01

172

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey.  

PubMed

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management. PMID:18280731

Banar, Mufide; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun

2008-02-15

173

Nuclear waste management policy in France  

SciTech Connect

The object of the nuclear waste management policy in France has always been to protect the worker and the public from unacceptable risks. The means and the structures developed to reach this objective, however, have evolved with time. One fact has come out ever more clearly over the years: Nuclear waste problems cannot be considered in a piecemeal fashion. The French nuclear waste management structure and policy aim at just this global approach. Responsibilities have been distributed between the main partners: the waste producers and conditioners, the research teams, the safety authorities, and the long-term waste manager, National Radioactive Waste Management Agency. The main technical options adopted for waste forms are embedding in hydraulic binders, bitumen, or thermosetting resins for low-level waste (LLW) and medium-level waste (MLW), and vitrification for high-level, liquid wastes. One shallow land disposal site for LLW and MLW has been in operation since 1969, the Centre of La Manche. Alpha-bearing and high-level waste will be disposed of by deep geological storage, possibly in granite formations. Further RandD aims mainly at improving present-day practices, developing more durable, long-term, alpha-bearing waste for all solid waste forms and going into all aspects of deep geological disposal characterization.

Lefevre, J.F.

1983-06-01

174

Calculation of the proportion of reactive waste for hydrogen ignition scenario  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted as outlined in NHC Letter of Instruction 9751330 dated February 247 1997 and entitled {open_quotes}Analysis by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to Support a Safety Assessment for Rotary Mode Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watchlist Tanks{close_quotes}. As prescribed in this letter, the results of this study were provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to revise the safety assessment document. Sampling Hanford tanks with a rotary drill could result in a drill-bit overheating accident which could ignite flammable gases present in the tanks. According to calculations, an over-heated drill bit could not get hot enough to ignite the hydrogen directly. However, an overheated drill bit could ignite saltcake waste containing high concentrations of organics, and a local organics burn would achieve sufficient temperature to ignite flammable gas present in the waste. This report estimates one quantity required to evaluate this particular accident scenario; the fraction of reactive waste in the tank waste. Reactive waste is waste that contains sufficient organic carbon and a low enough moisture content to ignite when in contact with an over-heated drill bit. This report presents a methodology to calculate the proportion of reactive waste for the 100 series tanks, using sampling data from tank characterization studies. The tanks are ranked according to their reactive waste proportions, and confidence limits are assigned to the estimates.

Gao, Feng; Heasler, P.G.

1997-04-01

175

Spent fuel receipt scenarios study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during

L. B. Ballou; D. N. Montan; M. A. Revelli

1990-01-01

176

Managing Nuclear Waste: Options Considered  

SciTech Connect

Starting in the 1950s, U.S. scientists began to research ways to manage highly radioactive materials accumulating at power plants and other sites nationwide. Long-term surface storage of these materials poses significant potential health, safety, and environmental risks. Scientists studied a broad range of options for managing spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The options included leaving it where it is, disposing of it in various ways, and making it safer through advanced technologies. International scientific consensus holds that these materials should eventually be disposed of deep underground in what is called a geologic repository. In a recent special report, the National Academy of Sciences summarized the various studies and emphasized that geologic disposal is ultimately necessary.

DOE

2002-05-02

177

Technology Roadmapping for Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Technology roadmapping can be an effective strategic technology planning tool. This paper describes a process for customizing a generic technology roadmapping process. Starting with a generic process reduces the learning curve and speeds up the roadmap development. Similarly, starting with a generic domain model provides leverage across multiple applications or situations within the domain. A process that combines these two approaches facilitates identifying technology gaps and determining common core technologies that can be reused for multiple applications or situations within the domain. This paper describes both of these processes and how they can be integrated. A core team and a number of technology working groups develop the technology roadmap, which includes critical system requirements and targets, technology areas and metrics for each area, and identifies and evaluates possible technology alternatives to recommend the most appropriate ones to pursue. A generalized waste management model, generated by considering multiple situations or applications in terms of a generic waste management model, provides the domain requirements for the technology roadmapping process. Finally, the paper discusses lessons learns from a number of roadmapping projects.

Bray, O.

2003-02-26

178

The mixed waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

Streit, R.D.

1995-10-01

179

Scenario and parametric uncertainty in GESAMAC: A methodological study in nuclear waste disposal risk assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine a conceptual framework for accounting for all sources of uncertainty in complex prediction problems, involving six ingredients: past data, future observables, and scenario, structural, parametric, and predictive uncertainty. We apply this framework to nuclear waste disposal using a computer simulation environment - GTMCHEM - which "deterministically" models the one-dimensional migration of radionuclides through the geosphere up to the biosphere. Focusing on scenario and parametric uncertainty, we show that mean predicted maximum doses to humans on the earth's surface due to I-129, and uncertainty bands around those predictions, are larger when scenario uncertainty is properly assessed and propagated. We also illustrate the value of a new method for global sensitivity analysis of model output called extended FAST .

Draper, David; Pereira, Antonio; Prado, Pedro; Saltelli, Andrea; Cheal, Ryan; Eguilior, Sonsoles; Mendes, Bruno; Tarantola, Stefano

1999-03-01

180

Combining lifecycle and risk assessments of mineral waste reuse scenarios for decision making support  

SciTech Connect

Lack of regulations and standards on mineral waste recycling makes Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) useful methods for environmental assessment of recycling scenarios. An unsolved problem arises whenever two scenarios of recycling have to be compared according to both ERA and LCA impact results considered simultaneously. A methodology to combine LCA and ERA results and tools toward Integrated Environmental Assessment (IEA) is proposed together with three application examples based on case studies. The most effective combination approach is to define further impact categories for ERA to be considered with the standard LCA ones. Then, the use of a multicriteria analysis method was proved to be an efficient way to rank alternative scenarios with respect to all the results. The key issues to be further researched are discussed and proposals are suggested.

Benetto, Enrico [ECOINNOVA France, 47 rue M. Flandin, 69003 Lyon Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: benetto@ecoinnova.it; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia [INSA Lyon-LAEPSI, 20 rue A.Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex, since November 2005: INSA Toulouse-LIPE, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex France (France)]. E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr; Perrodin, Yves [ENTPE-LSE, rue M.Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin cedex (France)]. E-mail: perrodin@entpe.fr

2007-04-15

181

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01

182

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01

183

Macro material flow modeling for analyzing solid waste management options  

SciTech Connect

A Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability. This capability is intended to provide part of the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as evaluating the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. The MMFM capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. This model is a macro-level simulation of the flows of the various materials through the solid waste management system, and also through the associated materials production and use system. Inclusion of materials production and use within the modeling context allows a systems approach to be used, providing a much more complete understanding of the origins of the solid waste materials and also of possible options for materials recovery and reuse than if a more traditional end-of-pipe'' view of solid waste is adopted. The MMFM is expected to be useful in evaluating longer-term, broader-ranging solid waste impacts than are traditionally evaluated by decision-makers involved in implementing solutions to local or regional solid waste management problems. This paper discusses the types of questions of interest in evaluating long-term, broad-range impacts from solid waste. It then identifies the basic needs for predictive modeling capabilities like the MMFM, and provides a basic description of the conceptual framework for the model and the associated data. Status of the MMFM implementation is also discussed.

Holter, G.M.; Pennock, K.A.; Shaver, S.R.

1993-06-01

184

Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the...

J. M. Vann

1998-01-01

185

Solid Waste Management, Foreign Research and Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Developments in countries other than the United States in solid waste management during the period January 1970 to August 1974 are presented. Management and disposal methods considered in this report include biodegradation, recovery, reuse, photodegradati...

R. L. Torian

1974-01-01

186

Life cycle assessment (LCA) of solid waste management strategies in Tehran: landfill and composting plus landfill.  

PubMed

As circumstances of operating and maintenance activities for landfilling and composting in Tehran metropolis differ from those of cities in developed countries, it was concluded to have an environmental impact comparison between the current solid waste management (MSW) strategies: (1) landfill, and (2) composting plus landfill. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to compare these scenarios for MSW in Tehran, Iran. The Eco-Indicator 99 is applied as an impact assessment method considering surplus energy, climate change, acidification, respiratory effect, carcinogenesis, ecotoxicity and ozone layer depletion points of aspects. One ton of municipal solid waste of Tehran was selected as the functional unit. According to the comparisons, the composting plus landfill scenario causes less damage to human health in comparison to landfill scenario. However, its damages to both mineral and fossil resources as well as ecosystem quality are higher than the landfill scenario. Thus, the composting plus landfill scenario had a higher environmental impact than landfill scenario. However, an integrated waste management will ultimately be the most efficient approach in terms of both environmental and economic benefits. In this paper, a cost evaluation shows that the unit cost per ton of waste for the scenarios is 15.28 and 26.40 US$, respectively. Results show landfill scenario as the preferable option both in environmental and economic aspects for Tehran in the current situation. PMID:20924666

Abduli, M A; Naghib, Abolghasem; Yonesi, Mansoor; Akbari, Ali

2010-10-06

187

Scenario Development for Water Resources Planning and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of scenario development for water resources is to inform policy-makers about the implications of various policies to inform decision-making. Although there have been a number of studies conducted in the relatively-new and recent field of scenario analysis and development, very few of those have been explicitly applied to water resource issues. More evident is the absence of

S. Stewart; M. Mahmoud; Y. Liu; H. Hartman; T. Wagener; H. Gupta

2006-01-01

188

Principles of integrated solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

As a recognized expert in the field, the author presents a review and expanded discussion about the policies, politics, regulations, technologies, systems, and practices of integrated solid waste management. Written from a practitioner`s point of view, the book takes a no nonsense approach to the practicalities and realities of planning, designing, and managing integrated solid waste management systems. Readers will learn the fundamentals of design and the principles for each method and practice of integrated municipal solid waste management. Contents include: policies and roles; legislation and regulations; planning, management, organization, financing; collection principles and systems design; transfer station principles and facility design; recycling principles and facility design; composting principles and facility design; waste-to-energy principles and facility design; landfill principles and facility design; managing special and construction/demolition wastes.

Hickman, H.L. Jr.

1999-08-01

189

Management of small producers waste in Slovenia  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Radioactive materials are extensively used in Slovenia in various fields and applications in medicine, industry and research. For the managing of radioactive waste raised from these establishments the Agency for radwaste management (ARAO) was authorised as the state public service of managing the radioactive waste in 1999. The public service of the radioactive waste of small producers in Slovenia is performed in line with the Governmental decree on the Mode, Subject and Terms of Performing the Public Service of Radioactive Waste Management (Official Gazette RS No. 32/99). According to the Decree the scope of the public service includes: 'collection of the waste from small producers at the producers' premises and its transportation to the storage facility for treatment, storing and disposal', 'acceptance of radioactive waste in case of emergency situation on the premises, in case of transport accidents or some other accidents', 'acceptance of radioactive waste in cases when the producer is unknown', 'management (collection, transport, pre-treatment, storing, together with QA and radiation protection measures) of radioactive waste', 'treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste for storing and disposal', and 'operating of the Central Interim Storage for LIL waste from small producers'. After taking over the performing of the public service, ARAO first started with the project for refurbishment and modernization of the Central Interim Storage Facility, including improvements of the storage utilization and rearrangement of the stored waste. (authors)

Fabjan, Marija; Rojc, Joze [Agency for Radwaste Management, Parmova 53, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2007-07-01

190

Solid Waste Management Practices in EBRP Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Louisiana school district has made tremendous progress toward developing and implementing an environmentally friendly solid waste management program. Packaging changes in school food service, newspaper and aluminum can recycling, and composting of leaf and yard waste have contributed to reduced waste sent to the local landfill. (MLF)

Mann, Nadine L.

1994-01-01

191

Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

Spooner, Charles S.

192

Solid Waste Management Practices in EBRP Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A Louisiana school district has made tremendous progress toward developing and implementing an environmentally friendly solid waste management program. Packaging changes in school food service, newspaper and aluminum can recycling, and composting of leaf and yard waste have contributed to reduced waste sent to the local landfill. (MLF)|

Mann, Nadine L.

1994-01-01

193

Municipal solid waste management in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Basic measures taken in recent years to control waste management in Japan include: (1) Pollution prevention, (2) reuse and recycling, and (3) waste incineration with air pollution control. It is generally agreed that it is appropriate to follow the assigned priority of these options. Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the responsibility of the citizen, the local government and the business

Shin-ichi Sakai; Shinichi

1996-01-01

194

Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as ``Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.`` Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material.

Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S. [Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-04-01

195

Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.'' Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material.

Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M. (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S. (Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-04-01

196

Assay and RTR of solid waste management received TRU waste  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) provides storage of Transuranic (TRU) and Transuranic Mixed (TRUM) waste from U.S. DOD and DOE offsite and onsite generators. In addition to storage, TRUSAF also performs assay and RTR (real time radiography) on each TRU drum with the intent of certification of the waste to WIPP-WAC (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria) to allow eventual disposal of the TRU waste at WIPP. Due to the uncertainties associated with WIPP-WAC and the potential for all TRU WIPP-WAC certification at the generator or WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) facility, this study documents the requirements for TRU assay and RTR of all incoming TRU drums and establishes SWM (Solid Waste Management) policy on future assay and RTR of received TRU waste.

Irwin, R.M.

1995-11-01

197

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15

198

1995 Baseline solid waste management system description  

SciTech Connect

This provides a detailed solid waste system description that documents the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) strategy for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and greater-than-Class III waste. This system description is intended for use by managers of the solid waste program, facility and system planners, as well as system modelers. The system description identifies the TSD facilities that constitute the solid waste system and defines these facilities` interfaces, schedules, and capacities. It also provides the strategy for treating each of the waste streams generated or received by the Hanford Site from generation or receipt through final destination.

Anderson, G.S.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

1995-09-01

199

Planning for municipal solid waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid waste management is a continuing problem of municipal government. Other levels of government, Federal, State, Regional and County, may advise and assist; but the responsibility for proper municipal solid waste management rests with the city. Currently, the small and moderate sized city is not adequately staffed to develop comprehensive long-range plans to resolve this problem. Presented herein is a

W. C. Goessling; J. F. Jr. Malina

1972-01-01

200

Nuclear waste management: some considerations of scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing and future radioactive wastes from civil and military nuclear activities must be managed in such a way as to pose no significant threat to the health and safety of occupational personnel and the general public. There is broad agreement within the informed technical community that the technologies required for safe nuclear waste management and disposal can be made available.

1982-01-01

201

World terends in municipal solid waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The philosophy of the Waste Management Hierarchy (prevention\\/minimization, materials recovery, incineration and landfill) has been adopted by most industrialized nations as the menu for developing municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategies. The extent to which any one option is used within a given country (or region) varies depending on a large number of factors, including topography, population density, transportation infrastructures,

S. Sakai; S. E. Sawell; A. J. Chandler; T. T. Eighmy; D. S. Kosson; J. Vehlow; H. A. van der Sloot; J. Hartlén; O. Hjelmar

1996-01-01

202

Environmental Education: Compendium for Integrated Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This compendium is a tool for bringing waste management education into classrooms. Curriculum materials gathered from across the country were reviewed by California's top environmental educators, both for correlation with the state's educational frameworks and for accuracy and completeness of waste management information. Materials that cover…

California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

203

SETTING THE ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICY CONTEXT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The animal waste management policy issue is complex. In this paper, we propose that the animal waste management policy debate is complicated by a number of factors that arise from changes taking place in the animal industry, and within the rural population. The debate is also complicated by the number of different policy issues that are nested within the general

Patricia E. Norris; Sandra S. Batie

2000-01-01

204

Hazardous waste management for the 80's  

SciTech Connect

This book provides practical, usable information and data to engineers and scientists, government agencies and lawyers and others who manage waste-generating organizations. Critical issues in hazardous waste management are discussed: ground water and seepage; treatment, storage an disposal; site cleanup, and safety and legal considerations. 189 references, 109 figures, 46 tables.

Sweeney, T.L.; Bhatt, H.G.; Sykes, R.M.; Sproul, O.J. (eds.)

1982-01-01

205

Multiple system modelling of waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to

Ola Eriksson; Mattias Bisaillon

2011-01-01

206

Tank waste remediation system tank waste retrieval risk management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Risk Management Plan defines the approach to be taken to manage programmatic risks in the TWRS Tank Waste Retrieval program. It provides specific instructions applicable to TWR, and is used to supplement the guidance given by the TWRS Risk Management procedure.

Klimper, S.C.

1997-11-07

207

77 FR 10401 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2011-0012] Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...assessment as part of its radioactive waste management decision-making. The DOE...Assessment Directorate, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2012-02-22

208

77 FR 26991 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...3150-AI92 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management'' (76 FR 50500; August...Assessment Directorate, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2012-05-08

209

Solid Waste Management Law: A Focus on Indiana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Indiana recently initiated an active program to manage its solid waste. A brief discussion of some characteristics of solid waste management is followed by a review of laws relating to Federal, State, regional, and local solid waste management responsibil...

D. T. Massey L. H. Dunlap

1976-01-01

210

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, April 1984-September 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; and supporting studies. 33 figures, 13 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1984-12-01

211

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, October 1984-March 1985  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following studies on radioactive waste management: defense waste technology; nuclear waste materials characterization center; and supporting studies. 19 figs., 29 tabs.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1985-06-01

212

Solid waste management in Croatia in response to the European Landfill Directive.  

PubMed

The European Landfill Directive 99/31/EC represents the most influential piece of waste legislation on the management of municipal solid waste. In addition to technical standards regarding the design and location of landfills, it calls for a decrease in the amount of biodegradable waste landfilled. In order to meet the reduction targets set in the Landfill Directive, national solid waste strategies need to be changed. This article outlines the impact of the Landfill Directive on the Croatian waste management strategy and discusses the key challenges of its implementation. In addition, three scenarios of future waste management (mechanical biological pre-treatment, waste-to-energy and landfilling) have been investigated and evaluated regarding environmental impacts and affordability. The results of the analysis show that Croatia has transposed the said Directive into its own legislation in an exemplary way. The developed national waste management strategy foresees the set up of a separate collection of recyclables, waste pre-treatment of MSW, as well as the upgrading of existing disposal sites to sanitary landfills. However, the practical progress of carrying out provisions implemented on paper is lagging behind. Concerning the investigated scenarios the results of the evaluation indicate that mechanical biological pre-treatment in conjunction with separate collection of recyclables appears to be the most feasible option (in terms of economic and ecologic parameters). This result is in line with the proposed national waste management strategy. PMID:22615201

Stanic-Maruna, Ira; Fellner, Johann

2012-05-21

213

LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement.  

PubMed

When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues. PMID:22516101

Slagstad, Helene; Brattebø, Helge

2012-04-18

214

Process-based analysis of waste management systems: a case study.  

PubMed

This paper presents an analysis, using process simulation, of the waste management system applied in a collection basin located in the south of Paris (France). The study was conducted in close cooperation with the "SYCTOM of Paris agglomeration", an operator in charge of managing 2.5 milliontons/yr of municipal solid waste in the Paris area. The analysis includes a description of the current situation of waste management in this collection basin, the construction and calibration of a simulator that reproduces this situation, the simulation of scenarios that account for possible future changes in waste flows and treatment options and finally a comparison of scenario results. Results illustrate the interest of a process-based approach to waste management systems. Such an approach is complementary to life cycle analyses, which usually rely on more generic descriptions of waste treatment units. The detailed analysis of a waste management system using local data on waste streams and treatment units provides technical indicators of system efficiency expressed in terms of recycling rates, energy recovery, emission fluxes and costs. Such information can help reach a consensus with respect to the actual situation of waste management and provides decision-makers with quantitative arguments that can be brought into the public debate. PMID:18316183

Villeneuve, J; Michel, P; Fournet, D; Lafon, C; Ménard, Y; Wavrer, P; Guyonnet, D

2008-03-07

215

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann.

1992-01-01

216

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann

1992-03-01

217

Waste Management Project Contingency Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the office of Waste Management (WM) with recommended contingency calculation procedures for typical WM projects. Typical projects were defined as conventional construction-type activities that use innovative elements when necessary to meet the project objectives. Projects involve treatment, storage, and disposal of low level, mixed low level, hazardous, transuranic, and high level waste. Cost contingencies are an essential part of Total Cost Management. A contingency is an amount added to a cost estimate to compensate for unexpected expenses resulting from incomplete design, unforeseen and unpredictable conditions, or uncertainties in the project scope (DOE 1994, AACE 1998). Contingency allowances are expressed as percentages of estimated cost and improve cost estimates by accounting for uncertainties. The contingency allowance is large at the beginning of a project because there are more uncertainties, but as a project develops, the allowance shrinks to adjust for costs already incurred. Ideally, the total estimated cost remains the same throughout a project. Project contingency reflects the degree of uncertainty caused by lack of project definition, and process contingency reflects the degree of uncertainty caused by use of new technology. Different cost estimation methods were reviewed and compared with respect to terminology, accuracy, and Cost Guide standards. The Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE) methods for cost estimation were selected to represent best industry practice. AACE methodology for contingency analysis can be readily applied to WM Projects, accounts for uncertainties associated with different stages of a project, and considers both project and process contingencies and the stage of technical readiness. As recommended, AACE contingency allowances taper off linearly as a project nears completion.

Edward L. Parsons, Jr.

1999-08-31

218

Economic analysis of waste management alternatives for reprocessing wastes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the results of a cost analysis of a broad range of alternatives for management of reprocessing wastes that would require geologic repository disposal. The intent was to identify cost-effective alternatives and the costs of potential repository performance requirements. Four integrated treatment facility alternatives for transuranic (TRU) wastes are described and compared. These include no treatment, compaction, incineration,

R. W. McKee; L. L. Clark; P. M. Daling; J. F. Nesbitt; J. L. Swanson

1984-01-01

219

Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01

220

Waste management facilities cost information for hazardous waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing hazardous waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

1995-06-01

221

Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

1995-06-01

222

Commercial nuclear-waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is primarily concerned with nuclear waste generated by commercial power operations. It is clear, however, that the total generation of commercial nuclear waste does not tell the whole story, there are sizeable stockpiles of defense nuclear wastes which will impact areas such as total nuclide exposure to the biosphere and the overall economics of waste disposal. The effects

Andress

1981-01-01

223

Fusion reactor radioactive waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed.

J. D. Kaser; A. K. Postma; D. J. Bradley

1976-01-01

224

SCENARIO-BASED PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF SIMULATION GAME: A REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is devoted to scenario development methodology for planning and management of business simulation games. Nowadays the high efficiency of simulation games as a training method is obvious. Requirements to this kind of training are increasing. Modern computer technologies allow developing complex simulation games that are close to real life conditions. Generation of game scenarios is not a trivial

Jana Bikovska; Galina Merkuryeva

225

75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SW-FRL-9191-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

2010-08-23

226

77 FR 41720 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9699-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Mail: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...Delivery: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office...

2012-07-16

227

75 FR 16037 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SW-FRL-9131-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

2010-03-31

228

77 FR 56558 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9727-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...CONTACT: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...adversely affected by common waste management practices for this...

2012-09-13

229

75 FR 62040 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9211-7] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...originating from a land-based waste management unit may be a factor resulting...adversely affected by common waste management practices for this...

2010-10-07

230

78 FR 46940 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2050-AE81 Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and...proposed rule: Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and...comments to Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification...

2013-08-02

231

76 FR 63252 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2050-AE81 Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and...proposed rule: Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and...residuals (CCRs); Facility and waste management unit data; Information on...

2011-10-12

232

Hazardous waste management at Rockwell Hanford Operations  

SciTech Connect

The control of hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site is a complex task and one that requires cooperation from each of the site operating contractors. The Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) Hazardous Waste Management Program being conducted at the Hanford site is described briefly in the following paragraphs. The program, as described, is an evolving program that is changing continually to improve control, enhance safety, and achieve full regulatory compliance. The Rockwell Hazardous Waste Management Program can be divided into three parts: (1) the control of hazardous materials; (2) the identification of hazardous waste streams; and (3) the disposal of hazardous wastes. These three parts and how they interface to provide an effective Hazardous Waste Management Program are described in the following text.

McCall, D.L.

1984-11-01

233

Waste management fiscal year 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Program is pleased to issue the Fiscal Year 1998 Progress Report presenting program highlights and major accomplishments of the last year. This year-end update describes the current initiatives in waste management and the progress DOE has made toward their goals and objectives, including the results of the waste management annual performance commitments. One of the most important program efforts continues to be opening the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic waste. A major success was achieved this year by the West Valley Demonstration Project in New York, which in June completed the project`s production phase of high-level waste processing ahead of schedule and under budget. Another significant accomplishment this year was the award of two privatization contracts for major waste management operations, one at Oak ridge for transuranic waste treatment, and one at Hanford for the Tank Waste Remediation System privatization project. DOE is proud of the progress that has been made, and will continue to pursue program activities that allow it to safely and expeditiously dispose of radioactive and hazardous wastes across the complex, while reducing worker, public, and environmental risks.

NONE

1998-12-31

234

Quantifying uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management is significant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model, scenario and parameter uncertainties contribute. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential procedure for quantifying uncertainty is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of procedure is illustrated by a case-study. - Abstract: Uncertainty analysis in LCA studies has been subject to major progress over the last years. In the context of waste management, various methods have been implemented but a systematic method for uncertainty analysis of waste-LCA studies is lacking. The objective of this paper is (1) to present the sources of uncertainty specifically inherent to waste-LCA studies, (2) to select and apply several methods for uncertainty analysis and (3) to develop a general framework for quantitative uncertainty assessment of LCA of waste management systems. The suggested method is a sequence of four steps combining the selected methods: (Step 1) a sensitivity analysis evaluating the sensitivities of the results with respect to the input uncertainties, (Step 2) an uncertainty propagation providing appropriate tools for representing uncertainties and calculating the overall uncertainty of the model results, (Step 3) an uncertainty contribution analysis quantifying the contribution of each parameter uncertainty to the final uncertainty and (Step 4) as a new approach, a combined sensitivity analysis providing a visualisation of the shift in the ranking of different options due to variations of selected key parameters. This tiered approach optimises the resources available to LCA practitioners by only propagating the most influential uncertainties.

Clavreul, Julie, E-mail: julc@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, ENAG BRGM-School, BP 6009, 3 Avenue C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-12-15

235

Formulating waste management strategies based on waste management practices of households in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid urbanisation, population growth and changes in lifestyles in low- and middle-income countries contribute to increasing the per capita domestic waste generation. This trend leads to deplorable environmental and public health conditions, especially in rapidly expanding cities of low- and middle-income countries lacking appropriate waste management systems, Santiago de Cuba is no exception. To improve solid waste management in the

Hans Joachim Mosler; Silke Drescher; Christian Zurbrügg; Tamara Caballero Rodríguez; Omar Guzmán Miranda

2006-01-01

236

Formulating waste management strategies based on waste management practices of households in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid urbanisation, population growth and changes in lifestyles in low- and middle-income countries contribute to increasing the per capita domestic waste generation. This trend leads to deplorable environmental and public health conditions, especially in rapidly expanding cities of low- and middle-income countries lacking appropriate waste management systems, Santiago de Cuba is no exception. To improve solid waste management in the

Hans Joachim; Silke Drescher; Christian Zurbrugg; Tamara Caballero Rodriguez; Omar Guzman

237

Los Alamos Plutonium Facility Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the new computer-based transuranic (TRU) Waste Management System (WMS) being implemented at the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Waste Management System is a distributed computer processing system stored in a Sybase database and accessed by a graphical user interface (GUI) written in Omnis7. It resides on the local area network at the Plutonium Facility and is accessible by authorized TRU waste originators, count room personnel, radiation protection technicians (RPTs), quality assurance personnel, and waste management personnel for data input and verification. Future goals include bringing outside groups like the LANL Waste Management Facility on-line to participate in this streamlined system. The WMS is changing the TRU paper trail into a computer trail, saving time and eliminating errors and inconsistencies in the process.

Smith, K.; Montoya, A.; Wieneke, R.; Wulff, D.; Smith, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.

1997-02-01

238

A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY  

EPA Science Inventory

Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

239

Scenarios for Public-Private Partnerships in Water Management: A Case Study from Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to document the experience of public-private partnership (PPP) in the management of the domestic water sector in Amman city, Jordan. It also intends to reflect on the transformations in water management after the introduction of PPP using metaphors from ecology. Scenarios for water management are developed and assessed based on financial viability and political

Odeh R. Al-Jayyousi

2003-01-01

240

Waste Input-Output Analysis and Optimization of Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A decision analytic model of life cycle assessment (LCA) for waste management based on the waste input-output (WIO) model is presented. The resulting WIO-LP model can help environmental decision making with regard to choosing an “optimal” waste management from among a set of possible technological alternatives to meet given policy objectives under consideration of given physical, economic, and institutional constraints. Its implementation to Japanese data reveals the presence of a trade-off relationship between the reduction of CO2 emission and the consumption of landfill capacity.

Kondo, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shinichiro

241

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01

242

Life cycle assessment for waste management  

SciTech Connect

Standard methods for assessing the environmental impact of waste management systems are needed to underpin the development and implementation of sustainable waste management practices. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is an emerging tool for ensuring such assessment is comprehensive and covers the full cradle to grave impacts associated with providing a product or service. This paper discusses aspects of a recent study commissioned by the UK Department of the Environment to assess how LCA methodology could be developed and applied to assist decision makers in waste management. It focuses on a method developed by the research contractors for identifying the environmental burdens that occur during the collection, treatment and disposal of non-hazardous waste. The method requires waste management activities to be defined as generic unit operations which are independent of the specific characteristics of the waste processed. These unit operations are used to flowsheet the specific system under study and burdens that are independent of the waste are identified. Waste-dependent burdens are identified separately by considering the interaction of unit operations and the specific characteristics exhibited by the waste under study. For identification purposes a restricted list of 10 characteristics is considered sufficient to highlight those burdens for which inventory data may be required. Comment is made on the potential to develop the identification method to provide quantified data for the burden inventory.

Barton, J.R. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Dalley, D.; Patel, V.S. [Aspinwall and Co., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31

243

Precision Management of Cattle Feedlot Waste  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cattle feedlot nutrient waste management is a topic of increasing environmental, sociological, and regulatory concern. This report investigates methods adapted from the management of saline soils for application to feedlot surface management as well operation of a vegetative treatment area (VTA) ut...

244

National solid waste management plan for Iraq.  

PubMed

After decades of turmoil and international sanctions much of the key civil infrastructure within Iraq has fallen into disrepair, leading to a considerable decline in the provision of basic and essential municipal services. This is particularly true of waste and resource management services that have seen years of underdevelopment and deterioration. This has resulted in a lack of provision of basic public services in the waste sector which have been replaced by a burgeoning unregulated informal market in waste collection, disposal and recycling. In response, a National Solid Waste Management Plan (NSWMP) for Iraq was developed in 2007, to plan for the strategic development of all aspects of waste management in the country over the coming 20 years. In particular, the NSWMP focuses on policy development and integrated planning regarding regulatory framework, economic aspects, institutional capacity, citizen and technical education, and technical and operational development. This paper summarizes the key objectives, challenges and subsequent recommendations contained in the NSWMP for Iraq. PMID:19470543

Knowles, James A

2009-05-26

245

Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

Vann, J.M.

1998-01-08

246

Overview assessment of nuclear-waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The environmental control technologies associated with Department of Energy nuclear waste management programs were reviewed and the most urgent problems requiring further action or follow up were identified. In order of decreasing importance they are: (1) shallow land disposal technology development; (2) active uranium mill tailings piles; (3) uranium mine dewatering; (4) site decommissioning; (5) exhumation/treatment of transuranic waste at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; (6) uranium mine spoils; and (7) medical/institutional wastes.

Burton, B. W.; Gutschick, V. P.; Perkins, B. A.; Reynolds, C. L.; Rodgers, J. C.; Steger, J. G.; Thompson, T. K.; Trocki, L. K.; Wewerka, E. M.; Wheeler, M. L.

1982-08-01

247

Materials issues in nuclear-waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, materials issues in the management of nuclear waste, including its generation, processing, storage, transport, and disposal, are examined for low-level and high-level waste, with an emphasis on the aspects of their immobilization and long-term isolation. Selecting materials for low-level and high-level waste form and containers is reviewed, and the long-term performance issues with these materials as barriers to nuclide migration or release are discussed.

Yim, Man-Sung; Linga Murty, K.

2000-09-01

248

Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences.

Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Scientific Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-03-01

249

SEMINAR PUBLICATION: ORGANIC AIR EMISSIONS FROM WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The organic chemicals contained in wastes processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause toxic or carcinogenic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Because air emissions from waste management operations pose a threat to human health...

250

Ydinjaetehuollon ohjelma 1992. (Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1992).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Manag...

1991-01-01

251

Ydinjaetehuollon ohjelma 1994. (Nuclear waste management programme 1994).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Manag...

1993-01-01

252

Ydinjaetehuollon ohjelma 1996. (Nuclear waste management programme 1996).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT) founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Manage...

1995-01-01

253

Ydinjaetehuollon ohjelma 1995. (Nuclear waste management programme 1995).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Manag...

1994-01-01

254

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

SciTech Connect

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31

255

Defense Waste and Byproducts Management. Monthly Report, October 1983.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The draft of the revised Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP) has been completed and is currently in review. Extensively rewritten, the draft document covers all aspects of waste management with emphasis on the final deposition of the waste materials. Key...

1983-01-01

256

Managing America`s solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02

257

Making the Case for Construction Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Construction and demolition activities generate a large portion of the total solid waste stream in the United States and have a significant impact on the environment. To reduce this environmental impact, some contractors have implemented construction waste management plans on their projects in order to divert construction and demolition debris from landfill disposal. Yet there are still many contractors who

Hazem Elzarka

258

Overview assessment of nuclear-waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environmental control technologies associated with Department of Energy nuclear waste management programs were reviewed and the most urgent problems requiring further action or follow up were identified. In order of decreasing importance they are: (1) shallow land disposal technology development; (2) active uranium mill tailings piles; (3) uranium mine dewatering; (4) site decommissioning; (5) exhumation\\/treatment of transuranic waste at

B. W. Burton; V. P. Gutschick; B. A.. Perkins; C. L. Reynolds; J. C. Rodgers; J. G. Steger; T. K. Thompson; L. K. Trocki; E. M. Wewerka; M. L. Wheeler

1982-01-01

259

Suggested nuclear waste management radiological performance objectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of criteria for the safe disposal of nuclear wastes in geologic media requires the establishment of definitive objectives against which the adequacy of various waste management methods may be judged. Certain guidelines are suggested that might serve as first approximations pending promulgation of official criteria. These include: the allowable radiation dose to individuals should be related to the predicted

J. Cohen

1978-01-01

260

Public waste management and the ocean choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volume examines these issues and places ocean disposal within the context of other waste-management options. Theory is blended with practice drawing upon scientists and public and private sector interests. Experience and planning in Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York illustrate the technical, economic and institutional aspects that communities face in disposing of their wastes. Throughout, there is a common theme--ocean

K. D. Stolzenbach; J. T. Kildow; E. T. Harding

1986-01-01

261

Assessment of LANL liquid waste management documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this report is to determine the present status of operations of the Liquid Waste Section of The Waste Management Group (HSE-7) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with respect to preparation and maintenance of necessary criteria, pla...

J. G. Danna E. A. Jennrich D. M. Lund K. D. Davis S. S. Hoevemeyer

1991-01-01

262

Land Use Management for Solid Waste Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author discusses the problems of solid waste disposal and examines various land use management techniques. These include the land use plan, zoning, regionalization, land utilities, and interim use. Information concerning solid waste processing site zoning and analysis is given. Bibliography included. (MA)|

Brown, Sanford M., Jr.

1974-01-01

263

Managing solid waste in small hotels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collectively, small hotels constitute a significant solid waste management (SWM) problem. Little research has focused on the SWM practices of small hotels. In the United Kingdom, much of the solid waste generated by small hotels goes to landfill. This study uses a constructionist approach to investigate SWM issues in small hotels in a local authority in Wales and examines the

Hatem R. I. Radwan; Eleri Jones; Dino Minoli

2010-01-01

264

Engineering assessment of mixed waste management options  

Microsoft Academic Search

An engineering assessment of the low-level radioactive mixed waste (contains both radioactive and hazardous constituents) management program at Los Alamos National Laboratory was performed during the summer and fall of 1989. The assessment was aimed at developing recommendations for upgrading existing or developing new mixed waste treatment, storage, characterization, and disposal capabilities at the facility. The assessment was initiated with

K. D. Davis; R. B. Klein; E. A. Jennrich

1989-01-01

265

Waste management project technical baseline description.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alt...

J. P. Sederburg

1997-01-01

266

Solid Waste Management: Programs and Policies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study evaluates current and future solid waste management needs in the Appalachian Region. It is divided into two sections. The first section covers planning and implementation requirements that will be of interest to those wanting to establish sound ...

1980-01-01

267

Legal Approach to Radioactive Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The authors of this paper review the major legal problems raised by radioactive waste management. They stress the complexity of such problems by posing three main queries: surveillance or no surveillance; liability or no liability and finally internationa...

B. Derche P. Rocamora A. Salelles

1983-01-01

268

Savannah River Plant Waste Management Information Index.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This index includes reports and articles concerning waste management and environmental activities at Savannah River. The information was compiled by machine into three sections: a bibliographic listing, a subject listing, and an author listing. (ERA citat...

1976-01-01

269

A Program on Hazardous Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of the "Hazardous Waste Management Graduate Certificate" program at Wayne State University. Describes four required courses and nine optional courses. Discusses the development of a Master program and the curriculum of the Master program. (YP)

Kummler, Ralph H.; And Others

1989-01-01

270

Overview Assessment of Nuclear-Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

After reviewing the environmental control technologies associated with Department of Energy nuclear waste management programs, we have identified the most urgent problems requiring further action or follow-up. They are in order of decreasing importance: (...

B. W. Burton V. P. Gutschick B. A. Perkins C. L. Reynolds J. C. Rodgers

1982-01-01

271

Public policy issues in nuclear waste management  

SciTech Connect

This document aims to raise issues and to analyze them, not resolve them. The issues were: temporal equity, geographic and socioeconomic equity, implementation of a nuclear waste management system, and public involvement.

Nealey, S.M.; Radford, L.M.

1978-10-01

272

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01

273

Legacy Risk Measure for Environmental Management Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is investigating the development of a comprehensive and quantitative risk model framework for environmental management activities at the site. Included are waste management programs (high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, mixed low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and special nuclear materials), major environmental restoration efforts, major decontamination and decommissioning projects, and planned long-term stewardship activities. Two basic types of risk estimates are included: risks from environmental management activities, and long-term legacy risks from wastes/materials. Both types of risks are estimated using the Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) developed at the INEEL. Given these two types of risk calculations, the following evaluations can be performed: • Risk evaluation of an entire program (covering waste/material as it now exists through disposal or other end states) • Risk comparisons of alternative programs or activities • Comparisons of risk benefit versus risk cost for activities or entire programs • Ranking of programs or activities by risk • Ranking of wastes/materials by risk • Evaluation of site risk changes with time as activities progress • Integrated performance measurement using indicators such as injury/death and exposure rates. This paper discusses the definition and calculation of legacy risk measures and associated issues. The legacy risk measure is needed to support three of the seven types of evaluations listed above: comparisons of risk benefit versus risk cost, ranking of wastes/materials by risk, and evaluation of site risk changes with time.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Nitschke, Robert Leon

2002-02-01

274

Implementing a Waste-Management-Plan Method in Construction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing awareness of environmental impacts from construction waste has led to the development of waste management as an important function of construction project management. Various approaches for managing construction waste have been developed by many researchers around the world. The Hong Kong government started employing the implementation of a waste-management-plan method for all construction projects in 2003. During the

Vivian W. Y. Tam

275

Including indirect environmental impacts in waste management planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activities within waste management systems, such as energy and material recovery, can lead to indirect environmental impacts that occur outside of waste management systems. In this paper, the effect of including indirect greenhouse-gas emissions on the choice of waste management solutions on a national level is explored. The global warming potentials (GWPs) of future waste management solutions for Sweden are

Maria Ljunggren Söderman

2003-01-01

276

Radioactive waste management in the former USSR  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste materials--and the methods being used to treat, process, store, transport, and dispose of them--have come under increased scrutiny over last decade, both nationally and internationally. Nuclear waste practices in the former Soviet Union, arguably the world's largest nuclear waste management system, are of obvious interest and may affect practices in other countries. In addition, poor waste management practices are causing increasing technical, political, and economic problems for the Soviet Union, and this will undoubtedly influence future strategies. this report was prepared as part of a continuing effort to gain a better understanding of the radioactive waste management program in the former Soviet Union. the scope of this study covers all publicly known radioactive waste management activities in the former Soviet Union as of April 1992, and is based on a review of a wide variety of literature sources, including documents, meeting presentations, and data base searches of worldwide press releases. The study focuses primarily on nuclear waste management activities in the former Soviet Union, but relevant background information on nuclear reactors is also provided in appendixes.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-06-01

277

Airborne radionuclide waste-management reference document  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides the detailed data required to develop a strategy for airborne radioactive waste management by the Department of Energy (DOE). The airborne radioactive materials of primary concern are tritium (H-3), carbon-14 (C-14), krypton-85 (Kr-85), iodine-129 (I-129), and radioactive particulate matter. The introductory section of the report describes the nature and broad objectives of airborne waste management. The relationship

R. A. Brown; J. D. Christian; T. R. Thomas

1983-01-01

278

Progress and Pitfalls in Global Change Scenario Use for Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources was one of the first sectors where focused interest in potential management challenges regarding future climate change was exhibited. This interest was a function of the relatively long planning horizon for water resources infrastructure as well as the centrality of the resource to most human enterprises. As the challenge of climate change draws nearer, use of scenarios for long-term planning has become more critical. To sensibly assess the threats and (sometimes) opportunities that water managers face they need scenarios of climate change and other key future factors (e.g., population, technology, economic development) to determine the climate's future impact on their sector and the factors that influence vulnerability. One key issue in scenario formation (and quantification of uncertainty characterized initially in scenarios) is that of reflexivity, or how to represent decisions within scenarios. This is usually an issue in scenarios of socio-economic development and other factors that influence the development of projections of emissions. One school of thought suggests that scenarios that directly involve human agency should not become part of a probabilistic enterprise, while another suggests that the condition poses no problem for rendering future population, technological advances etc.. This issue will be discussed in the context of water resource management needs for information about the future.

Mearns, L. O.

2006-12-01

279

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG&G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG&G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01

280

Multiple system modelling of waste management.  

PubMed

Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. PMID:21855313

Eriksson, Ola; Bisaillon, Mattias

2011-08-19

281

Simulating post-wildfire forest trajectories under alternative climate and management scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To assess post-fire vegetation recovery under the influence of climate change, we applied the Climate-Forest Vegetation Simulator (Climate-FVS), a new version of a widely used forest management model, to compare alternative climate and management scenarios in a severely burned multi-species forest of Arizona, U.S.A. The incorporation of seven combinations of General Circulation Models (GCM) and emissions scenarios altered long-term (100 years) projections of future forest condition compared to a No Climate Change (NCC) scenario, which forecast a gradual increase to high levels of forest density and carbon storage. In contrast, emissions scenarios that included continued high greenhouse gas releases led to near-complete deforestation by 2111. GCM-emissions scenario combinations that were less severe reduced forest structure and carbon storage relative to NCC. Fuel reduction treatments that had been applied prior to the severe wildfire did have persistent effects, especially under NCC, but were overwhelmed by increasingly severe climate change. We tested six management strategies aimed at sustaining future forests: prescribed burning at 5, 10, or 20-year intervals, thinning 40% or 60% of stand basal area, and no-treatment. Severe climate change led to deforestation under all management regimes, but important differences emerged under the moderate scenarios: treatments that included regular prescribed burning fostered low density, wildfire-resistant forests composed of the naturally dominant species, ponderosa pine. Non-fire treatments under moderate climate change were forecast to become dense and susceptible to severe wildfire, with a shift to dominance by sprouting species. Current U.S.A. management requires modeling of future scenarios but does not mandate consideration of climate change effects. However, this study showed substantial differences in model outputs depending on climate and management actions. Managers should incorporate climate change into the process of analyzing the environmental effects of alternative actions.

Azpeleta, Alicia; Fule, Peter; Shive, Kristen; Sieg, Carolyn; Sanchez-Meador, Andrew; Strom, Barbara

2013-04-01

282

Hospitals become cost centers in managed care scenario.  

PubMed

In a risk-bearing managed care enterprise, acute-care facilities will change from being profit centers to being cost centers, and this transformation will require a focus on controlling costs rather than increasing admissions. This article details the elements of change that healthcare financial managers should consider, from the increased difficulty of matching revenue to expense, to the expanded role of clinical engineers. PMID:10146043

Keegan, A J

1994-08-01

283

Household hazardous waste management planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1985, Hennepin County entered into an agreement with Hennepin Energy Resource Co., Ltd. for the construction and operation of a 1000-ton-a-day waste-to-energy facility. In an effort to ensure that the new incinerator operates as safety as possible, Hennepin County is currently examining various methods of removing unacceptable materials from the waste stream; household hazardous wastes (HHW) are one stream

Seeberger

1991-01-01

284

Radioactive waste management complex low-level waste radiological composite analysis  

SciTech Connect

The composite analysis estimates the projected cumulative impacts to future members of the public from the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and all other sources of radioactive contamination at the INEEL that could interact with the LLW disposal facility to affect the radiological dose. Based upon the composite analysis evaluation, waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the RWMC is the only source at the INEEL that will significantly interact with the LLW facility. The source term used in the composite analysis consists of all historical SDA subsurface disposals of radionuclides as well as the authorized LLW subsurface disposal inventory and projected LLW subsurface disposal inventory. Exposure scenarios evaluated in the composite analysis include all the all-pathways and groundwater protection scenarios. The projected dose of 58 mrem/yr exceeds the composite analysis guidance dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr; therefore, an options analysis was conducted to determine the feasibility of reducing the projected annual dose. Three options for creating such a reduction were considered: (1) lowering infiltration of precipitation through the waste by providing a better cover, (2) maintaining control over the RWMC and portions of the INEEL indefinitely, and (3) extending the period of institutional control beyond the 100 years assumed in the composite analysis. Of the three options investigated, maintaining control over the RWMC and a small part of the present INEEL appears to be feasible and cost effective.

McCarthy, J.M.; Becker, B.H.; Magnuson, S.O.; Keck, K.N.; Honeycutt, T.K.

1998-05-01

285

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01

286

Scenario Planning for Wildlife Management: A Case Study of the National Elk Refuge, Jackson, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1980s, scenario planning has increasingly been used in business and military settings to integrate an appreciation of uncertainty about the future into planning processes. There is a growing precedent to use it in ecological management decision making. Although well suited for the purpose, the technique has not been adequately applied to wildlife management. This article presents a case

Mark W. Neff

2007-01-01

287

Recent Advancements in Food Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past few years, there has been a tremendous increase in food waste generation due to rapid urbanization and industrialization. Population is also increasing and is expected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050. Both of these factors have put an emphasis to employ novel techniques for management of waste generated so that waste generation could be reduced to a minimum or these wastes could be converted into some valuable products. Therefore, in this view much technological advancement has occurred in the recent past which has proved to be useful for combating this problem. In this review, a brief introduction to status of waste generation and novel methods for its management has been discussed.

Amin, Tawheed; Chhabra, Poonam; Bhat, Suman Vikas

2012-09-01

288

Feasibility of Target Material Recycling as Waste Management Alternative  

SciTech Connect

The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management include disposal in repositories, recycling, or clearance from regulatory control, following a reasonable cooling period. This paper concerns the feasibility of recycling the heavy-ion-beam targets, in particular the hohlraum wall materials that include, for example, Au/Gd, Au, W, Pb, Hg, Ta, Pb/Ta/Cs, Hg/W/Cs, Pb/Hf, Hf, solid Kr, and solid Xe. The choice between target material disposal and recycling depends on the amount of waste generated relative to the nuclear island, the strategy to solve the recycling problem, and the impact of the additional cost and complexity of the recycling process on the overall machine. A detailed flow diagram for the elements of the recycling process was developed to analyze two extreme activation cases: (a) one-shot use and then disposal in a repository and (b) recycling continuously during plant life without removal of transmutation products. Metrics for comparing the two scenarios included waste level, dose to recycling equipment, additional cost, and design complexity. Comparing the two approaches indicated a preference for the one-shot scenario as it generates 1 m{sup 3}/yr of extremely low-level waste (Class A) and offers attractive design and economics features. Recycling reduces the target waste stream by a factor of 10 or more but introduces additional issues. It may produce high-level waste, requires remote handling, adds radioactive storage facilities, and increases the cost and complexity of the plant. The inventory analysis indicated that the heavy-ion-beam (HIB) target materials represent a very small waste stream compared to that of the nuclear island (<1% of the total waste). This means recycling is not a 'must' requirement for IFE-HIB power plants unless the target materials have cost and/or resource problems (e.g., Au and Gd). In this case, the additional cost and complexity of the recycling process should be factored into the economics of IFE power plants.

El-Guebaly, L.; Wilson, P.; Henderson, D.; Varuttamaseni, A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2004-11-15

289

Life cycle analysis: Its place in waste management  

SciTech Connect

Reducing waste at the source requires analyzing the waste stream and making appropriate adjustments such as a process change, material change and/or operational change. There is a management gap between these adjustments to reduce waste by the producer and consumer and the actual management of the generated wastes by the waste management professional. The LCA concept supports the producer, consumer, and waste management professional in taking a systems approach in determining and understanding the waste stream. The purpose of the paper is to discuss how LCA can be the tool to assist waste management decision makers.

Bridges, J.S.

1993-04-01

290

Municipal solid waste management strategies in Turkey.  

PubMed

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental problem in Turkey, as in many developing countries. Problems associated with municipal solid waste are difficult to address, but efforts towards more efficient collection and transportation and environmentally acceptable waste disposal continue in Turkey. Although strict regulations on the management of solid waste are in place, primitive disposal methods such as open dumping and discharge into surface water have been used in various parts of Turkey. This study presents a brief history of the legislative trends in Turkey for MSW management. The study also presents the MSW responsibility and management structure together with the present situation of generation, composition, recycling, and treatment. The results show that approximately 25 million ton of MSW are generated annually in Turkey. About 77% of the population receives MSW services. In spite of efforts to change open dumping areas into sanitary landfills and to build modern recycling and composting facilities, Turkey still has over 2000 open dumps. PMID:18644708

Turan, N Gamze; Coruh, Semra; Akdemir, Andaç; Ergun, Osman Nuri

2008-07-21

291

OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

2002-02-27

292

Corrective Measures Study Modeling Results for the Southwest Plume - Burial Ground Complex/Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater modeling scenarios were performed to support the Corrective Measures Study and Interim Action Plan for the southwest plume of the Burial Ground Complex/Mixed Waste Management Facility. The modeling scenarios were designed to provide data for an economic analysis of alternatives, and subsequently evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedial technologies for tritium reduction to Fourmile Branch. Modeling scenarios assessed include no action, vertical barriers, pump, treat, and reinject; and vertical recirculation wells.

Harris, M.K.

1999-01-29

293

Geochemical survey of an illegal waste disposal site under a waste emergency scenario (Northwest Naples, Italy).  

PubMed

Since the mid 1980s, Naples and the Campania region have suffered from the dumping of wastes into overfilled landfills. The aim was to characterise a former cave located in Roccarainola (Naples, Italy) for its eventual destination to a controlled landfill site. A detailed hydro-geochemical survey of the area was carried out through drilling of 14 boreholes and four monitoring wells. Samples of water, sediment and soil were analysed for heavy metals and organic contaminants from a dew pond placed in the middle of the cave. The underneath aquifer was also surveyed. The nature of gases emitted from the site was investigated. Results of the geognostic survey revealed the presence of huge volumes of composite wastes, approximately half a million of cubic metre, which accumulated up to a thickness of 25.6 m. In some points, wastes lie below the free surface level of the aquifer. The sampled material from the boreholes revealed levels of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sn, Tl and Zn exceeding the intervention legal limits. Outstanding loads of Cd, Pb and Zn were found, with levels exceeding of about 50, 100 and 1,870 times the limit. In several points, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon load was extremely high, 35 vs 1 mg kg(-1) of the threshold. The aquifer was also very heavily polluted by Cd, Cr-tot, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, with impressive high load of Cr and Mn, up to 250-370 times the limits. Hot gases up to 62 °C with presence of xylene and ethylbenzene were found. Results indicated that the site needs an urgent intervention of recovery to avoid compromising the surrounding areas and aquifers of the Campania plain. PMID:22766923

Ferrara, L; Iannace, M; Patelli, A M; Arienzo, M

2012-07-06

294

40 CFR 60.2055 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2055 Section 60.2055...Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2055 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2013-07-01

295

Evaluation of Operations Scenarios for Managing the Big Creek Marsh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wetland management in changing climate is important for maintaining sustainable ecosystem as well as for reducing the impact of climate change on the environment as wetlands act as natural carbon sinks. The Big Creek Marsh within the Essex County is a Provincially Significant Wetland (PSW) in Ontario, Canada. The marsh is approximately 900 hectares in area and is primarily fed by streamflow from the Big Creek Watershed. The water level of this wetland has been managed by the stakeholders using a system of pumps, dykes and a controlled outlet to the Lake Erie. In order to adequately manage the Big Creek Marsh and conserve diverse aquatic plant species, Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA), Ontario has embarked on developing an Operations Plan to maintain desire water depths during different marsh phases, viz., Open water, Hemi and Overgrown marsh phases. The objective of the study is to evaluate the alternatives for managing water level of the Big Creek Marsh in different marsh phases. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a continuous simulation model was used to simulate streamflow entering into the marsh from the Big Creek watershed. A Water Budget (WB) model was developed for the Big Creek Marsh to facilitate in operational management of the marsh. The WB model was applied to simulate the marsh level based on operations schedules, and available weather and hydrologic data aiming to attain the target water depths for the marsh phases. This paper presents the results of simulated and target water levels, streamflow entering into the marsh, water releasing from the marsh, and water pumping into and out of the marsh under different hydrologic conditions.

Wilson, Ian; Rahman, Masihur; Wychreschuk, Jeremy; Lebedyk, Dan; Bolisetti, Tirupati

2013-04-01

296

Managing nuclear wastes: the international connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The global health and environmental aspects of nuclear waste management transcend national decision making and must be coordinated with the management policies of other nuclear-power countries. Assuming that reprocessing will continue at limited sites, ocean transport of radioactive materials introduces the need for preventive standards that will eliminate transnational pollution. This requires a level of cooperation beyond local and national

Handl

1981-01-01

297

Managing hazardous waste: Fulfilling the public trust  

SciTech Connect

Managing hazardous waste means dealing responsibly with the by-products of our industrialized society. Everyday essentials from medicine to textiles, from furniture to vehicles, are all manufactured by processes that generate by-products that must be properly managed to safeguard human health and the environment.

NONE

1989-12-31

298

Nondestructive radioassay for waste management: an assessment  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive Assay (NDA) for Transuranic Waste Management is used to mean determining the amount of transuranic (TRU) isotopes in crates, drums, boxes, cans, or other containers without having to open the container. It also means determining the amount of TRU in soil, bore holes, and other environmental testing areas without having to go through extensive laboratory wet chemistry analyses. it refers to radioassay techniques used to check for contamination on objects after decontamination and to determine amounts of TRU in waste processing streams without taking samples to a laboratory. Gednerally, NDA instrumentation in this context refers to all use of radioassay which does not involve taking samples and using wet chemistry techniques. NDA instruments have been used for waste assay at some sites for over 10 years and other sites are just beginning to consider assay of wastes. The instrumentation used at several sites is discussed in this report. Almost all these instruments in use today were developed for special nuclear materials safeguards purposes and assay TRU waste down to the 500 nCi/g range. The need for instruments to assay alpha particle emitters at 10 nCi/g or less has risen from the wish to distinguish between Low Level Waste (LLW) and TRU Waste at the defined interface of 10 nCi/g. Wastes have historically been handled as TRU wastes if they were just suspected to be transuranically contaminated but their exact status was unknown. Economic and political considerations make this practice undesirable since it is easier and less costly to handle LLW. This prompted waste generators to want better instrumentation and led the Transuranic Waste Management Program to develop and test instrumentation capable of assaying many types of waste at the 10 nCi/g level. These instruments are discussed.

Lehmkuhl, G.D.

1981-06-01

299

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS: ITS PLACE IN WASTE MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

When the waste management hierarchy is fully understood by waste management decision makers, there seems to be agreement that reducing waste is one of the correct objectives. educing waste at the source required analyzing the waste stream and making appropriate adjustments such a...

300

The contemporary European copper cycle: waste management subsystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive copper mass balance for waste management in Europe has been carried out, including municipal solid waste, construction and demolition waste, wastes from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), and end-of-life vehicles (ELV). The recycling efficiency of the current waste management system in Europe was quantified and the sources of copper scrap used for secondary copper production were determined. Additionally,

M. Bertram; T. E. Graedel; H. Rechberger; S. Spatari

2002-01-01

301

Radioactive waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume 4, No. 3, waste management organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This special issue of the Journal: Radioactive Waste Management and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, is a collection of papers describing the management organizations and nuclear waste programs in six European countries, the United States, and the IAEA. European countries included are Switzerland, Sweden, France, Belgium, Italy, and the United Kingdom. Collectively,the papers present a comprehensive background, with history of the

1984-01-01

302

The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management.  

PubMed

The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management is charged with recommending to Government, by July 2006, options for the long term management of the UK's radioactive waste legacy. These options should inspire public confidence. Now, more than halfway into the time allotted, we, as two former members of the Committee, express our concerns at the wayward approach that has been adopted. The Committee has placed emphasis on gaining public confidence but this has been done at the expense of recruiting the best scientific expertise in the management of radioactive waste, an act which we believe will actually undermine public confidence. Furthermore, given also the immense importance of this decision to public safety, national security and the national interest, we believe urgent steps should be taken to review the Committee's process, its management and its sponsorship. PMID:16286694

Baverstock, Keith; Ball, David J

2005-09-06

303

Design Scenarios for Web-Based Management of Online Information  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet enables access to more information, from a greater variety of perspectives and with greater immediacy, than ever before. A person may be interested in information to become more informed or to coordinate his or her local activities and place them into a larger, more global context. The challenge, as has been noted by many, is to sift through all the information to find what is relevant without becoming overwhelmed. Furthermore, the selected information must be put into an actionable form. The diversity of the Web has important consequences for the variety of ideas that are now available. While people once relied on newspaper editors to shape their view of the world, today's technology creates room for a more democratic approach. Today it is easy to pull news feeds from a variety of sources and aggregate them. It is less easy to push that information to a variety of channels. At a higher level, we might have the goal of collecting all the available information about a certain topic, on a daily basis. There are many new technologies available under the umbrella of Web 2.0, but it can be difficult to use them together for the management of online information. Web-based support for online communication management is the most appropriate choice to address the deficiencies apparent with current technologies. We consider the requirements and potential designs for such information management support, by following an example related to local food.

Hepting, Daryl H.; Maciag, Timothy

304

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-01-01

305

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...June 20, 1996 § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2010-07-01

306

Institutional and financial consideration in regional solid waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lack of urban land for solid waste disposal and growing public pressures to increase recycling are forcing many urban areas to change traditional solid waste management practices. Development of regional solid waste management plans requires interrelated studies of technical, institutional, and financial alternatives. When the goal of the technical studies is to improve existing waste management practices and to emphasize

Raymond K. O'Neil; Edward R. Locke

1975-01-01

307

Improving integrated waste management at the regional level: the case of Lombardia.  

PubMed

The article summarises the main results of the 'Gestione Rifiuti in Lombardia: Analisi del ciclo di vita' (Waste management in Lombardia region: Life cycle assessment; GERLA) project. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been selected by Regione Lombardia as a strategic decision support tool in the drafting of its new waste management programme. The goal was to use the life cycle thinking approach to assess the current regional situation and thus to give useful strategic indications for the future waste management. The first phase of the study consisted of the LCA of the current management of municipal waste in the Lombardia region (reference year: 2009). The interpretation of such results has allowed the definition of four possible waste management scenarios for the year 2020, with the final goal being to improve the environmental performance of the regional system. The results showed that the current integrated waste management of Lombardia region is already characterised by good energy and environmental performances. However, there is still room for further improvement: actions based, on the one hand, on a further increase in recycling rates and, on the other hand, on a series of technological modifications, especially in food waste and residual waste management, can be undertaken to improve the overall system. PMID:23831777

Rigamonti, Lucia; Falbo, Alida; Grosso, Mario

2013-07-05

308

Management of chemical toxic wastes  

SciTech Connect

Two regimes of vertical shaft furnace operation can be employed to slag encapsulate hazardous chemical wastes. One of these is similar to a method applicable to radioactive wastes, involving the pouring of hot molten slag from a coal reactor over the hazardous matter contained in a suitable designed crucible. The other method is especially appropriate for the treatment of chemical wastes that have become mixed with a great deal of soil or other diluent as must be handled as in the case of the love canal incident. It consists of feeding the contaminated solid mass into the coal reactor with a predetermined amount of coal and limestone that will still admit an adequate heat balance to generate a carefully tailored slag to incorporate the reacted waste feedstock.

Gold, L.

1982-05-25

309

Managing nuclear wastes: the international connection  

SciTech Connect

The global health and environmental aspects of nuclear waste management transcend national decision making and must be coordinated with the management policies of other nuclear-power countries. Assuming that reprocessing will continue at limited sites, ocean transport of radioactive materials introduces the need for preventive standards that will eliminate transnational pollution. This requires a level of cooperation beyond local and national management that will have to be initiated by individual countries and then replaced by joint international action. (DCK)

Handl, G.

1981-04-01

310

Chemistry and technology of radioactive waste management —the IAEA perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper refers the consideration of chemical composition of radioactive waste in selection of particular method and technology for waste treatment and conditioning, importance of physicochemical parameters of waste processing techniques for optimisation of waste processing to produce waste form of appropriate quality. Consideration of waste chemistry is illustrated by several IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and by outlining the scope of some selected technical reports on different waste management subjects. Different components of the IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and on technology transfer are presented and discussed.

Efremenkov, V. M.

2003-01-01

311

Future issues in haz waste management  

SciTech Connect

The hazardous waste management market has experienced a roller-coaster ride during the past few years. The business exploded during the 1980s as public concerns led to a vast new range of regulatory controls, and siting/permitting difficulties caused demand to quickly outstrip capacity. Prices for hazardous waste management went through the roof, attracting many technology developers to the industry. But the forces of supply and demand, coupled with ongoing regulatory changes, soon adjusted market conditions. First, high profitability and growth attracted droves of new participants to the industry, eventually bringing new capacity on line. Second, and more significantly, high prices forced industrial America to closely re-examine its manufacturing practices and waste generation habits. It soon became clear there were broad opportunities to minimize hazardous waste generation through improved housekeeping practices, alternative manufacturing processes, and substitution of toxic materials in manufacturing.

Maxwell, S. (TechKNOWLEDGEy Strategic Group, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-10-15

312

THE SUSTAINABILITY OF ALLIANCES BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT -using the concept of integrated Sustainable Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the concept of Integrated Sustainable Waste Management (ISWM)1 in the context of assessing the sustainability of waste management alliances. ISWM differs from conventional approaches towards waste management by seeking stakeholder participation, by including waste prevention and resource recovery explicitly, by encouraging the analysis of interactions with other urban systems and by promoting an integration of different habitat

Justine Anschiitz

313

ICPP Waste Management Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), a Spent fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan was developed jointly by DOE and WINCO.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-01-01

314

WASTE MANAGEMENT AT SRS - MAKING IT HAPPEN  

SciTech Connect

The past five years have witnessed a remarkable transition in the pace and scope of waste management activities at SRS. At the start of the new M&O contract in 1996, little was being done with the waste generated at the site apart from storing it in readiness for future treatment and disposal. Large volumes of legacy waste, particularly TRU and Low Level Waste, had accumulated over many years of operation of the site's nuclear facilities, and the backlog was increasing. WSRC proposed the use of the talents of the ''best in class'' partners for the new contract which, together with a more commercial approach, was expected to deliver more results without a concomitant increase in cost. This paper charts the successes in the Solid Waste arena and analyzes the basis for success.

Heenan, T. F.; Kelly, S.

2002-02-25

315

40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. The State shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are...

2013-07-01

316

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01

317

Can we talk? Communications management for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a complex nuclear waste management project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia Nuclear Waste Management Program is pursuing for DOE an option for permanently disposing radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories. Included in the Program are the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project for US defense program mixed waste the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) for spent power reactor fuel and vitrified high-level waste, projects for other waste types, and development efforts

S. A. Goldstein; G. M. Pullen; D. R. Brewer

1995-01-01

318

Radioactive waste management in a hospital.  

PubMed

Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations. PMID:21475524

Khan, Shoukat; Syed, At; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A; Ajaz, M; Jan, Fa

2010-01-01

319

Environmental assessment of alternative municipal solid waste management strategies. A Spanish case study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to compare, from an environmental point of view, different alternatives for the management of municipal solid waste generated in the town of Castellón de la Plana (Spain). This town currently produces 207 ton of waste per day and the waste management system employed today involves the collection of paper/cardboard, glass and light packaging from materials banks and of rest waste at street-side containers. The proposed alternative scenarios were based on a combination of the following elements: selective collection targets to be accomplished by the year 2015 as specified in the Spanish National Waste Plan (assuming they are reached to an extent of 50% and 100%), different collection models implemented nationally, and diverse treatments of both the separated biodegradable fraction and the rest waste to be disposed of on landfills. This resulted in 24 scenarios, whose environmental behaviour was studied by applying the life cycle assessment methodology. In accordance with the ISO 14040-44 (2006) standard, an inventory model was developed for the following stages of the waste management life cycle: pre-collection (bags and containers), collection, transport, pre-treatment (waste separation) and treatment/disposal (recycling, composting, biogasification+composting, landfill with/without energy recovery). Environmental indicators were obtained for different impact categories, which made it possible to identify the key variables in the waste management system and the scenario that offers the best environmental behaviour. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was used to test some of the assumptions made in the initial life cycle inventory model. PMID:20381331

Bovea, M D; Ibáñez-Forés, V; Gallardo, A; Colomer-Mendoza, F J

2010-04-08

320

Multiple system modelling of waste management  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the systems. > The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. > The simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. - Abstract: Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models.

Eriksson, Ola, E-mail: ola.eriksson@hig.se [Profu i Goeteborg AB, Goetaforsliden 13 Nedre, SE 431 34 Moelndal (Sweden); Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gaevle, SE 801 76 Gaevle (Sweden); Bisaillon, Mattias, E-mail: mattias.bisaillon@profu.se [Profu i Goeteborg AB, Goetaforsliden 13 Nedre, SE 431 34 Moelndal (Sweden)

2011-12-15

321

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul.  

PubMed

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul. PMID:20185290

Kanat, Gurdal

2010-02-24

322

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

SciTech Connect

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15

323

Use of a Knowledge Management System in Waste Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

In Germany the knowledge management system 'WasteInfo' about waste management and disposal issues has been developed and implemented. Beneficiaries of 'WasteInfo' are official decision makers having access to a large information pool. The information pool is fed by experts, so called authors This means compiling of information, evaluation and assigning of appropriate properties (metadata) to this information. The knowledge management system 'WasteInfo' has been introduced at the WM04, the operation of 'WasteInfo' at the WM05. The recent contribution describes the additional advantage of the KMS being used as a tool for the dealing with waste management projects. This specific aspect will be demonstrated using a project concerning a comparative analysis of the implementation of repositories in six countries using nuclear power as examples: The information of 'WasteInfo' is assigned to categories and structured according to its origin and type of publication. To use 'WasteInfo' as a tool for the processing the projects, a suitable set of categories has to be developed for each project. Apart from technical and scientific aspects, the selected project deals with repository strategies and policies in various countries, with the roles of applicants and authorities in licensing procedures, with safety philosophy and with socio-economic concerns. This new point of view has to be modelled in the categories. Similar to this, new sources of information such as local and regional dailies or particular web-sites have to be taken into consideration. In this way 'WasteInfo' represents an open document which reflects the current status of the respective repository policy in several countries. Information with particular meaning for the German repository planning is marked and by this may influence the German strategy. (authors)

Gruendler, D.; Boetsch, W.U. [Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) GmbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-50667 Cologne (Germany); Holzhauer, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-50667 Cologne (Germany); Nies, R.A. [Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Robert-Schuman-Platz 3, D - 53175 Bonn (Germany)

2006-07-01

324

Exploring the life cycle management of industrial solid waste in the case of copper slag.  

PubMed

Industrial solid waste has potential impacts on soil, water and air quality, as well as human health, during its whole life stages. A framework for the life cycle management of industrial solid waste, which integrates the source reduction process, is presented and applied to copper slag management. Three management scenarios of copper slag are developed: (i) production of cement after electric furnace treatment, (ii) production of cement after flotation, and (iii) source reduction before the recycling process. A life cycle assessment is carried out to estimate the environmental burdens of these three scenarios. Life cycle assessment results showed that the environmental burdens of the three scenarios are 2710.09, 2061.19 and 2145.02 Pt respectively. In consideration of the closed-loop recycling process, the environmental performance of the flotation approach excelled that of the electric furnace approach. Additionally, although flash smelting promotes the source reduction of copper slag compared with bath smelting, it did not reduce the overall environmental burdens resulting from the complete copper slag management process. Moreover, it led to the shifting of environmental burdens from ecosystem quality damage and resources depletion to human health damage. The case study shows that it is necessary to integrate the generation process into the whole life cycle of industrial solid waste, and to make an integrated assessment for quantifying the contribution of source reduction, rather than to simply follow the priority of source reduction and the hierarchy of waste management. PMID:23512953

Song, Xiaolong; Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Li, Bo

2013-03-19

325

Issues directions in hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Early this year, Richard J. Pastor, vice president external affairs of Envirosafe Management Services, Inc. (Valley Forge, Pa.), was elected chairman of the board of governors of the Hazardous Waste Management Association (HWMA). HWMA is one of three associations that form part of the Environmental Industry Associations (EIA) and represent entities involved in the transportation, storage, treatment, remediation, disposal, and recycling of hazardous wastes or PCBs; and those companies involved in the provision of professional, technical, financial, and legal services to those entities. Pastor and HWMA vice president Doug MacMillan are interviewed regarding their views on the HWMA and issues facing HWMA members today.

McAdams, C.L.

1994-05-01

326

Household hazardous waste management planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1985, Hennepin County entered into an agreement with Hennepin Energy Resource Co., Ltd. for the construction and operation of a 1000-ton-a-day waste-to-energy facility. In an effort to ensure that the new incinerator operates as safety as possible, Hen...

D. A. Seeberger

1991-01-01

327

Probabilistic scenario-based water resource planning and management:A case study in the Yellow River Basin, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resource planning and management is subject to large uncertainties with respect to the impact of climate change and socio-economic development on water systems. In order to deal with these uncertainties, probabilistic climate and socio-economic scenarios were developed based on the Principle of Maximum Entropy, as defined within information theory, and as inputs to hydrological models to construct probabilistic water scenarios using Monte Carlo simulation. Probabilistic scenarios provide more explicit information than equally-likely scenarios for decision-making in water resource management. A case was developed for the Yellow River Basin, China, where future water availability and water demand are affected by both climate change and socio-economic development. Climate scenarios of future precipitation and temperature were developed based on the results of multiple Global climate models; and socio-economic scenarios were downscaled from existing large-scale scenarios. Probability distributions were assigned to these scenarios to explicitly represent a full set of future possibilities. Probabilistic climate scenarios were used as input to a rainfall-runoff model to simulate future river discharge and socio-economic scenarios for calculating water demand. A full set of possible future water supply-demand scenarios and their associated probability distributions were generated. This set can feed the further analysis of the future water balance, which can be used as a basis to plan and manage water resources in the Yellow River Basin. Key words: Probabilistic scenarios, climate change, socio-economic development, water management

Dong, C.; Schoups, G.; van de Giesen, N.

2012-04-01

328

Ydinjaetehuollon ohjelma 1993. (Nuclear Waste Management Programme 1993).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Waste Commission of Finnish Power Companies (YJT), founded by nuclear energy producing Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima (TVO), coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management. In YJT's Nuclear Waste Manageme...

1992-01-01

329

Computer-aided waste management strategic planning and analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A computational model called WASTE-MGMT has been developed to assist in the evaluation of alternative waste management approaches in a complex setting involving multiple sites, waste streams, and processing options. The model provides the quantities and c...

H. I. Avci T. J. Kotek B. L. Koebnick

1995-01-01

330

Greenhouse gas accounting and waste management.  

PubMed

Accounting of emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) is a major focus within waste management. This paper analyses and compares the four main types of GHG accounting in waste management including their special features and approaches: the national accounting, with reference to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the corporate level, as part of the annual reporting on environmental issues and social responsibility, life-cycle assessment (LCA), as an environmental basis for assessing waste management systems and technologies, and finally, the carbon trading methodology, and more specifically, the clean development mechanism (CDM) methodology, introduced to support cost-effective reduction in GHG emissions. These types of GHG accounting, in principle, have a common starting point in technical data on GHG emissions from specific waste technologies and plants, but the limited availability of data and, moreover, the different scopes of the accounting lead to many ways of quantifying emissions and producing the accounts. The importance of transparency in GHG accounting is emphasised regarding waste type, waste composition, time period considered, GHGs included, global warming potential (GWP) assigned to the GHGs, counting of biogenic carbon dioxide, choice of system boundaries, interactions with the energy system, and generic emissions factors. In order to enhance transparency and consistency, a format called the upstream-operating-downstream framework (UOD) is proposed for reporting basic technology-related data regarding GHG issues including a clear distinction between direct emissions from waste management technologies, indirect upstream (use of energy and materials) and indirect downstream (production of energy, delivery of secondary materials) activities. PMID:19808731

Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H; Aoustin, Emmanuelle

2009-10-06

331

Review of scenario selection approaches for performance assessment of high-level waste repositories and related issues.  

SciTech Connect

The selection of scenarios representing plausible realizations of the future conditions-with associated probabilities of occurrence-that can affect the long-term performance of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is the commonly used method for treating the uncertainty in the prediction of the future states of the system. This method, conventionally referred to as the ``scenario approach,`` while common is not the only method to deal with this uncertainty; other method ``ch as the environmental simulation approach (ESA), have also been proposed. Two of the difficulties with the scenario approach are the lack of uniqueness in the definition of the term ``scenario`` and the lack of uniqueness in the approach to formulate scenarios, which relies considerably on subjective judgments. Consequently, it is difficult to assure that a complete and unique set of scenarios can be defined for use in a performance assessment. Because scenarios are key to the determination of the long-term performance of the repository system, this lack of uniqueness can present a considerable challenge when attempting to reconcile the set of scenarios, and their level of detail, obtained using different approaches, particularly among proponents and regulators of a HLW repository.

Banano, E.J. [Beta Corporation International, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baca, R.G. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1995-08-01

332

The RUNES Middleware for Networked Embedded Systems and its Application in a Disaster Management Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the inherent nature of their heterogeneity, resource scarcity and dynamism, the provision of middleware for future networked embedded environments is a challenging task. In this paper we present a middleware approach that addresses these key challenges; we also discuss its application in a realistic networked embedded environment. Our application scenario involves fire management in a road tunnel that

Paolo Costa; Geoff Coulson; Richard Gold; Manish Lad; Cecilia Mascolo; Luca Mottola; Gian Pietro Picco; Thirunavukkarasu Sivaharan; Nirmal Weerasinghe; Stefanos Zachariadis

2007-01-01

333

An Optimization Method Based on Scenario Analysis for Watershed Management Under Uncertainty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In conjunction with socioeconomic development in watersheds, increasingly challenging problems, such as scarcity of water resources and environmental deterioration, have arisen. Watershed management is a useful tool for dealing with these issues and maintaining sustainable development at the watershed scale. The complex and uncertain characteristics of watershed systems have a great impact on decisions about countermeasures and other techniques that will be applied in the future. An optimization method based on scenario analysis is proposed in this paper as a means of handling watershed management under uncertainty. This method integrates system analysis, forecast methods, and scenario analysis, as well as the contributions of stakeholders and experts, into a comprehensive framework. The proposed method comprises four steps: system analyses, a listing of potential engineering techniques and countermeasures, scenario analyses, and the optimal selection of countermeasures and engineering techniques. The proposed method was applied to the case of the Lake Qionghai watershed in southwestern China, and the results are reported in this paper. This case study demonstrates that the proposed method can be used to deal efficiently with uncertainties at the watershed level. Moreover, this method takes into consideration the interests of different groups, which is crucial for successful watershed management. In particular, social, economic, environmental, and resource systems are all considered in order to improve the applicability of the method. In short, the optimization method based on scenario analysis proposed here is a valuable tool for watershed management.

Liu, Yong; Guo, Huaicheng; Zhang, Zhenxing; Wang, Lijing; Dai, Yongli; Fan, Yingying

2007-05-01

334

Cattle herd vulnerability to rainfall variability: responses to two management scenarios in southern Ethiopia.  

PubMed

We examine how the system of grazing management of cattle in savanna rangelands affects the herd response to drought. We have used long-term time series data to evaluate the effects of management on drought-induced cattle mortality using traditional livestock management practices. There was no control of stocking densities, as compared to a government ranch where stocking densities would be adjusted in accordance with available pasture. We tested the responses under two scenarios. Scenario 1: Response of cattle herds to inter-annual rainfall variability (IRV) under a regulated grazing management system; this provides more reliable predictions of cattle population and performance in terms of herd mortality and calving rates than does the communal land use system. Scenario 2: Regardless of the management system, similar trends in cattle populations will be observed in response to IRV. The results of the study showed that fluctuations in cattle numbers, herd mortality and calving rates were highly correlated with IRV, with stronger linear impacts in accordance with scenario 2. In both management systems, cattle herd sizes and calving rates declined during periods of drought, followed by slow recovery. Cattle populations in Borana rangelands in southern Ethiopia did not recover for a period of two decades. We conclude that a management system based on control of stocking densities did not improve herd survival, as compared with traditional drought management strategies. This contradicts common expectations. Increased drought frequencies aggravated cattle mortality and lowered calving rates. The implication of the findings is that regardless of adjusted stocking density, livestock populations in the arid savanna ecosystems of southern Ethiopia remain at risk from climate change. PMID:23054807

Angassa, Ayana; Oba, Gufu

2012-10-07

335

Municipal solid waste management in Thailand and disposal emission inventory.  

PubMed

The increasing municipal solid waste (MSW) generation along with the high fraction of organic waste and a common disposal of open dumping is the current scenario in many areas in Thailand. As a response to this problem, the country's Pollution Control Department (PCD) aims to reduce the MSW generation rate to less than 1 kg/capita/day, increase the collection efficiency, and improve the recovery of recyclables. For many years, more than 60% of the solid waste disposal system in Thailand has been carried out by open dumping. According to the survey conducted by this study, in 2004 there were 425 disposal sites (95 landfills; 330 open dumps) in Thailand and an estimated methane emission of 115.4 Gg/year was generated based on this practice. It has been estimated that the anticipated methane emission in Thailand will rise from 115.4 Gg/year to 118.5 Gg/year if the largest open dumpsites in provinces with no existing landfill are upgraded to sanitary landfill; and it will increase to 193.5 Gg/year if the existing sanitary landfill is upgraded to integrated waste management facilities. Moreover, Bangkok metropolitan have the highest methane emission (54.83 Gg/year) among all the regions in Thailand. The methane emission forecast of 339 Gg/year by 2020 (based on LandGEM methodology) provides a stimulus to create a comprehensive plan to capture and utilize methane as an energy source. PMID:17492361

Chiemchaisri, C; Juanga, J P; Visvanathan, C

2007-05-10

336

Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilisation wedge for the Maltese islands.  

PubMed

The continuous increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions occurring since the Industrial Revolution is offering significant ecological challenges to Earth. These emissions are leading to climate changes which bring about extensive damage to communities, ecosystems and resources. The analysis in this article is focussed on the waste sector within the Maltese islands, which is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in the archipelago following the energy and transportation sectors. This work shows how integrated waste management, based on a life cycle assessment methodology, acts as an effective stabilisation wedge strategy for climate change. Ten different scenarios applicable to the Maltese municipal solid waste management sector are analysed. It is shown that the scenario that is most coherent with the stabilisation wedges strategy for the Maltese islands consists of 50% landfilling, 30% mechanical biological treatment and 20% recyclable waste export for recycling. It is calculated that 16.6 Mt less CO2-e gases would be emitted over 50 years by means of this integrated waste management stabilisation wedge when compared to the business-as-usual scenario. These scientific results provide evidence in support of policy development in Malta that is implemented through legislation, economic instruments and other applicable tools. PMID:23179509

Falzon, Clyde; Fabri, Simon G; Frysinger, Steven

2012-11-23

337

Popular democracy and waste management  

SciTech Connect

The US has moved from representative democracy to popular democracy and public scrutiny is unrelenting. Any hope of success on their part in resolving the nuclear waste question hinges on their ability to condition themselves to operate in a popular democracy environment. Those opposed to the siting of high- and low-level waste repositories have already developed a set of recurring themes: (1) the siting criteria are fatally flawed; (2) the criteria are not adequate; (3) the process is driven by politics not science; (4) unrealistic deadlines lead to dangerous shortcuts; (5) transportation experience is lacking; (6) the scientific community does not really know how to dispose of the wastes. They must continue to tell the public that if science has brought us problems, then the answer can be only more knowledge - not less. Failure by their profession to recognize that popular democracy is a fact and that nuclear issues need to be addressed in humanistic terms raises the question of whether America is philosophically suited for the expanded use of nuclear power in the future - or for that matter for leadership in the world of tomorrow.

Wallis, L.R.

1986-01-01

338

ORWARE—a simulation tool for waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simulation model, ORWARE (ORganic WAste REsearch) is described. The model is mainly used as a tool for researchers in environmental systems analysis of waste management. It is a computer-based model for calculation of substance flows, environmental impacts, and costs of waste management. The model covers, despite the name, both organic and inorganic fractions in municipal waste. The model consists

O Eriksson; B Frostell; A Björklund; G Assefa; J.-O Sundqvist; J Granath; M Carlsson; A Baky; L Thyselius

2002-01-01

339

Plastic waste management in construction: technological and institutional issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of a solid waste management system is to effectively safeguard the public health, safety, and welfare. The various options involved in a waste management process are landfilling, incineration, and recycling wastes into useful products. Plastics recycling, in particular, would not be successful unless the proper infrastructure to collect the waste is being set, the technology to economically

K. S. Rebeiz; A. P. Craft

1995-01-01

340

Management of hazardous wastes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), during the course of numerous research activities, generates hazardous, radioactive, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The management of these waste materials is highly regulated in the United States (US). This paper focuses on the hazardous waste regulations that limit and prescribe waste management at LLNL.

Jackson, C.S.

1993-11-01

341

A Review of Waste Management Options in Olive Oil Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, treatment and disposal alternatives of olive oil mill wastes and technical requirements for their management are covered. Waste characteristics, treatment options with regard to the economic feasibility, and challenges of existing waste disposal practices in olive growing countries are mentioned. Attention is drawn to present-day techniques of waste management. The search concerning the environmentally acceptable, economically feasible,

NURI AZBAR; ABDURRAHMAN BAYRAM; AYSE FILIBELI; AYSEN MUEZZINOGLU; FUSUN SENGUL; ADEM OZER

2004-01-01

342

Urban waste management: Development in Helsinki 1945-1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viable waste management is crucial for the functioning of a city. Still, the urban history of waste management and its historical development in the capital of Finland has been researched only little. In post-war Helsinki the policy makers were struggling with the demands to improve the waste disposal methods towards more hygienic ones, the increased amount of waste to be

Paula Schönach

343

In situ redox manipulation treatability test: waste management plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Waste Management Plan provides guidance for the management of waste generated from groundwater well installations in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The well installations are necessary to implement the In Situ Redox Manipulation Treatability Test to det...

A. J. Knepp

1997-01-01

344

Current Status of the IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The International Atomic Energy Agency's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) contains information on national radioactive waste management programs and organizations, plans and activities, relevant laws and regulations, policies and radioactive...

G. W. Csullog I. Pozdniakov M. J. Bell

2003-01-01

345

Hazardous-waste management: a descriptive study. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased emphasis and enforcement of the RCRA regulations by the US EPA has prompted AF managers to reevaluate-base-hazardous waste management activities. This research effort provides management with a profile of the current state of affairs of waste management within the Air Force community. This profile provides the necessary baseline data for managers to develop and support future hazardous-waste-management initiatives.

Drewett

1986-01-01

346

Testing the robustness of management decisions to uncertainty: Everglades restoration scenarios.  

PubMed

To effectively manage large natural reserves, resource managers must prepare for future contingencies while balancing the often conflicting priorities of different stakeholders. To deal with these issues, managers routinely employ models to project the response of ecosystems to different scenarios that represent alternative management plans or environmental forecasts. Scenario analysis is often used to rank such alternatives to aid the decision making process. However, model projections are subject to uncertainty in assumptions about model structure, parameter values, environmental inputs, and subcomponent interactions. We introduce an approach for testing the robustness of model-based management decisions to the uncertainty inherent in complex ecological models and their inputs. We use relative assessment to quantify the relative impacts of uncertainty on scenario ranking. To illustrate our approach we consider uncertainty in parameter values and uncertainty in input data, with specific examples drawn from the Florida Everglades restoration project. Our examples focus on two alternative 30-year hydrologic management plans that were ranked according to their overall impacts on wildlife habitat potential. We tested the assumption that varying the parameter settings and inputs of habitat index models does not change the rank order of the hydrologic plans. We compared the average projected index of habitat potential for four endemic species and two wading-bird guilds to rank the plans, accounting for variations in parameter settings and water level inputs associated with hypothetical future climates. Indices of habitat potential were based on projections from spatially explicit models that are closely tied to hydrology. For the American alligator, the rank order of the hydrologic plans was unaffected by substantial variation in model parameters. By contrast, simulated major shifts in water levels led to reversals in the ranks of the hydrologic plans in 24.1-30.6% of the projections for the wading bird guilds and several individual species. By exposing the differential effects of uncertainty, relative assessment can help resource managers assess the robustness of scenario choice in model-based policy decisions. PMID:18488629

Fuller, Michael M; Gross, Louis J; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M; Palmer, Mark

2008-04-01

347

Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a result of the Reagan administration's commitment to nuclear energy as a significant future energy source and of attempts by the 97th Congress to grapple with legislative aspects of the problem, increased attention has focused recently on the problem of safely disposing of nuclear waste. These proceedings of the Third Symposium on Nuclear Waste Management of the Materials Research Society provide insight into the status of investigations on the subject as of late 1980. As with volumes 1 and 2 of this series, the 77 contributions are all short progress reports of ongoing research with the emphasis fittingly on materials science. Readers who wish extensive background material on the problems of nuclear-waste management and disposal, details of specific sites, or overviews of the programs of research in this country and abroad will have to look elsewhere.

Trask, Newell J.

348

Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Hennepin County) integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM system.

NONE

1995-11-01

349

Recent Developments in Nuclear Waste Management in Canada  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent developments in the field of nuclear waste management in Canada with a focus on management of nuclear fuel waste. Of particular significance is the April 2001 tabling in the Canadian House of Commons of Bill C-27, An Act respecting the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. At the time of finalizing this paper (January 15, 2002), Bill C-27 is in Third Reading in the House of Commons and is expected to move to the Senate in February. The Nuclear Fuel Waste Act is expected to come into force later in 2002. This Act requires the three nuclear utilities in Canada owning nuclear fuel waste to form a waste management organization and deposit funds into a segregated fund for nuclear fuel waste long-term management. The waste management organization is then required to perform a study of long-term management approaches for nuclear fuel waste and submit the study to the federal government within three years. The federal government will select an approach for implementation by the waste management organization. The paper discusses the activities that the nuclear fuel waste owners currently have underway to prepare for the formation of the waste management organization. As background, the paper reviews the status of interim storage of nuclear fuel waste in Canada, and describes previous initiatives related to the development of a national strategy for nuclear fuel waste long-term management.

King, F.

2002-02-27

350

Waste management project technical baseline description  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

Sederburg

1997-01-01

351

Navigating the Hazardous Waste Management Maze.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hazardous waste management is a continual process. Administrators should maintain good relations with state agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency and use them as resources. Contacts with businesses and professional groups as well as forming coalitions with neighboring districts are ways to share information and expenses. (MLF)

Voelkle, James P.

1997-01-01

352

International High Level Nuclear Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the radioactive waste management in Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the USSR. Indicates that scientists and statesmen should look beyond their own lifetimes into future centuries and millennia to conduct long-range plans essential to protection of future generations. (CC)

Dreschhoff, Gisela; And Others

1974-01-01

353

International High Level Nuclear Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the radioactive waste management in Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the USSR. Indicates that scientists and statesmen should look beyond their own lifetimes into future centuries and millennia to conduct long-range plans essential to protection of future generations. (CC)|

Dreschhoff, Gisela; And Others

1974-01-01

354

Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environ...

1995-01-01

355

Flexible Membrane Liner Testing in Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flexible membrane liners (FMLs) have grown, and must continue to grow, in importance across the solid and hazardous waste management industry. Their study has increased in importance as their applications have increased. This paper develops new criteria for testing, as well as discussing the implications. Current test procedures are based upon standard materials tests that do not combine the many

Richard Ian Stessel; Paul Goldsmith

1992-01-01

356

Management of uncontrolled hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect

This book is a compilation of papers presented at a conference on the management of uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Papers were presented in the following topics: federal and state programs; sampling and monitoring; leaking tanks; in-situ treatment; site remediation; banner technology; storage/disposal; endangerment assessment; risk assessment techniques; and research and development.

Not Available

1985-01-01

357

Waste management project technical baseline description  

SciTech Connect

A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

Sederburg, J.P.

1997-08-13

358

Public Regulation Concept in Solid Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides definition of what might be in solid waste management, what forms it might take, and whether these new or unique forms might provide more efficient and more economical service to the community than existing systems. The study that App...

1973-01-01

359

Managing nuclear waste from power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

National strategies to manage nuclear waste from commercial nuclear power plants are analyzed and compared. The current strategy is to try to operate a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to dispose storage at a centralized facility or next to nuclear power plants. If either of these is pursued now, the analysis assumes that a repository will be built in 2100

Ralph L. Keeney; Detlof Winterfeldt

1994-01-01

360

Solid Waste Management Planning--A Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents a twofold solid waste management plan consisting of a basic design methodology and a decision-making methodology. The former provides a framework for the developing plan while the latter builds flexibility into the design so that there is a model for use during the planning process. (MA)|

Theisen, Hilary M.; And Others

1975-01-01

361

Solid-waste-management policy analysis. [TVA  

Microsoft Academic Search

TVA's role in solid waste management community assistance activities has evolved and undergone program modification over the past decade. The purpose of this policy analysis is to determine the need for appropriate changes in program emphasis in light of TVA's corporate objectives in economic development and resource conservation. Additional reasons which warrant evaluation of TVA's future role in this area

D. B. Cox; R. H. Ginn; P. M. Giordano; J. C. Hodges; P. J. Mummert; J. L. Needy; F. G. Parker; D. A. Patterson

1981-01-01

362

Life cycle assessment of food waste management options  

Microsoft Academic Search

This environmental assessment of alternative means for managing food waste is based on the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. It covers the service provided by a household in-sink food waste processor (FWP) unit, and alternatives to it. The three alternatives considered are home composting, landfilling food waste with municipal waste (“codisposal”) and centralised composting of green (food and garden) waste.The

Sven Lundie; Gregory M. Peters

2005-01-01

363

Waste Material Management: Energy and materials for industry  

SciTech Connect

This booklet describes DOE`s Waste Material Management (WMM) programs, which are designed to help tap the potential of waste materials. Four programs are described in general terms: Industrial Waste Reduction, Waste Utilization and Conversion, Energy from Municipal Waste, and Solar Industrial Applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01

364

Lessons learned from mixed-waste management and regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed waste is radioactive waste that is mixed with wastes that are subject to Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) subtitle C regulation. Mixed waste is a relatively recent concept, since the US Department of Energy (DOE) did not recognize EPA's participation in the management of mixed wastes until 1987. The DOE, EPA, and state regulators

S. P. Cowan; P. H. Brown

1991-01-01

365

Computer-aided waste management strategic planning and analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computational model called WASTE-MGMT has been developed to assist in the evaluation of alternative waste management approaches in a complex setting involving multiple sites, waste streams, and processing options. The model provides the quantities and characteristics of wastes processed at any facility or shipped between any two sites as well as environmental emissions at any facility within the waste

H. I. Avci; T. J. Kotek; B. L. Koebnick

1995-01-01

366

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01

367

Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Configuration Management (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan descibes the execution of the configuration management (CM) that the contractor uses to manage and integrate its programmatic and functional operations to perform work.

WEIR, W.R.

2000-12-18

368

Solid Waste Management Efforts In Turkey — Regional Solid Waste Management In Adana-Mersin  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Solid waste management in the Adana-Mersin region of Turkey is the subject-matter of this paper. Discussion begins with an introduction to the solid waste management\\u000a problems in the region and proposals for their alleviation. It then moves on to the modalities proposed in the recent Development\\u000a Plans of Turkey for the alleviation of those problems. the Seventh Five-year Development Plan

Hunay Evliya

369

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2013-07-01

370

Managing household waste in Ireland: behavioural parameters and policy options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formulating efficient waste management policy requires data on market conditions. Data on household waste management behaviour in Ireland is scarce, and policy making could benefit from improved data and market analysis. In this paper we estimate models of household waste management behaviour in Ireland using econometrics and simple comparison of average effects, but we find that some important parameters cannot

John Curtis; Sean Lyons; Abigail OCallaghan-Platt

2011-01-01

371

Low level waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

EG and G Idaho, Inc. is the lead contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program, established in 1979. In this role, the company uses its waste management expertise to provide management and technical direction to support the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) in a manner that protects the environment and the public health and

A. D. Rodgers; D. J. Truitt; J. A. Logan; R. M. Brown

1986-01-01

372

Beneficial role of conflict in radioactive waste management programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of the technical, political, and social problems associated with radioactive waste management, least is known about the latter two. Lay persons tend to generalize negative attitudes about other nuclear activity to radioactive waste management. Thus, conflict appears inevitable between the general public, citizen action groups, and decision-makers on radioactive waste management. The basis of conflict, we believe, can be found

B. A. Payne; R. G. Williams

1985-01-01

373

90074: Nuclear weapons production complex: Environmental compliance and waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aging nuclear weapons production complex, managed by the Department of Energy (DOE), faces enormous environmental and waste management problems. Several hundred billion dollars may be needed to clean up leaking waste pits, groundwater contamination, growing accumulations of radioactive - waste, and uncontrolled liquid discharges at DOE facilities. DOE`s cleanup program is carried out by the Office of Environmental Management

Holt

1997-01-01

374

Environmental assessment of low-organic waste landfill scenarios by means of life-cycle assessment modelling (EASEWASTE).  

PubMed

The environmental performance of two low-organic waste landfill scenarios ('low-organic-energy' and 'low-organic-flare') was developed and compared with two household waste landfill scenarios ('household-energy' and 'household-flare') by means of LCA-modelling. The LCA-modelling was made for 1 tonne of wet waste landfilled and the environmental aspects were evaluated for a 100-year period after disposal. The data utilized in the LCA-calculations to model the first 10-20 years of landfilling of the two low-organic waste scenarios make extensive use of site-specific data from the Nauerna Landfill (The Netherlands), but average data from other comparable, existing landfills were used too. As data from full-scale landfills do not cover more than 30-40 years of landfilling, data from laboratory simulations and accelerated tests of limited scale were also utilized. The life-cycle impact assessments show that the low-organic waste scenarios achieved better environmental performance than the household waste scenarios with regard to both ordinary and toxicity-related environmental impact categories. This indicates that the reduction of organic matter accepted at landfills (as prescribed by the European Union Landfill Directive: Council Directive 1999/31/EC, EU, Brussels, 1999) can be a successful approach to decrease the environmental loads in several impact categories in comparison with landfilling of waste with significant organic content. However, when utilization of landfill gas is accounted for in the life-cycle impact assessment calculation, the small gas generation in low-organic waste landfills reduced the actual potential for energy generation and therefore the environmental savings obtained were reduced proportionally. Groundwater pollution from input of leachate was also evaluated and the WHO (Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality; WHO, Geneva, 2006) guideline for drinking water quality was assumed as reference. The results show that low-organic waste landfills pose a smaller risk of groundwater contamination, but the impact potentials estimated still remain a lot higher than estimated in other categories. PMID:19710111

Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H; Scharff, Heijo; Jacobs, Joeri

2009-08-26

375

Resource Management, Coexistence, and Balance--The Fundamentals of Teaching Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues for the need for courses in waste management in departments other than civil engineering. Points out that although waste management is a business administration function, it is best performed from an environmental management perspective. (DDR)

Donovan, Connie

1998-01-01

376

Resource Management, Coexistence, and Balance--The Fundamentals of Teaching Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Argues for the need for courses in waste management in departments other than civil engineering. Points out that although waste management is a business administration function, it is best performed from an environmental management perspective. (DDR)|

Donovan, Connie

1998-01-01

377

Re-defining waste, the concept of ownership and the role of waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an attempt to construct a new agenda for waste management, this paper explores the complex relationship between definitions of waste and their subsequent impact on its ownership and management. A range of internationally accepted definitions for waste are analysed and it is concluded that they are inadequate in scope in an attempt to describe waste. The philosophical ramifications inherent

Eva Pongrácz; Veikko J. Pohjola

2004-01-01

378

59 FR- Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Recycled Used...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Listing of Hazardous Waste; Recycled Used Oil Management Standards; Final Rule ENVIRONMENTAL...Listing of Hazardous Waste; Recycled Used Oil Management Standards AGENCY: Environmental...September 10, 1992, EPA exempted used oil inserted into crude oil pipelines from...

1994-03-04

379

77 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0066; SW FRL-9730-5] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous...appears that DRAS was run using the ``landfill'' waste management unit (WMU) input, but the Proposed Rule...

2012-09-20

380

Municipal solid waste management in Beijing City  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Beijing City. Beijing, the capital of China, has a land area of approximately 1368.32 km{sup 2} with an urban population of about 13.33 million in 2006. Over the past three decades, MSW generation in Beijing City has increased tremendously from 1.04 million tons in 1978 to 4.134 million tons in 2006. The average generation rate of MSW in 2006 was 0.85 kg/capita/day. Food waste comprised 63.39%, followed by paper (11.07%), plastics (12.7%) and dust (5.78%). While all other wastes including tiles, textiles, glass, metals and wood accounted for less than 3%. Currently, 90% of MSW generated in Beijing is landfilled, 8% is incinerated and 2% is composted. Source separation collection, as a waste reduction method, has been carried out in a total of 2255 demonstration residential and commercial areas (covering about 4.7 million people) up to the end of 2007. Demonstration districts should be promoted over a wider range instead of demonstration communities. The capacity of transfer stations and treatment plants is an urgent problem as these sites are seriously overloaded. These problems should first be solved by constructing more sites and converting to new treatment technologies. Improvements in legislation, public education and the management of waste pickers are problematic issues which need to be addressed.

Li Zhenshan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)], E-mail: lizhenshan@pku.edu.cn; Yang Lei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu XiaoYan [Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Sui Yumei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

2009-09-15

381

Hydrological simulation of extreme flood scenarios for operational flood management at the Middle Elbe river  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Operational flood management at the Middle Elbe river requires comprehensive knowledge about the magnitude and characteristics of possible extreme flood events. Since these events are not sufficiently included in available historical records, an extended sample of extreme flood events was generated by hydrological scenario simulation. Present paper emphasises simulations in the German part of the catchment of the Middle Elbe river and introduces the stochastic-conceptual precipitation-runoff model which was developed for this task. After validation of this model and its coupling with the weather forecast model COSMO and hydraulic-numerical models, a set of 25 flood scenarios could be simulated and provided for a planning of flood protection measures. Analysis of simulated scenarios reveal that extreme flood events at the Mulde and Middle Elbe rivers may have a wide spectrum of characteristics and may considerably exceed the magnitude of past flood events (e.g., those of August 2002).

Helms, M.; Ihringer, J.; Mikovec, R.

2012-12-01

382

Radioactive waste management as approached by nuclear materials management  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Materials Management at EG and G Idaho, Inc., works energetically to maximize recovery of excessed nuclear fuel. This paper summarizes four fuel dispositions of nonroutine or odd lot fuels and supports the concept that recovery is the optimal disposal method. Specific packaging, recordkeeping, and timely disposal problems are described. The need for cooperative planning among nuclear materials and waste management personnel, contract personnel, and the program experimenters who use the fuel is stressed. 1 reference, 2 figures, 1 table.

Reyes, B.D.

1984-01-01

383

Solid waste management complex site development plan  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this Solid Waste Management Complex Site Development Plan is to optimize the location of future solid waste treatment and storage facilities and the infrastructure required to support them. An overall site plan is recommended. Further, a series of layouts are included that depict site conditions as facilities are constructed at the SWMC site. In this respect the report serves not only as the siting basis for future projects, but provides siting guidance for Project W-112, as well. The plan is intended to function as a template for expected growth of the site over the next 30 years so that future facilities and infrastructure will be properly integrated.

Greager, T.M.

1994-09-30

384

Radiation safety requirements for radioactive waste management in the framework of a quality management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) is the institution responsible for the management of radioactive wastes generated from nuclear applications in medicine, industry and research in Cuba. Radioactive Waste Management Service is provided at a national level and it includes the collection and transportation of radioactive wastes to the Centralized Waste Management Facilities, where they are characterized, segregated,

M. M. Salgado; J. C. Benitez; R. Pernas; N. Gonzalez

2007-01-01

385

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to

Kirk

1993-01-01

386

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection.  

PubMed

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management. PMID:19318239

Calabrò, Paolo S

2009-03-21

387

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection  

SciTech Connect

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

Calabro, Paolo S. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, via Graziella - loc. Feo di Vito, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.calabro@unirc.it

2009-07-15

388

Managing uncertainty: a review of food system scenario analysis and modelling  

PubMed Central

Complex socio-ecological systems like the food system are unpredictable, especially to long-term horizons such as 2050. In order to manage this uncertainty, scenario analysis has been used in conjunction with food system models to explore plausible future outcomes. Food system scenarios use a diversity of scenario types and modelling approaches determined by the purpose of the exercise and by technical, methodological and epistemological constraints. Our case studies do not suggest Malthusian futures for a projected global population of 9 billion in 2050; but international trade will be a crucial determinant of outcomes; and the concept of sustainability across the dimensions of the food system has been inadequately explored so far. The impact of scenario analysis at a global scale could be strengthened with participatory processes involving key actors at other geographical scales. Food system models are valuable in managing existing knowledge on system behaviour and ensuring the credibility of qualitative stories but they are limited by current datasets for global crop production and trade, land use and hydrology. Climate change is likely to challenge the adaptive capacity of agricultural production and there are important knowledge gaps for modelling research to address.

Reilly, Michael; Willenbockel, Dirk

2010-01-01

389

Report to Congress: management of hazardous wastes from educational institutions  

SciTech Connect

The EPA has studied and evaluated the problems associated with managing hazardous wastes generated by educational institutions. This report is factual in nature. EPA was not directed by the law to develop recommendations for regulatory or statutory changes. The report identifies the statutory and regulatory requirements for educational institutions to manage hazardous waste, examines current hazardous-waste-management practices at such institutions, identifies the hazardous-waste-management problems encountered by them, and concludes by identifying possible ways for educational institutions to improve hazardous-waste management. The report primarily focuses on hazardous waste generated by universities, colleges, high schools, and vocational schools. The findings of the report can also apply to waste generated at facilities providing adult education and programs of education of less than 2 years' duration, because factors affecting the management of such waste would be similar for all levels and categories of educational institutions.

Not Available

1989-04-01

390

Minimax regret optimization analysis for a regional solid waste management system.  

PubMed

Solid waste management (SWM) facilities are crucial for environmental management and public health in urban regions. Due to the waste management hierarchy, one of the greatest challenges that organizations face today is to figure out how to diversify the treatment options, increase the reliability of infrastructure systems, and leverage the redistribution of waste streams among incineration, compost, recycling, and other facilities to their competitive advantage region wide. Systems analysis plays an important role for regionalization assessment of integrated SWM systems, leading to provide decision makers with break-through insights and risk-informed strategies. This paper aims to apply a minimax regret optimization analysis for improving SWM strategies in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), an economically fast growing region in the US. Based on different environmental, economic, legal, and social conditions, event-based simulation in the first stage links estimated waste streams in major cities in LRGV with possible solid waste management alternatives. The optimization analysis in the second stage emphasizes the trade-offs and associated regret evaluation with respect to predetermined scenarios. Such optimization analyses with multiple criteria have featured notable successes, either by public or private efforts, in diverting recyclables, green waste, yard waste, and biosolids from the municipal solid waste streams to upcoming waste-to-energy, composting, and recycling facilities. Model outputs may link prescribed regret scenarios in decision making with various scales of regionalization policies. The insights drawn from the system-oriented, forward-looking, and preventative study can eventually help decision-makers and stakeholders gain a scientific understanding of the consequences of short-term and long-term decisions relating to sustainable SWM in the fast-growing US-Mexico borderland. PMID:16793251

Chang, Ni-Bin; Davila, Eric

2006-06-21

391

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15

392

A multi-criteria assessment of scenarios on thermal processing of infectious hospital wastes: A case study for Central Macedonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Greece more than 14,000tonnes of infectious hospital waste are produced yearly; a significant part of it is still mismanaged. Only one off-site licensed incineration facility for hospital wastes is in operation, with the remaining of the market covered by various hydroclave and autoclave units, whereas numerous problems are still generally encountered regarding waste segregation, collection, transportation and management, as

A. Karagiannidis; A. Papageorgiou; G. Perkoulidis; G. Sanida; P. Samaras

2010-01-01

393

Human factors in waste management - potential and reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is enormous potential for human factors contributions in the realm of waste management. The reality, however, is very different from the potential. This is particularly true for low-level and low-level mixed-waste management. The hazards are less severe; therefore, health and safety requirements (including human factors) are not as rigorous as for high-level waste. High-level waste management presents its own

Thompson

1996-01-01

394

Urban water budgets: a comparative study of three landscape management scenarios in southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fate of irrigation water in urban landscapes is highly uncertain, due in large part to uncertainties in urban ecohydrology. In this study, we compared evapotranspiration (ET), leaf-level stomatal conductance, and soil moisture of three landscapes managed under typical, retrofitted, and low-impact scenarios. The typical landscape consisted of fescue (Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub), a common cool-season turfgrass species. Watering was

N. S. Bijoor; D. Haver; D. E. Pataki

2009-01-01

395

Legislative aspects of hazardous waste management.  

PubMed Central

In the fall of 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, commonly referred to as RCRA. The objective of the statute is to create an orderly system for the generation, handling and disposal of hazardous waste by means of a comprehensive tracking and record keeping mechanism. RCRA does not regulate directly by statute so much as it delegates rule making authority to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Pursuant to its mandate to develop regulations in accordance with the broad criteria of RCRA, EPA has published extensive regulations. These regulations address hazardous waste generation, transportation, treatment, storage and handling and its final disposal. The statute also offers remedies available to both EPA and the public at large to ensure enforcement of the provisions of RCRA and the EPA regulations. Additionally, it sets guidelines for states to implement their own hazardous waste management programs. This article is intended to introduce this complicated statutory/regulatory package to scientists and health professionals. It outlines the provisions of RCRA and the EPA regulations, abbreviates early judicial decisions interpreting these provisions and sets forth a brief description of various state approaches to hazardous waste management.

Friedman, M

1983-01-01

396

Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

397

Sustainable solid waste management: an integrated approach for Asian countries.  

PubMed

Solid waste management (SWM) has been an integral part of every human society. The approaches for SWM should be compatible with the nature of a given society, and, in this regard, Asian countries are no exception. In keeping with global trends, the systems are being oriented to concentrate on sustainability issues; mainly through the incorporation of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) technologies. However, degree and nature of improvements toward sustainability are varying and depend on the economic status of a country. High-income countries like Japan and South Korea can afford to spend more to incorporate 3R technologies. Most of the latest efforts focus on "Zero Waste" and/or "Zero Landfilling" which is certainly expensive for weaker economies such as those of India or Indonesia. There is a need to pragmatically assess the expectations of SWM systems in Asian countries. Hence, in this paper, we analyze the situation in different Asian countries, and explore future trends. We conceptually evaluate issues surrounding the sustainability of SWM. We propose a multi-pronged integrated approach for improvement that achieves sustainable SWM in the context of national policy and legal frameworks, institutional arrangement, appropriate technology, operational and financial management, and public awareness and participation. In keeping with this approach, a generic action plan has been proposed that could be tailored to suit a situation in a particular country. Our proposed concept and action plan framework would be useful across a variety of country-specific scenarios. PMID:19081236

Shekdar, Ashok V

2008-12-09

398

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options.  

PubMed

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative. PMID:19136243

Kiatkittipong, Worapon; Wongsuchoto, Porntip; Pavasant, Prasert

2009-01-10

399

Sustainable solid waste management: An integrated approach for Asian countries  

SciTech Connect

Solid waste management (SWM) has been an integral part of every human society. The approaches for SWM should be compatible with the nature of a given society, and, in this regard, Asian countries are no exception. In keeping with global trends, the systems are being oriented to concentrate on sustainability issues; mainly through the incorporation of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) technologies. However, degree and nature of improvements toward sustainability are varying and depend on the economic status of a country. High-income countries like Japan and South Korea can afford to spend more to incorporate 3R technologies. Most of the latest efforts focus on 'Zero Waste' and/or 'Zero Landfilling' which is certainly expensive for weaker economies such as those of India or Indonesia. There is a need to pragmatically assess the expectations of SWM systems in Asian countries. Hence, in this paper, we analyze the situation in different Asian countries, and explore future trends. We conceptually evaluate issues surrounding the sustainability of SWM. We propose a multi-pronged integrated approach for improvement that achieves sustainable SWM in the context of national policy and legal frameworks, institutional arrangement, appropriate technology, operational and financial management, and public awareness and participation. In keeping with this approach, a generic action plan has been proposed that could be tailored to suit a situation in a particular country. Our proposed concept and action plan framework would be useful across a variety of country-specific scenarios.

Shekdar, Ashok V. [Nagpur Institute of Technology, Mahurzari, Katol Road, Nagpur 445304 (India)], E-mail: ashok.shekdar@gmail.com

2009-04-15

400

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01

401

Radiological evaluations for advanced waste management studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall risk evaluation for various radioactive waste management ;\\u000a concepts includes calculation of radiation doses to individuals and local ;\\u000a populations. Radiation doses are the most appropriate measure of the ;\\u000a consequences of unforeseen releases of radioactive materials to the environment ;\\u000a and dose criteria are available by which the severity may be judged. A ;\\u000a comprehensive dose computational

D. H. Denham; D. A. Baker; J. K. Soldat; J. P. Corley

1973-01-01

402

THE CURRENT RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN ROMANIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1957, Romania commissioned a Russian-designed VVR-S research reactor used for scientific activities and radioisotope production. This reactor is now planned for decommissioning. An American TRIGA -type research reactor has been in use since 1978. The first Canadian CANDU-6 type power reactor was commissioned in December 1996 and is in commercial operation. The radioactive waste management in Romania followed decentralized

V. Andrei; F. Glodeanu; I. Rotaru; T. Chirica

2000-01-01

403

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

Not Available

1991-12-01

404

Issues for small businesses with waste management.  

PubMed

Participation by small and medium enterprise (SME) in corporate social responsibility issues has been found to be lacking. This is a critical issue, as individually SMEs may have little impact on the environment but their collective footprint is significant. The management style and ethical stance of the owner-manager affects business decision making and therefore has a direct impact on the environmental actions of the business. Although adoption of environmental practices to create competitive advantage has been advocated, many businesses see implementation as a cost which cannot be transferred to their customers. After a brief review of pertinent literature this paper reports on an exploratory investigation into the issue. Results show that whereas owner-managers of small enterprises express concern regarding the environment, this does not then translate into better waste management practices. PMID:17445961

Redmond, Janice; Walker, Elizabeth; Wang, Calvin

2007-04-18

405

Global warming factor of municipal solid waste management in Europe.  

PubMed

The global warming factor (GWF; CO(2)-eq. tonne(-1) waste) performance of municipal waste management has been investigated for six representative European Member States: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Poland and the United Kingdom. The study integrated European waste statistical data for 2007 in a life-cycle assessment modelling perspective. It is shown that significant GWF benefit was achieved due to the high level of energy and material recovery substituting fossil energy and raw materials production, especially in Denmark and Germany. The study showed that, despite strong regulation of waste management at European level, there are major differences in GWF performance among the member states, due to the relative differences of waste composition, type of waste management technologies available nationally, and the average performance of these technologies. It has been demonstrated through a number of sensitivity analyses that, within the national framework, key waste management technology parameters can influence drastically the national GWF performance of waste management. PMID:19808730

Gentil, Emmanuel; Clavreul, Julie; Christensen, Thomas H

2009-10-06

406

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...available additional waste management measures, taking into account the effectiveness of waste management measures already in place...In developing your waste management plan, you must consider the...Prevention: Waste Reduction Strategies for Health Care...

2013-07-01

407

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false What must my waste management plan include? 62.14431 Section...Constructed on or Before June 20, 1996 Waste Management Plan § 62.14431 What must my waste management plan include? Your waste...

2010-07-01

408

40 CFR 60.2060 - When must I submit my waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false When must I submit my waste management plan? 60.2060 Section...Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2060 When must I submit my waste management plan? You must submit a...

2013-07-01

409

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false What must my waste management plan include? 62.14431 Section...Constructed on or Before June 20, 1996 Waste Management Plan § 62.14431 What must my waste management plan include? Your waste...

2009-07-01

410

40 CFR 62.14590 - What should I include in my waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...waste management plan? A waste management plan must include...reduction or separation of waste-stream elements such as paper, cardboard, plastics, glass, batteries, or...must identify any additional waste management measures,...

2010-07-01

411

40 CFR 60.2065 - What should I include in my waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...waste management plan? A waste management plan must include...reduction or separation of waste-stream elements such as paper, cardboard, plastics, glass, batteries, or...must identify any additional waste management measures and...

2010-07-01

412

Tank waste remediation system configuration management implementation plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan describes the actions that will be taken by Project Hanford Management Contract Team to implement the TWRS Configuration Management program defined in HNF 1900, TWRS Con...

J. M. Vann

1998-01-01

413

Waste Management Project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the

1997-01-01

414

Sustainable waste management in the food and drink industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

In moving towards sustainable wastes management, the UK Government has adopted a wastes hierarchy. This hierarchy sets out clearly the priorities for sustainable resource use and wastes management: it ought to be the guiding principle of private and public policy, with the emphasis placed strongly on reducing the amount of raw material used. The House of Commons Environment, Transport &

Margaret P. Bates; Paul S. Phillips

1999-01-01

415

Social aspects of public waste management in Switzerland  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is becoming increasingly evident that a waste management program, and especially a waste treatment technique, which ignores social aspects, is doomed to failure. Aspects concerning the problems of public acceptance, public participation in planning and implementation, consumer behaviour and changing value systems are no less important than the technical or economic aspects in waste management research and decision-making. As

W. Joos; V. Carabias; H. Winistoerfer; A. Stuecheli

1999-01-01

416

Guidelines for improving wastewater and solid waste management. Technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pollution from wastewater and solid waste is a significant problem for developing countries, especially in urban and peri-urban areas. The report presents a methodology for improving waste management within these limitations. According to the methodology, there are three possible points of intervention: the individuals and institutions responsible for pollution, those responsible for waste management (e.g., environmental resource and water treatment

R. N. Andrews; W. B. Lord; L. J. OToole; L. F. Requena; E. Brantly

1993-01-01

417

Solid and liquid wastes: management, methods, and socioeconomic considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is one of three books published by the Pennsylvania Academy of Science describing and analyzing the technology and disposal of waste products. This volume considers waste types, sources, and management, and covers such aspects as classification and properties, waste management in municipalities, hospitals and the pulp and paper industry, and the role of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources

S. K. Majumdar; E. W. Miller

1984-01-01

418

Characteristics and management of infectious industrial waste in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious industrial waste management in Taiwan is based on the specific waste production unit. In other countries, management is based simply on whether the producer may lead to infectious disease. Thus, Taiwan has a more detailed classification of infectious waste. The advantage of this classification is that it is easy to identify the sources, while the disadvantage lies in the

Mei-Chuan Huang; Jim Juimin Lin

2008-01-01

419

Evaluating a municipal waste management plan using orware  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental consequences of implementing Uppsala's waste management plan have been analysed using orware, a computerized static substance flow model based on life cycle assessment methodology. Normalizing emissions from waste management to total emission loadings in the municipality was tested as a means to improve the evaluation. It was found that anaerobic digestion of biodegradable waste can reduce net environmental impact,

Anna Björklund; Magnus Dalemo; Ulf Sonesson

1999-01-01

420

Managing Household Waste in Ireland: Behavioural Parameters and Policy Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ireland has signed up to ambitious targets for diverting municipal solid waste from landfill. These targets are likely to be very difficult to meet without substantial changes to the way household waste is collected and managed. Data on household waste management behaviour in Ireland is scarce, and policymaking could benefit from improved data and market analysis. In this paper we

John Curtis; Sean Lyons; Abigail OCallaghan-Platt

2009-01-01

421

Hospital waste management in Libya: A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Libya, as in many developing countries, little information is available regarding generation, handling and disposal of hospital waste. This fact hinders the development and implementation of hospital waste management schemes. The specific objective of this study is to present an appraisal of the current situation regarding hospital waste management in Libya. Procedures, techniques, methods of handling, and disposal of

M. Sawalem; E. Selic; J.-D. Herbell

2009-01-01

422

Factors Influencing Regional Municipal Solid Waste Management Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although regionalization policies have been proven as good strategies for municipal solid waste (MSW) management in previous studies, the optimal allocation of the waste stream is significantly affected by several influential factors, thus further investigation of the impacts of these factors on regional MSW management strategies is necessary. This study demonstrated the impacts of waste-to-electricity transformation coefficient (WETC) of incinerators

Chungching Wang; Min-Der Lin; Chenfang Lin; Kevin Tory; Dale Hess; Sunhee Lee; Manuela Burgers; Bill Lilley; Richard Baldauf; Eben Thoma; Michael Hays; Richard Shores; John Kinsey; Brian Gullett; Sue Kimbrough; Vlad Isakov; Thomas Long; Richard Snow; Andrey Khlystov; Jason Weinstein; Fu-Lin Chen; Robert Seila; David Olson; Ian Gilmour; Seung-Hyun Cho; Nealson Watkins; Patricia Rowley; Gary Whitten; Greg Yarwood; Marc Carreras-Sospedra; Donald Dabdub; Jacob Brouwer; Eladio Knipping; Naresh Kumar; Ken Darrow; Anne Hampson; Bruce Hedman; James Droppo; Bruce Napier; Cynthia Howard-Reed; Victor Henzel; Steven Nabinger; Andrew Persily; B. deCastro; Lu Wang; Jana Mihalic; Patrick Breysse; Alison Geyh; Timothy Buckley; M. Garci´a; M. Sa´nchez; Isidro rez; Beatriz Torre; Gui Li; Alex Visscher; Seoung Kim; Chivalai Temiyasathit; Victoria Chen; Sun-Kyoung Park; Melanie Sattler; Armistead Russell

2008-01-01

423

Graphical Integrated Waste Management Model for Puerto Rico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of STELLA, a commercially available, graphically based simulation language for the Macintosh computer, to solid waste facility planning is described. This paper discusses a STELLA model which was developed for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The model simulates the existing solid waste management system in Puerto Rico and also the proposed system of

Samuel A. Vigil; Hilary M. Theisen

1992-01-01

424

Characterizing regulation and negligence rule uncertainty in solid waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a model of municipal waste management that combines waste quality monitoring with leachate control. These inputs modulate two types of uncertainty. First, waste quality is uncertain, as it arrives from several nonpoint sources and may contain hazardous waste. Second, while U.S. federal law requires landfill operators to employ these specific inputs, the rates at which they should be

Jeffrey Wagner; Gregory DeAngelo

2005-01-01

425

Solid and liquid wastes: Management, methods and socioeconomic considerations  

SciTech Connect

Topics described in this book include: Classification and properties of solid and liquid wastes; sources of wastes; management of wastes; cadmium and other trace elements; recreational impact of fossil fuel plants; sewage effluents; water fluoridation; the ecological effects of acid rain, and the economic benefits of recovering and utilizing coal wastes.

Majumdar, S.K.; Miller, E.W

1984-01-01

426

Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different

Goeran Finnveden; Anna Bjoerklund; Marcus Carlsson Reich; Ola Eriksson; Adrienne Soerbom

2007-01-01

427

Enhanced adaptive management: integrating decision analysis, scenario analysis and environmental modeling for the everglades.  

PubMed

We propose to enhance existing adaptive management efforts with a decision-analytical approach that can guide the initial selection of robust restoration alternative plans and inform the need to adjust these alternatives in the course of action based on continuously acquired monitoring information and changing stakeholder values. We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort. We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding. Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information. PMID:24113217

Convertino, Matteo; Foran, Christy M; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Scarlett, Lynn; Loschiavo, Andy; Kiker, Gregory A; Linkov, Igor

2013-10-11

428

Enhanced Adaptive Management: Integrating Decision Analysis, Scenario Analysis and Environmental Modeling for the Everglades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose to enhance existing adaptive management efforts with a decision-analytical approach that can guide the initial selection of robust restoration alternative plans and inform the need to adjust these alternatives in the course of action based on continuously acquired monitoring information and changing stakeholder values. We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort. We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding. Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

Convertino, Matteo; Foran, Christy M.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Scarlett, Lynn; Loschiavo, Andy; Kiker, Gregory A.; Linkov, Igor

2013-10-01

429

Enhanced Adaptive Management: Integrating Decision Analysis, Scenario Analysis and Environmental Modeling for the Everglades  

PubMed Central

We propose to enhance existing adaptive management efforts with a decision-analytical approach that can guide the initial selection of robust restoration alternative plans and inform the need to adjust these alternatives in the course of action based on continuously acquired monitoring information and changing stakeholder values. We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort. We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding. Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

Convertino, Matteo; Foran, Christy M.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Scarlett, Lynn; LoSchiavo, Andy; Kiker, Gregory A.; Linkov, Igor

2013-01-01

430

Management of offshore wastes in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

During the process of finding and producing oil and gas in the offshore environment operators generate a variety of liquid and solid wastes. Some of these wastes are directly related to exploration and production activities (e.g., drilling wastes, produced water, treatment workover, and completion fluids) while other types of wastes are associated with human occupation of the offshore platforms (e.g., sanitary and domestic wastes, trash). Still other types of wastes can be considered generic industrial wastes (e.g., scrap metal and wood, wastes paints and chemicals, sand blasting residues). Finally, the offshore platforms themselves can be considered waste materials when their useful life span has been reached. Generally, offshore wastes are managed in one of three ways--onsite discharge, injection, or transportation to shore. This paper describes the regulatory requirements imposed by the government and the approaches used by offshore operators to manage and dispose of wastes in the US.

Veil, J. A.

1998-10-22

431

Support of International Waste Management Agreements in the field of TRU Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE has implemented technical information exchange agreements in the field of TRU waste management with the United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and France. This has been done in an effort to minimize research and development costs, and ensured maximum safety to man and the environment during waste handling and disposal. In this report, the technical work plan for fiscal year 1986 is presented. (JDL)

Not Available

1986-01-01

432

Integrated solid waste management of Springfield, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1993 cost of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for Municipal Solid Waste management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of managing MSW in Springfield; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

433

Using an information system to meet Hazardous Waste Management needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large quantity RCRA hazardous waste generator. LLNL also generates low level and transuranic radioactive waste that is managed in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The mixed low level...

J. J. Stewart R. E. Howe S. L. Townsend D. T. Maloy R. K. Kochhar

1995-01-01

434

Waste Management Control Handbook for Dairy Food Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Waste control is resource management control in dairy food plant operations. Appreciable reductions can be achieved in product, water, energy, labor, packaging losses and sewer surcharges. A good program in waste control can increase the profit margin by ...

M. F. Parkin R. E. Carawan W. J. Harper

1984-01-01

435

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management and Landfill Capacity in Illinois: 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the Illinois EPA's 18th Annual Report describing the management of non-hazardous municipal solid waste by the state's solid waste landfills, transfer stations and compost facilities. The report is divided into sections representing Illinois EPA ad...

E. Robinson

2005-01-01

436

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management and Landfill Capacity in Illinois: 1996.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Illinoise EPA's 10th Annual Report describing the management of nonhazardous municipal solid waste by the state's solid-waste landfills and transfer stations. The report is divided into section representing Illinois EPA administrative regions. Each re...

1998-01-01

437

Solid Waste Management Practices in a Plastics Production Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of solid waste generation, storage, collection, and disposal was conducted at a plastics production plant during the fall of 1968. A study team observed the normal solid waste management practices within the plant during one week. Additional data ...

W. T. Dehn D. E. Carruth

1970-01-01

438

Predictive Criteria for Construction/Demolition Solid Waste Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study basically expands on the current state of the art of construction solid waste management. The available information on solid waste generation rates, composition, disposal alternatives, and disposal costs has been compiled. In addition, data rel...

S. Chatterjee

1976-01-01

439

Linear programming in hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Linear programming techniques are applied to investigate the relative costs of regional and state-wide hazardous waste management schemes. The focus is the identification of a cost effective configuration of transportation routes, transfer stations, processing facilities and secure long-term storage impoundments. Wastes generated in North Carolina are studied as a useful example of linear programming applications in general and options available within a given state in particular. The value of the techniques are highlighted as are their limitations. The usefulness in developing relative costs of alternatives is stressed, particularly in the ability of the techniques to conduct sensitivity analyses in a topic area where data may not be generally available. Suggestions are made for overcoming data shortcomings. In the case study, the options are seen to revolve around the state of North Carolina's expressed desire to locate one large centralized storage landfill. From a pure cost standpoint, other management facilities like transfer stations and incinerators appear to be precluded even with optimal routing to and from the facilities. From other viewpoints, including risk aversion to spills while the waste is in transit, the inclusion of these facilities in the states program can be supported.

Chiampi, M.; Peirce, J.J.; Davidson, G.M.; Tartaglia, M.

1982-10-01

440

Greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sector in Argentina in business-as-usual and mitigation scenarios.  

PubMed

The objective of this work was the application of 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Guidelines for the estimation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the waste sector in Argentina as a preliminary exercise for greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory development and to compare with previous inventories based on 1996 IPCC Guidelines. Emissions projections to 2030 were evaluated under two scenarios--business as usual (BAU), and mitigation--and the calculations were done by using the ad hoc developed IPCC software. According to local activity data, in the business-as-usual scenario, methane emissions from solid waste disposal will increase by 73% by 2030 with respect to the emissions of year 2000. In the mitigation scenario, based on the recorded trend of methane captured in landfills, a decrease of 50% from the BAU scenario should be achieved by 2030. In the BAU scenario, GHG emissions from domestic wastewater will increase 63% from 2000 to 2030. Methane emissions from industrial wastewater, calculated from activity data of dairy, swine, slaughterhouse, citric, sugar, and wine sectors, will increase by 58% from 2000 to 2030 while methane emissions from domestic will increase 74% in the same period. Results show that GHG emissions calculated from 2006 IPCC Guidelines resulted in lower levels than those reported in previous national inventories for solid waste disposal and domestic wastewater categories, while levels were 18% higher for industrial wastewater. Implications: The implementation of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Inventories is now considering by the UNFCCC for non-Annex I countries in order to enhance the compilation of inventories based on comparable good practice methods. This work constitutes the first GHG emissions estimation from the waste sector of Argentina applying the 2006 IPCC Guidelines and the ad doc developed software. It will contribute to identifying the main differences between the models applied in the estimation of methane emissions on the key categories of waste emission sources and to comparing results with previous inventories based on 1996 IPCC Guidelines. PMID:24010371

Santalla, Estela; Córdoba, Verónica; Blanco, Gabriel

2013-08-01

441

Hazardous waste management plan, Savannah River Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

All SRP waste storage, disposal, and recycling facilities that have received hazardous waste, low-level radioactive hazardous waste (mixed waste) or process waste since 1980 have been evaluated by EPA standards. Generally the waste storage areas meet all applicable standards. However, additional storage facilities currently estimated at $2 million and waste disposal facilities currently estimated at $20 million will be required

Phifer

1984-01-01

442

Hazardous healthcare waste management in the Kingdom of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous healthcare waste has become an environmental concern for many developing countries including the Kingdom of Bahrain. There have been several significant obstacles facing the Kingdom in dealing with this issue including; limited documentation regarding generation, handling, management, and disposal of waste. This in turn hinders efforts to plan better healthcare waste management. In this paper, hazardous waste management status in the Kingdom has been investigated through an extensive survey carried out on selected public and private healthcare premises. Hazardous waste management practices including: waste generation, segregation, storage, collection, transportation, treatment, and disposal were determined. The results of this study along with key findings are discussed and summarized. In addition; several effective recommendations and improvements of hazardous waste management are suggested.

Mohamed, L.F. [Environmental Management Program, College of Graduate Studies, Arabian Gulf University, P.O. Box 26671, Manama (Bahrain)], E-mail: lamyafm@agu.edu.bh; Ebrahim, S.A. [Engineering and Maintenance Department, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 12, Manama (Bahrain); Al-Thukair, A.A. [Chemistry Department, King Fahad University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 157, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

2009-08-15

443

Electronic plastic waste management in malaysia: the potential of waste to energy conversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of electronic products is one of the world's fasting growing industries today. Due to this phenomena, the amount of electronic waste generated increases proportionately with the production. The growing numbers of uses of plastic products in this sector contribute to electronic plastic waste generated. From the management of solid waste aspect, the production of electronic plastic waste has

N. Othman; L. Mohd Sidek; N. E. Ahmad Basri; M. N. M. Yunus

2009-01-01

444

Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two

K. J. Galloway; J. G. Jolley

1994-01-01

445

W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a tra...

K. J. Leist

1998-01-01

446

Waste management. (Chapter 16). Book chapter, August 1991-August 1992  

SciTech Connect

Landfills, wastewater treatment lagoons, and livestock waste management are operations representing sources of methane. The report begins with a brief overview of how CH4 is generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste and then discusses generation of CH4 in detail in landfills, wastewater treatment lagoons, and livestock waste management. Current techniques for estimating CH4 emissions from waste are summarized, and sources of uncertainty are identified. (Copyright (c) Springer-Verlag 1993.)

Thorneloe, S.A.; Barlaz, M.A.; Peer, R.; Huff, L.C.; Davis, L.

1993-01-01

447

76 FR 58543 - Draft Policy Statement on Volume Reduction and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management that updates the 1981 Policy...Management Programs, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2011-09-21

448

Infectious waste management in Japan: A revised regulation and a management process in medical institutions  

SciTech Connect

In Japan, the waste management practice is carried out in accordance with the Waste Disposal Law of 1970. The first rule of infectious waste management was regulated in 1992, and infectious wastes are defined as the waste materials generated in medical institutions as a result of medical care or research which contain pathogens that have the potential to transmit infectious diseases. Revised criteria for infectious waste management were promulgated by the Ministry of Environment in 2004. Infectious waste materials are divided into three categories: the form of waste; the place of waste generation; the kind of infectious diseases. A reduction of infectious waste is expected. We introduce a summary of the revised regulation of infectious waste management in this article.

Miyazaki, M. [Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan)]. E-mail: motonobu@cis.fukuoka-u.ac.jp; Une, H. [Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan)

2005-07-01

449

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01

450

Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

Garfi, M. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: marianna.garfi@mail.ing.unibo.it; Tondelli, S. [DAPT, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Bonoli, A. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)

2009-10-15

451

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported on: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, TRU waste immobilization and decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, /sup 129/I fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation, waste management system and safety studies, effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, backfill material, spent fuel storage (criticality), barrier sealing and liners for U mill tailings, and revegetation of inactive U tailings sites. (DLC)

Chikalla, T.D.

1980-11-01

452

Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

453

Management of TRU waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since 1970, defense transuranic (TRU) waste has been placed into 20-year retrievable storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is to remove all retrievably stored TRU waste from the INEL. The INEL is currently developing, designing and constructing two facilities to demonstrate methods for retrieving, processing, and/or certifying the INEL stored TRU waste for shipment to, and experimental disposal demonstrations at, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste retrieval, nondestructive examination of waste containers, and certification of waste containers for shipment to the WIPP will be performed at the stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). Waste containers that cannot be certified at SWEPP will be treated at the Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP). The primary objective of PREPP is to demonstrate full-scale methods for processing the uncertifiable INEL stored TRU waste into a form that meets the waste acceptance criteria at the WIPP. The initial experimental processing method will consist of lowspeed shredding for waste container opening and waste sizing, a rotary kiln for waste incineration, and waste immobilization by cementing.

Gertz, C.P.

1984-07-01

454

HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics.

Sebastian Puente

1998-07-25

455

Guidance document for conducting waste management demonstration projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document presents the basic framework that has been developed for conducting waste management technology demonstration at the US Department of Energy\\/Oak Ridge Operations (DOE\\/ORO) sites. The guidance is based on experience gained by the Waste Management Technology Center (WMTC) in carrying out several innovative waste management technology demonstrations as part of its charter under the DOE\\/ORO's DOE Model program.

S. P. N. Singh; R. K. Genung; R. L. Jolley

1988-01-01

456

License scheme: an optimal waste management policy under asymmetric information  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system requiring a waste management license from an enforcement agency has been introduced in many countries. A license\\u000a system is usually coupled with fines, a manifest, and a disposal tax. However, these policy devices have not been integrated into an optimal policy. In this paper we derive\\u000a an optimal waste management policy by using those policy devices. Waste management

Takayoshi Shinkuma; Shunsuke Managi

2011-01-01

457

Analysis of Special Waste Configurations at the SRS Waste Management Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Job Control Waste (JCW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Solid Waste Management Facilities (SWMF) may be disposed of in special containers, and the analysis of these containers requires developing specific analysis methodologies. A method has been develop...

R. A. Dewberry V. R. Casella

2007-01-01

458

75 FR 71559 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0066; SW FRL-9231-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of Direct Final Exclusion AGENCY:...

2010-11-24

459

76 FR 76677 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 [FDMS Docket No.: EPA-R08-RCRA-2011-0823; FRL-9502-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

2011-12-08

460

75 FR 67919 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Proposed Exclusion for Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 [EPA-R05-RCRA-2010-0843; SW-FRL-9221-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Proposed Exclusion for Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

2010-11-04

461

76 FR 59960 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2009-0312; SW FRL-9472-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of proposed rule AGENCY: Environmental...

2011-09-28

462

Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineeri...

K. J. Galloway J. G. Jolley

1994-01-01

463

Compton ring for nuclear waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes an intense gamma-ray source based on the Compton scattering of laser photons by the electrons circulating in the storage ring. Gamma-ray energies fall in the range from 1 to 5 MeV. This source is an ideal tool for nuclear waste management by the nuclear resonance fluorescence method. The Compton ring is also a very promising tool for application in novel technologies for express cargo inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. A crab-crossing scheme in the ring lattice can be expected to permit a gamma-beam intensity of up to 5×1013 gammas/s with the latest laser and accelerator technologies.

Bulyak, Eugene; Gladkikh, Peter; Omori, Tsunehiko; Skomorokhov, Vladislav; Urakawa, Junji

2010-09-01

464

Facility accident analysis for low-level waste management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk to human health of potential radiological releases resulting from facility accidents constitutes an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management program. The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks associated with managing five types of radiological and chemical wastes in the DOE

J. Roglans-Ribas; C. Mueller; B. Nabelssi; S. Folga; M. Tompkins

1995-01-01

465

Life cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management with regard to greenhouse gas emissions: case study of Tianjin, China.  

PubMed

The environmental impacts of municipal solid waste (MSW) management have been highlighted in China, due to the continually increasing amount of MSW being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. Of particular interest is greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, aided by the Kyoto Mechanisms. China is an important case study for this global issue; however, an analysis of the entire life cycle of MSW management on GHG emissions is not available for China. This study evaluates the current and possible patterns of MSW management with regard to GHG emissions, using life cycle assessment (LCA), based on the Tianjin case. We assess the baseline scenario, reflecting the existing MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, five exploring waste treatment technology innovations and one exploring integrated MSW management, to quantitatively predict potentials of GHG mitigation for Tianjin. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is used to investigate the influence of landfill gas (LFG) collection efficiency, recycling rate and methodological choice, especially allocation, on the outcomes. The results show GHG emissions from Tianjin's MSW management system amount to 467.34 Mg CO2 eq. per year, based on the treatment of MSW collected in the central districts in 2006, and the key issue is LFG released. The integrated MSW management scenario, combining different improvement options, shows the highest GHG mitigation potential. Given the limited financial support and the current waste management practice in Tianjin, LFG utilization scenario would be the preferred choice. The sensitivity analysis of recycling rate shows an approximately linear relation of inverse proportion between recycling rate and total GHG emissions. Kitchen waste composting makes a considerable contribution to total GHG emissions reduction. Allocation choices result in differences in total quantitative outcomes, but preference orders and contributions analysis are found to be robust, suggesting LCA can support decision making. PMID:19068268

Zhao, Wei; van der Voet, Ester; Zhang, Yufeng; Huppes, Gjalt

2008-12-09

466

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a ge