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1

Radioactive waste management treatments: A selection for the Italian scenario  

SciTech Connect

The increased attention for radioactive waste management is one of the most peculiar aspects of the nuclear sector considering both reactors and not power sources. The aim of this paper is to present the state-of-art of treatments for radioactive waste management all over the world in order to derive guidelines for the radioactive waste management in the Italian scenario. Starting with an overview on the international situation, it analyses the different sources, amounts, treatments, social and economic impacts looking at countries with different industrial backgrounds, energetic policies, geography and population. It lists all these treatments and selects the most reasonable according to technical, economic and social criteria. In particular, a double scenario is discussed (to be considered in case of few quantities of nuclear waste): the use of regional, centralized, off site processing facilities, which accept waste from many nuclear plants, and the use of mobile systems, which can be transported among multiple nuclear sites for processing campaigns. At the end the treatments suitable for the Italian scenario are presented providing simplified work-flows and guidelines. (authors)

Locatelli, G. [Univ. of Lincoln, Lincoln School of Engineering, Brayford Pool - Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Mancini, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Via Lambruschini 4/B, Milano (Italy); Sardini, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Energy, Via Lambruschini 4, Milano (Italy)

2012-07-01

2

E-waste scenario in India, its management and implications.  

PubMed

Electronic waste or E-waste comprises of old, end-of-life electronic appliances such as computers, laptops, TVs, DVD players, refrigerators, freezers, mobile phones, MP3 players, etc., which have been disposed of by their original users. E-waste contains many hazardous constituents that may negatively impact the environment and affect human health if not properly managed. Various organizations, bodies, and governments of many countries have adopted and/or developed the environmentally sound options and strategies for E-waste management to tackle the ever growing threat of E-waste to the environment and human health. This paper presents E-waste composition, categorization, Global and Indian E-waste scenarios, prospects of recoverable, recyclable, and hazardous materials found in the E-waste, Best Available Practices, recycling, and recovery processes followed, and their environmental and occupational hazards. Based on the discussion, various challenges for E-waste management particularly in India are delineated, and needed policy interventions were discussed. PMID:20151189

Wath, Sushant B; Dutt, P S; Chakrabarti, T

2011-01-01

3

Alternative scenarios to meet the demands of sustainable waste management.  

PubMed

This paper analyses different alternatives for solid waste management that can be implemented to enable the targets required by the European Landfill and Packaging and Packaging Waste Directives to be achieved in the Valencian Community, on the east coast of Spain. The methodology applied to evaluate the environmental performance of each alternative is Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The analysis has been performed at two levels; first, the emissions accounted for in the inventory stage have been arranged into impact categories to obtain an indicator for each category; and secondly, the weighting of environmental data to a single unit has been applied. Despite quantitative differences between the results obtained with four alternative impact assessment methods, the same preference ranking has been established: scenarios with energy recovery (1v and 2v) achieve major improvements compared to baseline, with scenario 1v being better than 2v for all impact assessment methods except for the EPS'00 method, which obtains better results for scenario 2v. Sensitivity analysis has been used to test some of the assumptions used in the initial life cycle inventory model but none have a significant effect on the overall results. As a result, the best alternative to the existing waste management system can be identified. PMID:16202507

Bovea, M D; Powell, J C

2006-04-01

4

Assessment of municipal solid waste management scenarios in Irkutsk (Russia) using a life cycle assessment-integrated waste management model.  

PubMed

Continuous growth in the quantity of municipal solid waste (MSW) and increasing demands for their environmentally-friendly treatment are one of the main consequences of the growing social and economic development rate in modern society. Despite ecologically sustainable trends in waste management systems around the world, open dumps are still the main waste treatment option in Russia. This study aims to help the local municipality administration in Irkutsk (Russia) identify the most appropriate direction for current waste management and its optimization. Within this study four developed MSW management scenarios were assessed and compared with respect to their ecological, economic and social aspects using a life cycle-based integrated waste management model. The evaluation results of these scenarios show that the development of environmental sustainability and the reduction of social effects lead to an increase in handling of costs of waste. The best scenario, regarding both environmental and social aspects, is scenario four, which includes the separate collection and reprocessing of recyclables in combination with an aerobic mechanical-biological pre-treatment of the residual waste before landfilling. However, this scenario is 3.6 times more expensive than the existing system. The results of all assessed scenarios were further analyzed and recommendations were made to design integrated waste management solutions that are optimal not only from the ecological and social points of view, but which are also realistic within the given economic situation. PMID:23444153

Tulokhonova, Alisa; Ulanova, Olga

2013-05-01

5

E-waste scenario in India, its management and implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic waste or E-waste comprises of old, end-of-life electronic appliances such as computers, laptops, TVs, DVD players,\\u000a refrigerators, freezers, mobile phones, MP3 players, etc., which have been disposed of by their original users. E-waste contains\\u000a many hazardous constituents that may negatively impact the environment and affect human health if not properly managed. Various\\u000a organizations, bodies, and governments of many countries

Sushant B. Wath; P. S. Dutt; T. Chakrabarti

2011-01-01

6

The determination of an optimal waste management scenario for Kampala, Uganda.  

PubMed

The quality of the environment in the city of Kampala is deteriorating. The city needs a novel waste management approach to improve the environmental quality in its heterogeneous settlement patterns. Earlier, an integrated urban waste flow model (IUWFM) was applied to project the future waste flows and their impacts on the environment of Kampala using four waste management scenarios. These scenarios were 'business-as-usual', 'more enforcement', 'more collection' and 'proper management'. The robustness of the scenario results was determined by using a multi-criteria decision analysis. Twenty-four criteria were identified and grouped as environmental, economic, social, technological and general. Equal weights were assigned to these five sets of criteria. The four scenarios were evaluated against all criteria, and a sensitivity analysis was performed on the role of the equal weights on the choice of the scenarios. The results showed that 'proper management' scenario, which integrates diverse technologies and management programs matching with the local context, is the optimal approach to improve Kampala's environmental quality. Scenarios that emphasized more waste collection, but less resource recovery were ranked in the middle. The scenario of maintaining the status quo performed worst. Application of a mix of diverse technologies and management programs matching the local conditions is the most optimal solution to improve Kampala's environmental quality. PMID:24221972

Oyoo, Richard; Leemans, Rik; Mol, Arthur P J

2013-12-01

7

Scenario of solid waste management in present Indian context  

Microsoft Academic Search

A trend of significant increase in municipal solid waste generation has been recorded worldwide. This has been found due to over population growth rate, industrialization, urbanization and economic growth. Consumerism speed has been found very high covering around more then 50% of total population since last decade due to higher economic growth, which has ultimately resulted in increased solid waste

R. Rajput; G. Prasad; A. K. Chopra

8

Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Composition and Management: The World Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the abridgment of the waste generated from domestic, commercial and construction activities by natural persons which is collected and treated by municipalities. Exponential growth of population, urbanization, development of social economy, coupled with improvement of living standard have resulted in an increase in the amount of MSW generation throughout the world. On an average the

TANMOY KARAK; R. M. BHAGAT; PRADIP BHATTACHARYYA

2011-01-01

9

Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Composition, and Management: The World Scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the abridgment of the waste generated from domestic, commercial, and construction activities by natural persons that is collected and treated by municipalities. Exponential growth of population and urbanization, and the development of social economy, coupled with the improvement of living standard, have resulted in an increase in the amount of MSW generation throughout the world.

Tanmoy Karak; R. M. Bhagat; Pradip Bhattacharyya

2012-01-01

10

Applying waste management scenarios in the Peloponnese Region in Greece: a critical analysis in the frame of life cycle assessment.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to apply life cycle assessment in the waste management sector, in order to compare the environmental performance of different waste management methods. The methods that are studied are: landfilling, aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment, incineration and recycling, focusing on mass and energy balances and the environmental performance of each applied scenario. The Peloponnese Region in Greece was selected as a case for the application of this methodology and more specifically its largest municipalities, where a significant amount of waste is presented. The conducted LCA study proves the necessity of the adoption of an integrated waste management system and indicates its principal objectives by measuring environmental impacts. Thermal scenario contributes significant to the mitigation on the Greenhouse Gases. On the other hand, separation at source and recycling practices provides significant benefits to the abiotic depletion impact. PMID:22961485

Antonopoulos, I-S; Karagiannidis, A; Tsatsarelis, T; Perkoulidis, G

2013-04-01

11

Topical report on release scenario analysis of long-term management of high-level defense waste at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Potential release scenarios for the defense high-level waste (HLW) on the Hanford Site are presented. Presented in this report are the three components necessary for evaluating the various alternatives under consideration for long-term management of Hanford defense HLW: identification of scenarios and events which might directly or indirectly disrupt radionuclide containment barriers; geotransport calculations of waste migration through the site media; and consequence (dose) analyses based on groundwater and air pathways calculations. The scenarios described in this report provide the necessary parameters for radionuclide transport and consequence analysis. Scenarios are categorized as either bounding or nonbounding. Bounding scenarios consider worst case or what if situations where an actual and significant release of waste material to the environment would happen if the scenario were to occur. Bounding scenarios include both near-term and long-term scenarios. Near-term scenarios are events which occur at 100 years from 1990. Long term scenarios are potential events considered to occur at 1000 and 10,000 years from 1990. Nonbounding scenarios consider events which result in insignificant releases or no release at all to the environment. Three release mechanisms are described in this report: (1) direct exposure of waste to the biosphere by a defined sequence of events (scenario) such as human intrusion by drilling; (2) radionuclides contacting an unconfined aquifer through downward percolation of groundwater or a rising water table; and (3) cataclysmic or explosive release of radionuclides by such mechanisms as meteorite impact, fire and explosion, criticality, or seismic events. Scenarios in this report present ways in which these release mechanisms could occur at a waste management facility. The scenarios are applied to the two in-tank waste management alternatives: in-situ disposal and continued present action.

Wallace, R.W.; Landstrom, D.K.; Blair, S.C.; Howes, B.W.; Robkin, M.A.; Benson, G.L.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Walters, W.H.; Zimmerman, M.G.

1980-11-01

12

Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the process of comparing alternative management strategies in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Such strategies involve regionalization, decentralization, and centralization of waste treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Potential accidents at the HWSFs at the DOE sites are divided into categories of spill alone, spill plus fire, and other event combinations including spill plus fire plus explosion, fire only, spill and explosion, and fire and explosion. One or more accidents are chosen to represent the types of accidents for FY 1992 for 12 DOE sites were studied to determine the most representative set of possible accidents at all DOE sites. Each accident scenario is given a probability of occurrence that is adjusted, depending on the throughput and waste composition that passes through the HWSF at the particular site. The justification for the probabilities chosen is presented.

Policastro, A.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Marmer, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mueller, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Freeman, W. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-03-01

13

Future waste treatment and energy systems – examples of joint scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. • Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. • Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. • Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research – fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

2013-11-15

14

A holistic life cycle analysis of waste management scenarios at increasing source segregation intensity: the case of an Italian urban area.  

PubMed

Life cycle analysis of several waste management scenarios for an Italian urban area was performed on the basis of different source segregation collection (SS) intensities from 0% up to 52%. Source segregated waste was recycled and or/recovered by composting. Residual waste management options were by landfilling, incineration with energy recovery or solid recovered fuel (SRF) production to substitute for coal. The increase in fuel and materials consumption due to increase in SS had negligible influence on the environmental impact of the system. Recycling operations such as incineration and SRF were always advantageous for impact reduction. There was lower impact for an SS of 52% even though the difference with the SS intensity of 35% was quite limited, about 15%. In all the configurations analyzed, the best environmental performance was achieved for the management system producing SRF by the biodrying process. PMID:25008299

Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina

2014-11-01

15

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

16

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-print Network

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working records. The initial training of Hazardous Waste Management and Waste Minimization is done in a class is invited to attend the classroom training. For more information on Hazardous Waste Management, including

Dai, Pengcheng

17

HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE  

E-print Network

HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

Faraon, Andrei

18

Waste management program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant is provided. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, on-site storage and disposal, the Defense Waste Processing, Facility, TRU waste, and low-level waste are reported in the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, waste tank evaluation, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage. The development of criteria for the selection of sites for storage of waste forms produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility is described in the Commercial Waste Program.

1980-12-01

19

Waste management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The function of the waste management system was to control the disposition of solid and liquid wastes and waste stowage gases. The waste management system consisting of a urine subsystem and a fecal subsystem is described in detail and its overall performance is evaluated. Recommendations for improvement are given.

Sauer, R. L.; Jorgensen, G. K.

1975-01-01

20

Radioactive waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of radioactive waste is a very important part of the nuclear industry. The future of the nuclear power industry depends to a large extent on the successful solution of the perceived or real problems associated with the disposal of both low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW). All the activities surrounding the management of radioactive waste are reviewed.

N. Tsoulfanidis; R. G. Cochran

1991-01-01

21

Climate impact analysis of waste treatment scenarios--thermal treatment of commercial and pretreated waste versus landfilling in Austria.  

PubMed

A major challenge for modern waste management lies in a smart integration of waste-to-energy installations in local energy systems in such a way that the energy efficiency of the waste-to-energy plant is optimized and that the energy contained in the waste is, therefore, optimally utilized. The extent of integration of thermal waste treatment processes into regular energy supply systems plays a major role with regard to climate control. In this research, the specific waste management situation looked at scenarios aiming at maximizing the energy recovery from waste (i.e. actual scenario and waste-to-energy process with 75% energy efficiency [22.5% electricity, 52.5% heat]) yield greenhouse gas emission savings due to the fact that more greenhouse gas emissions are avoided in the energy sector than caused by the various waste treatment processes. Comparing dedicated waste-to-energy-systems based on the combined heat and power (CHP) process with concepts based on sole electricity production, the energy efficiency proves to be crucial with regard to climate control. This underlines the importance of choosing appropriate sites for waste-to-energy-plants. This research was looking at the effect with regard to the climate impact of various waste management scenarios that could be applied alternatively by a private waste management company in Austria. The research is, therefore, based on a specific set of data for the waste streams looked at (waste characteristics, logistics needed, etc.). Furthermore, the investigated scenarios have been defined based on the actual available alternatives with regard to the usage of treatment plants for this specific company. The standard scenarios for identifying climate impact implications due to energy recovery from waste are based on the respective marginal energy data for the power and heat generation facilities/industrial processes in Austria. PMID:19748941

Ragossnig, A M; Wartha, C; Pomberger, R

2009-11-01

22

Consequences of select boiling waste scenarios for waste feed delivery  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to quantify thermal phenomena and predict consequences for select double-shell tank (DST) heat-up scenarios for waste feed delivery safety applications. This work extends previous tank bump analyses [Epstein, et al., 2000; and Epstein, et al., 2000a] by focusing on selected scenarios in which extended loss of cooling leads to waste boiling and aerosol generation. The HADCRT code, Version 1.3, is used to provide a best-estimate, coupled simulation of both thermal-hydraulic and aerosol transport phenomena. The physical model employed considers boiling aerosol generation, aerosol agglomeration and gravitational sedimentation in the tank headspace, aerosol removal from steam condensation, and aerosol transport from the headspace to the environment and through ventilation flow paths. Thus, the net result of the calculation is the time history of aerosol release to the immediate vicinity of an underground DST.

MALINOVIC, B.; PLYS, M.G.

2003-03-21

23

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03

24

Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the

A. Policastro; J. Roglans-Ribas; D. Marmer; M. Lazaro; C. Mueller; W. Freeman

1994-01-01

25

CHAPTER 16. WASTE MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The chapter discusses global methane (CH4) emissions from waste management. t begins with a brief overview of how CH4 is generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste and then discusses in detail landfills, wastewater treatment lagoons, and livestock waste management. urren...

26

Nuclear waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

Chikalla, T. D.; Powell, J. A.

1981-09-01

27

Management of solid waste  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC, several waste management options were of solid waste. The current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste are highlighted. Capital operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options.

Thompson, W. T.; Stinton, L. H.

1980-04-01

28

Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.  

SciTech Connect

A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

2008-08-01

29

Radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the technical and legal considerations of nuclear waste management. The first three sections describe the technical aspects of spent-fuel-rod production, reprocessing, and temporary storage. The next two sections discuss permanent disposal of high-level wastes and spent-fuel rods. Finally, legislative and judicial responses to the nuclear-waste crisis.

Flax, S.J.

1981-01-01

30

http://wmr.sagepub.com Waste Management & Research  

E-print Network

http://wmr.sagepub.com Waste Management & Research DOI: 10.1177/0734242X09350787 2009; 27; 928 originally published online Oct 16, 2009;Waste Manag Res Asterios Papageorgiou, Avraam Karagiannidis, John R. Barton and Efstratios Kalogirou Municipal solid waste management scenarios for Attica

Columbia University

31

Enrollment Management Study: Five Scenarios.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of enrollment level changes on the long-range future of Western Washington University are investigated. Due to the high rate of Washington state in-migration, declining enrollments are not projected for Western Washington University. The impact of managed enrollment goals was examined to help the university determine the most…

Albers, James R.; Burns, James A.

32

Solid Waste Management Written Program  

E-print Network

Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste/Documents/Soilid%20Waste%20Program%20Manual.pdf #12;Solid Waste Management Program 1. Introduction This Cornell University Solid Waste Management Compliance manual is intended for use by personnel at Cornell University

Pawlowski, Wojtek

33

Social assessment of waste energy utilization scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Center of Technology Assessment in Stuttgart (Germany) constructed four energy scenarios for the year 2005 and 2020 referring to the German State of Baden-Württemberg. All these scenarios are based on the promise of the German government to reduce Carbon dioxide emissions by 25% in the year 2005, and there is a commitment of a 45% reduction for the year

Ortwin Renn

2003-01-01

34

Solid-Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

Science Teacher, 1973

1973-01-01

35

[Recommendations for waste management].  

PubMed

Laboratory waste management must ensure the safety of patients and staff, limiting the environmental impacts and control waste disposal budget. Sorting of waste must be carried out at the source. The packaging must be adapted, allowing easy identification of specific disposal routes. With regard to wastes for human or animal health care and/or related research (DASRI), packages must comply with the regulations, standards and ADR if necessary. Storage provisions differ according to the amount of DASRI produced. Waste collection is carried out directly on the place of activity by a certified service provider. Non pre-treated DASRI is incinerated in specific approved plants for a T ° > 1,200 °C. Special provisions also exist for chemical waste and radioactive waste, the latter being regulated by ANDRA. PMID:23765028

Vinner, E; Odou, M F; Fovet, B; Ghnassia, J C

2013-06-01

36

Nuclear waste management worldwide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous countries around the world are tackling the task of managing nuclear waste. By considering their approaches, we gain a broader perspective on the US program.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Charles McCombie

1997-01-01

37

Environmental evaluation of waste treatment scenarios for the towns Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut, Russia.  

PubMed

Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug - Ugra in Siberia has recently started to play a major role in the Russian economy because key oil and gas extraction sites are located in this region. As a result, the extensions of infrastructure and higher incomes have been leading to an accelerated population growth and consequent increase in the generation of solid household waste. The current methods of waste disposal have now reached their limits, especially in the towns Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut. The key objectives of this study were to identify the influence of waste composition and transport routes on the life cycle assessment (LCA) results and to assess the current waste treatment option for solid household waste and to compare it with proposed scenarios. Furthermore, recommendations for an optimal use of LCA within a decision-making process for a waste management plan are presented. LCA methodology was used to evaluate different waste management scenarios such as landfilling and incineration. One result was that the options 'incineration with recycling' and 'anaerobic mechanical-biological treatment with recycling' demonstrated lower environmental impact in both Khanty-Mansiysk and Surgut. Another finding was that there were hardly any differences in the ranking of the scenarios for Surgut and Khanty-Mansiysk. However, the special socio-cultural circumstances and location of each town have to be considered seriously in the development of a sustainable waste management plan. PMID:23381971

Kaazke, Julia; Meneses, Montse; Wilke, Berndt-Michael; Rotter, Vera Susanne

2013-03-01

38

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301  

E-print Network

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

Florida, University of

39

AVLIS production plant waste management plan  

SciTech Connect

Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-15

40

Microbiological Waste Management Microbiological waste includes  

E-print Network

Microbiological Waste Management Microbiological waste includes: 1. discarded cultures and stocks Acceptable Methods of Treatment of Microbiological Waste Steam Sterilization 1. temperature of at least 121º's instructions or 2. immerse the waste for not less than 3 minutes in: a. a freshly prepared solution

Natelson, Douglas

41

SUSTAINABILITY AND WASTE MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a need to move toward a more sustainable use of resources. Concern for the environment and future generations is leading us to shift the focus from waste management to resource management. This paper provides an overview of a decision support tool that provides a holis...

42

Biosolids - a fuel or a waste? An integrated appraisal of five co-combustion scenarios with policy analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated appraisal of five technology scenarios for the co-combustion of biosolids in the UK energy and waste management policy context is presented. Co-combustion scenarios with coal, municipal solid waste, wood, and for cement manufacture were subject to thermodynamic and materials flow modeling and evaluated by 19 stakeholder representatives. All scenarios provided a net energy gain (0.58-5.0 kWh\\/kg dry solids),

Elise Cartmell; Peter Gostelow; Drusilla Riddell-Black; Nigel Simms; John Oakey; Joe Morris; Paul Jeffrey; Peter Howsam; Simon J. Pollard

2006-01-01

43

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-print Network

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

44

Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

Environmental effects (including accidents) associated with facility construction, operation, decommissioning, and transportation in the management of commercially generated radioactive waste were analyzed for plants and systems assuming a light water power reactor scenario that produces about 10,000 GWe-yr through the year 2050. The following alternative fuel cycle modes or cases that generate post-fission wastes requiring management were analyzed: a once-through option, a fuel reprocessing option for uranium and plutonium recycle, and a fuel reprocessing option for uranium-only recycle. Volume 1 comprises five chapters: introduction; summary of findings; approach to assessment of environmental effects from radioactive waste management; environmental effects related to radioactive management in a once-through fuel cycle; and environmental effects of radioactive waste management associated with an LWR fuel reprocessing plant. (LK)

Not Available

1979-05-01

45

Characterization and inventories of nuclear materials and wastes for possible future energy scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Awareness of the total materials inventory and materials balance associated with differing methods for energy generation is part of present day concerns associated with disparate areas that include atmospheric emissions, resource utilization, health effects, and both current and long term hazards and risks. Nuclear energy, for a number of decades, has been the recipient of significant scrutiny concerning the materials and wastes it generates, particularly in the context of long term solutions to such issues. This paper examines the nuclear materials and waste generation for nuclear energy scenarios spanning the coming century. The paper also briefly addresses wastes (in the form of emissions) from other energy sources and examines requirements associated with backend energy system materials management. Possible future requirements pertaining to CO{sub 2} management are found to place conditions upon waste management generally similar to those for nuclear waste. One example of material flows for the case of coal generation of electricity coupled with carbon sequestration is also given.

Arthur, E.D.

1997-10-01

46

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2010-07-01

47

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2011-07-01

48

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2011-07-01

49

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2013-07-01

50

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2014-07-01

51

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2010-07-01

52

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2012-07-01

53

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2014-07-01

54

40 CFR 273.33 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management. 273.33 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.33 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2012-07-01

55

40 CFR 273.13 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.13 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Small Quantity...Universal Waste § 273.13 Waste management. (a) Universal waste...

2013-07-01

56

Future waste treatment and energy systems--examples of joint scenarios.  

PubMed

Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project. PMID:23932196

Münster, M; Finnveden, G; Wenzel, H

2013-11-01

57

Controlling transboundary wildlife damage: modeling under alternative management scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

The migratory nature of nuisance wildlife populations creates a special management problem by imposing a negative diffusion externality on landowners undertaking control efforts. This paper reviews three cost-minimizing wildlife-control models, each internalizing the diffusion externality under different management scenarios, namely, unilateral management, bilateral management, and centralized management. The three management scenarios lead to different optimal behaviors. Property owners exerting unilateral

Mahadev G. Bhat; Ray G. Huffaker; Suzanne M. Lenhart

1996-01-01

58

Waste Management Process Improvement Project  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle.

Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

2002-02-25

59

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26

60

Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-print Network

10 Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors: Jean Bogner (USA) Lead Authors: Mohammed Abdelrafie Ahmed, C. Diaz, A. Faaij, Q. Gao, S. Hashimoto, K. Mareckova, R. Pipatti, T. Zhang, Waste Management University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. #12;586 Waste Management Chapter 10 Table

Columbia University

61

Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

62

Scenario Development for Water Resources Planning and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of scenario development for water resources is to inform policy-makers about the implications of various policies to inform decision-making. Although there have been a number of studies conducted in the relatively-new and recent field of scenario analysis and development, very few of those have been explicitly applied to water resource issues. More evident is the absence of an established formal approach to develop and apply scenarios. Scenario development is a process that evaluates possible future states of the world by examining several feasible scenarios. A scenario is a projection of various physical and socioeconomic conditions that describe change from the current state to a future state. In this paper, a general framework for scenario development with special emphasis on applications to water resources is considered. The process comprises several progressive and reiterative phases: scenario definition, scenario construction, scenario analysis, scenario assessment, and risk management. Several characteristics of scenarios that are important in describing scenarios are also taken into account; these include scenario types, scenario themes, scenario likelihoods and scenario categories. A hindrance to the adoption of a unified framework for scenario development is inconsistency in the terminology used by scenario developers. To address this problem, we propose a consistent terminology of basic and frequent terms. Outreach for this formal approach is partially maintained through an interactive community website that seeks to educate potential scenario developers about the scenario development process, share and exchange information and resources on scenarios to foster a multidisciplinary community of scenario developers, and establish a unified framework for scenario development with regards to terminology and guidelines. The website provides information on scenario development, current scenario-related activities, key water resources scenario studies, links to other scenario studies, a forum for discussion on scenarios, a depository on scenario development publications, and a suggested scenario glossary.

Stewart, S.; Mahmoud, M.; Liu, Y.; Hartman, H.; Wagener, T.; Gupta, H.

2006-12-01

63

Radioactive Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Issues related to the management of radioactive wastes are presented with specific emphasis on high-level wastes generated as a result of energy and materials production using nuclear reactors. The final disposition of these high-level wastes depends on which nuclear fuel cycle is pursued, and range from once-through burning of fuel in a light water reactor followed by direct disposal in a geologic repository to more advanced fuel cycles (AFCs) where the spent fuel is reprocessed or partitioned to recover the fissile material (primarily 235U and 239Pu) as well as the minor actinides (MAs) (neptunium, americium, and curium) and some long-lived fission products (e.g., 99Tc and 129I). In the latter fuel cycle, the fissile materials are recycled through a reactor to produce more energy, the short-lived fission products are vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository, and the minor actinides and long-lived fission products are converted to less radiotoxic or otherwise stable nuclides by a process called transmutation. The advantages and disadvantages of the various fuel cycle options and the challenges to the management of nuclear wastes they represent are discussed.

Baisden, P. A.; Atkins-Duffin, C. E.

64

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2010-07-01

65

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2014-07-01

66

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2013-07-01

67

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2012-07-01

68

40 CFR 273.52 - Waste management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management. 273.52 Section 273... STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Universal Waste Transporters § 273.52 Waste management. (a) A universal...

2011-07-01

69

Radioactive waste management and disposal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first European Community conference on Radioactive Waste Management and Disposal was held in Luxembourg, where twenty-five papers were presented by scientists involved in European Community contract studies and by members of the Commission's scientific staff. The following topics were covered: treatment and conditioning technology of solid intermediate level wastes, alpha-contaminated combustible wastes, gaseous wastes, hulls and dissolver residues and

R. Simon; S. Orlowski

1980-01-01

70

The global waste management challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author states that the problem of solid waste management is not unique to the USA, and that almost all industrial nations are having to modify their policies regarding waste management. Many countries are having policy changes about heavy metals, dioxins, acid gases, ash disposal, and waste-facility operator training.

Goldstein

1987-01-01

71

[Environmental management: critical analysis, scenarios and challenges].  

PubMed

This article discusses the limits, alternatives and challenges of environmental management in contemporary globalized capitalist societies. It is based on a critical analysis supported by authors from social sciences, political ecology and public health. To this end, we systematize the meaning of hegemonic environmental management in terms of eco-efficiency and its limits to tackle environmental risks and construct democratic processes and societies. We developed four ideal scenarios involving possible combinations of environmental management and democracy. This model served as a base, together with academic studies and the theoretical and militant experience of the authors, for a reflection on the current characteristics and future trends of environmental management and democracy, with emphasis on the reality of Latin America, specifically Brazil. Lastly, we discuss possibilities for social transformation taking into consideration the contradictions and emancipatory alternatives resulting from confrontations between hegemonic tendencies of the market and counter-hegemonic utopias and social movements. The latter assume principles of environmental justice, economic solidarity, agro-ecology and sustainability as well as the construction of new epistemologies. PMID:22699636

Porto, Marcelo Firpo de Souza; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo

2012-06-01

72

Scenario of solid waste reuse in Khulna city of Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect

The reuse and recycling of waste materials are now sincerely considered to be an integral part of solid waste management in many parts of the world. In this context, a vast number of options ranging from small scale decentralized to larger scale centralized plants have been adopted. This study aimed at investigating the waste reuse schemes in Khulna city located in the southern part of Bangladesh and ranked third largest city in the country. The shops for reusable material (SRM) were mostly situated around railway, waterway, and truck station markets which provided easy transportation to further locations. For the reuses of waste materials and products, a chain system was found to collect reusable wastes under a total number of 310 identified SRM with 859 persons directly or indirectly involved in the scheme. This was a decentralized waste management system with self sufficient (autonomous) management. According to mass balance, about 38.52 tons d{sup -1} solid wastes were reused in Khulna city area, accounting for 7.65% of the total generated wastes. This study revealed that apparently a silent, systematic, smooth, and clean reuse chain has been established in Khulna city area under private initiatives, whose sustainability was confirmed over the years in the country without any official or formal funds. However, proper adjustment between the higher and lower chain in the materials flow path, as well as personal hygiene training for the workers, would further improve the achievements of the established reuse scheme.

Bari, Quazi H., E-mail: qhbari@yahoo.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technology, Khulna 9203 (Bangladesh); Mahbub Hassan, K. [Department of Civil Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technology, Khulna 9203 (Bangladesh); Haque, R. [Project Builders Ltd., Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

2012-12-15

73

Environmental performance of construction waste: Comparing three scenarios from a case study in Catalonia, Spain  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to evaluate environmental impacts of construction wastes in terms of the LIFE 98 ENV/E/351 project. Construction wastes are classified in accordance with the Life Program Environment Directive of the European Commission. Three different scenarios to current waste management from a case study in Catalonia (Spain) have been compared: landfilling, recycling and incineration, and these scenarios were evaluated by means of Life Cycle Assessment. The recommendations of the Catalan Waste Catalogue and the European Waste Catalogue have been taken into account. Also, the influence of transport has been evaluated. Results show that in terms of the Global Warming Potential, the most environmentally friendly treatment was recycling, followed by incineration and lastly landfilling. According to the influence of treatment plants location on the GWP indicator, we observe that incineration and recycling of construction wastes are better than landfilling, even for long distances from the building site to the plants. This is true for most wastes except for the stony types, than should be recycled close to the building site. In summary, data from construction waste of a Catalan case study was evaluated using the well established method of LCA to determine the environmental impacts.

Ortiz, O., E-mail: oscarortiz@unipamplona.edu.c [Rovira i Virgili University, Environmental Analysis and Management Group (AGA), Chemical Engineering Department, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007, Tarragona (Spain); University of Pamplona, Department of Industrial Engineering, Km 1 Via Bucaramanga, Pamplona, N de S (Colombia); Pasqualino, J.C.; Castells, F. [Rovira i Virgili University, Environmental Analysis and Management Group (AGA), Chemical Engineering Department, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007, Tarragona (Spain)

2010-04-15

74

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-print Network

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University waste through waste hierarchy and managing the waste in-house for final disposal. To explain the waste

Harman, Neal.A.

75

Industrial waste management in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Systematic management for industrial waste in Japan has been carried out based on the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law which was enacted in 1970. The law and its ordinances designate 19 kinds of waste materials discharged from business activities as industrial waste and prescribe the generator's responsibility, requirements for treatment contractors, standards for consignment, specific personnel, etc. from the view of proper management. And they also prescribe disposal standards, structure, and maintenance standards for treatment facilities, including final disposal sites, from the view of proper treatment and disposal. The Standard for Verification provides criteria to categorize as hazardous or nonhazardous industrial waste which is subjected to treatment and disposal in conformity with each standard. The fundamental policies to cope with industrial waste focus on reduction of generation, promotion of recycling, establishment of a comprehensive information management system and participation of the public which can contribute well to prevent environmental pollution caused by inappropriate management of industrial waste.

Hirota, Y.

1986-12-01

76

Perspectives on sustainable waste management.  

PubMed

Sustainable waste management is a goal that all societies must strive to maintain. Currently nearly 80% of global wastes are sent to landfill, with a significant amount lacking proper design or containment. The increased attention to environmental impacts of human activities and the increasing demand for energy and materials have resulted in a new perspective on waste streams. Use of waste streams for energy and materials recovery is becoming more prevalent, especially in developed regions of the world, such as Europe, the United States, and Japan. Although currently these efforts have a small impact on waste disposal, use of waste streams to extract value very likely will increase as society becomes more aware of the options available. This review presents an overview of waste management with a focus on following an expanded waste hierarchy to extract value specifically from municipal solid waste streams. PMID:24910921

Castaldi, Marco J

2014-01-01

77

Intruder scenarios for site-specific low-level radioactive waste classification  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has revised its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities supporting defense missions. Specifically, draft DOE Order 5820.2A, Chapter 3 describes the purpose, policy, and requirements necessary for the management of defense LLW. The draft DOE policy calls for LLW operations to be managed to protect the health and safety of the public, preserve the environment, and ensure that no remedial action will be necessary after termination of operations. The basic approach used by DOE is to establish overall performance objectives, in terms of groundwater protection and public radiation dose limits, and to require site-specific performance assessments to determine compliance. As a result of these performance assessments, each site will develop waste acceptance criteria that define the allowable quantities and concentrations of specific radioisotopes. Additional limitations on waste disposal design, waste form, and waste treatment will also be developed on a site-specific basis. As a key step in the site-specific performance assessments, an evaluation must be conducted of potential radiation doses to intruders who may inadvertently move onto a closed DOE LLW disposal site after loss of institutional controls. This report (1) describes the types of intruder scenarios that should be considered when performing this step of the site-specific performance assessment, (2) provides the results of generic calculations performed using unit concentrations of various radionuclides as a comparison of the magnitude of importance of the various intruder scenarios, and (3) shows the relationship between the generic doses and waste classification limits for defense wastes.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

1988-09-01

78

Cornell Cooperative Extension Cornell Waste Management Institute  

E-print Network

Cornell Cooperative Extension Cornell Waste Management Institute Department of Crop & Soil Sciences for Composting Butcher Waste 2010Cornell Waste Management Institute2 Properly composted material for Composting Butcher Waste Butcher Residuals - Current Situation In many communities, the custom butcher

Wang, Z. Jane

79

Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis  

E-print Network

Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis Prepared By: Mitchell Johnson Alex Sonnichsen #12;Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis May 2012 Page 1 Summary This study examines the economic impact of the solid waste management system

Oregon, University of

80

Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy  

E-print Network

Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed to sustainable waste management through reducing our consumption of materials, encouraging re-use where possible information in all future waste management contracts For further information see www

Haase, Markus

81

Diagnostic health risk assessment of electronic waste on the general population in developing countries' scenarios  

SciTech Connect

E-waste is the generic name for technological waste. Even though aspects related to e-waste environmental pollution and human exposure are known, scientific assessments are missing so far on the actual risks for health sustainability of the general population exposed to e-waste scenarios, such as illicit dumping, crude recycling and improper treatment and disposal. In fact, further to occupational and direct local exposure, e-waste scenarios may impact on the environment-to-food chain, thus eliciting a widespread and repeated exposure of the general population to mixtures of toxicants, mainly toxic chemical elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants. In the absence of any clear policy on e-waste flow management, the situation in the e-waste receiver countries may become quite scary; accordingly, here we address a diagnostic risk assessment of health issues potentially elicited by e-waste related mixtures of toxicants. Scientific evidence available so far (mainly from China) is discussed with special attention to the concept of health sustainability, i.e. the poor health burden heritage perpetuated through the mother-to-child dyad. Endocrine disruption and neurotoxicity are specifically considered as examples of main health burden issues relevant to perpetuation through life cycle and across generations; toxicological information are considered along with available data on environmental and food contamination and human internal exposure. The risk from exposure to e-waste related mixtures of toxicants of vulnerable subpopulation like breast-fed infants is given special attention. The diagnostic risk assessment demonstrates how e-waste exposure poses an actual public health emergency, as it may entrain significant health risks also for generations to come. Exposure scenarios as well as specific chemicals of major concern may vary in different contexts; for instance, only limited information is available on e-waste related exposures in a major site of e-waste dumping such as West Africa. Therefore, considerations are also given on data gaps possibly fitting a systematic risk assessment of the e-waste health impacts in different subscenarios as well as possible protective factors for exposed subpopulations.

Frazzoli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.frazzoli@iss.i [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Orisakwe, Orish Ebere [Toxicology Unit, Department of Pharmacology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, College of Health Sciences Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State (Nigeria); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Dragone, Roberto [Institute of Nanostructured Materials (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, at the Department of Chemistry of the 'Sapienza' University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy)

2010-11-15

82

Illinois solid waste management legislation  

SciTech Connect

Contents include: Degradable Plastic Act; Energy Assistance Act of 1989; Hazardous and Solid Waste Recycling and Treatment Act; Household Hazardous Waste Collection Program Act; Illinois Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act; Illinois Environmental Facilities Financing Act; Illinois Procurement Code; Illinois Solid Waste Management Act; Intergovernmental Cooperation Act; Junkyard Act; Litter Control Act; Local Solid Waste Disposal Act; Metro East Solid Waste Disposal and Energy Producing Service Act; Recycled Newsprint Use Act; Responsible Property Transfer Act of 1988; Solid Waste Disposal District Act; Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act; Solid Waste Site Operator Certification Law; Township Refuse Collection and Disposal Act; Toxic Pollution Prevention Act; Used Motor Oil Recycling Act; Waste Oil Recovery Act; and Water Supply, Drainage and Flood Control Act.

NONE

1999-07-01

83

Waste management at LAMPF  

SciTech Connect

Future major improvements at the Clinto P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) will require replacement of many large radioactive components. Proper disposal of the components presents special waste management problems caused by component size, weight, geometry, and activity level. A special, large cask trailer (54 metric tons gross) is being constructed for transporting the material to the disposal site. The cask trailer is designed so that the amount of shielding may be individually tailored to suit the geometry and activity level of eah item transported. Special handling techniques and methods of stabilizing loose contamination are being developed to facilitate transport of large radioactive components across open areas. A special Monitor remote-handling system is being constructed to perform the various preparation and rigging operations. Implementation of this equipment will expedite future improvements at LAMPF with minimum impact and/or interference with other ongoing activities.

Lambert, J.E.; Grisham, D.L.

1982-01-01

84

Interactive graphical timelines as collaborative scenario management tools  

E-print Network

INTERACTIVE GRAPHICAL TIMELINES AS COLLABORATIVE SCENARIO MANAGEMENT TOOLS A Thesis by AUSTIN CHRISTOPHER RIDDLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science INTERACTIVE GRAPHICAL TIMELINES AS COLLABORATIVE SCENARIO MANAGEMENT TOOLS A Thesis by AUSTIN CHRISTOPHER RIDDLE Submitted to the Office...

Riddle, Austin Christopher

2008-10-10

85

Nuclear waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides

T. D. Chikalla; J. A. Powell

1981-01-01

86

Federal Waste Management www.lebensministerium.at  

E-print Network

Federal Waste Management Plan 2001 www.lebensministerium.at #12;AUSTRIAN FEDERAL MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY ENVIRONMENT AND WATER MANAGEMENT FEDERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 2001 Issued: The Federal Waste Management Plan 2001 has been issued in two volumes: · Federal Waste Management Plan

Columbia University

87

Waste management models and their application to sustainable waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to review the types of models that are currently being used in the area of municipal waste management and to highlight some major shortcomings of these models. Most of the municipal waste models identified in the literature are decision support models and for the purposes of this research, are divided into three categories—those based

A. J. Morrissey; J Browne

2004-01-01

88

SNES 2000: Environmental Sciences Colloquium Garbage and Waste Management  

E-print Network

SNES 2000: Environmental Sciences Colloquium Fall 2012 Garbage and Waste Management Friday September 28 Barbara Eckstrom, Solid Waste Manager, Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division. October October 26 Solid waste management Jean Bonhotal, Cornell Waste Management Institute, Crop & Soil Science

Keinan, Alon

89

Chemical Waste Management and Disposal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes simple, efficient techniques for treating hazardous chemicals so that nontoxic and nonhazardous residues are formed. Discusses general rules for management of waste chemicals from school laboratories and general techniques for the disposal of waste or surplus chemicals. Lists specific disposal reactions. (CW)

Armour, Margaret-Ann

1988-01-01

90

date 04/2009 Waste Management  

E-print Network

date 04/2009 Waste Management In The City Of Munich #12;date 04/2009 Waste Management Corporation Munich ­ Position within the Municipality of Munich · The Waste Management Corporation AWM Framework Directive · German Legislation: Act for Promoting Closed Substance Cycle Waste Management

91

Occupational Analysis: Waste Management Specialist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) has provided this document which includes an overview of general required competencies for waste management specialists. General areas of competence such as analyzing, auditing and managing waste streams are included, as well as specific tasks in each category. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

92

http://wmr.sagepub.com/ Waste Management &  

E-print Network

http://wmr.sagepub.com/ Research Waste Management & http://wmr.sagepub.com/content/13/4/363 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0734242X9501300407 1995 13: 363Waste Manag: International Solid Waste Association can be found at:Waste Management & ResearchAdditional services

93

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-print Network

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

94

Integrated waste management - Looking beyond the solid waste horizon  

SciTech Connect

Waste as a management issue has been evident for over four millennia. Disposal of waste to the biosphere has given way to thinking about, and trying to implement, an integrated waste management approach. In 1996 the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) defined 'integrated waste management' as 'a framework of reference for designing and implementing new waste management systems and for analysing and optimising existing systems'. In this paper the concept of integrated waste management as defined by UNEP is considered, along with the parameters that constitute integrated waste management. The examples used are put into four categories: (1) integration within a single medium (solid, aqueous or atmospheric wastes) by considering alternative waste management options (2) multi-media integration (solid, aqueous, atmospheric and energy wastes) by considering waste management options that can be applied to more than one medium (3) tools (regulatory, economic, voluntary and informational) and (4) agents (governmental bodies (local and national), businesses and the community). This evaluation allows guidelines for enhancing success: (1) as experience increases, it is possible to deal with a greater complexity; and (2) integrated waste management requires a holistic approach, which encompasses a life cycle understanding of products and services. This in turn requires different specialisms to be involved in the instigation and analysis of an integrated waste management system. Taken together these advance the path to sustainability.

Seadon, J.K. [School of Geography and Environmental Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand) and School of the Built Environment, Unitec New Zealand, Private Bag 92025, Auckland (New Zealand)]. E-mail: jseadon@unitec.ac.nz

2006-07-01

95

Scenarios for the Hanford immobilized Low-Activity waste (ILAW) performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the next version of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is to provide an updated estimate of the long-term human health and environmental impact of the disposal of ILAW and to compare these estimates against performance objectives displayed in Tables 1,2, and 3 (Mann 1999a). Such a radiological performance assessment is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on radioactive waste management (DOE 1988a and DOE 1999a). This document defines the scenarios that will be used for the next update of the PA that is scheduled to be issued in 2001. Since the previous performance assessment (Mann 1998) was issued, considerable additional data on waste form behavior and site-specific soil geotechnical properties have been collected. In addition, the 2001 ILAW PA will benefit from improved computer models and the experience gained from the previous performance assessment. However, the scenarios (that is, the features, events, and processes analyzed in the Performance assessment) for the next PA are very similar to the ones in the 1998 PA.

MANN, F.M.

1999-09-09

96

Modeling of common radio resource management scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we first present a systematic view on common radio resource management (CRRM) problems. Then we classify different CRRM levels and propose a categorization framework for CRRM algorithms based on their relationship to load sharing strategies. The proposed model framework based on this systematic view enables a cost-benefit analysis of different CRRM algorithms and architectures. Different centralized or

Andreas Pillekeit; Fariborz Derakhshan; Bruno Müller-clostermann

2007-01-01

97

Seventh State of the Environment Report 3.11 Waste Management 3.11 WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

Seventh State of the Environment Report ­ 3.11 Waste Management 211 3.11 WASTE MANAGEMENT 3 and Regulations (Directive 2002/96/EC on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment, Directive 2000/53/EC on End on waste management: specific types of waste (end-of-life vehicles, white goods) must be collected

Columbia University

98

SOCIOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVES: METHOLOLOGY AND DEMONSTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

A methodology for analyzing economic and social effects of alternatives in hazardous waste management is presented and demonstrated. The approach includes the use of environmental threat scenarios and evaluation of effects on and responses by parties-at-interest. The methodology ...

99

WASTE MANAGEMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND POLLUTION PREVENTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Management and Environmental Compliance Group within the Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for managing all waste generated in NMT facilities from operations with, or that support, actinide processing. These operations result in the generation of a variety of waste forms, from sanitary and salvage to radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste.

James J. Balkey; Ronald E. Wieneke

2000-01-01

100

International waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect

Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

1997-10-01

101

Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2011-08-31

102

Application of scenario technique in flood risk management.  

PubMed

It is now commonly accepted that the management of flood risks has to be fulfilled within an integrated framework. About two decades ago flood risk was managed from a limited perspective predominantly by means of structural measures aimed at flood control. In contrast integrated flood risk management incorporates the complete management cycle consisting of the phases prevention, protection and preparedness. In theory it is a well described concept. In the stage of implementation, however, there is often a lack of support although a consistent policy framework exists. Consequently, the degree of implementation must be rated as inadequate in many cases. In particular this refers to the elements which focus on preparedness and prevention. The study to which this paper refers emphasises the means and potentials of scenario technique to foster the implementation of potentially appropriate measures and new societal arrangements when applied in the framework of integrated flood risk management. A literature review is carried out to reveal the state-of-the-art and the specific problem framework within which scenario technique is generally being applied. Subsequently, it is demonstrated that scenario technique is transferable to a policy making process in flood risk management that is integrated, sustainable and interactive. The study concludes with a recommendation for three applications in which the implementation of measures of flood damage prevention and preparedness is supported by scenario technique. PMID:17851209

Winterscheid, A

2007-01-01

103

Safeguards for long-term management of radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear material safeguards parlance radioactive wastes are measured discards.'' However, the accumulation of large amounts of fissile materials in wastes over a period of time can be a safeguards concern like waste inventories in the US, which may contain more than 10 Mt of fissile materials. In addition to conventional radioactive waste forms, such as high-level wastes, transuranic wastes, and low-level wastes, spent nuclear fuel from commercial fuel cycles is now considered a radioactive waste form in the US. Spent nuclear fuels, placed in underground repositories, have the potential to become plutonium mines of the future and attractive targets for diversion or theft because of their valuable material content and decreasing radioactivity. In the context of present strategies for the disposal of these radioactive waste forms, this paper identifies some of the domestic and international safeguards issues relevant to the various proposed scenarios for the long-term management and permanent disposal of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories. Present knowledge of inventories is presented to illustrate the enormity of the problem of verifying special nuclear material contents of waste inventories in the US. Good materials management practices during the disposal phase of nuclear wastes should have elements to address issues that are identified here. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1991-01-01

104

Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's  

E-print Network

Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste and submit a chemical waste pick-up request form for proper disposal. Periodically evaluate your chemical are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO

Jia, Songtao

105

An Economic Analysis of Household Waste Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a comprehensive model of household waste management policy incorporating the possibility of waste reduction effort by the firm and the household and of illegal waste disposal by the household. When household waste reduction effort is insignificant, the first-best optimum can be achieved using various combinations of environmental tax on the firm and waste collection charge on the

Chongwoo Choe; Iain Fraser

1999-01-01

106

Radioactive Waste Management in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Ltd. (KHNP) is responsible for the management of radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plants and radioisotope (RI) users in Korea. KHNP\\/NETEC is also in charge of establishing efficient spent fuel storage for nuclear power plants. Among the research and development activities of KHNP\\/NETEC to develop advanced technologies

Myung Jae Song

2004-01-01

107

Radioactive Waste Management in Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is clearly written and concise. The report will be of considerable assistance to decision-makers, opinion formers and interested members of the general public. It will form a useful summary for a non-specialist reader who is interested in radioactive waste management practices in the OECD area, and in the current expert consensus on the subject. The explanations of the

Martin A Broderick

1996-01-01

108

Healthcare waste management in Asia  

SciTech Connect

The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

Prem Ananth, A.; Prashanthini, V. [Environmental Engineering and Management Program, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Visvanathan, C., E-mail: visu@ait.ac.t [Environmental Engineering and Management Program, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

2010-01-15

109

TMI2 waste management experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The waste management experience following the TMI-2 March 1979 accident contributed invaluable information to the nuclear power industry. Unique to the TMI-2 cleanup were the columes, types, and special problems associated with the processing, handling, storage, packaging, transportation, and disposal of radioactive material. With its highlight of unusual situations encountered during cleanup, this report provides a comprehensive look at the

C. P. Deltete; R. E. Hahn

1992-01-01

110

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22

111

National waste management infrastructure in Ghana.  

PubMed

Radioactive materials have been used in Ghana for more than four decades. Radioactive waste generated from their applications in various fields has been managed without adequate infrastructure and any legal framework to control and regulate them. The expanded use of nuclear facilities and radiation sources in Ghana with the concomitant exposure to human population necessitates effective infrastructure to deal with the increasing problems of waste. The Ghana Atomic Energy Act 204 (1963) and the Radiation Protection Instrument LI 1559 (1993) made inadequate provision for the management of waste. With the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act, PNDCL 308, a radioactive waste management centre has been established to take care of all waste in the country. To achieve the set objectives for an effective waste management regime, a waste management regulation has been drafted and relevant codes of practice are being developed to guide generators of waste, operators of waste management facilities and the regulatory authority. PMID:9915643

Darko, E O; Fletcher, J J

1998-12-01

112

Our address: UM Waste Management Services  

E-print Network

Our address: UM Waste Management Services 1655 Dean Road Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2159 Directions to the Waste Management Services shop and offices: From Central and North Campuses, by UM bus: Take down the driveway to the large garage at the end. You have arrived at UM Waste Management Services

Awtar, Shorya

113

Proposed goals for radioactive waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals are proposed for the national radioactive waste management program to establish a policy basis for the guidance and coordination of the activities of government, business, and academic organizations whose responsibility it will be to manage radioactive wastes. The report is based on findings, interpretations, and analyses of selected primary literature and interviews of personnel concerned with waste management. Public

W. P. Bishop; D. H. Frazier; I. R. Hoos; P. E. McGrath; D. S. Metlay; W. C. Stoneman; R. A. Watson

1977-01-01

114

Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

Turner, J.W. [ed.

1995-02-01

115

Implementation of SAP Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) assumed responsibility for newly generated waste on October 1, 2005. To ensure effective management and accountability of newly generated waste, Y-12 has opted to utilize SAP, Y-12's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tool, to track low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), hazardous waste, and non-regulated waste from generation through acceptance and disposal. SAP Waste will include the functionality of the current waste tracking system and integrate with the applicable modules of SAP already in use. The functionality of two legacy systems, the Generator Entry System (GES) and the Waste Information Tracking System (WITS), and peripheral spreadsheets, databases, and e-mail/fax communications will be replaced by SAP Waste. Fundamentally, SAP Waste will promote waste acceptance for certification and disposal, not storage. SAP Waste will provide a one-time data entry location where waste generators can enter waste container information, track the status of their waste, and maintain documentation. A benefit of the new system is that it will provide a single data repository where Y-12's Waste Management organization can establish waste profiles, verify and validate data, maintain inventory control utilizing hand-held data transfer devices, schedule and ship waste, manage project accounting, and report on waste handling activities. This single data repository will facilitate the production of detailed waste generation reports for use in forecasting and budgeting, provide the data for required regulatory reports, and generate metrics to evaluate the performance of the Waste Management organization and its subcontractors. SAP Waste will replace the outdated and expensive legacy system, establish tools the site needs to manage newly generated waste, and optimize the use of the site's ERP tool for integration with related business processes while promoting disposition of waste. (authors)

Frost, M.L.; LaBorde, C.M.; Nichols, C.D. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01

116

Regional solid waste management study  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the Lower Savannah Council of Governments (LSCOG) began dialogue with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding possibilities for cooperation and coordination of solid waste management practices among the local governments and the Savannah River Site. The Department of Energy eventually awarded a grant to the Lower Savannah Council of Governments for the development of a study, which was initiated on March 5, 1992. After careful analysis of the region`s solid waste needs, this study indicates a network approach to solid waste management to be the most viable. The network involves the following major components: (1) Rural Collection Centers, designed to provide convenience to rural citizens, while allowing some degree of participation in recycling; (2) Rural Drop-Off Centers, designed to give a greater level of education and recycling activity; (3) Inert landfills and composting centers, designed to reduce volumes going into municipal (Subtitle D) landfills and produce useable products from yard waste; (4) Transfer Stations, ultimate landfill disposal; (5) Materials Recovery Facilities, designed to separate recyclables into useable and sellable units, and (6) Subtitle D landfill for burial of all solid waste not treated through previous means.

Not Available

1992-09-01

117

Role of NGOs and CBOs in Waste Management  

PubMed Central

Background Developing cities like Khulna, the third largest metropolitan city in Bangladesh, have now begun to confess the environmental and public health risks associated with uncontrolled dumping of solid wastes mainly due to the active participation of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) in municipal solid waste (MSW) management. Methods: A survey was conducted to observe the present scenarios of secondary disposal site (SDS), ultimate disposal site (UDS), composting plants, medical wastes management and NGOs and CBOs MSW management activities. Results: A total of 22 NGOs and CBOs are involved in MSW management in 31 wards of Khulna City Corporation. About 9 to 12% of total generated wastes are collected by door-to-door collection system provided by mainly NGOs and CBOs using 71 non-motorized rickshaw vans. A major portion of collected wastes is disposed to the nearest SDS by these organizations and then transferred to UDS or to private low-lying lands from there by the city authority. A small portion of organic wastes is going to the composting plants of NGOs. Conclusion: The participation of NGOs and CBOs has improved the overall MSW management system, especially waste collection process from sources and able to motivate the residents to store the waste properly and to keep clean the premises. PMID:23113191

Ahsan, A; Alamgir, M; Imteaz, M; Nik Daud, NN; Islam, R

2012-01-01

118

Nuclear waste management  

SciTech Connect

Several recent congressional and executive proposals address the political problem posed by nuclear wastes. The proposals are divided into three categories on the basis of the degree of authority granted to state officials in siting decisions: those granting states a veto power, those providing for consultation with state officials during planning, and those leaving plenary authority in the hands of the Federal goverment. Legislative proposals are discussed under these categories. The most-balanced approach provides a formal role for state officials without granting the states an absolute veto. This solution provides a political outlet for local concern and ensures a wider range of views. It also avoids the problem, inherent in the state veto, of sacrificing the national interest in selecting the safest possible disposal site. 69 references.

Frankel, D.R.

1980-01-01

119

Solid waste management in Japan  

SciTech Connect

On Friday 17 June 1994, as the invited speaker of the International Congress of IWM/ISWA at Torbay, UK the author presented a paper of {open_quotes}A framework for success: the role of legislation{close_quotes}. THis was to introduce the amendment of Waste Disposal Cleansing Law and the Basic Environment Law in 1991, but the combination of the two amended laws has enforced promoting and assisting the fulfillment of the responsibilities of corporations and citizens. In addition to such presentation, the author pointed out a new manner of solid waste management (SWM) in Japan.

Naito, S.

1995-09-01

120

Managing Risk in Disaster Scenarios with Autonomous Robots  

E-print Network

.stormont@aggiemail.usu.edu; vicki.allan@usu.edu Abstract-- Disaster areas are one of the most challenging environments faced1 Managing Risk in Disaster Scenarios with Autonomous Robots Daniel P. Stormont and Vicki H. Allan. Prepositioned autonomous rescue robots offer promise in assisting the first responders to a disaster site

Allan, Vicki H.

121

Managing Risk in Disaster Scenarios with Autonomous Robots  

E-print Network

.stormont@aggiemail.usu.edu; vicki.allan@usu.edu Abstract-- Disaster areas are one of the most challenging environments facedManaging Risk in Disaster Scenarios with Autonomous Robots Daniel P. Stormont and Vicki H. Allan. Prepositioned autonomous rescue robots offer promise in assisting the first responders to a disaster site

Allan, Vicki H.

122

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17

123

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01

124

US Department of Energy: Waste Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management's goals include minimizing the waste generated by DOE, and pursuing compliance with all applicable environmental regulations. The Waste Management Web site contains information on how the DOE directs the treatment, storage, and disposal of waste generated by DOE's activities, nuclear and otherwise. A whole host of reports and other informational products such as the Standard Operating Practices and Procedures link and Waste Management Privatization information is available.

125

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31

126

A PROBABILISTIC DERIVATION OF WASTE CONCENTRATION LIMITS FOR THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITES AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Microsoft Academic Search

A probabilistic approach to performance assessment was used to derive waste concentration limits for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Probabilistic techniques employed in the performance assessments include probabilistic treatment of parameter uncertainty, the occurrence of inadvertent human intrusion scenarios, and the longevity of institutional controls. Site- specific and probabilistic

Greg Shott; Vefa Yucel; Paul Black; Beth Moore

127

Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-12-29

128

Local waste management constraints and waste administrators in China.  

PubMed

Local level waste authorities and their officials directly interact and serve the people on behalf of higher governments. Given the influential positions they have on the quality of life of the citizens, these local waste authorities deserve more attention from researchers. This study throws light on the factors related to local waste management and administrators that have caused waste management failures in three mainland Chinese cities. Based on a survey conducted in 2002-2003, it was found that waste administrators in these cities are not professionally competent in their jobs and they are also not confident in using economic instruments to address waste management issues in their cities. These local waste authorities are generally under-funded, and funding politics has to some extent eroded the incentives to carry out the instructions of higher waste authorities. The community at large also does not respect local waste management work. The residents frequently litter, are unobservant of waste collection times and are unwilling to pay for waste collection service. All of these are handicapping environmentally sound waste management. PMID:17280826

Chung, Shan Shan; Lo, Carlos W H

2008-01-01

129

Electronic waste management approaches: An overview  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: ? Human toxicity of hazardous substances in e-waste. ? Environmental impacts of e-waste from disposal processes. ? Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) to and solve e-waste problems. ? Key issues relating to tools managing e-waste for sustainable e-waste management. - Abstract: Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems.

Kiddee, Peeranart [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Wong, Ming H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (China)

2013-05-15

130

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order to...

2013-10-01

131

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order to...

2010-10-01

132

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order to...

2011-10-01

133

Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE  

E-print Network

Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Arizona State University Management, generate a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. ASU is classified as a hazardous waste generator & Safety is responsible for coordinating an effective hazardous waste management program for university

Reisslein, Martin

134

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order to...

2014-10-01

135

45 CFR 671.13 - Waste management for the USAP.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Waste management for the USAP. 671.13 Section 671...NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.13 Waste management for the USAP. (a) In order to...

2012-10-01

136

Healthcare waste management: Current practices in selected healthcare facilities, Botswana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare waste management continues to present an array of challenges for developing countries, and Botswana is no exception. The possible impact of healthcare waste on public health and the environment has received a lot of attention such that Waste Management dedicated a special issue to the management of healthcare waste (Healthcare Wastes Management, 2005. Waste Management 25(6) 567–665). As the

Bontle Mbongwe; Baagi T. Mmereki; Andrew Magashula

2008-01-01

137

Aerospace vehicle water-waste management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The collection and disposal of human wastes, such as urine and feces, in a spacecraft environment are performed in an aesthetic and reliable manner to prevent degradation of crew performance. The waste management system controls, transfers, and processes materials such as feces, emesis, food residues, used expendables, and other wastes. The requirements, collection, transport, and waste processing are described.

Pecoraro, J. N.

1973-01-01

138

Waste Management World November/December 2005  

E-print Network

Waste Management World November/December 2005 The European position By Ella Stengler November 2, 2005 Where is waste-to-energy, and where is it going? A WTE plant in Mallorca, Spain. European plants of wastes at waste-to-energy plants each year, generating an amount of energy that can supply electricity

Columbia University

139

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICY IN ROMANIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioactive waste management is a key issue of the environmental policy of our company. According to the Romanian Nuclear Act (Law 111\\/1996) and the Law of the Environmental Protection (Law 137\\/1996) the owner is responsible for the management of all radioactive wastes streams at the Nuclear Power Plant, including the technical and cost components. For radioactive waste disposal and plant

V. Andrei; F. Glodeanu; D. Popescu; I. Rotaru

2000-01-01

140

Solid waste management in Abuja, Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new city of Abuja provided an opportunity to avoid some of the environmental problems associated with other major cities in Africa. The current status of solid waste management in Abuja has been reviewed and recommendations for improvements are made. The existing solid waste management system is affected by unfavourable economic, institutional, legislative, technical and operational constraints. A reliable waste

A. Imam; B. Mohammed; D. C. Wilson; C. R. Cheeseman

2008-01-01

141

Multi-criteria analysis for the determination of the best WEEE management scenario in Cyprus.  

PubMed

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) constitutes one of the most complicated solid waste streams in terms of its composition, and, as a result, it is difficult to be effectively managed. In view of the environmental problems derived from WEEE management, many countries have established national legislation to improve the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of this waste stream so as to apply suitable management schemes. In this work, alternative systems are examined for the WEEE management in Cyprus. These systems are evaluated by developing and applying the Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method PROMETHEE. In particular, through this MCDM method, 12 alternative management systems were compared and ranked according to their performance and efficiency. The obtained results show that the management schemes/systems based on partial disassembly are the most suitable for implementation in Cyprus. More specifically, the optimum scenario/system that can be implemented in Cyprus is that of partial disassembly and forwarding of recyclable materials to the native existing market and disposal of the residues at landfill sites. PMID:18262405

Rousis, K; Moustakas, K; Malamis, S; Papadopoulos, A; Loizidou, M

2008-01-01

142

Multi-criteria analysis for the determination of the best WEEE management scenario in Cyprus  

SciTech Connect

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) constitutes one of the most complicated solid waste streams in terms of its composition, and, as a result, it is difficult to be effectively managed. In view of the environmental problems derived from WEEE management, many countries have established national legislation to improve the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of this waste stream so as to apply suitable management schemes. In this work, alternative systems are examined for the WEEE management in Cyprus. These systems are evaluated by developing and applying the Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method PROMETHEE. In particular, through this MCDM method, 12 alternative management systems were compared and ranked according to their performance and efficiency. The obtained results show that the management schemes/systems based on partial disassembly are the most suitable for implementation in Cyprus. More specifically, the optimum scenario/system that can be implemented in Cyprus is that of partial disassembly and forwarding of recyclable materials to the native existing market and disposal of the residues at landfill sites.

Rousis, K.; Moustakas, K. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece); Malamis, S. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: smalamis@central.ntua.gr; Papadopoulos, A.; Loizidou, M. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, 9, Heroon Polytechniou St., Zographou Campus, P.C. 15773 Athens (Greece)

2008-07-01

143

Disaster waste management: A review article  

SciTech Connect

Depending on their nature and severity, disasters can create large volumes of debris and waste. The waste can overwhelm existing solid waste management facilities and impact on other emergency response and recovery activities. If poorly managed, the waste can have significant environmental and public health impacts and can affect the overall recovery process. This paper presents a system overview of disaster waste management based on existing literature. The main literature available to date comprises disaster waste management plans or guidelines and isolated case studies. There is ample discussion on technical management options such as temporary storage sites, recycling, disposal, etc.; however, there is little or no guidance on how these various management options are selected post-disaster. The literature does not specifically address the impact or appropriateness of existing legislation, organisational structures and funding mechanisms on disaster waste management programmes, nor does it satisfactorily cover the social impact of disaster waste management programmes. It is envisaged that the discussion presented in this paper, and the literature gaps identified, will form a basis for future comprehensive and cohesive research on disaster waste management. In turn, research will lead to better preparedness and response to disaster waste management problems.

Brown, Charlotte, E-mail: charlotte.brown@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Milke, Mark, E-mail: mark.milke@canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Seville, Erica, E-mail: erica.seville@canterbury.ac.nz [University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand)

2011-06-15

144

SYNERGIA Forum Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management  

E-print Network

"Why is incineration a necessary cornerstone of a successful waste recycling?" *Bernd Bilitewski, Managing Director CEWEP Confederation of European Waste toEnergy Plants "WtERT Germany, WTE Plants in Germany" Michael Jakuttis, Dipl.Ing. Wt

Columbia University

145

Solid waste management problems in secondary schools in Ibadan, Nigeria.  

PubMed

Inappropriate solid waste management practices in schools in less-developed countries, particularly in major urban communities, constitute one of the major factors leading to declining environmental health conditions. The objective of the authors' descriptive, cross-sectional study was to assess solid waste management problems in selected urban schools in Ibadan, Nigeria. Eight secondary schools with average pupil populations not less than 500 per school were selected randomly. Four hundred questionnaires (50 per school) were administered. In addition, an observational checklist was used to assess the physical environment. Paper and plastics were the most frequently generated wastes. Common methods of solid waste disposal reported were use of dustbins for collection and open burning. Major problems perceived with current refuse disposal methods by the study students were odors, pest infestation, and spillages. Littering and spillages of solid waste were also common features reported. Data suggested inadequate waste management facilities and practices in study schools. The lack of refuse bins may have contributed to waste spillages and the burning practices. Odors may have arisen from both the decay of overstored organic waste rich in moisture and emissions from refuse burning. This scenario poses a community environmental health nuisance and may compromise school environmental quality. PMID:21949981

Ana, G R E E; Oloruntoba, E O; Shendell, D; Elemile, O O; Benjamin, O R; Sridhar, M K C

2011-09-01

146

An optimization scenario methodology for bank asset liability management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asset-liability management is one of the most important issues in bank strategic planning. This study presents an ALM methodology\\u000a in a stochastic interest-rate environment. The intention is to develop an optimization tool for interest rate scenarios and\\u000a to determine the optimal balance among profitability, risk, liquidity and other uncertainties by considering several goals,\\u000a such as the maximization of returns, the

Kosmidou Kyriaki; Constantin Zopounidis

2002-01-01

147

Management of municipal solid waste incineration residues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of residues from thermal waste treatment is an integral part of waste management systems. The primary goal of managing incineration residues is to prevent any impact on our health or environment caused by unacceptable particulate, gaseous and\\/or solute emissions. This paper provides insight into the most important measures for putting this requirement into practice. It also offers an

T. Sabbas; A. Polettini; R. Pomi; T. Astrup; O. Hjelmar; P. Mostbauer; G. Cappai; G. Magel; S. Salhofer; C. Speiser; S. Heuss-Assbichler; R. Klein; P Lechner

2003-01-01

148

Waste Management Technician Partnership Program. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report for Columbia Basin College's waste management technician partnership program outlines 4 objectives: (1) develop at least 4 waste management competency-based curriculum modules; (2) have 50 participants complete at least 1 module; (3) have 100 participants complete a training and/or certification program and 200 managers complete…

Campbell, Donna

149

The Integrated Waste Tracking System - A Flexible Waste Management Tool  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has fully embraced a flexible, computer-based tool to help increase waste management efficiency and integrate multiple operational functions from waste generation through waste disposition while reducing cost. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS)provides comprehensive information management for containerized waste during generation,storage, treatment, transport, and disposal. The IWTS provides all information necessary for facilities to properly manage and demonstrate regulatory compliance. As a platformindependent, client-server and Web-based inventory and compliance system, the IWTS has proven to be a successful tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of management flexibility.

Anderson, Robert Stephen

2001-02-01

150

E-Waste Management and Challenges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

E-Waste is one of the silent degraders of the environment in the fast-growing world. This paper explores briefly the ultra-modern problem of E-Waste. After enumerating the causes and effects of the E-Waste, it focuses on management of the E-waste using modern techniques. The paper also deals with the responsibilities of the governments, industries and citizens in reducing E-waste.

Narayanan, S.; Kumar, K. Ram

2010-11-01

151

E-Waste Management and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-Waste is one of the silent degraders of the environment in the fast-growing world. This paper explores briefly the ultra-modern problem of E-Waste. After enumerating the causes and effects of the E-Waste, it focuses on management of the E-waste using modern techniques. The paper also deals with the responsibilities of the governments, industries and citizens in reducing E-waste.

S. Narayanan; K. Ram Kumar

2010-01-01

152

Life Cycle Management of Municipal Solid Waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Life-cycle assessment concepts and methods are currently being applied to evaluate integrated municipal solid waste management\\u000a strategies throughout the world. The Research Triangle Institute and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are working\\u000a to develop a computer-based decision support tool to evaluate integrated municipal solid waste management strategies in the\\u000a United States. The waste management unit processes included in this tool

Keith Weitz; Morton Barlaz; Ranji Ranjithan; Downey Brill; Susan Thorneloe; Robert Ham

1999-01-01

153

Risk management and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect

This book analyses the treatment of uncertainties within risk management and regulation for hazardous wastes, in five national case-studies. It is shown that, although institutional uncertainties vary between national political cultures, regulatory bureaucracies everywhere understate these more fundamental uncertainties (which are often structural conflicts, of different rationalities) and define them instead as marginal technical uncertainties or imprecision in risk-definitions. Close comparative analysis shows that technical regulatory standards depend upon their local institutional setting in systematic ways, so that conventional regulatory emphasis on technical precision or standardisation should be replaced by greater social negotiation, and educated public involvement and control.

Wynne, B.

1987-01-01

154

Agricultural water management scenarios to protect groundwater-dependent ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater pumping, even if only seasonal, may significantly impact groundwater dependent ecosystems through increased streamflow depletion, particularly in semi-arid and arid regions. The effects are exacerbated, under some conditions, by climate change. In this work we combine different tools to evaluate impact of water management scenarios in an agricultural basin. Here we first develop a spatio-temporally distributed soil water budget model that we couple with an analytical model for stream depletion from groundwater pumping to rapidly assess seasonal impacts of groundwater pumping on streamflow during critical low flow periods. In a second step, the water budget model is used to provide recharge and pumping values for each field as input for a valley-wide groundwater model developed with MODFLOW-2005. Results of the simulations obtained by means of the simple coupled soil water budget model/analytical model have been used to select and design with the engagement of stakeholders feasible management scenarios. The latter have been implemented in the numerical groundwater model. Results and insights from both modelling approaches are discussed. We demonstrate the applicability of the analysis for the Scott Valley in Northern California, where protected salmon depend on summer streamflow fed by cool groundwater. In this example, simulations obtained with the two approaches suggest that increased recharge in the period immediately preceding the critical low streamflow season, and transfer of groundwater pumping away from the stream are potentially promising tools to address ecosystem concerns, albeit raising difficult infrastructure and water trading issues. In contrast, additional winter recharge at the expense of later spring recharge, whether intentional or driven by climate may reduce summer streamflows. Results suggests that the coupled soil water mass balance - stream depletion function approach provides a viable tool for scenario development among stakeholders, to constructively inform the search for potential solutions, and to direct more detailed, complex site specific feasibility studies. The further implementation of the management scenarios into the numerical groundwater model provides details on the local impact of the results and more insights about specific data collection and needed infrastructures in order to practically develop the management scenarios.

Foglia, Laura; Harter, Thomas

2014-05-01

155

Assay and RTR of solid waste management received TRU waste  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) provides storage of Transuranic (TRU) and Transuranic Mixed (TRUM) waste from U.S. DOD and DOE offsite and onsite generators. In addition to storage, TRUSAF also performs assay and RTR (real time radiography) on each TRU drum with the intent of certification of the waste to WIPP-WAC (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria) to allow eventual disposal of the TRU waste at WIPP. Due to the uncertainties associated with WIPP-WAC and the potential for all TRU WIPP-WAC certification at the generator or WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) facility, this study documents the requirements for TRU assay and RTR of all incoming TRU drums and establishes SWM (Solid Waste Management) policy on future assay and RTR of received TRU waste.

Irwin, R.M.

1995-11-01

156

Technology Roadmapping for Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Technology roadmapping can be an effective strategic technology planning tool. This paper describes a process for customizing a generic technology roadmapping process. Starting with a generic process reduces the learning curve and speeds up the roadmap development. Similarly, starting with a generic domain model provides leverage across multiple applications or situations within the domain. A process that combines these two approaches facilitates identifying technology gaps and determining common core technologies that can be reused for multiple applications or situations within the domain. This paper describes both of these processes and how they can be integrated. A core team and a number of technology working groups develop the technology roadmap, which includes critical system requirements and targets, technology areas and metrics for each area, and identifies and evaluates possible technology alternatives to recommend the most appropriate ones to pursue. A generalized waste management model, generated by considering multiple situations or applications in terms of a generic waste management model, provides the domain requirements for the technology roadmapping process. Finally, the paper discusses lessons learns from a number of roadmapping projects.

Bray, O.

2003-02-26

157

The mixed waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

Streit, R.D.

1995-10-01

158

Principles of integrated solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

As a recognized expert in the field, the author presents a review and expanded discussion about the policies, politics, regulations, technologies, systems, and practices of integrated solid waste management. Written from a practitioner`s point of view, the book takes a no nonsense approach to the practicalities and realities of planning, designing, and managing integrated solid waste management systems. Readers will learn the fundamentals of design and the principles for each method and practice of integrated municipal solid waste management. Contents include: policies and roles; legislation and regulations; planning, management, organization, financing; collection principles and systems design; transfer station principles and facility design; recycling principles and facility design; composting principles and facility design; waste-to-energy principles and facility design; landfill principles and facility design; managing special and construction/demolition wastes.

Hickman, H.L. Jr.

1999-08-01

159

Characterization of raw and stabilized waste in relation to toxic metals mobility in realistic landfilling scenarios.  

PubMed

Toxic metal release in simple leaching tests has been studied in this paper to assess waste behaviour in realistic landfilling scenarios. The waste is a galvanic sludge, raw or cement stabilized. Six different leachants were taken into account: distilled water, CO2-saturated solution, Olsen solution, Mehlich No. 3 solution, acid or alkaline soil circulating solution. Dynamic leaching tests of different duration were used for raw and stabilized waste. The results have shown that, with the exception of Mehlich No. 3 solution, when the waste comes into contact with waters of composition similar to that of the solutions studied, the potential environmental contamination should not be of concern. PMID:16398346

Buondonno, Andrea; Cioffi, Raffaele; Santoro, Luciano

2005-01-01

160

Management of small producers waste in Slovenia  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Radioactive materials are extensively used in Slovenia in various fields and applications in medicine, industry and research. For the managing of radioactive waste raised from these establishments the Agency for radwaste management (ARAO) was authorised as the state public service of managing the radioactive waste in 1999. The public service of the radioactive waste of small producers in Slovenia is performed in line with the Governmental decree on the Mode, Subject and Terms of Performing the Public Service of Radioactive Waste Management (Official Gazette RS No. 32/99). According to the Decree the scope of the public service includes: 'collection of the waste from small producers at the producers' premises and its transportation to the storage facility for treatment, storing and disposal', 'acceptance of radioactive waste in case of emergency situation on the premises, in case of transport accidents or some other accidents', 'acceptance of radioactive waste in cases when the producer is unknown', 'management (collection, transport, pre-treatment, storing, together with QA and radiation protection measures) of radioactive waste', 'treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste for storing and disposal', and 'operating of the Central Interim Storage for LIL waste from small producers'. After taking over the performing of the public service, ARAO first started with the project for refurbishment and modernization of the Central Interim Storage Facility, including improvements of the storage utilization and rearrangement of the stored waste. (authors)

Fabjan, Marija; Rojc, Joze [Agency for Radwaste Management, Parmova 53, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2007-07-01

161

Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

Spooner, Charles S.

162

Gardening waste management - case study: Tehran - Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wastes are unwanted products in human life as well as inseparable part of every process resulted in various sectors such as agriculture and gardening. Agriculture in Iran produces more than 80% of the country's food supply; therefore, it is one of the main producers of the wastes. This shows the importance of agricultural Losses and waste management. Consequently, a case

H. F. Ahmadi; A. Rezaee; Q. Miraki

2010-01-01

163

Solid Waste Management Practices in EBRP Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Louisiana school district has made tremendous progress toward developing and implementing an environmentally friendly solid waste management program. Packaging changes in school food service, newspaper and aluminum can recycling, and composting of leaf and yard waste have contributed to reduced waste sent to the local landfill. (MLF)

Mann, Nadine L.

1994-01-01

164

Editor's Page: Management of Hazardous Wastes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed is the problem of management of hazardous waste disposal. Included are various federal laws and congressional kills pertinent to the problem of hazardous waste disposal. Suggested is cooperation between government and the chemical industry to work for a comprehensive solution to waste disposal. (DS)

Chemical and Engineering News, 1980

1980-01-01

165

Land treatment, a hazardous waste management alternative  

SciTech Connect

This book contains chapters on the following subjects Health risk assessments for hazardous waste-an overview; land treatment as a waste management technology, rend treatment practices in the petroleum industry, the land treatability of appendix VIII, organic presented in petroleum industry wastes.

Loehr, R.C.; Malina, J.F. Jr.

1986-01-01

166

An Integrated Framework for Evaluating Leaching in Waste Management and Utilization of Secondary Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

A framework for the evaluation of inorganic constituent leaching from wastes and secondary materials is presented. The framework is based on the measurement of intrinsic leaching properties of the material in conjunction with mathematical modeling to estimate release under field management scenarios. Site specific and default scenarios are considered, which may be selected based on the evaluation context. A tiered

D. S. Kosson; F. Sanchez; A. C. Garrabrants

2002-01-01

167

Charging generators for waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of a plan to charge waste management costs to the facility that generates such waste requires a long-term commitment and consistent administration. The benefit is that generators are provided the incentive to optimize waste management practices if the charges are appropriately applied. This paper summarizes (1) a plan to charge waste generators, (2) the administrative structure of the plan, (3) a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and (4) issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

1988-01-01

168

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01

169

Application of processed organic municipal solid waste on agricultural land – a scenario analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Source separation, composting and anaerobic digestion, with associated land application, are increasingly being considered\\u000a as alternative waste management strategies to landfilling and incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW). Environmental life\\u000a cycle assessments are a useful tool in political decision-making about waste management strategies. However, due to the diversity\\u000a of processed organic MSW and the situations in which it can be

Sander Bruun; Trine Lund Hansen; Thomas H. Christensen; Jakob Magid; Lars S. Jensen

2006-01-01

170

Optimal waste-to-energy strategy assisted by GIS For sustainable solid waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has become more complex and costly with the rapid socio-economic development and increased volume of waste. Planning a sustainable regional waste management strategy is a critical step for the decision maker. There is a great potential for MSW to be used for the generation of renewable energy through waste incineration or landfilling with gas capture system. However, due to high processing cost and cost of resource transportation and distribution throughout the waste collection station and power plant, MSW is mostly disposed in the landfill. This paper presents an optimization model incorporated with GIS data inputs for MSW management. The model can design the multi-period waste-to-energy (WTE) strategy to illustrate the economic potential and tradeoffs for MSW management under different scenarios. The model is capable of predicting the optimal generation, capacity, type of WTE conversion technology and location for the operation and construction of new WTE power plants to satisfy the increased energy demand by 2025 in the most profitable way. Iskandar Malaysia region was chosen as the model city for this study.

Tan, S. T.; Hashim, H.

2014-02-01

171

75 FR 11002 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EPA-R04-RCRA-2008-0900; FRL-9124-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

2010-03-10

172

The Orbital Workshop Waste Management Compartment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image is a wide-angle view of the Orbital Workshop waste management compartment. The waste management facilities presented a unique challenge to spacecraft designers. In addition to collection of liquid and solid human wastes, there was a medical requirement to dry all solid human waste products and to return the residue to Earth for examination. Liquid human waste (urine) was frozen for return to Earth. Total quantities of each astronaut's liquid and solid wastes were precisely measured. Cabin air was drawn into the toilet, shown on the wall at right in this photograph, and over the waste products to generate a flow of the waste in the desired direction. The air was then filtered for odor control and antiseptic purposes prior to being discharged back into the cabin.

1972-01-01

173

1995 Baseline solid waste management system description  

SciTech Connect

This provides a detailed solid waste system description that documents the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) strategy for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and greater-than-Class III waste. This system description is intended for use by managers of the solid waste program, facility and system planners, as well as system modelers. The system description identifies the TSD facilities that constitute the solid waste system and defines these facilities` interfaces, schedules, and capacities. It also provides the strategy for treating each of the waste streams generated or received by the Hanford Site from generation or receipt through final destination.

Anderson, G.S.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

1995-09-01

174

Scenario analysis of the benefit of municipal organic-waste composting over landfill, Cambodia.  

PubMed

This paper presents insight into the benefits of organic waste recycling through composting over landfill, in terms of landfill life extension, compost product, and mitigation of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Future waste generation from 2003 to 2020 was forecast, and five scenarios of organic waste recycling in the municipality of Phnom Penh (MPP), Cambodia, were carried out. Organic waste-specifically food and garden waste-was used for composting, and the remaining waste was landfilled. The recycling scenarios were set based on organic waste generated from difference sources: households, restaurants, shops, markets, schools, hotels, offices, and street sweeping. Through the five scenarios, the minimum volume reductions of waste disposal were about 56, 123, and 219 m(3) d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, whereas the maximum volume reductions in these years were about 325, 643, and 1025 m(3) d(-1). These volume reductions reflect a landfill life extension of a minimum of half a year and a maximum of about four years. Compost product could be produced at a minimum of 14, 30, and 54 tons d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, and at a maximum in those years of about 80, 158, and 252 tons d(-1). At the same time benefit is gained in compost product, GHG emissions could be reduced by a minimum of 12.8% and a maximum of 65.0% from 2003 to 2020. This means about 3.23 (minimum) and 5.79 million tons CO(2)eq (maximum) contributed to GHG mitigation. In this regard, it is strongly recommended that MPP should try to initiate an organic-waste recycling strategy in a best fit scenario. PMID:23168253

Seng, Bunrith; Hirayama, Kimiaki; Katayama-Hirayama, Keiko; Ochiai, Satoru; Kaneko, Hidehiro

2013-01-15

175

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, April 1984-September 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; and supporting studies. 33 figures, 13 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1984-12-01

176

GENERIC DEGRADATION SCENARIO AND CONFIGURATION ANALYSIS FOR DOE CODISPOSAL WASTE PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to develop a generic set of degradation scenarios and associated configurations for various Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package (WP). The degradation takes place inside the WP. These scenarios and configurations are developed as refinements of the standard degradation scenarios and potentially critical configuration classes given in Section 3.1 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (Ref. 1). Certain degradation scenarios and configurations will change when EDA II design is baselined. In accordance with AP-3.10Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, a work direction was developed, issued, and used in the preparation of this document (Ref. 13, p. 7).

S.F. A. Deng

1999-11-10

177

World terends in municipal solid waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The philosophy of the Waste Management Hierarchy (prevention\\/minimization, materials recovery, incineration and landfill) has been adopted by most industrialized nations as the menu for developing municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategies. The extent to which any one option is used within a given country (or region) varies depending on a large number of factors, including topography, population density, transportation infrastructures,

S. Sakai; S. E. Sawell; A. J. Chandler; T. T. Eighmy; D. S. Kosson; J. Vehlow; H. A. van der Sloot; J. Hartlén; O. Hjelmar

1996-01-01

178

Hazardous waste management for the 80's  

SciTech Connect

This book provides practical, usable information and data to engineers and scientists, government agencies and lawyers and others who manage waste-generating organizations. Critical issues in hazardous waste management are discussed: ground water and seepage; treatment, storage an disposal; site cleanup, and safety and legal considerations. 189 references, 109 figures, 46 tables.

Sweeney, T.L.; Bhatt, H.G.; Sykes, R.M.; Sproul, O.J. (eds.)

1982-01-01

179

Elements of a radioactive waste management course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The demand for scientists, engineers, and technicians with expertise in radioactive waste management is growing rapidly. Many universities, government agencies, and private contractors are developing courses in radioactive waste management. Two such courses have been developed at The Ohio State University. In support of that course development, two surveys were conducted. One survey went to all nuclear engineering programs in

Fentiman

1994-01-01

180

Radioactive waste management: 1963-1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

A broad-brush description of radioactive waste management over the past twenty-one years is given. It is set in the context of statutory requirements of the Radioactive Substance Act 1960, which became law in 1983. The Act is looked at critically and an attempt is made to demonstrate that where there were failings in the field of waste management, these were

B R Hookway

1984-01-01

181

The Virginia Yard-Waste Management Manual  

E-print Network

The Virginia Yard-Waste Management Manual Second Edition PUBLICATION 452-055 #12;#12;The Virginia Yard-Waste Management Manual Second Edition Prepared by: Gregory K. Evanylo, Caroline A. Sherony, James Sciences Virginia Tech Blacksburg, Virginia Editor: Nancy Templeman Layout: Chris Cox Cover and Equipment

Liskiewicz, Maciej

182

LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION  

E-print Network

L b b b L h b L i LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUNf"+ Ministry of Environment,-" ~y!==- Lands and Parks O& kdi Ministry of Agriculture, m Fisheries and Food `-w . L / . #12;L LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA JULY 1995

183

2007 Site environmental report xvi the environmental and Waste Management  

E-print Network

2007 Site environmental report xvi the environmental and Waste Management services Division field Division radiological Control Division lead chapter authors environmental and waste management services contributors environmental and waste management services division Arland Carsten, Consultant Mark Davis George

184

77 FR 26991 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...3150-AI92 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management'' (76 FR 50500; August...Assessment Directorate, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2012-05-08

185

77 FR 10401 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRC-2011-0012] Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...assessment as part of its radioactive waste management decision-making. The DOE...Assessment Directorate, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2012-02-22

186

WASTE PACKAGING MANAGEMENT IN REPUBLIC OF CROATIA  

E-print Network

By reason of the deposit model of the Ordinance on Packaging and Packaging Waste nearly the total beverage packaging waste is collected and recovered. Collectors, transporters and recyclers are designated by the Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency Fund. Its duty is to pay for collection and transport, so the Fund is the owner of all gathered waste. The paper explains the waste packaging management system in Republic of Croatia.

Maja Rujni?-sokele; Mladen Šercer; Ana Pilipovi?

187

1996 Global nuclear waste management and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Backend and waste activities in major nuclear countries and selected non-nuclear countries during 1996 are summarized. Nuclear program and major waste projects are very briefly described for each country listed. Social, political, and economic issues affecting waste management and disposal are noted. Public relations activities of the nuclear industry, including hearings, committee meetings, and educational programs, to increase public acceptance of waste projects are also described.

NONE

1997-02-01

188

Integrated waste management via the Natural Laws  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The basic tools of engineering, energy and material balances and rate expressions, provide a pathway to apply the Natural Laws of Hazardous Waste for proper waste management. Overall, one must focus on nature's limits, which are discussed, using open minded engineering practices for proper waste management. By expansion of balance concepts beyond ‘end-of-pipe’ and integrating concepts beyond basic life-cycles,

W. David Constant; Louis J. Thibodeaux

1993-01-01

189

Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.  

PubMed

A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

2006-09-01

190

Practical Tips for Managing Challenging Scenarios in Undergraduate Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) has been involved in a number of new initiatives as of late, and one such project is the "Resources for Undergraduate Research". This series brings together topical information on new research methods and strategies for working with undergraduate students on a number of mathematical endeavors. This particular paper looks at how to best manage different scenarios that might arise during the research advising process. Authored by Sarah Adams and Darren A. Narayan, this document is based on solutions discussed by a group of faculty members that participated in the 2008 Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics Workshop. The five-page document discusses five specific scenarios that might occur (including what might be done if a student tends to dominate or control a group project) and offers some specific and concrete solutions to such difficulties. The scenarios discussed could occur in more than just college math classrooms, so this document is broadly relevant for many groups of educators.

Bailey, Brad

2009-01-01

191

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15

192

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey.  

PubMed

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management. PMID:18280731

Banar, Mufide; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun

2009-01-01

193

77 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FRL-9730-5] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) Analytical...using the ``landfill'' waste management unit (WMU) input, but...

2012-09-20

194

Assessment methods for solid waste management: A literature review.  

PubMed

Assessment methods are common tools to support decisions regarding waste management. The objective of this review article is to provide guidance for the selection of appropriate evaluation methods. For this purpose, frequently used assessment methods are reviewed, categorised, and summarised. In total, 151 studies have been considered in view of their goals, methodologies, systems investigated, and results regarding economic, environmental, and social issues. A goal shared by all studies is the support of stakeholders. Most studies are based on life cycle assessments, multi-criteria-decision-making, cost-benefit analysis, risk assessments, and benchmarking. Approximately 40% of the reviewed articles are life cycle assessment-based; and more than 50% apply scenario analysis to identify the best waste management options. Most studies focus on municipal solid waste and consider specific environmental loadings. Economic aspects are considered by approximately 50% of the studies, and only a small number evaluate social aspects. The choice of system elements and boundaries varies significantly among the studies; thus, assessment results are sometimes contradictory. Based on the results of this review, we recommend the following considerations when assessing waste management systems: (i) a mass balance approach based on a rigid input-output analysis of the entire system, (ii) a goal-oriented evaluation of the results of the mass balance, which takes into account the intended waste management objectives; and (iii) a transparent and reproducible presentation of the methodology, data, and results. PMID:24895080

Allesch, Astrid; Brunner, Paul H

2014-06-01

195

Scenarios for consequence assessments of radioactive-waste repositories at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the construction and preliminary analysis of nearly 4000 scenarios for the release of radioactive waste from a hypothetical repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site. Preliminary analyses were carried out for four rock units: the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Formation, the bedded tuffs of the Calico Hills, and the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Formation. Only a few of the scenarios were found to have appreciable probabilities of occurrence. Preliminary modeling of certain possible release mechanisms shows that convective cells can form in saturated tuff. The scenarios can be used to guide future consequence analyses and exploratory programs.

Hunter, R.L.; Barr, G.E.; Bingham, F.W.

1983-03-01

196

Biomedical waste management operating plan. Revision D  

SciTech Connect

Recent national incidents involving medical and/or infectious wastes indicated the need for tighter control of medical wastes. Within the last five years, improper management of medical waste resulted in the spread of disease, reuse of needles by drug addicts, and the closing of large sections of public beaches due to medical waste that washed ashore from ocean disposal. This information outlines and summarizes the general requirements of each standard or rule applicable to biohazardous waste management. In addition, it informs employees of risks associated with biohazardous waste management. Several government agencies recognized the need for regulations which prescribe safeguards to protect workers and the public against hazards associated with exposure to blood and certain body fluids potentially containing bloodborne pathogens. This information will assist employers and employees in understanding and complying with the applicable regulations.

Chivington, G.K.

1997-03-01

197

Biomedical waste management operating plan. Revision E  

SciTech Connect

Recent national incidents involving medical and/or infectious wastes indicated the need for tighter control of medical wastes. Within the last five years, improper management of medical waste resulted in the spread of disease, reuse of needles by drug addicts, and the closing of large sections of public beaches due to medical waste that washed ashore from ocean disposal. This information outlines and summarizes the general requirements of each standard or rule applicable to biohazardous waste management. In addition, it informs employees of risks associated with biohazardous waste management. Several government agencies recognized the need for regulations which prescribe safeguards to protect workers and the public against hazards associated with exposure to blood and certain body fluids potentially containing bloodborne pathogens. This information will assist employers and employees in understanding and complying with the applicable regulations.

Chivington, G.K.

1997-04-01

198

Biomedical waste management operating plan. Revision C  

SciTech Connect

Recent national incidents involving medical and/or infectious wastes indicated the need for tighter control of medical wastes. Within the last five years, improper management of medical waste resulted in the spread of disease, reuse of needles by drug addicts, and the closing of large sections of public beaches due to medical waste that washed ashore from ocean disposal. Several regulations, both at the federal and state level, govern management (i.e., handling, storage, transport, treatment, and disposal) of solid or liquid waste which may present a threat of infection to humans. This waste, called infectious, biomedical, biohazardous, or biological waste, generally includes non-liquid human tissue and body parts; laboratory waste which contains human disease-causing agents; discarded sharps; human blood, blood products, and other body fluids. The information that follows outlines and summarizes the general requirements of each standard or rule applicable to biohazardous waste management. In addition, it informs employees of risks associated with biohazardous waste management.

Not Available

1996-02-14

199

Waste management fiscal year 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Program is pleased to issue the Fiscal Year 1998 Progress Report presenting program highlights and major accomplishments of the last year. This year-end update describes the current initiatives in waste management and the progress DOE has made toward their goals and objectives, including the results of the waste management annual performance commitments. One of the most important program efforts continues to be opening the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic waste. A major success was achieved this year by the West Valley Demonstration Project in New York, which in June completed the project`s production phase of high-level waste processing ahead of schedule and under budget. Another significant accomplishment this year was the award of two privatization contracts for major waste management operations, one at Oak ridge for transuranic waste treatment, and one at Hanford for the Tank Waste Remediation System privatization project. DOE is proud of the progress that has been made, and will continue to pursue program activities that allow it to safely and expeditiously dispose of radioactive and hazardous wastes across the complex, while reducing worker, public, and environmental risks.

NONE

1998-12-31

200

Household hazardous waste management: a review.  

PubMed

This paper deals with the waste stream of household hazardous waste (HHW) presenting existing management systems, legislation overview and other relevant quantitative and qualitative information. European Union legislation and international management schemes are summarized and presented in a concise manner by the use of diagrams in order to provide crucial information on HHW. Furthermore, sources and types, numerical figures about generation, collection and relevant management costs are within the scope of the present paper. The review shows that the term used to refer to hazardous waste generated in households is not clearly defined in legislation, while there is absence of specific acts regulating the management of HHW. The lack of obligation to segregate HHW from the household waste and the different terminology used makes it difficult to determine the quantities and composition of this waste stream, while its generation amount is relatively small and, therefore, is commonly overlooked in waste statistics. The paper aims to cover the gap in the related literature on a subject that is included within the crucial waste management challenges at world level, considering that HHW can also have impact on other waste streams by altering the redox conditions or causing direct reactions with other non hazardous waste substances. PMID:25528172

Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Moustakas, Konstantinos

2015-03-01

201

Waste Input-Output Analysis and Optimization of Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A decision analytic model of life cycle assessment (LCA) for waste management based on the waste input-output (WIO) model is presented. The resulting WIO-LP model can help environmental decision making with regard to choosing an “optimal” waste management from among a set of possible technological alternatives to meet given policy objectives under consideration of given physical, economic, and institutional constraints. Its implementation to Japanese data reveals the presence of a trade-off relationship between the reduction of CO2 emission and the consumption of landfill capacity.

Kondo, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shinichiro

202

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark.  

PubMed

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg(-1) ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg(-1) ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly. PMID:21316210

Boldrin, Alessio; Andersen, Jacob K; Christensen, Thomas H

2011-07-01

203

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15

204

Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

Loiseaux, Jm; David, S.

2006-05-01

205

Waste management in Guangdong cities: the waste management literacy and waste reduction preferences of domestic waste generators.  

PubMed

A questionnaire survey was conducted in 2002 on 1365 households in two prefectural-level cities in the Pearl River Delta, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. Three groups of issues are covered in this paper: 1) waste management literacy, concerns, and public participation; 2) waste recycling practices and the potential for waste avoidance; and 3) public environmental literacy. This study confirms findings from previous surveys and provides new information on important issues such as imposing monetary charges on waste and environmental activities, littering, source separation programs (SSPs), and public participation and expectations in local waste management. Saving up recyclable materials for redemption in waste depots is commonly practiced in mainland China regardless of the level of development of a city, although at the household level, high-income families tend to place less value on the revenues to be gained from redemption than lower income groups do. Data from the previous and the present studies indicate that such voluntary but largely economically driven waste recovery behavior diverts at least 10% of the household waste from the waste stream. Although uncompensated SSP is less appealing in the two cities than compensated SSP, it was found that when the median per capita income of a city reaches RMB2000 per month, a high participation rate for uncompensated waste recovery is more likely to occur. Education and income levels are the chief factors affecting littering behavior and the potential for waste avoidance. Contrary to general belief, the local Chinese community is active in microwaste management. The concern, however, is over the inability of the grassroots bureaucracy to deal with rising expectations for waste collection services and neighborhood cleanliness. PMID:15503387

Chung, Shan-Shan; Lo, Carlos W H

2004-05-01

206

Electronic waste management approaches: an overview.  

PubMed

Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including life cycle assessment (LCA), material flow analysis (MFA), multi criteria analysis (MCA) and extended producer responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems. PMID:23402807

Kiddee, Peeranart; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

2013-05-01

207

Novel pervasive scenarios for home management: the Butlers architecture.  

PubMed

Many efforts today aim to energy saving, promoting the user's awareness and virtuous behavior in a sustainability perspective. Our houses, appliances, energy meters and devices are becoming smarter and connected, domotics is increasing possibilities in house automation and control, and ambient intelligence and assisted living are bringing attention onto people's needs from different viewpoints. Our assumption is that considering these aspects together allows for novel intriguing possibilities. To this end, in this paper we combine home energy management with domotics, coordination technologies, intelligent agents, ambient intelligence, ubiquitous technologies and gamification to devise novel scenarios, where energy monitoring and management is just the basic brick of a much wider and comprehensive home management system. The aim is to control home appliances well beyond energy consumption, combining home comfort, appliance scheduling, safety constraints, etc. with dynamically-changeable users' preferences, goals and priorities. At the same time, usability and attractiveness are seen as key success factors: so, the intriguing technologies available in most houses and smart devices are exploited to make the system configuration and use simpler, entertaining and attractive for users. These aspects are also integrated with ubiquitous and pervasive technologies, geo-localization, social networks and communities to provide enhanced functionalities and support smarter application scenarios, hereby further strengthening technology acceptation and diffusion. Accordingly, we first analyse the system requirements and define a reference multi-layer architectural model - the Butlers architecture - that specifies seven layers of functionalities, correlating the requirements, the corresponding technologies and the consequent value-added for users in each layer. Then, we outline a set of notable scenarios of increasing functionalities and complexity, discuss the structure of the corresponding system patterns in terms of the proposed architecture, and make this concrete by presenting some comprehensive interaction examples as comic strip stories. Next, we discuss the implementation requirements and how they can be met with the available technologies, discuss a possible architecture, refine it in the concrete case of the TuCSoN coordination technology, present a subsystem prototype and discuss its properties in the Butlers perspective. PMID:24555169

Denti, Enrico

2014-01-01

208

Waste management at Los Alamos: Protecting our environment  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a broad overview of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The following topics are discussed: The growth of the waste management group; what we do today; the mission of the waste management group; the liquid waste treatment section; the radioactive liquid waste project office; the chemical waste section; the radioactive waste section; and the technical support section.

Not Available

1993-11-01

209

Solid Waste Management in Tianjin City: Status and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Along with economic development in Tianjin, the quantity of solid waste generated has increased rapidly. Solid waste management offers opportunities to improve profits by conserving resources and improving environmental performance. The present study introduces Tianjin's urban solid waste management in detail with regard to the legislative framework, waste characteristics and treatment methods. Two waste categories: municipal solid waste and hospital

Wei Zhao; Qun Zhang

2011-01-01

210

An integrated approach for the management of demolition waste in Cyprus.  

PubMed

This study investigated the generation and management of demolition waste (DW) in Cyprus. A methodology has been developed and applied for the estimation of the quantities of the waste stream under examination, since quantitative primary data were not available. The existing situation relating to the practices applied for the management of DW was investigated and assessed. Furthermore, a multi-criteria analysis method (PROMETHEE II) was developed and applied in order to examine alternative systems that could be implemented for the management of the DW in the country. In particular, nine management systems (scenarios) were examined, evaluated and ranked according to their efficiency using seventeen individual criteria, divided into four groups (social-legislative, environmental, economic and technical). The ranking of the alternative waste management scenarios indicated that the optimum management system for possible implementation in the island included complete selective demolition procedures and transfer of mixed recyclable materials to the recycling centre and non-recyclable material to landfill. PMID:19039075

Kourmpanis, Basilis; Papadopoulos, Achilleas; Moustakas, Konstantinos; Kourmoussis, Fotis; Stylianou, Marinos; Loizidou, Maria

2008-12-01

211

Infectious Waste Management Plan Page 1 University of Washington  

E-print Network

Infectious Waste Management Plan Page 1 University of Washington Infectious/Biomedical Waste Management Plan JUNE 2005 By Members Of UW Infectious Waste Committee UW Institutional Biosafety Committee #12;Infectious Waste Management Plan Page 2 Both the University of Washington Infectious Waste

Wilcock, William

212

Precision Management of Cattle Feedlot Waste  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cattle feedlot nutrient waste management is a topic of increasing environmental, sociological, and regulatory concern. This report investigates methods adapted from the management of saline soils for application to feedlot surface management as well operation of a vegetative treatment area (VTA) ut...

213

Modeling of Human Intrusion Scenarios at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a mined, geologic repository designed for permanent disposal of transuranic waste. The facility is owned by the United States Department of Energy, and licensed for operations by the Environmental Protection Agency. Compliance with license requirements dictates that the repository must comply with regulatory stipulations that performance assessment calculations include the effects of resource exploitation on probable releases. Scenarios for these releases incorporate inadvertent penetration of the repository by an exploratory drilling operation. This paper presents the scenarios and models used to predict releases from the repository to the biosphere during. an inadvertent intrusion into the waste disposal regions. A summary of model results and conclusions is also presented.

Gross, M.B.; Hansen, F.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Larson, K.W.; Thompson, T.W.

1998-12-04

214

Waste to energy - key element for sustainable waste management.  

PubMed

Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of "protection of men and environment" and "resource conservation". Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas. PMID:24630214

Brunner, Paul H; Rechberger, Helmut

2015-03-01

215

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01

216

National solid waste management plan for Iraq.  

PubMed

After decades of turmoil and international sanctions much of the key civil infrastructure within Iraq has fallen into disrepair, leading to a considerable decline in the provision of basic and essential municipal services. This is particularly true of waste and resource management services that have seen years of underdevelopment and deterioration. This has resulted in a lack of provision of basic public services in the waste sector which have been replaced by a burgeoning unregulated informal market in waste collection, disposal and recycling. In response, a National Solid Waste Management Plan (NSWMP) for Iraq was developed in 2007, to plan for the strategic development of all aspects of waste management in the country over the coming 20 years. In particular, the NSWMP focuses on policy development and integrated planning regarding regulatory framework, economic aspects, institutional capacity, citizen and technical education, and technical and operational development. This paper summarizes the key objectives, challenges and subsequent recommendations contained in the NSWMP for Iraq. PMID:19470543

Knowles, James A

2009-06-01

217

International perspectives on hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the International Solid Wastes and Public Cleansing Association (I.S.W.A.) approved the formation of an international working group on hazardous wastes. This book contains the edited final reports of the twelve national organisations which formed this working group. Also included is a review and assessment of various national policies and programs for waste management, together with recommendations and suggested strategies for the future.

Forester, W.S.

1987-01-01

218

Materials issues in nuclear-waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, materials issues in the management of nuclear waste, including its generation, processing, storage, transport, and disposal, are examined for low-level and high-level waste, with an emphasis on the aspects of their immobilization and long-term isolation. Selecting materials for low-level and high-level waste form and containers is reviewed, and the long-term performance issues with these materials as barriers to nuclide migration or release are discussed.

Yim, Man-Sung; Linga Murty, K.

2000-09-01

219

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

Microsoft Academic Search

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste

Gurdal Kanat; Gurdal

2010-01-01

220

SEMINAR PUBLICATION: ORGANIC AIR EMISSIONS FROM WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The organic chemicals contained in wastes processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause toxic or carcinogenic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Because air emissions from waste management operations pose a threat to human health...

221

Disruption scenario analysis for a nuclear waste repository in Hanford Site basalts, Washington State  

SciTech Connect

An initial application was made of the Delphi method of expert opinion consensus-forming to disruption scenario analysis of a candidate high-level nuclear waste repository at the Hanford Site, Washington State. Expert scientific and engineering opinion was elicited for the purpose of identifying, categorizing, and ranking of site-specific scenarios within the framework of occurrence-probability categories established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency. After refinement by a second Delphi iteration, the disruption scenarios selected to be of most concern will be characterized in detail for use in assessing long-term repository performance under disruption scenario conditions. 3 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

Davis, J.D.; Runchal, A.K.

1984-01-01

222

Managing America`s solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02

223

Managing solid waste in small hotels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collectively, small hotels constitute a significant solid waste management (SWM) problem. Little research has focused on the SWM practices of small hotels. In the United Kingdom, much of the solid waste generated by small hotels goes to landfill. This study uses a constructionist approach to investigate SWM issues in small hotels in a local authority in Wales and examines the

Hatem R. I. Radwan; Eleri Jones; Dino Minoli

2010-01-01

224

(Low-level radioactive waste management techniques)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US team consisting of representatives of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River plant (SRP), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations participated in a training program on French low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management techniques. Training in the rigorous waste characterization, acceptance and certification procedures required in France was provided at Agence Nationale

S. D. Van Hoesen; J. M. Kennerly; L. C. Williams; W. N. Lingle; M. S. Peters; G. R. Darnell; Du Pont de Nemours

1988-01-01

225

Municipal Solid Waste - Sustainable Materials Management  

EPA Science Inventory

The MSW DST was initially developed in the 1990s and has evolved over the years to better account for changes in waste management practices, waste composition, and improvements in decision support tool design and functionality. The most recent version of the tool is publicly ava...

226

Nuclear waste management policy in France  

Microsoft Academic Search

The object of the nuclear waste management policy in France has always been to protect the worker and the public from unacceptable risks. The means and the structures developed to reach this objective, however, have evolved with time. One fact has come out ever more clearly over the years: Nuclear waste problems cannot be considered in a piecemeal fashion. The

Lefevre

1983-01-01

227

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01

228

A Program on Hazardous Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of the "Hazardous Waste Management Graduate Certificate" program at Wayne State University. Describes four required courses and nine optional courses. Discusses the development of a Master program and the curriculum of the Master program. (YP)

Kummler, Ralph H.; And Others

1989-01-01

229

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01

230

Public policy issues in nuclear waste management  

SciTech Connect

This document aims to raise issues and to analyze them, not resolve them. The issues were: temporal equity, geographic and socioeconomic equity, implementation of a nuclear waste management system, and public involvement.

Nealey, S.M.; Radford, L.M.

1978-10-01

231

Toward integrated design of waste management technologies  

SciTech Connect

What technical, economic and institutional factors make radioactive and/or hazardous waste management technologies publicly acceptable? The goal of this paper is to initiate an identification of factors likely to render radioactive and hazardous waste management technologies publicly acceptable and to provide guidance on how technological R&D might be revised to enhance the acceptability of alternative waste management technologies. Technology development must attend to the full range of technology characteristics (technical, engineering, physical, economic, health, environmental, and socio-institutional) relevant to diverse stakeholders. ORNL`s efforts in recent years illustrate some attempts to accomplish these objectives or, at least, to build bridges toward the integrated design of waste management technologies.

Carnes, S.A.; Wolfe, A.K.

1993-11-01

232

Drivers of sustainable waste management in Asia.  

PubMed

Drivers of sustainable waste management are defined as groups of related factors that influence the development (or lack thereof) of industry. There has been no attempt to reasonably list the drivers that influence sustainable waste management in Asia. In this review, four groups of drivers of sustainable waste management, specifically of Asia, are explained. The four groups of drivers consist of three human elements (human, economic and institutional) and the environment as a single driving group. Typically, the first three groups have been very influential, with the environment driver, noticeably, only considered when preceded by other groups of drivers. The interconnectedness of the drivers and neglect of the environment driver is discussed. It is concluded that while the essence of the four groups of drivers can be found all over Asia, each driving group must be investigated in a local context and all information combined to devise sustainable waste management policies or strategies. PMID:19470545

Agamuthu, P; Khidzir, K M; Hamid, Fauziah Shahul

2009-10-01

233

Global waste management and disposal update 1993  

SciTech Connect

This article is a review of waste management/disposal efforts in various countries of the world in 1993. The activities of 17 countries are summarized, with technical, business, and political aspects being covered in each.

NONE

1994-02-01

234

A Smart Waste Management with Self-Describing Yann Glouche  

E-print Network

A Smart Waste Management with Self-Describing objects Yann Glouche Paul Couderc INRIA, Unit´e de to improve waste management by providing early automatic identification of waste at bin level. In this paper management; recycling chain; RFID; NFC; QR code. I. INTRODUCTION Waste management is an important requirement

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions.

Merrick

1990-01-01

236

Radioactive waste management in the former USSR  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste materials--and the methods being used to treat, process, store, transport, and dispose of them--have come under increased scrutiny over last decade, both nationally and internationally. Nuclear waste practices in the former Soviet Union, arguably the world's largest nuclear waste management system, are of obvious interest and may affect practices in other countries. In addition, poor waste management practices are causing increasing technical, political, and economic problems for the Soviet Union, and this will undoubtedly influence future strategies. this report was prepared as part of a continuing effort to gain a better understanding of the radioactive waste management program in the former Soviet Union. the scope of this study covers all publicly known radioactive waste management activities in the former Soviet Union as of April 1992, and is based on a review of a wide variety of literature sources, including documents, meeting presentations, and data base searches of worldwide press releases. The study focuses primarily on nuclear waste management activities in the former Soviet Union, but relevant background information on nuclear reactors is also provided in appendixes.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-06-01

237

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01

238

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG&G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG&G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01

239

75 FR 61356 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...SW-FRL-9209-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction AGENCY...appendix IX to part 261--Waste Excluded Under Sec...review by the Office of Management and Budget...

2010-10-05

240

77 FR 12497 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FRL-9640-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

2012-03-01

241

76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FRL-9285-7] Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion AGENCY...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

2011-03-24

242

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01

243

Recent Advancements in Food Waste Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past few years, there has been a tremendous increase in food waste generation due to rapid urbanization and industrialization. Population is also increasing and is expected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050. Both of these factors have put an emphasis to employ novel techniques for management of waste generated so that waste generation could be reduced to a minimum or these wastes could be converted into some valuable products. Therefore, in this view much technological advancement has occurred in the recent past which has proved to be useful for combating this problem. In this review, a brief introduction to status of waste generation and novel methods for its management has been discussed.

Amin, Tawheed; Chhabra, Poonam; Bhat, Suman Vikas

2012-09-01

244

Urban waste management and the mobile challenge.  

PubMed

Digital evolution and mobile developments are carving a new era that affects human behaviour and global governance. Interconnectivity and flow of information through various types of modern means create new opportunities for cooperation and ways to work. Waste management could not stay unaffected by these changes. New potentials are arising for the sector, offering a novel field for innovation, changing the way waste practices are applied. In this framework, mobile products and apps can become valuable tools for authorities, companies, civilians and other stakeholders, integrating these technologies in the battle for environmental protection, recycling, etc. This article examines the unexplored challenges of mobile apps to deliver sustainable waste management with emphasis on recycling and waste prevention performance, especially for emerging developing countries. It presents the opportunities that are involved in using mobile apps to improve both the systemic performance of a specific waste management system and the individual behaviour of the users. Furthermore, the article reviews the most important relevant literature and summarises the key findings of the recent research on mobile apps and human behaviour. Useful conclusions are drawn for both the content and the format of the mobile apps required for recycling and waste prevention. Finally, the article presents the most characteristic mobile apps that are already in place in the waste management sector. PMID:25827847

Mavropoulos, Antonis; Tsakona, Maria; Anthouli, Aida

2015-04-01

245

How to improve scenario analysis as a strategic management tool?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scenarios are claimed to support strategic decision makers. They are especially effective in dealing with uncertainties. This paper addresses some drawbacks of the conventional scenario method, which is especially directed at handling these uncertainties, and indicates possible avenues for methodological adaptations. We take the approach, which rests in the Shell tradition, as exemplary for our discussion on the mainstream scenario

Theo J. B. M. Postma; Franz Liebl

2005-01-01

246

Municipal solid waste management strategies in Turkey.  

PubMed

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental problem in Turkey, as in many developing countries. Problems associated with municipal solid waste are difficult to address, but efforts towards more efficient collection and transportation and environmentally acceptable waste disposal continue in Turkey. Although strict regulations on the management of solid waste are in place, primitive disposal methods such as open dumping and discharge into surface water have been used in various parts of Turkey. This study presents a brief history of the legislative trends in Turkey for MSW management. The study also presents the MSW responsibility and management structure together with the present situation of generation, composition, recycling, and treatment. The results show that approximately 25 million ton of MSW are generated annually in Turkey. About 77% of the population receives MSW services. In spite of efforts to change open dumping areas into sanitary landfills and to build modern recycling and composting facilities, Turkey still has over 2000 open dumps. PMID:18644708

Turan, N Gamze; Coruh, Semra; Akdemir, Andaç; Ergun, Osman Nuri

2009-01-01

247

OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

2002-02-27

248

Innovative technologies for managing oil field waste.  

SciTech Connect

Each year, the oil industry generates millions of barrels of wastes that need to be properly managed. For many years, most oil field wastes were disposed of at a significant cost. However, over the past decade, the industry has developed many processes and technologies to minimize the generation of wastes and to more safely and economically dispose of the waste that is generated. Many companies follow a three-tiered waste management approach. First, companies try to minimize waste generation when possible. Next, they try to find ways to reuse or recycle the wastes that are generated. Finally, the wastes that cannot be reused or recycled must be disposed of. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has evaluated the feasibility of various oil field waste management technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper describes four of the technologies Argonne has reviewed. In the area of waste minimization, the industry has developed synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) that have the desired drilling properties of oil-based muds without the accompanying adverse environmental impacts. Use of SBMs avoids significant air pollution from work boats hauling offshore cuttings to shore for disposal and provides more efficient drilling than can be achieved with water-based muds. Downhole oil/water separators have been developed to separate produced water from oil at the bottom of wells. The produced water is directly injected to an underground formation without ever being lifted to the surface, thereby avoiding potential for groundwater or soil contamination. In the area of reuse/recycle, Argonne has worked with Southeastern Louisiana University and industry to develop a process to use treated drill cuttings to restore wetlands in coastal Louisiana. Finally, in an example of treatment and disposal, Argonne has conducted a series of four baseline studies to characterize the use of salt caverns for safe and economic disposal of oil field wastes.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

2003-09-01

249

40 CFR 60.2055 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2055 Section 60.2055...Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2055 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2014-07-01

250

40 CFR 60.2620 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2620 Section 60.2620...Waste Incineration Units Model Rule-Waste Management Plan § 60.2620 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2014-07-01

251

40 CFR 60.2620 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2620 Section 60.2620...Waste Incineration Units Model Rule-Waste Management Plan § 60.2620 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2012-07-01

252

40 CFR 60.2055 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2055 Section 60.2055...Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2055 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2013-07-01

253

40 CFR 60.2620 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2620 Section 60.2620...Waste Incineration Units Model Rule-Waste Management Plan § 60.2620 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2013-07-01

254

Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility -Perimeter Soils Update  

E-print Network

Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility - Perimeter Soils Update Brookhaven National Laboratory Division #12;2 Background Cesium -137 contamination found outside the Former Hazardous Waste Management Community Advisory Council September 9, 2010 Robert J. Lee, Interim Manager Environmental Protection

Homes, Christopher C.

255

Fish waste management by conversion into heterotrophic bacteria biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Just as all other types of animal production, aquaculture produces waste. This waste can be managed outside the production system, comparable to terrestrial husbandry systems. However, particularly recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS) are suited to manage waste within the system. In this case, processes have to be selected to convert the waste into a re-usable product. Dissolved and solid waste conversion

O. Schneider

2006-01-01

256

The contemporary European copper cycle: waste management subsystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive copper mass balance for waste management in Europe has been carried out, including municipal solid waste, construction and demolition waste, wastes from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), and end-of-life vehicles (ELV). The recycling efficiency of the current waste management system in Europe was quantified and the sources of copper scrap used for secondary copper production were determined. Additionally,

M. Bertram; T. E. Graedel; H. Rechberger; S. Spatari

2002-01-01

257

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan, Supplement 1: Level 2 Activity Networks is being issued to provide detailed activity networks for three missions: the double-shell tank waste mission, the single-shell tank waste mission, and the solid waste mission. Supporting information can be found in the principal document, the Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration

Merrick

1990-01-01

258

Radioactive wastes management development in Chile  

SciTech Connect

A Facility for immobilizing and conditioning of radioactive wastes generated in Chile, has recently started in operation. It is a Radioactive Wastes Treatment Plant, RWTP, whose owner is Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN. A Storgement Building of Conditioned Wastes accomplishes the facility for medium and low level activity wastes. The Project has been carried with participation of chilean professionals at CCHEN and Technical Assistance of International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA. Processes developed are volume reduction by compaction; immobilization by cementation and conditioning. Equipment has been selected to process radioactive wastes into a 200 liters drum, in which wastes are definitively conditioned, avoiding exposition and contamination risks. The Plant has capacity to treat low and medium activity radioactive wastes produced in Chile due to Reactor Experimental No. 1 operation, and annex Laboratories in Nuclear Research Centers, as also those produced by users of nuclear techniques in Industries, Hospitals, Research Centers and Universities, in the whole country. With the infrastructure developed in Chile, a centralization of Radioactive Wastes Management activities is achieved. A data base system helps to control and register radioactive wastes arising in Chile. Generation of radioactive wastes in Chile, has found solution for the present production and that of near future.

Mir, S.A.; Cruz, P.F.; Rivera, J.D.; Jorquera, O.H.

1994-12-31

259

A hybrid simulation\\/optimisation scenario model for asset\\/liability management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we desciibe a decision support model to sustain management of pension-funds in the strategic planning of the available asset- and liability policy instruments. A main characteristic of the approach is that the relevant risk-drivers are modelled by scenarios, rather than by probability distributions. We will describe the scenario generation methodology, and how the scenarios are used by

Guus C. E. Boender

1997-01-01

260

A DSS for water resources management under uncertainty by scenario analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: In this paper we present a scenario analysis approach to perform water system planning and management under climatic and hydrological uncertainty friendly data - input phase and results analysis Different generation techniques can be used to set up and analyze a number of scenarios modeled by a scenario - tree in a multistage environment, which includes different possible configurations

Stefano Pallottino; Giovanni M. Sechi; Paola Zuddas

2005-01-01

261

The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management.  

PubMed

The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management is charged with recommending to Government, by July 2006, options for the long term management of the UK's radioactive waste legacy. These options should inspire public confidence. Now, more than halfway into the time allotted, we, as two former members of the Committee, express our concerns at the wayward approach that has been adopted. The Committee has placed emphasis on gaining public confidence but this has been done at the expense of recruiting the best scientific expertise in the management of radioactive waste, an act which we believe will actually undermine public confidence. Furthermore, given also the immense importance of this decision to public safety, national security and the national interest, we believe urgent steps should be taken to review the Committee's process, its management and its sponsorship. PMID:16286694

Baverstock, Keith; Ball, David J

2005-09-01

262

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31

263

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-01-01

264

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...June 20, 1996 § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2012-07-01

265

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 3 -Chemical Waste Management  

E-print Network

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 3 - Chemical Waste Management UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 3-1 Section 3 - Chemical Waste Management Contents A. HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE 3 - Chemical Waste Management Laboratory Safety Manual UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 3-2 4

Wilcock, William

266

Waste Management Web address: www.ehs.psu.edu  

E-print Network

Waste Management Log Book Web address: www.ehs.psu.edu Designated Accumulation Area: Building;Chemical Storage and Waste Management The following protocols have been established to ensure that all and waste management must be conducted in each accumulation area, and all persons who handle chemical waste

Maroncelli, Mark

267

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...Incinerators § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2013-07-01

268

Waste Management in Dsseldorf Combination of separate collection,  

E-print Network

Waste Management in Düsseldorf Combination of separate collection, recycling and waste-to-energy use Status quo and perspectives Dr. Mark Lindert Head of Waste Management Section, Environmental/a #12;10 19/1.3 02/2009 Contribution of waste management in Northrhine-Westphalia to climate protection

Columbia University

269

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...June 20, 1996 § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2011-07-01

270

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...Incinerators § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2014-07-01

271

40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management plan. 60.55c Section...June 20, 1996 § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator...affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste...

2010-07-01

272

CURRENT STATUS OF THE IAEA'S NET ENABLED WASTE MANAGEMENT DATABASE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Atomic Energy Agency's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) contains information on national radioactive waste management programs and organizations, plans and activities, relevant laws and regulations, policies and radioactive waste inventories. The NEWMDB, which was launched on the Internet July 6, 2001, is the successor to the Agency's Waste Management Database (WMDB), which was in use during the

G. W. Csullog; I. Pozdniakov; M. J. Bellag

2003-01-01

273

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01

274

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01

275

Combining lifecycle and risk assessments of mineral waste reuse scenarios for decision making support  

SciTech Connect

Lack of regulations and standards on mineral waste recycling makes Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) useful methods for environmental assessment of recycling scenarios. An unsolved problem arises whenever two scenarios of recycling have to be compared according to both ERA and LCA impact results considered simultaneously. A methodology to combine LCA and ERA results and tools toward Integrated Environmental Assessment (IEA) is proposed together with three application examples based on case studies. The most effective combination approach is to define further impact categories for ERA to be considered with the standard LCA ones. Then, the use of a multicriteria analysis method was proved to be an efficient way to rank alternative scenarios with respect to all the results. The key issues to be further researched are discussed and proposals are suggested.

Benetto, Enrico [ECOINNOVA France, 47 rue M. Flandin, 69003 Lyon Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: benetto@ecoinnova.it; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia [INSA Lyon-LAEPSI, 20 rue A.Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex, since November 2005: INSA Toulouse-LIPE, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex France (France)]. E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr; Perrodin, Yves [ENTPE-LSE, rue M.Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin cedex (France)]. E-mail: perrodin@entpe.fr

2007-04-15

276

Hazardous and toxic wastes: technology, management and health effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of three volumes on waste material, this book deals with the hazardous and toxic wastes of an industrial society. Part one considers waste types and treatment and disposal methods, covering industrial waste incineration, the destruction of toxic chemical wastes, and the management of hazardous waste. Part two discusses the distribution, selection, and geological aspects of siting hazardous and toxic

S. K. Majumdar; E. W. Miller

1984-01-01

277

Management of chemical toxic wastes  

SciTech Connect

Two regimes of vertical shaft furnace operation can be employed to slag encapsulate hazardous chemical wastes. One of these is similar to a method applicable to radioactive wastes, involving the pouring of hot molten slag from a coal reactor over the hazardous matter contained in a suitable designed crucible. The other method is especially appropriate for the treatment of chemical wastes that have become mixed with a great deal of soil or other diluent as must be handled as in the case of the love canal incident. It consists of feeding the contaminated solid mass into the coal reactor with a predetermined amount of coal and limestone that will still admit an adequate heat balance to generate a carefully tailored slag to incorporate the reacted waste feedstock.

Gold, L.

1982-05-25

278

Chemistry and technology of radioactive waste management —the IAEA perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper refers the consideration of chemical composition of radioactive waste in selection of particular method and technology for waste treatment and conditioning, importance of physicochemical parameters of waste processing techniques for optimisation of waste processing to produce waste form of appropriate quality. Consideration of waste chemistry is illustrated by several IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and by outlining the scope of some selected technical reports on different waste management subjects. Different components of the IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and on technology transfer are presented and discussed.

Efremenkov, V. M.

2003-01-01

279

Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, October-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, in situ storage or disposal, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, and low-level waste management are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities.

None

1983-07-01

280

Managing nuclear wastes: the international connection  

SciTech Connect

The global health and environmental aspects of nuclear waste management transcend national decision making and must be coordinated with the management policies of other nuclear-power countries. Assuming that reprocessing will continue at limited sites, ocean transport of radioactive materials introduces the need for preventive standards that will eliminate transnational pollution. This requires a level of cooperation beyond local and national management that will have to be initiated by individual countries and then replaced by joint international action. (DCK)

Handl, G.

1981-04-01

281

Environmental assessment of waste management in Greenland: current practice and potential future developments.  

PubMed

The majority of the waste in Greenland is disposed of in open dumps or incinerated in simple small-scale incinerators. There are relatively few environmental regulations that control the emissions of leachate, landfill gas and/or flue gases from incineration. Only some scrap metal and hazardous waste are collected separately and exported to Europe. The impacts from the current waste management system were modelled from a life-cycle perspective using the LCA-waste model EASEWASTE. Impacts with regard to global warming, acidification, etc. are small (a few hundred person-equivalents (PE) for a system serving 56 000 inhabitants), but significant environmental loads are caused by air emissions from the incinerators and leachate from the landfills. Several alternative management scenarios were modelled and results show that increased use of incineration, full utilization of the heat production for district heating and separation of hazardous waste probably could improve Greenland's waste management system. Segregation of recyclable materials as paper, cardboard and biowaste will do little to environmentally improve the waste management system due to loss of energy recovery from incineration and the long transport of the recyclables to markets. Export of waste to Denmark for incineration at modern waste incinerators with advanced flue gas cleaning could also be considered as a means to achieve better environmental performance of the waste management system. PMID:23539347

Eisted, Rasmus; Christensen, Thomas H

2013-05-01

282

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-print Network

there is a growing trend to PVC. For example, 54% of window frames in Germany are made of PVC. In 1997 the production of PVC in Germany increased by 9%, the fastest growth rate of all plastics. The waste stream in Germany is estimated to contain an annu- al total of 630,000 tonnes of PVC (calculated as pure PVC). The mixed plastic

Columbia University

283

Waste in a land of plenty -Solid waste generation and management  

E-print Network

Waste in a land of plenty - Solid waste generation and management in the US The US generates solid waste generation and management Nickolas J. Themelis and Scott M. Kaufman Article by N.J. Themelis and S.M. Kaufman in WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD, ISWA (www.iswa.org), September-October 2004 Issue

Columbia University

284

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste  

E-print Network

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 · Identification manage hazardous chemical waste you must first learn the various identification steps, in order to: 1-Chemical- Biological-Waste Hierarchy to identify the regulations that govern waste management. Use the Non

Ford, James

285

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01

286

ICPP Waste Management Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), a Spent fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan was developed jointly by DOE and WINCO.

Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.; Knecht, D.A. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonkoski, M.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-01-01

287

40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. The State shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are...

2012-07-01

288

40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. The State shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are...

2013-07-01

289

40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section... Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. The State shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are...

2014-07-01

290

Integrated waste and water management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance requirements of the NASA Space Station have prompted a reexamination of a previously developed integrated waste and water management system that used distillation and catalytic oxydation to purify waste water, and microbial digestion and incineration for waste solids disposal. This system successfully operated continuously for 206 days, for a 4-man equivalent load of urine, feces, wash water, condensate, and trash. Attention is given to synergisms that could be established with other life support systems, in the cases of thermal integration, design commonality, and novel technologies.

Murray, R. W.; Sauer, R. L.

1986-01-01

291

Waste management for JAERI fusion reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the fusion reactor design study at Japan Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI), several waste management strategies were assessed. The assessed strategies are: (1) reinforced neutron shield to clear the massive ex-shielding components from regulatory control; (2) low aspect ratio tokamak to reduce the total waste; (3) reuse of liquid metal breeding material and neutron shield. Combining these strategies, the weight of disposal waste from a low aspect ratio reactor VECTOR is expected to be comparable with the metal radwaste from a light water reactor (˜4000 t).

Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Konishi, S.; Jitsukawa, S.

2004-08-01

292

Radioactive waste management in a hospital.  

PubMed

Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations. PMID:21475524

Khan, Shoukat; Syed, At; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A; Ajaz, M; Jan, Fa

2010-01-01

293

Radioactive Waste Management in A Hospital  

PubMed Central

Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations. PMID:21475524

Khan, Shoukat; Syed, AT; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A.; Ajaz, M; Jan, FA

2010-01-01

294

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

SciTech Connect

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15

295

Multiple system modelling of waste management  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the systems. > The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. > The simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models. - Abstract: Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models.

Eriksson, Ola, E-mail: ola.eriksson@hig.se [Profu i Goeteborg AB, Goetaforsliden 13 Nedre, SE 431 34 Moelndal (Sweden); Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gaevle, SE 801 76 Gaevle (Sweden); Bisaillon, Mattias, E-mail: mattias.bisaillon@profu.se [Profu i Goeteborg AB, Goetaforsliden 13 Nedre, SE 431 34 Moelndal (Sweden)

2011-12-15

296

Shuttle era waste management and biowaste monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The acquisition of crew biomedical data has been an important task on manned space missions. The monitoring of biowastes from the crew to support water and mineral balance studies and endocrine studies has been a valuable part of this activity. This paper will present a review of waste management systems used in past programs. This past experience will be cited as to its influence on the Shuttle design. Finally, the Shuttle baseline waste management system and the proposed Shuttle biomedical measurement and sampling systems will be presented.

Sauer, R. L.; Fogal, G. L.

1976-01-01

297

Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.  

SciTech Connect

The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-05-25

298

Use of a Knowledge Management System in Waste Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

In Germany the knowledge management system 'WasteInfo' about waste management and disposal issues has been developed and implemented. Beneficiaries of 'WasteInfo' are official decision makers having access to a large information pool. The information pool is fed by experts, so called authors This means compiling of information, evaluation and assigning of appropriate properties (metadata) to this information. The knowledge management system 'WasteInfo' has been introduced at the WM04, the operation of 'WasteInfo' at the WM05. The recent contribution describes the additional advantage of the KMS being used as a tool for the dealing with waste management projects. This specific aspect will be demonstrated using a project concerning a comparative analysis of the implementation of repositories in six countries using nuclear power as examples: The information of 'WasteInfo' is assigned to categories and structured according to its origin and type of publication. To use 'WasteInfo' as a tool for the processing the projects, a suitable set of categories has to be developed for each project. Apart from technical and scientific aspects, the selected project deals with repository strategies and policies in various countries, with the roles of applicants and authorities in licensing procedures, with safety philosophy and with socio-economic concerns. This new point of view has to be modelled in the categories. Similar to this, new sources of information such as local and regional dailies or particular web-sites have to be taken into consideration. In this way 'WasteInfo' represents an open document which reflects the current status of the respective repository policy in several countries. Information with particular meaning for the German repository planning is marked and by this may influence the German strategy. (authors)

Gruendler, D.; Boetsch, W.U. [Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) GmbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-50667 Cologne (Germany); Holzhauer, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-50667 Cologne (Germany); Nies, R.A. [Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Robert-Schuman-Platz 3, D - 53175 Bonn (Germany)

2006-07-01

299

Managing radioactively contaminated infectious waste at a large biomedical facility.  

PubMed

Proper management of infectious waste containing radioactive material depends on three program elements. First, screening methods are required to identify medical waste containing radioactive material. Second, a means of managing the volume of waste identified has to be developed. Management includes identifying the radioisotopes, dealing with the physical requirements of the waste (e.g., the need for cold storage), and treating the material as a mixed waste. Finally, methods to limit production of waste at its source must be implemented. This includes educating the radioactive material users, enabling them with the means of reducing waste volume, and giving them feedback on how well they are implementing the waste reduction practices. PMID:8449714

Methé, B M

1993-02-01

300

Greenhouse gas accounting and waste management.  

PubMed

Accounting of emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) is a major focus within waste management. This paper analyses and compares the four main types of GHG accounting in waste management including their special features and approaches: the national accounting, with reference to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the corporate level, as part of the annual reporting on environmental issues and social responsibility, life-cycle assessment (LCA), as an environmental basis for assessing waste management systems and technologies, and finally, the carbon trading methodology, and more specifically, the clean development mechanism (CDM) methodology, introduced to support cost-effective reduction in GHG emissions. These types of GHG accounting, in principle, have a common starting point in technical data on GHG emissions from specific waste technologies and plants, but the limited availability of data and, moreover, the different scopes of the accounting lead to many ways of quantifying emissions and producing the accounts. The importance of transparency in GHG accounting is emphasised regarding waste type, waste composition, time period considered, GHGs included, global warming potential (GWP) assigned to the GHGs, counting of biogenic carbon dioxide, choice of system boundaries, interactions with the energy system, and generic emissions factors. In order to enhance transparency and consistency, a format called the upstream-operating-downstream framework (UOD) is proposed for reporting basic technology-related data regarding GHG issues including a clear distinction between direct emissions from waste management technologies, indirect upstream (use of energy and materials) and indirect downstream (production of energy, delivery of secondary materials) activities. PMID:19808731

Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H; Aoustin, Emmanuelle

2009-11-01

301

Issues that Drive Waste Management Technology Development for Space Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Waste management technologies for space life support systems are currently at low development levels. Manual compaction of waste in plastic bags and overboard disposal to earth return vehicles are the primary current waste management methods. Particularly on future missions, continuance of current waste management methods would tend to expose the crew to waste hazards, forfeit recoverable resources such as water, consume valuable crew time, contaminate planetary surfaces, and risk return to Earth of extraterrestrial life. Improvement of waste management capabilities is needed for adequate management of wastes. Improvements include recovery of water and other resources, conversion of waste to states harmless to humans, long-term containment of wastes, and disposal of waste. Current NASA requirements documents on waste management are generally not highly detailed. More detailed requirements are needed to guide the development of waste management technologies that will adequately manage waste. In addition to satisfying requirements, waste management technologies must also recover resources. Recovery of resources such as water and habitat volume can reduce mission cost. This paper explores the drivers for waste management technology development including requirements and resource recovery.

Fisher, John W.; Levri, Julie A.; Hogan, John A.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai

2005-01-01

302

Two graphical user interfaces for managing and analyzing MODFLOW groundwater-model scenarios  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Scenario Manager and Scenario Analyzer are graphical user interfaces that facilitate the use of calibrated, MODFLOW-based groundwater models for investigating possible responses to proposed stresses on a groundwater system. Scenario Manager allows a user, starting with a calibrated model, to design and run model scenarios by adding or modifying stresses simulated by the model. Scenario Analyzer facilitates the process of extracting data from model output and preparing such display elements as maps, charts, and tables. Both programs are designed for users who are familiar with the science on which groundwater modeling is based but who may not have a groundwater modeler’s expertise in building and calibrating a groundwater model from start to finish. With Scenario Manager, the user can manipulate model input to simulate withdrawal or injection wells, time-variant specified hydraulic heads, recharge, and such surface-water features as rivers and canals. Input for stresses to be simulated comes from user-provided geographic information system files and time-series data files. A Scenario Manager project can contain multiple scenarios and is self-documenting. Scenario Analyzer can be used to analyze output from any MODFLOW-based model; it is not limited to use with scenarios generated by Scenario Manager. Model-simulated values of hydraulic head, drawdown, solute concentration, and cell-by-cell flow rates can be presented in display elements. Map data can be represented as lines of equal value (contours) or as a gradated color fill. Charts and tables display time-series data obtained from output generated by a transient-state model run or from user-provided text files of time-series data. A display element can be based entirely on output of a single model run, or, to facilitate comparison of results of multiple scenarios, an element can be based on output from multiple model runs. Scenario Analyzer can export display elements and supporting metadata as a Portable Document Format file.

Banta, Edward R.

2014-01-01

303

Progress and challenges to the global waste management system.  

PubMed

Rapid economic growth, urbanization and increasing population have caused (materially intensive) resource consumption to increase, and consequently the release of large amounts of waste to the environment. From a global perspective, current waste and resource management lacks a holistic approach covering the whole chain of product design, raw material extraction, production, consumption, recycling and waste management. In this article, progress and different sustainability challenges facing the global waste management system are presented and discussed. The study leads to the conclusion that the current, rather isolated efforts, in different systems for waste management, waste reduction and resource management are indeed not sufficient in a long term sustainability perspective. In the future, to manage resources and wastes sustainably, waste management requires a more systems-oriented approach that addresses the root causes for the problems. A specific issue to address is the development of improved feedback information (statistics) on how waste generation is linked to consumption. PMID:24938296

Singh, Jagdeep; Laurenti, Rafael; Sinha, Rajib; Frostell, Björn

2014-09-01

304

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 2: Site performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This document contains twelve papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics of this volume include: performance assessment methodology; remedial action alternatives; site selection and site characterization procedures; intruder scenarios; sensitivity analysis procedures; mathematical models for mixed waste environmental transport; and risk assessment methodology. Individual papers were processed separately for the database. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-12-01

305

Life cycle assessment of urban waste management: Energy performances and environmental impacts. The case of Rome, Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfilling is nowadays the most common practice of waste management in Italy in spite of enforced regulations aimed at increasing waste pre-sorting as well as energy and material recovery. In this work we analyse selected alternative scenarios aimed at minimizing the unused material fraction to be delivered to the landfill. The methodological framework of the analysis is the life cycle

Francesco Cherubini; Silvia Bargigli; Sergio Ulgiati

2008-01-01

306

Medical waste management training for healthcare managers - a necessity?  

PubMed Central

Background This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers) regarding bio-medical waste management. Methods The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June – August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions). A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups. Results 67.5% (162) of participants were female. 42.5% (102) are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers. A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test) and others who had not (p<0.01). It was observed that information levels of all healthcare managers who had received training on waste management had risen at the completion of that training session. Conclusion On the subject of waste management, to have trained healthcare employees who are responsible for the safe disposal of wastes in hospitals is both a necessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country. PMID:24499642

2013-01-01

307

Advanced waste management technology evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this program is to evaluate the feasibility of steam reforming spacecraft wastes into simple recyclable inorganic salts, carbon dioxide and water. Model waste compounds included cellulose, urea, methionine, Igapon TC-42, and high density polyethylenes. These are compounds found in urine, feces, hygiene water, etc. The gasification and steam reforming process used the addition of heat and low quantities of oxygen to oxidize and reduce the model compounds.The studied reactions were aimed at recovery of inorganic residues that can be recycled into a closed biologic system. Results indicate that even at very low concentrations of oxygen (less than 3%) the formation of a carbonaceous residue was suppressed. The use of a nickel/cobalt reforming catalyst at reaction temperature of 1600 degrees yielded an efficient destruction of the organic effluents, including methane and ammonia. Additionally, the reforming process with nickel/cobalt catalyst diminished the noxious odors associated with butyric acid, methionine and plastics.

Couch, H.; Birbara, P.

1996-01-01

308

ORWARE—a simulation tool for waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simulation model, ORWARE (ORganic WAste REsearch) is described. The model is mainly used as a tool for researchers in environmental systems analysis of waste management. It is a computer-based model for calculation of substance flows, environmental impacts, and costs of waste management. The model covers, despite the name, both organic and inorganic fractions in municipal waste. The model consists

O Eriksson; B Frostell; A Björklund; G Assefa; J.-O Sundqvist; J Granath; M Carlsson; A Baky; L Thyselius

2002-01-01

309

DIVISION 1 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 01524 CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

_____________________________________________________________ 01524 CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT A. Design Considerations 1. The University, by requiring. Although not required, the University's waste hauler can be used. Waste Management is familiar with our the recycling of non-hazardous demolition and construction materials and other waste generated

310

Management of hazardous wastes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), during the course of numerous research activities, generates hazardous, radioactive, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The management of these waste materials is highly regulated in the United States (US). This paper focuses on the hazardous waste regulations that limit and prescribe waste management at LLNL.

Jackson, C.S.

1993-11-01

311

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1982-March 1983  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of a series of technical progress reports designed to report radioactive waste management programs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Accomplishments in the following programs are reported: waste stabilization; Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; low-level waste management; remedial action; and supporting studies.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1983-06-01

312

Legislative and regulatory aspects of radioactive waste management in France  

SciTech Connect

The French legislative and regulatory framework for safe management of radioactive waste is presented. Emphasis is put on legislative aspects for the management of high-level waste and on the operation of surface disposal for low-level waste. Other topics such as policy and issues for very low-level waste or dismantling are also briefly developed.

Niel, J.C. [Ministere de l`Industrie des Postes et Telecommunications et du Commerce Exterieur et Ministere de l`Environnement, Paris (France). Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires

1996-08-01

313

Management of TRU waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1970, defense transuranic (TRU) waste has been placed into 20-year retrievable storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is to remove all retrievably stored TRU waste from the INEL. The INEL is currently developing, designing and constructing

Gertz

1984-01-01

314

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.  

PubMed

In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. PMID:22819043

Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

2012-12-01

315

Organic waste management for EBI in Quebec, feedstock analysis  

E-print Network

EBI is a company located in the province of Quebec in Canada with the mission to integrate waste management. Great challenges in regards to organic waste management are faced and anaerobic digestion is considered by EBI ...

Sylvestre, Olivier, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01

316

Popular democracy and waste management  

SciTech Connect

The US has moved from representative democracy to popular democracy and public scrutiny is unrelenting. Any hope of success on their part in resolving the nuclear waste question hinges on their ability to condition themselves to operate in a popular democracy environment. Those opposed to the siting of high- and low-level waste repositories have already developed a set of recurring themes: (1) the siting criteria are fatally flawed; (2) the criteria are not adequate; (3) the process is driven by politics not science; (4) unrealistic deadlines lead to dangerous shortcuts; (5) transportation experience is lacking; (6) the scientific community does not really know how to dispose of the wastes. They must continue to tell the public that if science has brought us problems, then the answer can be only more knowledge - not less. Failure by their profession to recognize that popular democracy is a fact and that nuclear issues need to be addressed in humanistic terms raises the question of whether America is philosophically suited for the expanded use of nuclear power in the future - or for that matter for leadership in the world of tomorrow.

Wallis, L.R.

1986-01-01

317

LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

2012-07-15

318

Environmental impact assessment of solid waste management in Beijing City, China  

SciTech Connect

The environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management in Beijing City were evaluated using a life-cycle-based model, EASEWASTE, to take into account waste generation, collection, transportation, treatment/disposal technologies, and savings obtained by energy and material recovery. The current system, mainly involving the use of landfills, has manifested significant adverse environmental impacts caused by methane emissions from landfills and many other emissions from transfer stations. A short-term future scenario, where some of the landfills (which soon will reach their capacity because of rising amount of waste in Beijing City) are substituted by incinerators with energy recovery, would not result in significant environmental improvement. This is primarily because of the low calorific value of mixed waste, and it is likely that the incinerators would require significant amounts of auxiliary fuels to support combustion of wet waste. As for the long-term future scenario, efficient source separation of food waste could result in significant environmental improvements, primarily because of increase in calorific value of remaining waste incinerated with energy recovery. Sensitivity analysis emphasized the importance of efficient source separation of food waste, as well as the electricity recovery in incinerators, in order to obtain an environmentally friendly waste management system in Beijing City.

Zhao Yan [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Solid Waste Management and Environment Safety, Ministry of Education of China, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lu Wenjing; Wu Huayong [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Wang Hongtao, E-mail: htwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China)

2011-04-15

319

Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Hennepin County) integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM system.

NONE

1995-11-01

320

Hospital waste management and toxicity evaluation: A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital waste management is an imperative environmental and public safety issue, due to the waste’s infectious and hazardous character. This paper examines the existing waste strategy of a typical hospital in Greece with a bed capacity of 400–600. The segregation, collection, packaging, storage, transportation and disposal of waste were monitored and the observed problematic areas documented. The concentrations of BOD,

M. Tsakona; E. Anagnostopoulou; E. Gidarakos

2007-01-01

321

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01

322

General survey of solid-waste management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potential ways of providing solid-waste management for a building complex serviced by a modular integrated utility system (MIUS) were explored. Literature surveys were conducted to investigate both conventional and unusual systems to serve this purpose. The advantages and disadvantages of the systems most compatible with MIUS are discussed.

Reese, T. G.; Wadle, R. C.

1974-01-01

323

Navigating the Hazardous Waste Management Maze.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hazardous waste management is a continual process. Administrators should maintain good relations with state agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency and use them as resources. Contacts with businesses and professional groups as well as forming coalitions with neighboring districts are ways to share information and expenses. (MLF)

Voelkle, James P.

1997-01-01

324

International High Level Nuclear Waste Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the radioactive waste management in Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the USSR. Indicates that scientists and statesmen should look beyond their own lifetimes into future centuries and millennia to conduct long-range plans essential to protection of future generations. (CC)

Dreschhoff, Gisela; And Others

1974-01-01

325

Waste Management's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

SciTech Connect

Waste Management, Inc., began operating a fleet of heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks at its Washington, Pennsylvania, facility. The objective of the project was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US); Clark, N. [West Virginia University (US)

2001-01-25

326

Waste management project technical baseline description  

SciTech Connect

A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

Sederburg, J.P.

1997-08-13

327

Managing nuclear waste from power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

National strategies to manage nuclear waste from commercial nuclear power plants are analyzed and compared. The current strategy is to try to operate a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to dispose storage at a centralized facility or next to nuclear power plants. If either of these is pursued now, the analysis assumes that a repository will be built in 2100

Ralph L. Keeney; Detlof Winterfeldt

1994-01-01

328

TMI2 waste management experience. Interim report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The waste management experience following the TMI-2 March 1979 accident contributed invaluable information to the nuclear power industry. Unique to the TMI-2 cleanup were the columes, types, and special problems associated with the processing, handling, storage, packaging, transportation, and disposal of radioactive material. With its highlight of unusual situations encountered during cleanup, this report provides a comprehensive look at the

C. P. Deltete; R. E. Hahn

1992-01-01

329

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Merrick, D.L.

1990-04-30

330

Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen  

E-print Network

Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen School greatly magnified the problems with Vietnam's solid waste management system, pushing waste management ..................................................................................................................................3 3. Solid Waste Management in Vietnam 3.1 Generation and Components

Columbia University

331

40 CFR 60.2899 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2899 Section 60.2899...SOURCES Preconstruction Siting Analysis Waste Management Plan § 60.2899 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2010-07-01

332

40 CFR 60.2899 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2899 Section 60.2899...SOURCES Preconstruction Siting Analysis Waste Management Plan § 60.2899 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2012-07-01

333

40 CFR 60.2899 - What is a waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false What is a waste management plan? 60.2899 Section 60.2899...SOURCES Preconstruction Siting Analysis Waste Management Plan § 60.2899 What is a waste management plan? A waste management plan...

2011-07-01

334

75 FR 51678 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EPA-R06-RCRA-2008-0456; SW-FRL-9191-7] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

2010-08-23

335

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-print Network

1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada% of the total solid waste management budget. [28] Ironically, NGO and community groups are opposed and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious

Columbia University

336

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Waste Management Manuscript Draft  

E-print Network

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Waste Management Manuscript Draft Manuscript Number: WM-7-244R1 suitable for use as soil amendment. Author-produced version of the article published in Waste Management.04.001 hal-00585197,version1-12Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Waste Management 29, 1 (2009) p. 197

Boyer, Edmond

337

MANAGEMENT OF SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTE Revised August 2008  

E-print Network

k MANAGEMENT OF SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTE Revised August 2008 Safety Services #12;MANAGEMENT OF SOLID for Appendices 4 and 5 22 Appendix 10 Flow chart of waste-streaming 23 #12;1 MANAGEMENT OF SOLID RADIOACTIVE RADIOACTIVE WASTES Page Minimisation 1 Streaming 2 Procedures 2 Keeping track of the activities placed

Davidson, Fordyce A.

338

http://wmr.sagepub.com/ Waste Management & Research  

E-print Network

http://wmr.sagepub.com/ Waste Management & Research http://wmr.sagepub.com/content/23/5/457 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0734242X05058684 2005 23: 457Waste Manag Res Association can be found at:Waste Management & ResearchAdditional services and information for http

Short, Daniel

339

33 CFR 151.57 - Waste management plans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management plans. 151.57 Section...Pollution and Sewage § 151.57 Waste management plans. (a) This section...ship is not operated unless a waste management plan meeting paragraph...

2010-07-01

340

Sustainable Decentralized Model for Solid Waste Management in Urban India  

E-print Network

Sustainable Decentralized Model for Solid Waste Management in Urban India Hita Unnikrishnan, Brunda the sustenance of a decentralized solid waste management system in urban India. Towards this end, two by the Honorable Supreme Court of India has given support to community based waste management schemes through

Columbia University

341

UCB Campus Policy Topic: HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICIES,  

E-print Network

6 UCB Campus Policy Topic: HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICIES, GENERATOR TRAINING, COMPLIANCE and management of Hazardous Waste (HW) on Campus shall be properly trained and comply with all rules as specified, student and staff) are responsible for proper manage- ment of hazardous waste and inspections

Stowell, Michael

342

33 CFR 151.57 - Waste management plans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management plans. 151.57 Section...Pollution and Sewage § 151.57 Waste management plans. (a) This section...ship is not operated unless a waste management plan meeting paragraph...

2011-07-01

343

Major: Ecological Systems Design, Air Quality Control and Waste Management  

E-print Network

1 Major: Ecological Systems Design, Air Quality Control and Waste Management · Being able to solve, consultancy, and administration · Knowledge in waste management and technologies, · Understanding air control technologies · Knowledge in waste management and technologies Module 1: Ecological Systems Design

Giger, Christine

344

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2014-07-01

345

33 CFR 151.57 - Waste management plans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management plans. 151.57 Section...Pollution and Sewage § 151.57 Waste management plans. (a) This section...ship is not operated unless a waste management plan meeting paragraph...

2012-07-01

346

PUB-3093, Revision 6 Guidelines for the Management of Waste  

E-print Network

PUB-3093, Revision 6 Guidelines for the Management of Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs) at Berkeley for the Management of Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs) at Berkeley Lab PUB-3093 Revision 6 Effective Date: March 2005 Approved By: Nancy Rothermich Waste Management Group Leader Environment, Health and Safety Division

347

FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE  

E-print Network

FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE L. EL-GUEBALY,* P. WILSON for Publication February 3, 2004 The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management

California at San Diego, University of

348

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2010-07-01

349

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2013-07-01

350

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2012-07-01

351

40 CFR 60.35e - Waste management guidelines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste management guidelines. 60.35e Section...Incinerators § 60.35e Waste management guidelines. For approval...include the requirements for a waste management plan at least as protective...

2011-07-01

352

Municipal solid waste management in Rasht City, Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pollution and health risks generated by improper solid waste management are important issues concerning environmental management in developing countries. In most cities, the use of open dumps is common for the disposal of wastes, resulting in soil and water resource contamination by leachate in addition to odors and fires. Solid waste management infrastructure and services in developing countries are far

M. R. Alavi Moghadam; N. Mokhtarani; B. Mokhtarani

2009-01-01

353

Critical Evaluation of Biomedical Wastes Management Practices in Kathmandu Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kathmandu, the capital city of Nepal, is facing serious environmental degradation and public health-risk due to ineffective municipal solid waste management practices. The improper management of bio-medical waste from Health Care Institutes (HCI) has created another dimension of environmental as well as public health problems in Kathmandu valley. It was, therefore, prudent to critically evaluate existing solid waste management practices

Kedar Rijal; Ashok Deshpande

354

Healthcare waste management in Algeria and Mostaganem department  

Microsoft Academic Search

Algeria as other developing countries faces an array of challenges for healthcare waste management. The management of healthcare waste is of major importance due to its public health risks and potential environmental hazards. Many efforts have been made by the government authorities in order to better manage the waste from healthcare facilities. However most healthcare facilities do not comply with

Z. Bendjoudi; F. Taleb; F. Abdelmalek; A. Addou

2009-01-01

355

Tank waste remediation system risk management list  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remedation System (TWRS) Risk Management List and it`s subset of critical risks, the Critical Risk Management List, provide a tool to senior RL and WHC management (Level-1 and -2) to manage programmatic risks that may significantly impact the TWRS program. The programmatic risks include cost, schedule, and performance risks. Performance risk includes technical risk, supportability risk (such as maintainability and availability), and external risk (i.e., beyond program control, for example, changes in regulations). The risk information includes a description, its impacts, as evaluation of the likelihood, consequences and risk value, possible mitigating actions, and responsible RL and WHC managers. The issues that typically form the basis for the risks are presented in a separate table and the affected functions are provided on the management lists.

Collard, L.B.

1995-10-31

356

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01

357

Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities is to provide managers and senior staff at the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and its contractors with timely and concise information on Hanford Site environmental and waste management activities. Each edition updates the information on the topics in the previous edition, deletes those determined not to be of current interest, and adds new topics to keep up to date with changing environmental and waste management requirements and issues. Section A covers current waste management and environmental restoration issues. In Section B are writeups on national or site-wide environmental and waste management topics. Section C has writeups on program- and waste-specific environmental and waste management topics. Section D provides information on waste sites and inventories on the site. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Brown, M.C.

1991-06-01

358

Waste Information Management System-2012 - 12114  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) -2012 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. WIMS continues to successfully accomplish the goals and objectives set forth by DOE for this project. It has replaced the historic process of each DOE site gathering, organizing, and reporting their waste forecast information utilizing different databases and display technologies. In addition, WIMS meets DOE's objective to have the complex-wide waste forecast and transportation information available to all stakeholders and the public in one easy-to-navigate system. The enhancements to WIMS made since its initial deployment include the addition of new DOE sites and facilities, an updated waste and transportation information, and the ability to easily display and print customized waste forecast, the disposition maps, GIS maps and transportation information. The system also allows users to customize and generate reports over the web. These reports can be exported to various formats, such as Adobe{sup R} PDF, Microsoft Excel{sup R}, and Microsoft Word{sup R} and downloaded to the user's computer. Future enhancements will include database/application migration to the next level. A new data import interface will be developed to integrate 2012-13 forecast waste streams. In addition, the application is updated on a continuous basis based on DOE feedback. (authors)

Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L.; Roelant, D. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2012-07-01

359

Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals  

E-print Network

Cornell Waste Management Institute ­ Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals Program Work Team ­ Annual Meeting Summary Cornell Waste Management Institute Date: March 10, 2011 Location's meeting discussed 1) NY State's Solid Waste Management Plan and its focus on management of organics, 2

Wang, Z. Jane

360

Managing lead-based paint abatement wastes  

SciTech Connect

Renovation, remodeling, demolition, and surface preparation for painting, in addition to specified lead abatement, are all activities that have the potential to produce hazardous wastes if a property was painted with lead-based paint. Lead-based paint was used on residential structures until 1978, when most residential uses were banned by the Consumer Products Safety Council. Prior to the 1950s, paints for residential uses may have contained up to 50% lead by weight. Today, commercial and military paints may still contain lead and can be used on non-residential structures. The lead content of residential paints is limited to 0.06% lead (by weight) in the dried film. This paper provides an overview of some of the information needed to properly manage lead-based paint abatement wastes. The issues covered in this paper include waste classification, generator status, treatment, and land disposal restrictions. The author assumes that the reader is familiar with the provision of the Health and Safety Code and the California Code of Regulations that pertain to generation and management of hazardous wastes. Citations provided herein do not constitute an exhaustive list of all the regulations with which a generator of hazardous waste must comply.

Steele, N.L.C.

1994-12-31

361

Resource Management, Coexistence, and Balance--The Fundamentals of Teaching Waste Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues for the need for courses in waste management in departments other than civil engineering. Points out that although waste management is a business administration function, it is best performed from an environmental management perspective. (DDR)

Donovan, Connie

1998-01-01

362

Scenario Generation and Stochastic Programming Models for Asset Liability Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we develop and test scenario generation methods for asset liability managementmodels. We propose a multi-stage stochastic programming model for a Dutch pension fund. Bothrandomly sampled event trees and event trees fitting the mean and the covariance of the returndistribution are used for generating the coefficients of the stochastic program. In order to investigatethe performance of the model

Roy Kouwenberg

1998-01-01

363

Minutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste Management Topic  

E-print Network

with the Symposium on the State of the Science: Animal Manure and Waste Management Attended by: M. Risse (UGA), T. Doug Hamilton agreed to organize the workshop on "Management of Lagoons and liquid waste storage: Southern Animal and Waste Management Quarterly 2. Format & length: Electronic, pdf and MSWord (by request

364

Safeguards and security recommendations for the OCRWM (Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management) Federal Waste Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The systems and procedures that will be part of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) -- managed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) -- will be subject to the requirements of nuclear materials safeguards. The FWMS will include the acceptance of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) at the

B. W. Moran; L. G. Fishbone; J. H. Saling; E. R. Johnson; E. F. Wonder; Johnson; VA Fairfax

1989-01-01

365

Plasma reactor waste management systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

1992-01-01

366

Scientific and technological uncertainty, the precautionary principle, scenarios and risk management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncertainty, the precautionary principle and scenario are three important concepts in current regulatory debates concerned with risk management. In this paper, each concept is described in relation to its regulatory context and a linkage between the three concepts is established. Three scenarios relating to increasing scientific and technical uncertainty are presented. The most obvious regulatory approach to uncertainty is to

Michael D. Rogers

2001-01-01

367

Radioactive Waste Management in Central Asia - 12034  

SciTech Connect

After the collapse of the Soviet Union the newly independent states in Central Asia (CA) whose regulatory bodies were set up recently are facing problems with the proper management of radioactive waste and so called 'nuclear legacy' inherited from the past activities. During the former Soviet Union (SU) period, various aspects of nuclear energy use took place in CA republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Activities range from peaceful use of energy to nuclear testing for example at the former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Kazakhstan, and uranium mining and milling industries in all four countries. Large amounts of radioactive waste (RW) have been accumulated in Central Asia and are waiting for its safe disposal. In 2008 the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), with the support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, has developed bilateral projects that aim to assist the regulatory bodies in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan (from 2010) to identify and draft relevant regulatory requirements to ensure the protection of the personnel, population and environment during the planning and execution of remedial actions for past practices and radioactive waste management in the CA countries. The participating regulatory authorities included: Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyrgyzstan State Agency on Environmental Protection and Forestry, Nuclear Safety Agency of Tajikistan, and State Inspectorate on Safety in Industry and Mining of Uzbekistan. The scope of the projects is to ensure that activities related to radioactive waste management in both planned and existing exposure situations in CA will be carried out in accordance with the international guidance and recommendations, taking into account the relevant regulatory practice from other countries in this area. In order to understand the problems in the field of radioactive waste management we have analysed the existing regulations through the so called 'Threat assessment' in each CA country which revealed additional problems in the existing regulatory documents beyond those described at the start of our ongoing bilateral projects in Kazakhstan, Kirgizistan Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. (authors)

Zhunussova, Tamara; Sneve, Malgorzata; Liland, Astrid [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

2012-07-01

368

Using STELLA System Dynamic Model to Analyze Greenhouse Gases' Emission From Solid Waste Management in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Using a system dynamic model (SDM), such as STELLA, to analyze the waste management policy is a new trial for Taiwan's research communities. We have developed an easy and relatively accurate model for analyzing the greenhouse gases emission for the wastes from animal farming and municipalities. With the local research data of the past decade, we extract the most prominent factors and assemble the SDM. The results and scenarios were compared with the national inventory. By comparing to the past data, we found these models reasonably represent the situation in Taiwan. However, SDM can program many scenarios and produce a lot of prediction data. With the development of many program control tools on STELLA, we believe the models could be further used by researchers or policy-makers to find the needed research topics, to set the future scenarios and to determine the management tools.

Horng, Jao-Jia; Lee, R.F.; Liao, K.Y.

2004-03-31

369

Waste management for Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: Extended summary  

SciTech Connect

The Shippingport Station (SSDP) is demonstrating that the techniques and methodologies of waste management, which are currently employed by the nuclear industry, provide adequate management and control of waste activities for the decommissioning of a large scale nuclear plant. The SSDP has some unique aspects in that as part of the objective to promote technology transfer, multiple subcontractors are being utilized in the project. The interfaces resulting from multiple subcontractors require additional controls. Effective control has been accomplished by the use of a process control and inventory system, coupled with personnel training in waste management activities. This report summarizes the waste management plan and provides a status of waste management activities for SSDP.

Mullee, G.R.; Schulmeister, A.R.

1987-01-01

370

A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY  

EPA Science Inventory

Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

371

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to

Kirk

1993-01-01

372

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

Not Available

1993-12-01

373

A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN  

SciTech Connect

This paper is entitled ''A QUARTER CENTURY OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN JAPAN''. Since the first statement on the strategy for radioactive waste management in Japan was made by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1976, a quarter century has passed, in which much experience has been accumulated both in technical and social domains. This paper looks back in this 25-year history of radioactive waste management in Japan by highlighting activities related to high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal.

Masuda, S.

2002-02-25

374

Human factors in waste management - potential and reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is enormous potential for human factors contributions in the realm of waste management. The reality, however, is very different from the potential. This is particularly true for low-level and low-level mixed-waste management. The hazards are less severe; therefore, health and safety requirements (including human factors) are not as rigorous as for high-level waste. High-level waste management presents its own

Thompson

1996-01-01

375

A NEW RUSSIAN WASTE MANAGEMENT INSTALLATION  

SciTech Connect

The Polyarninsky Shipyard (sometimes called Navy Yard No. 10 or the Shkval Shipyard) has been designated as the recipient for Solid Radioactive Waste (SRW) management facilities under the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program. The existing SRW storage site at this shipyard is filled to capacity, which is forcing the shipyard to reduce its submarine dismantlement activities. The Polyarninsky Shipyard Waste Management Installation is planned as a combination of several AMEC projects. It will have several elements, including a set of hydraulic metal cutting tools, containers for transport and storage, the Mobile Pretreatment Facility (MPF) for Solid Radioactive Waste, the PICASSO system for radiation monitoring, and a Waste Storage Facility. Hydraulically operated cutting tools can cut many metal items via shearing so that dusts or particulates are not generated. The AMEC Program procured a cutting tool system, consisting of a motor and hydraulic pumping unit, a 38-mm conduit-cutting tool, a 100- mm pipe-cutting tool, and a spreading tool all mounted on a wheeled cart. The vendor modified the tool system for extremely cold conditions and Russian electrical standards, then delivered the tool system to the Polyarninsky shipyard. A new container for transportation and storage of SRW and been designed and fabricated. The first 400 of these containers have been delivered to the Northern Fleet of the Russian Navy for use at the Polyarninsky Shipyard Waste Management Installation. These containers are cylindrical in shape and can hold seven standard 200-liter drums. They are the first containers ever certified in Russia for the offsite transport of military SRW. These containers can be transported by truck, rail, barge, or ship. The MPF will be the focal point of the Polyarninsky Shipyard Waste Management Installation and a key element in meeting the nuclear submarine dismantlement and waste processing needs of the Russian Federation. It will receive raw waste in various conditions, treat it, package it in standard 200-liter drums, and load these drums into the new transportation and storage containers. The MPF has been designed, fabricated, and assembled at the fabrication site, the Zvezdochka Shipyard. It passed a demonstration test in September 2002. The entire MPF has been disassembled into its transportable modules, which are currently stored at the Zvezdochka Shipyard. In the spring of 2003, the MPF modules will be transported to the Polyarninsky Shipyard, where they will be reassembled and the facility will be cold tested. The site preparation work is already under way for the installation at the Polyarninsky Shipyard. An automatic radiation monitoring system, PICASSO-AMEC, has been developed and will be installed at Polyarninsky Shipyard as one of the elements of the installation. The radiation monitoring system is based on the software package PICASSO-3, developed by the Institute for Energy Technology in Norway. Treated waste f rom the MPF will require safe and secure storage. The Waste Storage Facility will be connected to the MPF, and it will be large enough to store all 400 of the new containers. Incoming waste boxes in overpacks will enter one part of the storage facility on trucks. Then they will be inspected and transferred into the MPF through the receiving area. Drums of processed waste in containers will be removed from the MPF and stacked in another part of the storage facility via a bridge crane. This facility will be designed and construction will begin during the winter of 2002/2003.

Griffith, Andrew; Engxy, Thor; Endregard, Monica; Schwab, Patrick; Nazarian, Ashot; Krumrine, Paul; Backe, Steinar; Gorin, Stephen; Evans, Brent

2003-02-27

376

Evolution of solid waste management in Malaysia: impacts and implications of the solid waste bill, 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid waste generation and its implications for people and the environment are global issues. The complexity of the waste\\u000a composition and the ever-increasing percapita waste generation is a challenge for waste managers, particularly in developing\\u000a countries. Thus, the need to have a clear policy on waste management and legislation to realize that policy is imperative.\\u000a Malaysia is developing rapidly and

Agamuthu Periathamby; Fauziah Shahul Hamid; Kahlil Khidzir

2009-01-01

377

Definition of intrusion scenarios and example concentration ranges for the disposal of near-surface waste at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of conducting performance assessments of its radioactive waste sites and disposal systems to ensure that public health and safety are protected, the environment is preserved, and that no remedial actions after disposal are required. Hanford Site low-level waste performance assessments are technical evaluations of waste sites or disposal systems that provide a basis for making decisions using established criteria. The purpose of this document is to provide a family of scenarios to be considered when calculating radionuclide exposure to individuals who may inadvertently intrude into near-surface waste disposal sites. Specific performance assessments will use modifications of the general scenarios described here to include additional site/system details concerning the engineering design, waste form, inventory, and environmental setting. This document also describes and example application of the Hanford-specific scenarios in the development of example concentration ranges for the disposal of near-surface wastes. The overall goal of the example calculations is to illustrate the application of the scenarios in a performance assessment to assure that people in the future cannot receive a dose greater than an established limit. 24 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Aaberg, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1990-10-01

378

Integrated solid waste management of Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Seattle, Washington, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

379

Waste Management System overview for future spacecraft.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Waste Management Systems (WMS) for post Apollo spacecraft will be significantly more sophisticated and earthlike in user procedures. Some of the features of the advanced WMS will be accommodation of both males and females, automatic operation, either tissue wipe or anal wash, measurement and sampling of urine, feces and vomitus for medical analysis, water recovery, and solids disposal. This paper presents an overview of the major problems of and approaches to waste management for future spacecraft. Some of the processes discussed are liquid/gas separation, the Dry-John, the Hydro-John, automated sampling, vapor compression distillation, vacuum distillation-catalytic oxidation, incineration, and the integration of the above into complete systems.

Ingelfinger, A. L.; Murray, R. W.

1973-01-01

380

Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

381

Management of high-level nuclear wastes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief review is given of significant developments in the management of high-level nuclear wastes since the Oct. 1976 first Pacific Basin Conference on Nuclear Power Development and the Fuel Cycle. Emphasis is on policy and technical developments in the U.S., with some attention paid to developments in other countries that have impacted technical direction in the U.S. Spent fuel

A. M. Platt; J. L. McElroy

1978-01-01

382

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection  

SciTech Connect

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

Calabro, Paolo S. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, via Graziella - loc. Feo di Vito, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.calabro@unirc.it

2009-07-15

383

Issues for small businesses with waste management.  

PubMed

Participation by small and medium enterprise (SME) in corporate social responsibility issues has been found to be lacking. This is a critical issue, as individually SMEs may have little impact on the environment but their collective footprint is significant. The management style and ethical stance of the owner-manager affects business decision making and therefore has a direct impact on the environmental actions of the business. Although adoption of environmental practices to create competitive advantage has been advocated, many businesses see implementation as a cost which cannot be transferred to their customers. After a brief review of pertinent literature this paper reports on an exploratory investigation into the issue. Results show that whereas owner-managers of small enterprises express concern regarding the environment, this does not then translate into better waste management practices. PMID:17445961

Redmond, Janice; Walker, Elizabeth; Wang, Calvin

2008-07-01

384

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false What must my waste management plan include? 62.14431 Section...Constructed on or Before June 20, 1996 Waste Management Plan § 62.14431 What must my waste management plan include? Your waste...

2010-07-01

385

40 CFR 60.2060 - When must I submit my waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false When must I submit my waste management plan? 60.2060 Section...Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2060 When must I submit my waste management plan? You must submit a...

2014-07-01

386

40 CFR 60.2060 - When must I submit my waste management plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false When must I submit my waste management plan? 60.2060 Section...Solid Waste Incineration Units Waste Management Plan § 60.2060 When must I submit my waste management plan? You must submit a...

2013-07-01

387

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false What must my waste management plan include? 62.14431 Section...Constructed on or Before June 20, 1996 Waste Management Plan § 62.14431 What must my waste management plan include? Your waste...

2011-07-01

388

40 CFR 62.14431 - What must my waste management plan include?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false What must my waste management plan include? 62.14431 Section...Constructed on or Before June 20, 1996 Waste Management Plan § 62.14431 What must my waste management plan include? Your waste...

2012-07-01

389

Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different

Goeran Finnveden; Anna Bjoerklund; Marcus Carlsson Reich; Ola Eriksson; Adrienne Soerbom

2007-01-01

390

Planning for waste management: changing discourses and institutional relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waste planning in the UK is confronted with new policy agendas and is under pressure to develop new policy frameworks in the emerging local plans. The changes in policy agendas are pushing waste planning to shift from total reliance on disposal of waste to landfill towards a wider range of waste management techniques based on a hierarchy of options. This

Simin Davoudi

2000-01-01

391

Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today’s rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc; Hans Schnitzer

2009-01-01

392

Management of offshore wastes in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

During the process of finding and producing oil and gas in the offshore environment operators generate a variety of liquid and solid wastes. Some of these wastes are directly related to exploration and production activities (e.g., drilling wastes, produced water, treatment workover, and completion fluids) while other types of wastes are associated with human occupation of the offshore platforms (e.g., sanitary and domestic wastes, trash). Still other types of wastes can be considered generic industrial wastes (e.g., scrap metal and wood, wastes paints and chemicals, sand blasting residues). Finally, the offshore platforms themselves can be considered waste materials when their useful life span has been reached. Generally, offshore wastes are managed in one of three ways--onsite discharge, injection, or transportation to shore. This paper describes the regulatory requirements imposed by the government and the approaches used by offshore operators to manage and dispose of wastes in the US.

Veil, J. A.

1998-10-22

393

An Exploration of Scenarios to Support Sustainable Land Management Using Integrated Environmental Socio-economic Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scenario analysis constitutes a valuable deployment method for scientific models to inform environmental decision-making, particularly for evaluating land degradation mitigation options, which are rarely based on formal analysis. In this paper we demonstrate such an assessment using the PESERA-DESMICE modeling framework with various scenarios for 13 global land degradation hotspots. Starting with an initial assessment representing land degradation and productivity under current conditions, options to combat instances of land degradation are explored by determining: (1) Which technologies are most biophysically appropriate and most financially viable in which locations; we term these the "technology scenarios"; (2) how policy instruments such as subsidies influence upfront investment requirements and financial viability and how they lead to reduced levels of land degradation; we term these the "policy scenarios"; and (3) how technology adoption affects development issues such as food production and livelihoods; we term these the "global scenarios". Technology scenarios help choose the best technology for a given area in biophysical and financial terms, thereby outlining where policy support may be needed to promote adoption; policy scenarios assess whether a policy alternative leads to a greater extent of technology adoption; while global scenarios demonstrate how implementing technologies may serve wider sustainable development goals. Scenarios are applied to assess spatial variation within study sites as well as to compare across different sites. Our results show significant scope to combat land degradation and raise agricultural productivity at moderate cost. We conclude that scenario assessment can provide informative input to multi-level land management decision-making processes.

Fleskens, L.; Nainggolan, D.; Stringer, L. C.

2014-11-01

394

Evaluating a municipal waste management plan using orware  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental consequences of implementing Uppsala's waste management plan have been analysed using orware, a computerized static substance flow model based on life cycle assessment methodology. Normalizing emissions from waste management to total emission loadings in the municipality was tested as a means to improve the evaluation. It was found that anaerobic digestion of biodegradable waste can reduce net environmental impact,

Anna Björklund; Magnus Dalemo; Ulf Sonesson

1999-01-01

395

An overview of military radioactive waste management in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present and past activities of Ministry of Defence (MOD) have resulted in the production of radioactive waste, particularly from the naval nuclear propulsion programme and the nuclear weapons programme. The MOD manages radioactive waste in accordance with national policy and regulation, making use of disposal options where available. MOD radioactive waste management practices are subject to independent review and

Frederic Dawson

1997-01-01

396

An Agent-based National Radioactive Waste Management Framework design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioactive waste management is now a much discussed public concern, especially at the moment with the Taiwanese government's impending announcement of a site for building a final disposal facility before the end of 2008. Despite there being a few software-based waste management systems independently developed within nuclear power plants and off-site interim radioactive waste facilities, much of the systems remain

I.-Hsin Chou; Chin-Feng Fan

2010-01-01

397

Energy implications of alternative solid waste management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the energy implications of alternative solid waste management systems. As state and local governments move away from a traditional single facility strategies to more integrated waste management systems, energy use and recovery patterns will be substantially altered. The direct and indirect effects of such trends will result in major shifts in the volumes and composition of waste

A. L. White; M. B. Becker; S. T. Schatzki

1990-01-01

398

Municipal solid waste management in Nepal: practices and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid waste management in Kathmandu valley of Nepal, especially concerning the siting of landfills, has been a challenge for over a decade. The current practice of the illegal dumping of solid waste on the river banks has created a serious environmental and public health problem. The focus of this study was to carry out an evaluation of solid waste management

D. Pokhrel; T.. Viraraghavan

2005-01-01

399

Development of release scenarios for geologic nuclear waste repositories: Where have we been. Where should we be going  

SciTech Connect

Geologic nuclear waste repositories have been analyzed for almost a decade to determine the conditions or situations that could lead to the initiation of radionuclide release from the waste. This problem has been approached from both the generic and system-specific perspectives, and the assessments have applied expert opinion, fault/event tree, and simulation methods. The results from these studies suggest an emerging consensus that certain scenarios are potentially important and others are unimportant. Past approaches to scenario analysis may have been limited by lack of emphasis on the concept of scenario analysis itself. Future work in the scenario analysis area should focus on strengthening the scientific basis of the analysis and the quantitative evaluation of the uncertainties in the predictions. 25 references.

Burkholder, H.C.

1980-09-01

400

Generating interest rate scenarios for bank asset liability management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last years the Second European Directive on Banking and Financial services demand that financial institutions develop\\u000a asset liability management tools to identify and measure the various financial risks they encounter. The present paper develops\\u000a a goal programming ALM model with a simulation analysis, to assist a commercial bank in managing its exposure to interest\\u000a rate risk taking into

Kosmidou Kyriaki; Constantin Zopounidis

2008-01-01

401

Minimax regret optimization analysis for a regional solid waste management system.  

PubMed

Solid waste management (SWM) facilities are crucial for environmental management and public health in urban regions. Due to the waste management hierarchy, one of the greatest challenges that organizations face today is to figure out how to diversify the treatment options, increase the reliability of infrastructure systems, and leverage the redistribution of waste streams among incineration, compost, recycling, and other facilities to their competitive advantage region wide. Systems analysis plays an important role for regionalization assessment of integrated SWM systems, leading to provide decision makers with break-through insights and risk-informed strategies. This paper aims to apply a minimax regret optimization analysis for improving SWM strategies in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), an economically fast growing region in the US. Based on different environmental, economic, legal, and social conditions, event-based simulation in the first stage links estimated waste streams in major cities in LRGV with possible solid waste management alternatives. The optimization analysis in the second stage emphasizes the trade-offs and associated regret evaluation with respect to predetermined scenarios. Such optimization analyses with multiple criteria have featured notable successes, either by public or private efforts, in diverting recyclables, green waste, yard waste, and biosolids from the municipal solid waste streams to upcoming waste-to-energy, composting, and recycling facilities. Model outputs may link prescribed regret scenarios in decision making with various scales of regionalization policies. The insights drawn from the system-oriented, forward-looking, and preventative study can eventually help decision-makers and stakeholders gain a scientific understanding of the consequences of short-term and long-term decisions relating to sustainable SWM in the fast-growing US-Mexico borderland. PMID:16793251

Chang, Ni-Bin; Davila, Eric

2007-01-01

402

Support of International Waste Management Agreements in the field of TRU Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The USDOE has implemented technical information exchange agreements in the field of TRU waste management with the United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and France. This has been done in an effort to minimize research and development costs, and ensured maximum safety to man and the environment during waste handling and disposal. In this report, the technical work plan for fiscal year 1986 is presented. (JDL)

Not Available

1986-01-01

403

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15

404

Management and utilization of poultry wastes.  

PubMed

Waste by-products such as excreta or bedding material that are generated by the worldwide annual production of more than 40 million metric tons (t) of poultry meat and 600 billion eggs are generally land applied as the final step of a producer's waste management strategy. Under proper land application conditions, the nutrients and organisms in poultry wastes pose little environmental threat. Environmental contamination occurs when land application of poultry wastes is in excess of crop utilization potential, or is done under poor management conditions causing nutrient loss from environmental factors such as soil erosion or surface runoff during rainfall. Environmental parameters of concern are N, P, and certain metals (Cu and Zn in particular), as well as pathogenic microorganisms that may be contained in poultry waste. The biochemical cycle of N is very dynamic, and N contained in poultry waste may either be removed by crop harvest, leave the animal production facility, waste treatment lagoon, or application field as a gas (NH3, NO, NO2, N2O, or N2), or, due to its mobility in soil, be transported in organic or inorganic N forms in the liquid state via surface runoff or leaching into groundwater. Elevated concentrations of NO3-N in groundwater used for human consumption is a health risk to infants that are susceptible to methemoglobinemia. An environmental impact resulting from elevated NO3-N is eutrophication of surface waters. Ammonia loss from poultry waste is an environmental concern because of volatilized wet and dry deposits of NH3 into nitrogen-sensitive ecosystems. Phosphorus in poultry wastes may contribute to environmental degradation by accelerating the process of eutrophication. Unlike N, P is very immobile in soil and must first be transported to a surface water environment to have an environmental impact. It is generally accepted, however, that this nutrient affects receiving waters via transport in eroding soil as sediment-bound P or in surface runoff as soluble inorganic or organic P. Numerous studies have reported that excess P contained in land-applied manures may contribute to eutrophication. Soils containing P concentrations that greatly exceed the agronomic potential of crops may require years or even decades to return to levels that are crop limiting for this nutrient. Environmental concerns include the capacity of such soils to adsorb new P and the amount of P loss from these soils from erosion, runoff, drainage, or leaching to groundwater. Although much information is available regarding the loss of P from agricultural fields from erosion and runoff, less information is available regarding P losses from fields receiving poultry wastes. However, studies have shown that there are many challenges to controlling P losses from fields receiving manures. In addition, subsurface transport of P resulting from repeated application of poultry manure onto soils that are artificially drained is an environmental concern where drainage waters enter or interact with water bodies sensitive to eutrophication. Trace elements such as As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn are often added in excess to poultry feed to increase the animal's rate of weight gain, feed efficiency, and egg production and to prevent diseases. Because most of the excess trace elements are not absorbed by the bird, the concentration of elements excreted in the manure will reflect dietary overformulation. Because trace elements are generally required in very small quantities for crop growth and, like P, are immobile in most soil types, their concentrations will increase with repeated land application of poultry wastes. Of particular concern are accumulations of Cu and Zn in certain soil types utilized for certain crops. Copper and Zn toxicity for some crops have been documented in some areas receiving repeated land-applied poultry wastes. A potential environmental concern relative to poultry litter and trace elements in receiving soils involves the transpor PMID:10392043

Williams, C M; Barker, J C; Sims, J T

1999-01-01

405

Integrated solid waste management of Springfield, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1993 cost of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for Municipal Solid Waste management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of managing MSW in Springfield; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

NONE

1995-11-01

406

Hazardous and toxic waste management in Botswana: practices and challenges.  

PubMed

Hazardous and toxic waste is a complex waste category because of its inherent chemical and physical characteristics. It demands for environmentally sound technologies and know-how as well as clean technologies that simultaneously manage and dispose it in an environmentally friendly way. Nevertheless, Botswana lacks a system covering all the critical steps from importation to final disposal or processing of hazardous and toxic waste owing to limited follow-up of the sources and types of hazardous and toxic waste, lack of modern and specialised treatment/disposal facilities, technical know-how, technically skilled manpower, funds and capabilities of local institutions to take lead in waste management. Therefore, because of a lack of an integrated system, there are challenges such as lack of cooperation among all the stakeholders about the safe management of hazardous and toxic waste. Furthermore, Botswana does not have a systematic regulatory framework regarding monitoring and hazardous and toxic waste management. In addition to the absence of a systematic regulatory framework, inadequate public awareness and dissemination of information about hazardous and toxic waste management, slower progress to phase-out persistent and bio-accumulative waste, and lack of reliable and accurate information on hazardous and toxic waste generation, sources and composition have caused critical challenges to effective hazardous and toxic waste management. It is, therefore, important to examine the status of hazardous and toxic waste as a waste stream in Botswana. By default; this mini-review article presents an overview of the current status of hazardous and toxic waste management and introduces the main challenges in hazardous and toxic waste management. Moreover, the article proposes the best applicable strategies to achieve effective hazardous and toxic waste management in the future. PMID:25432741

Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Meng, Liu

2014-12-01

407

Sustainable solid waste management: an integrated approach for Asian countries.  

PubMed

Solid waste management (SWM) has been an integral part of every human society. The approaches for SWM should be compatible with the nature of a given society, and, in this regard, Asian countries are no exception. In keeping with global trends, the systems are being oriented to concentrate on sustainability issues; mainly through the incorporation of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) technologies. However, degree and nature of improvements toward sustainability are varying and depend on the economic status of a country. High-income countries like Japan and South Korea can afford to spend more to incorporate 3R technologies. Most of the latest efforts focus on "Zero Waste" and/or "Zero Landfilling" which is certainly expensive for weaker economies such as those of India or Indonesia. There is a need to pragmatically assess the expectations of SWM systems in Asian countries. Hence, in this paper, we analyze the situation in different Asian countries, and explore future trends. We conceptually evaluate issues surrounding the sustainability of SWM. We propose a multi-pronged integrated approach for improvement that achieves sustainable SWM in the context of national policy and legal frameworks, institutional arrangement, appropriate technology, operational and financial management, and public awareness and participation. In keeping with this approach, a generic action plan has been proposed that could be tailored to suit a situation in a particular country. Our proposed concept and action plan framework would be useful across a variety of country-specific scenarios. PMID:19081236

Shekdar, Ashok V

2009-04-01

408

Sustainable solid waste management: An integrated approach for Asian countries  

SciTech Connect

Solid waste management (SWM) has been an integral part of every human society. The approaches for SWM should be compatible with the nature of a given society, and, in this regard, Asian countries are no exception. In keeping with global trends, the systems are being oriented to concentrate on sustainability issues; mainly through the incorporation of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) technologies. However, degree and nature of improvements toward sustainability are varying and depend on the economic status of a country. High-income countries like Japan and South Korea can afford to spend more to incorporate 3R technologies. Most of the latest efforts focus on 'Zero Waste' and/or 'Zero Landfilling' which is certainly expensive for weaker economies such as those of India or Indonesia. There is a need to pragmatically assess the expectations of SWM systems in Asian countries. Hence, in this paper, we analyze the situation in different Asian countries, and explore future trends. We conceptually evaluate issues surrounding the sustainability of SWM. We propose a multi-pronged integrated approach for improvement that achieves sustainable SWM in the context of national policy and legal frameworks, institutional arrangement, appropriate technology, operational and financial management, and public awareness and participation. In keeping with this approach, a generic action plan has been proposed that could be tailored to suit a situation in a particular country. Our proposed concept and action plan framework would be useful across a variety of country-specific scenarios.

Shekdar, Ashok V. [Nagpur Institute of Technology, Mahurzari, Katol Road, Nagpur 445304 (India)], E-mail: ashok.shekdar@gmail.com

2009-04-15

409

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

SciTech Connect

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15

410

Communication and coordination support in ad hoc networks for emergency management scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the world has witnessed many catastrophic events where the intervention of first responders was required to manage massive disaster scenarios. To be effective, emergency management teams must be able to coordinate and communicate efficiently. To the best of our knowledge no solution has been proposed to support the communication and coordination of these teams in an integrated

José Mocito; Luís Rodrigues; Hugo Miranda

2010-01-01

411

Organizational justice and conflict management styles : Teaching notes, role playing instructions, and scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to provide a set of role playing exercises for teachers that demonstrates to their students the relationship between organizational justice and conflict management. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The objectives are achieved by presenting two scenarios that illustrate a manager who conducts a performance review and is highly sensitive to organizational justice issues and a

B. Charles Tatum; Richard J. Eberlin

2006-01-01

412

Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry  

E-print Network

This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

Sprinkle, Donald Lee

1991-01-01

413

The Savannah River Site Waste Inventory Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Each hazardous and radioactive waste generator that delivers waste to Savannah River Site (SRS) treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities is required to implement a waste certification plan. The waste certification process ensures that waste has been properly identified, characterized, segregated, packaged, and shipped according to the receiving facilities waste acceptance criteria. In order to comply with the rigid acceptance criteria, the Reactor Division developed and implemented the Waste Inventory Management Program (WIMP) to track the generation and disposal of low level radioactive waste. The WIMP system is a relational database with integrated barcode technology designed to track the inventory radioactive waste. During the development of the WIMP several waste minimization tools were incorporated into the design of the program. The inclusion of waste minimization tools as part of the WIMP has resulted in a 40% increase in the amount of waste designated as compactible and an overall volume reduction of 5,000 cu-ft.

Griffith, J.M.; Holmes, B.R.

1995-09-01

414

Satellite Power System (SPS) financial/management scenarios  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possible benefits of a Satellite Power System (SPS) program, both domestically and internationally, justify detailed and imaginative investigation of the issues involved in financing and managing such a large-scale program. In this study, ten possible methods of financing a SPS program are identified ranging from pure government agency to private corporations. The following were analyzed and evaluated: (1) capital requirements for SPS; (2) ownership and control; (3) management principles; (4) organizational forms for SPS; (5) criteria for evaluation; (6) detailed description and preliminary evaluation of alternatives; (7) phased approaches; and (8) comparative evaluation. Key issues and observations and recommendations for further study are also presented.

Vajk, J. P.

1978-01-01

415

An inexact reverse logistics model for municipal solid waste management systems.  

PubMed

This paper proposed an inexact reverse logistics model for municipal solid waste management systems (IRWM). Waste managers, suppliers, industries and distributors were involved in strategic planning and operational execution through reverse logistics management. All the parameters were assumed to be intervals to quantify the uncertainties in the optimization process and solutions in IRWM. To solve this model, a piecewise interval programming was developed to deal with Min-Min functions in both objectives and constraints. The application of the model was illustrated through a classical municipal solid waste management case. With different cost parameters for landfill and the WTE, two scenarios were analyzed. The IRWM could reflect the dynamic and uncertain characteristics of MSW management systems, and could facilitate the generation of desired management plans. The model could be further advanced through incorporating methods of stochastic or fuzzy parameters into its framework. Design of multi-waste, multi-echelon, multi-uncertainty reverse logistics model for waste management network would also be preferred. PMID:20943308

Zhang, Yi Mei; Huang, Guo He; He, Li

2011-03-01

416

Hazardous healthcare waste management in the Kingdom of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous healthcare waste has become an environmental concern for many developing countries including the Kingdom of Bahrain. There have been several significant obstacles facing the Kingdom in dealing with this issue including; limited documentation regarding generation, handling, management, and disposal of waste. This in turn hinders efforts to plan better healthcare waste management. In this paper, hazardous waste management status in the Kingdom has been investigated through an extensive survey carried out on selected public and private healthcare premises. Hazardous waste management practices including: waste generation, segregation, storage, collection, transportation, treatment, and disposal were determined. The results of this study along with key findings are discussed and summarized. In addition; several effective recommendations and improvements of hazardous waste management are suggested.

Mohamed, L.F. [Environmental Management Program, College of Graduate Studies, Arabian Gulf University, P.O. Box 26671, Manama (Bahrain)], E-mail: lamyafm@agu.edu.bh; Ebrahim, S.A. [Engineering and Maintenance Department, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 12, Manama (Bahrain); Al-Thukair, A.A. [Chemistry Department, King Fahad University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 157, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

2009-08-15

417

Chemical Waste/ Unwanted Material Management in Laboratories on Campus-Checklist This checklist is for managing Chemical Waste/ Unwanted Material in laboratories on the  

E-print Network

Chemical Waste/ Unwanted Material Management in Laboratories on Campus- Checklist This checklist is for managing Chemical Waste/ Unwanted Material in laboratories on the campus of Washington University Danforth

Subramanian, Venkat

418

A framework for assessing integrated water and energy management scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water and energy management strategies in Australia have undergone un- precedented change over the last two decades, as a result of reforms initi- ated by State and Federal governments. These reforms brought about changes to the structure, ownership and regulatory arrangements of the sectors. While the dominant focus of reform has been economic, devel- opments in the recent past, for

Debborah Marsh; Deepak Sharma

419

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

1981-09-01

420

Dynamic analysis for solid waste management systems: an inexact multistage integer programming approach.  

PubMed

In this study, a dynamic analysis approach based on an inexact multistage integer programming (IMIP) model is developed for supporting municipal solid waste (MSW) management under uncertainty. Techniques of interval-parameter programming and multistage stochastic programming are incorporated within an integer-programming framework. The developed IMIP can deal with uncertainties expressed as probability distributions and interval numbers, and can reflect the dynamics in terms of decisions for waste-flow allocation and facility-capacity expansion over a multistage context. Moreover, the IMIP can be used for analyzing various policy scenarios that are associated with different levels of economic consequences. The developed method is applied to a case study of long-term waste-management planning. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated for binary and continuous variables. They can help generate desired decisions of system-capacity expansion and waste-flow allocation with a minimized system cost and maximized system reliability. PMID:19320267

Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe

2009-03-01

421

Anticipatory Water Management in Phoenix using Advanced Scenario Planning and Analyses: WaterSim 5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complexity, uncertainty, and variability are inherent properties of linked social and natural processes; sustainable resource management must somehow consider all three. Typically, a decision support tool (using scenario analyses) is used to examine management alternatives under suspected trajectories in driver variables (i.e., climate forcing's, growth or economic projections, etc.). This traditional planning focuses on a small set of envisioned scenarios whose outputs are compared against one-another in order to evaluate their differing impacts on desired metrics. Human cognition typically limits this to three to five scenarios. However, complex and highly uncertain issues may require more, often much more, than five scenarios. In this case advanced scenario analysis provides quantitative or qualitative methods that can reveal patterns and associations among scenario metrics for a large ensemble of scenarios. From this analysis, then, a smaller set of heuristics that describe the complexity and uncertainty revealed provides a basis to guide planning in an anticipatory fashion. Our water policy and management model, termed WaterSim, permits advanced scenario planning and analysis for the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. In this contribution we examine the concepts of advanced scenario analysis on a large scale ensemble of scenarios using our work with WaterSim as a case study. For this case study we created a range of possible water futures by creating scenarios that encompasses differences in water supplies (our surrogates for climate change, drought, and inherent variability in riverine flows), population growth, and per capital water consumption. We used IPCC estimates of plausible, future, alterations in riverine runoff, locally produced and vetted estimates of population growth projections, and empirical trends in per capita water consumption for metropolitan cities. This ensemble consisted of ~ 30, 700 scenarios (~575 k observations). We compared and contrasted two metropolitan communities that exhibit differing growth projections and water portfolios; moderate growth with a diverse portfolio versus high growth for a more restrictive portfolio. Results illustrate that both communities exhibited an expanding envelope of possible, future water outcomes with rational water management trajectories. However, a more diverse portfolio resulted in a broad, time-insensitive decision space for management interventions. The reverse was true for the more restrictive water portfolio with high growth projections.

Sampson, D. A.; Quay, R.; White, D. D.; Gober, P.; Kirkwood, C.

2013-12-01

422

76 FR 58543 - Draft Policy Statement on Volume Reduction and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management that updates the 1981 Policy...Management Programs, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...

2011-09-21

423

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA BIOMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA BIOMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN DEVELOPED BY: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH to properly manage this waste and control the spread of infection is required by the State of Florida, SAFETY, INSURANCE & RISK MANAGEMENT June 2008 #12;Table of Contents Section Page Background 1 Definitions

Asaithambi, Asai

424

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported on: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, TRU waste immobilization and decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, /sup 129/I fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation, waste management system and safety studies, effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, backfill material, spent fuel storage (criticality), barrier sealing and liners for U mill tailings, and revegetation of inactive U tailings sites. (DLC)

Chikalla, T.D.

1980-11-01

425

Animal biocalorimeter and waste management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A biocalorimeter and waste management system is provided for making metabolic heat release measurements of animals or humans in a calorimeter (enclosure) using ambient air as a low velocity source of ventilating air through the enclosure. A shroud forces ventilating air to pass over the enclosure from an end open to ambient air at the end of the enclosure opposite its ventilating air inlet end and closed around the inlet end of the enclosure in order to obviate the need for regulating ambient air temperature. Psychrometers for measuring dry- and wet-bulb temperature of ventilating air make it possible to account for the sensible and latent heat additions to the ventilating air. A waste removal system momentarily recirculates high velocity air in a closed circuit through the calorimeter wherein a sudden rise in moisture is detected in the ventilating air from the outlet.

Poppendiek, Heinz F. (Inventor); Trimailo, William R. (Inventor)

1995-01-01

426

Managing nuclear waste: Social and economic impacts  

SciTech Connect

Recent research has focused on perceptions of risk dominant source of economic impacts due to siting a high level radioactive waste facility. This article addresses the social and economic considerations involved with the issue of risk perception and other types of negative imagery. Emphasis is placed on ways of measuring the potential for economic effects resulting from perceptions prior to construction and operation of a HLW facility. We describe the problems in arriving at defensible estimates of economic impacts. Our review has found that although legal and regulatory bases may soon allow inclusion of these impacts in EIS and for compensation purposes, credible scientific methods do not currently exist for predicting the existence or magnitude of changes in economic decision-making. Policy-makers should recognize the potential for perception-based economic impacts in determining the location and means of managing radioactive waste; but, they also need be cognizant of the current limitations of quantitative estimates of impacts in this area.

Hemphill, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bassett, G.W. Jr. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics

1993-03-01

427

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01

428

Waste management for different fusion reactor designs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) waste management studies performed up to 1998 concerned three power tokamak designs. In-vessel structural materials consist of V-alloys or low activation martensitic (LAM) steel; tritium-producing materials are Li 2O, Pb-17Li, Li 4SiO 4 with a Be-multiplier; coolants are helium or water. The strategy chosen reduces permanent radwaste by recycling the in-vessel materials and by clearance of the other structures. Limits of the contact dose rate and specific activity of the waste allowing such options are defined accordingly. SEAFP activities for 1999 enlarge the analysis to three additional reactors with in-vessel structures made with SiC/SiC composites. These materials cannot be recycled due to their form and, according to national regulations of E.C. countries, long-lived activation products hinder near-surface burial (NSB).

Rocco, Paolo; Zucchetti, Massimo

2000-12-01

429

Environmental remediation and waste management information systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

1993-12-31

430

Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, July-December, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, other support, in situ storage or disposal, waste form development and characterization, process and equipment development, and the Defense Waste Processing Facility are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations: tank farm operation, inspection program, burial ground operations, and waste transfer/tank replacement.

None

1986-10-01

431

The tenth conference on solid waste management & materials policy and the New York State solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the Tenth Conference on Solid Waste Management and Materials Policy and the New York State Solid Waste Management held February 19-22, 1995 in New York City are presented. Such topics as recycling, resource recovery, emission characteristics of burn barrels, ash management, controlling landfill closure costs, flow control and federalism, composting programs, air pollutant emissions from MSW landfills, backyard waste management, waste-based manufacturing, and scrap tire management are covered. A separate abstract and indexing were prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-05-01

432

78 FR 46940 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Special Wastes; Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals From Electric Utilities AGENCY...of Special Wastes; Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals From Electric Utilities that...associated with the requirements for coal combustion residual management units. The...

2013-08-02

433

HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics.

Sebastian Puente

1998-07-25

434

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

1986-09-01

435

Solid waste management challenges for cities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stakeholders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factors affecting performance waste management systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Questionnaire as Annex for waste management baseline assessment. - Abstract: Solid waste management is a challenge for the cities' authorities in developing countries mainly due to the increasing generation of waste, the burden posed on the municipal budget as a result of the high costs associated to its management, the lack of understanding over a diversity of factors that affect the different stages of waste management and linkages necessary to enable the entire handling system functioning. An analysis of literature on the work done and reported mainly in publications from 2005 to 2011, related to waste management in developing countries, showed that few articles give quantitative information. The analysis was conducted in two of the major scientific journals, Waste Management Journal and Waste Management and Research. The objective of this research was to determine the stakeholders' action/behavior that have a role in the waste management process and to analyze influential factors on the system, in more than thirty urban areas in 22 developing countries in 4 continents. A combination of methods was used in this study in order to assess the stakeholders and the factors influencing the performance of waste management in the cities. Data was collected from scientific literature, existing data bases, observations made during visits to urban areas, structured interviews with relevant professionals, exercises provided to participants in workshops and a questionnaire applied to stakeholders. Descriptive and inferential statistic methods were used to draw conclusions. The outcomes of the research are a comprehensive list of stakeholders that are relevant in the waste management systems and a set of factors that reveal the most important causes for the systems' failure. The information provided is very useful when planning, changing or implementing waste management systems in cities.

Abarca Guerrero, Lilliana, E-mail: l.abarca.guerrero@tue.nl [Built Environment Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech, 25612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maas, Ger, E-mail: g.j.maas@tue.nl [Built Environment Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech, 25612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hogland, William, E-mail: william.hogland@lnu.se [School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar (Sweden)

2013-01-15

436

WASTE MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waste management is emerging as a key sector for sustainable development in South Africa with opportunities for enhancing\\u000a investments in carbon credits that target reduction of methane from landfills and moveable assets in relation to environmentally\\u000a sound equipment required for effective waste management. In the past, the waste management sector was dominated by private\\u000a sector with selective operations in what

PATRICK KARANI; STAN M. JEWASIKIEWITZ

2007-01-01

437

75 FR 16037 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...becomes final, Tokusen's management of the wastes covered by this...Subtitle D landfill of Waste Management Industrial Subtitle D landfill...or if circumstances have changed so that the information is...to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)....

2010-03-31

438

Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system  

SciTech Connect

Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: lgodfrey@csir.co.za

2008-07-01

439

Waste management in Greenland: current situation and challenges.  

PubMed

Waste management in Greenland (56,000 inhabitants) is characterized by landfilling, incineration and export to Denmark of small quantities of metals and hazardous waste. The annual amount of waste is estimated to about 50,000?tons but actual data are scarce. Data on the waste composition is basically lacking. The scattered small towns and settlements, the climate and the long transport distances between towns and also to recycling industries abroad constitute a complex situation with respect to waste management. The landfills have no collection of gas and leachate and the incinerators are small and equipped with only moderate flue gas cleaning technology. This report summarizes the current waste management situation in Greenland and identifies important challenges in improving the waste management. PMID:21382877

Eisted, Rasmus; Christensen, Thomas H

2011-10-01

440

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01

441

Waste Management with Earth Observation Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The range of applications where Earth Observation (EO) can be useful has been notably increased due to the maturity reached in the adopted technology and techniques. In most of the cases, EO provides a manner to remotely monitor particular variables and parameters with a more efficient usage of the available resources. Typical examples are environmental (forest, marine, resources…) monitoring, precision farming, security and surveillance (land, maritime…) and risk / disaster management (subsidence, volcanoes…). In this context, this paper presents a methodology to monitor waste disposal sites with EO. In particular, the explored technology is Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which applies the interferometric concept to SAR images. SAR is an advanced radar concept able to acquire 2D coherent microwave reflectivity images for large scenes (tens of thousands kilometres) with fine resolution (< 1 m). The main product of InSAR is Digital Elevation Models (DEM) that provide key information about the tri-dimensional configuration of a scene, that is, a height map of the scene. In practice, this represents an alternative way to obtain the same information than in-situ altimetry can provide. In the case of waste management, InSAR has been used to evaluate the potentiality of EO to monitor the disposed volume along a specific range of time. This activity has been developed in collaboration with the Agència de Resídus de Catalunya (ARC) (The Waste Agency of Catalonia), Spain, in the framework of a pilot project. The motivation comes from the new law promoted by the regional Government that taxes the volume of disposed waste. This law put ARC in duty to control that the real volume matches the numbers provided by the waste processing firms so that they can not commit illegal actions. Right now, this task is performed with in-situ altimetry. But despite of the accurate results, this option is completely inefficient and limits the numbers of polls that can be generated and the number of waste sites that can be studied. As a consequence, the option to take profit of EO represents a good chance for ARC to improve the precision and quality of the monitoring tasks. This paper will present the methodology developed for monitoring waste sites as well as some sample results obtained with ENVISAT images. These data have been acquired for a controlled waste site, which accounts the largest activity in the disposal of solid waste generated by the construction sector. Cross-checking with ground-truth acquired by ARC is also presented for validation purposes. In the current phase, the available data is still limited and this makes work conclusions tentative. Further data acquired for different sites shall be analyzed at short term before obtaining more conclusive results.

Margarit, Gerard; Tabasco, A.

2010-05-01

442

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01

443

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1981-03-01

444

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01

445

Introduction to Nuclear Waste Management Nuclear Waste is a type of radioactive waste that is usually the by-product of  

E-print Network

Introduction to Nuclear Waste Management Nuclear Waste is a type of radioactive waste Meltdowns Bad? - Nuclear Fallout -Water Pollution - Human Health Nuclear Waste Management between decay and waste management. 2. Determine a means by which this process can be accelerated. 3

Auerbach, Scott M.

446

A purview of waste management evolution: Special emphasis on USA  

SciTech Connect

The generation of waste in urban regions over time is seen to impact the balance of anthropogenic and natural resources. Various national and international initiatives to manage urban solid waste are in place and has thus have evolved at present to form an assortment of different subcomponents involving environmental, administrative, regulatory, scientific, market, technology, and socio-economic factors, which has increasing bearing on the US due to its volume and nature of discards. This paper draws together the various aspects of municipal solid waste (MSW) management as it evolved, particularly in the American society through reviewing works and findings. In many parts of the country, waste management at present, primarily involves landfilling, incineration with and without energy recovery, recycling and composting. Legislation, nature of wastes and market trends continue to redefine management operations and its responsibilities and impacts. Complexities are added to it by the nature of urban development as well. New studies and concepts like 3Rs, cradle-to-cradle, industrial ecology, and integrated waste management are adding new dimensions for solving waste problems towards achieving sustainable resource use. Local initiatives, both public and private are in the forefront of adopting alternate waste management procedures. The assistance from various government and private bodies, supporting shifts in waste management approaches, have immense value, as according to the new paradigms, nothing goes to waste.

Kollikkathara, Naushad [Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ 07043 (United States)], E-mail: kollikkathn1@mail.montclair.edu; Feng, Huan; Stern, Eric [Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ 07043 (United States)

2009-02-15

447

Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: practices and challenges.  

PubMed

Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal. PMID:19540745

Manaf, Latifah Abd; Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd

2009-11-01

448

Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

Garfi, M. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: marianna.garfi@mail.ing.unibo.it; Tondelli, S. [DAPT, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Bonoli, A. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)

2009-10-15

449

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01

450

Waste load allocation for water quality management of a heavily polluted river using linear programming.  

PubMed

A waste load allocation model using linear programming has been developed for economic water quality management. A modified Qual2e model was used for water quality calculations and transfer coefficients were derived from the calculated water quality. This allocation model was applied to the heavily polluted Gyungan River, located in South Korea. For water quality management of the river, two scenarios were proposed. Scenario 1 proposed to minimise the total waste load reduction in the river basin. Scenario 2 proposed to minimise waste load reduction considering regional equity. Waste loads, which have to be reduced at each sub-basin and WWTP, were determined to meet the water quality goal of the river. Application results of the allocation model indicate that advanced treatment is required for most of the existing WWTPs in the river basin and construction of new WWTPs and capacity expansion of existing plants are necessary. Distribution characteristics of pollution sources and pollutant loads in the river basin was analysed using Arc/View GIS. PMID:15137169

Cho, J H; Ahn, K H; Chung, W J; Gwon, E M

2003-01-01

451

International nuclear waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect

The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US.

Abrahms, C W; Patridge, M D; Widrig, J E

1995-11-01

452

Integrating waste management with Job Hazard analysis  

SciTech Connect

The web-based Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) system is a tool designed to help capture and communicate the results of the hazard review and mitigation process for specific work activities. In Fluor Hanford's day-to-day work planning and execution process, AJHA has become the focal point for integrating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) through industrial health and safety principles; environmental safety measures; and involvement by workers, subject-matter experts and management. This paper illustrates how AJHA has become a key element in involving waste-management and environmental-control professionals in planning and executing work. To support implementing requirements for waste management and environmental compliance within the core function and guiding principles of an integrated safety management system (ISMS), Fluor Hanford has developed the a computer-based application called the 'Automated Job Hazard Analysis' (AJHA), into the work management process. This web-based software tool helps integrate the knowledge of site workers, subject-matter experts, and safety principles and requirements established in standards, and regulations. AJHA facilitates a process of work site review, hazard identification, analysis, and the determination of specific work controls. The AJHA application provides a well-organized job hazard analysis report including training and staffing requirements, prerequisite actions, notifications, and specific work controls listed for each sub-task determined for the job. AJHA lists common hazards addressed in the U.S. Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) federal codes; and State regulations such as the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Administration (WISHA). AJHA also lists extraordinary hazards that are unique to a particular industry sector, such as radiological hazards and waste management. The work-planning team evaluates the scope of work and reviews the work site to identify potential hazards. Hazards relevant to the work activity being analyzed are selected from the listing provided in AJHA. The work team can also enter one-time hazards unique to the work activity. Because AJHA is web based, it can be taken into the field during site walk-downs using wireless or cell- phone technologies. Once hazards are selected, AJHA automatically lists mandatory and optional controls, based on the referenced codes and good work practices. The hazards selected may also require that additional specific analysis be performed, focusing on the unique characteristics of the job being analyzed. For example, the physical characteristics, packaging, handling, and disposal requirements for a specific waste type. The work team then evaluates the identified hazards and related controls and adds details as needed for the specific work activity being analyzed. The selection of relevant hazards also triggers required reviews by subject-matter experts (SMEs) and the on-line completion of necessary forms and permits. The details of the hazard analysis are reviewed on line or in a work- team group setting. SME approvals are entered on-line and are published in the job hazard analysis report. (authors)

NONE

2007-07-01

453

Dismantlement and Radioactive Waste Management of DPRK Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for “complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement,” or “CVID.” It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and long completion times. The radioactive waste management problem in fact offers a prospect for international participation to engage the DPRK constructively. DPRK nuclear dismantlement, when accompanied with a concerted effort for effective radioactive waste management, can be a mutually beneficial goal.

Jooho, W.; Baldwin, G. T.

2005-04-01

454

Waste Acceptance Decisions and Uncertainty Analysis at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Attainment Team (AT) routinely provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations with Go/No-Go decisions associated with the disposition of over 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous waste. This supply of waste comes from 60+ environmental restoration projects over the next 15 years planned to be dispositioned at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF WAC AT decision making process is accomplished in four ways: (1) ensure a clearly defined mission and timeframe for accomplishment is established, (2) provide an effective organization structure with trained personnel, (3) have in place a set of waste acceptance decisions and Data Quality Objectives (DQO) for which quantitative measures are required, and (4) use validated risk-based forecasting, decision support, and modeling/simulation tools. We provide a summary of WAC AT structure and performance. We offer suggestions based on lessons learned for effective transfer to other DOE.

Redus, K. S.; Patterson, J. E.; Hampshire, G. L.; Perkins, A. B.

2003-02-25

455

Hazardous waste database: Waste management policy implications for the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hazardous waste risk assessment modeling (HaWRAM) database is being developed to analyze the risk from treatment technology operations and potential transportation accidents associated with the hazardous waste management alternatives. These alternatives are being assessed in the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). To support the risk analysis, the current database contains

M. A. Lazaro; A. J. Policastro; A. A. Antonopoulos; H. M. Hartmann; B. Koebnick; M. Dovel; P. W. Stoll

1994-01-01

456

New hazardous waste management system: regulation of wastes or wasted regulation  

SciTech Connect

The unsound management of hazardous wastes, as exemplified by Love Canal, causes a variety of environmental and health problems. A review of present state controls reveals the need for the Federal regulation that was incorporated in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). A detailed description of RCRA, however, faults the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for deferring regulation and for its failure to meet deadlines, issue standards, or include many dangerous wastes in the prohibited list. EPA's interim standards of essentially voluntary guidelines will offer little protection from contamination until final permit regulations are established. 326 references. (DCK)

Friedland, S.I.

1981-01-01

457

An exploration of scenarios to support sustainable land management using integrated environmental socio-economic models.  

PubMed

Scenario analysis constitutes a valuable deployment method for scientific models to inform environmental decision-making, particularly for evaluating land degradation mitigation options, which are rarely based on formal analysis. In this paper we demonstrate such an assessment using the PESERA-DESMICE modeling framework with various scenarios for 13 global land degradation hotspots. Starting with an initial assessment representing land degradation and productivity under current conditions, options to combat instances of land degradation are explored by determining: (1) Which technologies are most biophysically appropriate and most financially viable in which locations; we term these the "technology scenarios"; (2) how policy instruments such as subsidies influence upfront investment requirements and financial viability and how they lead to reduced levels of land degradation; we term these the "policy scenarios"; and (3) how technology adoption affects development issues such as food production and livelihoods; we term these the "global scenarios". Technology scenarios help choose the best technology for a given area in biophysical and financial terms, thereby outlining where policy support may be needed to promote adoption; policy scenarios assess whether a policy alternative leads to a greater extent of technology adoption; while global scenarios demonstrate how implementing technologies may serve wider sustainable development goals. Scenarios are applied to assess spatial variation within study sites as well as to compare across different sites. Our results show significant scope to combat land degradation and raise agricultural productivity at moderate cost. We conclude that scenario assessment can provide informative input to multi-level land management decision-making processes. PMID:24263675

Fleskens, L; Nainggolan, D; Stringer, L C

2014-11-01

458

Applications of life cycle assessment and cost analysis in health care waste management  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Health Care Waste (HCW) scenarios were assessed through environmental and cost analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCW treatment using microwave oven had the lowest environmental impacts and costs in comparison with autoclave and lime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lime had the worst environmental and economic results for HCW treatment, in comparison with autoclave and microwave. - Abstract: The establishment of rules to manage Health Care Waste (HCW) is a challenge for the public sector. Regulatory agencies must ensure the safety of waste management alternatives for two very different profiles of generators: (1) hospitals, which concentrate the production of HCW and (2) small establishments, such as clinics, pharmacies and other sources, that generate dispersed quantities of HCW and are scattered throughout the city. To assist in developing sector regulations for the small generators, we evaluated three management scenarios using decision-making tools. They consisted of a disinfection technique (microwave, autoclave and lime) followed by landfilling, where transportation was also included. The microwave, autoclave and lime techniques were tested at the laboratory to establish the operating parameters to ensure their efficiency in disinfection. Using a life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis, the decision-making tools aimed to determine the technique with the best environmental performance. This consisted of evaluating the eco-efficiency of each scenario. Based on the life cycle assessment, microwaving had the lowest environmental impact (12.64 Pt) followed by autoclaving (48.46 Pt). The cost analyses indicated values of US$ 0.12 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with microwaves, US$ 1.10 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated by the autoclave and US$ 1.53 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with lime. The microwave disinfection presented the best eco-efficiency performance among those studied and provided a feasible alternative to subsidize the formulation of the policy for small generators of HCW.

Soares, Sebastiao Roberto, E-mail: soares@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Finotti, Alexandra Rodrigues, E-mail: finotti@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Prudencio da Silva, Vamilson, E-mail: vamilson@epagri.sc.gov.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); EPAGRI, Rod. Admar Gonzaga 1347, Itacorubi, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina 88034-901 (Brazil); Alvarenga, Rodrigo A.F., E-mail: alvarenga.raf@gmail.com [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Ghent University, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure Links 653/9000 Gent (Belgium)

2013-01-15

459

A legislator`s guide to municipal solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this guide is to allow individual state legislators to gain a better understanding of municipal solid waste (MSW) management issues in general, and examine the applicability of these concerns to their state. This guide incorporates a discussion of MSW management issues and a comprehensive overview of the components of an integrated solid waste management system. Major MSW topics discussed include current management issues affecting states, federal activities, and state laws and local activities. Solid waste characteristics and management approaches are also detailed.

Starkey, D.; Hill, K.

1996-08-01

460

Life-Cycle-based Solid Waste Management. I: Model Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an integrated solid waste management ~ISWM! model to assist in identifying alternative SWM strategies that meet cost, energy, and environmental emissions objectives. An SWM system consisting of over 40 unit processes for collection, transfer, separation, treatment ~e.g., combustion, composting!, and disposal of waste as well as remanufacturing facilities for processing recycled material is defined. Waste is categorized

Eric Solano; S. Ranji Ranjithan; Morton A. Barlaz; E. Downey Brill

2002-01-01

461

Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

1992-01-01

462

The Management of Chemical Waste in a University Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This thesis describes a study of the management of chemical waste at the State University of New York at Binghamton. The study revealed that the majority of chemical waste at the university is in the form of hazardous waste. It was hypothesized that the volume, related costs, and potential long-term liability associated with the disposal of…

Coons, David Michael

463

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The collection, treatment, disposal, and monitoring of radioactive ; wastes (solid, liquid, and gaseous) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are ; described in detail, Illustrations of facilities, maps, and tables of data on ; waste volumes and radionuelides discharged to the enviromnent are included. The ; philosophy and history of waste management are discussed. The report constitutes ; an evaluation

Browder; F. N. comp

1959-01-01

464

Scientific basis for nuclear waste management 11: Volume 112: Proceedings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book contains 74 reports on the scientific aspects of nuclear waste management. Divided into eight topical areas, the book contains papers discussing mathematical modeling of waste form solubilities, radionuclide migration, vitrification, grouting, corrosion, geochemistry, spent fuels, glasses, and nuclear waste facilities. (TEM)

M. J. Apted; R. E. Westerman

1987-01-01

465

Municipal waste management in Sicily: Practices and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are numerous problems yet to be solved in waste management and although efforts towards waste recovery and recycling have been made, landfills are still the most common method used in the EU and many other industrialised countries. Thermal disposal, particularly incineration, is a tested and viable alternative. In 2004, only 11% of the annual waste production of Italy was

Antonio Messineo; Domenico Panno

2008-01-01

466

Urban solid waste management in Tanzania Issues, concepts and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban solid waste in Tanzania in general and in Dar es Salaam city in particular, is a serious environmental problem. Concurrent with recent socioeconomic development, coupled with liberalization of the economy and rapid population growth, the quantum of solid waste generated has increased at a rapid rate. The manner in which urban solid waste is managed in Dar es Salaam

Michael Yhdego