Sample records for wastewater sludge treatments

  1. Biomembrane wastewater treatment by activated sludge method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Bodzek; Zuzanna Debkowska; Ewa Lobos; Krystyna Konieczny

    1996-01-01

    The paper compares the biomembrane and classical activated sludge methods of wastewater treatment and presents the influence of ultrafiltration on the activated sludge condition. It specifies the difference of enzymatic activity of activated sludge in both systems. In effect of both activated sludge performance and separation properties of the ultrafiltration membrane, the effluent from the biomembrane system is less loaded.

  2. Wastewater treatment using activated sludge entrapped in polyethylene glycol prepolymer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nobuko Hashimoto; Tatsuo Sumino

    1998-01-01

    Immobilized activated sludge was applied to the treatment of organic wastewater discharged from a semiconductor plant. To enhance the treatment efficiency, the growth characteristics of heterotrophic bacteria and the effect of the BOD loading rate in continuous wastewater treatment by the immobilized activated sludge were investigated. The activated sludge was entrapped in polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer pellets. Wastewater with a

  3. Minimization of excess sludge production for biological wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuansong Wei; Renze T. Van Houten; Arjan R. Borger; Dick H. Eikelboom; Yaobo Fan

    2003-01-01

    Excess sludge treatment and disposal currently represents a rising challenge for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to economic, environmental and regulation factors. There is therefore considerable impetus to explore and develop strategies and technologies for reducing excess sludge production in biological wastewater treatment processes. This paper reviews current strategies for reducing sludge production based on these mechanisms: lysis-cryptic growth, uncoupling

  4. 40 CFR 721.10667 - Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. 721.10667...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10636 - Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste. 721.10636...Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical...slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10667 - Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. 721.10667...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical...sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10636 - Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste. 721.10636...Slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical...slimes and sludges, automotive coating, wastewater treatment, solid waste (PMN...

  8. Adsorbent obtained from CEPT sludge in wastewater chemically enhanced treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Xu; W. T. Zhang; G. B. Li

    2005-01-01

    Chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) in municipal wastewater treatment is particularly suitable for rapidly growing cities. The focus on CEPT process now might be the cost of chemicals and disposal of chemical sludge. In this study, the potential application of adsorbent made from CEPT sludge in CEPT wastewater treatment was investigated in various conditions, such as the adsorbent dosage, pH,

  9. Digital image processing and analysis for activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Lee, Xue Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Yeap, Kim Ho; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge system is generally used in wastewater treatment plants for processing domestic influent. Conventionally the activated sludge wastewater treatment is monitored by measuring physico-chemical parameters like total suspended solids (TSSol), sludge volume index (SVI) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. For the measurement, tests are conducted in the laboratory, which take many hours to give the final measurement. Digital image processing and analysis offers a better alternative not only to monitor and characterize the current state of activated sludge but also to predict the future state. The characterization by image processing and analysis is done by correlating the time evolution of parameters extracted by image analysis of floc and filaments with the physico-chemical parameters. This chapter briefly reviews the activated sludge wastewater treatment; and, procedures of image acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation and analysis in the specific context of activated sludge wastewater treatment. In the latter part additional procedures like z-stacking, image stitching are introduced for wastewater image preprocessing, which are not previously used in the context of activated sludge. Different preprocessing and segmentation techniques are proposed, along with the survey of imaging procedures reported in the literature. Finally the image analysis based morphological parameters and correlation of the parameters with regard to monitoring and prediction of activated sludge are discussed. Hence it is observed that image analysis can play a very useful role in the monitoring of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25381111

  10. Direct sludge filtration: sustainable municipal wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harry Futselaar; Patrick van Lierop; Rob Borgerink

    2012-01-01

    After the successes of ultrafiltration (UF) capillary membranes in well water, surface water, seawater and wastewater effluent polishing, a new membrane concept is introduced that is capable to treat sludge from the biological reactor directly. The technology is called “direct sludge filtration” and is simple, clean and maintenance poor. Based on the successful 0.8 and 1.5?mm hydrophilic polyethersulfone (PES) UF

  11. Sludge reduction by lumbriculus variegatus in Ahvas wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Basim, Yalda; Farzadkia, Mahdi; Jaafarzadeh, Nematollah; Hendrickx, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Sludge production is an avoidable problem arising from the treatment of wastewater. The sludge remained after municipal wastewater treatment contains considerable amounts of various contaminants and if is not properly handled and disposed, it may produce extensive health hazards. Application of aquatic worm is an approach to decrease the amount of biological waste sludge produced in wastewater treatment plants. In the present research reduction of the amount of waste sludge from Ahvaz wastewater treatment plant was studied with the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus in a reactor concept. The sludge reduction in the reactor with worm was compared to sludge reduction in a blank reactor (without worm). The effects of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration up to 3 mg/L (run 1) and up to 6 mg/L (run 2) were studied in the worm and blank reactors. No meaningful relationship was found between DO concentration and the rate of total suspended solids reduction. The average sludge reductions were obtained as 32% (run 1) and 33% (run 2) in worm reactor and 16% (run 1) and 12% (run 2) in the blank reactor. These results showed that the worm reactors may reduce the waste sludge between 2 and 2.75 times higher than in the blank conditions. The obtained results showed that the worm reactor has a high potential for use in large-scale sludge processing. PMID:23369451

  12. Wastewater treatment performance and sludge reduction properties of a household wastewater treatment system combined with an aerobic sludge digestion unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsuyoshi Ichinari; Akitaka Ohtsubo; Tetsunori Ozawa; Kohji Hasegawa; Keiji Teduka; Tatsuo Oguchi; Yoshiaki Kiso

    2008-01-01

    On-site domestic wastewater treatment systems (Johkasous) have become popular in Japan and play an important role in controlling pollution of aquatic environments. Appropriate control of accumulated sludge is an important aspect of the use of these systems. With the goals of reducing sludge production and the total volume of the system, we developed and evaluated an experimental system. The total

  13. Enhanced primary wastewater treatment by sludge recycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ju Chang Huang; Ling Li

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a cost?effective modified primary treatment method which can significantly increase the removal of both finely?divided and soluble organic matter without resorting to the use of any chemical coagulants or secondary treatment method. It involves the recycling of a small portion of the settled primary sludge and then mixing it, after brief aeration, with raw

  14. Wastewater treatment sludge as a raw material for the production of bacillus thuringiensis based biopesticides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria de Lourdes Tirado Montiel; R. D Tyagi; J. R Valero

    2001-01-01

    Seven wastewater sludges of different origins and types were used as an alternate culture medium for producing Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki HD-1. The sludge samples were used under three different preparations: without pre-treatment, with acid treatment (hydrolysed sludge) and the supernatant obtained after centrifugation of the hydrolysed sludge. The sludge composition varied widely with origin and the type of sludge.

  15. A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process B. Boulkrounea , M : Activated sludge, wastewater treatment process, Lyapunov function, Lips- chitz singular discrete the recent results of [2] and [5]. In the last decades, the modeling of the activated sludge wastewater

  16. Wastewater cleanup: Put activated-sludge treatment to work

    SciTech Connect

    Scroggins, D. [Pollution Control, Inc., Florence, KY (United States); Deiters, S. [Diffused Gas Technologies, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Strict wastewater treatment and discharge limits continue to challenge wastewater treatment systems. For industrial wastewater, the selected system must not only meet regulatory requirements, but must also be flexible enough to handle the variations in volume, flowrate and pollutant load that typify industrial effluent streams. At existing industrial sites, the selection of a wastewater treatment system is also impacted by constraints, such as limited space or the desire to minimize downtime or process interruptions. Meanwhile, for municipalities, wastewater treatment requirements are often made or complicated by the need to add a disinfection step to destroy waterborne pathogens in the discharge stream. Biological treatment processes, based on the use of activated sludge, have long been used to degrade organic contaminants in municipal and industrial wastewater. For years, the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has been used to treat wastewater using activated sludge. However, in recent years, the variable depth reactor (VDR) has emerged as an alternative system, by addressing some of the shortcomings of the SBR.

  17. Mechanism for sludge acidification in aerobic treatment of coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Mei; Tseng, I-Cheng; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2006-10-11

    This work was undertaken to investigate the cause of sludge acidification that led to disruption of the activated sludge process treating coking wastewater from a steel-making plant in Taiwan. An activated sludge reactor (ASR) with a working volume of 80 L was used as a model system to simulate the behavior of the real wastewater treatment process. Parameters that may cause acidification or inactivation of the sludge (NH(3), SCN(-), S(2)O(3)(2-) and CN(-)) were studied individually to examine for their effects on the performance of the ASR. The results show that high loading of NH(3), SCN(-) and CN(-) did not lead to pH decrease, while the ASR attained 85% COD removal and nearly 100% SCN degradation. In contrast, when the wastewater was supplemented with ca. 1,000 mg/L of S(2)O(3)(2-), the pH dropped to nearly 4.0 in 2 days and the COD and SCN removal yields were significantly lower (at 50 and 0-20%, respectively). Thus, overloading of S(2)O(3)(2-) was apparently a key factor causing sludge acidification. The results suggest that to ensure a normal functioning of the activated sludge, the influent S(2)O(3)(2-) concentration should be closely monitored and that the pH control of the ASR is indispensable when the S(2)O(3)(2-) loading is in excess. PMID:16784811

  18. Land treatment of contaminated sludge with wastewater irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Demirjian, Y.A.; Westman, T.R.; Joshi, A.M.; Rop, D.J.; Buhl, R.V.; Clark, W.R.

    1984-04-01

    A large-scale field experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of land application of sludge from industrial and domestic wastewater treatment to determine the fate and environmental impact of the contaminants. The sludge contained 13 organic priority pollutants, 16 additional environmentally significant organic compounds, and high concentrations of several metals (zinc, copper, lead, nickel, and cadmium). Each compound was monitored as the irrigation water percolated through the soil and the groundwater over time. Most of the organic compounds diminished to non-detectable levels by the end of the study, and the metals proved harmless to the environment. The effectiveness of land application of sludge with wastewater irrigation was clearly demonstrated. 1 figure, 11 tables.

  19. TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL LATEX WASTEWATER BY ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veerasak THONGLIMP; Gallaya SRISUWAN; Patcharaporn JKAEW

    This research was aimed to study the effect of food to microorganism ratio (F\\/M ratio) , hydraulic retention time (HRT), sulfate, and calcium concentration on activated sludge treatment of concentrated latex industrial wastewater. The experiment on batch aeration was carried out at various F\\/M ratios,HRT, and concentrations of sulfate and calcium. The results showed that the highest BOD5 and COD

  20. Adsorbent obtained from CEPT sludge in wastewater chemically enhanced treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Zhang, W T; Li, G B

    2005-12-01

    Chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) in municipal wastewater treatment is particularly suitable for rapidly growing cities. The focus on CEPT process now might be the cost of chemicals and disposal of chemical sludge. In this study, the potential application of adsorbent made from CEPT sludge in CEPT wastewater treatment was investigated in various conditions, such as the adsorbent dosage, pH, and dosing modes of ferric chloride and adsorbent. It was found that sludge-derived adsorbent was a good way of sludge disposal while enhanced pollutants removal rate and reduced the fresh ferric chloride dosage. With the use of 10.0 mg L(-1) of ferric chloride and 0.6 g L(-1) of the adsorbent at the first stage simultaneously, the enhanced removal efficiencies of turbidity, UV254, COD, TP were 83.3%, 52.3%, 48.8% and 89.0%, respectively. The experiments showed that ferric chloride dose was reduced about 50%. The pH played a significant role in coagulation and adsorption process. PMID:16310821

  1. Cultivation of aerobic granular sludge for rubber wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Noor Hasyimah; Nor Anuar, Aznah; Othman, Inawati; Harun, Hasnida; Sulong Abdul Razak, Muhammad Zuhdi; Elias, Siti Hanna; Mat Hassan, Mohd Arif Hakimi; Chelliapan, Shreesivadass; Ujang, Zaini

    2013-02-01

    Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) was successfully cultivated at 27±1 °C and pH 7.0±1 during the treatment of rubber wastewater using a sequential batch reactor system mode with complete cycle time of 3 h. Results showed aerobic granular sludge had an excellent settling ability and exhibited exceptional performance in the organics and nutrients removal from rubber wastewater. Regular, dense and fast settling granule (average diameter, 1.5 mm; settling velocity, 33 m h(-1); and sludge volume index, 22.3 mL g(-1)) were developed in a single reactor. In addition, 96.5% COD removal efficiency was observed in the system at the end of the granulation period, while its ammonia and total nitrogen removal efficiencies were up to 94.7% and 89.4%, respectively. The study demonstrated the capabilities of AGS development in a single, high and slender column type-bioreactor for the treatment of rubber wastewater. PMID:23317554

  2. Treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater using an activated sludge\\/contact aeration process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-K. Chen; S.-L. Lo

    This study combines a two-phase biological treatment system of activated sludge\\/contact aeration process by adding biological contact filters into the rear sector of the activated sludge aeration tank of the slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plant. This system keeps the advantages of complete mixing of substrates and microorganisms and flexible operation of the activated sludge process, and increased biological phase, less sludge,

  3. Development of anaerobic sludge bed (ASB) reactor technologies for domestic wastewater treatment: motives and perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youssouf Kalogo; Willy Verstraete

    1999-01-01

    During the treatment of raw domestic wastewater in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, the suspended solids (SS) present in the wastewater tend to influence negatively the methanogenic activity and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion efficiency. These problems led to the emergence of various anaerobic sludge bed systems such as the expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB), the upflow

  4. Advanced purification of carbonization wastewater by activated sludge treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Moerman; D. R. Bamelis; P. M. Van Holle; H. L. Vergote; W. H. Verstraete

    1995-01-01

    A full scale activated sludge plant has been developed treating 960 mof carbonization wastewater daily. Results and process parameters from the first three years of operation are described. In spite of intense physical?chemical pretreatment, the carbonization wastewater must still be diluted by 50% prior to biological processing due to the presence of inhibitory organic compounds. The activated sludge plant consists

  5. Development of granular sludge for textile wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khalida Muda; Azmi Aris; Mohd Razman Salim; Zaharah Ibrahim; Adibah Yahya; Mark C. M. van Loosdrecht; Azlan Ahmad; Mohd Zaini Nawahwi

    2010-01-01

    Microbial granular sludge that is capable to treat textile wastewater in a single reactor under intermittent anaerobic and aerobic conditions was developed in this study. The granules were cultivated using mixed sewage and textile mill sludge in combination with anaerobic granules collected from an anaerobic sludge blanket reactor as seed. The granules were developed in a single sequential batch reactor

  6. Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated, Dominic Frigon Department of Civil EngineeringINTRODUCTION Activated sludge treatment processes produce

  7. An activated sludge model based on activated sludge model number 3 for full?scale wastewater treatment plant simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji Fan

    2009-01-01

    A modified model based on the activated sludge model no. 3 was established to simulate a full?scale municipal wastewater treatment plant in Shanghai, China. The activated sludge model no. 3 was modified to describe the simultaneous storage and growth processes occurring in activated sludge systems under aerobic and anoxic conditions. The mechanism of soluble microbial product formation and degradation by

  8. Ozone treatment of wastewater sludge for reduction and stabilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Y. Park; S. K. Maeng; K. G. Song; K. H. Ahn

    2008-01-01

    Ozonation was applied to wastewater sludge for reduction and stabilization. Ozone was found to be very effective at reducing sludge and producing a useful carbon source. An ozone dose of 0.3 g\\/gDS fulfilled the criteria for the disinfection of class A type biosolids. The sludge treated with 0.5 gO3\\/gDS produced no hydrogen sulfide for a month at 29°C. Ozonation resulted

  9. Wastewater cleanup: Put activated-sludge treatment to work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Scroggins; S. Deiters

    1995-01-01

    Strict wastewater treatment and discharge limits continue to challenge wastewater treatment systems. For industrial wastewater, the selected system must not only meet regulatory requirements, but must also be flexible enough to handle the variations in volume, flowrate and pollutant load that typify industrial effluent streams. At existing industrial sites, the selection of a wastewater treatment system is also impacted by

  10. Synergistic cooperation between wastewater-born algae and activated sludge for wastewater treatment: influence of algae and sludge inoculation ratios.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanyan; Mennerich, Artur; Urban, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    An algal-bacterial culture, composed of wastewater-born algae and activated sludge, was cultivated to treat domestic wastewater and accumulate biomass simultaneously. The influence of algae and sludge inoculation ratios on the treatment efficiency and the settleability of the accumulated biomass were investigated. There was no significant effect of the inoculation ratios on the chemical oxygen demand removal. Comparatively, the nutrients removal and related mechanism were varied with different inoculation ratios. The highest nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were observed with 5:1 (algae/sludge) culture (91.0±7.0% and 93.5±2.5%, respectively) within 10 days, which was 5-40% higher and 2-4 days faster than those with other inoculation ratios. The biomass settleability was improved with the assistance of sludge, and the 1:5 (algae/sludge) culture showed the best settleability. Furthermore, 16S rDNA gene analysis showed that the bacterial communities were varying with different algae and sludge inoculation ratios and some specific bacteria were enriched during operation. PMID:22189078

  11. Removal of organic constituents in a coal gasification process wastewater by activated sludge treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. C. Stamoudis; R. G. Luthy; W. Harrison

    1979-01-01

    The wastewater sample was obtained from a pilot-scale HYGAS run. Wastewater was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity and was then processed in an activated sludge reactor at a hydraulic residence time of two days with a bacterial mean cell residence time of 15 days and a COD removal rate of 0.86 per day. Analysis indicates that activated sludge treatment

  12. Integrated application of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for the treatment of wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Latif, Muhammad Asif; Ghufran, Rumana; Wahid, Zularisam Abdul; Ahmad, Anwar

    2011-10-15

    The UASB process among other treatment methods has been recognized as a core method of an advanced technology for environmental protection. This paper highlights the treatment of seven types of wastewaters i.e. palm oil mill effluent (POME), distillery wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, piggery wastewater, dairy wastewater, fishery wastewater and municipal wastewater (black and gray) by UASB process. The purpose of this study is to explore the pollution load of these wastewaters and their treatment potential use in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket process. The general characterization of wastewater, treatment in UASB reactor with operational parameters and reactor performance in terms of COD removal and biogas production are thoroughly discussed in the paper. The concrete data illustrates the reactor configuration, thus giving maximum awareness about upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for further research. The future aspects for research needs are also outlined. PMID:21764417

  13. Phosphorus Recovery From Urban Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Liquor by Ion Exchange

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bottini; L. Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    In this study phosphorous recovery from sludge liquor by ion exchange process was investigated. The efficiency of a commercially available anionic iron oxide resin was evaluated in batch and packed column tests using synthetic phosphorous solution and actual sludge liquor, taken from of an urban wastewater treatment plant (UWWTP). When phosphorous recovery from sludge liquor was investigated, experimental data fitted

  14. Sludge valorization from wastewater treatment plant to its application on the ceramic industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Martínez-García; D. Eliche-Quesada; L. Pérez-Villarejo; F. J. Iglesias-Godino; F. A. Corpas-Iglesias

    The main aim of this study is to assess the effect of incorporating waste sludge on the properties and microstructure of clay used for bricks manufacturing. Wastewater treatment plants produce annually a great volume of sludge. Replacing clay in a ceramic body with different proportions of sludge can reduce the cost due to the utilization of waste and, at the

  15. COMPOSTING OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seminar publication provides practical information on current methods of composting municipal wastewater sludges. It is intended for government and private sector individuals involved in the planning, design, and operation of municipal sludge treatment and disposal systems. C...

  16. Electro-coagulation treatment of oily wastewater with sludge analysis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dhorgham Skban; Sakthipriya, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor to treat the oily effluent by electro-coagulation. The influence of operating parameters such as applied current, type of electrode and electrolysis time on electro-coagulation efficiency has been critically examined. The maximum percentage removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 94% under optimum experimental conditions of pH 6.7, current density 6 mA/cm², electrolysis time 40 min, and using mild steel as anode. The remaining sludge in the reactor was analyzed by energy disperse analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The analysis confirms that the oily pollutant was removed by electroflotation and adsorption of the oily particles of precipitate during the electro-coagulation process. Electro-coagulation can be used as an efficient treatment technique for oily wastewater. PMID:23109567

  17. Treatment of 14 sludge types from wastewater treatment plants using bench and pilot thermal hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Yifei; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A total of 14 types of sludge from household sewage, mixture of domestic and industrial wastewater, and industrial and oil wastewater treatment plants were selected to evaluate the effectiveness and adaptability of thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Organic solubilization, dewatering improvement, volume reduction, high-strength filtrate biodegradation, and dewatered sludge incineration were investigated using bench and pilot thermal hydrolysis experiments (170 °C/60 min). Results showed that sludge types significantly affected the treatment effects. Organic content has a primary influence on thermal effects. The relationship between suspended solid (SS) solubilization and raw sludge organic content was linear with an R(2) of 0.73. The relationship between raw sludge organic content and treated sludge dewatering was linear with an R(2) of 0.86 and 0.65 for pilot and bench pre-treatments, respectively. Household and oil sludge possessed incineration possibilities with high heat value. Industrial and oil sludge filtrate was unsuitable for digestion to recover bioenergy. PMID:22766883

  18. American advances in wastewater treatment related to toxics control and to sludge management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Bishop; J. B. Farrell; K. M. Lee

    1987-01-01

    Research emphasis by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in wastewater treatment has focused on control of toxics and sludge management. This paper describes highlights of the Environmental Protection Agency's research in these areas. The research on toxics control features studies on the treatability and fate of specific chemicals in conventional primary-secondary wastewater treatment and on toxicity reduction in treatment

  19. Continuous treatment of textile wastewater by combined coagulation, electrochemical oxidation and activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheng H. Lin; Chi F. Peng

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of text wastewaters from a large dyeing and finishing mill by a continuous process of combined chemical coagulation, electrochemical oxidation and activated sludge treatment is investigated. The experimental results are assessed in terms of COD and color (turbidity) reductions to determine the overall treatment efficiency of the combined process. Operating variables, such as the wastewater flow rate, conductivity, pH,

  20. Evaluation of thickening and dewatering characteristics of SRC-I wastewater treatment sludges. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The SRC-I Demonstration Plant in Newman, Kentucky, will generate several different sludges as a result of providing extensive wastewater treatment. Because construction of this plant has been postponed indefinitely, there has been an opportunity to generate additional data pertinent to waste treatment. Accordingly, this report presents the results of a study on the thickening and dewatering characteristics of several of the wastewater treatment sludges. The study included: evaluation of chemical conditioning agents; aerobic digestion of biological sludges; gravity thickening; and the relative effectiveness of dewatering by centrifuge, vacuum filter, belt filter, and pressure filter. Sludges were tested individually and in combination. The results indicated that the biological sludge could be best dewatered by pressure filtration. The chemical sludges should be combined prior to dewatering, which should be provided by a belt filter. The tar acid sludge will be kept separate, due to its low pH, and ultimate disposal will be by incineration. The tar acid sludge was more concentrated than had been expected. As a result, thickening, rather than centrifuging, is the recommended treatment for this sludge. All sludges were tested for leachate toxicity by the extraction procedure method. The results were negative, indicating the sludges are non-hazardous in heavy metal concentrations, according to RCRA classification. The test results have identified design changes for the proposed wastewater treatment facilities.

  1. BIOLOGICAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE COMPOSTING OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personnel employed at wastewater treatment plant sludge composting operations are exposed to a variety of viable gram-negative bacteria, and fungi as well as microbial products such as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) in their work environment. This investigation was designed...

  2. AMERICAN ADVANCES IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT RELATED TO TOXICS CONTROL AND TO SLUDGE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research emphasis by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in wastewater treatment has focussed on control of toxics and sludge management. The paper describes highlights of the Environmental Protection Agency's research in these areas. The research on toxics control ...

  3. Development of granular sludge for textile wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Muda, Khalida; Aris, Azmi; Salim, Mohd Razman; Ibrahim, Zaharah; Yahya, Adibah; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Ahmad, Azlan; Nawahwi, Mohd Zaini

    2010-08-01

    Microbial granular sludge that is capable to treat textile wastewater in a single reactor under intermittent anaerobic and aerobic conditions was developed in this study. The granules were cultivated using mixed sewage and textile mill sludge in combination with anaerobic granules collected from an anaerobic sludge blanket reactor as seed. The granules were developed in a single sequential batch reactor (SBR) system under alternating anaerobic and aerobic condition fed with synthetic textile wastewater. The characteristics of the microbial granular sludge were monitored throughout the study period. During this period, the average size of the granules increased from 0.02 +/- 0.01 mm to 2.3 +/- 1.0 mm and the average settling velocity increased from 9.9 +/- 0.7 m h(-1) to 80 +/- 8 m h(-1). This resulted in an increased biomass concentration (from 2.9 +/- 0.8 g L(-1) to 7.3 +/- 0.9 g L(-1)) and mean cell residence time (from 1.4 days to 8.3 days). The strength of the granules, expressed as the integrity coefficient also improved. The sequential batch reactor system demonstrated good removal of COD and ammonia of 94% and 95%, respectively, at the end of the study. However, only 62% of color removal was observed. The findings of this study show that granular sludge could be developed in a single reactor with an intermittent anaerobic-aerobic reaction phase and is capable in treating the textile wastewater. PMID:20580402

  4. Extracellular protein analysis of activated sludge and their functions in wastewater treatment plant by shotgun proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Li, Chun; Wang, Han; Chen, You-Peng; Yan, Peng; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, proteins in extracellular polymeric substances extracted from anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic sludges of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were analyzed to probe their origins and functions. Extracellular proteins in WWTP sludges were identified using shotgun proteomics, and 130, 108 and 114 proteins in anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic samples were classified, respectively. Most proteins originated from cell and cell part, and their most major molecular functions were catalytic activity and binding activity. The results exhibited that the main roles of extracellular proteins in activated sludges were multivalence cations and organic molecules binding, as well as in catalysis and degradation. The catalytic activity proteins were more widespread in anaerobic sludge compared with those in anoxic and aerobic sludges. The structure difference between anaerobic and aerobic sludges could be associated with their catalytic activities proteins. The results also put forward a relation between the macro characteristics of activated sludges and micro functions of extracellular proteins in biological wastewater treatment process. PMID:26160685

  5. Analysis of metals and EOX in sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants: A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniele Goi; Franco Tubaro; Giuliano Dolcetti

    2006-01-01

    The monitoring of extractable organic halogen (EOX) and heavy metal contents in sludge coming from 10 different municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTP) located in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) is reported.In this work, sludge samples drawn from sludge treatment units have been digested and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metal evaluation. Samples were also extracted and analyzed by

  6. Rare earth elements and other trace elements in wastewater treatment sludges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akira Kawasaki; Ryosuke Kimura; Shigemitsu Arai

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of contamination of soil with trace elements by the application of sludges to soil, the contents of rare earth elements (REEs; La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) and other trace elements (Be, As, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Bi, and U) in wastewater treatment sludges were determined.

  7. Physicochemical and thermal characteristics of the sludge produced after thermochemical treatment of petrochemical wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shilpi Verma; Basheshwar Prasad; I. M. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    The present work describes the physicochemical and thermal characteristics of the sludge generated after thermochemical treatment of wastewater from a petrochemical plant manufacturing purified terephthalic acid (PTA). Although FeCl3 was found to be more effective than CuSO4 in removing COD from wastewater, the settling and filtration characteristics of FeCl3 sludge were poorer. Addition of cationic polyacrylamide (CPAA; 0.050 kg\\/m) to the

  8. Odor-causing volatile organic compounds in wastewater treatment plant units and sludge management areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faruk Dincer; Aysen Muezzinoglu

    2008-01-01

    Odors due to malodorous gas and vapor emissions from units of Izmir Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) were studied and evaluated with respect to chemical composition. Altogether 29 target compounds consisting of 4 different groups of chemicals were identified and quantified in the odorous gas samples from wastewater and sludges. Total volatile malodorous organic compounds (VMOC) consisted of reduced sulfur compounds

  9. Pre-treatment of wastewater sludge--biodegradability and rheology study.

    PubMed

    Verma, M; Brar, Satinder K; Riopel, A R; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates the changes in biodegradability, rheology and metal concentration of wastewater sludge--non-hydrolyzed (raw), sterilized, and hydrolyzed (thermal alkaline pre-treatment) at total solids concentration from 10-50 g l(-1) to ascertain the bioavailability of nutrients for subsequent fermentation. The dissolved solids concentration increased linearly with total solids. Irrespective of the wastewater sludge (raw or, pre-treated), percentage biodegradability in terms of total solids (26.5-44.5%), total COD (25.8-56.5%) and dissolved solids (41.9-66.9%) was maximum around 20 g l(-1) solids concentration. The pseudoplasticity of sludge decreased (consistency index decreased from 895.1 to 5.2 and flow behaviour index increased from 0.28 to 0.88, for all sludge types) with pre-treatment and increased with total solids concentration. The pre-treated sludge, namely, sterilized and hydrolyzed sludge showed higher microbial growth (1-2 log cycles increase in comparison to raw sludge) suggesting their susceptibility to microbial degradation. The C:N ratio decreased with pre-treatment (raw sludge > sterilized > hydrolyzed) during biodegradation. Although the metal concentration increased in incubated hydrolyzed sludge, the final concentration was within the regulatory norms for agriculture application. Thus, pretreatment of sludge resulted in increase in biodegradability making it an excellent proponent for fermented value-added products. PMID:17432380

  10. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Sludge Conditioning & Dewatering Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwing, Carl M.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the sludge conditioning and dewatering process of wastewater treatment facilities. In this process, sludge is treated with chemicals to make the sludge coagulate and give up its water more easily. The treated sludge is then dewatered using a vacuum filter. The guide gives step-by-step…

  11. A comparative study of the flocculation behaviour and final properties of synthetic and activated sludge in wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tan Phong Nguyen; Nicholas P. Hankins; Nidal Hilal

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated in a comparative fashion the flocculation behaviour and final properties of both synthetic and activated sludge. Synthetic sludge was prepared according to established procedures; activated sludge was produced in a lab-scale, continuous-flow reactor which was fed with live activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. The novelty of our approach lies in the attempt

  12. Physicochemical and thermal characteristics of the sludge produced after thermochemical treatment of petrochemical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shilpi; Prasad, Basheshwar; Mishra, I M

    2012-01-01

    The present work describes the physicochemical and thermal characteristics of the sludge generated after thermochemical treatment of wastewater from a petrochemical plant manufacturing purified terephthalic acid (PTA). Although FeCl3 was found to be more effective than CuSO4 in removing COD from wastewater, the settling and filtration characteristics of FeCl3 sludge were poorer. Addition of cationic polyacrylamide (CPAA; 0.050kg/m3) to the FeCl3 wastewater system greatly improved the values of the filter characteristics of specific cake resistance (1.2 x 10(8) m/kg) and resistance of filter medium (9.9 x 10(8) m(-1)) from the earlier values of 1.9 x 10(9) m/kg and 1.7 x 10(8) m(-1), respectively. SEM-EDAX and FTIR studies were undertaken, to understand the sludge structure and composition, respectively. The moisture distribution in the CuSO4 sludge, FeCl3 sludge and FeCl3 + CPAA sludge showed that the amount of bound water content in the CuSO4 and FeCl3 + CPAA sludges is less than that of the FeCl3 sludge and there was a significant reduction in the solid-water bond strength of FeCl3 + CPAA sludge, which was responsible for better settling and filtration characteristics. Due to the hazardous nature of the sludge, land application is not a possible route of disposal. The thermal degradation behaviour of the sludge was studied for its possible use as a co-fuel. The studies showed that degradation behaviour of the sludge was exothermic in nature. Because of the exothermic nature of the sludge, it can be used in making fuel briquettes or it can be disposed of via wet air oxidation. PMID:22988641

  13. Characterization, Modeling and Application of Aerobic Granular Sludge for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    Recently extensive studies have been carried out to cultivate aerobic granular sludge worldwide, including in China. Aerobic granules, compared with conventional activated sludge flocs, are well known for their regular, dense, and strong microbial structure, good settling ability, high biomass retention, and great ability to withstand shock loadings. Studies have shown that the aerobic granules could be applied for the treatment of low- or high-strength wastewaters, simultaneous removal of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and decomposition of toxic wastewaters. Thus, this new form of activate sludge, like anaerobic granular sludge, could be employed for the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters in near future. This chapter attempts to provide an up-to-date review on the definition, cultivation, characterization, modeling and application of aerobic granular sludge for biological wastewater treatment. This review outlines some important discoveries with regard to the factors affecting the formation of aerobic granular sludge, their physicochemical characteristics, as well as their microbial structure and diversity. It also summarizes the modeling of aerobic granule formation. Finally, this chapter highlights the applications of aerobic granulation technology in the biological wastewater treatment. It is concluded that the knowledge regarding aerobic granular sludge is far from complete. Although previous studies in this field have undoubtedly improved our understanding on aerobic granular sludge, it is clear that much remains to be learned about the process and that many unanswered questions still remain. One of the challenges appears to be the integration of the existing and growing scientific knowledge base with the observations and applications in practice, which this paper hopes to partially achieve.

  14. Diversity and dynamics of Archaea in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The activated sludge process is one of the most widely used methods for treatment of wastewater and the microbial community composition in the sludge is important for the process operation. While the bacterial communities have been characterized in various activated sludge systems little is known about archaeal communities in activated sludge. The diversity and dynamics of the Archaea community in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Results The Archaea community was dominated by Methanosaeta-like species. During a 15?month period major changes in the community composition were only observed twice despite seasonal variations in environmental and operating conditions. Water temperature appeared to be the process parameter that affected the community composition the most. Several terminal restriction fragments also showed strong correlations with sludge properties and effluent water properties. The Archaea were estimated to make up 1.6% of total cell numbers in the activated sludge and were present both as single cells and colonies of varying sizes. Conclusions The results presented here show that Archaea can constitute a constant and integral part of the activated sludge and that it can therefore be useful to include Archaea in future studies of microbial communities in activated sludge. PMID:22784022

  15. Aeration control in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant: impact on performances, energy consumption

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aeration control in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant: impact strategy on energy consumption and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant for stratospheric ozone [1]. In biological wastewater treatment, microbial processes such as hydroxylamine oxidation

  16. Reduction in excess sludge production in a dairy wastewater treatment plant via nozzle-cavitation treatment: Case study of an on-farm wastewater treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kayako Hirooka; Ryoki Asano; Atsushi Yokoyama; Masao Okazaki; Akira Sakamoto; Yutaka Nakai

    2009-01-01

    Nozzle-cavitation treatment was used to reduce excess sludge production in a dairy wastewater treatment plant. During the 450-d pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) operation, when 300l of the sludge mixed liquor (1\\/10 of the MBR volume) was disintegrated per day by the nozzle-cavitation treatment with the addition of sodium hydrate (final concentration: 0.01% W\\/W) and returned to the MBR, the amount

  17. Phosphorus removal by acid mine drainage sludge from secondary effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xinchao Wei; Roger C. Viadero Jr.; Shilpa Bhojappa

    2008-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge, a waste product from coal mine water treatment, was used in this study as an adsorbent to develop a cost-effective treatment approach to phosphorus removal from municipal secondary effluents. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, temperature, concentration, and contact time for phosphorus removal from wastewater. Batch tests were followed by

  18. Bioavailable and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen in activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was carried out to understand the fate of biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) and bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen (ABDON) along the treatment trains of a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) equipped with an activated sludge (AS) system and a WWTF equipped with a two-stag...

  19. Characterizing hydrocyclone performance for grit removal from wastewater treatment activated sludge plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Majdala Mansour-Geoffrion; Peter L. Dold; Daniel Lamarre; Alain Gadbois; Stéphane Déléris; Yves Comeau

    2010-01-01

    Typically, 15–45% of the mixed liquor (sludge) in biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) consists of inorganic (fixed) suspended solids. A portion of these inorganic compounds is grit (sand) originating from the influent. Grit accumulation impacts WWTP design and operating costs as these unbiodegradable solids reduce the effective treatment capacity of the bioreactor and other unit operations that must be sized

  20. Production of biodegradable plastics from activated sludge generated from a food processing industrial wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, M; Mudliar, S N; Reddy, K M K; Chakrabarti, T

    2004-12-01

    Most of the excess sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (60%) is disposed by landfill. As a resource utilization of excess sludge, the production of biodegradable plastics using the sludge has been proposed. Storage polymers in bacterial cells can be extracted and used as biodegradable plastics. However, widespread applications have been limited by high production cost. In the present study, activated sludge bacteria in a conventional wastewater treatment system were induced, by controlling the carbon: nitrogen ratio to accumulate storage polymers. Polymer yield increased to a maximum 33% of biomass (w/w) when the C/N ratio was increased from 24 to 144, where as specific growth yield decreased with increasing C/N ratio. The conditions which are required for the maximum polymer accumulation were optimized and are discussed. PMID:15288276

  1. A comprehensive substance flow analysis of a municipal wastewater and sludge treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Christensen, T H; Guildal, T; Scheutz, C

    2013-11-11

    The fate of total organic carbon, 32 elements (Al, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) and 4 groups of organic pollutants (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in a conventional wastewater treatment plant were assessed. Mass balances showed reasonable closures for most of the elements. However, gaseous emissions were accompanied by large uncertainties and show the limitation of mass balance based substance flow analysis. Based on the assessment, it is evident that both inorganic and organic elements accumulated in the sewage sludge, with the exception of elements that are highly soluble or degradable by wastewater and sludge treatment processes. The majority of metals and metalloids were further accumulated in the incineration ash, while the organic pollutants were effectively destroyed by both biological and thermal processes. Side streams from the sludge treatment process (dewatering and incineration) back to the wastewater treatment represented less than 1% of the total volume entering the wastewater treatment processes, but represented significant substance flows. In contrast, the contribution by spent water from the flue gas treatment process was almost negligible. Screening of human and eco-toxicity by applying the consensus-based environmental impact assessment method USEtox addressing 15 inorganic constituents showed that removal of inorganic constituents by the wastewater treatment plant reduced the toxic impact potential by 87-92%. PMID:24231042

  2. Occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants: removal and ecotoxicological impact of wastewater discharges and sludge disposal.

    PubMed

    Martín, J; Camacho-Muñoz, D; Santos, J L; Aparicio, I; Alonso, E

    2012-11-15

    The occurrence of sixteen pharmaceutically active compounds in influent and effluent wastewater and in primary, secondary and digested sludge in one-year period has been evaluated. Solid-water partition coefficients (Kd) were calculated to evaluate the efficiency of removal of these compounds from wastewater by sorption onto sludge. The ecotoxicological risk to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, due to wastewater discharges to the receiving streams and to the application of digested sludge as fertilizer onto soils, was also evaluated. Twelve of the pharmaceuticals were detected in wastewater at mean concentrations from 0.1 to 32 ?g/L. All the compounds found in wastewater were also found in sewage sludge, except diclofenac, at mean concentrations from 8.1 to 2206 ?g/kg dm. Ibuprofen, salicylic acid, gemfibrozil and caffeine were the compounds at the highest concentrations. LogKd values were between 1.17 (naproxen) and 3.48 (carbamazepine). The highest ecotoxicological risk in effluent wastewater and digested sludge is due to ibuprofen (risk quotient (RQ): 3.2 and 4.4, respectively), 17?-ethinylestradiol (RQ: 12 and 22, respectively) and 17?-estradiol (RQ: 12 and 359, respectively). Ecotoxicological risk after wastewater discharge and sludge disposal is limited to the presence of 17?-estradiol in digested-sludge amended soil (RQ: 2.7). PMID:22608399

  3. EVALUATION OF THE HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AND SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, started in 1977, clinical and serologic evaluations of workers involved in composting of wastewater treatment plant sludge by the aerated pile method was initiated to evaluate the potential health effects of exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus and other viable and no...

  4. Degradation of phthalate esters in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Roslev; Katrin Vorkamp; Jakob Aarup; Klavs Frederiksen; Per Halkjær Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Efficient removal of phthalate esters (PE) in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is becoming an increasing priority in many countries. In this study, we examined the fate of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in a full scale activated sludge WWTP with biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus. The mean concentrations of DMP, DBP,

  5. Biodegradation of 14C-dicofol in wastewater aerobic treatment and sludge anaerobic biodigestion.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jaime L da M; Silva, Denise P; Martins, Edir M; Langenbach, Tomaz; Dezotti, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Organic micropollutants are often found in domestic and industrial effluents. Thus, it is important to learn their fate, the metabolites generated and their sorption during biological treatment processes. This work investigated the biodegradation of 14C-dicofol organochloride during wastewater aerobic treatment and sludge anaerobic biodigestion. The performance of these processes was evaluated by physical-chemical parameters. Radioactivity levels were monitored in both treatments, and residues of dicofol (DCF) and dichlorobenzophenone (DBP) were quantified by HPLC/UV. The efficiency of the aerobic and anaerobic processes was slightly reduced in the presence of DCF and DBP. After aerobic treatment, only 0.1% of DCF was mineralized, and 57% of radioactivity remained sorbed on biological sludge as DBP. After 18 days of anaerobiosis, only 3% of DCF and 5% of DBP were detected in the sludge. However, 70% of radioactivity remained in the sludge, probably as other metabolites. Dicofol was biodegraded in the investigated process, but not mineralized. PMID:22629645

  6. Fate of selected pharmaceuticals and synthetic endocrine disrupting compounds during wastewater treatment and sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Samaras, Vasilios G; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Mamais, Daniel; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Lekkas, Themistokles D

    2013-01-15

    The concentrations of nine emerging contaminants, including pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) (ibuprofen, IBF; naproxen, NPX; diclofenac, DCF; ketoprofen, KFN) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (triclosan, TCS; bisphenol, BPA; nonylphenol, NP; nonylphenol monoethoxylate, NP1EO; nonylphenol diethoxylate, NP2EO), were determined in wastewater and sludge samples of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Greece. Average concentrations in raw and treated wastewater ranged from 0.39 (KFN) to 12.52 ?g L(-1) (NP) and from wastewater was bound to the particulate phase, while PhACs and BPA were mainly detected in the aqueous phase. Removal of target compounds during wastewater treatment ranged between 39% (DCF) and 100% (IBF). Except of DCF and BPA, similar removal efficiencies were observed in both WWTPs and no effect of WWTP's size and operational conditions was noticed. Use of mass balances showed that accumulation on sludge was a significant removal mechanism for NPs and TCS, while biodegradation/biotransformation was the major mechanism for the other compounds. Sampling of raw and digested sludge demonstrated that IBF and NPX are significantly removed (>80%) during anaerobic digestion, whereas removal of EDCs was lower, ranging up to 55% for NP1EO. PMID:23257325

  7. IASON - Intelligent Activated Sludge Operated by Nanotechnology - Hydrogel Microcarriers in Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleit, E.; Melicz, Z.; Sándor, D.; Zrínyi, M.; Filipcsei, G.; László, K.; Dékány, I.; Király, Z.

    Performance of biological wastewater treatment depends to a large extent on mechanical strength, size distribution, permeability and other textural properties of the activated sludge flocs. A novel approach was developed in applying synthetic polymer materials to organize floc architecture instead of spontaneously formed activated sludge floc. Developed microcarrier polymer materials were used in our experiments to mitigate technological goals. Preliminary results suggest that the PVA-PAA (polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid copolymer) is a feasible choice for skeleton material replacing "traditional" activated sludge floc. Use of PVA-PAA hydrogel material as microreactors and methods for biofilm formation of wastewater bacteria on the carrier material are described. Laboratory scale experimental results with microscopic size bioreactors and their potential application for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification are presented.

  8. Coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge and reuse in post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nair, Abhilash T; Ahammed, M Mansoor

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, feasibility of recovering the coagulant from water treatment plant sludge with sulphuric acid and reusing it in post-treatment of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater were studied. The optimum conditions for coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). Sludge obtained from plants that use polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and alum coagulant was utilised for the study. Effect of three variables, pH, solid content and mixing time was studied using a Box-Behnken statistical experimental design. RSM model was developed based on the experimental aluminium recovery, and the response plots were developed. Results of the study showed significant effects of all the three variables and their interactions in the recovery process. The optimum aluminium recovery of 73.26 and 62.73 % from PACl sludge and alum sludge, respectively, was obtained at pH of 2.0, solid content of 0.5 % and mixing time of 30 min. The recovered coagulant solution had elevated concentrations of certain metals and chemical oxygen demand (COD) which raised concern about its reuse potential in water treatment. Hence, the coagulant recovered from PACl sludge was reused as coagulant for post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater. The recovered coagulant gave 71 % COD, 80 % turbidity, 89 % phosphate, 77 % suspended solids and 99.5 % total coliform removal at 25 mg Al/L. Fresh PACl also gave similar performance but at higher dose of 40 mg Al/L. The results suggest that coagulant can be recovered from water treatment plant sludge and can be used to treat UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater which can reduce the consumption of fresh coagulant in wastewater treatment. PMID:24777321

  9. Life cycle assessment of processes for the treatment of wastewater urban sludge: energy and global warming analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Houillon; O. Jolliet

    2005-01-01

    This study compares six wastewater sludge treatment scenarios applied to a 300,000 equivalent-inhabitant (eq. inh) wastewater treatment plant: agricultural spreading, fluidised bed incineration, wet oxidation, pyrolysis, incineration in cement kilns and landfill. The study focuses on energy and emissions contributing to global warming over the whole treatment life cycle. As a result, avoided burdens by coproducts are very important in

  10. Partitioning, Persistence, and Accumulation in Digested Sludge of the Topical Antiseptic Triclocarban during Wastewater Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOCHEN H EIDLER; ROLF U. H ALDEN

    2006-01-01

    The topical antiseptic agent triclocarban (TCC) is a common additive in many antimicrobial household consum- ables, including soaps and other personal care products. Long-term usage of the mass-produced compound and a lack of understanding of its fate during sewage treatment motivated the present mass balance analysis conducted at a typical U.S. activated sludge wastewater treatment plant featuring a design capacity

  11. Preparation of ZnO nanowire using sludge from wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Fengqin; Ma, Chao; Elingarami, Sauli; He, Nongyue

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we present the synthesis of ZnO nanowire by hydrothermal process through reutilization of sludge from soy sauce wastewater electrochemical treatment. The influences of floc content and caramel pigment concentration on the morphologies of ZnO were studied. The products were characterized by XRD and SEM. The results showed that ZnO powder was of hexagonal wurtzite structure and well crystallized with high purity. Floc content and caramel pigment concentration played an important role in the final morphologies of ZnO nanowires. On the basis of these results, a possible growth mechanism for the formation of ZnO nanowires was described. These findings not only may contribute to control the synthesis of ZnO, but also present a novel method for the disposal of wastewater treatment sludge. PMID:23882849

  12. Occurrence of organic contaminants in sewage sludges from eleven wastewater treatment plants, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Quan-Ying Cai; Ce-Hui Mo; Qi-Tang Wu; Qiao-Yun Zeng; Athanasios Katsoyiannis

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the occurrence of 43 semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) listed as priority pollutants by both China and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, in sewage sludges collected from eleven wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of mainland and Hong Kong, China. Thirty-six SVOCs were detected by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer (GC–MS) and at least 14 in each sample.

  13. Continuous flow aerobic granular sludge reactor for dairy wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Bumbac, C; Ionescu, I A; Tiron, O; Badescu, V R

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study was to assess the treatment performance and granule progression over time within a continuous flow reactor. A continuous flow airlift reactor was seeded with aerobic granules from a laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and fed with dairy wastewater. Stereomicroscopic investigations showed that the granules maintained their integrity during the experimental period. Laser diffraction investigation showed proof of new granules formation with 100-500 ?m diameter after only 2 weeks of operation. The treatment performances were satisfactory and more or less similar to the ones obtained from the SBR. Thus, removal efficiencies of 81-93% and 85-94% were observed for chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand, respectively. The N-NH(+)4 was nitrified with removal efficiencies of 83-99% while the nitrate produced was simultaneously denitrified - highest nitrate concentration determined in the effluent was 4.2 mg/L. The removal efficiency of total nitrogen was between 52 and 80% depending on influent nitrogen load (39.3-76.2 mg/L). Phosphate removal efficiencies ranged between 65 and above 99% depending on the influent phosphate concentration, which varied between 11.2 and 28.3 mg/L. PMID:25714645

  14. Occurrence of multiclass UV filters in treated sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Gago-Ferrero, Pablo; Díaz-Cruz, M Silvia; Barceló, Damià

    2011-08-01

    Many substances related to human activities end up in wastewater and accumulate in sewage sludge. So far, there is only one extensive survey on the occurrence of UV filter residues in sewage sludge. However, more data are required to draw a reliable picture of the fate and effects of these compounds in the environment. This study attempts to fill this gap through the determination of selected UV filters and derivatives namely 4-methylbenzylidenecamphor, benzophenone-3, octocrylene, ethylhexylmethoxycinnamate, ethylhexyldimethyl PABA, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, and 4,4'-dihydroxybenzophenone in treated sewage sludge. The target compounds were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction and after this, determined by ultra high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The determination was fast and sensitive, affording limits of detection lower than 19 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) except for 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (60 ng g(-1) dw). Good recovery rates, especially given the high complexity of sludge matrix (between 70% and 102% except for 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (30%)) were achieved. The application of developed method allowed reporting for the first time the occurrence of two major degradation products of benzophenone-3 that have estrogenic activity in sewage sludge: 4,4'-dihydroxybenzophenone (in 5/15 WWTPs) and 4-hydroxybenzophenone (in 1/15 WWTPs). Results revealed the presence of UV filters in 15 wastewater treatment plants in Catalonia (Spain) at concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 9.17 ?g g(-1) dw. PMID:21530995

  15. Fate of cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in municipal wastewater during activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rivera, Francisco; Field, James A; Brown, Dustin; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the fate of nano-CeO(2) during municipal wastewater treatment using a laboratory-scale activated sludge (A/S) system fed with primarily-treated municipal wastewater and nano-CeO(2) (55.0 mg Ce/L). Nano-CeO(2) was highly removed during A/S treatment (96.6% total Ce). Extensive removal of CeO(2) <200 nm was also attained and the concentration escaping treatment was only 0.11 mg Ce/L. Elimination occurred mainly by aggregation and settling of CeO(2) particles, promoted by circumneutral pH values and by nanoparticle interactions with organic and/or inorganic wastewater constituents. Biosorption also contributed to CeO(2) removal as shown by sludge analysis and batch adsorption studies. Batch bioassays demonstrated that nano-CeO(2) only exerted inhibition of O(2) uptake by A/S at concentrations exceeding those in the bioreactor feed (50% inhibition at 950 mg CeO(2)/L). These findings indicate that A/S treatment is expected to provide extensive removal of nano-CeO(2) in municipal wastewaters. PMID:22265985

  16. Metaproteomics Provides Functional Insight into Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Paul; Wexler, Margaret; Bond, Philip L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis”. When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming ?-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid ? oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. Conclusions/Significance Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of “Accumulibacter” to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models. PMID:18392150

  17. [Characteristics of sludge in treatment of high concentrated organic wastewater by swim-bed technology].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Yang, Jia-Li; Zhang, Yan; Furukawa, Kenji

    2009-02-15

    Based on the technology of conditional activated sludge process, swim-bed technology involving the novel biomass attachment material biofringe (BF) is one of the new and efficient advanced municipal wastewater treatments process. The process demonstrated effective treatment of high concentrated organic wastewater. When VLRs were from 1.7 kg/(m3 x d) to 4.5 kg/(m3 x d), 96% of average COD removal efficiencies and 80.7% of nitrification rate were achieved, respectively. The BF material allowed for attachment of large amounts of biomass. The mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentrations in the reactor reached 23 g/L at the highest during operation period, with holding 20-50 mL/g of SVI. An exponential law was found to be suitable to describe the variation of the viscosity as a function of MLSS. The granulation phenomenon of sludge was observed during the experiment. Protozoan and metazoans on the bio-film and suspended sludge were proved existing in the system by microscopic observation and DNA experiment. Observed sludge yields from 0.1046 to 0.1723 (MLSS/BOD) were obtained in swim-bed system. PMID:19402496

  18. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Seminatural Wetlands and Activated Sludge Wastewater-Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Ilda; Franco, Daniel; Piccioni, Enrico; Favero, Laura; Mattiuzzo, Erika; Zanetto, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the competitiveness of seminatural Free Water Surface (FWS) wetlands compared to traditional wastewater-treatment plants. Six scenarios of the service costs of three FWS wetlands and three different wastewater-treatment plants based on active sludge processes were compared. The six scenarios were all equally effective in their wastewater-treatment capacity. The service costs were estimated using real accounting data from an experimental wetland and by means of a market survey. Some assumptions had to be made to perform the analysis. A reference wastewater situation was established to solve the problem of the different levels of dilution that characterize the inflow water of the different systems; the land purchase cost was excluded from the analysis, considering the use of public land as shared social services, and an equal life span for both seminatural and traditional wastewater-treatment plants was set. The results suggest that seminatural systems are competitive with traditional biotechnological systems, with an average service cost improvement of 2.1-fold to 8-fold, according to the specific solution and discount rate. The main improvement factor was the lower maintenance cost of the seminatural systems, due to the self-regulating, low artificial energy inputs and the absence of waste to be disposed. In this work, only the waste-treatment capacity of wetlands was considered as a parameter for the economic competitiveness analysis. Other goods/services and environmental benefits provided by FWS wetlands were not considered.

  19. Characterization of sulfur in raw and anaerobically digested municipal wastewater treatment sludges.

    PubMed

    Du, Weiwei; Parker, Wayne

    2013-02-01

    A microwave-enhanced acid digestion method that was integrated with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry was developed and validated for determining total, soluble, and precipitated sulfur in wastewater treatment sludges. The coefficient of variation of this method was less than 4.0%. The recovery of dosed sulfur from sludge samples was between 97.1% and 100.5%. The composition of sulfur in primary and waste-activated sludge (WAS) before and after anaerobic digestion at 35 and 55 degrees C was characterized by employing this developed method. There was not an apparent relationship between the precipitated sulfur and nonsoluble iron concentrations in sludges. Raw WAS had a more consistent organic sulfur fractionation because of its relatively homogeneous composition. The organic-sulfur-containing components (proteins) of WAS had reduced degradability as compared with that in primary sludge during anaerobic digestion. Digestion at 55 degrees C increased solubilization but not ultimate conversion of organic sulfur in sludge. PMID:23472328

  20. STATUS OF OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication provides an updated status report on the number and type of oxygen-activated sludge facilities in operation, under construction, and being designed. It describes in detail the latest EPA supported oxygenation research and demonstration project, an evaluation of t...

  1. Occurrence, distribution and potential affecting factors of antibiotics in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-02-15

    The occurrence and distribution of eight quinolones, nine sulfonamides, and five macrolides were investigated in sewage sludge from 45 wastewater treatment plants in 23 cities in China. Among all the antibiotics considered, quinolones were the dominant antibiotics detected in all samples [total concentrations up to 8905 ?g/kg, dry weight (dw)], followed by macrolides (85.1 ?g/kg, dw), and sulfonamides (22.7 ?g/kg, dw). High concentrations of quinolones in sewage sludge indicated that antibiotics are widely used and extensive pollutants in China. Significant differences were observed for the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge samples among the 45 WWTPs. To evaluate the potential factors affecting the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge, wastewater and sludge characteristics, as well as the operational conditions and treatment techniques in WWTPs were investigated. The results indicated that the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge depend to a great extent on wastewater characteristics. Significant correlation between total organic carbon (TOC) and total concentrations of antibiotics was also found in studied WWTPs, indicating that TOC could affect the sludge adsorption capability to the antibiotics to some extent. Moreover, the relation between treatment techniques and the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge showed that antibiotic levels in sludge increased with longer solid retention time. PMID:23340024

  2. Integrated production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with municipal wastewater and sludge treatment at pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Sagastume, F; Hjort, M; Cirne, D; Gérardin, F; Lacroix, S; Gaval, G; Karabegovic, L; Alexandersson, T; Johansson, P; Karlsson, A; Bengtsson, S; Arcos-Hernández, M V; Magnusson, P; Werker, A

    2015-04-01

    A pilot-scale process was operated over 22 months at the Brussels North Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in order to evaluate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production integration with services of municipal wastewater and sludge management. Activated sludge was produced with PHA accumulation potential (PAP) by applying feast-famine selection while treating the readily biodegradable COD from influent wastewater (average removals of 70% COD, 60% CODsol, 24% nitrogen, and 46% phosphorus). The biomass PAP was evaluated to be in excess of 0.4gPHA/gVSS. Batch fermentation of full-scale WWTP sludge at selected temperatures (35, 42 and 55 °C) produced centrate (6-9.4 gCODVFA/L) of consistent VFA composition, with optimal fermentation performance at 42 °C. Centrate was used to accumulate PHA up to 0.39 gPHA/gVSS. The centrate nutrients are a challenge to the accumulation process but producing a biomass with 0.5 gPHA/gVSS is considered to be realistically achievable within the typically available carbon flows at municipal waste management facilities. PMID:25638407

  3. Reduction of sludge generation by the addition of support material in a cyclic activated sludge system for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Moacir Messias de; Lermontov, André; Araujo, Philippe Lopes da Silva; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2013-09-01

    An innovative biomass carrier (Biobob®) was tested for municipal wastewater treatment in an activated sludge system to evaluate the pollutant removal performance and the sludge generation for different carrier volumes. The experiment was carried out in a pilot-scale cyclic activated sludge system (CASS®) built with three cylindrical tanks in a series: an anoxic selector (2.1 m(3)), an aerobic selector (2.5 m(3)) and the main aerobic reactor (25.1 m(3)). The results showed that by adding the Biobob® carrier decreased the MLVSS concentration, which consequently reduced the waste sludge production of the system. Having 7% and 18% (v/v) support material in the aerobic reactor, the observed biomass yield decreased 18% and 36%, respectively, relative to the reactor operated with suspended biomass. The addition of media did not affect the system's performance for COD and TSS removal. However, TKN and TN removal were improved by 24% and 14%, respectively, using 18% (v/v) carrier. PMID:23831747

  4. Treatment of thiosulfate-containing wastewater in activated sludge systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. F. Millano; C. A. Sorber

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous biological oxidation of sodium thiosulfate and organic carbon was studied in continuous bench-scale activated sludge reactors. Thiosulfate oxidation did not influence organic carbon removal, which was more than 90%. Hydraulic detention time, pH, and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations did not influence elemental sulfur production or conversion of thiosulfate to sulfate. The thiosulfate F:M was the only determinant parameters. Thiobacillus

  5. Analysis of metals and EOX in sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants: a case study.

    PubMed

    Goi, Daniele; Tubaro, Franco; Dolcetti, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    The monitoring of extractable organic halogen (EOX) and heavy metal contents in sludge coming from 10 different municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTP) located in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) is reported. In this work, sludge samples drawn from sludge treatment units have been digested and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metal evaluation. Samples were also extracted and analyzed by microcoulometric titrations, following modified DIN 38414 T17 standard, for EOX analysis. Analytical results showed a slight enrichment of the contents of certain metals (Cd< 2mg/kg, Cr< 51.5mg/kg, Cu<105.8 mg/kg, Hg<1.4 mg/kg, Ni<35.9 mg/kg, Pb<58.7 mg/kg, Zn<410.1 mg/kg, Ba<317.1 mg/kg, Co<1 mg/kg, Mo< 5 mg/kg, Mn<106.7 mg/kg), so almost all of the sludge would be suitable for agricultural use following Italian and European regulations. The evaluation of EOX was carried out by using hexane and ethyl acetate as extraction solvents, and a measurable organic halogen content (ranging from 0.31 to 39.5 mg Cl/kg DM) was clearly detected in the sludge. The lowest concentrations of EOX were found in sludge coming from the smallest MWWTPs, which is to be considered more suitable for agricultural use. Additionally, analytical assays on composts, peat and soils were performed to compare EOX concentrations between these matrices and sludge. PMID:15905082

  6. Effect of microalgae/activated sludge ratio on cooperative treatment of anaerobic effluent of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Fatemeh Pourasgharian; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, Akram; Moayedi, Zohreh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this work, capability of the green microalga (MA), Chlorella vulgaris, in treating synthetic anaerobic effluent of municipal wastewater was investigated. While pure C. vulgaris (100 % MA) provided maximum soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) and N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies of 27 and 72 % respectively, addition of activated sludge (AS) to MA in different mass ratios (91, 80, 66.7, 9 % MA) improved wastewater treatment efficiency. Thus giving maximum sCOD and N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies 85 and 86.3 % (for MA/AS = 10/1), respectively. Utilizing AS without C. vulgaris, for treating the synthetic wastewater resulted in 87 % maximum sCOD and 42 % maximum N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies. Furthermore, algal growth and specific growth rates were measured in the systems with microalga as the dominant cellular population. As a result, faster algal growth was observed in mixed systems. Specific growth rate of C. vulgaris was 0.14 (day(-1)) in 100 % MA and 0.39 (day(-1)) in 80 % MA. Finally, data gathered by online measurement of dissolved oxygen indicate that algae-activated sludge mixture improves photosynthetic activity of examined microalga strain during anaerobic effluent treatment. PMID:24052335

  7. A novel approach to the anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater in temperate climates through primary sludge fortification.

    PubMed

    Lester, J N; Soares, A; San Martin, D; Harper, P; Jefferson, B; Brigg, J; Wood, E; Cartmell, E

    2009-09-01

    It is proposed that anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater in temperate climates is attainable through the fortification of wastewater with primary sewage sludge to enhance the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Three bench-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactors (0.5 L) were operated to provide a preliminary verification of this approach. Mass and energy balances were modelled using the GPS-X (COST model, population equivalent of 118,500) to determine the energy balance of the primary sludge wastewater fortification process flowsheet in comparison with conventional aerobic secondary treatment with activated sludge. The addition of 5% primary sludge by volume to crude wastewater pretreated with ultrasound resulted in an increase in total COD from 536 mg L(-1) to 2300 mg L(-1). A COD removal of 86% +/- 8% and methane production of 400 mL L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in the reactor that was supplied with this primary sludge fortified wastewater. In comparison a COD reduction of 77% +/- 8% and 40 mL L(-1) d(-1) of methane were observed in the reactor which was supplied with crude wastewater only, and a 79% +/- 8% COD removal and 156 mL L(-1) d(-1) of methane were observed in UASB2, which was supplied with crude wastewater pretreated with ultrasound. The modelled energy balance for the fortified wastewater treatment process flowsheet was -305 kWh d(-1) compared with -937 kWh d(-1) in the aerobic flowsheet, corresponding to an energy saving of 67%. PMID:19886422

  8. Partitioning, Persistence, and Accumulation in Digested Sludge of the Topical Antiseptic Triclocarban During Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heidler, Jochen; Sapkota, Amir; Halden, Rolf U.

    2009-01-01

    The topical antiseptic agent triclocarban (TCC) is a common additive in many antimicrobial household consumables, including soaps and other personal care products. Long-term usage of the mass-produced compound and a lack of understanding of its fate during sewage treatment motivated the present mass balance analysis conducted at a typical U.S. activated sludge wastewater treatment plant featuring a design capacity of 680 million liters per day. Using automated samplers and grab sampling, the mass of TCC contained in influent, effluent and digested sludge was monitored by isotope dilution liquid chromatography (tandem) mass spectrometry. The average mass of TCC (mean ± standard deviation) entering and exiting the plant in influent (6.1 ± 2.0 ?g/L) and effluent (0.17 ± 0.03 ?g/L) was 3,737 ± 694 and 127 ± 6 g/d, respectively, indicating an aqueous-phase removal efficiency of 97 ± 1%. Tertiary treatment by chlorination and sand filtration provided no detectable benefit to the overall removal. Due to strong sorption of TCC to wastewater particulate matter (78 ± 11% sorbed), the majority of the TCC mass was sequestered into sludge in the primary and secondary clarifiers of the plant. Anaerobic digestion for 19 days did not promote TCC transformation, resulting in an accumulation of the antiseptic compound in dewatered, digested municipal sludge to levels of 51 ± 15 mg/kg dry weight (2,815 ± 917 g/d). In addition to the biocide mass passing through the plant contained in the effluent (3 ± 1%), 76 ± 30% of the TCC input entering the plant underwent no net transformation and instead partitioned into and accumulated in municipal sludge. Based on the rate of beneficial reuse of sludge produced by this facility (95%), which exceeds the national average (63%), study results suggest that approximately three quarters of the mass of TCC disposed of by consumers in the catchment area of the plant ultimately is released into the environment by application of municipal sludge (biosolids) on land used in part for agriculture. PMID:16786704

  9. Mass and energy balances of sludge processing in reference and upgraded wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Mininni, G; Laera, G; Bertanza, G; Canato, M; Sbrilli, A

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary assessment of a platform of innovative upgrading solutions aimed at improving sludge management and resource recovery in wastewater treatment plants. The effectiveness of the upgrading solutions and the impacts of their integration in model reference plants have been evaluated by means of mass and energy balances on the whole treatment plant. Attention has been also paid to the fate of nitrogen and phosphorus in sludge processing and to their recycle back to the water line. Most of the upgrading options resulted in reduced production of dewatered sludge, which decreased from 45 to 56 g SS/(PE?×?day) in reference plants to 14-49 g SS/(PE?×?day) in the upgraded ones, with reduction up to 79 % when wet oxidation was applied to the whole sludge production. The innovative upgrades generally entail an increased demand of electric energy from the grid, but energy recovery from biogas allowed to minimize the net energy consumption below 10 kWh/(PE?×?year) in the two most efficient solutions. In all other cases the net energy consumption was in the range of -11 % and +28 % of the reference scenarios. PMID:25598155

  10. Net energy production and emissions mitigation of domestic wastewater treatment system: a comparison of different biogas-sludge use alternatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2013-09-01

    Wastewater treatment systems are increasingly designed for the recovery of valuable chemicals and energy in addition to waste stream disposal. Herein, the life-cycle energy production and emissions mitigation of a typical domestic wastewater treatment system were assessed, in which different combinations of biogas use and sludge processing lines for industrial or household applications were considered. The results suggested that the reuse of biogas and sludge was so important in the system's overall energy balance and environmental performance that it may offset the cost in the plant's installation and operation. Combined heat and power and household utilization were two prior options for net energy production, provided an ideal power conversion efficiency and biogas production. The joint application of household biogas use and sludge nutrient processing achieved both high net energy production and significant environmental remediation across all impact categories, representing the optimal tradeoff for domestic wastewater treatment. PMID:23880131

  11. Effect of wastewater treatment processes on the pyrolysis properties of the pyrolysis tars from sewage sludges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Xie, Li-Ping; Li, Xin-Yu; Dai, Xiao-Hong; Fei, Xue-Ning; Jiang, Yuan-Guang

    2011-06-01

    The pyrolysis properties of five different pyrolysis tars, which the tars from 1# to 5# are obtained by pyrolyzing the sewage sludges of anaerobic digestion and indigestion from the A2/O wastewater treatment process, those from the activated sludge process and the indigested sludge from the continuous SBR process respectively, were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis at a heating rate of 10 °C/min in the nitrogen atmosphere. The results show that the pyrolysis processes of the pyrolysis tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5# all can be divided into four stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, heavy polar organic compounds decomposition, heavy organic compounds decomposition and the residual organic compounds decomposition. However, the process of 4# pyrolysis tar is only divided into three stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, decomposition of heavy polar organic compounds and the residual heavy organic compounds respectively. Both the sludge anaerobic digestion and the "anaerobic" process in wastewater treatment processes make the content of light organic compounds in tars decrease, but make that of heavy organic compounds with complex structure increase. Besides, both make the pyrolysis properties of the tars become worse. The pyrolysis reaction mechanisms of the five pyrolysis tars have been studied with Coats-Redfern equation. It shows that there are the same mechanism functions in the first stage for the five tars and in the second and third stage for the tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5#, which is different with the function in the second stage for 4# tar. The five tars are easy to volatile.

  12. Study of hybrid vertical anaerobic sludge-aerobic biofilm membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Phattaranawik, Jirachote; Leiknes, TorOve

    2010-03-01

    Alternative design of a hybrid biofilm reactor was developed and evaluated experimentally in this article, aimed to minimize a suspended solid in the effluent and to manage an excess sludge produced in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system. A hybrid vertical anaerobic sludge-aerated biofilm reactor (HyVAB) was proposed and coupled with external submerged membrane filtration for wastewater treatment application. The HyVAB featured an upper chamber of aerobic biofilm, a lower chamber of anaerobic activated sludge, and a roof-shaped separator located between the chambers, to prevent diffusion of dissolved oxygen to the anaerobic chamber. The lower chamber was used for anaerobic digestion of aerobic sludge waste. The effects of hydraulic retention time in the HyVAB on effluent quality and on membrane fouling were studied. The average suspended solids concentration in the effluent was found to be lower than 15 mg/L. The optimum operating conditions for the HyVAB MBR were investigated. PMID:20369572

  13. Application of hydrothermal oxidation and alkaline hydrothermal gasification for the treatment of sewage sludge and pharmaceutical wastewaters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jude A. Onwudili; Pushpa Radhakrishnan; Paul T. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal treatment involving the oxidation and gasification of sewage sludge and pharmaceutical wastewater samples has been carried out in batch autoclave reactor. The efficiency of the oxidation processes measured in terms of total organic carbon (TOC) and total solids (TS) removal showed that effective sample treatments were achieved at moderately low temperatures of 350–450°C. More than 90% TOC removal was

  14. Integration of aerobic granular sludge and mesh filter membrane bioreactor for cost-effective wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Wang, Yun-Kun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Gui, Yong-Xin; Yu, Lei; Xie, Tong-Qing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-10-01

    Conventional MBR has been mostly based on floc sludge and the use of costly microfiltration membranes. Here, a novel aerobic granule (AG)-mesh filter MBR (MMBR) process was developed for cost-effective wastewater treatment. During 32-day continuous operation, a predominance of granules was maintained in the system, and good filtration performance was achieved at a low trans-membrane pressure (TMP) of below 0.025 m. The granules showed a lower fouling propensity than sludge flocs, attributed to the formation of more porous biocake layer at mesh surface. A low-flux and low-TMP filtration favored a stable system operation. In addition, the reactor had high pollutant removal efficiencies, with a 91.4% chemical oxygen demand removal, 95.7% NH(4)(+) removal, and a low effluent turbidity of 4.1 NTU at the stable stage. This AG-MMBR process offers a promising technology for low-cost and efficient treatment of wastewaters. PMID:22370232

  15. Effect of variability on the treatment of textile dyeing wastewater by activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Alinsafi; M. da Motta; S. Le Bonté; M. N. Pons; A. Benhammou

    2006-01-01

    Using a pilot scale continuous system with activated sludge, the effect of the variability of non-pretreated synthetic textile wastewater containing reactive dyes on the pollution bio-removal and on the characteristics of activated sludge (sludge volume index, floc size and shape, filamentous bacteria abundance) has been monitored. Off-line batch respirometry tests have been used in parallel to assess the toxic effects

  16. Production of porous carbonaceous adsorbent from physical activation of sewage sludge: application to wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rio, S; Le Coq, L; Faur, C; Le Cloirec, P

    2006-01-01

    With an objective of production of carbonaceous sorbent for industrial effluent treatment, physical activation by steam of biological sludge collected from the municipal wastewater treatment plant of Nantes (France) was studied and optimised using experimental design. Thus, this activation process consists of a carbonisation under N2 atmosphere at 600 degrees C for 1 h, followed by a thermal oxidation using steam (760 degrees C, 0.5 h, 2.5 L/Umin). The global mass yield of the process is equal to 38%. The thermal treatment allows a specific surface area of up to 225 m2/g to be reached, the porous structure being composed of both micropores and mesopores. The content of acidic surface groups is 0.71 mEq/g whereas that of basic surface groups is 0.55 mEq/g. The adsorption properties of the sorbent made from sludge are estimated with regard to various pollutants representative of industrial pollution of wastewaters and compared with those of commercial activated carbon. Whereas the adsorption capacities of organic micropollutants are quite low because of proportionality to the microporosity, the important mesoporosity of the sorbent leads to interesting properties for macromolecules removal from aqueous solutions, such as dyes (q(m) = 175-200 mg/g). Furthermore, the surface functional groups and Ca2+ ions within the materials allow high copper ion adsorption capacities of 140 mg/g to be obtained. Finally, a techno-economic approach shows that the sludge activation process seems to be economically competitive with regard to incineration. PMID:16605037

  17. Influence of pharmaceutical residues on the structure of activated sludge bacterial communities in wastewater treatment bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kraigher, Barbara; Kosjek, Tina; Heath, Ester; Kompare, Boris; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2008-11-01

    Concern is growing over contamination of the environment with pharmaceuticals because of their widespread use and incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, where microorganisms drive the key processes. The influence of pharmaceuticals on bacterial community structure in activated sludge was assessed in small-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors containing different concentrations (5, 50, 200 and 500microgL(-1)) of several commonly used pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, diclofenac and clofibric acid). T-RFLP analyses of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated a minor but consistent shift in the bacterial community structure in the bioreactor R50 supplied with pharmaceuticals at a concentration of 50microgL(-1), compared to the control reactor R0, which was operated without addition of pharmaceuticals. In the reactors operated with higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals, a greater structural divergence was observed. Bacterial community composition was further investigated by preparation of two clone libraries of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from reactors R0 and R50. Most clones in both libraries belonged to the Betaproteobacteria, among which Thauera, Sphaerotilus, Ideonella and Acidovorax-related spp. dominated. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira sp., which are key organisms for the second stage of nitrification in wastewater treatment plants, were found only in the clone library of the reactor without pharmaceuticals. In addition, diversity indices were calculated for the two clone libraries, indicating a reduced diversity of activated sludge bacterial community in the reactor supplied with 50microgL(-1) of each of selected pharmaceuticals. PMID:18786690

  18. Performances of an activated sludge process for the treatment of fish processing saline wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fathi Aloui; Sonia Khoufi; Slim Loukil; Sami Sayadi

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid proliferation of fish industries across the world. The conditions in the fish industries are often squalid with the continual generation of liquid wastes. The generated wastewaters are rich in salts (NaCl) and nitrogen ammonia. In this work an industrial wastewater containing 1 to 6% salt (NaCl) was treated in an activated sludge

  19. Advances in distributed parameter approach to the dynamics and control of activated sludge processes for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, T T; Wang, F Y; Newell, R B

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a review of modelling and control of biological nutrient removal (BNR)-activated sludge processes for wastewater treatment using distributed parameter models described by partial differential equations (PDE). Numerical methods for solution to the BNR-activated sludge process dynamics are reviewed and these include method of lines, global orthogonal collocation and orthogonal collocation on finite elements. Fundamental techniques and conceptual advances of the distributed parameter approach to the dynamics and control of activated sludge processes are briefly described. A critical analysis on the advantages of the distributed parameter approach over the conventional modelling strategy in this paper shows that the activated sludge process is more adequately described by the former and the method is recommended for application to the wastewater industry. PMID:16458947

  20. FRACTIONATION OF MUTAGENS FROM MUNICIPAL SLUDGE AND WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are potential environmental concerns from the disposal of municipal wastewater effluents and sewage treatment plant sludges. This report summarizes the microbial mutagenic evaluation and chemical analysis of 13 sewage sludge samples from various sewage treatment plants loca...

  1. Occurrence and analysis of parabens in municipal sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Albero, Beatriz; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo; Tadeo, José Luis

    2012-11-15

    A rapid method for determination of seven parabens and two chlorinated by-products in sewage sludge was developed based on matrix solid-phase dispersion and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The analytical procedure showed good recoveries that ranged from 80 to 125%, with relative standard deviations lower than 12% and low detection limits, ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 ng g(-1) dry weight. The developed method was applied to the analysis of sewage sludge collected during 2010 in 19 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in various urban, industrial or rural zones in Madrid (Spain). Methylparaben was found in most of the WWTPs sampled (95%) at levels between 5.1 and 26.2 ng g(-1) dry weight and propylparaben was detected in 74% of the WWTPs at levels up to 44.1 ng g(-1) dry weight. In order to study the temporal variation of parabens and two chlorinated parabens during a four-year period, sludge samples were collected from 3 selected WWTPs. The levels of methylparaben encountered were rather constant throughout the sampling period whereas propylparaben levels slightly increased. In one of the WWTPs monitored, isopropylparaben was found at the beginning of the sampling period but its content decreased and was not detected in the 2010 sampling. PMID:22640822

  2. Toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to ciliated protozoa Stentor coeruleus and Coleps hirtus isolated from activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Beata; Fyda, Janusz; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kocerba, Wioleta; Fia?kowska, Edyta; Sobczyk, Mateusz

    2012-11-01

    We assessed the toxicity of ammonia ions to Stentor coeruleus and Coleps hirtus (Protozoa) isolated from activated sludge taken from two municipal wastewater treatment plants in southern Poland. Stentor coeruleus is a rarely occurring species in activated sludge, unlike the widespread Coleps hirtus. The mean LC50 values (concentration causing 50 % mortality) calculated for the 24 h tests differed hugely between the tested species: 43.03 mg NH(4+) dm(-3) for Stentor coeruleus and 441.12 mg NH(4+) dm(-3) for Coleps hirtus. The ammonia ion concentration apparently is an important factor in the occurrence of these protozoan species in activated sludge. PMID:22976439

  3. Essence of disposing the excess sludge and optimizing the operation of wastewater treatment: rheological behavior and microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Zhang, Zi

    2014-06-01

    Proper disposal of excess sludge and steady maintenance of the high bioactivity of activated sludge in bioreactors are essential for the successful operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Since sludge is a non-Newtonian fluid, the rheological behavior of sludge can therefore have a significant impact on various processes in a WWTP, such as fluid transportation, mixing, oxygen diffusion, mass transfer, anaerobic digestion, chemical conditioning and mechanical dewatering. These are key factors affecting the operation efficiency and the energy consumption of the entire process. In the past decade-due to the production of large quantities of excess sludge associated with the extensive construction of WWTPs and the emergence of some newly-developed techniques for wastewater purification characterized by high biomass concentrations-investigations into the rheology of sludge are increasingly important and this topic has aroused considerable interests. We reviewed a number of investigations into the rheology of sludge, with the purpose of providing systematic and detailed analyses on the related aspects of the rheological behavior of sludge. It is clear that, even though considerable research has focused on the rheology of sludge over a long time period, there is still a need for further thorough investigation into this field. Due to the complex process of bio-treatment in all WWTPs, biological factors have a major influence on the properties of sludge. These influences are however still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the mechanisms involved and magnitude of such impacts. When taking note of the conspicuous biological characteristics of sludge, it becomes important that biological factors, such as the species composition and relative abundance of various microorganisms, as well as the microbial community characteristics that affect relevant operating processes, should be considered. PMID:24462086

  4. Optimizing sequencing batch reactor (SBR) reactor operation for treatment of dairy wastewater with aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Wichern, M; Lübken, M; Horn, H

    2008-01-01

    The biological wastewater treatment using aerobic granular sludge is a new and very promising method, which is predominantly used in SBR reactors which have higher volumetric conversion rates than methods with flocculent sludge. With suitable reactor operation, flocculent biomass will accumulate into globular aggregates, due to the creation of increased substrate gradients and high shearing power degrees. In the research project described in this paper dairy wastewater with a high particle load was treated with aerobic granular sludge in an SBR reactor. A dynamic mathematical model was developed describing COD and nitrogen removal as well as typical biofilm processes such as diffusion or substrate limitation in greater detail. The calibrated model was excellently able to reproduce the measuring data despite of strongly varying wastewater composition. In this paper scenario calculations with a calibrated biokinetic model were executed to evaluate the effect of different operation strategies for the granular SBR. Modeling results showed that the granules with an average diameter of 2.5 mm had an aerobic layer in between 65-95 microm. Density of the granules was 40 kgVSS/m3. Results revealed amongst others optimal operation conditions for nitrogen removal with oxygen concentrations below 5 gO2/m3. Lower oxygen concentrations led to thinner aerobic but thicker anoxic granular layers with higher nitrate removal efficiencies. Total SBR-cycle times should be in between 360-480 minutes. Reduction of the cycle time from 480 to 360 minutes with a 50% higher throughput resulted in an increase of peak nitrogen effluent concentrations by 40%. Considering biochemical processes the volumetric loading rate for dairy wastewater should be higher than 4.5 kgCOD/(m3*d). Higher COD input load with a COD-based volumetric loading rate of 9.0 kgCOD/(m3*d) nearly led to complete nitrogen removal. Under different operational conditions average nitrification rates up to 5 gNH/(m3*h) and denitrification rates up to 3.7 gNO/(m3*h) were achieved. PMID:18845857

  5. Co-treatment of domestic and dairy wastewater in an activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Sparchez, E; Elefsiniotis, P; Wareham, D G; Fongsatitkul, P

    2015-03-01

    This research assesses the potential for co-treatment of a dairy wastewater with a domestic wastewater in a lab-scale, continuous-flow, activated sludge system. To evaluate the influence of the dairy waste contribution, seven runs were conducted with each run being a mixture of dairy wastewater (either cheese or milk) in different ratios ranging from 1:0.01 to 1:0.30 by volume. More than 87% of the carbon was removed for both waste additions; however, while 95% ammonia-nitrogen removal was recorded for the cheese waste, only 75% removal was obtained for the milk. Kinetic studies for carbon consumption revealed a first-order model with lower kinetic constants as the cheese waste proportion increased. Specific carbon consumption rates indicated that the biomass had not reached its maximum potential to degrade carbon. The ability of the biomass to settle was hindered when the Gram negative to Gram positive filamentous bacteria ratio increased to approximately 1.5. PMID:25204524

  6. Nitrification treatment of swine wastewater with acclimated nitrifying sludge immobilized in polymer pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Vanotti, M.B.; Hunt, P.G.

    2000-04-01

    Nitrification of ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) is a critical component for improved systems of animal wastewater treatment. One of the most effective processes uses nitrifying microorganisms encapsulated in polymer resins. It is used in Japan in municipal wastewater treatment plants for higher nitrification rates, shorter hydraulic retention times (HRT), and lower aeration treatment cost. The authors evaluated whether this technology could be adapted for treatment of higher-strength lagoon swine wastewaters containing {approximately}230 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L and 195 mg BOD{sub 5}/L. A culture of acclimated lagoon nitrifying sludge (ALNS) was prepared from a nitrifying biofilm developed in an overland flow soil using fill-and-draw cultivation. The ALNS was successfully immobilized in 3- to 5-mm polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer pellets by a PVA-freezing method. Swine wastewater was treated in aerated, suspended bioreactors with a 15% (w/v) pellet concentration using batch and continuous flow treatment. Alkalinity was supplemented with inorganic carbon to maintain the liquid pH within an optimum range (7.7--8.4). In batch treatment, only 14 h were needed for nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Ammonia was nitrified readily, decreasing at a rate of 16.1 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L h. In contrast, it took 10 d for a control (no-pellets) aerated reactor to start nitrification; furthermore, 70% of the N was lost by air stripping. Without alkalinity supplements, the pH of the liquid fell to 6.0--6.2, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} oxidation stopped. In continuous flow treatment, nitrification efficiencies of 95% were obtained with NH{sub 4}{sup +} loading rates of 418 mg-N/L-reactor d (2.73 g-N/g-pellet d) and an HRT of 12 h. The rate of nitrification obtained with HRT of 4 h was 567 mg-N/L d. In all cases, the NH{sub 4}-N removed was entirely recovered in oxidized N forms. Nitrification rates obtained in this work were not greatly affected by high NH{sub 4}{sup +} or BOD concentration of swine wastewater. Thus, immobilized pellet technology can be adapted for fast and efficient removal of NH{sub 4}{sup +} contained in anaerobic swine lagoons using acclimated microorganisms.

  7. Monitoring of activated sludge settling ability through image analysis: validation on full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, D P; Dias, O; Amaral, A L; Ferreira, E C

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, a great deal of attention has been focused on the research of activated sludge processes, where the solid-liquid separation phase is frequently considered of critical importance, due to the different problems that severely affect the compaction and the settling of the sludge. Bearing that in mind, in this work, image analysis routines were developed in Matlab environment, allowing the identification and characterization of microbial aggregates and protruding filaments in eight different wastewater treatment plants, for a combined period of 2 years. The monitoring of the activated sludge contents allowed for the detection of bulking events proving that the developed image analysis methodology is adequate for a continuous examination of the morphological changes in microbial aggregates and subsequent estimation of the sludge volume index. In fact, the obtained results proved that the developed image analysis methodology is a feasible method for the continuous monitoring of activated sludge systems and identification of disturbances. PMID:18726121

  8. Alkaline extraction of wastewater activated sludge biosolids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flor Y. García Becerra; Edgar J. Acosta; D. Grant Allen

    2010-01-01

    Activated sludge produced by wastewater treatment facilities are a sub-utilized by-product whose handling and disposal represent significant costs to these facilities. In this work, we introduced a simple and effective alkaline extraction technique that extracts up to 75% of the sludge’s organic matter into a liquor containing potentially useful organic material (proteins, carbohydrates, etc.). The results suggest that at pH

  9. Concentrations and distribution of synthetic musks and siloxanes in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Shi, Yali; Li, Wenhui; Xu, Lin; Cai, Yaqi

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we assessed the occurrence and distribution patterns of seven synthetic musks (SMs) and 17 siloxanes in anaerobic digested sludge samples collected at the dewatering process from 42 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in China. SMs in sludge from different WWTPs exhibited similar composition profiles, and their total concentrations ranged from 47.3 ng/g to 68.2 ?g/g dry weight (dw). On average, galaxolide (HHCB, 63.8%) and tonalide (AHTN, 31.7%) accounted for 95.5% of ?SMs. The total concentrations of cyclic siloxanes ranged from sludge indicated that both of them were widely used in China. Among the sludge samples from 42 WWTPs, the concentrations of both ?SMs and ?siloxanes had considerable variations. We investigated the influence of potential factors (wastewater and sludge characteristics, the treatment capacity, serving population, and the treatment techniques of WWTPs) on the levels of target compounds in sludge, and found that SMs were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the total organic carbon (TOC) of the sludge and the serving population of WWTP. There were also strong correlations (p<0.05) between the treatment capacity of WWTPs and cyclic siloxanes, as well as between the TOC of the sludge and linear siloxanes. In addition, the ecological risks of SMs and siloxanes in sewage sludge addressed to land application were assessed, which suggested that there was a low risk to the soil environment. PMID:24463026

  10. Characteristic of the sludge from the wastewater treatment plants near Varna city and possibilities for use in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Marinova-Garvanska, S

    2005-01-01

    During the last few years numerous stations were built for purification of wastewaters in the country. Such a station was opened in Varna town on the Black sea cost. At purification of wastewaters a huge amount of sludge is received. The sludge is accumulated in the WWTP premises, thus hampering its functioning and polluting the environment. The aim of this investigation was to determine the chemical characteristics of the sludge from this station, considering the different modes of treatment: the sludge compactor and the drying beds after some stay. With the sludge from Varna Purification station a pot experiment was set to determine at what levels of loading with sludge the soils differ from each other by the biomass yield and heavy metals content. During the experiment two crops were grown: rape-fodder and rye-grass harvested in two cuts to follow the effects of the sludge use and the post effect in controlled conditions. The experiment was carried out on four soil units: Calcareous Chernozem, Leached Smolnitsa, Leached Cinnamonic Forest soil and Grey Forest soil (Calcic Chernozem, Haplic Vertisol, and two Chromic Luvisols from South and North Bulgaria, respectively). PMID:16114620

  11. XRF and leaching characterization of waste glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, R.G., Jr

    1994-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to investigate use of XRF (x-ray fluorescence spectrometry) as a near real-time method to determine melter glass compositions. A range of glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges associated with DOE sites was prepared. They were analyzed by XRF and wet chemistry digestion with atomic absorption/inductively coupled emission spectrometry. Results indicated good correlation between these two methods. A rapid sample preparation and analysis technique was developed and demonstrated by acquiring a sample from a pilot-scale simulated waste glass melter and analyzing it by XRF within one hour. From the results, XRF shows excellent potential as a process control tool for waste glass vitrification. Glasses prepared for this study were further analyzed for durability by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and product consistency test and results are presented.

  12. Selenium Speciation in Biofilms from Granular Sludge Bed Reactors Used for Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    van Hullenbusch, Eric; /Marne la Vallee U.; Farges, Francois; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur., Paris; Lenz, Markus; Lens, Piet; /Wageningen U.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-13

    Se K-edge XAFS spectra were collected for various model compounds of Se as well as for 3 biofilm samples from bioreactors used for Se-contaminated wastewater treatment. In the biofilm samples, Se is dominantly as Se(0) despite Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy cannot easily distinguish between elemental Se and Se(-I)-bearing selenides. EXAFS spectra indicate that Se is located within aperiodic domains, markedly different to these known in monoclinic red selenium. However, Se can well occur within nanodivided domains related to monoclinic red Se, as this form was optically observed at the rim of some sludges. Aqueous selenate is then efficiently bioreduced, under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  13. Selenium Speciation in Biofilms from Granular Sludge Bed Reactors Used for Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hullenbusch, Eric van [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee (France); Farges, Francois [Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); USM 201 'Mineralogie', UMR CNRS 7160, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, (France); Lenz, Markus; Lens, Piet [Sub-dept. of Environmental Technology, Wageningen Universitaet, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Brown, Gordon E. Jr. [Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, MS 69, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2007-02-02

    Se K-edge XAFS spectra were collected for various model compounds of Se as well as for 3 biofilm samples from bioreactors used for Se-contaminated wastewater treatment. In the biofilm samples, Se is dominantly as Se(0) despite Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy cannot easily distinguish between elemental Se and Se(-I)-bearing selenides. EXAFS spectra indicate that Se is located within aperiodic domains, markedly different to these known in monoclinc red selenium. However, Se can well occur within nanodivided domains related to monoclinic red Se, as this form was optically observed at the rim of some sludges. Aqueous selenate is then efficiently bioreduced, under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  14. Demonstration of vitrification of surrogate F006 waste-water treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Bennert, D.M.; Overcamp, T.J. [Clemson Univ. Environmental Systems Engineering, Anderson, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.; Jantzen, C.M.; Cicero, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A demonstration program with the focus on vitrification of surrogate formulations of Savannah River Site M-Area wastewater treatment sludges has been completed. The program utilized commercially available melting equipment, supplied by EnVitCo, Inc., and Stir Melter, Inc., located at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Laboratories. Over 2000 kg of glass was manufactured in a series of five separate tests with four formulations. Glasses were characterized by Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT), with all glasses showing leach characteristics better than Land Disposal Requirements (LDR) for corresponding F006 waste (TCLP) and benchmark environmental assessment glasses (PCT). Offgas sampling by EPA Method 5 was conducted, including chemical analysis of filter residue and impinger solution. Data is presented on glass leaching, offgas sampling, phase separation, and melter performance.

  15. Fate of surfactants in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants: A model verification study

    SciTech Connect

    Feijtel, T.; Vits, H.; Murray-Smith, R.; Wijk, R. van; Koch, V.; Schroeder, R.; Birch, R.; Ten Berge, W.

    1995-12-31

    The European Chemical Industry has commissioned a joint industry Task Force of the Association International de la Savonnerie et la Detergence (AIS) and the Comite Europeen de Agents de Surface et Intermediares Organiques (CESIO) to develop and apply specific methodology for the environmental monitoring of surfactants. The objectives of the TF was (1) to establish the fate, distribution and concentrations of major surfactants in relevant environmental compartments and (2) to provide the necessary data for checking the applicability of mathematical models to predict their fate and concentrations in these environmental compartments. This presentation will focus on the results of this AIS/CESIO surfactant, monitoring program and how the measured removals, effluent concentrations, and sludge concentrations compare to predicted levels for different wastewater treatment plants across Europe. Mathematical models that predict the fate of chemicals in Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPS) are used as an integral part of risk assessment process in many countries. In this paper, the predictive power of two mathematical models, SIMPLETREAT and WWTREAT, is checked against linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) fate data collected at five WWTPs located across Europe. Magnitudes and time-scales of the variability in WWTP streams were identified using statistical methods. In addition, the performance of these models is also checked against measured removal and effluent data for alcohol ethoxylates and alcohol ethoxysulfates.

  16. Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008

    E-print Network

    Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008 Revised Model calculations and cost benefit analysis for Esbjerg Vest wastewater treatment plant, Denmark PSO-F&U project nr. 2006 This project "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet .DK under the PSO

  17. Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007

    E-print Network

    Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Model calculations and cost "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet.DK under the PSO-F&U projects having National Laboratory, Rambøll, the Estate of Overgaard and SamRas. The wastewater treatment plant Esbjerg

  18. Advanced sludge treatment affects extracellular polymeric substances to improve activated sludge dewatering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Neyens; Jan Baeyens; Raf Dewil; Bart De heyder

    2004-01-01

    The management of wastewater sludge, now often referred to as biosolids, accounts for a major portion of the cost of the wastewater treatment process and represents significant technical challenges. In many wastewater treatment facilities, the bottleneck of the sludge handling system is the dewatering operation. Advanced sludge treatment (AST) processes have been developed in order to improve sludge dewatering and

  19. 6:2 Fluorotelomer alcohol aerobic biotransformation in activated sludge from two domestic wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijie; McCausland, Patricia K; Folsom, Patrick W; Wolstenholme, Barry W; Sun, Hongwen; Wang, Ning; Buck, Robert C

    2013-07-01

    6:2 Fluorotelomer alcohol [6:2 FTOH, F(CF2)6CH2CH2OH] is a major basic chemical being used to manufacture FTOH-based products. After the end of use, 6:2 FTOH-based products may be released to domestic wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as a first major environmental entry point. Activated sludge collected from two WWTPs was dosed with 6:2 FTOH to investigate its biotransformation rate and to identify major transformation products. The volatile 5:2 sFTOH [F(CF2)5CH(OH)CH3] is the most abundant transformation product and accounted for an average of 40mol% of initially dosed 6:2 FTOH after two months of incubation with activated sludge, with 30mol% detected in the headspace. PFPeA [F(CF2)4COOH] averaged 4.4mol% after two months, 2.4-7 times lower than that in sediment and soils. The much lower level of PFPeA formed in activated sludge compared with soil indicates that microbial populations in activated sludge may lack enzymes or suitable environment conditions to promote rapid 5:2 sFTOH decarboxylation to form PFPeA, resulting in more 5:2 sFTOH partitioned to the headspace. PFHxA [F(CF2)5COOH] and 5:3 [F(CF2)5CH2CH2COOH] acid are major non-volatile transformation products in activated sludge. For example, PFHxA averaged 11mol% after two months, which is about 30% higher compared with sediment and soils, suggesting that microbes in WWTPs may utilize similar pathways as that in sediment and soils to convert 5:2 sFTOH to PFHxA. 5:3 Acid averaged 14mol% after two months, comparable to that in soils and slightly lower than in sediment, further confirming that 5:3 acid is a unique product of 6:2 FTOH biotransformation in the environment. PMID:23540810

  20. Application of the upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) process for treatment of complex wastewaters at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, I.W.; Lettinga, G.

    1985-10-01

    The feasibility of the upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) process for the treatment of potato starch wastewater at low ambient temperatures was demonstrated by operating two 5.65 l reactors at 14 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. The organic space loading rates achieved in these laboratory-scale reactors were 3 kg COD/cubic m/day at 14 degrees C and 4-5 kg COD/cubic m/day at 20 degrees C. The corresponding sludge loading rates were 0.12 kg COD/kg VSS/day at 14 degrees C and 0.16-0.18 kg COD/kg VSS/day at 20 degrees C. These findings are of considerable practical importance because application of anaerobic treatment at low ambient temperatures will lead to considerable savings in energy needed for operating the process. As compared with various other anaerobic wastewater treatment processes, a granular sludge upflow process represents one of the best options developed so far. Although the overall sludge yield under psychrophilic conditions is slightly higher than under optimal mesophilic conditions, this doesn't seriously hamper the operation of the process. The extra sludge yield, due to accumulation of slowly hydrolyzing substrate ingredients, was 4.75% of the COD input at 14 degrees C and 1.22% of the COD input at 20 degrees C. 26 references.

  1. Combined Treatment of Leachate from Sanitary Landfill and Municipal Wastewater by Activated Sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Del Borghi; L. Binaghi; A. Converti; M. Del Borghi

    Two leachates from sanitary landfill, characterized by different biodegradability, were mixed with municipal wastewater in different proportions and aerobically treated by activated sludge. The overall removals of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and am- monia as well as the fraction of hardly-biodegradable substances were investigated to se- lect the best operating conditions for the simultaneous removal of these pollutants. Pre- liminary

  2. Micronutrient supplements for optimisation of the treatment of industrial wastewater using activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna E Burgess; Joanne Quarmby; Tom Stephenson

    1999-01-01

    The process performance and metabolic rates of several samples of activated sludge which were dosed with micronutrient supplements have been compared in this study. Six trace metals and six vitamins were used as chemical additives dosed into the mixed liquor. It was confirmed experimentally that a wastewater stream from a chemicals manufacturing plant did not contain a sufficient supply of

  3. Savings with upgraded performance through improved activated sludge denitrification in the combined activated sludge-biofilter system of the Southpest Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Jobbágy, A; Tardy, G M; Palkó, Gy; Benáková, A; Krhutková, O; Wanner, J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to increase the rate of activated sludge denitrification in the combined biological treatment system of the Southpest Wastewater Treatment Plant in order to gain savings in cost and energy and improve process efficiency. Initial profile measurements revealed excess denitrification capacity of the preclarified wastewater. As a consequence, flow of nitrification filter effluent recirculated to the anoxic activated sludge basins was increased from 23,000 m3 d(-1) to 42,288 m3 d(-1) at an average preclarified influent flow of 64,843 m3 d(-1), Both simulation studies and microbiological investigations suggested that activated sludge nitrification, achieved despite the low SRT (2-3 days), was initiated by the backseeding from the nitrification filters and facilitated by the decreased oxygen demand of the influent organics used for denitrification. With the improved activated sludge denitrification, methanol demand could be decreased to about half of the initial value. With the increased efficiency of the activated sludge pre-denitrification, plant effluent COD levels decreased from 40-70 mg l(-1) to < 30-45 mg l(-1) due to the decreased likelihood of methanol overdosing in the denitrification filter. PMID:18469403

  4. Treatment of artificial soybean wastewater anaerobic effluent in a continuous aerobic-anaerobic coupled (CAAC) process with excess sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaoxia; Fu, Weichao; Wu, Shihan; Li, Chun

    2012-12-01

    In this study, treatment of artificial soybean wastewater anaerobic effluent was studied in a continuous aerobic-anaerobic coupled (CAAC) process. The focus was on COD and nitrogen removal as well as excess sludge reduction. During the continuous operation without reflux, the COD removal efficiency was 96.5% at the optimal hydraulic retention time (HRT) 1.3 days. When HRT was shortened to 1.0 day, reflux from anaerobic zone to moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was introduced. The removal efficiencies of COD and TN were 94.4% and 76.0% at the optimal reflux ratio 30%, respectively. The sludge yield coefficient of CAAC was 0.1738, the simultaneous removal of COD and nitrogen with in situ sludge reduction could be achieved in this CAAC process. The sludge reduction mechanism was discussed by soluble components variation along the water flow. PMID:23073101

  5. Enhanced nitrogen removal in a wastewater treatment process characterized by carbon source manipulation with biological adsorption and sludge hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Zhao, Fang; Mao, Boyang; Wen, Xianghua

    2012-06-01

    An innovative adsorption/nitrification/denitrification/sludge-hydrolysis wastewater treatment process (ENRS) characterized by carbon source manipulation with a biological adsorption unit and a sludge hydrolysis unit was developed to enhance nitrogen removal and reduce sludge production for municipal wastewater treatment. The system presented good performance in pollutants removal, yielding the effluent with average COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP of 48.5, 0.6, 13.2 and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Sixty percent of the total carbon source in the influent was concentrated and separated by the quick adsorption of activated sludge, providing the possibilities of reusing waste carbon source in the denitrification tank and accumulating nitrobacteria in the nitrification tank. Low temperature of 6-15 °C and high hydraulic loading rate of 3.0-15.0 m(3)/d did not affect NH(4)(+)-N removal performance, yielding the NH(4)(+)-N of lower 1.0 mg/L in the effluent. Furthermore, 50% of the residual sludge in the ENRS system could be transformed into soluble COD (SCOD) by alkaline thermal hydrolysis with temperature of 60 °C and pH of 11, and the hydrolyzed carbon could completely substitute methanol as a good quality carbon to support high efficient denitrification. PMID:22487133

  6. Feasibility of expanded granular sludge bed reactors for the anaerobic treatment of low-strength soluble wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.T.; Field, J.A.; Versteeg, P.; Lettinga, G. (Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1994-08-05

    The application of the expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for the anaerobic treatment of low-strength soluble wastewaters using ethanol as a model substrate was investigated in laboratory-scale reactors at 30 C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was above 80% at organic loading rates up to 12 g COD/L [center dot] d with influent concentrations as low as 100 to 200 mg COD/L. These results demonstrate the suitability of the EGSB reactor for the anaerobic treatment of low-strength wastewaters. The high treatment performance can be attributed to the intense mixing regime obtained by high hydraulic and organic loads. Good mixing of the bulk liquid phase for the substrate-biomass contact and adequate expansion of the sludge bed for the degassing were obtained when the liquid upflow velocity (V[sub up]) was greater than 2.5 m/h. Under such conditions, an extremely low apparent K[sub s] value for acetoclastic methanogenesis of 9.8 mg COD/L was observed. The presence of dissolved oxygen in the wastewater had no detrimental effect on the treatment performance. Sludge piston flotation from pockets of biogas accumulating under the sludge bed occurred at V[sub up] lower than 2.5 m/h due to poor bed expansion. This problem is expected only in small diameter laboratory-scale reactors. A more important restriction of the EGSB reactor was the sludge washout occurring at V[sub up] higher than 5.5 m/h and which was intensified at organic loads higher than 7 g COD/L [center dot] d due to buoyancy forces from the gas production.

  7. Empirical Model for Predicting Concentrations of Refractory Hydrophobic Organic Compounds in Digested Sludge from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Randhir P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2009-01-01

    An empirical model is presented allowing for the prediction of concentrations of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) prone to accumulate and persist in digested sludge (biosolids) generated during conventional municipal wastewater treatment. The sole input requirements of the model are the concentrations of the individual HOCs entering the wastewater treatment plant in raw sewage, the compound’s respective pH-dependent octanol-water partitioning coefficient (DOW), and an empirically determined fitting parameter (pfit) that reflects persistence of compounds in biosolids after accounting for all potential removal mechanisms during wastewater treatment. The accuracy of the model was successfully confirmed at the 99% confidence level in a paired t test that compared predicted concentrations in biosolids to empirical measurements reported in the literature. After successful validation, the resultant model was applied to predict levels of various HOCs for which occurrence data in biosolids thus far are lacking. PMID:20161626

  8. Assessment of activated sludge microbial community analysis in full-scale biological wastewater treatment plants using patterns of fatty acid isopropyl esters (FAPEs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan G. Werker; Jennifer Becker; Carly Huitema

    2003-01-01

    This investigation introduces the application of a relatively rapid technique to obtain information about the dynamic nature of microbial communities in activated sludge. The objective has been to consider variability due to measurement errors and protocol changes within the same quantitative framework as the analysis of systematic differences in microbial communities in large-scale aerobic activated sludge secondary wastewater treatment systems.

  9. Granulation of activated sludge in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bing-Jie Ni; Wen-Ming Xie; Shao-Gen Liu; Han-Qing Yu; Ying-Zhe Wang; Gan Wang; Xian-Liang Dai

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic granulation of activated sludge was achieved in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for the treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater (<200mgL?1 of COD, chemical oxygen demand). The volume exchange ratio and settling time of an SBR were found to be two key factors in the granulation of activated sludge grown on the low-strength municipal wastewater. After operation of 300

  10. Studies on the Survival of Enterohemorrhagic and Environmental Escherichia coli Strains in Wastewater and in Activated Sludges from Dairy Sewage Treatment Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANUTA CZAJKOWSKA; HANKA BOSZCZYK-MALESZAK; I RENA SIKORSKA; AGNIESZKA SOCHAJ

    Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain isolated from milk in Poland and an environmental E. coli strain in wastewater from Garwolin and £owicz dairies and in activated sludges from dairy sewage treatment plants as well as in dairy wastewater with activated sludges was examined. Environmental materials were contaminated with about 10 8 of target bacteria\\/ml of sample. The experiments were

  11. Aminopolyphosphonate removal during wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Nowack

    2002-01-01

    Phosphonates are used in large quantities in industry and household products as scale inhibitors and chelating agents. They are not biodegraded during wastewater treatment but are removed by adsorption processes. Field measurements from different wastewater treatment plants affirm that they are removed almost completely during wastewater treatment. Adsorption of nitrilotrismethylenephosphonic acid onto activated sludge, amorphous iron oxide and humic acids

  12. Conversion of activated-sludge reactors to microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment coupled to electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Tomoya; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater can be treated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the aid of microbes that oxidize organic compounds using anodes as electron acceptors. Previous studies have suggested the utility of cassette-electrode (CE) MFCs for wastewater treatment, in which rice paddy-field soil was used as the inoculum. The present study attempted to convert an activated-sludge (AS) reactor to CE-MFC and use aerobic sludge in the tank as the source of microbes. We used laboratory-scale (1 L in capacity) reactors that were initially operated in an AS mode to treat synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and detergents. After the organics removal became stable, the aeration was terminated, and CEs were inserted to initiate an MFC-mode operation. It was demonstrated that the MFC-mode operation treated the wastewater at similar efficiencies to those observed in the AS-mode operation with COD-removal efficiencies of 75-80%, maximum power densities of 150-200 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiencies of 20-30%. These values were similar to those of CE-MFC inoculated with the soil. Anode microbial communities were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Comparative analyses revealed that anode communities enriched from the aerobic sludge were largely different from those from the soil, suggesting that similar reactor performances can be supported by different community structures. The study demonstrates that it is possible to construct wastewater-treatment MFCs by inserting CEs into water-treatment tanks. PMID:24856588

  13. Recovery of Iron Coagulants From Tehran Water-Treatment-Plant Sludge for Reusing in Textile Wastewater Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Vaezi; F Batebi; Gh Moosavi

    Most of the water treatment plants in Iran discharge their sludge to the environment whithout consideration of possible side effects. Since this kind of sludge is generally considered pollutant, the sludge treatment of water industry seems to be an essential task. Obviously theweight and volume of solids produced during the coagulation process are much more than other wastes of water

  14. Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Turney, Terence W.; Naidu, Ravi; Miller, Bradley W.; Scheckel, Kirk G. (U. South Australia); (EPA); (Monash)

    2013-01-14

    The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/stockpiling, were also assessed. The results indicated that 'native' Zn and Zn added either as a soluble salt or as NPs was rapidly converted to sulfides in all treatments. The hydrophobicity of the commercial formulation retarded the conversion of ZnO-NP. However, at the end of the anaerobic digestion process and after postprocessing of the sewage sludge (which caused a significant change in Zn speciation), the speciation of Zn was similar across all treatments. This indicates that, at least for the material tested, the risk assessment of ZnO-NP through this exposure pathway can rely on the significant knowledge already available in regard to other 'conventional' forms of Zn present in sewage sludge.

  15. Occurrence of PBDEs and other alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Song, Geum-Ju; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-02-01

    Studies on the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other alternative brominated flame retardants in the environment are scarce. In this study, PBDEs and non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), were measured in sludge collected from three types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of PBDEs (?PBDE) in sludge ranged from 298 to 48,000 (mean: 3240) ng/g dry weight. Among 10 NBFRs analyzed, DBDPE and BTBPE were the only ones detected in sludge samples. Concentrations of DBDPE and BTBPE ranged from sludge were higher than those reported in other countries. The highest concentrations of ?PBDE and DBDPE were found in sludge samples originated from industrial-WWTPs (I-WWTPs), suggesting that industrial activities are a major source of these contaminants. Non-parametric multidimensional scaling ordination showed that congener profiles of PBDEs in sludge are dependent on the types of WWTPs. Almost all sludge samples contained a low ratio (mean: 0.18) of DBDPE/BDE 209, indicating an on-going contamination by PBDEs in Korea. However, the high ratios (>1) of DBDPE/BDE 209 were found in sludge from I-WWTPs, reflecting a shift in the usage pattern of BFRs by the Korean industry. The nationwide annual emission fluxes of ?PBDE, DBDPE and BTBPE via WWTPs to the environment were estimated to be 7400, 480, and 3.7 kg/year, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from Korea. PMID:23993837

  16. A comparative study of freeze-thaw processes for conditioning wastewater and water treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Trahern, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    This research effort involved the application of indirect- and direct-contact, freeze-thaw conditioning techniques for improving the dewatering characteristics of both waste water and water treatment sludges. Sludges tested included waste activated sludge, primary sewage sludge, waste activated/primary sewage sludge mixtures and alum sludge. The direct-freeze methods examined were the use of a secondary refrigerant (butane) evaporated in the sludge and the use of gas hydrate or clathrate formation by addition of Freon 12 under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions. Sludges were also frozen solid using indirect freezing methods, thawed and tested for comparative purposes. Particle size distribution and floc density measurements were used to determine changes in particle characteristics; specific resistance values and dewatered dry solids concentration were used to assess dewatering characteristics. Results of direct and indirect-contact, freeze-thaw conditioning were compared to the effects of polymer conditioning. The results indicated that direct-freeze methods do not appear technically or economically competitive with currently accepted conditioning methods. The superior results obtained with the indirect-contact, freeze-thaw process when compared to the direct-contact processes suggested that the extent and rate of freezing may greatly influence the particle characteristics of the conditioned sludge, and thus its dewatering characteristics.

  17. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Activated Sludge - Aeration & Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, George J.

    This guide for developing standard operating job procedures for wastewater treatment facilities is devoted to the activated sludge aeration and sedimentation process. This process is for conversion of nonsettleable and nonfloatable materials in wastewater to settleable, floculated biological groups and separation of the settleable solids from the…

  18. Nitrogen removal in a full-scale domestic wastewater treatment plant with activated sludge and trickling filter.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammadi, Davood; Esmaeeli, Mir-Bager; Akbarian, Hossein; Ghasemian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, more stringent effluent requirements concerning the nutrients effluent values have been imposed by legislation and social concern. In this study, efficiency of total nitrogen removal in activated sludge and trickling filter processes (AS/TF) was investigated in Tehran North wastewater treatment plant. Biological system in this site was included, anoxic selector tank, aeration tank, final sedimentation, and trickling filter. A part of treated wastewater before chlorination was mixed with supernatant of dewatered sludge and fed to the trickling filter. Supernatant of dewatered sludge with high concentration of NH4-N was diluted by treated wastewater to provide complete nitrification in trickling filter Produced nitrate in trickling filter was arrived to the anoxic tank and converted to nitrogen gas by denitrification. According to the study result, low concentration of organic carbone and high concentration of NH4-N led to nitrification in TF, then nitrate denitrification to nitrogen gas occurred in selector area. NH4-N concentration decreased from 26.8?mg/L to 0.29?mg/L in TF, and NO3-N concentration increased from 8.8?mg/L to 27?mg/L in TF. Consequently, the total nitrogen decreased approximately to 50% in biological process. This efficiency has been observed in returned flow around 24% from final sedimentation into TF. It was concluded that, in comparison with biological nutrient removal processes, this process is very efficient and simple. PMID:23710197

  19. Nitrogen Removal in a Full-Scale Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plant with Activated Sludge and Trickling Filter

    PubMed Central

    Nourmohammadi, Davood; Esmaeeli, Mir-Bager; Akbarian, Hossein; Ghasemian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, more stringent effluent requirements concerning the nutrients effluent values have been imposed by legislation and social concern. In this study, efficiency of total nitrogen removal in activated sludge and trickling filter processes (AS/TF) was investigated in Tehran North wastewater treatment plant. Biological system in this site was included, anoxic selector tank, aeration tank, final sedimentation, and trickling filter. A part of treated wastewater before chlorination was mixed with supernatant of dewatered sludge and fed to the trickling filter. Supernatant of dewatered sludge with high concentration of NH4-N was diluted by treated wastewater to provide complete nitrification in trickling filter Produced nitrate in trickling filter was arrived to the anoxic tank and converted to nitrogen gas by denitrification. According to the study result, low concentration of organic carbone and high concentration of NH4-N led to nitrification in TF, then nitrate denitrification to nitrogen gas occurred in selector area. NH4-N concentration decreased from 26.8?mg/L to 0.29?mg/L in TF, and NO3-N concentration increased from 8.8?mg/L to 27?mg/L in TF. Consequently, the total nitrogen decreased approximately to 50% in biological process. This efficiency has been observed in returned flow around 24% from final sedimentation into TF. It was concluded that, in comparison with biological nutrient removal processes, this process is very efficient and simple. PMID:23710197

  20. DESIGN MANUAL: DEWATERING MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual discusses the many factors involved in selecting and designing dewatering equipment for organic sludges produced during primary and secondary municipal wastewater treatment. ive-step approach is outlined for the selection and design of the dewatering equipment for eit...

  1. Assessing wastewater toxicity to activated sludge: recent research and developments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shijin Ren

    2004-01-01

    Toxicants in municipal sewage treatment plant (STP) influent wastewater may inhibit the biological activity of the activated sludge and cause treatment plant process upsets. Such process upsets may be avoided if influent wastewater is monitored for toxicity and protective actions are taken when toxicity is detected. A comprehensive review of the methods that can be used for assessing wastewater toxicity

  2. Enrichment of anammox bacteria from three sludge sources for the startup of monosodium glutamate industrial wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Li-dong, Shen; An-hui, Hu; Ren-cun, Jin; Dong-qing, Cheng; Ping, Zheng; Xiang-yang, Xu; Bao-lan, Hu

    2012-01-15

    Three activated sludges from a landfill leachate treatment plant (S1), a municipal sewage treatment plant (S2) and a monosodium glutamate (MSG) wastewater treatment plant (S3) were used as inocula to enrich anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria for the startup of MSG industrial wastewater treatment system. After 360 days of cultivation using MSG wastewater, obvious anammox activity was observed in all three cultures. The maximum specific anammox activities of cultures S1, S2 and S3 were 0.11 kg N kg(-1) VSS day(-1), 0.09 kg N kg(-1) VSS day(-1) and 0.16 kg N kg(-1) VSS day(-1), respectively. Brownish-red anammox granules having diameters in the range of 0.2-1.0mm were visible in cultures S1 and S2, and large red granules having diameters in the range of 0.5-2.5mm were formed in culture S3 after 420 days of cultivation. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that Kuenenia organisms were the dominant anammox species in all three cultures. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes of anammox bacteria in cultures S1, S2 and S3 were 6.8 × 10(7) copies mL(-1), 9.4 × 10(7) copies mL(-1) and 7.5 × 10(8) copies mL(-1), respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that anammox cultivation from conventional activated sludges was highly possible using MSG wastewater. Thus the anammox process has possibility of applying to the nitrogen removal from MSG wastewater. PMID:22104770

  3. Configuration of biological wastewater treatment line and influent composition as the main factors driving bacterial community structure of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jaranowska, Paulina; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieli?ska, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    The structure of microbial consortia in wastewater treatment facilities is a resultant of environmental conditions created by the operational parameters of the purification process. In the research, activated sludge from nine Polish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) was investigated at a molecular level to determine the impact of the complexity of biological treatment line and the influent composition on the species structure and the diversity of bacterial consortia. The community fingerprints and technological data were subjected to the canonical correspondence and correlation analyses. The number of separated biological processes realized in the treatment line and the presence of industrial wastewater in the influent were the key factors determining the species structure of total and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biomass. The N2O-reducers community composition depended significantly on the design of the facility; the highest species richness of denitrifiers was noted in the WWTPs with separated denitrification tanks. The contribution of industrial streams to the inflow affected the diversity of total and denitrifying bacterial consortia and diminished the diversity of ammonia oxidizers. The obtained data are valuable for engineers since they revealed the main factors, including the design of wastewater treatment plant, influencing the microbial groups critical for the stability of purification processes. PMID:23397107

  4. Sludge Treatment, Utilization, and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Richard I.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers such areas: (1) industrial and hazardous sludges; (2) chemical sludges; (3) stabilization and combustion; (4) ocean disposal; and (5) land application. A list of 411 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Biomethanization of mixtures of fruits and vegetables solid wastes and sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lahoz, C; Fernández-Giménez, B; Garcia-Herruzo, F; Rodriguez-Maroto, J M; Vereda-Alonso, C

    2007-03-01

    The possible management of Fruit and Vegetable Solid Wastes (FVSWs) through their simultaneous digestion with the primary sludge of Municipal Wastewater Treatment plants is investigated. This alternative allows the recovery of energy and a solid product that can be used as an amendment for soils that generated the residue, while is not expensive. Results indicate that the ratio of FVSWs to sludge and the pH control are the main variables determining the methane production and concentration. NaHCO3 was selected to achieve the pH control. The results for a ratio of 50% sludge together with 10 g NaHCO3/kg of residue are among the best obtained, with a methane yield of about 90 L per kg of volatile solids, and a methane concentration of 40% (v/v) of the biogas. A 50% reduction of the total solids; 21% reduction of the volatile solids (in terms of total solids); and a pH value of the sludge, which is 6.9 indicate that the digested sludge can be a good material for soil amendment. PMID:17365318

  6. Paracoccus zhejiangensis sp. nov., isolated from activated sludge in wastewater-treatment system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Dao-Feng; Liu, Ya-Long; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xin; Li, Chao; Li, Shun-Peng; Hong, Qing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-07-01

    A bacterial strain, designated J6(T), was isolated from activated sludge, collected from a chemical wastewater treatment system in Zhejiang Province of China. The cells stained Gram-negative, were aerobic, pale-yellow, and non-motile short rods. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the closest relative of this organism was Paracoccus aminophilus KACC 12262(T) = JCM 7686(T) (97.4 % sequence similarity). Strain J6(T) grew at 10-37 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and with 0-5 % NaCl (optimum 3 %, w/v). The predominant cellular fatty acid found was summed feature 8(C18:1 ?7c and/or C18:1 ?6c; 82.8 %). The major respiratory quinone-detected was Q-10 and the DNA G+C content was 61.9 mol %. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and several unknown polar lipids. Strain J6(T) showed low DNA-DNA relatedness values with P. aminophilus KACC 12262(T) (28 ± 3 %). The phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-cell fatty acid composition as well as biochemical characteristics allowed clear differentiation of the isolate from the other type strains of already described Paracoccus species. It is evident from the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses that strain J6(T) should be classified as a novel species of the genus Paracoccus, for which the name P. zhejiangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is J6(T) (KACC 16703(T) = CCTCC AB 2012031(T)). PMID:23653121

  7. Distributions of polycyclic musk fragrance in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and sludges in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Casteel, Kenneth; Dai, Hongjian; Wehmeyer, Kenneth R; Kiel, Brian; Federle, Thomas

    2014-09-15

    The polycyclic musks, AHTN and HHCB are fragrance ingredients widely used in consumer products. A monitoring campaign was conducted and collected grab effluent and sludge samples at 40 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) across the United States to understand their occurrence and statistical distribution in these matrices. AHTN concentration in effluent ranged from <0.05 ?g/L (LOQ) to 0.44 ?g/L with a mean and standard deviation of 0.18 ± 0.11 ?g/L. HHCB concentrations in effluent ranged from 0.45 to 4.79 ?g/L with a mean of 1.86 ± 1.01 ?g/L. AHTN concentrations in sludge ranged from 0.65 to 15.0mg/kg dw (dry weight) with a mean and standard deviation being 3.69 ± 2.57 mg/kg dw, while HHCB sludge concentrations were between 4.1 and 91 mg/kg with a mean of 34.0 ± 23.1mg/kg dw. Measured concentrations of AHTN and HHCB were significantly correlated with each other in both effluent and sludge. The concentrations of HHCB in both effluent and sludge were approximately an order of magnitude higher than those for AHTN, consistent with 2011 usage levels. The highest measured effluent concentrations for both AHTN and HHCB were below their respective freshwater PNECs (predicted no effect concentrations), indicating a negligible risk to biological communities below WWTPs, even in the absence of upstream dilution. Moreover, the large number of effluents and sludges sampled provides a statistical distribution of loadings that can be used to develop more extensive probabilistic exposure assessments for WWTP mixing zones and sludge amended soils. PMID:24792690

  8. A nationwide survey and emission estimates of cyclic and linear siloxanes through sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Song, Geum-Ju; Ra, Kongtae; Lee, Won-Chan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-11-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in various industrial applications as well as in personal care products. Despite their widespread use and potential toxic effects, few studies have reported on the occurrence of siloxanes in the environment. In this study, we determined the concentrations of 5 cyclic and 15 linear siloxanes in sludge collected from 40 representative wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of 20 siloxanes (?siloxane) in sludge ranged from 0.05 to 142 (mean: 45.7) ?g/g dry weight, similar to the concentrations reported in European countries but higher than those reported in China. The concentrations of siloxanes in sludge from domestic WWTPs were significantly (p<0.01) higher than those from industrial WWTPs, indicating higher consumption of siloxanes in various personal care products (e.g. shampoos and conditioners). The major siloxane compounds found in sludge were decamethylcyclopentasilane (D5), docosamethyldecasiloxane (L10) and dodecamethylcyclohexasilane (D6), which collectively accounted for, on average, 62% of the ?siloxane concentrations. Non-parametric multidimensional scaling ordination of the profiles of siloxanes indicated the existence of different usage patterns of siloxanes between industrial and household activities. Multiple linear regression analysis of siloxane concentrations and WWTP characteristics suggested that D5, D6 and linear siloxane concentrations in sludge were positively correlated with population served by a WWTP. Environmental emission fluxes of cyclic and linear siloxanes through sludge disposal in Korea were 14,800 and 18,500 kg/year, respectively. This is the first report describing occurrence and environmental emission of siloxanes through sludge in Korea. PMID:25127445

  9. Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brar, Satinder K., E-mail: satinder.brar@ete.inrs.c [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Verma, Mausam [Department of Biological Engineering, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 2X4 (Canada); Tyagi, R.D. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Surampalli, R.Y. [US Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 17-2141, Kansas City, KS 66117 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

  10. The role of stress agents as operating factors in formation and functioning of granular aerobic activated sludge at model domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Khokhlachev, Nikolay S; Kalenov, Sergei V; Zanina, Olga S; Tyupa, Dmitry V; Baurina, Marina M; Kuznetsov, Alexander Ye

    2014-09-01

    Maintenance of the wastewater treatment plants and increasing the efficiency of existing aerobic biological reactors depend on the stability of activated sludge characteristics under varying wastewater parameters within significant limits and/or influence of some environmental factors. The steady microbial communities observed in biofilms and anaerobic granules of activated sludge can serve as successful samples of formation of the similar aerobic systems. The granular aerobic sludge obtained in the course of our researches is an ideal "plant" on treatment of biogenic pollution at both low and high concentrations. It demonstrates high ability for treatment and stability to adverse factors. To improve aerobic wastewater treatment characteristics, a possibility of using impact of stress conditions upon activated sludge has been studied. Under conditions of fractional hydrogen peroxide addition at diffused lighting, the granular aerobic activated sludge adapted to hydrogen peroxide has been obtained. This sludge has got good sedimentary properties and it differs from the control sample in the species diversity, improved treatment characteristics and also resistance to the stressor. It also endures an impact of one-time hydrogen peroxide addition up to 1.2-1.5 g H2O2/l. The conditions under which the steady aerobic granules of the diameter from 2 to 5 mm were formed with high treatment ability have been chosen. The granules were being stabilized at passages with hydrogen peroxide treatment and they endured up to 2.4-3.0 g/l of one-time H2O2 addition. PMID:24556977

  11. Biological phosphorus removal performance and relevant microorganism characteristics of activated sludge in municipal wastewater treatment plants, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Zhijian; Wang, Hang; Xu, Xin; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Jianying; Jun, Zhu

    2011-07-01

    Municipal wastewater discharge is threatening the ecological security of the local water environment. This study investigated the field process performance and microorganism characteristics of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in China. The results showed that three WWTPs met the required criteria of phosphorus for discharge (< or = 1 mg/L), but with a low level of Accumulibacter (6.4 to 3.8%, on average) and a relatively high level of Competibacter (3.2 to 9.1%) in sludge. The phosphorus release and uptake rates were varied from 0.224 to 7.770 mg/gVSS x h and 0.386 to 7.901 mg/gVSSh, respectively. Denitrifying polyphosphate-accumulating organisms were estimated to be 28.2% of the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms. Sludge characteristics (phosphorus release and uptake rates) were positively correlated with the abundance of Accumulibacter and negatively correlated with the proportion of Competibacter. Moreover, the lower the ratio of anaerobic phosphorus/acetate (e.g., 0.496) is, the more abundant the Competibacter would be. Further discussion on an improvement strategy for these WWTPs for EBPR should be comprehensively based on the data of periodic investigations on field operation, sludge activities, and microbial populations. PMID:21790077

  12. Heavy metals in untreated\\/treated urban effluent and sludge from a biological wastewater treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aline da Silva Oliveira; Ana Bocio; Tânia M. Beltramini Trevilato; Angela M. Magosso Takayanagui; José L. Domingo; Susana I. Segura-Muñoz

    2007-01-01

    Background, Aim and Scope  The presence of heavy metals in wastewater is one of the main causes of water and soil pollution. The aim of the present study\\u000a was to investigate the removal of Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Mn, Cr and Zn in urban effluent by a biological wastewater treatment, as\\u000a well as to quantify the levels of As, Be, Cd,

  13. Performance of aerobic granular sludge in a sequencing batch bioreactor for slaughterhouse wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Kang, Xiaorong; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yixing

    2015-08-01

    Lab-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the formation and characteristics of aerobic granular sludge for biological nutrient removal of slaughterhouse wastewater. Experimental results showed that removal performances of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia and phosphate were enhanced with sludge granulation, and their removal efficiencies reached 95.1%, 99.3% and 83.5%, respectively. The aerobic granular sludge was matured after 90days cultivation, and protein-like substances were the main components. Simultaneously, the mass ratio of proteins and polysaccharides (PN/PS) was enhanced to 2.5 from 1.7. The granules with particle sizes of 0.6-1.2 and 1.2-1.8mm, accounting for 69.6%, were benefit for the growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrate oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and corresponding specific oxygen demand rates (SOUR) of AOB and NOB were 31.4 and 23.3mgO2/gMLSSh, respectively. PMID:25777064

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS AND TECHNIQUES FOR FINAL TREATMENT OF COMBINED MUNICIPAL AND TEXTILE WASTEWATER INCLUDING SLUDGE UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigations were carried out on laboratory scale, employing various mixtures of dyeing and municipal wastewaters. The processes studied were: coagulation, ozonization, chlorination, activated carbon, activated sludge, and anaerobic digestion. Lime appeared to be the best c...

  15. POLISH/U.S. SYMPOSIUM ON WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND SLUDGE DISPOSAL HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON FEBRUARY 10-12, 1976. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication comprises the proceedings of the Polish/U.S. Symposium on Wastewater Treatment and Sludge Disposal, held in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 10 through 12, 1976. Topics included both research work, notably in biodegradability and toxicity, and treatment and disposal met...

  16. Microbiological basis of phosphate removal in the activated sludge process for the treatment of wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. W. Fuhs; Min Chen

    1975-01-01

    Several strains resembling members of theAcinetobacter-Moraxella-Mima group of bacteria were isolated from activated sludge-type sewage treatment plants designed for phosphate removal. The bacteria are obligate aerobes but utilize as carbon and energy sources low-molecular intermediates generated anaerobically, particularly acetate and ethanol. These bacteria can be shown to be responsible for the phosphate luxury uptake occurring in these treatment plants. The

  17. Quorum quenching bacteria isolated from the sludge of a wastewater treatment plant and their application for controlling biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Leum; Park, Son-Young; Lee, Chi-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak; Lee, Jung-Kee

    2014-11-28

    Bacteria recognize changes in their population density by sensing the concentration of signal molecules, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). AHL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) plays a key role in biofilm formation, so the interference of QS, referred to as quorum quenching (QQ), has received a great deal of attention. A QQ strategy can be applied to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for advanced wastewater treatment to control biofouling. To isolate QQ bacteria that can inhibit biofilm formation, we isolated diverse AHL-degrading bacteria from a laboratory-scale MBR and sludge from real wastewater treatment plants. A total of 225 AHLdegrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge sample by enrichment culture. To identify the enzyme responsible for AHL degradation in QQ bacteria, AHL-degrading activities were analyzed using cell-free lysate, culture supernatant, and whole cells. Afipia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. strains produced the intracellular QQ enzyme, whereas Pseudomonas sp. and Micrococcus sp. produced the extracellular QQ enzyme that was most likely to produce AHLacylase. AHL-degrading activity was observed in whole-cell assay with the Microbacterium sp. and Rhodococcus sp. strains. There has been no report for AHL-degrading capability in the case of Streptococcus sp. and Afipia sp. strains. Finally, inhibition of biofilm formation by isolated QQ bacteria or enzymes was observed on glass slides and 96-well microtiter plates using crystal violet staining. QQ strains or enzymes not only inhibited initial biofilm development but also reduced established biofilms. PMID:25112313

  18. Treatment of sewage sludge using electrokinetic geosynthetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Glendinning; John Lamont-Black; Colin J. F. P. Jones

    2007-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of sewage sludge is one of the most problematical issues affecting wastewater treatment in the developed world. The traditional outlets for sewage sludge are to spread it on agricultural land, or to form a cake for deposit to landfill or incineration. In order to create a sludge cake, water must be removed. Existing dewatering technology based

  19. Activated sludge wastewater treatment plant modelling and simulation: state of the art

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krist V. Gernaey; Mark C. M. Van Loosdrecht; Mogens Henze; Morten Lind; Sten B. Jørgensen

    2004-01-01

    This review paper focuses on modelling of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). White-box modelling is widely applied in this field, with learning, design and process optimisation as the main applications. The introduction of the ASM model family by the IWA task group was of great importance, providing researchers and practitioners with a standardised set of basis models. This paper introduces the

  20. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF SLUDGE AND ASH FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tests were performed to determine the physical properties and chemical leaching characteristics of the residuals and the stabilized/solidified products from two publicly-owned wastewater treatment works (POTW). The two POTW waste products included in this study were an anaerobic ...

  1. Microfiltration of activated sludge using submerged membrane with air bubbling (application to wastewater treatment)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    El Hani Bouhabila; Roger Ben Aïm; Herve Buisson

    1998-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor is one of the applications of membrane technology to wastewater treatment. In this study we present the results obtained using hollow fiber microfiltration membranes directly immersed in the bioreactor. Two sizes of equipment were used: laboratory scale with a specially designed set of microfiltration hollow fibers (filtration area 0.016 m2) and pilot scale with a bundle of

  2. Investigation of nonylphenol and nonylphenol ethoxylates in sewage sludge samples from a metropolitan wastewater treatment plant in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ömero?lu, Seçil; Murdoch, Fadime Kara; Sanin, F Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) have drawn significant attention within the last decade for both scientific and legislative reasons. In Turkey, the Regulation Regarding the Use of Domestic and Urban Sludges on Land states a limit value for the sum of nonylphenol (NP), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP1EO) and nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) as NPE (NPE=NP+NP1EO+NP2EO). Unfortunately a standard method for the determination of these chemicals has not been yet set by the authorities and no data exists about the concentrations of NP and NPEOs in sewage sludge in Turkey. The aim of this study is to propose simple and easily applicable extraction and measurement techniques for 4-n-nonylphenol (4-n-NP), NP, NP1EO and NP2EO in sewage sludge samples and investigate the year round concentrations in a Metropolitan Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in Turkey. Different extraction techniques and GC/MS methods for sewage sludge were tested. The best extraction method for these compounds was found to be ultrasonication (5 min) using acetone as the solvent with acceptable recovery of analytes suggested by USEPA and other studies. The optimized extraction method showed good repeatability with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 6%. The recovery of analytes were within acceptable limits suggested by USEPA and other studies. The limits of detection (LODs) were 6 µg kg(-1) for NP and NP1EO, 12 µg kg(-1) for NP2EO and 0.03 µg kg(-1) for 4-n-NP. The developed method was applied to sewage sludge samples obtained from the Central WWTP in Ankara, Turkey. The sum NPE (NP+NP1EO+NP2EO) was found to be in between 5.5 µg kg(-1) and 19.5 µg kg(-1), values which are in compliance with Turkish and European regulations. PMID:25281154

  3. Hungry microbes eat away wastewater sludge problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kratch

    1995-01-01

    Accumulations of diluted resin solids and sludge in an equalization pond were reducing a White City, Ore., chemical plant`s wastewater treatment capacity by 90%. Dyno Polymers, a division of Norway-based Dyno Industries, manufacturers formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde and phenol-formaldehyde resins for the wood products industry. High-solids and biosolids bulking in the plant`s aeration pond overloaded the clarifier, and an overabundance of solids

  4. Occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing; Gao, Xu; Chen, You-Peng; Peng, Xu-Ya; Zhang, Yi-Xin; Gan, Xiu-Mei; Zi, Cheng-Fang; Guo, Jin-Song

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological assessment of 21 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) including antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics and antihypersensitives, were studied at four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Individual treatment unit effluents, as well as primary and secondary sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the selected PhACs to evaluate their biodegradation, persistence and partitioning behaviors. PhACs were identified and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. All the 21 analyzed PhACs were detected in wastewater and the target PhACs except acetaminophen, ibuprofen and gemfibrozil, were also found in sludge. The concentrations of the antibiotics and SVT were comparable to or even higher than those reported in developed countries, while the case of other target PhACs was opposite. The elimination of PhACs except acetaminophen was incomplete and a wide range of elimination efficiencies during the treatment were observed, i.e. from "negative removal" to 99.5%. The removal of PhACs was insignificant in primary and disinfection processes, and was mainly achieved during the biological treatment. Based on the mass balance analysis, biodegradation is believed to be the primary removal mechanism, whereas only about 1.5% of the total mass load of the target PhACs was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (<500 L/kg, with a few exceptions) also indicate that biodegradation/transformation was responsible for the removal of the target PhACs. Ecotoxicological assessment indicated that the environment concentrations of single compounds (including sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, azithromycin and erythromycin-H2O) in effluent and sludge, as well as the mixture of the 21 detected PhACs in effluent, sludge and receiving water had a significant ecotoxicological risk to algae. Therefore, further control of PhACs in effluent and sludge is required before their discharge and application to prevent their introduction into the environment. PMID:24176710

  5. Effect of aluminium and sulphate on anaerobic digestion of sludge from wastewater enhanced primary treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Cabirol; E. J. Barragán; A. Durán; A. Noyola

    2003-01-01

    The combined and individual effects of aluminium and sulphate at concentrations of 1,000 mg\\/l as Al(OH)3, and 150 mgSO42-\\/L as K2SO4, respectively, on the anaerobic digestion of sludge from enhanced primary treatment (EPT) were evaluated in 1 L capacity semi continuous reactors. It was found that at 59 days, aluminium inhibits the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of methanogenic and acetogenic

  6. Wastewater Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoltek, J., Jr.; Melear, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) process application; (2) coagulation and solids separation; (3) adsorption; (4) ion exchange; (5) membrane processes; and (6) oxidation processes. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Effects of sonication on bacteria viability in wastewater treatment plants evaluated by flow cytometry—Fecal indicators, wastewater and activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paola Foladori; Bruni Laura; Andreottola Gianni; Ziglio Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    The application of sonication to wastewater or sludge contributes to the dispersion of aggregates, the solubilisation of particulate matter with an increase in its biodegradability, the damage of microorganisms due to the loss of cellular membrane integrity. This research is aimed at investigating the effects of sonication at 20kHz frequency on viability of microorganisms present in raw wastewater and activated

  8. Wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.H.F.; Liptak, B.G. [eds.

    2000-07-01

    An exhaustive compilation, ``Wastewater Treatment'' covers subjects that run the gamut from wastewater sources, characteristics, and monitoring to chemical treatments and nutrient removal. The wealth of easy-to-use tables and illustrations provides quick and clear references, making it indispensable. Schematic drawings of equipment and devices explain the technology and techniques. With the level of detail included, one can count on finding both introductory material and very technical answers to complex questions.

  9. Process efficiency and microbial monitoring in MBR (membrane bioreactor) and CASP (conventional activated sludge process) treatment of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Munz, Giulio; Gualtiero, Mori; Salvadori, Laura; Claudia, Barberio; Claudio, Lubello

    2008-12-01

    In this study a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a conventional activated sludge plant (CASP), treating the same tannery wastewaters and in the same operating conditions, have been compared in order to evaluate the overall treatment efficiency, the presence and distribution of Gram negative bacteria and the kinetics of nitrifying bacteria. Process efficiency was evaluated in terms of organic and nitrogen compounds: the MBR showed a higher COD removal (+4%) and a more stable and complete nitrification. The Gram negative bacteria were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with phylogenetic probes monitoring of alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, of the main ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the Nitrobacter and Nitrospira genera. The results showed that the main differences between the two sludges were: the higher abundance of alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria in the MBR bioreactor and the presence of AOB aggregates only on the surfaces of MBR flocs. Finally, the titrimetric (pH-stat, DO-stat) tests showed similar values of the kinetic parameters of the nitrifiers both in MBR and CASP sludge. PMID:18499451

  10. Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, B; Gautier, M; Michel, P; Gourdon, R

    2013-01-01

    The use of vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) is well developed in France and other countries for the treatment of wastewaters from small communities. The patented Azoé® process has been developed by a French company, SCIRPE, in order to improve denitrification and phosphorus removal as compared to classical VFCWs. It includes a biological trickling filter pretreatment followed by two stages of partially flooded VFCW. The performances of partially flooded VFCW are well demonstrated for the removal of organic matter and nitrogen. The system is now being considered for phosphorus removal as well. In this article, sludge and granular materials sampled from the filters of a municipal plant where the Azoé® system has been operated for 8 years were analyzed in order to provide data that may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of phosphorus retention. Elemental analyses showed that phosphorus was predominantly captured in the sludge layer accumulated at the surface of the first stage. The progressive mineralization of the sludge over time was also clearly highlighted. The phosphate phases were mainly associated with iron and calcium. The transport of phosphorus via the migration of fine particles through the porous medium in the first stage was also observed. PMID:24292476

  11. Kalman filter for updating the coefficients of regression models. A case study from an activated sludge waste-water treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pekka Teppola; Satu-Pia Mujunen; Pentti Minkkinen

    1999-01-01

    A Kalman filter was developed to overcome the problems caused by process drifting. Different types of models were used to predict response variables of an activated sludge waste-water treatment plant. These models were constructed using MLR, PCR, and PLS. The MLR-type regression coefficients were calculated for both the PCR and PLS models. After that, the Kalman filter was used to

  12. Membrane bioreactors for waste water treatment: reduction of sludge production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gérard Goma; Jean Luc Rols; Alain Pareilleux

    1997-01-01

    In order to reduce the excess sludge produced by Activated Sludge (AS) wastewater treatment plants, studies have been carried out with a Membrane BioReactor (MBR) to study the maintenance and cryptic growth phenomena of Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures. Experiments with various imposed wasting rates showed that viability and sludge production yield decreased when sludge age increased.A continuous sludge thermal treatment system

  13. UNITED STATES PRACTICE IN SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sludge treatment and disposal problems and costs grow with increased concern about the quality of wastewater treatment. As standards for effluent quality in the United States have become stricter, the problems of sludge treatment and disposal have grown disproportionately. Today ...

  14. Fate of aromatic hydrocarbons in Italian municipal wastewater systems: an overview of wastewater treatment using conventional activated-sludge processes (CASP) and membrane bioreactors (MBRs).

    PubMed

    Fatone, Francesco; Di Fabio, Silvia; Bolzonella, David; Cecchi, Franco

    2011-01-01

    We studied the occurrence, removal, and fate of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Italian municipal wastewater treatment systems in terms of their common contents and forms, and their apparent and actual removal in both conventional activated-sludge processes (CASP) and membrane bioreactors (MBRs). We studied five representative full-scale CASP treatment plants (design capacities of 12,000 to 700,000 population-equivalent), three of which included MBR systems (one full-scale and two pilot-scale) operating in parallel with the conventional systems. We studied the solid-liquid partitioning and fates of these substances using both conventional samples and a novel membrane-equipped automatic sampler. Among the VOCs, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 4-chlorotoluene were ubiquitous, whereas naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene were the most common PAHs. Both PAHs and aromatic VOCs had removal efficiencies of 40-60% in the headworks, even in plants without primary sedimentation. Mainly due to volatilization, aromatic VOCs had comparable removal efficiencies in CASP and MBRs, even for different sludge ages. MBRs did not enhance the retention of PAHs sorbed to suspended particulates compared with CASPs. On the other hand, the specific daily accumulation of PAHs in the MBR's activated sludge decreased logarithmically with increasing sludge age, indicating enhanced biodegradation of PAHs. The PAH and aromatic VOC contents in the final effluent are not a major driver for widespread municipal adoption of MBRs, but MBRs may enhance the biodegradation of PAHs and their removal from the environment. PMID:20804998

  15. A study of the relationship among sludge retention time, bacterial communities, and hydrolytic enzyme activities in inclined plate membrane bioreactors for the treatment of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ittisupornrat, Suda; Tobino, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Inclined plate membrane bioreactors (ip-MBRs) have been proposed as a highly effective method in wastewater treatment. With the help of settling enhancer inclined plates, dense excess sludge can be kept in the mainstream of the process, and consequently, suitable sludge mass can be maintained in the membrane tank. In this study, the relationship among sludge retention time (SRT), bacterial communities, and hydrolytic enzyme activities was investigated. Two identical bench-scale ip-MBRs were operated 1 year in real municipal wastewater treatment. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) plots of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprints showed similar changes in the bacterial communities in terms of bacterial members and abundance over time in both the reactors, which was primarily caused by the changes of wastewater composition. However, the impact of SRT revealed significant differences in the dominant bacterial communities when both the reactors were operated with a largely different SRT (infinite SRT and SRT of 20 days). The sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were classified into six libraries of A-F. The largest group of sequences belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria. The phylum Bacteroidetes was dominant in the seed sludge retrieved from the conventional activated sludge (CAS) as Flavobacterium-like bacterium was dominantly observed. Under the MBR operation (libraries B-F), bacterial communities belonging to the phyla Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were dominant. Most of them may be responsible for protein degradation because aminopeptidase activity increased in proportion with the abundance of these bacteria. PMID:25016344

  16. Effectiveness of dairy wastewater treatment in a bioreactor based on the integrated technology of activated sludge and hydrophyte system.

    PubMed

    Debowski, M; Zieli?ski, M; Krzemieniewski, M; Rokicka, M; Kupczyk, K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of dairy wastewater treatment in the integrated technology based on the simultaneous use of the activated sludge method (AS) and a hydrophyte system (HS) (AS-HS), in this case, common reed (Phragmites australis) or common cattail (Typha latifolia). Experiments were conducted in an innovative reactor exploited in the fractional-technical scale at the loads of 0.05 mg BOD5/mg.d.m. d (biochemical oxygen demand) and 0.10 mg BOD5/mg.d.m d. The AS--HS enabled improving the removal effectiveness ofbiogenes characterized by concentrations of Ntot., N-NH4 and Ptot. In contrast, the integrated system had no significant reducing effect either on concentrations of organic compounds characterized by BOD5 and chemical oxygen demand parameters or on the structure of AS in the sequencing batch-type reactors. PMID:24701933

  17. Biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Mayabhate; S. K. Gupta; S. G. Joshi

    1988-01-01

    A study of physicochemical and biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by the activated sludge process was performed in an oxidation ditch. The physicochemical study using different coagulants revealed that all the coagulants used are not effective and their doses required were very high for COD reduction. In the biological oxidation study, it was found that the wastewater could be processed

  18. Effects of dried wastewater-treatment sludge application on ground-water quality in South Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howie, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Four test fields in the south Dade agricultural area were studied to determine the effects of sludge application on ground-water quality. Two fields had been cultivated for 10 years or more, and two had not been farmed for at least 10 years. The fields were representative of the area's two soil types (Rockdale and Perrine marl) and two major crop types (row crops and groves). Before the application of sludge, wells upgradient of, within, and downgradient of each field were sampled for possible sludge contaminants at the end of wet and dry seasons. Municipal wastewater treatment sludge from the Dade County Water and Sewe Authority Department was then applied to the fields at varying application rates. The wells at each field were sampled over a 2-year period under different hydrologic conditions for possible sludge-related constituents (specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, chloride, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, and sodium). Comparisons were made between water quality in the vicinity of the test fields and Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations, an between water quality upgradient of, beneath, and downgradient of the fields. Comparisons between presludge and postsludge water quality did not indicate any improvement because of retention of agrichemicals by the sludge nor did they indicate any deterioration because of leaching from the sludge. Comparisons of water quality upgradient of the fields to water quality beneath and downgradient of the fields also did not indicate any changes related to sludge. Florida Department of Environmental Regulation primary and secondary drinking-water regulations wer exceeded at the Rockdale maximum-application field by mercury (9.5 ug/L (micrograms per liter)), and the Perrine marl maximum-application field by manganese (60 ug/L) and lead (85 ug/L), and at the Perrine marl row-crop field by mercury (5.2 ug/L). All other exceedances were either in presludge or upgradient samples, or they were for constituents or properties, such as iron and color, which typically exceed standards in native ground water. Acid-extractable and base-neutral compounds, volatile organic compounds, chlorophenoxy herbicides, organophosphorus insecticides, and organochlorine compounds were analyzed for one shallow well at each field twice annually. Those compounds that equaled or exceeded the detection limit after sludge was applied included benzene (0.3 and 1.2 ug/L), chloroform (0.2 and 0.3 ug/L), bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate (29 and 42 ug/L), methylene chloride (14 ug/L), tolulene (0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 1.3, and 4.4 ug/L), 1, 1,1-trichloroethana (0.6 ug/L), trichloroethylene (0.3 ug/L), 2.4-D (0.01 ug/L), and xylene (0.3 ug/L). It ws not possible to ascertain the origin of these compounds becuase they are available from sources other than sludge.

  19. Bioconversion of industrial wastewater and wastewater sludge into Bacillus thuringiensis based biopesticides in pilot fermentor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Yezza; R. D. Tyagi; J. R. Valéro; R. Y. Surampalli

    2006-01-01

    Starch industry wastewater (SWW), slaughterhouse wastewater (SHWW) and secondary sludges from three different wastewater treatment plants (Jonquière—JQS, Communauté Urbaine de Québec—CUQS and Black lake—BLS) were used as raw materials for the production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based biopesticides in a pilot scale fermentor (100L working volume). The slaughterhouse wastewater exhibited the lowest Bt growth and entomotoxcity (Tx) potential (measured against

  20. The re-use of Waste-Activated Sludge as part of a "zero-sludge" strategy for wastewater treatments in the pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Kaluža, Leon; Suštarši?, Matej; Rutar, Vera; Zupan?i?, Gregor D

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of introducing the thermo-alkali hydrolysis of Waste-Activated Sludge (WAS) was investigated, in order to enable the use of its solid residue as a raw material in cardboard production and the use of its liquid portion for anaerobic digestion in an UASB reactor. The evaluation of the hydrolysis at pH>12 and T=70°C showed that the microbe cells were disrupted with more than 90% efficiency in less than 2h. The solid portion was hygienised, therefore making it possible to integrate it into the cardboard production as a raw material for less demanding cardboards. Up to 6% addition of the liquid portion of hydrolysed WAS to wastewater decreased the specific biogas production in a pilot-scale UASB from 0.236 to 0.212 m(3)/kg(COD), while the efficiency of the COD removal decreased from 80.4% to 76.5%. These values still guarantee an adequate treatment of the wastewater and an increased biogas production by 16%. PMID:24215770

  1. Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment B. Kim1,2 , M. Gautier*1 , P. Michel2 and R. Gourdon1 1, Society of design and production engineering for wastewater purification, 5 Allée Alban Vistel, F-69110 Wetlands (VFCW) is well developed in France and other countries for the treatment of wastewaters from small

  2. Probabilistic assessment of environmental exposure to the polycyclic musk, HHCB and associated risks in wastewater treatment plant mixing zones and sludge amended soils in the United States.

    PubMed

    Federle, Thomas; Sun, Ping; Dyer, Scott; Kiel, Brian

    2014-09-15

    The objective of this work was to conduct an environmental risk assessment for the consumer use of the polycyclic musk, HHCB (CAS No. 1222-05-5) in the U.S. focusing on mixing zones downstream from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and sludge amended soils. A probabilistic exposure approach was utilized combining statistical distributions of effluent and sludge concentrations for the U.S. WWTPs with distributions of mixing zone dilution factors and sludge loading rates to soil to estimate HHCB concentrations in surface waters and sediments below WWTPs and sludge amended soils. These concentrations were then compared to various toxicity values. Measured concentrations of HHCB in effluent and sludge from a monitoring program of 40 WWTPs across the U.S. formed the basis for estimating environmental loadings. Based upon a Monte Carlo analysis, the probability of HHCB concentrations being below the PNEC (predicted no effect concentration) for pelagic freshwater organisms was greater than or equal to 99.87% under both mean and low flow regimes. Similarly, the probability of HHCB concentrations being less than the PNEC for freshwater sediment organisms was greater than or equal to 99.98%. Concentrations of HHCB in sludge amended soils were estimated for single and repeated annual sludge applications with tilling of the sludge into the soil, surface application without tilling and a combination reflecting current practice. The probability of soil HHCB concentrations being below the PNEC for soil organisms after repeated sludge applications was 94.35% with current sludge practice. Probabilistic estimates of HHCB exposures in surface waters, sediments and sludge amended soils are consistent with the published values for the U.S. In addition, the results of these analyses indicate that HHCB entering the environment in WWTP effluent and sludge poses negligible risk to aquatic and terrestrial organisms in nearly all exposure scenarios. PMID:24802072

  3. INVESTIGATIONS OF HEAT TREATMENT FOR PAPER MILL SLUDGE CONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of oxidative and nonoxidative heat treatment processes for the conditioning of hydrous sludges originating in pulp and paper industry manufacturing or wastewater treatment operations was defined on the basis of laboratory scale investigation. Sludges employed in th...

  4. Self-heating of dried wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Della Zassa, M; Biasin, A; Canu, P

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally studied the occurrence of spontaneous self-heating of sludge after drying, to understand its nature, course and remediation. The sludge originates from primary and biological treatment of both municipal and industrial wastewater, the latter largely dominant (approx. 90% total organic carbon, mainly from local tanneries). Dried sludge is collected into big-bags (approx. 1.5m(3)) and landfilled in a dedicated site. After several years of regular operation of the landfill, without any management or environmental issue, indications of local warming emerged, together with smoke and smelling emissions, and local subsidence. During a two year monitoring activity, temperatures locally as high as 80°C have been detected, 6-10 m deep. Experiments were carried out on large quantities of dried sludge (? 1t), monitoring the temperature of the samples over long periods of time (months), aiming to reproduce the spontaneous self-heating, under different conditions, to spot enhancing and damping factors. Results demonstrate that air is a key factor to trigger and modulate the self-heating. Water, in addition to air, supports and emphasizes the heating. Unusual drying operation was found to affect dramatically the self-heating activity, up to spontaneous combustion, while ordinary drying conditions yield a sludge with a moderate self-heating inclination. Temperature values as well as heating time scales suggest that the exothermic process nature is mainly chemical and physical, while microbiological activity might be a co-factor. PMID:23046875

  5. Wastewater Treatment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Water-technology.net web site for the water industry contains links to many sites for detailed information on industrial and municipal wastewater treatment plants as well as water supply and transmission. Also find information on current news releases, expos, conferences and much more.

  6. Basis for the development of sustainable optimisation indicators for activated sludge wastewater treatment plants in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G T; McCann, B P

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the basis of a stakeholder-based sustainable optimisation indicator (SOI) system to be developed for small-to-medium sized activated sludge (AS) wastewater treatment plants (WwTPs) in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). Key technical publications relating to best practice plant operation, performance audits and optimisation, and indicator and benchmarking systems for wastewater services are identified. Optimisation studies were developed at a number of Irish AS WwTPs and key findings are presented. A national AS WwTP manager/operator survey was carried out to verify the applied operational findings and identify the key operator stakeholder requirements for this proposed SOI system. It was found that most plants require more consistent operational data-based decision-making, monitoring and communication structures to facilitate optimised, sustainable and continuous performance improvement. The applied optimisation and stakeholder consultation phases form the basis of the proposed stakeholder-based SOI system. This system will allow for continuous monitoring and rating of plant performance, facilitate optimised operation and encourage the prioritisation of performance improvement through tracking key operational metrics. Plant optimisation has become a major focus due to the transfer of all ROI water services to a national water utility from individual local authorities and the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive. PMID:25607680

  7. MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. D. Bostick; D. P. Hoffmann; R. J. Stevenson; A. A. Richmond; D. F. Bickford

    1994-01-01

    The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and

  8. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Soebbing, J.B. [CH2M Hill, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Yolo, R.A. [CH2M Hill, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) activity in wastewater treatment plants is discussed. Three case histories are presented showing through-wall pitting from MIC in return activated sludge (RAS) process piping systems. Field and laboratory investigation activities are reported. Alternatives are reviewed for initial corrosion prevention and mitigation following identification. A brief discussion of wastewater treatment and specifically, the activated sludge process is also provided. The applicability of common MIC prevention and mitigation practices to wastewater treatment facilities or processes is also reviewed.

  9. Predicting concentrations of trace organic compounds in municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge and biosolids using the PhATE™ model.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Virginia L; D'Aco, Vincent J; Pfeiffer, Danielle; Anderson, Paul D; Buzby, Mary E; Hannah, Robert E; Jahnke, James; Parke, Neil J

    2012-07-01

    This article presents the capability expansion of the PhATE™ (pharmaceutical assessment and transport evaluation) model to predict concentrations of trace organics in sludges and biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). PhATE was originally developed as an empirical model to estimate potential concentrations of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in US surface and drinking waters that could result from patient use of medicines. However, many compounds, including pharmaceuticals, are not completely transformed in WWTPs and remain in biosolids that may be applied to land as a soil amendment. This practice leads to concerns about potential exposures of people who may come into contact with amended soils and also about potential effects to plants and animals living in or contacting such soils. The model estimates the mass of API in WWTP influent based on the population served, the API per capita use, and the potential loss of the compound associated with human use (e.g., metabolism). The mass of API on the treated biosolids is then estimated based on partitioning to primary and secondary solids, potential loss due to biodegradation in secondary treatment (e.g., activated sludge), and potential loss during sludge treatment (e.g., aerobic digestion, anaerobic digestion, composting). Simulations using 2 surrogate compounds show that predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) generated by PhATE are in very good agreement with measured concentrations, i.e., well within 1 order of magnitude. Model simulations were then carried out for 18 APIs representing a broad range of chemical and use characteristics. These simulations yielded 4 categories of results: 1) PECs are in good agreement with measured data for 9 compounds with high analytical detection frequencies, 2) PECs are greater than measured data for 3 compounds with high analytical detection frequencies, possibly as a result of as yet unidentified depletion mechanisms, 3) PECs are less than analytical reporting limits for 5 compounds with low analytical detection frequencies, and 4) the PEC is greater than the analytical method reporting limit for 1 compound with a low analytical detection frequency, possibly again as a result of insufficient depletion data. Overall, these results demonstrate that PhATE has the potential to be a very useful tool in the evaluation of APIs in biosolids. Possible applications include: prioritizing APIs for assessment even in the absence of analytical methods; evaluating sludge processing scenarios to explore potential mitigation approaches; using in risk assessments; and developing realistic nationwide concentrations, because PECs can be represented as a cumulative probability distribution. Finally, comparison of PECs to measured concentrations can also be used to identify the need for fate studies of compounds of interest in biosolids. PMID:22162313

  10. Treatment of organic pollutants in coke plant wastewater by the method of ultrasonic irradiation, catalytic oxidation and activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping Ning; Hans-Jörg Bart; Yijiao Jiang; A. de Haan; C. Tien

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the degradation of the organic pollutants in coke plant wastewater by the combination process of ultrasonic irradiation, catalytic oxidation and activated sludge. The effect factors of ultrasonic irradiation on the degradation of the organic pollutants such as saturating gas, initial pollutant concentration, ultrasonic power density, the category and consumption of catalyst were investigated. The results indicate

  11. Use of dewatered alum sludge as main substrate in treatment reed bed receiving agricultural wastewater: Long-term trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Q. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; A. O. Babatunde

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore a novel application of dewatered alum sludge cakes (DASC) as the main medium in a single model reed bed to treat phosphorus-rich animal farm wastewater under “tidal flow” operation on a long-term basis. It is expected that the cakes act as the carrier for developing biofilm and also serve as adsorbent to enhance phosphorus (P)

  12. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY : CONTROL OF PATHOGENS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 71 - page Technology Transfer Environmental Regulations and echnology publication describes the Federal requirements promulgated in 1979 for reducing pathogens n wastewater sludge and provides guidance in determining whether individual sludge treatment andated or particular ...

  13. Sewage sludge management for phosphorus recovery as struvite in EBPR wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Pastor, L; Marti, N; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2008-07-01

    The influence of separate and mixed thickening of primary and secondary sludge on struvite recovery was studied. Phosphorus precipitation in the digester was reduced from 13.7 g of phosphorus per kg of treated sludge in the separate thickening experiment to 5.9 in the mixed thickening experiment. This lessening of the uncontrolled precipitation means a reduction of the operational problems and enhances the phosphorus availability for its later crystallization. High phosphorus precipitation and recovery efficiencies were achieved in both crystallization experiments. However, mixed thickening configuration showed a lower percentage of phosphorus precipitated as struvite due to the presence of high calcium concentrations. In spite of this low percentage, the global phosphorus mass balance showed that mixed thickening experiment produces a higher phosphorus recovery as struvite per kg of treated sludge (i.e., 3.6 gP/kg sludge vs. 2.5 gP/kg sludge in separate thickening). PMID:17976981

  14. Microwave and thermal pretreatment as methods for increasing the biogas potential of secondary sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, the sludge was pretreated with microwave irradiation and low-temperature thermal method, both conducted under the same temperature range (30-100°C). Microwave pretreatment was found to be superior over the thermal treatment with respect to sludge solubilization and biogas production. Taking into account the specific energy demand of solubilization, the sludge pre-treated at 60-70°C by microwaves of 900 W was chosen for further experiments in continuous mode, which was more energetically sustainable compared to lower value (700 W) and thermal treatment. Continuous biogas reactor experiments indicated that pre-treated sludge (microwave irradiation: 900 W, temperature: 60-70°C) gave 35% more methane, compared to untreated sludge. Moreover, the results of this study clearly demonstrated that microwave pretreated sludge showed better degree of sanitation. PMID:23500587

  15. Treatment of Dairy Wastewater Using an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. N. Gavala; H. Kopsinis; I. V. Skiadas; K. Stamatelatou; G. Lyberatos

    1999-01-01

    Wastewater coming from cheese-producing industries in Greece is high in organic matter (about 40–60 g\\/l Chemical Oxygen Demand, COD) since it generally contains discarded cheese-whey as well. This wastewater is rich in easily biodegradable carbohydrates and has a relatively low content in suspended solids (1–5 g\\/l). Because of the high organic content of dairy wastewater, anaerobic digestion is essentially the

  16. Performance of down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor coupled with up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for treatment of onion dehydration wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hala El-Kamah; Mohamed Mahmoud; Ahmed Tawfik

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a promising system consisting of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was investigated for onion dehydration wastewater treatment. Laboratory experiments were conducted at two different phases, i.e., phase (1) at overall hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 11h (UASB reactor: 6h and DHS reactor: 5h) and phase (2) at overall HRT

  17. A combined approach of partial least squares and fuzzy c-means clustering for the monitoring of an activated-sludge waste-water treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pekka Teppola; Satu-Pia Mujunen; Pentti Minkkinen

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, a combined approach of partial least squares (PLS) and fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering for the monitoring of an activated-sludge waste-water treatment plant is presented. Their properties are also investigated. Both methods were applied together in process monitoring. PLS was used for extracting the most useful information from the control and process variables in order to predict a

  18. An integrated approach for monitoring efficiency and investments of activated sludge-based wastewater treatment plants at large spatial scale.

    PubMed

    De Gisi, Sabino; Sabia, Gianpaolo; Casella, Patrizia; Farina, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    WISE, the Water Information System for Europe, is the web-portal of the European Commission (EU) that disseminates the quality state of the receiving water bodies and the efficiency of the municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in order to monitor advances in the application of both the Water Framework Directive (WFD) as well as the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD). With the intention to develop WISE applications, the aim of the work was to define and apply an integrated approach capable of monitoring the efficiency and investments of activated sludge-based WWTPs located in a large spatial area, providing the following outcomes useful to the decision-makers: (i) the identification of critical facilities and their critical processes by means of a Performance Assessment System (PAS), (ii) the choice of the most suitable upgrading actions, through a scenario analysis. (iii) the assessment of the investment costs to upgrade the critical WWTPs and (iv) the prioritization of the critical facilities by means of a multi-criteria approach which includes the stakeholders involvement, along with the integration of some technical, environmental, economic and health aspects. The implementation of the proposed approach to a high number of municipal WWTPs highlighted how the PAS developed was able to identify critical processes with a particular effectiveness in identifying the critical nutrient removal ones. In addition, a simplified approach that considers the cost related to a basic-configuration and those for the WWTP integration, allowed to link the critical processes identified and the investment costs. Finally, the questionnaire for the acquisition of data such as that provided by the Italian Institute of Statistics, the PAS defined and the database on the costs, if properly adapted, may allow for the extension of the integrated approach on an EU-scale by providing useful information to water utilities as well as institutions. PMID:25863511

  19. ENGINEERING ASSESSMENT OF VERMICOMPOSTING MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vermicomposting -- the biological degradation of organic matter that occurs as earthworms feed on waste materials -- has been advocated by some as a means of stabilizing and disposing of municipal wastewater sludges. Vermicomposting is being attempted on an experimental scale, th...

  20. Anaerobic granulation technology for wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Liu; Hai-Lou Xu; Kuan-Yeow Show; Joo-Hwa Tay

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment using granular sludge reactors is a developing technology, in which granular sludge is the core component. So far, around 900 anaerobic granular sludge units have been operated worldwide. Although intensive research attention has been given to anaerobic granules in the past 20 years, the mechanisms responsible for anaerobic granulation and the strategy of how to expedite substantially

  1. Performance of a combined system of microbial fuel cell and membrane bioreactor: wastewater treatment, sludge reduction, energy recovery and membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinying; Tian, Yu; Sun, Zhicai; Lu, Yaobin; Li, Zhipeng

    2013-11-15

    A novel combined system of sludge microbial fuel cell (S-MFC) stack and membrane bioreactor (MBR) was proposed in this study. The non-consumed sludge in the MBR sludge-fed S-MFC was recycled to the MBR. In the combined system, the COD and ammonia treatment efficiencies were more than 90% and the sludge reduction was 5.1% higher than that of the conventional MBR. It's worth noting that the energy recovery and fouling mitigation were observed in the combined system. In the single S-MFC, about 75 mg L(-1) COD could be translated to electricity during one cycle. The average voltage and maximum power production of the single S-MFC were 430 mV and 51 mWm(-2), respectively. Additionally, the combined system was able to mitigate membrane fouling by the sludge modification. Except for the content decrease (22%), S-MFC destroyed simple aromatic proteins and tryptophan protein-like substances in loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS). These results indicated that effective wastewater treatment, sludge reduction, energy recovery and membrane fouling mitigation could be obtained in the combined system. PMID:23722047

  2. Preparation of ceramic filler from reusing sewage sludge and application in biological aerated filter for soy protein secondary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Gao, Yue; Fan, Chunzhen; He, Shengbing

    2015-02-11

    Dehydrated sewage sludge (DSS) and clay used as raw materials for preparation of novel media-sludge ceramic filler (SCF) and SCF employed in a lab-scale up-flow biological aerated filter (BAF) were investigated for soy protein secondary wastewater treatment. Single factor experiments were designed to investigate the preparation of SCF, and the characteristics (microstructure properties, toxic metal leaching property and other physical properties) of SCF prepared under the optimum conditions were examined. The influences of media height, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and air-liquid ratio (A/L) on chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) removal rate were studied. The results showed that the optimum addition of DSS was approximately 25.0 wt% according to the physical properties of SCF (expansion ratio of 53.0%, v/v, water absorption of 8.24 wt%, bulk density of 350.4 kg m(-3) and grain density of 931.5 kg m(-3)), and the optimum conditions of BAF system were media height of 75.0 cm, HRT of 10.0 h and A/L of 15:1 in terms of CODcr and NH4(+)-N removal rate (91.02% and 90.48%, respectively). Additionally, CODcr and NH4(+)-N (81.6 and 15.3 mg L(-1), respectively) in the final effluent of BAF system met the national standard (CODcr ? 100 mg L(-1), NH4(+)-N ? 25.0 mg L(-1), GB 18918-2002, secondary standard). PMID:25464302

  3. Treatment of coal-conversion wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact-stabilization activated-sludge process. First annual technical progress report, February 1, 1981July 31, 1981

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Suidan; C. S. Gee; M. A. Deady; M. Pirbazari

    1981-01-01

    The scope of work of the present reseach project is to evaluate the effectiveness of the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated sludge process in the treatment of a coke oven wastewater. Nitrification and subsequent denitrification of the contact-stabilization clarifier effluent will also be evaluated. Emphasis during this research will be placed on determining the effect of sludge retention time and

  4. Treatment of coal-conversion wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated-sludge process. First semiannual technical progress report, August 1, 1980January 31, 1981

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Suidan; M. Pirbazari; C. S. Gee; M. A. Deady

    1981-01-01

    The treatment of coal conversion wastewaters has traditionally been accomplished through the use of the activated sludge process and its various modifications. General observations have been that phenol was degraded efficiently; however, very poor removal efficiencies of thiocyanate, cyanide, and ammonia were obtained. The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to the activated sludge process has been reported to result

  5. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors for treatment of wastewater from the brewery industry

    E-print Network

    Scampini, Amanda C

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion can be utilized to convert industrial wastewater into clean water and energy. The goal of this project was to set up lab-scale anaerobic digesters to collect data that will be used to develop and validate ...

  6. Wastewater Treatment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bianca Pedersen

    Before this activity the students will have heard about groundwater and water resources through lecture to give them a background on where our drinking water comes from. The activity involves a tour of the local wastewater treatment plant where the students told about the treatment processes and shown the treatment facility. They are also introduced to the water quality testing done at the plans and they learn about the energy usage/management at the plant. As part of the activity they write up a paper on the processes in the treatment process from the time water enters the plant until it exits. The students are encouraged before hand to ask questions to ensure that they gather the needed information. This always means that each tour has a slightly different content based on these questions.

  7. Respirometric Evaluation of Strong Wastewater Activated Sludge Treatment for a Complex Chemical Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Ubay Cokgor; G. Insel; E. Aydin; S. Ozdemir; D. Orhon

    \\u000a This study deals with respirometric modeling of biodegradation of complex organic matter generated from a chemical industry.\\u000a Evaluation with a multi-degradation model indicated that organic matter in raw wastewater has four types of biodegradable\\u000a components having different biodegradation characteristics. The model evaluation of batch respirogram indicated that the acclimated\\u000a biomass exhibited a delayed response after the addition of raw wastewater

  8. Degradation of estrogens by Rhodococcus zopfii and Rhodococcus equi isolates from activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Nagai, Fumiko; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Mizukoshi, Harumi; Makino, Takashi; Kimura, Kazumasa; Saino, Hideyuki; Sawada, Haruji; Omura, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    We have isolated four strains of Rhodococcus which specifically degrade estrogens by using enrichment culture of activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants. Strain Y 50158, identified as Rhodococcus zopfii, completely and rapidly degraded 100 mg of 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and ethinyl estradiol/liter, as demonstrated by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Strains Y 50155, Y 50156, and Y 50157, identified as Rhodococcus equi, showed degradation activities comparable with that of Y 50158. Using the random amplified polymorphism DNA fingerprinting test, these three strains were confirmed to have been derived from different sources. R. zopfii Y 50158, which showed the highest activity among these four strains, revealed that the strain selectively degraded 17beta-estradiol during jar fermentation, even when glucose was used as a readily utilizable carbon source in the culture medium. Measurement of estrogenic activities with human breast cancer-derived MVLN cells showed that these four strains each degraded 100 mg of 17beta-estradiol/liter to 1/100 of the specific activity level after 24 h. It is thus suggested that these strains degrade 17beta-estradiol into substances without estrogenic activity. PMID:15345411

  9. Sewage Sludge ElectroDewatering Treatment—A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pham-Anh Tuan; Sillanpää Mika; Isosaari Pirjo

    2012-01-01

    Purification of municipal wastewater generates huge amounts of sewage sludge, which contains large quantities of water, biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances. It is widely known that sewage sludge usually has a poor dewaterability. A large amount of water in sludge directly translates into high transport and handling costs; therefore, sludge treatment and disposal usually requires over 50% of the operation

  10. EVALUATION OF SORPTION ISOTHERMS FOR SELECTED AZO DYES AS PREDICTORS OF FATE IN AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azo dyes are of concern because of their widespread production and use and their potential adverse environmental and health impacts. Environmental exposure is normally via aqueous effluents of manufacturing and use industries, and treatment is at municipal wastewater treatment pl...

  11. Thermophilic aerobic biological wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy M LaPara; James E Alleman

    1999-01-01

    The following review article will serve to elucidate the existing state-of-the-art and breadth of technical understanding related to thermophilic aerobic biological wastewater treatment. The advantages of this technology include rapid biodegradation rates, low sludge yields, and excellent process stability. Substrate utilization rates reported in the technical literature are 3–10 times greater than that observed with analogous mesophilic processes, and sludge

  12. Toxicity of ionic liquid cations and anions towards activated sewage sludge organisms from different sources -- consequences for biodegradation testing and wastewater treatment plant operation.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Marta; Piszora, Magdalena; Caicedo, Nelson; Jungnickel, Christian; Stolte, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have attracted great interest in academia and industry during the last decade. So far, several ILs have been used in technological processes, from small scale to industrial applications, which makes it more and more likely that they will be released into the environment. Researchers have been actively studying the environmental and toxicological behaviour of ILs, but their influence on the activated sludge communities of wastewater treatment plants have yet to be investigated. This study aims to fill this knowledge gap by systematically investigating the influence of ILs on activated sewage sludge communities. We tested the inhibition of activated sludge respiration (according to OECD guideline 209) by a selection of 19 different compounds covering the chemical space of ILs as comprehensively as possible. To elicit the differences in sensitivities/tolerances towards ILs we investigated activated sludge from different domestic and industrial sources. Generally speaking, the structure activity relationships of IL toxicity towards activated sludge are in good agreement with those found for other organisms and test systems. The inhibitory potential of tested ILs substituted with short alkyl chains (? 4) and polar anions was low. On the other hand, the toxic effects of highly hydrophobic ionic cations and anions were greater - IC50 values were low, some < 50 ?M (<10 mg L(-1)). We were able to demonstrate that the EC50 values from Vibrio fischeri can be used for a reliable assessment of the sludge inhibition potential of tested ILs. All the results are discussed in the context of their consequences for biodegradation processes and the performance of wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23561501

  13. DEWATERING WASTEWATER TREATMENT SLUDGE BY CLATHRATE FREEZING: A BENCH-SCALE FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies were performed to prove the concept and feasibility for a novel technology to dewater sludges. This involves the formation of solid hydrate crystals of water and specific clathrate-forming agents followed by separation of the hydrate crystal solids from the slu...

  14. Psychrophilic (6--15 {degree}C) high-rate anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater in a two-module expanded granular sludge bed system

    SciTech Connect

    Rebac, S.; Lier, J.B. van; Lens, P.; Cappellen, J. van; Vermeulen, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lettinga, G. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands)] [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands); Dekkers, F.; Swinkels, K.T.M. [Bavaria B.V., Lieshout (Netherlands)] [Bavaria B.V., Lieshout (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    Psychrophilic (6--15 C) anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater was investigated. A two-module expanded granular sludge bed reactor system with a total volume of 140 dm{sup 3} was used to treat malting wastewater having a soluble and total chemical oxygen demand (COD) between 233 and 1778 mg dm{sup {minus}3} and between 317 and 4422 mg dm{sup {minus}3}, respectively. The removal efficiencies at 6 C were 47 and 71% of the soluble and volatile fatty acids (VFA) COD, at organic loading rates (OLR) ranging between 3.3 and 5.8 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The removal efficiencies at 10--15 C were 67--78 and 90--96% of the soluble and VFA COD at an OLR between 2.8 and 12.3 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The specific methanogenic activity of the sludge present in each module increased 2--3-fold during system operation for 400 days. The relatively high concentration of suspended solids in the influent (25% of the total COD) caused a deterioration of the sludge bed in the first reactor module. This was aggravated by excessive growth of acidifying biomass, which persisted in the first module sludge bed and resulted in granular sludge flotation. However, the second module could accommodate the increased OLR, this providing a very high effluent quality (soluble COD < 200 mg dm{sup {minus}3}) of the total system. The stability of module 1 concerning suspended solids could be restored by presettling the wastewater.

  15. DETERMINATION OF METHYL MERCURY IN A PILOT-SCALE ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. PAVLOGEORGATOS; N. S. THOMAIDIS

    The methylation of mercury has been investigated and documented mainly in sediments, fish and microorganisms, while limited number of relevant studies is available for wastewater. The procedure of mercury methylation can occur via biological pathway (by microorganisms) and via chemical or photochemical reactions. Methylation of mercury occurs mainly under anaerobic conditions, but some studies have shown its existence also under

  16. The effect of chemical composition on the PCT durability of mixed waste glasses from wastewater treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R.G.; Overcamp, T.J. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.; Cicero, C.A. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-01-25

    An experimental program has been designed to examine the chemical durability of glass compositions derived from the vitrification of simulated wastewater treatment sludges. These sludges represent the majority of low-level mixed wastes currently in need of treatment by the US DOE. The major oxides in these model glasses included SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, CaO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, three minor oxides, BaO, NiO, and PbO, were added as hazardous metals. The major oxides were each varied at two levels resulting in 32 experimental glasses. The chemical durability was measured by the 7-Day Product Consistency Test (PCT). The normalized sodium release rates (NRR{sub Na}) of these glasses ranged from 0.01 to 4.99 g/m{sup 2}. The molar ratio of the glass-former to glass-modifier (F/M) was found to have the greatest effect on PCT durability. Glass-formers included SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while Na{sub 2}O, CaO, BaO, NiO, and PbO were glass-modifiers. As this ratio increased from 0.75 to 2.0, NRR{sub Na} was found to decrease between one and two orders of magnitude. Another important effect on NRR{sub Na} was the Na{sub 2}O/CaO ratio. As this ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0, NRR{sub Na} increased up to two orders of magnitude for the glasses with the low F/M ratio but almost no effect was observed for the glasses with the high F/M ratio. Increasing the iron oxide content from 2 to 18 mole% was found to decrease NRR{sub Na} one order of magnitude for the glasses with low F/M but iron had little effect on the glasses with the high F/M ratio. The durability also increased when 10 mole percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was included in low iron oxide glasses but no effect was observed with the high iron glasses. The addition of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} had little effect on durability. The effects of other composition parameters on durability are discussed as well.

  17. Treatment of a chocolate industry wastewater in a pilot-scale low-temperature UASB reactor operated at short hydraulic and sludge retention time.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Soto, M; Arzate-Archundia, O; Solís-Morelos, C; Fall, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a 244-L pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor during the treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater under low-temperature conditions (18 ± 0.6 °C) for approximately 250 d. The applied organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 4 and 7 kg/m(3)/d by varying the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODsol), while keeping the hydraulic retention time constant (6.4 ± 0.3 h). The CODsol removal efficiency was low (59-78%). The measured biogas production increased from 240 ± 54 to 431 ± 61 L/d during the experiments. A significant linear correlation between the measured biogas production and removed OLR indicated that 81.69 L of biogas were produced per kg/m(3) of CODsol removed. Low average reactor volatile suspended solids (VSS) (2,700-4,800 mg/L) and high effluent VSS (177-313 mg/L) were derived in a short sludge retention time (SRT) (4.9 d). The calculated SRT was shorter than those reported in the literature, but did not affect the reactor's performance. Average sludge yield was 0.20 kg-VSS/kg-CODsol. The low-temperature anaerobic treatment was a good option for the pre-treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater. PMID:23508162

  18. Characterization of refractory matters in dyeing wastewater during a full-scale Fenton process following pure-oxygen activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Won, Hosik; Hwang, Byungho; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Chung, Jinwook; Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae

    2015-04-28

    Refractory pollutants in raw and treated dyeing wastewaters were characterized using fractional molecular weight cut-off, Ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS). Significant organics and color compounds remained after biological (pure-oxygen activated sludge) and chemical (Fenton) treatments at a dyeing wastewater treatment plant (flow rate ?100,000m(3)/d). HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed that some organic compounds disappeared after the biological treatment but reappeared after the chemical oxidation process, and some of that were originally absent in the raw dyeing wastewater was formed after the biological or chemical treatment. It appeared that the Fenton process merely impaired the color-imparting bonds in the dye materials instead of completely degrading them. Nevertheless, this process did significantly reduce the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD, 66%) and color (73%) remaining after initial biological treatment which reduced SCOD by 53% and color by 13% in raw wastewater. Biological treatment decreased the degradable compounds substantially, in such a way that the following Fenton process could effectively remove recalcitrant compounds, making the overall hybrid system more economical. In addition, ferric ion inherent to the Fenton reaction effectively coagulated particulate matters not removed via biological and chemical oxidation. PMID:25682369

  19. Total organic carbon-calibrated mathematical model for a completely mixed activated sludge waste-water treatment process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. U. Rao; Daniel Tyteca; Edmond-Jacques Nyns

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for a total organic carbon-monitored, completely mixed activated sludge process for the treatment of a mixed domestic and laboratory waste water is discussed and experimentally calibrated. The first-order kinetic model was better suited to fit the experimental data than the Monod model. Values obtained for the sludge yield, Y, and the first-order kinetic constant, kL, agree with

  20. Ecological stabilization of thickened wastewater sludge from CAST process.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y B; Wu, X H; Liu, Zh Sh; Liu, J Zh; Lin, Y Z

    2008-01-01

    Wastewater sludge ecological stabilization (WWSES) pilot scale experiments were conducted for thickening treatment and disposal of sludge which came from Cyclic Activated Sludge Technology (CAST) process. The study was performed over the periods from June to November 2005 and from May to November 2006, on a bed of 80 m2. The sludge loadings were stopped for the winter from December 2005 and resumed in May 2006. The results shows that dried sludge layer has higher permeation coefficients of 0.15-1.3 m/h. It is suggested that the percolate did not filtrate downwards evenly, part of percolate filtrates downwards along stems, roots and cracks existing in dried sludge which have lower flow resistance. The relationship of dried sludge thickness and operation time is in accord with quadratic equation under fluctuating sludge loadings. Linear regression equation can indicate dried sludge thickness variation under fixed sludge loading. In comparison with natural ones, coarse protein content of Phragmites australis roots in the system is twice as high, coarse fiber content of roots, coarse fat content of stems and leaf are obviously higher; and coarse protein content of Typha augustifolia in the system are obviously higher, while coarse fat and coarse fiber contents have no significant difference. PMID:19039169

  1. Recovery of volatile fatty acids from fermentation of sewage sludge in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Longo, S; Katsou, E; Malamis, S; Frison, N; Renzi, D; Fatone, F

    2014-10-01

    This work investigated the pilot scale production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from sewage sludge through alkaline fermentation and the subsequent membrane filtration. Furthermore, the impact of the fermentation liquid on nutrient bioremoval was examined. The addition of wollastonite in the fermenter to buffer the pH affected the composition of the carbon source produced during fermentation, resulting in higher COD/NH4-N and COD/PO4-P ratios in the liquid phase and higher content of propionic acid. The addition of wollastonite decreased the capillary suction time (CST) and the time to filter (TTF), resulting in favorable dewatering characteristics. The sludge dewatering characteristics and the separation process were adversely affected from the use of caustic soda. When wollastonite was added, the permeate flux increased by 32%, compared to the use of caustic soda. When fermentation liquid was added as carbon source for nutrient removal, higher removal rates were obtained compared to the use of acetic acid. PMID:25459853

  2. MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication describes and evaluates the various municipal sludge combustion systems. It also emphasizes the necessity for considering and evaluating the costs involved in the total sludge management train, including dewatering, combustion, air pollution control, and ash dispo...

  3. Brevibacterium ammoniilyticum sp. nov., an ammonia-degrading bacterium isolated from sludge of a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsoo; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; You, Taek; Bang, John J; Park, Sujeong; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2013-03-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, non-motile, chemo-organotrophic, mesophilic, aerobic bacterium, designated A1(T), was isolated from sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Strain A1(T) showed good ability to degrade ammonia and grew well on media amended with methanol and ammonia. Strain A1(T) grew with 0-11?% (w/v) NaCl, at 20-42 °C, but not <15 or >45 °C and at pH 6-10 (optimum pH 8.0-9.0). The isolate was catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The DNA G+C content was 70.7 mol%. A comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain A1(T) formed a distinct phyletic lineage in the genus Brevibacterium and showed high sequence similarity with Brevibacterium casei NCDO 2048(T) (96.9?%), Brevibacterium celere KMM 3637(T) (96.9?%) and Brevibacterium sanguinis CF63(T) (96.4?%). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed <43?% DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolate and its closest phylogenetic relatives. The affiliation of strain A1(T) with the genus Brevibacterium was supported by the chemotaxonomic data: predominant quinone menaquinone MK-7(H2); polar lipid profile containing diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified glycolipid; characteristic cell-wall diamino acid meso-diaminopimelic acid; whole-cell sugars galactose, xylose and ribose; absence of mycolic acids; and major fatty acids iso-C15?:?0, anteiso-C15?:?0 and anteiso-C17?:?0. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed phenotypic differentiation of strain A1(T) from members of the genus Brevibacterium. On the basis of the results in this study, a novel species, Brevibacterium ammoniilyticum sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is A1(T) (?=?KEMC 41-098(T) ?=?JCM 17537(T) ?=?KACC 15558(T)). PMID:22729022

  4. Sorption of emerging trace organic compounds onto wastewater sludge solids.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Garmon, John; Drewes, Jörg E; Khan, Stuart J; McDonald, James A; Dickenson, Eric R V

    2011-05-01

    This work examined the sorption potential to wastewater primary- and activated-sludge solids for 34 emerging trace organic chemicals at environmentally relevant concentrations. These compounds represent a diverse range of physical and chemical properties, such as hydrophobicity and charge state, and a diverse range of classes, including steroidal hormones, pharmaceutically-active compounds, personal care products, and household chemicals. Solid-water partitioning coefficients (K(d)) were measured where 19 chemicals did not have previously reported values. Sludge solids were inactivated by a nonchemical lyophilization and dry-heat technique, which provided similar sorption behavior for recalcitrant compounds as compared to fresh activated-sludge. Sorption behavior was similar between primary- and activated-sludge solids from the same plant and between activated-sludge solids from two nitrified processes from different wastewater treatment systems. Positively-charged pharmaceutically-active compounds, amitriptyline, clozapine, verapamil, risperidone, and hydroxyzine, had the highest sorption potential, log K(d)=2.8-3.8 as compared to the neutral and negatively-charged chemicals. Sorption potentials correlated with a compound's hydrophobicity, however the higher sorption potentials observed for positively-charged compounds for a given log D(ow) indicate additional sorption mechanisms, such as electrostatic interactions, are important for these compounds. Previously published soil-based one-parameter models for predicting sorption from hydrophobicity (log K(ow)>2) can be used to predict sorption for emerging nonionic compounds to wastewater sludge solids. PMID:21536314

  5. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge in a wastewater treatment plant by means of mechanical and thermal pre-treatments: Performance, energy and economical assessment.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, Barbara; Campo, Giuseppe; Genon, Giuseppe; Lorenzi, Eugenio; Novarino, Daniel; Scibilia, Gerardo; Zanetti, Mariachiara

    2014-10-22

    Performances of mechanical and low-temperature (<100°C) thermal pre-treatments were investigated to improve the present efficiency of anaerobic digestion (AD) carried out on waste activated sludge (WAS) in the largest Italian wastewater treatment plant (2,300,000p.e.). Thermal pre-treatments returned disintegration rates of one order of magnitude higher than mechanical ones (about 25% vs. 1.5%). The methane specific production increased by 21% and 31%, with respect to untreated samples, for treatment conditions of respectively 70 and 90°C, 3h. Thermal pre-treatments also decreased WAS viscosity. Preliminary energy and economic assessments demonstrated that a WAS final total solid content of 5% was enough to avoid the employment of auxiliary methane for the pre-treatment at 90°C and the subsequent AD process, provided that all the heat generated was transferred to WAS through heat exchangers. Moreover, the total revenues from sale of the electricity produced from biogas increased by 10% with respect to the present scenario. PMID:25459836

  6. Choose appropriate wastewater treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Belhateche, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    Industrial wastewater treatment has been slow to develop, and in some respects has not kept up with advances in manufacturing technology. An earlier CEP article outlined a procedure for developing an effective wastewater treatment strategy. This article discusses the various wastewater treatment technologies in more detail and includes tables that compare their applications, advantages, and disadvantages. It also provides guidance on when to apply what type of treatment to which waste streams. This information can help bridge the gap between where the plant needs to be, in terms of effluent quality, and where it is, in terms of wastewater characteristics. Technologies include wet air oxidation, supercritical oxidation, incineration, activated sludge, aerated lagoons, stabilization ponds, trickling filters, fixed-film reactors, and anaerobic degradation.

  7. Sustainability of wastewater treatment technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen E. Muga; James R. Mihelcic

    2008-01-01

    A set of indicators that incorporate environmental, societal, and economic sustainability were developed and used to investigate the sustainability of different wastewater treatment technologies, for plant capacities of 5 million gallons per day (MGD) or 18.9×103 cubic meters (m3\\/day). The technologies evaluated were mechanical (i.e., activated sludge with secondary treatment), lagoon (facultative, anaerobic, and aerobic), and land treatment systems (e.g.,

  8. Removal of dissolved Zn(II) using coal mine drainage sludge: implications for acidic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Cannon, Fred S; Na, Seunmin; Khim, Jeehyeong; Park, Jae Kwang

    2013-02-15

    The mechanism for the removal of Zn(II) by using coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS) was investigated by spectroscopic analysis and observations of batch tests using model materials. Zeta potential analysis showed that CMDS(25) (dried at 25 °C) and CMDS(550) (dried at 550 °C) had a much lower isoelectric point of pH (pH(IEP)) than either goethite or calcite, which are the main constituents of CMDS. This indicates that the negatively charged anion (sulfate) was incorporated into the structural networks and adsorbed on the surface of CMDS via outer-sphere complexation. The removal of Zn(II) by CMDS was thought to be primarily caused by sulfate-complexed iron (oxy)hydroxide and calcite. In particular, the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged functional group, FeOH-SO(4)(2-), to the dissolved Zn(II) could provide high removal efficiencies over a wide pH range. Thermodynamic modeling and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) demonstrated that ZnSO(4) is the dominant species in the pH range 3-7 as the sulfate complexes with the hydroxyl groups, whereas the precipitation of Zn(II) as ZnCO(3) or Zn(5)(CO(3))(2) (OH)(6) through the dissolution of calcite is the dominant mechanism in the pH range 7-9.6. PMID:23295677

  9. Industrial flue gas desulfurization waste may offer an opportunity to facilitate SANI® application for significant sludge minimization in freshwater wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Qian, J; Jiang, F; Chui, H K; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, G H

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an exploratory study on the use of a sulfite-rich industrial effluent to enable the integration of a sulfite-sulfide-sulfate cycle to the conventional carbon and nitrogen cycles in wastewater treatment to achieve sludge minimization through the non-sludge-producing Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitri?cation and Nitri?cation Integrated (SANI) process. A laboratory-scale sulfite reduction reactor was set up for treating sulfite-rich synthetic wastewater simulating the wastewater from industrial flue gas desulfurization (FGD) units. The results indicated that the sulfite reduction reactor can be started up within 11 d, which was much faster than that using sulfate. Thiosulfate was found to be the major sulfite reduction intermediate, accounting for about 30% of the total reduced sulfur in the reactor effluent, which may enable additional footprint reduction of the autotrophic denitrification reactor in the SANI process. This study indicated that it was possible to make use of the FGD effluent for applying the FGD-SANI process in treating freshwater-based sewage. PMID:23787323

  10. Co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with primary sludge at a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dereli, Recep Kaan; Ersahin, Mustafa Evren; Gomec, Cigdem Yangin; Ozturk, Izzet; Ozdemir, Ozgur

    2010-05-01

    Co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge may be an attractive alternative for sustainable management of two separate waste streams produced in large amounts in all countries. This study evaluates calculation-based results of an anaerobic co-digestion process for primary sludge (PS) together with the OFMSW. The calculations were carried out for the anaerobic digester of Kayseri municipal wastewater treatment plant (in Turkey) presently digesting only PS. Two alternatives were proposed using different solid waste contents in co-digesters. For achieving the optimal solids content, some treated wastewater should be recycled to the inlet of the digesters. The municipal solid waste collection method characterized as mechanically sorted (MS-OFMSW; Option 1) is evaluated as well as a source sorted (SS-OFMSW) alternative (Option 2). Utilizing the energy produced by the existing sludge digester, only 30% of the internal energy demand at the wastewater treatment plant can be covered. The aim of this study is to evaluate how energy production would be increased by co-digestion of OFMSW and PS. The best operational condition considering organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time and energy generation could be attained at 10% digester solids content for both options. According to Option 1, almost 77% of the energy demand could be covered by co-digestion of MS-OFMSW and PS. Results indicated that almost 100% energy coverage can be obtained when co-digestion (Option 2) was performed according to SS-OFMSW and PS. PMID:19710107

  11. Comparison of the removal of phthalates and other organic pollutants from industrial wastewaters in membrane bioreactor and conventional activated sludge treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Llop, A; Borrull, F; Pocurull, E

    2009-01-01

    In recent years greater attention has been paid to the presence of pollutants in wastewater treatment plants, mainly because of strict environmental regulations and the possibility of reusing treated water in industrial processes. Since some organic pollutant compounds are not sufficiently removed in conventional activated sludge treatment (CAST) plants, new treatment processes have been developed, such as membrane bioreactors (MBRs). In this study a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used to treat mixed industrial wastewaters in parallel with a CAST plant. Two hydraulic retention times (HRT) of wastewater were tested as one of the operational conditions of MBR and the quality of effluents of the two processes were studied and compared. Several general quality parameters were analysed in wastewaters: chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, conductivity, nitrogen, phosphate, suspended solids (SS) and turbidity. The two systems reduced COD by around 90%. SS was reduced by around 81% in the CAST plant and around 90% in the MBR plant. The results for the other general parameters were similar or better in the MBR process, which worked at a lower HRT. We also studied the removal of a group of six phthalates and bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate ester by SPME/GC-MS in the two treatment plants. Most of these compounds were not completely removed in the two treatment plants and were identified at low microg l(-1) levels. We also tentatively identify some organic compounds in the wastewaters. Most of the compounds we found in the influent, MBR effluent and CAST effluent were benzene derivates, styrene, naphthalene and naphthalene derivates, and phenol derivates. PMID:19901476

  12. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF OPEN TANK OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pilot plant for this study consisted of one oxygenation basin and two clarifiers. The system treated primary clarifier effluent from the Englewood, Colorado, treatment facility. The influent flow rate was adjusted to attain average aeration reactor detention times ranging fro...

  13. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, A. C.; Karanth, P. N.; Lajoie, C. A.; Meyers, A. J.; Gregory, I. R.; Stapleton, R. D.; Taylor, D. E.; Sayler, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial wastewater treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of these clones were members of the beta subdivision, and their sequences showed high homology to sequences of known bacterial species as well as published 16S rDNA sequences from other activated sludge sources. Sixteen clones belonged to the alpha subdivision, 7 of which showed similarity to Hyphomicrobium species. This cluster was chosen for further studies due to earlier work on Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 isolated from this treatment plant. A nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 was 99% similar to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans DSM 1869T in Hyphomicrobium cluster II. Three of the cloned sequences from the activated sludge samples also grouped with those of Hyphomicrobium cluster II, with a 96% sequence similarity to that of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. The other four cloned sequences from the activated sludge sample were more closely related to those of the Hyphomicrobium cluster I organisms (95 to 97% similarity). Whole-cell fluorescence hybridization of microorganisms in the activated sludge with genus-specific Hyphomicrobium probe S-G-Hypho-1241-a-A-19 enhanced the visualization of Hyphomicrobium and revealed that Hyphomicrobium appears to be abundant both on the outside of flocs and within the floc structure. Dot blot hybridization of activated sludge samples from 1995 with probes designed for Hyphomicrobium cluster I and Hyphomicrobium cluster II indicated that Hyphomicrobium cluster II-positive 16S rRNA dominated over Hyphomicrobium cluster I-positive 16S rRNA by 3- to 12-fold. Hyphomicrobium 16S rRNA comprised approximately 5% of the 16S rRNA in the activated sludge. PMID:10698787

  14. Electricity generation using chocolate industry wastewater and its treatment in activated sludge based microbial fuel cell and analysis of developed microbial community in the anode chamber.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sunil A; Surakasi, Venkata Prasad; Koul, Sandeep; Ijmulwar, Shrikant; Vivek, Amar; Shouche, Y S; Kapadnis, B P

    2009-11-01

    Feasibility of using chocolate industry wastewater as a substrate for electricity generation using activated sludge as a source of microorganisms was investigated in two-chambered microbial fuel cell. The maximum current generated with membrane and salt bridge MFCs was 3.02 and 2.3 A/m(2), respectively, at 100 ohms external resistance, whereas the maximum current generated in glucose powered MFC was 3.1 A/m(2). The use of chocolate industry wastewater in cathode chamber was promising with 4.1 mA current output. Significant reduction in COD, BOD, total solids and total dissolved solids of wastewater by 75%, 65%, 68%, 50%, respectively, indicated effective wastewater treatment in batch experiments. The 16S rDNA analysis of anode biofilm and suspended cells revealed predominance of beta-Proteobacteria clones with 50.6% followed by unclassified bacteria (9.9%), alpha-Proteobacteria (9.1%), other Proteobacteria (9%), Planctomycetes (5.8%), Firmicutes (4.9%), Nitrospora (3.3%), Spirochaetes (3.3%), Bacteroides (2.4%) and gamma-Proteobacteria (0.8%). Diverse bacterial groups represented as members of the anode chamber community. PMID:19539465

  15. Adsorption of heavy metals from wastewater with waste activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the investigation of the adsorption of heavy metals from wastewater with waste activated sludge (WAS) so as to increase the operational flexibility of activated sludge processes for the shock loading problems of heavy metals. By contacting the raw wastewater with WAS, before it entered the activated sludge process unit, some heavy metals in the

  16. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Sludge Thickening Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwing, Carl M.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the screening and grinding process of wastewater treatment facilities. The objective of this process is the removal of coarse materials from the raw waste stream for the protection of subsequent equipment and processes. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for safety inspection,…

  17. Transformation of Four Silver/Silver Chloride Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Treatment of Wastewater and Post-processing of Sewage Sludge

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of silver (Ag) nanoparticles [containing either elemental Ag (Ag-NPs) or AgCl (AgCl-NPs)] in commercial products such as textiles will most likely result in these materials reaching wastewater treatment plants. Previous studies indicate that a conversion of Ag-...

  18. Treatment of sewage sludge using electrokinetic geosynthetics.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, Stephanie; Lamont-Black, John; Jones, Colin J F P

    2007-01-31

    The treatment and disposal of sewage sludge is one of the most problematical issues affecting wastewater treatment in the developed world. The traditional outlets for sewage sludge are to spread it on agricultural land, or to form a cake for deposit to landfill or incineration. In order to create a sludge cake, water must be removed. Existing dewatering technology based on pressure can only remove a very limited amount of this water because of the way in which water is bound to the sludge particles or flocs. Several researchers have shown that electrokinetic dewatering of sludge is more efficient than conventional hydraulically driven methods. This involves the application of a dc voltage across the sludge, driving water under an electrical gradient from positive (anode) electrode to negative (cathode) electrode. However, there have been several reasons why this technique has not been adopted in practice, not least because the, normally metallic, anode rapidly dissolves due to the acidic environment created by the electrolysis of water. This paper will describe experimentation using electrokinetic geosynthetics (EKG): polymer-based materials containing conducting elements. These have been used to minimise the problem of electrode corrosion and create a sludge treatment system that can produce dry solids contents in excess of 30%. It will suggest different options for the treatment of sludges both in situ in sludge lagoons and windrows, and ex situ as a treatment process. PMID:16635546

  19. Evaluating sedimentation problems in activated sludge treatment plants operating at complete sludge retention time.

    PubMed

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Pekridis, George; Taousanidis, Nikolaos

    2015-02-01

    Zero net sludge growth can be achieved by complete retention of solids in activated sludge wastewater treatment, especially in high strength and biodegradable wastewaters. When increasing the solids retention time, MLSS and MLVSS concentrations reach a plateau phase and observed growth yields values tend to zero (Yobs ? 0). In this work, in order to evaluate sedimentation problems arised due to high MLSS concentrations and complete sludge retention operational conditions, two identical innovative slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plants were studied. Measurements of wastewaters' quality characteristics, treatment plant's operational conditions, sludge microscopic analysis and state point analysis were conducted. Results have shown that low COD/Nitrogen ratios increase sludge bulking and flotation phenomena due to accidental denitrification in clarifiers. High return activated sludge rate is essential in complete retention systems as it reduces sludge condensation and hydraulic retention time in the clarifiers. Under certain operational conditions sludge loading rates can greatly exceed literature limit values. The presented methodology is a useful tool for estimation of sedimentation problems encountered in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with complete retention time. PMID:25463928

  20. Performance of the biosorptive activated sludge (BAS) as pre-treatment to UF for decentralized wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, V; Eftaxias, A; Bundervoet, B; Verstraete, W

    2014-03-01

    A biosorptive activated sludge (BAS) was operated at lab-scale with diluted and concentrated municipal wastewater to study the efficiency of removal of organics (particulate and soluble COD) and recovery of nutrients (TKN, ammonia, phosphorus). The system performed significantly better with concentrated wastewater, where COD removal efficiency was 80% at organic loading rates between 10 and 20kg m(-3)d(-1). Supplementation of ferrous iron at 20mg L(-1), significantly improved both the removal of particulate, soluble COD and phosphorus. The effluent from the BAS was further treated using an ultrafiltration process with backwashing. The average permeate flux (at constant TMP=0.3bar) increased from 23 to 28 and 34L m(-2)h(-1) when raw sewage, BAS without iron, and iron respectively were tested. The proposed technology is compact, efficient and suitable for decentralized water reuse, while the capital and operational expenses were calculated as 0.64 and 0.43€ m(-3), respectively. PMID:24525216

  1. Aerobic versus anaerobic wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.; White, J.E.; Callier, A.J. [Burns and McDonnell Engineering Co., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Biological wastewater treatment facilities are designed to emulate the purification process that occurs naturally in rivers, lakes and streams. In the simulated environment, conditions are carefully manipulated to spur the degradation of organic contaminants and stabilize the residual sludge. Whether the treatment process is aerobic or anaerobic is determined by a number of factors, including the composition of the wastewater, the degree of stabilization required for environmental compliance and economic viability. Because anaerobic digestion is accomplished without oxygen in a closed system, it is economical for pretreatment of high-strength organic sludge. Before the effluent can be discharged, however, followup treatment using an aerobic process is required. Though it has the drawback of being energy intensive, aerobic processing, the aeration of organic sludges in an open tank, is the primary method for treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater. Aerobic processes are more stable than anaerobic approaches and can be done rather simply, particularly with trickling filters. Gradually, the commercialization of modular systems that are capable of aerobic and anaerobic digestion will blur the distinctions between the two processes. Systems that boast those capabilities are available now.

  2. Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge--evidence and impacts.

    PubMed

    Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-03-01

    Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles--consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams. PMID:19926463

  3. Anaerobic digestion and wastewater treatment systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Lettinga

    1995-01-01

    Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) wastewater (pre-)treatment systems represent a proven sustainable technology for a wide range of very different industrial effluents, including those containing toxic\\/inhibitory compounds. The process is also feasible for treatment of domestic wastewater with temperatures as low as 14–16° C and likely even lower. Compared to conventional aerobic treatment systems the anaerobic treatment process merely offers

  4. Nutrient removal from municipal wastewater by activated sludge process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    Pilot scale study using an anaerobic?anoxic?aerobic activated sludge process for the treatment of nitrogen and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater in Taiwan was carried out. The BOD, TN and TP removal efficiency of 97.8%, 67.4% and 77.4% were achieved, respectively. Furthermore, effluent TN and TP were decreased to the lever of 8.7 mg\\/L and 1.13 mg\\/L, respectively. This showed that

  5. Fate of 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, epirubicin, and daunorubicin in hospital wastewater and their elimination by activated sludge and treatment in a membrane-bio-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Mahnik, S N; Lenz, K; Weissenbacher, N; Mader, R M; Fuerhacker, M

    2007-01-01

    Antineoplastic agents are applied in cancer therapy and end up in hospital wastewater by human excretions. In this study, the raw wastewater of the sewer of the oncologic in-patient treatment ward of the Vienna University Hospital was monitored for 98 d over 2 years for the cytostatics 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin (DOX), epirubicin, and daunorubicin. In a next step, the elimination of the drugs by a membrane-bio-reactor system was investigated. In addition, their fate in wastewater and elimination by activated sludge was investigated with radio-labelled substances. During the monitoring periods, concentration levels ranging from <8.6 to 124 microgl(-1) for 5-FU and from <0.26 to 1.35 microgl(-1) for DOX were determined. The concentrations analysed fitted the lower ranges calculated by an input-output model. Treatment of oncologic wastewater in the membrane bio-reactor as well as the analysis of the effluents of the Vienna University Hospital resulted in concentrations below the limit of detection. Investigations with radio-labelled compounds showed that 5-FU is eliminated from the liquid phase below the limit of detection. But, up to 25% of radio-labelled equivalents of the drug's amount were found in the gaseous phase and only a marginal part in the solid phase, this indicates that at least one part of the drug is biodegraded. For the anthracyclines more than 90% was eliminated from the liquid phase. In this case, adsorption to suspended solids seems to be the major elimination pathway, as up to 30% of the radio-labelled equivalents of the drug's amount was detected in the solid phase. Our results indicate that the investigated anticancer drugs are eliminated by sewage treatment plants, either by biodegradation or adsorption. PMID:16839587

  6. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Tawfik; F. El-Gohary; H. Temmink

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor\\u000a and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22–35 °C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated\\u000a at different hydraulic retention times (HRT’s) of 13.3, 10 and 5.0 h. An overall reduction of 80–86% for CODtotal; 51–73% for CODcolloidal and 20–55%

  7. PARASITES IN SOUTHERN SLUDGES AND DISINFECTION BY STANDARD SLUDGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major objectives were to: (a) assess types and densities of parasites in municipal wastewater sludges in the southern United States, (b) investigate the inactivation of parasites by lime stabilization of sewage sludges seeded with selected intestinal parasites, (c) assess convent...

  8. Short-term batch studies on biological removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater using activated sludge biomass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yinguang Chen; Guowei Gu

    2005-01-01

    Biological treatment of Cr(VI)-containing wastewater has drawn much attention recently as a method to treat environmental Cr(VI) contamination. The activated sludge method, due to its convenient operation and easy-to-scale-up, has been widely applied to treat municipal wastewater and some industrial wastewaters. In order to develop a suitable technique using activated sludge as the biomass to continuously remove Cr(VI) from wastewater,

  9. Sludge treatment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Dillow, T.A.; Bush, S.A.; Lee, S.Y.; Hunt, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    Solid formation in filtered leachates and wash solutions was seen in five of the six sludges treated by Enhanced Sludge Washing. Solid formation in process solutions takes a variety of forms: very fine particles, larger particulate solids, solids floating in solution like egg whites, gels, crystals, and coatings on sample containers. A gel-like material that formed in a filtered leachate from Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford T-104 sludge was identified as natrophosphate, Na{sub 7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{center_dot}19H{sub 2}O. A particulate material that formed in a filtered caustic leachate from Hanford SX-113 sludge contained sodium and silicon. This could be any of a host of sodium silicates in the NaOH-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system. Acidic treatment of Hanford B-202 sludge with 1 M, 3 M, and 6 M HNO{sub 3} sequential leaching resulted in complete dissolution at 75 C, but not at ambient temperature. This treatment resulted in the formation of solids in filtered leachates. Analyses of the solids revealed that a gel material contained silica with some potassium, calcium, iron, and manganese. Two phases were embedded in the gel. One was barium sulfate. The other could not be identified, but it was determined that the only metal it contained was bismuth.

  10. Energy in wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to examine the role of energy in wastewater treatment and to consolidate the information into a single document to provide a framework for future investigations in this area. Part I identifies the key factors that influence energy consumption in wastewater treatment and characterizes the relationship of energy use in wastewater processing to consumption in

  11. Study of Salt Wash Water Toxicity on Wastewater Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mostafa F. Hashad; Surabhi Sharma; Loring F. Nies; James E. Alleman

    2006-01-01

    This research effort focused on evaluating the toxicity of the saline waste water generated from washing of Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) deicing trucks and to study the feasibility of discharging it into wastewater treatment plants. Performance of activated sludge treating wastewater under varying levels of salt concentration was studied by measuring the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), activated sludge oxygen

  12. IMPACT OF INFLUENT MICROORGANISMS UPON POOR SOLIDS SEPARATION IN THE QUIESCENT ZONE OF AN INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most common biological treatment systems used to clean wastewater is suspended growth activated sludge wastewater treatment (AS). When AS is adapted for the treatment of wastewater from industrial manufacturing processes, unanticipated difficulties can arise. For the s...

  13. LAND APPLICATION AND SLUDGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal matter potentially containing pathogenic microorganisms and chemical contaminants enters community wastewater collection systems from hospitals, funeral homes, animal slaughtering operations, and dwellings. While these wastewaters are cleansed in the wastewater treatment p...

  14. Composting of municipal waste-water sludges. Seminar pub

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    This seminar publication provides practical information on current methods of composting municipal waste-water sludges. It is intended for government and private sector individuals involved in the planning, design, and operation of municipal sludge treatment and disposal systems. Chapter 1 presents general principles of the composting process and system design. Chapters 2 and 3 discuss in depth the experiences at the Dickerson, Western Branch, and Site II static-pile-composting operations in Maryland and at the windrow operation in Los Angeles County. In-vessel composting is reviewed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 discusses current and proposed regulations and guidelines that pertain to sludge composting. The publication is not a design manual nor does it include all the latest knowledge about composting.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of pulp and paper mill wastewater and sludge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-15

    Pulp and paper mills generate large amounts of waste organic matter that may be converted to renewable energy in form of methane. The anaerobic treatment of mill wastewater is widely accepted however, usually only applied to few selected streams. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates in full-scale reactors range between 30 and 90%, and methane yields are 0.30-0.40 m(3) kg(-1) COD removed. Highest COD removal rates are achieved with condensate streams from chemical pulping (75-90%) and paper mill effluents (60-80%). Numerous laboratory and pilot-scale studies have shown that, contrary to common perception, most other mill effluents are also to some extent anaerobically treatable. Even for difficult-to-digest streams such as bleaching effluents COD removal rates range between 15 and 90%, depending on the extent of dilution prior to anaerobic treatment, and the applied experimental setting. Co-digestion of different streams containing diverse substrate can level out and diminish toxicity, and may lead to a more robust microbial community. Furthermore, the microbial population has the ability to become acclimated and adapted to adverse conditions. Stress situations such as toxic shock loads or temporary organic overloading may be tolerated by an adapted community, whereas they could lead to process disturbance with an un-adapted community. Therefore, anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing elevated levels of inhibitors or toxicants should be initiated by an acclimation/adaptation period that can last between a few weeks and several months. In order to gain more insight into the underlying processes of microbial acclimation/adaptation and co-digestion, future research should focus on the relationship between wastewater composition, reactor operation and microbial community dynamics. The potential for engineering and managing the microbial resource is still largely untapped. Unlike in wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of mill biosludge (waste activated sludge) and primary sludge is still in its infancy. Current research is mainly focused on developing efficient pretreatment methods that enable fast hydrolysis of complex organic matter, shorter sludge residence times and as a consequence, smaller sludge digesters. Previous experimental studies indicate that the anaerobic digestibility of non-pretreated biosludge from pulp and paper mills varies widely, with volatile solids (VS) removal rates of 21-55% and specific methane yields ranging between 40 and 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Pretreatment can increase the digestibility to some extent, however in almost all reported cases, the specific methane yield of pretreated biosludge did not exceed 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Increases in specific methane yield mostly range between 0 and 90% compared to non-pretreated biosludge, whereas larger improvements were usually achieved with more difficult-to-digest biosludge. Thermal treatment and microwave treatment are two of the more effective methods. The heat required for the elevated temperatures applied in both methods may be provided from surplus heat that is often available at pulp and paper mills. Given the large variability in specific methane yield of non-pretreated biosludge, future research should focus on the links between anaerobic digestibility and sludge properties. Research should also involve mill-derived primary sludge. Although biosludge has been the main target in previous studies, primary sludge often constitutes the bulk of mill-generated sludge, and co-digestion of a mixture between both types of sludge may become practical. The few laboratory studies that have included mill primary sludge indicate that, similar to biosludge, the digestibility can range widely. Long-term studies should be conducted to explore the potential of microbial adaptation to lignocellulosic material which can constitute more than half of the organic matter in pulp and paper mill sludge. PMID:25150519

  16. Production of biopesticides as a novel method of wastewater sludge utilization\\/disposal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Sachdeva; R. D. Tyagi; J. R. Valéro

    Production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) var. kurstaki HD-1, an industrially produced biopesticide source, was tested as a potential method to valorize wastewater treatment sludge. The effects of sludge solids concentration and inoculum size were verified on the production of Bt. Inoculum sizes of 1% and 5% were tested. The cell and spore counts achieved were comparable to those in the

  17. Phosphorus removal from wastewater in upgraded activated sludge system with natural zeolite addition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hrenovi?; Y. Orhan; H. Büyükgüngör

    A new application of natural zeolites (NZ) in sewage treatment is presented in this paper. In order to investigate possibilities of phosphorus removal from wastewater two experimental studies were run; the first one was an upgraded activated sludge system with NZ addition and the other one was a conventional activated sludge system, run as a control unit. The aim of

  18. Activated Sludge Properties in MBR Deeply Treating Pulp-Making Wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Ji

    2009-01-01

    This study adopted MBR (membrane biological reactor) to replace the second sediment in pulp-making wastewater treatment to find out the removal rate of COD, and explored the microbe character variation of activated sludge in MBR compared with that in the second sediment. The results showed that the activated sludge of 8 g\\/l concentration in MBR had distinct differences in appearance

  19. Production of polyhydroxyalcanoates (PHAs) using milk whey and dairy wastewater activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesca Bosco; Fulvia Chiampo

    2010-01-01

    The production of polyhydroxyalcanoates (PHAs), which are biodegradable plastics, was studied using milk whey and dairy wastewater activated sludge to define a suitable C\\/N ratio, the pre-treatments required to reduce the protein content, and the effect of pH correction. The results show good production of PHAs at a C\\/N=50 and without pH correction. The use of dairy wastewater activated sludge

  20. Performance of down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor coupled with up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for treatment of onion dehydration wastewater.

    PubMed

    El-Kamah, Hala; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a promising system consisting of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was investigated for onion dehydration wastewater treatment. Laboratory experiments were conducted at two different phases, i.e., phase (1) at overall hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 11h (UASB reactor: 6h and DHS reactor: 5h) and phase (2) at overall HRT of 9.4h (UASB reactor: 5.2h and DHS reactor: 4.2h). Long-term operation results of the proposed system showed that its overall TCOD, TBOD, TSS, TKN and NH(4)-N removal efficiencies were 92 ± 5, 95 ± 2, 95 ± 2, 72 ± 6 and 99 ± 1.3%, respectively (phase 1). Corresponding values for the 2nd phase were 85.4 ± 5, 86 ± 3, 87 ± 6, 65 ± 8 and 95 ± 2.8%. Based on the available results, the proposed system could be more viable option for treatment of wastewater generated from onion dehydration industry in regions with tropical or sub-tropical climates and with stringent discharge standards. PMID:21546245

  1. Screening of immobilization materials for anaerobic wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-S. Hwu; S.-K. Tseng

    1996-01-01

    Two attachment and four entrapment materials were screened, based on physical, microbiological and reactor operational aspects, for anaerobic wastewater treatment. Anaerobic digested sludge was immobilized by agar, calcium alginate (CA), polyacrylamide (PA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) entrapment and by powdered activated carbon (PAC) and DEAE resin attachment methods, respectively. Granular sludge taken from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor

  2. Agronomic properties of wastewater sludge biochar and bioavailability of metals in production of cherry tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mustafa K. Hossain; Vladimir Strezov; K. Yin Chan; Peter F. Nelson

    2010-01-01

    This work presents agronomic values of a biochar produced from wastewater sludge through pyrolysis at a temperature of 550°C. In order to investigate and quantify effects of wastewater sludge biochar on soil quality, growth, yield and bioavailability of metals in cherry tomatoes, pot experiments were carried out in a temperature controlled environment and under four different treatments consisting of control

  3. Challenge of psychrophilic anaerobic wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gatze Lettinga; Salih Rebac; Grietje Zeeman

    2001-01-01

    Psychrophilic anaerobic treatment is an attractive option for wastewaters that are discharged at moderate to low temperature. The expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor has been shown to be a feasible system for anaerobic treatment of mainly soluble and pre-acidified wastewater at temperatures of 5–10°C. An organic loading rate (OLR) of 10–12 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) per cubic meter

  4. SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL. VOLUME 1. SLUDGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two volume set presents in detail technical design information for the following sludge treatment and disposal processes: lime stabilization, anaerobic digestion, aerobic digestion, thermal sludge conditioning, thickening, dewatering, and landfilling. The discussion of each ...

  5. Kinetics of styrene biodegradation in synthetic wastewaters using an industrial activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Babaee; B. Bonakdarpour; B. Nasernejad; N. Fallah

    2010-01-01

    Kinetics of styrene biodegradation in synthetic wastewaters, containing either styrene or styrene together with ethanol, by an industrial activated sludge obtained from the wastewater treatment unit of a petrochemical complex was studied. The kinetic data could be fitted using the Haldane kinetic model. This model was previously used to predict kinetic data for biodegradation of styrene by pure or mixed

  6. Novel wastewater treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, D.L. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Few fermentation processes are as versatile as anaerobic digestion in terms of utility, application and capability to handle feeds of varied chemical complexity and physical characteristics. The anaerobic digestion process has served the pollution control industry in the US for over 100 years in stabilizing organic sludges and wastewaters; treatment of these high-moisture-content and high-strength aqueous wastes by alternative thermal or aerobic biological processes requires much higher energy inputs than that needed to conduct anaerobic digestion. The anaerobic digestion process has taken on new importance and emphasis in recent years because of its potential application for energy and chemical production from various types of renewable-carbon resources, and because it can be coupled with certain electrochemical, thermochemical and biochemical processes to generate electric power, hydrocarbons, methanol and other high-value products. A number of initiatives have been taken to improve the anaerobic digestion process in keeping with the increasing appreciation for its utility and versatility of application in municipal, industrial and rural settings. Using processes based upon the anaerobic digestion of organic wastes, the Institute of Gas Technology has developed technologies applicable for the treatment of a wide variety of organic wastes. Increased methane gas production and enhanced waste reduction can be achieved through the ACIMET, SOLCON and HIMET Processes, depending upon concentration and characteristics of the incoming organic waste stream. These proprietary IGT waste treatment systems are described.

  7. Sludge accumulation and conversion to methane in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the septic tank is the most applied on-site system for wastewater pre-treatment, limited research has been performed to determine sludge accumulation and biogas production in the tank. Therefore a dynamic mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was developed for anaerobic digestion of the accumulated sludge in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water. The results showed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the tank mainly control the filling time with sludge, while operational temperature governs characteristics of the accumulated sludge and conversion to methane. For obtaining stable sludge and high conversion, the tank needs to be operated for a period more than a year without sludge wasting. Maximum conversion to methane in the tank is about 50 and 60% for domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. The required period for sludge wasting depends on the influent COD concentration and the HRT, while characteristics of the wasted sludge are affected by operational temperature followed by the influent COD concentration and the HRT. Sludge production from the tank ranges between 0.19 to 0.22 and 0.13 to 0.15 L/(person.d), for the domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. PMID:23985530

  8. A new wastewater treatment technology for mixed acid drainage containing fluorine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akio Goto; Kazuyuki Yamasaki

    1999-01-01

    A new environment-friendly wastewater treatment technology was developed for the treatment of mixed acid drainage containing fluorine. The ordinary wastewater system using “slaked lime” is ineffective at removing fluorine; besides, it cannot decompose “hard-type surfactants” in the wastewater, so the amount of generated sludge and the quality of treated wastewater are not at the satisfactory level. This newly developed wastewater

  9. Studies on the production of B. thuringiensis based biopesticides using wastewater sludge as a raw material.

    PubMed

    Vidyarthi, A S; Tyagi, R D; Valero, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2002-11-01

    Growth and delta-endotoxin yield of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) subsp kurstaki in tryptic soy yeast extract (TSY) medium, soybean meal based commercial medium and wastewater sludge medium were studied. The viable spores (VS) count in sludge medium was comparable to that obtained in laboratory and commercial media. The entomotoxicity of the fermentation liquid (Bt grown sludge) against Choristoneura fumiferana was comparable to the concentrated commercial Bt formulation available in the market (Foray 48B). A higher entomotoxicity was observed in a sludge medium than in the TSY or soybean meal media. The secondary and mixed (mixture of primary and secondary) sludges from various wastewater treatment plants were also evaluated for spore formation and entomotoxicity yield. The VS count was higher in a mixed sludge compared to the secondary sludge at a similar sludge solids concentration. Both VS count and entomotoxicity yield was found to be a function of sludge solids concentration in the medium. The optimum value of solids concentration for Bt production was found to be 25 g (-1) (dry weight basis). Beyond this concentration, a drop in VS count and entomotoxicity yield was observed. A low C:N ratio in the secondary sludge and a high C:N ratio in the mixed sludge resulted in a higher entomotoxicity. The optimum value of C:N ratio in combined sludge for Bt production was found to be 7.9-9.9. Relationships between entomotoxicity and maximum specific growth as well as with specific sporulation rate were developed. PMID:12448528

  10. NORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-print Network

    -Norway treats source separated household waste (food waste), organic industrial waste (food processingNORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT SWEDEN·FINLAND·DENMARK·NORWAY #12;SLUDGE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY 19 #12;3 Sludge originates from the process of treatment of waste water. Due to the physical

  11. Wastewater treatment with particulate biofilm reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Nicolella; M. C. M. van Loosdrecht; J. J. Heijnen

    2000-01-01

    The review presented in this paper focuses on applications of particulate biofilm reactors (e.g. Upflow Sludge Blanket, Biofilm Fluidized Bed, Expanded Granular Sludge Blanket, Biofilm Airlift Suspension, Internal Circulation reactors). Several full-scale applications for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment are presented and illustrated, and their most important design and operation aspects (e.g. biofilm formation, hydrodynamics, mass transfer, mixing) are analysed

  12. Bioaerosol emission from wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonor Pascual; Sara Pérez-Luz; M. Adela Yáñez; Ana Santamaría; Karina Gibert; Miquel Salgot; David Apraiz; Vicente Catalán

    2003-01-01

    In this report we describe the results of astudy conducted to better estimate airbornemicroorganisms present in wastewater treatmentplants (WWTP) environments. Air samples weretaken with the Air Sampler MAS 100 impactor(Merck) at each stage of an activated-sludgeWWTP (pre-treatment, primary clarifiers,aeration basins and sludge processors), inorder to determine levels of contaminationaccording to work stations. Culture methodswere used to investigate heterotrophic platecount, moulds

  13. Reduction of Excess Sludge Produced by Biological Treatment Processes: Effect of Ozonation on Biomass and on Sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Etienne Paul; Hubert Debellefontaine

    2007-01-01

    The excess sludge produced during biological treatment of wastewater can be reduced by treating this sludge with ozone in a specific reactor and recycling it to the biological facility. This increases the biodegradability of the inert fractions of the sludge without deteriorating the activity of the microorganisms. Ozone reacts only within the film zone near the gas\\/liquid interface: it is

  14. Anaerobic wastewater treatment of concentrated sewage using a two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket anaerobic filter system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maha M. Halalsheh; Zainab M. Abu Rumman; Jim A. Field

    2010-01-01

    A two-stage pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket – anaerobic filter (UASB-AF) reactors system treating concentrated domestic sewage was operated at 23°C and at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 15 and 4 h, respectively. Excess sludge from the downstream AF stage was returned to the upstream UASB reactor. The aim was to obtain higher sludge retention time (SRT) in the UASB

  15. Enhanced industrial wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nachabe, A.H.; Durlak, E. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate (SS/FS) process is a treatment technology for the reduction of hexavalent chromium and precipitation of heavy metals in industrial wastewater treatment plants (IWTP). When the ferrous ion, as ferrous sulfate, is mixed with sulfide, the hexavalent chromium is rapidly reduced to its trivalent state at a neutral pH and then precipitated. SS/FS technology can be used to replace the current hydroxide treatment chemistry in Navy IWTPs. This paper will present the results and lessons learned from full-scale implementation of SS/FS at Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) Keyport, Washington. The SS/FS treatment process reduced the chemical cost by fifty nine percent and sludge disposal cost by thirty one percent. On an annual basis total cost savings amounted to $31,950 or thirty four percent. The SS/FS treatment process lowered the amount of treatment chemicals used in the IWTP. Furthermore, metal sulfides tend to be two to three orders of magnitude less soluble than their corresponding metal hydroxides. This allows for cleaner effluent, which will help the facility meet environmental discharge requirements. Further benefits include the removal from the shop area of the high pressure sulfur dioxide cylinder (used in the hydroxide process), a faster and more reliable chrome reduction method, neutral pH operation that extends tank and equipment life, and less acid and caustic chemicals stored on the shop floor. As Navy activities respond to the ever increasing pressures to do more with less, the SS/FS process can help them meet the increasingly stringent standards.

  16. Research laboratory wastewater treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Jancuk, W.A.; Fisher, J.R. [AT and T Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Aqueous waste streams, described as laboratory wash waters, from the AT and T Engineering Research Center in Princeton, NJ are piped to a central facility for treatment prior to discharge to the receiving waters of the State of New Jersey per a NJPDES Permit within the limits. The wastewater may contain acids, bases, metals such as copper and chromium from plating baths rinses, cyanides, ammonical and phosphorus compounds. The standard treatment technology used to treat these types of wastewaters include neutralization, cyanide oxidation, chromium reduction and metals precipitation as hydroxides followed by filtration to remove the solids. The AT and T Engineering Research Center redesigned its Research Laboratory wastewater treatment process and treatment scheme using environmentally conscious techniques. Sulfide precipitation chemistry was selected to remove the dissolved metal contaminates to the lowest levels possible while using the least amount of treatment chemicals and generating the least amount of sludge. The treatment process includes multiple batch treatment tanks enabling a batch to be returned for treatment if it does not meet specifications.

  17. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  18. Wastewater Treatment Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Professor Darin Taylor

    2005-11-15

    Every time you take a bath, wash your clothes, flush the toilet, or run water down the kitchen or bathroom sinks you are creating wastewater. The average household generates between 60-75 gallons of wastewater each day. So where does that wastewater go? By working through this instructional unit, you will be able to better answer this question. Please read through the information provided below to learn more about wastewater and how it is treated. After you have completed the unit, you will need to complete the Wastewater Treatment worksheet that will be handed out to you in class by Professor Taylor. If you live in a small rural community you are most likely to have a septic tank system to treat your wastewater. This type of system treats your wastewater on your own property near your home. To learn more about septic tank sytems see the following link provided. Sewer and Septic Tanks If ...

  19. Factors affecting the removal of metals during activated sludge wastewater treatment I. The role of soluble ligands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Lawson; R. M. Sterritt; J. N. Lester

    1984-01-01

    Samples of mixed liquor were withdrawn from a laboratory-scale activated sludge simulation operated at a range of sludge ages from 3 to 12 days in order to examine the difference in metal uptake by the mixed liquor biomass in the absence and presence of soluble ligands. One half of the samples were centrifuged, washed, and resuspended in physiological saline solution,

  20. Sewage sludge treatment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, John J. (Inventor); Mueller, William A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Raw sewage may be presently treated by mixing screened raw sewage with activated carbon. The mixture is then allowed to stand in a first tank for a period required to settle the suspended matter to the bottom of the tank as a sludge. Thereafter, the remaining liquid is again mixed with activated carbon and the mixture is transferred to a secondary settling tank, where it is permitted to stand for a period required for the remaining floating material to settle as sludge and for adsorption of sewage carbon as well as other impurities to take place. The sludge from the bottom of both tanks is removed and pyrolyzed to form activated carbon and ash, which is mixed with the incoming raw sewage and also mixed with the liquid being transferred from the primary to the secondary settling tank. It has been found that the output obtained by the pyrolysis process contains an excess amount of ash. Removal of this excess amount of ash usually also results in removing an excess amount of carbon thereby requiring adding carbon to maintain the treatment process. By separately pyrolyzing the respective sludges from the first and second settling tanks, and returning the separately obtained pyrolyzed material to the respective first and second tanks from which they came, it has been found that the adverse effects of the excessive ash buildup is minimized, the carbon yield is increased, and the sludge from the secondary tank can be pyrolyzed into activated carbon to be used as indicated many more times than was done before exhaustion occurs.

  1. METALS REMOVALS AND PARTITIONING IN CONVENTIONAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metals removal and partitioning to primary and secondary sludge during treatment of domestic wastewater by conventional sewage treatment processes was studied. Raw wastewater entering the Mill Creek Sewage Treatment Plant, Cincinnati, Ohio, was fed to a 0.1 l/s (1.6 gpm) pilot tr...

  2. Wastewater treatment technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheremisinoff

    1989-01-01

    This book addresses two areas of environmental control effort. Analysis and abatement of pollution are described. Potential hazards associated with sludges resulting from waste treatment and land disposal are presented.

  3. Simulation study supporting wastewater treatment plant upgrading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Hvala; D. Vrecko; O. Burica; M. Strazar; M. Levstek

    The paper presents a study where upgrading of an existing wastewater treatment plant was supported by simulation. The aim of the work was to decide between two technologies to improve nitrogen removal: a conventional activated sludge process (ASP) and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). To perform simulations, the mathematical models of both processes were designed. The models were calibrated

  4. HEALTH EFFECTS OF A WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data obtained as part of a comprehensive community health study conducted during 1965-1971 were utilized to examine the incidence of acute illness in a population surrounding an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant and a control location in Tecumseh, Michigan. Study partic...

  5. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Soebbing, J.B. [CH2M Hill, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Yolo, R.A. [CH2M Hill, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) activity in wastewater treatment plans is discussed. Three case histories are presented showing throughwall pitting from MIC in recycle activated sludge process piping systems. Field and laboratory investigation activities are reported. Alternatives are reviewed for corrosion prevention and mitigation.

  6. PHOSPHORUS RECOVERY FROM PHOSPHATE RICH SIDE STREAMS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Levlin; B. Hultman

    Phosphorus can be recovered from phosphorus rich side-streams in wastewater treatment plants with biological phosphorus removal. Different variants exsist for instance the PhoStrip process, in which phosphorus is recovered from the return sludge. Soluble phosphate is released at anaerobic treatment of return or excess sludge of phosphorus rich sludge from the activated sludge processes with biological phosphorus removal. Another alternative

  7. Bioremediation of wastewaters with decabromodiphenyl ether by anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Wang, Zhibin; Lv, Lu; Liang, Xueyou; Ren, Longfei; Zhou, Qingxin

    2015-04-01

    Facilities adopting anaerobic granular sludge are widely used for the treatment of high strength wastewater, and hence collect many polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), especially decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209). We initiated a detailed investigation to gain insight into the bioremoval of BDE-209 by anaerobic granules. Influenced by solution pH, ionic strength and temperature, the equilibrium time was ?6 h and the biosorption amount increased from 0.099 to 1.25 mg/g suspended sludge with the increase of BDE-209 concentrations. Kinetic studies indicate that BDE-209 biosorption on anaerobic granules follows the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Isotherm analysis exhibits that the Langmuir model fits the data at low temperature, while the Freundlich model is appropriate at room temperature. Thermodynamic analysis shows that biosorption followed an endothermic path and was nonspontaneous with negative value of ?G0. XPS and FTIR spectra confirmed that oxygen and nitrogen atoms notably contributed to BDE-209 binding. PMID:25784301

  8. Microwave, ultrasonic and chemo-mechanical pretreatments for enhancing methane potential of pulp mill wastewater treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Saha, Mithun; Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Marin, Juan

    2011-09-01

    Microwave (2450 MHz, 1250 W), ultrasonic (20 kHz, 400 W) and chemo-mechanical (MicroSludge® with 900 mg/L NaOH followed by 83,000 kPa) pretreatments were applied to pulp mill waste sludge to enhance methane production and reduce digester sludge retention time. The effects of four variables (microwave temperature in a range of 50-175°C) and sonication time (15-90 min), sludge type (primary or secondary) and digester temperature (mesophilic and thermophilic) were investigated. Microwave pretreatment proved to be the most effective, increasing specific methane yields of WAS samples by 90% compared to controls after 21 days of mesophilic digestion. Sonication solubilized the sludge samples better, but resulted in soluble non-biodegradable compounds. Based on the laboratory scale data, MicroSludge® was found the least energy intensive pretreatment followed by sonication for 15 min alternative with net energy profits of 1366 and 386 kWh/tonne of total solids (TS), respectively. Pretreatment benefits were smaller for thermophilic digesters. PMID:21727004

  9. Evaluation of IAWQ Activated Sludge Model No. 2 using steady-state data from four full-scale wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cinar, O.; Daigger, G.T.; Graef, S.P.

    1998-09-01

    Several new tools, including the Activated Sludge Model No. 2 (ASM No.2) developed by the International Association on Water Quality, are becoming available to analyze the nutrient removal capability of existing wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The ASM No. 2 is a potentially inexpensive and effective tool, but its use needs to be evaluated. To solve the differential equations in the model, the computer program Activated Sludge Simulation Program (ASIM 3.0) was used. The model was calibrated using data from the Mauldin Road WWTP, which is a nutrient removal plant. Only 6 of 71 stoichiometric and kinetic parameter values were changed from suggested default values. The stoichiometric and kinetic parameters determined for the Mauldin Road WWTP were then used to develop models for the Lower Reedy, gilder Creek, and Durbin Creek WWTPs. The calibrated model was subsequently confirmed using separate data sets for each WWTP. The model was successfully calibrated and confirmed at the Lower Reedy WWTP. This plant uses high-speed mechanical surface aerators, and it achieves significant phosphorus removal. It was modeled by specifically considering the flow pattern likely to be created by these aerators. Several options to improve the phosphorus removal capability of the Lower Reedy WWTP were evaluated. The simulation results suggested that phosphorus removal performance could be improved by repositioning the mechanical surface aerators to produce a defined anaerobic zone and by providing dissolved oxygen control. The performance of the Durbin Creek and Gilder Creek WWTPs, which use oxidation ditch processes, could not be fully simulated using the model. Potential reasons for this failure are discussed.

  10. Thermal treatment energizes San Mateo sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Cebalt, F.

    1984-12-01

    A four year operating experience with a thermal process incorporating waste heat recovery has demonstrated that sludge is indeed a viable source of usable energy at a wastewater treatment plant. The wastewater treatment facility at San Mateo generates over 125,000 gpd of waste solids. Since this plant is hemmed in by heavily populated areas to the north, west, and south and by the Bay to the east, thermal treatment of sludge, followed by waste heat recovery, was incorporated in the design. Sludge is first thickened to 3-5% solids in a gravity thickener. Then it is thermally conditioned in the Zimpro low-pressure wet oxidation unit designed for a maximum throughput of 88 pgm. On two vacuum filters the conditioned sludge dewaters to a cake of 35-45% solids. Then it is fed to a 6 bed multiple hearth furnace. Heat is recovered from furnace off-gases in a waste heat recovery boiler where about 4,000,000 Btu per hr of steam is generated and reused as the heat source for the Simpro unit. Ash, 130 cu yards per month, is hauled to a landfill. Temperatures into the waste heat recovery boiler range from 1060-1325 F and from 550-650 F out of the boiler. 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. The fate and removal of triclosan during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A; Griffin, P; Stuetz, R; Cartmell, E

    2005-01-01

    This work examines the variation in removal efficiency of triclosan in wastewater treatment works in the United Kingdom between November 2003 and April 2004. Concentrations of triclosan were measured at set points within three different types of wastewater treatment works: rotating biological contactors, trickling filters, and activated sludge. Overall removal of triclosan through these plants ranged from 58 to 96% (rotating biological contactors), 86 to 97% (trickling filter), and 95 to 98% (activated sludge). PMID:15765937

  12. Improvements in Wastewater Treatment Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2007-01-01

    2 Abstract: There have been several new improvements in the wastewater treatment field in the last years. Alternatives have presented themselves for classical and conventional wastewater treatment systems. Advanced wastewater treatments have become an area of global focus as individuals, communities, industries and nations strive for ways to keep essential resources available and suitable for use. Advanced wastewater treatment technology,

  13. Evaluation of the fate of perfluoroalkyl compounds in wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui Guo; Won-Jin Sim; Eung-Sun Lee; Ji-Hyun Lee; Jeong-Eun Oh

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a significant source of perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in natural water. In this study, 10 PFCs were analyzed in influent and effluent wastewater and sludge samples in 15 municipal, 4 livestock and 3 industrial WWTPs in Korea. The observed distribution pattern of PFCs differed between the wastewater and sludge samples.

  14. Environmental biodegradability of [¹?C] single-walled carbon nanotubes by Trametes versicolor and natural microbial cultures found in New Bedford Harbor sediment and aerated wastewater treatment plant sludge.

    PubMed

    Parks, Ashley N; Chandler, G Thomas; Ho, Kay T; Burgess, Robert M; Ferguson, P Lee

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about environmental biodegradability or biotransformations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because of their strong association with aquatic organic matter, detailed knowledge of the ultimate fate and persistence of SWNT requires investigation of possible biotransformations (i.e., biodegradation) in environmental media. In the present study, [(14)C]SWNT were utilized to track biodegradation over 6 mo by pure liquid culture of the fungus Trametes versicolor and mixed bacterial isolates from field-collected sediment or aerated wastewater treatment plant sludge. The mixed cultures were chosen as more environmentally relevant media where SWNT will likely be deposited under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Activity of [(14)C] was assessed in solid, aqueous, and (14)CO2 gaseous phases to determine amounts of intact SWNT, partially soluble SWNT degradation products, and mineralized SWNT, respectively, during the 6 mo of the experiment. Mass balances based on radiocarbon activity were approximately 100% over 6 mo, and no significant degradation of SWNT was observed. Approximately 99% of the [(14)C] activity remained in the solid phase, 0.8% in the aqueous phase, and less than 0.1% was mineralized to (14)CO2, regardless of culture type. These results suggest that SWNT are not readily biodegraded by pure fungal cultures or environmental microbial communities, and are likely persistent in environmental media. PMID:25352477

  15. State of the art of biogranulation technology for wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Liu; Joo-Hwa Tay

    2004-01-01

    Biogranulation technology developed for wastewater treatment includes anaerobic and aerobic granulation processes. Anaerobic granulation is relatively well known, but research on aerobic granulation commenced only recently. Many full-scale anaerobic granular sludge units have been operated worldwide, but no report exists of similar units for aerobic granulation. This paper reviews the fundamentals and applications of biogranulation technology in wastewater treatment. Aspects

  16. Elimination of Cu(II) toxicity by powdered waste sludge (PWS) addition to an activated sludge unit treating Cu(II) containing synthetic wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Yunus Pamukoglu; Fikret Kargi

    2007-01-01

    Copper(II) ion toxicity onto activated sludge organisms was eliminated by addition of powdered waste sludge (PWS) to the feed wastewater for removal of Cu(II) ions by biosorption before biological treatment. The synthetic feed wastewater containing 14 or 22mgl?1 Cu(II) was mixed with PWS in a mixing tank where Cu(II) ions were adsorbed onto PWS and the mixture was fed to

  17. SEPARATION OF METALS IN WASTEWATER SLUDGE BY CENTRIFUGAL CLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal wastewater sludges frequently contain undesirably high concentrations of heavy metals and/or organic pollutants which interfere with beneficial use of sludge on farmland and with some disposal practices such as ocean disposal. Centrifugal classification is a low-cost pr...

  18. Priority and emerging pollutants in sewage sludge and fate during sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Mailler, R; Gasperi, J; Chebbo, G; Rocher, V

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims at characterizing the quality of different treated sludges from Paris conurbation in terms of micropollutants and assessing their fate during different sludge treatment processes (STP). To achieve this, a large panel of priority and emerging pollutants (n=117) have been monitored in different STPs from Parisian wastewater treatment plants including anaerobic digestion, thermal drying, centrifugation and a sludge cake production unit. Considering the quality of treated sludges, comparable micropollutant patterns are found for the different sludges investigated (in mg/kg DM - dry matter). 35 compounds were detected in treated sludges. Some compounds (metals, organotins, alkylphenols, DEHP) are found in every kinds of sludge while pesticides or VOCs are never detected. Sludge cake is the most contaminated sludge, resulting from concentration phenomenon during different treatments. As regards treatments, both centrifugation and thermal drying have broadly no important impact on sludge contamination for metals and organic compounds, even if a slight removal seems to be possible with thermal drying for several compounds by abiotic transfers. Three different behaviors can be highlighted in anaerobic digestion: (i) no removal (metals), (ii) removal following dry matter (DM) elimination (organotins and NP) and iii) removal higher than DM (alkylphenols - except NP - BDE 209 and DEHP). Thus, this process allows a clear removal of biodegradable micropollutants which could be potentially significantly improved by increasing DM removal through operational parameters modifications (retention time, temperature, pre-treatment, etc.). PMID:24797622

  19. EVALUATION OF THE FULL-SCALE APPLICATION OF ANAEROBIC SLUDGE DIGESTION AT THE BLUE PLAINS WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY, WASHINGTON, DC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mesophilic-thermophilic digestion process is a new two-step concept for treating municipal wasterwater sludges. The first step operates under mesophilic process conditions (digestion with anaerobic microorganisms that thrive at 90 to 100F). The second step operates under ther...

  20. Developments in wastewater treatment methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Sonune; Rupali Ghate

    2004-01-01

    Wastewaters are waterborne solids and liquids discharged into sewers that represent the wastes of community life. Wastewater includes dissolved and suspended organic solids, which are “putrescible” or biologically decomposable. Two general categories of wastewaters, not entirely separable, are recognized: domestic and industrial. Wastewater treatment is a process in which the solids in wastewater are partially removed and partially changed by

  1. COLLECTION, TREATMENT, AND DISPOSAL OF SLUDGE FROM SMALL COMMUNITIES: U.S. EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sludge treatment represents almost half the cost of wastewater treatment at many facilities in the U.S. Although sludge problems are of serious concern everywhere, they are different for different locations. The approach to sludge handling and the solution to problems depends on ...

  2. Excess sludge reduction in activated sludge processes by integrating biomass alkaline heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Rocher, M; Roux, G; Goma, G; Begue, A P; Louvel, L; Rols, J L

    2001-01-01

    With new EC regulations, alternative treatment and disposal techniques of the excess sludge produced by activated sludge wastewater treatment plants have to be developed. To decrease activated sludge production yield, microbial cell lysis can be amplified to enhance cryptic growth (biomass growth on lysates). Cell breakage techniques (thermal, alkaline and a combination) were studied to generate Ralstonia eutropha (strain model) and waste activated sludge lysates and to evaluate their biodegradability. Gentle treatment conditions by alkaline waste treatment (20 min at 60 degrees C and pH 10 by NaOH addition) allowed waste activated sludge to be solubilized by a two step process (instantaneous and post-treatment) giving a dissolved organic carbon released by the total suspended solids treated of 267 mgDOC x g(-1)TSS. The biodegradation of the soluble fraction of the lysates by fresh sludge reached 75 and 90% after 48 and 350 hrs of incubation respectively. A validation on a laboratory scale by insertion of a liquor alkaline heat treatment loop in a biological synthetic wastewater treatment process was carried out. A reduction of 37% of the excess sludge was obtained without altering the purification yield of the process. PMID:11548016

  3. Dye Removal from Textile Dye Wastewater Using Recycled Alum Sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Chu

    2001-01-01

    The removal of dyes from textile dying wastewater by recycled alum sludge (RAS) generated by the coagulation process itself was studied and optimized. One hydrophobic and one hydrophilic dye were used as probes to examine the performance of this process. It was found that RAS is a good way of removing hydrophobic dye in wastewater, while simultaneously reducing the fresh

  4. Pretreatment of petrochemical wastewater by coagulation and flocculation and the sludge characteristics.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shilpi; Prasad, Basheshwar; Mishra, Indra Mani

    2010-06-15

    In the present study, coagulation-flocculation was investigated as a pretreatment process for the treatment of purified terephthalic acid (PTA) wastewater. The effect of various inorganic and organic coagulants on the treatment of wastewater collected from flow equalization tank of an effluent treatment plant was studied. The settling and filtration characteristics of the sludge were also studied. The jar tests revealed that the wastewater was best treated when 3000 mg l(-1) of ferric chloride was dosed at pH 5.6. At optimum conditions, COD of the wastewater was reduced by 75.5%. The results of the gravity filtration of the treated wastewater showed that the addition of cationic polyacrylamide (175 mg l(-1)) to ferric chloride coagulation improved the filtration characteristics and reduced the specific cake resistance. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies were also conducted to know the sludge structure and composition, respectively. Thermal analysis of the sludge showed that the oxidation of the sludges in the present study is a three step process. However, with the addition of C-PAA to ferric chloride coagulation system, the oxidation was found to be a two step process. PMID:20303661

  5. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Montgomery, Gary A.; Ritenour, Kelsey L.; Tucker, Travis W.

    2009-01-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A??cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges - hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes - can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  6. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Layton; P. N. Karanth; C. A. Lajoie; A. J. Meyers; I. R. Gregory; R. D. Stapleton; D. E. Taylor; G. S. Sayler

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial waste- water treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of

  7. Membrane bio-reactor for advanced textile wastewater treatment and reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Lubello; R. Gori

    Textile wastewater contains slowly- or non-biodegradable organic substances whose removal or transformation calls for advanced tertiary treatments downstream Activated Sludge Treatment Plants (ASTP). This work is focused on the treatment of textile industry wastewater using Membrane Bio-reactor (MBR) technology. An experimental activity was carried out at the Baciacavallo Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) (Prato, Italy) to verify the efficiency of a

  8. Process Design Manual: Wastewater Treatment Facilities for Sewered Small Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffel, R. E.; And Others

    This manual attempts to describe new treatment methods, and discuss the application of new techniques for more effectively removing a broad spectrum of contaminants from wastewater. Topics covered include: fundamental design considerations, flow equalization, headworks components, clarification of raw wastewater, activated sludge, package plants,…

  9. USE OF ZERO-VALENT IRON FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suwannee Junyapoon

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays many water resources are polluted by anthropogenic sources including household and agricultural waste and industrial processes. Public concern over the environmental impact of wastewater pollution has increased. Several conventional wastewater treatment techniques, i.e. chemical coagulation, adsorption, activated sludge, have been applied to remove the pollution, however there are still some limitations, especially that of high operation costs. The use

  10. Alternative Flotation Techniques for Wastewater Treatment: Focus on Electroflotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Matis; E. N. Peleka

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades (dissolved-air) flotation has found several applications in water and wastewater treatment. Flocculation is generally required in advance for a satisfactory separation and a membrane process is often applied downstream. Examples from the literature given in the present review include heavy metals, textile dyes, food, paper industry, oily effluents, laundry wastewaters, sludge etc. and are accompanied by

  11. Capital and operating costs of full-scale fecal sludge management and wastewater treatment systems in Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Dodane, Pierre-Henri; Mbéguéré, Mbaye; Sow, Ousmane; Strande, Linda

    2012-04-01

    A financial comparison of a parallel sewer based (SB) system with activated sludge, and a fecal sludge management (FSM) system with onsite septic tanks, collection and transport (C&T) trucks, and drying beds was conducted. The annualized capital for the SB ($42.66 capita(-1) year(-1)) was ten times higher than the FSM ($4.05 capita(-1) year(-1)), the annual operating cost for the SB ($11.98 capita(-1) year(-1)) was 1.5 times higher than the FSM ($7.58 capita(-1) year(-1)), and the combined capital and operating for the SB ($54.64 capita(-1) year(-1)) was five times higher than FSM ($11.63 capita(-1) year(-1)). In Dakar, costs for SB are almost entirely borne by the sanitation utility, with only 6% of the annualized cost borne by users of the system. In addition to costing less overall, FSM operates with a different business model, with costs spread among households, private companies, and the utility. Hence, SB was 40 times more expensive to implement for the utility than FSM. However, the majority of FSM costs are borne at the household level and are inequitable. The results of the study illustrate that in low-income countries, vast improvements in sanitation can be affordable when employing FSM, whereas SB systems are prohibitively expensive. PMID:22413875

  12. Treatment and Reuse of Sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Fuerhacker; Tadele Measho Haile

    \\u000a Almost all over the world, the production of sewage sludge rises due to increased population, industrialization and urbanization.\\u000a Treatment and disposal of sewage sludge is an expensive and environmentally challenging task, problems arising mainly from\\u000a lack of social acceptability, high treatment costs, human and environmental health risks associated with treatment and lack\\u000a of sustainable disposal options. Currently the most widely

  13. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

  14. U.S. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY)-SPONSORED EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTEWATER AND SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1975 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored 11 epidemiological studies of the potential health effects associated with the treatment and disposal of sewage and sewage sludge. Three of these have been occupational exposure studies: One of sewage treatment pla...

  15. UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AND SLUDGE ON LAND, PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1983 WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    A workshop on Utilization of Municipal Wastewater and Sludge on Land was held in Denver, Colorado from February 23 through 25, 1983. Researchers and practioners of land treatment, totaling 203 in number and from the United States and other countries were invited to attend and eva...

  16. Molecular screening of Bacillus thuringiensis strains from wastewater sludge for biopesticide production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mohammedi; S. Bala Subramanian; S. Yan; R. D. Tyagi; J. R. Valéro

    2006-01-01

    Ten strains of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were isolated from sludges collected from wastewater treatment plants and two strains were isolated from dead Tortricidae larvae sample collected from forest (Quebec, Canada). The bacterial isolates were characterized by PCR method using specific primers for amplification of the CryI gene (Cry IA and Cry IC genes codes active toxin against Lepidoptera species), Cry

  17. Inhibition of nitrification by fluoride in high-strength ammonium wastewater in activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julián Carrera; Mar??a Torrijos; Juan A. Baeza; Javier Lafuente; Teresa Vicent

    2003-01-01

    The biological treatment of some industrial wastewaters with high strength ammonium can be affected by the presence of inhibiting compounds. In the case of industries that frost bottles, this inhibitor can be fluoride. In this study, the effect of fluoride on nitrification in an activated sludge system was quantified. Working continuously in steady state, the maximum nitrification rate (MNR) was

  18. Fate of 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, epirubicin, and daunorubicin in hospital wastewater and their elimination by activated sludge and treatment in a membrane-bio-reactor system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. N. Mahnik; K. Lenz; N. Weissenbacher; R. M. Mader; M. Fuerhacker

    2007-01-01

    Antineoplastic agents are applied in cancer therapy and end up in hospital wastewater by human excretions. In this study, the raw wastewater of the sewer of the oncologic in-patient treatment ward of the Vienna University Hospital was monitored for 98d over 2 years for the cytostatics 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin (DOX), epirubicin, and daunorubicin. In a next step, the elimination of

  19. Performance evaluation and steady-state kinetics of the microbial degradation of phenolic, cyanic, ammoniacal wastewater in activated sludge systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was performed to study the effect of cyanide, powdered activated carbon (PAC) and sludge retention time (SRT) on the operation of an activated sludge system (AS) and an anoxic\\/oxic activated sludge system (A\\/O), treating synthetic wastewater containing thiocyanate, phenols and ammonia. Four bench-scale treatment systems (two AS and two A\\/O) were studied in the absence and presence

  20. Choose appropriate wastewater treatment technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Belhateche

    1995-01-01

    Industrial wastewater treatment has been slow to develop, and in some respects has not kept up with advances in manufacturing technology. An earlier CEP article outlined a procedure for developing an effective wastewater treatment strategy. This article discusses the various wastewater treatment technologies in more detail and includes tables that compare their applications, advantages, and disadvantages. It also provides guidance

  1. Operation, Maintenance and Management of Wastewater Treatment Facilities: A Bibliography of Technical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Dottie

    This is an annotated bibliography of wastewater treatment manuals. Fourteen manuals are abstracted including: (1) A Planned Maintenance Management System for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants; (2) Anaerobic Sludge Digestion, Operations Manual; (3) Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities; (4) Estimating Laboratory Needs…

  2. Screening wastewater for toxicity to activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1987-01-01

    Several toxicity tests were compared to define their utility for prediction of toxicity to activated sludge. The tests included: (1) oxygen uptake rates in batch tests with activated sludge, (2) adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measurements in the same batch tests, (3) Warburg respirometer studies with activated sludge, and (4) a luminescent bacteria test (Microtox\\/sup TM\\/). An evaluation of the toxicity tests

  3. Microalgae and wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Raouf, N.; Al-Homaidan, A.A.; Ibraheem, I.B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic and inorganic substances which were released into the environment as a result of domestic, agricultural and industrial water activities lead to organic and inorganic pollution. The normal primary and secondary treatment processes of these wastewaters have been introduced in a growing number of places, in order to eliminate the easily settled materials and to oxidize the organic material present in wastewater. The final result is a clear, apparently clean effluent which is discharged into natural water bodies. This secondary effluent is, however, loaded with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus and causes eutrophication and more long-term problems because of refractory organics and heavy metals that are discharged. Microalgae culture offers an interesting step for wastewater treatments, because they provide a tertiary biotreatment coupled with the production of potentially valuable biomass, which can be used for several purposes. Microalgae cultures offer an elegant solution to tertiary and quandary treatments due to the ability of microalgae to use inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for their growth. And also, for their capacity to remove heavy metals, as well as some toxic organic compounds, therefore, it does not lead to secondary pollution. In the current review we will highlight on the role of micro-algae in the treatment of wastewater. PMID:24936135

  4. Microalgae and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Raouf, N; Al-Homaidan, A A; Ibraheem, I B M

    2012-07-01

    Organic and inorganic substances which were released into the environment as a result of domestic, agricultural and industrial water activities lead to organic and inorganic pollution. The normal primary and secondary treatment processes of these wastewaters have been introduced in a growing number of places, in order to eliminate the easily settled materials and to oxidize the organic material present in wastewater. The final result is a clear, apparently clean effluent which is discharged into natural water bodies. This secondary effluent is, however, loaded with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus and causes eutrophication and more long-term problems because of refractory organics and heavy metals that are discharged. Microalgae culture offers an interesting step for wastewater treatments, because they provide a tertiary biotreatment coupled with the production of potentially valuable biomass, which can be used for several purposes. Microalgae cultures offer an elegant solution to tertiary and quandary treatments due to the ability of microalgae to use inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for their growth. And also, for their capacity to remove heavy metals, as well as some toxic organic compounds, therefore, it does not lead to secondary pollution. In the current review we will highlight on the role of micro-algae in the treatment of wastewater. PMID:24936135

  5. Disinfection. [Wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.N. (Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago); McCreary, J.J.

    1982-06-01

    Methods of disinfection of wastewater including chlorination, ultraviolet radiation, ozone, and quaternary compounds are reviewed. Various analytical methods to detect residues of the disinfectants are described. The production of inorganic and nonvolatile organic compounds in conventional water treatment processes is reviewed. (KRM)

  6. The simulation of nutrient fluxes in wastewater treatment plants with EBPR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Wild; H. Siegrist

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) for wastewater treatment not only affects the activated sludge plant itself, but also the connected process units, particularly those involved in sludge treatment. The consequences hereof are still little known, although problems may appear if phosphorus from digester supernatant is recycled to the activated sludge plant. This study illuminates the influence of

  7. Batch reactors offer efficient wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bolen, G.; Gilbert, A.

    1997-10-01

    Because today`s wastewater treatment applications vary widely, no single treatment system can address all situations. For both municipal and industrial applications, the wide range of treatment requirements has led to the development of numerous continuous-flow configurations. However, many applications are not well-served by continuous-flow, multiple-tank processes. Flow and strength fluctuations in the wastewater stream or, in many cases, in the specific strength or characteristics of the wastewater, are not efficiently handled by conventional, continuous-flow activated sludge. In other applications, extremes of climate, regulatory effluent limitations or other factors may make conventional processes prohibitively costly. Many of these applications, however, are ideally suited for batch reactor operations. Indeed, batch reactors typically offer capital, energy and operations and maintenance savings. Modern equipment technology, along with an increased understanding of batch processes, has resulted in increased batch reactor use.

  8. Emergy evaluations for constructed wetland and conventional wastewater treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. B.; Jiang, M. M.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.

    2009-04-01

    Based on emergy synthesis, this study presents a comparative study on constructed wetland (CW) and conventional wastewater treatments with three representative cases in Beijing. Accounting the environmental and economic inputs and treated wastewater output based on emergy, different characteristics of two kinds of wastewater treatments are revealed. The results show that CWs are environment-benign, less energy-intensive despite the relatively low ecological waste removal efficiency (EWRE), and less cost in construction, operation and maintenance compared with the conventional wastewater treatment plants. In addition, manifested by the emergy analysis, the cyclic activated sludge system (CASS) has the merit of higher ecological waste elimination efficiency.

  9. SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this manual is to present a contemporary review of sludge processing technology and the specific procedures to be considered, modified, and applied to meet unique conditions. he manual emphasizes the operational considerations and interrelationships of the various ...

  10. Treatment and reuse of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Luthy, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of recent experimental activities to evaluate processing characteristics of coal conversion wastewaters. Treatment studies have been performed with high-BTU coal gasification process quench waters to assess enhanced removal of organic compounds via powdered activated carbon-activated sludge treatment, and to evaluate a coal gasification wastewater treatment train comprised of sequential processing by ammonia removal, biological oxidation, lime-soda softening, granular activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis. In addition, treatment studies are in progress to evaluate solvent extraction of gasification process wastewater to recover phenolics and to reduce wastewater loading of priority organic pollutants. Biological oxidation of coal gasification wastewater has shown excellent removal efficiencies of major and trace organic contaminants at moderate loadings, addition of powdered activated carbon provides lower effluent COD and color. Gasification process wastewater treated through biological oxidation, lime-soda softening and activated carbon adsorption appears suitable for reuse as cooling tower make-up water. Solvent extraction is an effective means to reduce organic loadings to downstream processing units. In addition, preliminary results have shown that solvent extraction removes chromatographable organic contaminants to low levels.

  11. Persistence of pathogenic prion protein during simulated wastewater treatment processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, G.T.; Johnson, C.J.; Jacobson, K.H.; Bartholomay, C.; Mcmahon, K.D.; McKenzie, D.; Aiken, Judd M.; Pedersen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are a class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting a variety of mammalian species including humans. A misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP TSE) is the major, if not sole, component of the infectious agent. Prions are highly resistant to degradation and to many disinfection procedures suggesting that, if prions enter wastewater treatment systems through sewers and/or septic systems (e.g., from slaughterhouses, necropsy laboratories, rural meat processors, private game dressing) or through leachate from landfills that have received TSE-contaminated material, prions could survive conventional wastewater treatment Here, we report the results of experiments examining the partitioning and persistence of PrPTSE during simulated wastewater treatment processes including activated and mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. Incubation with activated sludge did not result in significant PrPTSE degradation. PrPTSE and prion infectivity partitioned strongly to activated sludge solids and are expected to enter biosolids treatment processes. A large fraction of PrPTSE survived simulated mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. The small reduction in recoverable PrPTSE after 20-d anaerobic sludge digestion appeared attributable to a combination of declining extractability with time and microbial degradation. Our results suggest that if prions were to enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most would partition to activated sludge solids, survive mesophilic anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  12. Persistence of pathogenic prion protein during simulated wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Hinckley, Glen T; Johnson, Christopher J; Jacobson, Kurt H; Bartholomay, Christian; McMahon, Katherine D; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M; Pedersen, Joel A

    2008-07-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are a class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting a variety of mammalian species including humans. A misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)) is the major, if not sole, component of the infectious agent. Prions are highly resistant to degradation and to many disinfection procedures suggesting that, if prions enter wastewater treatment systems through sewers and/or septic systems (e.g., from slaughterhouses, necropsy laboratories, rural meat processors, private game dressing) or through leachate from landfills that have received TSE-contaminated material, prions could survive conventional wastewater treatment. Here, we report the results of experiments examining the partitioning and persistence of PrPTSE during simulated wastewater treatment processes including activated and mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. Incubation with activated sludge did not result in significant PrPTSE degradation. PrPTSE and prion infectivity partitioned strongly to activated sludge solids and are expected to enter biosolids treatment processes. A large fraction of PrPTSE survived simulated mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. The small reduction in recoverable PrPTSE after 20-d anaerobic sludge digestion appeared attributable to a combination of declining extractability with time and microbial degradation. Our results suggest that if prions were to enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most would partition to activated sludge solids, survive mesophilic anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids. PMID:18754377

  13. Transfer of organic matter between wastewater and activated sludge flocs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Guellil; F Thomas; J.-C Block; J.-L Bersillon; P Ginestet

    2001-01-01

    The organic matter of wastewater was fractionated into settleable (i.e., particulate) and non-settleable (i.e., colloidal+soluble) fractions by settling followed by 0.22 ?m filtration. Particulate, colloidal and soluble proportions were found to be relatively constant (45, 31 and 24% of the total COD, respectively). Transfer of soluble fraction always occurred from the wastewater to the activated sludge flocs, whereas bidirectional transfer occurred

  14. Microalgae and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, O; Gaber, A; Abdel-Raouf, N

    1995-08-01

    The performance of microalgae aquaculture wastewater treatment system predominated mainly by Scenedesmus and Chlorella was assessed. Treatment induced a progressive reduction in both COD and BOD to values below the discharge limits. Different patterns were obtained for removal of phosphorus, nitrogen, and ammonia; however, the algal culture efficiencies reached 100% in their removal by the end of the treatment period. The applied aquatic systems demonstrated percentage reduction of heavy metals in the range between 52.3 and 100% in the batch system and 64.2 and 100% in the continuous system. Wastewater supported algal growth by inducing the incorporation of a significantly higher content of the individual amino acids Asp, Thr, Ser, Glu, Gly, and Tyr, and a markedly higher level of Pro. However, His, Lys, and Arg were markedly reduced compared to their levels in synthetic-medium-grown algae. PMID:7498057

  15. Membrane bioreactors and their uses in wastewater treatments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Le-Clech

    2010-01-01

    With the current need for more efficient and reliable processes for municipal and industrial wastewaters treatment, membrane\\u000a bioreactor (MBR) technology has received considerable attention. After just a couple of decades of existence, MBR can now\\u000a be considered as an established wastewater treatment system, competing directly with conventional processes like activated\\u000a sludge treatment plant. However, MBR processes still suffer from major

  16. ORGANIC CHEMICAL FATE PREDICTION IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes results from a broadly-based effort to determine the feasibility of predicting the fates of organic chemicals in diffused air, activated sludge wastewater treatment processes. The three conversion/removal mechanisms emphasized in the work were stripping, sorp...

  17. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by activated sludge treating municipal wastewater: effect of pH, sludge retention time (SRT), and acetate concentration in influent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adeline S. M Chua; Hiroo Takabatake; Hiroyasu Satoh; Takashi Mino

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the production of biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by activated sludge treating municipal wastewater was investigated. The effect of three operational factors, i.e. the acetate concentration in influent, pH, and sludge retention time (SRT) were studied. Sludge acclimatized with municipal wastewater supplemented with acetate could accumulate PHA up to 30% of sludge dry weight, while sludge acclimatized with

  18. ELECTROPLATING PLANT OPERATING CONDITIONS RELATED TO WASTEWATER SLUDGE LEACHABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to characterize the operating variables and wastewater sludges from six electroplating plants conducting a wide variety of plating operations so that the information developed would be applicable on an industry-wide basis. The results of the stud...

  19. Two Devices for Removing Sludge From Bioreactor Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Shivaun; Hitchens, G. DUncan; Jabs, Harry; Cross, Jennifer; Pilkinton, Michelle; Taylor, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Two devices a magnetic separator and a special filter denoted a self-regenerating separator (SRS) have been developed for separating sludge from the stream of wastewater from a bioreactor. These devices were originally intended for use in microgravity, but have also been demonstrated to function in normal Earth gravity. The magnetic separator (see Figure 1) includes a thin-walled nonmagnetic, stainless-steel cylindrical drum that rotates within a cylindrical housing. The wastewater enters the separator through a recirculation inlet, and about 80 percent of the wastewater flow leaves through a recirculation outlet. Inside the drum, a magnet holder positions strong permanent magnets stationary and, except near a recirculation outlet, close to the inner drum surface. To enable magnetic separation, magnetite (a ferromagnetic and magnetically soft iron oxide) powder is mixed into the bioreactor wastewater. The magnetite becomes incorporated into the sludge by condensation, onto the powder particles, of microbe flocks that constitute the sludge. As a result, the magnets inside the drum magnetically attract the sludge onto the outer surface of the drum.

  20. Simulation and optimization of chemically enhanced primary\\/activated sludge treatment for small communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SAFAA ABDELRAOUF AHMED; MOHAMED HASSAN SOROUR; SHADIA RAGHEB TEWFIK

    2005-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the use of coagulation and flocculation has been emphasized for the enhancement of primary sedimentation in municipal wastewater treatment plants. This work is concerned with the development of an approach for the simulation and optimization of a chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT)\\/activated sludge scheme for municipal wastewater treatment using ferric chloride as a coagulant. A

  1. Improvement strategy on enhanced biological phosphorus removal for municipal wastewater treatment plants: Full-scale operating parameters, sludge activities, and microbial features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhijian Zhang; Hui Li; Jun Zhu; Liu Weiping; Xu Xin

    2011-01-01

    The poor quality of effluent discharged by municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is threatening the safety of water ecology. This study, which integrated a field survey, batch tests, and microbial community identification, was designed to improve the effectiveness of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process for WWTPs. Over two-thirds of the investigated WWTPs could not achieve total P in

  2. Characterization of Domestic Wastewater Sludge in Oman from Three Different Regions and Recommendations for Alternative Reuse Applications

    PubMed Central

    BAAWAIN, Mahad S.; AL-JABRI, Mohsin; CHOUDRI, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background There are more than 350 wastewater treatment plants distributed across different parts of Oman. Some of them produce large quantities of domestic sewage sludge, particularly this study focused on characterizing domestic sludge of six treatment plants that may contain various pollutants, therefore the proper management of domestic sewage sludge is essential. Methods Samples of domestic sewage sludge were collected for each month over a period of one year in 2010. Samples of retained/recycled activated sludge (RAS) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were analyzed for elec-trical conductivity (EC), potential of hydrogen (pH), cations, anions and volatile content. All tests were conducted according to the Standard Method for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. Results Monitoring ofelectrical conductivity, nitrite and nitrate, the presence of chloride, sulfate and phosphate were higher than the other anions, the phosphate was found very high in all domestic STPs. The average obtained values of the cations in both domestic RAS and WAS samples were within the Omani Standards. Conclusion The study showed the very high concentration of phosphate, it might be worth to further investigate on the sources of phosphate. Cations in both domestic RAS and WAS samples were low and suggest that the domestic sludge can be re used in agriculture. A regular maintenance should be performed to prevent any accumulation of some harmful substances which may affect the sludge quality and the sludge drying beds should be large enough to handle the produced sludge for better management.

  3. Modelling activated sludge treatment of petroleum and petrochemical wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison Julia Baker

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the general framework of a comprehensive dynamic mechanistic mathematical model for predicting the behaviour of an activated sludge plant treating petroleum\\/petrochemical industrial wastewaters. Specifically, the aim was to develop two activated sludge mechanistic models which predicted the behaviour of systems treating: (1) petroleum refinery wastewater, and (2) petrochemical refinery wastewater. The wastewater

  4. Increased biogas production in a wastewater treatment plant by anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste and sewer sludge - a full scale study.

    PubMed

    Park, Nathan D; Thring, Ronald W; Garton, Randy P; Rutherford, Michael P; Helle, Steve S

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well established technology for the reduction of organic matter and stabilization of wastewater. Biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, is produced as a useful by-product of the process. Current solid waste management at the city of Prince George is focused on disposal of waste and not on energy recovery. Co-digestion of fresh fruit and vegetable waste with sewer sludge can improve biogas yield by increasing the load of biodegradable material. A six week full-scale project co-digesting almost 15,000 kg of supermarket waste was completed. Average daily biogas production was found to be significantly higher than in previous years. Digester operation remained stable over the course of the study as indicated by the consistently low volatile acids-to-alkalinity ratio. Undigested organic material was visible in centrifuged sludge suggesting that the waste should have been added to the primary digester to prevent short circuiting and to increase the hydraulic retention time of the freshly added waste. PMID:22020478

  5. Influence of powdered activated carbon addition on water quality, sludge properties, and microbial characteristics in the biological treatment of commingled industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Yuan; Li, Meng; Wang, Can; Ji, Min

    2015-09-15

    A powdered activated carbon-activated sludge (PAC-AS) system, a traditional activated sludge (AS) system, and a powdered activated carbon (PAC) system were operated to examine the insights into the influence of PAC addition on biological treatment. The average COD removal efficiencies of the PAC-AS system (39%) were nearly double that of the AS system (20%). Compared with the average efficiencies of the PAC system (7%), COD removal by biodegradation in the PAC-AS system was remarkably higher than that in the AS system. The analysis of the influence of PAC on water quality and sludge properties showed that PAC facilitated the removal of hydrophobic matter and metabolic acidic products, and also enhanced the biomass accumulation, sludge settleability, and specific oxygen uptake rate inside the biological system. The microbial community structures in the PAC-AS and AS systems were monitored. The results showed that the average well color development in the PAC-AS system was higher than that in the AS system. The utilization of various substrates by microorganisms in the two systems did not differ. The dissimilarity index was far less than one; thus, showing that the microbial community structures of the two systems were the same. PMID:25863578

  6. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on production and nutrient properties of wastewater sludge biochar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mustafa K. Hossain; Vladimir Strezov; K. Yin Chan; Artur Ziolkowski; Peter F. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    The important challenge for effective management of wastewater sludge materials in an environmentally and economically acceptable way can be addressed through pyrolytic conversion of the sludge to biochar and agricultural applications of the biochar. The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of pyrolysis temperature on production of wastewater sludge biochar and evaluate the properties required for agronomic

  7. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31

    Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them....

  8. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31

    Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them....

  9. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: SIDESTREAMS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance problems at publicly-owned treatment works are often attributed to the recycling of sidestreams generated in the wastewater treatment and sludge handling systems. Although the volumes of these sidestreams are generally small compared to plant influent flows, sidestrea...

  10. Activated sludge systems removal efficiency of veterinary pharmaceuticals from slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Pedro N; Pirra, António; Basto, M Clara P; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge on the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from animal food production industry for the removal of both hormones and antibiotics of veterinary application is still very limited. These compounds have already been reported in different environmental compartments at levels that could have potential impacts on the ecosystems. This work aimed to evaluate the role of activated sludge in the removal of commonly used veterinary drugs, enrofloxacin (ENR), tetracycline (TET), and ceftiofur, from wastewater during a conventional treatment process. For that, a series of laboratory-controlled experiments using activated sludge were carried out in batch reactors. Sludge reactors with 100 ?g/L initial drug charge presented removal rates of 68 % for ENR and 77 % for TET from the aqueous phase. Results indicated that sorption to sludge and to the wastewater organic matter was responsible for a significant percentage of drugs removal. Nevertheless, these removal rates still result in considerable concentrations in the aqueous phase that will pass through the WWTP to the receiving environment. Measuring only the dissolved fraction of pharmaceuticals in the WWTP effluents may underestimate the loading and risks to the aquatic environment. PMID:23740304

  11. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. McDonald; John A. Webb; Jeff Taylor [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Environmental Geoscience

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by {approximately} 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is {approximately}2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, {approximately}4.5, {approximately}5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Development of an ecologically sustainable wastewater treatment system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lokendra Kumar; Rajiv Ranjan; P. C. Sabumon

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed mainly for the development of a wastewater treatment system incorporating enhanced primary treatment, anaerobic digestion of coagulated organics, biofilm aerobic process for the removal of soluble organics and disinfection of treated water. An attempt was also made to study the reuse potential of treated water for irrigation and use of digested sludge as soil conditioner by

  13. Process Control Manual for Aerobic Biological Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publication is an operations manual for activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment facilities. The stated purpose of the manual is to provide an on-the-job reference for operators of these two types of treatment plants. The overall objective of the manual is to aid the operator in…

  14. Production of Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides using wastewater sludge as a raw material: effect of inoculum and sludge solids concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Lachhab; R. D Tyagi; J. R Valéro

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to optimise inoculum quantity and total solids concentration for the production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based biopesticides using wastewater sludge as a raw material in shake flasks and 15 l fermenters. The sludge used was a mixture of primary and secondary sludges. Two different Bt strains were employed; Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD-1 (Btk) and a new strain

  15. Efficiency of refinery sludge biodegradation using municipal wastewater and activated sludge and effect of hydrocarbon concentration on culturable bacteria community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saïd Ben Hamed; Raja Rezgui; Ayed Halleb; Abdeljelil Ghram; Ridha Oueslati; Marc Labat; Abderrazak Maaroufi

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of activated sludge as inoculum and municipal wastewater as diluent for the biodegradation of refinery sludge\\u000a was investigated. At a laboratory scale, biodegradation experiments carried out in an aerobic batch reactor showed that toxic\\u000a oily sludge was biodegradable after dilution. Compared with freshwater, the use of municipal wastewater for dilution clearly\\u000a enhanced the biodegradation of this toxic pollutant.

  16. Treatment of hypersaline wastewater by a combined neutralization–precipitation with ABR-SBR technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Lu; Yanfei Ma; Yurong Liu; Menghong Li

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic salts prohibit seriously the biological treatment of the wastewater discharged from the production of long-chained dicarboxylic acids from liquid paraffin by microbial fermentation. First, the inorganic salts in wastewater were removed partly by means of neutralization–precipitation. Second, the neutralized wastewater was treated in an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The digested sludge from the

  17. Biological treatment and nanofiltration of denim textile wastewater for reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erkan Sahinkaya; Nigmet Uzal; Ulku Yetis; Filiz B. Dilek

    2008-01-01

    This study aims at coupling of activated sludge treatment with nanofiltration to improve denim textile wastewater quality to reuse criteria. In the activated sludge reactor, the COD removal efficiency was quite high as it was 91±2% and 84±4% on the basis of total and soluble feed COD, respectively. The color removal efficiency was 75±10%, and around 50–70% of removed color

  18. Efficient centrifugal recovery of Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides from fermented wastewater and wastewater sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satinder K. Brar; M. Verma; R. D. Tyagi; J. R. Valéro; R. Y. Surampalli

    2006-01-01

    Studies were conducted on harvesting of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-based biopesticides from fermented broths of starch industry wastewater (SIW), wastewater sludge (raw and hydrolyzed—NH and TH, respectively) and semi-synthetic soyameal to enhance entomotoxicity (Tx) by centrifugation. Pertinent factors influencing Tx, solids concentration, pH, temperature and centrifugal force were investigated. The centrifugate solids concentration beyond 100g\\/l did not enhance Tx, instead caused

  19. Characterization of drinking water treatment sludge after ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic technology alone or the combination of ultrasound with alkaline or thermal hydrolysis as pretreatment for anaerobic digestion of activated sludge has been extensively documented. However, there are few reports on ultrasound as pretreatment of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS), and thereby the characteristic variability of sonicated DWTS has not been fully examined. This research presents a lab-scale study on physical, chemical and biological characteristics of a DWTS sample collected from a water plant after ultrasonic treatment via a bath/probe sonoreactor. By doing this work, we provide implications for using ultrasound as pretreatment of enhanced coagulation of recycling sludge, and for the conditioning of water and wastewater mixed sludge by ultrasound combined with polymers. Our results indicate that the most vigorous DWTS disintegration quantified by particles' size reduction and organic solubilization is achieved with 5 W/ml for 30 min ultra-sonication (specific energy of 1590 kWh/kg TS). The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) specific surface area of sonicated DWTS flocs increase as ultra-sonication prolongs at lower energy densities (0.03 and 1 W/ml), while decrease as ultra-sonication prolongs at higher energy densities (3 and 5 W/ml). Additionally, the pH and zeta potential of sonicated DWTS slightly varies under all conditions observed. A shorter sonication with higher energy density plays a more effective role in restraining microbial activity than longer sonication with lower energy density. PMID:25443278

  20. DENSITY LEVELS OF PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a critical review of the literature from laboratory and full scale studies regarding density levels of indicator and pathogenic organisms in municipal wastewater sludges and septage. The effectiveness of conventional municipal sludge stabilization processes (...

  1. [Modern approaches to wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Ivan'ko, O M

    2013-01-01

    The present state and prospects of new methods for cleaning in the water and wastewater using membrane separation, are examples of application of this technology in the treatment of surface and subsurface natural waters, seawater desalination, wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25016758

  2. Characterization of a bioflocculant from potato starch wastewater and its application in sludge dewatering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junyuan; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Bin; Shu, Bi

    2015-07-01

    A bioflocculant was produced by using potato starch wastewater; its potential in sludge dewatering and potato starch wastewater treatment was investigated. Production of this bioflocculant was positively associated with cell growth, and a highest value of 0.81 g/L was obtained. When incubated with this bioflocculant, dry solids (DS) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) of typical wastewater activated sludge reached 20.8 % and 3.9?×?10(12) m/kg, respectively, which were much better than the ones obtained with conventional chemical flocculants. Sludge dewatering was further improved when both the bioflocculant and conventional polyacrylamide (PAM) were used simultaneously. With potato starch wastewater, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity removal rates could reach 52.4 and 81.7 %, respectively, at pH value of 7.5 when the bioflocculant dose was adjusted to 30 mg/L; from a practical standpoint, the removal of COD and turbidity reached 48.3 and 72.5 %, respectively, without pH value adjustment. PMID:25851719

  3. Methane emissions from municipal wastewater treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Czepiel, P.M.; Crill, P.M.; Harriss, R.C. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from primary and secondary wastewater treatment processes were measured from mid-winter to summer conditions in Durham, NH. A statistically significant positive relationship between gas flux and wastewater temperature was determined for methane and carbon dioxide in both the aerated and nonaerated areas of the grit tanks. Statistical correlations to temperature measured in a secondary aeration tank were marginal for methane and insignificant for carbon dioxide. Emission factors derived from our measurements were 39 g of CH[sub 4] person[sup [minus]1] year[sup [minus]1] and 35 698 g of CO[sub 2] person[sup [minus]1] year[sup [minus]1] for primary and secondary activated sludge treatment processes. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Polyelectrolyte conditioning for iron-hydroxide-containing sludge produced from electroflocculation of fermentation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jang; Chen, Tson-Nan; Cheng, Yang-Chu

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the application of chemical conditioning method for the post-electroflocculation wastewater sludge treatment with polyelectrolytes of varying ionic characters, namely anionic, cationic and nonionic flocculating agents. Electroflocculation, a combination of the processes of electroflotation and electroprecipitation, was found effective to remove the organic and color components in monosodium glutamate fermentation wastewater. The settleability and dewaterability of the separated sludge, containing 15-20% of iron hydroxides, increased 35% and 60% due to polymer conditioning through a jar-test apparatus. The influence of shear conditions and polymer dose on the floc size, zeta potential, filterability and dewatering performance, and shear resistance of sludges was investigated. Experimental results showed that the anionic polymer acts as a better flocculating agent than both cationic and nonionic polymers, and the optimal polymer doses fall between 4.0 and 10.0 mg/g Fe sludge under corresponding shear rates of 200 300 rpm. This study also indicated that both charge neutralization and polymer bridging mechanisms operate in the sludge conditioning process. PMID:15328692

  5. SLUDGE DEWATERING AND DRYING ON SAND BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dewatering of water and wastewater treatment sludges was examined through mathematical modeling and experimental work. The various components of the research include: (1) chemical analyses of water treatment sludges, (2) drainage and drying studies of sludges, (3) a mathematical ...

  6. AMMONIUM-CARBONATE LEACHING OF METAL VALUES FROM WATER-TREATMENT SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was undertaken to explore and develop processes based on ammoniacal leaching to recover metal values from metal-finishing wastewater treatment sludges. The objective was to eliminate or to reduce sufficiently the heavy metal content of the sludge so that it would no ...

  7. REVIEW OF TECHNIQUES FOR TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF PHOSPHORUS-LADEN CHEMICAL SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the effects of phosphorus removal by chemical addition on sludge handling and disposal options at full-scale wastewater treatment plants. American and Canadian plants which generate phosphorus-laden chemical sludges were surveyed by questionnaire, and 174 re...

  8. Vermistabilization of paper mill wastewater sludge using Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Negi, Renu; Suthar, Surindra

    2013-01-01

    Vermistabilization of paper mill wastewater sludge (PMS) spiked with cow dung (CD) at ratios of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% was carried out employing the earthworm, Eisenia fetida. A total of five treatments were established and changes in chemical and microbial properties of mixtures were observed. Vermistabilization caused decreases in total organic carbon, C:N ratio and cellulose by 1.2-1.5, 4.6-14.6, and 2.3-9.7-fold, respectively, but increases in pH, electrical conductivity, ash content, (tot)N, (avail)P, (tot)P, (exch)K, Ca, Na, and N-NO(3)(-) of 1.06-1.11, 1.2-1.6, 1.3-1.6, 3.8-11.5, 4.1-6.5, 5.7-10.3, 1.7-2.0, 1.16-1.24, 1.23-1.45, 4.2-13.4-folds, respectively. PMS with 25-50% of CD showed the maximum mineralization rate. The fungal, bacterial and actinomycetes population increased 2.5-3.71, 3.13-8.96, and 5.71-9.48-fold, respectively after vermistabilization. The high level of plant-available nutrients indicates the suitability of vermistabilized material for agronomic uses. PMID:23196238

  9. PAPERMILL WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY MICROSTRAINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    An original treatment system was designed, constructed, and operated for removal of suspended solids, turbidity, color, and BOD from the wastewaters of two paper mills which produce technical and other fine papers. The treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation follo...

  10. Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater 

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    evaporation was one possible means of treatment which had not been studied to any great degree. Two bench scale evaporation units were employed to determine the fundamental relationships affecting wastewater quality during such treatment. In batch evaporation...

  11. Mangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere Wastewater Treatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreat

    E-print Network

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Mangere WastewaterMangere WastewaterMangere Wastewater Treatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatment PlantTreatmentTechnical Issues and Innovations Transformed the old Mangere Wastewater Treatment PlantTransformed the old Mangere Wastewater Treatment Plant 5 year project, treatment processes have been replaced5 year project, treatment

  12. SAFETY MANUAL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT WITH OXYGEN AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This safety manual provides design, operating, and safety personnel of municipal wastewater treatment plants which use oxygen aeration of activated sludge systems with the knowledge to prevent hazards due to the interaction of the oxygen with combustibles and other hazardous mate...

  13. Technical, economic and environmental assessment of sludge treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Ferrer, Ivet; Molist, Jordi; García, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Sludge treatment wetlands (STW) emerge as a promising sustainable technology with low energy requirements and operational costs. In this study, technical, economic and environmental aspects of STW are investigated and compared with other alternatives for sludge management in small communities (<2000 population equivalent). The performance of full-scale STW was characterised during 2 years. Sludge dewatering increased total solids (TS) concentration by 25%, while sludge biodegradation lead to volatile solids around 45% TS and DRI(24h) between 1.1 and 1.4 gO(2)/kgTS h, suggesting a partial stabilisation of biosolids. In the economic and environmental assessment, four scenarios were considered for comparison: 1) STW with direct land application of biosolids, 2) STW with compost post-treatment, 3) centrifuge with compost post-treatment and 4) sludge transport to an intensive wastewater treatment plant. According to the results, STW with direct land application is the most cost-effective scenario, which is also characterised by the lowest environmental impact. The life cycle assessment highlights that global warming is a significant impact category in all scenarios, which is attributed to fossil fuel and electricity consumption; while greenhouse gas emissions from STW are insignificant. As a conclusion, STW are the most appropriate alternative for decentralised sludge management in small communities. PMID:20932543

  14. Physical-chemical pretreatment as an option for increased sustainability of municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Mels

    2001-01-01

    Keywords : municipal wastewater treatment, physical-chemical pretreatment, chemically enhanced primary treatment, organic polymers, environmental sustainabilityMost of the currently applied municipal wastewater treatment plants in The Netherlands are based on the activated sludge process and include nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Physical-chemical pretreatment might be an option to improve the environmental sustainability of these wastewater treatment facilities. Physical-chemical pretreatment is meant to

  15. AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO URBAN WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. F. Harleman; S. Murcott

    Should cities of the developing world invest in the dominant municipal wastewater treatment technology of Western Europe and North America --- conventional primary plus activated sludge? Or, are there alternative \\

  16. RECOMMENDED PRACTICE FOR THE USE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FLOWMETERS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic flowmeters that conform to the guidelines described in this document can be used to measure the volumetric flowrate of all liquids and sludges normally encountered in wastewater treatment plants, provided that adequate inspection and maintenance are performed as r...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE TWO-ZONE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESS AT NORRISTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Economic and practical considerations compel today's designers to investigate alternatives to conventional strategies for wastewater treatment systems. One such alternative is the Two-Zone process, a novel activated sludge process which combines the aerobic biological reactor and...

  18. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AlDhowalia

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (HâS) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SOâ). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is

  19. WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY ARTIFICIAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of artificial wetlands at Santee, California demonstrated the capacity of wetlands systems for integrated secondary and advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters. When receiving a blend of primary and secondary wastewaters at a blend ratio of 1:2 (6 cm per day: 12 cm pe...

  20. Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kanti L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the sources and effects of nutrients in wastewater, and the methods of their removal in wastewater treatment. In order to conserve water resources and eliminate the cost of nutrient removal, treated effluent should be used wherever possible for irrigation, since it contains all the ingredients for proper plant growth. (JR)

  1. Electrochemical technologies in wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guohua Chen

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the development, design and applications of electrochemical technologies in water and wastewater treatment. Particular focus was given to electrodeposition, electrocoagulation (EC), electroflotation (EF) and electrooxidation. Over 300 related publications were reviewed with 221 cited or analyzed. Electrodeposition is effective in recover heavy metals from wastewater streams. It is considered as an established technology with possible further development

  2. Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains

    E-print Network

    Fay, Noah

    Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains to provide rapid, field-ready, inexpen- sive testing of these chemicals in wastewater is also needed estrogenic chemicals, and 2) develop sensor technology for the rapid measure- ment in wastewater of two key

  3. BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    especially Zn. Key words: heavy metals, accumulation, Brassica Napus, urban sludge, industrial sludge. 1. When purifying wastewater, heavy metals accumulate in the sludge. Thus, the sludge contains significant activities, heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cr) actually raise issues of particular concern. These non

  4. Effect of pH on phosphorus, copper, and zinc elution from swine wastewater activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Waki, Miyoko; Yasuda, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of reducing the amounts of phosphorus (P), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) discharged from swine wastewater activated sludge treatment facilities, we studied the elution of these elements from activated sludge at various pH values. Sludge samples with neutral pH collected from three farms were incubated at pH values ranging from 3 to 10. The soluble concentrations of these elements changed dramatically with pH and were highest at pH 3. We assumed that P present in the sludge under neutral and alkaline conditions was in insoluble form bound up with magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca), because Ca and Mg also eluted from the sludge at low pH. To clarify forms of Zn and Cu in the sludge, we performed a sequential extraction analysis. Zinc in adsorbed, organically bound, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Zn. Copper in organically bound, carbonate, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Cu. The soluble P concentrations were lowest at pH 9 or 10 (11-36 mg/L), the soluble Zn concentrations were lowest at pH 8 or 9 (0.07-0.15 mg/L), and the soluble Cu concentrations were lowest at pH 6-9 (0.2 mg/L, the detection limit). PMID:25116486

  5. Is your wastewater toxic to the municipal treatment plant?

    SciTech Connect

    Havash, J.; Oster, J. [Lockwood Green Technologies Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    For many reasons, it is beneficial to know whether or not wastewater generated from a manufacturing process is toxic or can inhibit the microorganisms in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. One simple way to test the wastewater is by using a laboratory respirometer, which can evaluate both toxicity and treatability. In some cases, respirometer use may save an industry thousands or even millions of dollars by proving that certain chemicals previously perceived to be detrimental are actually treatable in the municipal wastewater treatment plant. Because these chemicals will not cause any harm, the cost of a pretreatment plant is avoided. Of course, the reverse could be true when a municipality suspects wastewater discharged from an industry is causing an upset condition to its activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. Because toxicity and treatability are both functions of the respiration rate of microbial cells, a method that measures the respiration rate of microbial cells also can be used to measure toxicity. This article discusses several situations in which a respirometer was used to measure the toxicity and treatability of wastewater suspected to have a toxic effect on the municipal activated sludge plant.

  6. Partitioning of nutrients and micropollutants along the sludge treatment line: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gianico, A; Braguglia, C M; Mascolo, G; Mininni, G

    2013-09-01

    A 2-year sampling campaign was conducted in three wastewater treatment plants of various sizes in the Rome area to assess the occurrence of nutrients and micropollutants among primary, secondary and digested sludge. The primary purpose was to evaluate the quality of different sludge types and their suitability for agricultural use. Primary sludge was consistently more polluted than secondary in terms of organic micropollutants, whereas heavy metals partitioned equally among the sludge types. In digested sludge, the heavy metal concentrations were always below limit values proposed for agricultural utilisation. In contrast, organic micropollutants concentrated during anaerobic digestion and affected the quality of the digested sludge. Secondary sludge resulted less polluted and richer in nitrogen and phosphorus (up to three times) than primary sludge and is hence more suitable for agricultural use. Separate processing of primary and secondary sludge might therefore be an innovative option for sludge management that could maximise the possibilities of agricultural use of secondary sludge and limit disposal problems only to primary sludge. In fact, primary sludge could be easily treated and disposed of by conventional processes including thickening, anaerobic digestion, centrifugation and incineration, whereas the difficult digestibility of secondary sludge could be improved by disintegration pre-treatment before stabilisation. PMID:23589264

  7. Energy from municipal waste: assessment of energy conservation and recovery in municipal wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, F.W.; Pearson, C.V.

    1984-10-01

    This document provides a qualitative report on the status of a program for energy conservation in wastewater treatment. Analyzing the nation's energy requirements for wastewater treatment by process has shown that the wastewater- and sludge-stabilization processes accounted for more than 56% of the energy used for wastewater treatment in 1978. Advanced processes are projected to have the largest increase in energy of all treatment processes between 1978 and the year 2000. To promote energy conservation in wastewater treatment, DOE has sponsored a number of projects (either wholly or in part), including the following: demonstration of the anaerobic upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor at Knoxville, Tenn.; assessment of digester-gas production and use in anaerobic-digestion facilities; study of the enhancement of anaerobic digestion by carbon addition; demonstration of water-hyacinth wastewater-treatment (WHWT) at Lake Buena Vista, Florida; and demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization (UACS) of sludge. These programs are described. 19 references, 22 figures, 29 tables.

  8. CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DIGESTED, HEAT-CONDITIONED, AND PURIFAX-TREATED SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater sludges were stabilized by Purifax treatment, anaerobic digestion and heat conditioning. The processed sludges from the Purifax process at chlorine dosages normally used in processing wastewater sludges contained 2 to > 14 times the total organic chlorine content of th...

  9. Integrated treatment of municipal sewage sludge by deep dewatering and anaerobic fermentation for biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Wentian; Wei, Huangzhao; Sun, Chenglin

    2015-02-01

    The increasing sludge generated in wastewater treatment plants poses a threat to the environment. Based on the traditional processes, sludge dewatered by usual methods was further dewatered by hydraulic compression and the filtrate released was treated by anaerobic fermentation. The difficulties in sludge dewatering were associated with the existence of sludge flocs or colloidal materials. A suitable CaO dosage of 125 mg/g dry sludge (DS) could further decrease the moisture content of sludge from 82.4 to 50.9 %. The filtrate from the dewatering procedure was a potential substrate for biohydrogen production. Adding zero-valent iron (ZVI) into the anaerobic system improved the biohydrogen yield by 20 %, and the COD removal rate was lifted by 10 % as well. Meanwhile, the sludge morphology and microbial community were altered. The novel method could greatly reduce the sludge volume and successfully treated filtrate along with the conversion of organics into biohydrogen. PMID:25192669

  10. Application of Sludges and Wastewaters on Agricultural Land: A Planning and Educational Guide, MCD-35. Research Bulletin 1090.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knezek, Bernard D., Ed.; Miller, Robert H., Ed.

    This report addresses the application of agricultural processing wastes, industrial and municipal wastes on agricultural land as both a waste management and resource recovery and reuse practice. The document emphasizes the treatment and beneficial utilization of sludge and wastewater as opposed to waste disposal. These objectives are achieved…

  11. Sugarcane molasses-based bio-ethanol wastewater treatment by two-phase multi-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) combination with up-flow UASB and down-flow hanging sponge.

    PubMed

    Choeisai, P; Jitkam, N; Silapanoraset, K; Yubolsai, C; Yoochatchaval, W; Yamaguchi, T; Onodera, T; Syutsubo, K

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate a treatment system for high strength wastewater (vinasse) from a sugarcane molasses-based bio-ethanol plant in Thailand. A laboratory-scale two-phase treatment system composed of a sulfate reducing (SR) tank and multi-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (MS-UASB) reactor was used as the pre-treatment unit. Conventional UASB and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactors were used as the post-treatment unit. The treatment system was operated for 300 days under ambient temperature conditions (24.6-29.6 °C). The hydraulic retention time (HRT) in each unit was kept at 25 h for the two-phase system and 23 h for the UASB&DHS. The influent concentration was allowed to reach up to 15,000 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L. COD removal efficiency (based on influent COD) of the two-phase MS-UASB and the UASB&DHS was 54.9 and 18.7%, respectively. Due to the effective removal of sulfide in the SR tank, the MS-UASB achieved a high methane conversion ratio of up to 97%. In DHS, nitrification occurred at the outside portion of the sponge media while denitrification occurred at the inside. Consequently, 27% of the total nitrogen (TN) was removed. An amount of 32% of residual nitrogen (28 mgN/L) was in the form of nitrate, a better nitrogen state for fertilizer. PMID:24647181

  12. POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS FROM PERSISTENT ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER AND SLUDGES USED FOR LAND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential health problems associated with the presence of persistent organic chemicals in wastewater and sludge, when applied to agricultural lands, are reviewed. The type and amounts of organic chemicals present in wastewater and sludge, their fate on land, and available con...

  13. Utilizing acid mine drainage sludge and coal fly ash for phosphate removal from dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y R; Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a new and sustainable approach for the reuse of industrial by-products from wastewater treatment. The dairy industry produces huge volumes of wastewater, characterized by high levels of phosphate that can result in eutrophication and degradation of aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated the application of acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge, coal fly ash, and lignite as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of phosphate from dairy wastewater. Material characterization using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis revealed significant amounts of crystalline/amorphous Fe/Al/Si/Ca-based minerals and large surface areas of AMD sludge and fly ash. Batch adsorption isotherms were best described using the Freundlich model. The Freundlich distribution coefficients were 13.7 mg(0.577) L(0.423) g(-1) and 16.9 mg(0.478) L(0.522) g(-1) for AMD sludge and fly ash, respectively, and the nonlinearity constants suggested favourable adsorption for column applications. The breakthrough curves of fixed-bed columns, containing greater than 10 wt% of the waste materials (individual or composite blends) mixed with sand, indicated that phosphate breakthrough did not occur within 100 pore volumes while the cumulative removal was 522 and 490 mg kg(-1) at 10 wt% AMD sludge and 10 wt% fly ash, respectively. By contrast, lignite exhibited negligible phosphate adsorption, possibly due to small amounts of inorganic minerals suitable for phosphate complexation and limited surface area. The results suggest that both AMD sludge and fly ash were potentially effective adsorbents if employed individually at a ratio of 10 wt% or above for column application. PMID:24617077

  14. In situ investigation of tubular microbial fuel cells deployed in an aeration tank at a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    E-print Network

    wastewater treatment plant Fei Zhang a , Zheng Ge a , Julien Grimaud b , Jim Hurst b , Zhen He a: Microbial fuel cells Wastewater treatment Organic removal Aeration Activated sludge a b s t r a c of wastewater quality, and other operating conditions. Unlike prior lab stud- ies by others, the results

  15. Novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) coupled with a nonwoven fabric filter for household wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianghao Ren; H. K. Shon; Namjung Jang; Young Geun Lee; Minsu Bae; Jongho Lee; Kwangmyeung Cho; In S. Kim

    2010-01-01

    Conventional and modified membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are increasingly used in small-scale wastewater treatment. However, their widespread applications are hindered by their relatively high cost and operational complexity. In this study, we investigate a new concept of wastewater treatment using a nonwoven fabric filter bag (NFFB) as the membrane bioreactor. Activated sludge is charged in the nonwoven fabric filter bag and

  16. Marine carbohydrates of wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Prasad N; Gomathi, Thandapani; Vinodhini, P Angelin; Nasreen, K

    2014-01-01

    Our natural heritage (rivers, seas, and oceans) has been exploited, mistreated, and contaminated because of industrialization, globalization, population growth, urbanization with increased wealth, and more extravagant lifestyles. The scenario gets worse when the effluents or contaminants are discharged directly. So wastewater treatment is a very important and necessary in nowadays to purify wastewater before it enters a body of natural water, or it is applied to the land, or it is reused. Various methods are available for treating wastewater but with many disadvantages. Recently, numerous approaches have been studied for the development of cheaper and more effective technologies, both to decrease the amount of wastewater produced and to improve the quality of the treated effluent. Biosorption is an emerging technology, which uses natural materials as adsorbents for wastewater treatment. Low-cost adsorbents of polysaccharide-based materials obtained from marine, such as chitin, chitosan, alginate, agar, and carrageenan, are acting as rescue for wastewater treatment. This chapter reviews the treatment of wastewater up to the present time using marine polysaccharides and its derivatives. Special attention is paid to the advantages of the natural adsorbents, which are a wonderful gift for human survival. PMID:25300545

  17. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  18. Design concepts for biological treatment of industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Capps, R.W. [Pace Consultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Mantelli, G.N.; Bradford, M.L. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Wastewater treatment systems have an operating envelope bounded by upper and lower operating limits. The design criteria should therefore include upper and lower operating limits. Upper limits are generally dictated by the effluent permit, whereas lower limits are the result of design. The design challenge for an industrial wastewater treatment system is to create a process which is capable of responding to extreme variations in flow and pollutant concentration, yet maintain the effluent within permit limitations. Industrial wastewater is contaminated with oil, aromatics, ammonia, phenols, sulfide, and heavy metals. Because the operating loads (flow, pollutant concentration, toxics, pH, and salinity) are largely unpredictable, maximum flexibility and controllability should be incorporated into the design. Since the heart of the wastewater treating system is the biological oxidation process, particular attention should be given to its specifications. A biological oxidation system that is too large can cause as many problems as one that is too small. This paper focuses on design considerations for the activated sludge process for industrial wastewater. Case Study 1 is an example of how to design a grass roots wastewater treatment plant for a new refinery. This design provides for the maximum efficiency and operability within permit limits. However, Case Study 2 is an example of how not to design an industrial wastewater treatment plant. Typically wastewater treatment systems like Case Study 2 are over-designed, which causes many operability problems that lead to permit excursions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview in "Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Treatment, Philippe Quevauviller (Ed

  20. Studies on the production of B. thuringiensis based biopesticides using wastewater sludge as a raw material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S Vidyarthi; R. D Tyagi; J. R Valero; R. Y Surampalli

    2002-01-01

    Growth and ?-endotoxin yield of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) subsp kurstaki in tryptic soy yeast extract (TSY) medium, soybean meal based commercial medium and wastewater sludge medium were studied. The viable spores (VS) count in sludge medium was comparable to that obtained in laboratory and commercial media. The entomotoxicity of the fermentation liquid (Bt grown sludge) against Choristoneura fumiferana was comparable

  1. Reliability analysis of wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sílvia C; Von Sperling, Marcos

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a reliability analysis of 166 full-scale wastewater treatment plants operating in Brazil. Six different processes have been investigated, comprising septic tank+anaerobic filter, facultative pond, anaerobic pond+facultative pond, activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors alone and UASB reactors followed by post-treatment. A methodology developed by Niku et al. [1979. Performance of activated sludge process and reliability-based design. J. Water Pollut. Control Assoc., 51(12), 2841-2857] is used for determining the coefficients of reliability (COR), in terms of the compliance of effluent biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and fecal or thermotolerant coliforms (FC) with discharge standards. The design concentrations necessary to meet the prevailing discharge standards and the expected compliance percentages have been calculated from the COR obtained. The results showed that few plants, under the observed operating conditions, would be able to present reliable performances considering the compliance with the analyzed standards. The article also discusses the importance of understanding the lognormal behavior of the data in setting up discharge standards, in interpreting monitoring results and compliance with the legislation. PMID:17897694

  2. Parameters affecting the formation of perfluoroalkyl acids during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Kinsman, L; Ng, T; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-05-15

    This study examined the fate and behaviour of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in liquid and solid samples from five different wastewater treatment types: facultative and aerated lagoons, chemically assisted primary treatment, secondary aerobic biological treatment, and advanced biological nutrient removal treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest data set from a single study available in the literature to date for PFAAs monitoring study in wastewater treatment. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the predominant PFAA in wastewater with levels from 2.2 to 150ng/L (influent) and 1.9 to 140ng/L (effluent). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the predominant compound in primary sludge, waste biological sludge, and treated biosolids with concentrations from 6.4 to 2900ng/g dry weight (dw), 9.7 to 8200ng/gdw, and 2.1 to 17,000ng/gdw, respectively. PFAAs were formed during wastewater treatment and it was dependant on both process temperature and treatment type; with higher rates of formation in biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating at longer hydraulic retention times and higher temperatures. PFAA removal by sorption was influenced by different sorption tendencies; median log values of the solid-liquid distribution coefficient estimated from wastewater biological sludge and final effluent were: PFOS (3.73)>PFDA (3.68)>PFNA (3.25)>PFOA (2.49)>PFHxA (1.93). Mass balances confirmed the formation of PFAAs, low PFAA removal by sorption, and high PFAA levels in effluents. PMID:24691135

  3. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies. PMID:24457302

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination 

    E-print Network

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-10-23

    be distributed to lawns, it must be disinfected to remove disease-causing organisms. The three primary disinfecting agents used are chlorine, ultraviolet light, and ozone. The most common method of disinfection for onsite wastewater treatment systems... Disinfectant storage Pump tank Spray heads Wastewater treatment system Onsite wastewater treatment systems Liquid chlorination L-5460 9-08 Figure 1: A liquid chlorination system for residential wastewater treatment. B efore treated wastewater can...

  5. Anaerobic wastewater treatment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suidan, M.T.; Pfeffer, J.T.; Nakhla, G.F.; Fraser, J.; Klepp, B.E.; Mueller, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    This project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of wastewater dilution, GAC (granular activated carbon) replacement rate, GAC particle size, operating temperature, and reactor configuration on the treatment of coal gasification wastewater with the expanded-bed GAC anaerobic bioreactor. Coal gasification wastewater used was generated in a low BTU, elevated pressure, stirred fixed-bed, gasifier operated by Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The treatability of another wastewater generated in a full-scale, slagging fixed-bed modification of a conventional dry-ash, pressurized gasifier located at the Great Plains gasification Association (GPGA) facility in North Dakota was also evaluated. Full-strength METC wastewater was found to be effectively treated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates as high as 19.4 g/kg GAC-day. At this rate, an excess of 50% of the applied COD was converted to methane, and a carbon utilization rate of 10 g GAC per liter of wastewater treated was employed. At these operating conditions, COD removal efficiencies across the treatment system exceeded 95%. Good COD removal and efficient COD conversion to methane were attainable at loading rates exceeding 70 g COD/kg GAC-day. Wastewater generated at the GPGA facility was found to be treatable at full-strength in the expanded-bed GAC anaerobic reactor at COD loading rates as high as 48 g COD/kg GAC-day. COD removal efficiencies at this loading rate exceeded 90%. Coal gasification wastewater was found to resist treatment under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. The thermophilic expanded-bed GAC anaerobic reactor affected very poor conversion efficiencies of phenol, even when fed a synthetically prepared phenol bearing wastewater. 29 refs., 77 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by a hybrid biofilm and activated sludge system (Hybas).

    PubMed

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Ooi, Gordon; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Litty, Klaus; Christensson, Magnus; Kragelund, Caroline; Andersen, Henrik R; Bester, Kai

    2015-10-15

    Hospital wastewater contributes a significant input of pharmaceuticals into municipal wastewater. The combination of suspended activated sludge and biofilm processes, as stand-alone or as hybrid process (hybrid biofilm and activated sludge system (Hybas™)) has been suggested as a possible solution for hospital wastewater treatment. To investigate the potential of such a hybrid system for the removal of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater a pilot plant consisting of a series of one activated sludge reactor, two Hybas™ reactors and one moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) has been established and adapted during 10months of continuous operation. After this adaption phase batch and continuous experiments were performed for the determination of degradation of pharmaceuticals. Removal of organic matter and nitrification mainly occurred in the first reactor. Most pharmaceuticals were removed significantly. The removal of pharmaceuticals (including X-ray contrast media, ?-blockers, analgesics and antibiotics) was fitted to a single first-order kinetics degradation function, giving degradation rate constants from 0 to 1.49h(-1), from 0 to 7.78×10(-1)h(-1), from 0 to 7.86×10(-1)h(-1) and from 0 to 1.07×10(-1)h(-1) for first, second, third and fourth reactors respectively. Generally, the highest removal rate constants were found in the first and third reactors while the lowest were found in the second one. When the removal rate constants were normalized to biomass amount, the last reactor (biofilm only) appeared to have the most effective biomass in respect to removing pharmaceuticals. In the batch experiment, out of 26 compounds, 16 were assessed to degrade more than 20% of the respective pharmaceutical within the Hybas™ train. In the continuous flow experiments, the measured removals were similar to those estimated from the batch experiments, but the concentrations of a few pharmaceuticals appeared to increase during the first treatment step. Such increase could be attributed to de-conjugation or formation from other metabolites. PMID:26057543

  7. Land Application of Treated Sewage Sludge in the United States: Regulatory Considerations for Risk Reduction and Determining Treatment Process Equivalency

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, municipal wastewater includes discharges from households, commercial businesses and various industries. Microorganisms associated with these wastes can be concentrated in the solids (sludge) which are removed during treatment operations. Beneficial reuse a...

  8. Occurrence, Transformation, and Fate of Antibiotics in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tong Zhang; Bing Li

    2011-01-01

    Occurrence, transformation, and fate of antibiotics in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are becoming an emerging environmental research area. As pseudopersistent pollutants, antibiotics belonging to 6 classes (i.e., ?-lactams, sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and others) have been frequently detected in sewage, activated sludge, digested sludge, and effluents. The authors summarized the latest information on occurrence, transformation, and fate of antibiotics

  9. Effect of Organic Loading on Membrane Fouling in Membrane Bioreactor for Berberine Pharmaceutical Wastewater Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guanglei Qiu; Yonghui Song; Peng Yuan; Ping Zeng; Liang Duan; Xiaoyou Feng

    2011-01-01

    In order to specify the effects of organic loading on membrane fouling, the relationships of organic loadings, activated sludge properties and membrane fouling rates were studied based on statistical analysis of the long-term operation data of a lab-scale MBR for berberine pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. Results showed that, the activated sludge properties were directly determined by organic loading rate (OLR) and

  10. Comparison of startup and anaerobic wastewater treatment in UASB, hybrid and baffled reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hut?an; M. Drtil; L. Mrafková; J. Derco; J. Buday

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to compare the performance of selected anaerobic high rate reactors operated simultaneously at 37v°C. The three reactors, namely upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor (UASB), hybrid of UASB reactor and anaerobic filter (anaerobic hybrid reactor - AHR) and anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), were inoculated with the anaerobic digested sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant and

  11. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volodymyr Ivanov; Xiao-Hui Wang; Stephen Tiong-Lee Tay; Joo-Hwa Tay

    2006-01-01

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to

  12. Comparative effectiveness of membrane bioreactors, conventional secondary treatment, and disinfection to remove microorganisms from municipal wastewaters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Log removals of bacterial indicators, coliphage, and enteric viruses were studied in three membrane bioreactor activated-sludge (MBR) and two conventional secondary activated-sludge municipal wastewater treatment plants during three disinfection seasons (May–Oct.). In total, 73 regular samples were ...

  13. Thermophilic biological nitrogen removal in industrial wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Kubare, M; Saroj, D P; Chikamba, C; Schwarz, J; Daims, H; Brdjanovic, D

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification is an integral part of biological nitrogen removal processes and usually the limiting step in wastewater treatment systems. Since nitrification is often considered not feasible at temperatures higher than 40 °C, warm industrial effluents (with operating temperatures higher than 40 °C) need to be cooled down prior to biological treatment, which increases the energy and operating costs of the plants for cooling purposes. This study describes the occurrence of thermophilic biological nitrogen removal activity (nitritation, nitratation, and denitrification) at a temperature as high as 50 °C in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant treating wastewater from an oil refinery. Using a modified two-step nitrification-two-step denitrification mathematical model extended with the incorporation of double Arrhenius equations, the nitrification (nitrititation and nitratation) and denitrification activities were described including the cease in biomass activity at 55 °C. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses revealed that Nitrosomonas halotolerant and obligatehalophilic and Nitrosomonas oligotropha (known ammonia-oxidizing organisms) and Nitrospira sublineage II (nitrite-oxidizing organism (NOB)) were observed using the FISH probes applied in this study. In particular, this is the first time that Nitrospira sublineage II, a moderatedly thermophilic NOB, is observed in an engineered full-scale (industrial) wastewater treatment system at temperatures as high as 50 °C. These observations suggest that thermophilic biological nitrogen removal can be attained in wastewater treatment systems, which may further contribute to the optimization of the biological nitrogen removal processes in wastewater treatment systems that treat warm wastewater streams. PMID:23657583

  14. SLUDGE DEWATERING AND DRYING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guohua Chen; Po Lock Yue; Arun S. Mujumdar

    2002-01-01

    The production of wastewater treatment sludge, the basic characteristics of the sludge and the state of the water in the sludge are described in this paper. The methods for the determination of bound water content are discussed. The literature (including patents) on sludge dewatering and drying is reviewed, including vacuum filters, belt presses, centrifuges, direct dryers, indirect dryers and combined

  15. Removal of phosphorus from wastewater using ferroxysorb sorption media produced from amd sludge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, P.L.; Tucker, T.W.; Kehler, T.; Fletcher, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), whether with lime, limestone, caustic or simple aeration, nearly always results in generation of a metal hydroxide sludge. Disposal of the sludge often constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost for the AMD treatment plant. Research at the USGS - Leetown Science Center has shown that AMD sludge, with its high content of aluminum and iron oxides, has a high affinity of phosphorus (P). Anthropogenic sources of P are associated with eutrophication and degradation of aquatic environments, resulting in anoxic dead zones in certain sensitive waterways. In this paper, we describe a method of converting the AMD sludge from a liability into an asset - Ferroxysorb P removal media - which can be used to remove excess P from wastewater. Three different Ferroxysorb media samples were produced from differing AMD sources and tested for P removal. Adsorption isotherms confirmed that the media had a high sorption capacity for P, as high as 19,000 mg/kg. The technology was demonstrated at an active fish hatchery, where the media remained in service for over three months without stripping or regeneration. Over that period of time, the calculated P removal was 50%, even at a very low influent P concentration of 60 parts per billion. In summary, use of the AMD-derived Ferroxysorb sorption media will reduce AMD treatment costs while at the same time helping to resolve the pressing environmental issue of eutrophication and degradation of sensitive waterways.

  16. Reduction in toxicity of wastewater from three wastewater treatment plants to alga (Scenedesmus obliquus) in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Qing; Zhou, Jiti; Masunaga, Shigeki; Ma, Fang

    2015-09-01

    The toxicity of municipal wastewater to the receiving water bodies is still unknown, due to the lack of regulated toxicity based index for wastewater discharge in China. Our study aims at gaining insight into the acute toxic effects of local municipal wastewater on alga, Scenedesmus obliquus. Four endpoints, i.e. cell density, chlorophyll-A concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and cell membrane integrity, of alga were analyzed to characterize the acute toxicity effects of wastewater from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment techniques: sequencing batch reactor (SBR), Linpor and conventional activated sludge. Influent and effluent from each treatment stage in these three WWTPs were sampled and evaluated for their acute toxicity. Our results showed that all three techniques can completely affect the algal chlorophyll-A synthesis stimulation effects of influent; the algal cell growth stimulation effect was only completely removed by the secondary treatment process in conventional activated sludge technique; toxic effects on cell membrane integrity of two influents from WWTPs with SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques were completely removed; the acute toxicity on SOD activity was partially reduced in SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques while not significantly reduced by Linpor system. As to the disinfection unit, NaClO disinfection enhanced wastewater toxicity dramatically while UV radiation had no remarkable influence on wastewater toxicity. Our results illustrated that SOD activity and chlorophyll-A synthesis were relatively sensitive to municipal wastewater toxicity. Our results would aid to understand the acute toxicity of municipal wastewater, as well as the toxicity removal by currently utilized treatment techniques in China. PMID:25996525

  17. Designing more energy-efficient wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Banerji; J. T. OConnor

    1977-01-01

    The first of a year-long series on water pollution addresses the need to find more energy-efficient ways to treat wastewater. As energy prices increase, engineers will develop treatment facilities that can operate during utility off-peak periods. Costly and energy-intensive secondary biological treatment can be improved by recovering energy from sludges which are thickened either by gravity or flotation. Recent interest

  18. Mass flow of polycyclic musks in two wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Reiner, J L; Berset, J D; Kannan, K

    2007-05-01

    Synthetic musks are found in varying amounts in many consumer products. After use, synthetic musks go down the drain into the sewer system and then reach wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, mass flows of two synthetic polycyclic musks, 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta[gamma]-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN), along with HHCB-lactone (the oxidation product of HHCB) were examined in two WWTPs. Wastewater and sludge samples were collected at various stages of the treatment process for analysis. HHCB, AHTN, and HHCB-lactone were found in all wastewater samples at concentrations in the ranges of 1780 to 12700, 304 to 2590, and 146 to 4000 ng/L, respectively. The highest concentrations for all compounds were found in sludge samples. Sludge samples contained HHCB at 7.23 to 108 mg/kg dry weight, AHTN at 0.809 to 16.8 mg/kg dry weight, and HHCB-lactone at 3.16 to 22.0 mg/kg dry weight. This is the first study to report HHCB-lactone in wastewater and HHCB, HHCB-lactone, and AHTN in sludge in WWTPs from the United States. HHCB and AHTN concentrations decreased during treatment. However, the concentrations of HHCB-lactone increased in water after treatment. Based on the daily flow rates and mean concentrations of the three compounds in effluent, a WWTP representative of those studied here is expected to release 288 g HHCB, 60.4 g AHTN, and 158 g HHCB-lactone/100,000 people/d. Partitioning HHCB, AHTN, and HHCB-lactone to sludge is the major removal mechanism for polycyclic musks in WWTPs. PMID:17354035

  19. Evaluation of reusing alum sludge for the coagulation of industrial wastewater containing mixed anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jangkorn, Siriprapha; Kuhakaew, Sinchai; Theantanoo, Suwapee; Klinla-or, Harit; Sriwiriyarat, Tongchai

    2011-01-01

    A coagulation-flocculation process is typically employed to treat the industrial wastewater generated by the consumer products industry manufacturing detergents, soaps, and others. The expenditure of chemicals including coagulants and chemicals for pH adjustment is costly for treating this wastewater. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing the aluminum sulfate (alum) sludge as a coagulant or as a coagulation aid so that the fresh alum dosage can be minimized or the removal efficiency can be enhanced. The experiments were conducted in a jar-test apparatus simulating the coagulation-flocculation process for simultaneous removals of organic matters, anionic surfactants, suspended solids, and turbidity. At the optimum initial pH value of 10 and the fresh alum concentration of 400 mg/L, the total suspended solids (TSS), total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), total anionic surfactants, and turbidity removal efficiencies were 71.5%, 76.4%, 95.4%, and 98.2%, respectively. The addition of alum sludge as a coagulant alone without any fresh alum addition could significantly remove the turbidity, TCOD, and anionic surfactants. The TSS was left in the supernatants after the settling period, but would subsequently be removed by adding the fresh alum. The TSS, TCOD, and turbidity removal efficiencies were also enhanced when both the alum sludge and the fresh alum were employed. The TCOD removal efficiency over 80% has been accomplished, which has never fulfilled by using the fresh alum alone. It is concluded that the alum sludge could be reused for the treatment of industrial wastewater generated by the consumer products industry. PMID:21793400

  20. Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) as an Advanced Wastewater Treatment Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jelena Radjenovi?; Marin Matoši?; Ivan Mijatovi?; Mira Petrovi?; Damià Barceló

    The development and application of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for full-scale municipal wastewater\\u000a treatment is the most important recent technological advance in terms of biological wastewater treatment.\\u000a The MBR is a suspended growth-activated sludge system that utilizes microporous membranes for solid\\/liquid\\u000a separation instead of secondary clarifiers. It represents a decisive step forward concerning effluent\\u000a quality by delivering a hygienically pure effluent and by exhibiting

  1. Heavy metals, PCDD\\/F and PCB in sewage sludge samples from two wastewater treatment facilities in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Márcia de Souza Pereira; Bertram Kuch

    2005-01-01

    Two sewage sludge samples collected from an urban as well as a rural area in Brazil and one sludge sample originating from the city of Balingen, Baden-Württemberg, South Germany, were investigated in respect to contamination with heavy metals, PCDD\\/F and PCB. The results were compared to PCDD\\/F and indicator-PCB mean values found in the region of Baden-Württemberg. The observed toxicity

  2. Improved performance of air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using microfiltration membranes and multiple sludge inoculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Sun; Yongyou Hu; Zhe Bi; Yunqing Cao

    2009-01-01

    Substantial optimization and cost reduction are required before microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be practically applied. We show here the performance improvement of an air-cathode single-chamber MFC by using a microfiltration membrane (MFM) on the water-facing side of the cathode and using multiple aerobic sludge (AES), anaerobic sludge (ANS), and wetland sediment (WLS) as anodic inoculums. Batch test results show

  3. Biological treatment and nanofiltration of denim textile wastewater for reuse.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Uzal, Nigmet; Yetis, Ulku; Dilek, Filiz B

    2008-05-30

    This study aims at coupling of activated sludge treatment with nanofiltration to improve denim textile wastewater quality to reuse criteria. In the activated sludge reactor, the COD removal efficiency was quite high as it was 91+/-2% and 84+/-4% on the basis of total and soluble feed COD, respectively. The color removal efficiency was 75+/-10%, and around 50-70% of removed color was adsorbed on biomass or precipitated within the reactor. The high conductivity of the wastewater, as high as 8 mS/cm, did not adversely affect system performance. Although biological treatment is quite efficient, the wastewater does not meet the reuse criteria. Hence, further treatment to improve treated water quality was investigated using nanofiltration. Dead-end microfiltration (MF) with 5 microm pore size was applied to remove coarse particles before nanofiltration. The color rejection of nanofiltration was almost complete and permeate color was always lower than 10 Pt-Co. Similarly, quite high rejections were observed for COD (80-100%). Permeate conductivity was between 1.98 and 2.67 mS/cm (65% conductivity rejection). Wastewater fluxes were between 31 and 37 L/m2/h at 5.07 bars corresponding to around 45% flux declines compared to clean water fluxes. In conclusion, for denim textile wastewaters nanofiltration after biological treatment can be applied to meet reuse criteria. PMID:17976906

  4. Polyelectrolytes: Wastewater and sewage treatment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning polyelectrolytes in wastewater and water treatment. Topics include flocculation, coagulation, separation techniques, pollutant identification, water pollution sources, and sludge dehydration. Hospital wastewater processing, methods of synthesizing polyelectrolyte complexes, and performance evaluations of polyelectrolytes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Iron salts dosage for sulfide control in sewers induces chemical phosphorus removal during wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oriol Gutierrez; Donghee Park; Keshab R. Sharma; Zhiguo Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Chemical phosphorus (P) removal during aerobic wastewater treatment induced by iron salt addition in sewer systems for sulfide control is investigated. Aerobic batch tests with activated sludge fed with wastewater containing iron sulfide precipitates showed that iron sulfide was rapidly reoxidised in aerobic conditions, resulting in phosphate precipitation. The amount of P removed was proportional to the amount of iron

  6. Polyelectrolytes: Wastewater and sewage treatment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning polyelectrolytes in wastewater and water treatment. Topics include flocculation, coagulation, separation techniques, pollutant identification, water pollution sources, and sludge dehydration. Hospital wastewater processing, methods of synthesizing polyelectrolyte complexes, and performance evaluations of polyelectrolytes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Aerobic treatment of wastewater: Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus in the presence of humic substances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Kochany

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes results of studies on the removal of ammonia (NH3?N) and phosphorus (T–P) during biological treatment of wastewater in the presence of humic substances (humate). Initial respirometric tests indicated that the investigated system complied with the Haldane model for inhibitory wastes. Addition of humate mitigated the inhibitory effect of the wastewater on the returned activated sludge (RAS), resulting

  8. Phosphorus recovery by struvite crystallization in WWTPs: Influence of the sludge treatment line operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Martí; L. Pastor; A. Bouzas; J. Ferrer; A. Seco

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus recovery by struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) crystallization is one of the most widely recommended technologies for treating sludge digester liquors especially in wastewater treatments plants (WWTP) with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). In this paper, phosphorus recovery by struvite crystallization is assessed using the rejected liquors resulting from four different operational strategies of the sludge treatment line. Phosphorus precipitation and recovery

  9. Treatment of dairy effluents in an aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Schwarzenbeck; J. M. Borges; P. A. Wilderer

    2005-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge can successfully be cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating dairy wastewater. Attention has to be paid to the fact that suspended solids are always present in the effluent of aerobic granular sludge reactors, making a post-treatment step necessary. Sufficient post-treatment can be achieved through a sedimentation process with a hydraulic retention time of 15–30 min.

  10. Removal of carbon and nutrients from domestic wastewater using a low investment, integrated treatment concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunny Aiyuk; Joyce Amoako; Lutgarde Raskin; Adrianus van Haandel; Willy Verstraete

    2004-01-01

    An integrated chemical–physical–biological treatment concept for the low-cost treatment of domestic wastewater is proposed. Domestic wastewater was subjected to a chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT), followed by treatment in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. In addition, a regenerable zeolite was used to remove NH4+, either after CEPT pretreatment or after biological treatment in the UASB reactor. The CEPT

  11. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treatment of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H. Jr.; Earley, J.P.; Shen, Yutao.

    1989-09-01

    The work proposed is a laboratory investigation of the AnSBR (Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactors) for treatment of a synthetic coal conversion wastewater. Two different strategies will be pursued. First, an AnSBR will be operated to simulate the Anaerobic Up-flow Sludge Blanket Reactor in an attempt to develop a readily settleable granular sludge. Second, operating strategies will be sought to optimize treatment, without attempting to develop settleable granular sludge. These systems will require development of more elaborate decanting mechanisms, probably including use of tube settler technology. We will use: (1) screening tests to identify compounds which are amenable to anaerobic degradation; (2) to determine those which are toxic or have an inhibitory effect; and (3) to identify the dilution required to achieve anaerobic degradation of the synthetic waste water; acclimation tests of organisms collected from different sources to the synthetic coal conversion wastewater; and Automatic Laboratory AnSBR studies. A 4-liter reactor will be operated to maintain a settleable granular anaerobic sludge when treating the synthetic coal conversion wastewater. 72 refs., 238 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Use of sanitary sewers as wastewater pre-treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Warith, M.A. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Kennedy, K. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.] [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.; Reitsma, R. [WCT-Delcan Corp., Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)] [WCT-Delcan Corp., Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    As wastewater travels through a sewer system it undergoes changes in composition. The changes in composition may be caused by chemical, physical and/or biological processes. At present engineers do not take into consideration the impacts of these processes on the wastewater quality when designing wastewater treatment systems. However, the impact of these processes on the chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrogen and phosphorus content of the wastewater can be significant. In the case of the biological processes, microorganisms present in the water as it travels through the sewer system are similar to those found in an activated sludge process. Given that the microorganism population and the hydraulic retention time often resembles that of an activated sludge process, it would seem only reasonable to look further into the possibility of using sewers as wastewater treatment systems. Furthermore, the plug flow regime of a sanitary sewer is inherently beneficial in terms of wastewater treatment as it is not subject to short-circuiting. The first part of this paper provides a technical review of the processes which take place in a sewer system and the resulting degradation of some of the more significant substances found in wastewater. The contribution of both the suspended biomass and the attached biomass to the degradation of substrate is also examined. The second part of this paper examines the use of the Toxchem computer model to predict the processes which are taking place in the sewer under a variety of conditions. The goal being to determine the magnitude of the degradation of substrate and dissolved oxygen depletion in a sewer system. In obtaining a better understanding of the processes that are taking place in sewer systems, engineers will be able to more accurately predict the degradation of substrates in sanitary sewer systems. This will result in a reduction in the size of wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs).

  13. Inactivation of poliovirus in wastewater sludge with radiation and thermoradiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1977-01-01

    The effect of sludge on the rate of viral inactivation by radiation and thermoradiation was determined. The virus used for the experiments was the poliovirus type 1 strain CHAT, which was grown in HeLa cells. Radiation, heat, and thermoradiation treatments were carried out in a chamber specifically designed to permit rapid heating and cooling of the samples at the beginning

  14. Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark Michela Mulas , Antonio Carlos structure design the efficiency of a wastewater treatment plant can be improved, minimizing operational WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT Wastewater treatment plant pro

  15. The effect of ozone on tannery wastewater biological treatment at demonstrative scale.

    PubMed

    Di Iaconi, Claudio; Ramadori, Roberto; Lopez, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the results obtained during an investigation aimed at transferring to the demonstrative scale an aerobic granular biomass system (SBBGR--Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor) integrated with ozonation for the efficient treatment of tannery wastewater. The results show that the integrated process was able to achieve high removal efficiencies for COD, TSS, TKN, surfactants and colour with residual concentrations much lower than the current discharge limits. Furthermore, the process was characterised by a very low sludge production (i.e., 0.1 kg dry sludge/m(3) of treated wastewater) with interesting repercussions on treatment costs (about 1 euro per m(3) of wastewater). PMID:19577926

  16. Aerobic domestic waste water treatment in a pilot plant with complete sludge retention by cross-flow filtration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. B. Muller; A. H. Stouthamer; H. W. van Verseveld; D. H. Eikelboom

    1995-01-01

    An aerobic wastewater treatment pilot plant with cross-flow filtration was operated for more than 300 days to examine whether reduced sludge production and stable treatment performance can be achieved when sludge is completely retained. The volumetric loads ranged between 0.9 and 2.0 g COD·1?1·day?1. Technical observations were: the oxygen transfer rate became poor at high sludge concentrations; membrane capacities declined

  17. Occurrence of polycyclic musks in wastewater and receiving water bodies and fate during wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Clara; O. Gans; G. Windhofer; U. Krenn; W. Hartl; K. Braun; S. Scharf; C. Scheffknecht

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of cashmerane (DPMI), celestolide, phantolide, traesolide (ATII), galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) in sewage and surface waters and their fate during wastewater treatment and anaerobic sludge digestion is investigated. AHTN and HHCB are the most important representatives and influent concentrations of 0.41–1.8 and 0.9–13?gL?1 are observed. DPMI is detected in influent and effluent samples but in notably lower

  18. Efficient COD removal and nitrification in an upflow microaerobic sludge blanket reactor for domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shaokui; Cui, Cancan

    2012-03-01

    The treatment performance of an upflow microaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UMSB) for synthetic domestic wastewater was investigated at two dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, 0.3-0.5 and 0.7-0.9 mg l(-1), focusing on nitrification performance. The higher DO level induced complete nitrification of ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)-N), achieving chemical oxygen demand and NH(3)-N removals of 97 and 92%, respectively. There were consistently significantly higher nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and nitrite nitrogen (NO(2)-N) levels in the effluent, with ~66% of newly-produced oxidised nitrogen as NO(2)-N. Despite the high nitrification efficiency, only about 23% of the removed NH(3)-N amount from the influent was ultimately transformed into oxidised nitrogen due to the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification. Sludge blanket development and granulation occurred simultaneously in the UMSB. PMID:22105554

  19. Biodegradability of detergents and its effects on municipal wastewater activated sludge. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-09-17

    Battelle was contracted by the United States Air Force to conduct a laboratory study to examine the potential impacts, as well as the fate, of 20 detergents on the wastewater treatment plant in Heath, Ohio. The 20 detergents selected for this study were being considered for use by the Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center located at Newark Air Force Base in Newark, Ohio, as substitutes for various types of solvents. The study was conducted in three phases. The first phase evaluated the inhibition potential of the detergents based on the concentration-dependent changes in the respiration of activated sludge cultures. The second phase examined the potential fate of the detergents by monitoring their biodegradation. The final phase was conducted to determine how two types of washwater might impact the wastewater treatment plant in Heath, Ohio, the plant that receives Newark Air Force Base`s wastewater. All experiments were conducted using cultures obtained from the Heath plant. In order to be able to monitor the effects of the detergents, the experiments were conducted at detergent concentrations much higher than the Heath plant would experience. The results from the first phase of the study indicated that the detergents were inhibitory to the activated sludge cultures. The concentrations at which the detergents inhibited the cultures were much higher than would be seen at the Heath plant even under a `worst case` scenario. Based on the potentials for discharge of these washwaters from Newark Air Force Base, it was concluded that there would be no significant impact on the respiration of the activated sludge organisms at the Heath plant.

  20. Fate of diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant - a review.

    PubMed

    Vieno, Niina; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-08-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a common anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical that is often detected in waste wasters, effluents and surface waters. Recently, DCF was included in the watch list of substances in EU that requires its environmental monitoring in the member states. DCF is also known to harmfully affect several environmental species already at concentrations of ? 1 ?g/l. This review focuses on the occurrence and fate of DCF in conventional wastewater treatment processes. Research done in this area was gathered and analyzed in order to find out the possibilities to enhance DCF elimination during biological wastewater treatment. More precisely, human metabolism, concentrations in wastewater influents and effluents, elimination rates in the treatment train, roles of sorption and biotransformation mechanisms during the treatment as well as formation of transformation products are reported. Additionally, the effect of process configuration, i.e. conventional activated sludge (CAS), biological nutrient removal (BNR), membrane bioreactor (MBR) and attached-growth bioreactor, and process parameters, i.e. solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) are presented. Generally, DCF is poorly biodegradable which often translates into low elimination rates during biological wastewater treatment. Only a minor portion is sorbed to sludge. MBR and attached-growth bioreactors may result in higher elimination of DCF over CAS or BNR. Long SRTs (>150 d) favor the DCF elimination due to sludge adaptation. Longer HRTs (>2-3d) could significantly increase the elimination of DCF during biological wastewater treatment. Bioaugmentation could be used to enhance DCF elimination, however, this requires more research on microbial communities that are able to degrade DCF. Also, further research is needed to gain more information about the deconjugation processes and biotic and abiotic transformation and the nature of transformation products. PMID:24791707

  1. Wastewater Treatment: The Natural Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc. is widely acclaimed for innovative work in natural water purification which involves use of aquatic plants to remove pollutants from wastewater at a relatively low-cost. Haughton, Louisiana, visited Wolverton's artificial marsh test site and decided to use this method of wastewater treatment. They built an 11 acre sewage lagoon with a 70 by 900 foot artificial marsh called a vascular aquatic plant microbial filter cell. In the cell, microorganisms and rooted aquatic plants combine to absorb and digest wastewater pollutants, thereby converting sewage to relatively clean water. Raw waste water, after a period in the sewage lagoon, flows over a rock bed populated by microbes that digest nutrients and minerals from the sewage thus partially cleaning it. Additional treatment is provided by the aquatic plants growing in the rock bed, which absorb more of the pollutants and help deodorize the sewage.

  2. Fate of silica nanoparticles in simulated primary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Jarvie, Helen P; Al-Obaidi, Hisham; King, Stephen M; Bowes, Michael J; Lawrence, M Jayne; Drake, Alex F; Green, Mark A; Dobson, Peter J

    2009-11-15

    Through novel application of small-angle neutron scattering, we examined the fate of silica nanoparticles (SiO(2)NPs) during simulated primary wastewater treatment, by measuring, in real time, the colloidal behavior of SiO(2)NPs in wastewater (sewage). We examined the effects of surface functionality on SiO(2)NP fate in wastewater, by comparing both unfunctionalized (uncoated or "bare") SiO(2)NPs and SiO(2)NPs functionalized with a thin coating of a nonionic surfactant (Tween 20), which is widely used in personal care and household product formulations containing engineered oxide nanoparticles. Our results show new evidence that the surface functionality of SiO(2)NPs plays a crucial role in their flocculation and sedimentation behavior in wastewater, and thus the likely efficacy of their removal from the effluent stream during primary wastewater treatment. Uncoated SiO(2)NPs did not flocculate in wastewater over typical residence times for primary treatment. Conversely, surface-functionalized (Tween-coated) SiO(2)NPs underwent rapid flocculation in wastewater. Our results show that the surface-functionalized SiO(2)NPs are likely to be removed by sedimentation to sewage sludge (typically recycled to land), whereas uncoated SiO(2)NPs will continue through the effluent stream. While nanoparticle design is driven by use purpose, this study shows new potential for exploiting surface functionalization of nanoparticles to modify their environmental pathways. PMID:20028062

  3. Recycle of Alum recovered from water treatment sludge in chemically enhanced primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Yan, Z C; Wang, Y C; Wang, N

    2009-01-30

    An investigation was made to study the feasibility of recovering the Alum from coagulation sludges and reusing it in chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) process to make the CEPT more cost-effective and recover the resource (Alum) efficiently. The optimum condition and efficiency of the acidification method for Alum recovery from coagulation sludge were investigated in the test. The results show that when the recovery rate of Alum reaches its highest level, 84.5%, the reduction rate of sludge is 35.5%. It turns out that the capability of recovered coagulant to remove turbidity, UV(254) and COD are 96%, 46% and 53%, respectively. The results prove that the recovered coagulants could be used in CEPT and the efficiency of recovered coagulant to remove pollutants is similar to that of fresh coagulant. Although some substances will be enriched during recycle, they have little effect on the quality of treated wastewater. The experiments verify that it would be an advisable and cost-effective way to recover Alum from coagulation sludges in water treatment and chemical wastewater treatment, and it could be then recycled to CEPT as well as reduce sludge volume. PMID:18486332

  4. STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Bernard, Olivier

    CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

  5. Sludge quality after 10-20 years of treatment in reed bed systems.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Steen; Bruun, Esben Wilson

    2014-11-26

    The effect on the environment of the operation of sludge treatment in reed beds (STRB) system is seen as quite limited compared to traditional sludge treatment systems such as mechanical dewatering, drying and incineration with their accompanying use of chemicals and energy consumption. There are several STRB systems in Denmark receiving sludge from urban wastewater treatment plants. Stabilization and mineralization of the sludge in the STRB systems occur during a period between 10 and 20 years, where after the basins are emptied and the sludge residue typically is spread on agricultural land. In the present study, the sludge residue quality after treatment periods of 10-20 years from four Danish STRBs is presented. After reduction, dewatering and mineralization of the feed sludge (dry solid content of 0.5-3 %) in the STRB systems, the sludge residue achieved up to 26 % dry solid, depending on the sludge quality and dimensioning of the STRB system. The concentration of heavy metals and hazardous organic compounds in the sludge residue that are listed in the Danish and EU legislation for farmland application of sludge was below the limit values. The nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations as an average in the sludge residue were 28 and 36 g/kg dry solid (DS), respectively. In addition, mineralization on average across the four STRB systems removed up to 27 % of the organic solids in the sludge. The investigation showed that the sludge residue qualities of the four STRBs after a full treatment period all complied with the Danish and European Union legal limits for agricultural land disposal. PMID:25422113

  6. The nitrite-oxidizing community in activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant determined by fatty acid methyl ester-stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Myriam; Zumbrägel, Sabine; Bakker, Evert; Spieck, Eva; Eggers, Till; Lipski, André

    2013-10-01

    Metabolically-active autotrophic nitrite oxidizers from activated sludge were labeled with (13)C-bicarbonate under exposure to different temperatures and nitrite concentrations. The labeled samples were characterized by FAME-SIP (fatty acid methyl ester-stable isotope probing). The compound cis-11-palmitoleic acid, which is the major lipid of the most abundant nitrite oxidizer in activated sludge, Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii, showed (13)C-incorporation in all samples exposed to 3 mM nitrite. Subsequently, the lipid cis-7-palmitoleic acid was labeled, and it indicated the activity of a nitrite oxidizer that was different from the known Nitrospira taxa in activated sludge. The highest incorporation of cis-7-palmitoleic acid label was found after incubation with a nitrite concentration of 0.3 mM at 17 and 22°C. While activity of Nitrobacter populations could not be detected by the FAME-SIP approach, an unknown nitrite oxidizer with the major lipid cis-9 isomer of palmitoleic acid exhibited (13)C-incorporation at 28°C with 30 mM nitrite. These results indicated flexibility of nitrite-oxidizing guilds in a complex community responding to different conditions. Labeled lipids so far not described for activated sludge-associated nitrifiers indicated the presence of unknown nitrite oxidizers in this habitat. The FAME-SIP-based information can be used to define appropriate conditions for the enrichment of nitrite-oxidizing guilds from complex samples. PMID:23921154

  7. Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge

    E-print Network

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater., Edil, T. B., and Fox, P. J., "Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge", Geotechnics of High wastewater sludge. Small and large-scale laboratory consolidation tests were conducted and field observations

  8. Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) demands extensive sludge dewatering, and dewatering performance were made over time. · Certain extraction techniques have been shown to release EPS

  9. EMISSIONS OF METALS, CHROMIUM AND NICKEL SPECIES, AND ORGANICS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to provide data to support regulations on municipal wastewater sludge incineration, emissions of metals, hexavalent chromium, nickel subsulfide, polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and furans (PCDD/PCDFs), semivolatile and volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide (CO)...

  10. Land Application of Wastewater Sludges: A National Science Foundation Student-Originated Studies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Timothy J.; Barnard, Walther M.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes a student-originated studies project, funded by the National Science Foundation, on land application of wastewater sludges. Describes the students' proposal, research methods, and evaluation of the project. (DS)

  11. WINERY WASTEWATER CHARACTERISTICS AND TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been prepared to fulfill a Research, Development and Demonstration Grant. The grant was awarded to investigate a method of treatment for winery wastewaters. In brief - the grapes are harvested in the fall and are immediately pressed of their juice. The juice is fe...

  12. Green Systems for Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Plants found in marshlands and wetlands in many parts of the world may play an increasing part in a very new, yet very old approach to treatment of water and wastewater--the application of biological methods. Biological water pollution control methods being utilized around the world are examined. (BT)

  13. Imprinted Polymers in Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Christopher; Goodrich, Scott; Gartner, Isabelle; Mueller, Anja

    2004-03-31

    In wastewater treatment, a method that specifically recognizes a variety of impurities in a flexible manner would be useful for treatment facilities with varying needs. Current purification techniques (i.e. bacteria, oxidation, reduction, precipitation and filtration) are nonspecific and difficult to control in complex mixtures. Heavy metal removal is particularly important in improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment, as they inhibit or even destroy the bacteria used for filtration. Imprinting polymerization is a technique that allows for the efficient removal of specific compounds and has been used in purification of enantiomers. It has potential to be applied in wastewater systems with the impurities acting as the template for the imprinting polymerization. The polymer with the bound impurities intact can then be removed via precipitation. After removal of the impurity the polymer can be reused. Data for the imprinting polymerization of polyacrylates and polyacrylamides for several metal complexes will be presented. Imprinting polymerization in combination with emulsion polymerization to improve the removal of hydrophobic contaminants will be described. Removal efficiencies will be presented and compared with conventional wastewater treatment methods.

  14. Wastewater Treatment I. Student's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Water Pollution Control Association, Sacramento. Joint Education Committee.

    This student's guide is designed to provide students with the job skills necessary for the safe and effective operation and maintenance of wastewater treatment plants. It consists of three sections. Section 1 consists of an introductory note outlining course objectives and the format of the guide. A course outline constitutes the second section.…

  15. Polyelectrolyte-modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration membranes for wastewater treatment applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jozef Kochan; Thomas Wintgens; John Erik Wong; Thomas Melin

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the use of the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique to modify the surface of polyethersulfone hollow fi bre (HF) ultrafi ltration membranes for wastewater treatment. The polyelectrolytes employed are poly (ethylenimine), poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly (styrene sulfonate) to obtain up to three layers. Sludge supernatant was used as feed for fi ltrations and the throughput across the

  16. The survival of pathogens in soil treated with wastewater sludge and in potatoes grown in such soil.

    PubMed

    Chale-Matsau, J R B; Snyman, H G

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of pathogens on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) grown in soil amended with a pathogen rich wastewater sludge was investigated. Bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae are important pathogens causing intestinal and systemic illness of humans and other animals. Type B sludge was used. Sludges investigated are the high metal and the low metal sludges. Microorganisms in the sludge-amended soil were using culture-based technique. Salmonella and E. coli were observed in tested soil samples. No microorganisms were isolated from control samples taken throughout the process of the experiment. At harvest time, some of the potato samples from LMS soil were contaminated. These potatoes were subjected to further investigation using molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction) with fD1 and rP2 as primers. Organisms identified from the sequenced potato peel samples with the BLAST search tool included Enterobacter agglomerans (Pantoea agglomerans), several Buttiauxella spp., Pectobacterium spp., Erwinia spp. and a few Pantoea spp. Other than the E. agglomerans, which is commonly found in the gut and upper respiratory tract of humans and in the environment, all the other species identified were found to be mainly either plant or soil pathogens. The E. agglomerans are not primary pathogens but secondary opportunistic pathogens particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These results suggest that growing high risk crops using wastewater sludge contaminated soil may lead to limited infestation of produce with primary pathogens. It appears that the use of HMS due to early pathogen die-off provides less risk of infection than the LMS. However, proper treatment of wastewater sludge to reduce pathogen load is essential prior to its use as soil conditioner. PMID:17087382

  17. Potential non-phytopathogenic filamentous fungi for bioconversion of domestic wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Molla, Abul Hossain; Fakhru'l-Razi, Ahmadun; Hanafi, Mohamed Musa; Abd-Aziz, Suraini; Alam, Md Zahangir

    2002-09-01

    Ten filamentous fungi adapted to domestic wastewater sludge (DWS) were further studied to evaluate their potential in terms of adaptation to higher sludge supplemented growing media and phytopathogenicity (induction of diseases to plants) to three germinating crop (Corn: Zea mays, Mung bean: Phaseolus aureus and Mustard: Brassica napus) seeds. The performances of the fungi in seed germination were evaluated based on percent germination index (GI) and infected/spotted seeds on direct fungal biomass (FBM) and fungal metabolite (FM). Significantly the highest biomass production was achieved with RW-P1 512 and Penicillium corylophilum (WW-P1003) at the highest (25%) sludge supplemented growing media that implied its excellent potentiality of adaptation and multiplication to domestic wastewater sludge. Significantly encouraging results of percent GI and spotted/infected seedlings were observed in FM than FBM by all fungi except the strain Aspergillus niger. A. niger gave the poorest percent of GI (24.30, 26.98 and 00.00%) and the highest percent of infected/spotted seeds (70, 100, and 100%) using FBM for corn, mung bean and mustard, respectively. On the other hand, comparatively the highest percent of GI (107.99, 106.25 and 117.67%) and the lowest percent of spotted/infected seedlings (3.3, 3.3 and 3.3%) were achieved with the isolate RW-P1 512 using FM. In FBM, the superior results of percent GI (86.61, 95.92 and 83.87%) and spotted/infected seedlings (3.3, 63.3 and 43.3%) were obtained by A. versicolor. Several crop seeds were responded differently for different fungal treatments. Hundred percent infected/spotted seeds in FM were recorded only for mustard with Trichoderma family that implied its strong sensitiveness to its metabolites. PMID:12369641

  18. Distribution, partition and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during coking wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanhui; Wei, Chaohai; An, Guanfeng

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we report the performance of a full-scale conventional activated sludge (A-O1-O2) treatment in eliminating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both aqueous and solid phases along with the coking wastewater treatment processes were analyzed for the presence of 18 PAHs. It was found that the target compounds occurred widely in raw coking wastewater, treated effluent and sludge samples. In the coking wastewater treatment system, 4-5 ring PAHs were the dominant compounds, while 4 rings PAHs predominated in the sludge samples. Over 98% of the PAH removal was achieved in the coking wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), with the total concentration of PAHs being 21.3 ± 1.9 ?g L(-1) in the final effluent. During the coking wastewater treatment processes, the association of the lower molecular weight PAH with suspended solids was generally less than 60%, while the association of higher molecular weight PAHs was greater than 90%. High distribution efficiencies (Kdp and Kds) were found, suggesting that adsorption was the potential removal pathway of PAHs. Finally, the mass balances of PAHs in various stages of the coking WWTP were obtained, and the results indicated that adsorption to sludge was the main removal pathway for PAHs in the coking wastewater treatment processes. PMID:25865172

  19. Retrofitting LTV coke plant wastewater treatment system to comply with pretreatment discharge limits

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Chong, G.M. (ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Fittipaldo, J.J. (LTV Steel Co. Inc., Warren, OH (United States). Warren Coke Plant)

    1994-10-01

    Under a constant decree agreement in 1988, LTV Steel Co. installed an activated sludge biological treatment facility at the Warren works to treat coke plant wastewater prior to discharge to the city of Warren publicly owned treatment works. This discharge is required to meet effluent quality limits for phenol and ammonia, and suspended solids are subject to surcharges. the discharge limits imposed by the city of Warren are shown in Table 1. To meet these effluent discharge limits, the original treatment strategy was to process the coke plant wastewater through an ammonia steam stripping still to control ammonia, and process the ammonia-stripped wastewater through the activated sludge biological treatment unit to control phenol. This strategy was unsuccessful because of limitations of the ammonia still, the general composition of the wastewater and the operating conditions of the biological treatment process. This article discusses the upgrading of the biological treatment process operation to meet the required discharge effluent quality.

  20. Reuse of acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual to remove phosphorus from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lan; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Dongtian

    2014-06-01

    Acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual (DWSR) is a waste product from drinking waterworks sludge (DWS) treatment with acid for coagulant recovery. In this study, we evaluated DWSR as a potential phosphorus (P) removing material in wastewater treatment by conducting a series of batch and semi-continuous tests. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, initial concentration, and sludge dose on P removal. Batch test results showed that the P removal efficiency of DWSR was highly dependent on pH. Calcinated DWSR (C-DWSR) performed better in P removal than DWSR due to its higher pH. At an optimum initial pH value of 5-6 and a sludge dose of 10 g/L, the P removal rates of DWSR and DWS decreased from 99% and 93% to 84% and 14%, respectively, and the specific P uptake of DWSR and DWS increased from 0.19 and 0.19 mg P/g to 33.60 and 5.72 mg P/g, respectively, when the initial concentration was increased from 2 to 400 mg/L. The effective minimum sludge doses of DWSR and DWS were 0.5 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, when the P removal rates of 90% were obtained at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L. Results from semi-continuous test indicated that P removal rates over 99% were quickly achieved for both synthetic and actual wastewater (lake water and domestic sewage). These rates could be maintained over a certain time under a certain operational conditions including sludge dose, feed flow, and initial concentration. The physicochemical properties analysis results showed that the contents of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in DWSR were reduced by 50% and 70%, respectively, compared with DWS. The insoluble Al and Fe hydroxide in DWS converted into soluble Al and Fe in DWSR. Metal leaching test results revealed that little soluble Al and Fe remained in effluent when DWSR was used for P removal. We deduced that chemical precipitation might be the major action for P removal by DWSR and that adsorption played only a marginal role.

  1. A simple empirical model for the clarification-thickening process in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y K; Wang, H C; Qi, L; Liu, G H; He, Z J; Fan, H T

    2015-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), activated sludge is thickened in secondary settling tanks and recycled into the biological reactor to maintain enough biomass for wastewater treatment. Accurately estimating the activated sludge concentration in the lower portion of the secondary clarifiers is of great importance for evaluating and controlling the sludge recycled ratio, ensuring smooth and efficient operation of the WWTP. By dividing the overall activated sludge-thickening curve into a hindered zone and a compression zone, an empirical model describing activated sludge thickening in the compression zone was obtained by empirical regression. This empirical model was developed through experiments conducted using sludge from five WWTPs, and validated by the measured data from a sixth WWTP, which fit the model well (R(2) = 0.98, p < 0.001). The model requires application of only one parameter, the sludge volume index (SVI), which is readily incorporated into routine analysis. By combining this model with the conservation of mass equation, an empirical model for compression settling was also developed. Finally, the effects of denitrification and addition of a polymer were also analysed because of their effect on sludge thickening, which can be useful for WWTP operation, e.g., improving wastewater treatment or the proper use of the polymer. PMID:25714635

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Disinfectant storage Pump tank Spray heads Wastewater treatment system Onsite wastewater treatment systems Spray distribution system L-5303 9-08 Figure 1: A spray distribution system with treatment and disinfection devices. S pray distribution... to install of all wastewa- ter distribution systems. However, they require the most wastewater treatment, which increases the cost of a com- plete treatment and final treatment and dispersal system. Spray systems also help conserve Texas? freshwater...

  3. Biological treatment of ammonium-rich wastewater by partial nitritation and subsequent anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in a pilot plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Fux; Marc Boehler; Philipp Huber; Irene Brunner; Hansruedi Siegrist

    2002-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants with anaerobic sludge digestion, 15–20% of the nitrogen load is recirculated to the main stream with the return liquors from dewatering. Separate treatment of this ammonium-rich digester supernatant would significantly reduce the nitrogen load of the activated sludge system. Some years ago, a novel biological process was discovered in which ammonium is converted to nitrogen gas

  4. ENZYME ADDITION TO THE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER PRIMARY SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluates the effects of enzyme augmentation on municipal wastewater (MWW) sludge anaerobic digestion. The primary objective was to examine the impact of using enzymes to enhance the degradation of the cellulosic and the oil- and grease-rich sludge fractions. The additi...

  5. Quantitative Analyses of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    Quantitative Analyses of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes: Identi®ability and Parameter the population dynamics of two main bacterial groups in an anaerobic wastewater treatment process. In addition INTRODUCTION Anaerobic wastewater puri®cation processes have been increasingly used in the last few decades

  6. Orientation to Municipal Wastewater Treatment. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    Introductory-level material on municipal wastewater treatment facilities and processes is presented. Course topics include sources and characteristics of municipal wastewaters; objectives of wastewater treatment; design, operation, and maintenance factors; performance testing; plant staffing; and laboratory considerations. Chapter topics include…

  7. Physical-chemical treatment of tar-sand processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.H.

    1982-07-01

    This final report for Phase I summarizes work done to determine the ability of several coagulants to contribute significantly in the treatment of selected tar sand wastewaters. The coagulation process must be considered as one possible step in a treatment scheme to reduce pollutants in these wastewaters and lead to a water quality acceptable for reuse or disposal. Two wastewaters were provided by the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC). The primary emphasis in this study was focused on a representative steam flooding wastewater designated in the report as TARSAND 1S. The coagulation study in which treatment of this wastewater was the prime goal is described in full detail in the thesis entitled Chemical Coagulation of Steam Flooding Tar Sand Wastewaters. This thesis, written by Mr. Omar Akad, is included as Appendix A in this report. A representative combustion wastewater, designated as TARSAND 2C, was also provided by LETC. This wastewater was characteristically low in suspended solids and after initial screening experiments were conducted, it was concluded that coagulation was relatively ineffective in the treatment of TARSAND 2C. Hence, efforts were concentrated on the parametric evaluation of coagulation of TARSAND 1S. The objectives for the research conducted under Phase I were: (1) to compare the effectiveness of lime, alum, ferric chloride and representative synthetic organic polymers in reducing suspended solids and total organic carbon (TOC) from TARSAND 1S wastewater; (2) to determine the effects of pH, coagulant aids, and mixing conditions on the coagulation process; (3) to determine the relative volume of sludge produced from each selected coagulation process.

  8. Airborne coliphages from wastewater treatment facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Fannin, K F; Spendlove, J C; Cochran, K W; Gannon, J J

    1976-01-01

    The emission (from wastewater treatment plants) of airborne coliphages that form plaques on two strains of Escherichia coli was investigated. Two activated-sludge and two trickling-filter plants were studied. Field sampling procedures used large-volume air samplers with recirculation devices. Coliphages were enumerated by a most-probable-number (MPN) procedure. Temperature, relative humidity, windspeed, and presence of sunlight were monitored. Concurrent samples of sewage were taken during each air-sampling run. Average coliphage levels in the airborne emissions of trickling-filter beds and activated-sludge units were 2.84 X 10(-1) and 3.02 X 10(-1) MPN/m3, respectively, for all positive observations, and sewage liquor concentrations from the sources were 4.48 X 10(5) and 2.94 X 10(6) plaque-forming units/liter, respectively, depending upon the E. coli host used for assay. This work establishes minimal airborne-coliphage concentrations from the plants studied. The procedures employed will be useful in evaluating the animal virus levels in these emissions. PMID:1275492

  9. Treating Sludges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are some of the ways to handle municipal and industrial wastewater treatment sludge presented at the 1978 American Chemical Society meeting. Suggestions include removing toxic materials, recovering metals, and disposing treated sewage sludge onto farm land. Arguments for and against land use are also given. (MA)

  10. Fate of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons in the wastewater from six textile dyeing wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xun-An; Wang, Jing-Yu; Li, Rui-Jing; Wen, Wei-Bin; Chen, Chang-Min; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Zuo-Yi; Liu, Jing-Yong

    2015-10-01

    The occurrence and removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene and isopropylbenzene (BTEXSI) from 6 textile dyeing wastewater treatment plants (TDWTPs) were investigated in this study. The practical capacities of the 6 representative plants, which used the activated sludge process, ranged from 1200 to 26000m(3)d(-1). The results indicated that BTEXSI were ubiquitous in the raw textile dyeing wastewater, except for isopropylbenzene, and that toluene and xylenes were predominant in raw wastewaters (RWs). TDWTP-E was selected to study the residual BTEXSI at different stages. The total BTEXSI reduction on the aerobic process of TDWTP-E accounted for 82.2% of the entire process. The total BTEXSI concentrations from the final effluents (FEs) were observed to be below 1?gL(-1), except for TDWTP-F (2.12?gL(-1)). Volatilization and biodegradation rather than sludge sorption contributed significantly to BTEXSI removal in the treatment system. BTEXSI were not found to be the main contaminants in textile dyeing wastewater. PMID:25930124

  11. TOXICITY REDUCTION AT MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment plants receiving wastewaters from domestic/commercial sources and receiving wastewater from domestic/commercial plus industrial sources were evaluated to assess toxicity reduction and determine the importance of source. Seven-day renewal fathead minnow survival and grow...

  12. Diversity and enrichment of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria from wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Luesken, Francisca A; van Alen, Theo A; van der Biezen, Erwin; Frijters, Carla; Toonen, Ger; Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L G; Zeeman, Grietje; Temmink, Hardy; Strous, Marc; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M

    2011-11-01

    Recently discovered microorganisms affiliated to the bacterial phylum NC10, named "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera", perform nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. These microorganisms could be important players in a novel way of anaerobic wastewater treatment where ammonium and residual dissolved methane might be removed at the expense of nitrate or nitrite. To find suitable inocula for reactor startup, ten selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in The Netherlands were screened for the endogenous presence of M. oxyfera using molecular diagnostic methods. We could identify NC10 bacteria with 98% similarity to M. oxyfera in nine out of ten WWTPs tested. Sludge from one selected WWTP was used to start a new enrichment culture of NC10 bacteria. This enrichment was monitored using specific pmoA primers and M. oxyfera cells were visualized with fluorescence oligonucleotide probes. After 112 days, the enrichment consumed up to 0.4 mM NO(2)(-) per day. The results of this study show that appropriate sources of biomass, enrichment strategies, and diagnostic tools existed to start and monitor pilot scale tests for the implementation of nitrite-dependent methane oxidation in wastewater treatment at ambient temperature. PMID:21667086

  13. Wastewater treatment with biomass carriers made from steelmaking by-product

    SciTech Connect

    Aritome, Kiyoshi; Miki, Osamu; Okuno, Yoshio [Nippon Steel Corp., Chiba (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It is economical to use microorganisms in wastewater treatment. In steelmaking, ammonia liquor from coke-oven plant, for example, is treated using microorganisms. To treat wastewater efficiently in biological processes, the following conditions are necessary: appropriate conditions for activities of microorganisms; proper concentration of microorganisms in reactor; effective contact of wastewater and microorganisms; and reliable separation of treated wastewater and microorganisms. Three types of biomass carriers made from granulated slag to satisfy these conditions have been developed. Research efforts have been under way to apply these carriers in reduction of COD (chemical oxygen demand) in wastewater. Developed biomass carriers can reduce the volume of COD oxidation reactor and promise easy operation compared with the conventional activated sludge processes. This result has been substantialized in sewage treatment facilities, factory wastewater treatment facilities and deodorization facilities. For the future, nitrate reduction in stainless pickling wastewater with fixed-bed biomass carriers will be also investigated.

  14. Membrane bio-reactor for textile wastewater treatment plant upgrading.

    PubMed

    Lubello, C; Gori, R

    2005-01-01

    Textile industries carry out several fiber treatments using variable quantities of water, from five to forty times the fiber weight, and consequently generate large volumes of wastewater to be disposed of. Membrane Bio-reactors (MBRs) combine membrane technology with biological reactors for the treatment of wastewater: micro or ultrafiltration membranes are used for solid-liquid separation replacing the secondary settling of the traditional activated sludge system. This paper deals with the possibility of realizing a new section of one existing WWTP (activated sludge + clariflocculation + ozonation) for the treatment of treating textile wastewater to be recycled, equipped with an MBR (76 l/s as design capacity) and running in parallel with the existing one. During a 4-month experimental period, a pilot-scale MBR proved to be very effective for wastewater reclamation. On average, removal efficiency of the pilot plant (93% for COD, and over 99% for total suspended solids) was higher than the WWTP ones. Color was removed as in the WWTP. Anionic surfactants removal of pilot plant was lower than that of the WWTP (90.5 and 93.2% respectively), while the BiAS removal was higher in the pilot plant (98.2 vs. 97.1). At the end cost analysis of the proposed upgrade is reported. PMID:16235750

  15. Evaluation of reusing alum sludge for the coagulation of industrial wastewater containing mixed anionic surfactants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siriprapha Jangkorn; Sinchai Kuhakaew; Suwapee Theantanoo; Harit Klinla-or; Tongchai Sriwiriyarat

    2011-01-01

    A coagulation-flocculation process is typically employed to treat the industrial wastewater generated by the consumer products industry manufacturing detergents, soaps, and others. The expenditure of chemicals including coagulants and chemicals for pH adjustment is costly for treating this wastewater. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing the aluminum sulfate (alum) sludge as a coagulant or

  16. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  17. Greenhouse gas production: A comparison between aerobic and anaerobic wastewater treatment technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Y. Cakir; M. K. Stenstrom

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment offers improved energy conservation with potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Pitfalls exist in that the methane produced in anaerobic treatment can offset any reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, if it is released to the environment. This paper analyzes greenhouse gas emissions from both aerobic and anaerobic treatment systems, including sludge digestion and the losses of dissolved

  18. Treatment of UCG condensate by gas stripping, solvent extraction, activated carbon, and sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Humenick, M.J.; Shellenbarger, K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the continued study of the treatment of UCG condensate by various processing schemes. The purpose of this work was to obtain design data for use in providing an optimal rather than a universal treatment scheme for UCG wastewater condensate. In the past, several treatment schemes have been studied and design data collected and published. This work presents new options for consideration and evaluation. The laboratory experimental project studied the following options: treatment of UCG condensate by (a) solvent extraction (Methyl isobutyl ketone, MIBK), ammonia stripping, and activated sludge; (b) solvent extraction by MIBK, ammonia stripping, and activated sludge with supplemental powdered activated carbon addition to the activated sludge unit; (c) ammonia stripping and dilution of the stripped UCG condensate with contaminated pattern water before treatment of the mixture with activated sludge. Performance and kinetic information is provided for each option, along with a determination of relative toxicity of feeds and effluents for options (a) and (b).

  19. Radionuclides in wastewater treatment plants: monitoring of Sicilian plants.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, Alida; Rizzo, Salvatore; Sansone Santamaria, Antonio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2015-01-01

    Three Sicilian wastewater treatment plants were monitored to assess the occurrence and the behaviour of radionuclides. Two sampling campaigns (screening and long-term) were carried out during which liquid and solid samples have been analysed. It was found that (131)I mostly occurred in the samples analysed during the screening campaign (43% of the analysed samples contained (131)I). High (131)I specific activity was found in the mixed liquor, recycled sludge and dehydrated sludge samples. This finding was mainly due to the tendency of (131)I to be associated with solid particles. During the long-term sampling campaign an influence of the sludge retention time (SRT) on the (131)I behaviour was found. Increasing the SRT and consequently decreasing the fraction of active organic biomass inside the system, the specific activity of (131)I decreases. PMID:25633949

  20. Ferric coagulant recovered from coagulation sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Yan, Z C; Wang, N; Li, G B

    2009-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of ferric coagulant recovery from chemical sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) to make the process more cost-effective, as well as reduce sludge volume. The optimum conditions and efficiency of the acidification for ferric coagulant recovery from coagulation sludge were investigated. Experimental results showed that the recovered coagulants can be used in CEPT and the pollutants removal efficiency is similar to that of fresh coagulant, and for some aspects the effect of recovered coagulants is better than that of fresh ones, such as turbidity removal. Although some substances will be enriched during recycle, they have little effect on treated wastewater quality. Acidification condition also had significant influence on reduction of sludge volume. The efficiency of coagulant recovery had a linear relationship with sludge reduction. Experiments verify that it would be a sustainable and cost-effective way to recover ferric coagulant from coagulation sludge in water treatment and chemical wastewater treatment, and then recycle it to CEPT, as well as reduce sludge volume. PMID:19587418

  1. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Activated sludge is a potential source for production of biodegradable plastics from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khardenavis, A; Guha, P K; Kumar, M S; Mudliar, S N; Chakrabarti, T

    2005-05-01

    Increased utilization of synthetic plastics caused severe environmental pollution due to their non-biodegradable nature. In the search for environmentally friendly materials to substitute for conventional plastics, different biodegradable plastics have been developed by microbial fermentations. However, limitations of these materials still exist due to high cost. This study aims at minimization of cost for the production of biodegradable plastics P(3HB) and minimization of environmental pollution. The waste biological sludge generated at wastewater treatment plants is used for the production of P(3HB) and wastewater is used as carbon source. Activated sludge was induced by controlling the carbon: nitrogen ratio to accumulate storage polymer. Initially polymer accumulation was studied by using different carbon and nitrogen sources. Maximum accumulation of polymer was observed with carbon source acetic acid and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAHP) as nitrogen source. Further studies were carried out to optimize the carbon: nitrogen ratios using acetic acid and DAHP. A maximum of 65.84% (w/w) P(3HB) production was obtained at C/N ratio of 50 within 96 hours of incubation. PMID:15974272

  3. Rapid detection of multiple class pharmaceuticals in both municipal wastewater and sludge with ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangjuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Ben, Weiwei; Zhu, Bing; Liu, Junxin

    2014-09-01

    This work described the development, optimization and validation of an analytical method for rapid detection of multiple-class pharmaceuticals in both municipal wastewater and sludge samples based on ultrasonic solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction, and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantification. The results indicated that the developed method could effectively extract all the target pharmaceuticals (25) in a single process and analyze them within 24min. The recoveries of the target pharmaceuticals were in the range of 69%-131% for wastewater and 54%-130% for sludge at different spiked concentration levels. The method quantification limits in wastewater and sludge ranged from 0.02 to 0.73ng/L and from 0.02 to 1.00?g/kg, respectively. Subsequently, this method was validated and applied for residual pharmaceutical analysis in a wastewater treatment plant located in Beijing, China. All the target pharmaceuticals were detected in the influent samples with concentrations varying from 0.09ng/L (tiamulin) to 15.24?g/L (caffeine); meanwhile, up to 23 pharmaceuticals were detected in sludge samples with concentrations varying from 60ng/kg (sulfamethizole) to 8.55mg/kg (ofloxacin). The developed method demonstrated its selectivity, sensitivity, and reliability for detecting multiple-class pharmaceuticals in complex matrices such as municipal wastewater and sludge. PMID:25193847

  4. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Activated-sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Shoreline erosion control structure: Application of wastewater sludge ash

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, A.; Khanbilvardi, R.M.

    1998-07-01

    Disposal of sludge from sewage treatment plant presents a rapidly growing problem in metropolitan areas in the US. Approximately 1,000 dry tons of sludge per day is disposed of in New York State alone. Incineration of sludge is a common practice to reduce its volume, however the final ash remaining for disposal after the burning process is considerably high. This paper details the outcome of the laboratory and field studies those were conducted to evaluate the suitability of incinerator ash as an aggregate for use in shoreline erosion control structure. The field study was done for twelve months. In the field study 108 ash mixed blocks were compared with 108 non-ash blocks. Every month 9 ash blocks and 9 non-ash blocks were taken out from the bay for chemical and physical tests. The results show that the ash blocks behaved just like the non-ash blocks. No adverse environmental impacts were observed. So, ash can be used in making blocks, which can be used, for shoreline erosion structures.

  8. A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    94/0169 A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE study; reeds; sludge dewatering; sludge drying beds; small wastewater treatment plants. INTRODUCTION). It was of interest to confirm this aptitude for dewatering sludge from extended aeration plants, a medium

  9. Efficacy of activated sludge\\/powdered activated carbon for removal of organic constituents in wastewater from commercial-scale, high-Btu coal gasification plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Harrison; D. L. Ford

    1980-01-01

    Bench-scale, activated-sludge (AS) treatability studies indicate that approximately 98 percent of total organic constituents can be removed from wastewater generated by HYGAS and slagging-type, high-Btu coal gasification pilot plants. This suggests that the most important unit of a wastewater treatment system for organics removal in commercial-scale versions of such plants will be the AS unit, augmented by powdered activated carbon

  10. Thermophilic aerobic wastewater treatment, process performance, biomass characteristics, and effluent quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Suvilampi; J. Rintala

    2003-01-01

    Thermophilic aerobic wastewater treatment is reviewed. Thermophilic processes have been studied in laboratory and pilot-scale\\u000a while full-scale applications are rare. The paper focuses on the microbiology of aerobic thermophiles, performance of the\\u000a aerobic wastewater treatments, sludge yield, and alternatives to enhance performance of thethermophilic process. Thermophilic\\u000a processes have been shown to operate under markedly high loading rates (30–180 kg COD

  11. Microorganisms in bioaerosol emissions from wastewater treatment plants during summer at a Mediterranean site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Styliani Karra; Eleftheria Katsivela

    2007-01-01

    Measurements were conducted at a Mediterranean site (latitude 35° 31? north and longitude 24° 03? east) during summer, to study the concentration of microorganisms emitted from a wastewater treatment plant under intensive solar radiation (520–840W\\/m2) and at elevated air temperatures (25–31°C). Air samples were taken with the Air Sampler MAS 100 (Merck) at each stage of an activated-sludge wastewater treatment

  12. HANFORD K BASINS SLUDGE RETREIVAL & TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    VASQUEZ, D.A.

    2005-07-05

    This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the US and the UK to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, thus removing the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout encapsulation processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. The grout process to produce the final waste form is backed by BNG America's 20 years experience of grouting radioactive waste at Sellafield and elsewhere. The use of transportable and re-usable equipment is emphasized and its role noted in avoiding new plant build that itself will require cleanup. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup worldwide.

  13. Genotoxicity of sludges, wastewater and effluents from three different industries.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthi, K; Saravana Devi, S; Hengstler, J G; Hermes, Matthias; Kumar, Koel; Dutta, Dipanwita; Muhil Vannan, S; Subin, T S; Yadav, R R; Chakrabarti, T

    2008-12-01

    Many surface waters in Europe, Asia and South America have been reported to be contaminated with genotoxic substances. Therefore, it is important to establish strategies for identification of the most critical sources. In this study, we used a battery of four genotoxicity assays namely chromosomal aberration, DNA strand break, DNA laddering and P53 accumulation tests in mononuclear blood cells. Before cleaning of wastewater high levels of genotoxic contamination could be observed. For instance, we observed an increase in chromosomal aberrations from 2.6 +/- 1.1 (aberrant cells in %; control), to 33.6 +/- 6.6 in a petrochemical plant, 29.4 +/- 3.3 in a petroleum refinery and 14.4 +/- 1.8 in a coke plant of steel industry. A good correlation between the four assays was found. The most sensitive and reproducible results were obtained with the chromosomal aberration assay. Interestingly, clear differences in the efficiency of wastewater cleaning in three different treatment plants were observed. The first and second treatment plants in petrochemical industry and coke plant of steel industry completely eliminated genotoxicity of the wastewater. However, the third plant in petroleum refinery could achieve a reduction in genotoxicity but significant genotoxic contaminations were still present. In conclusion, our battery of genotoxicity tests allows the identification of critical sources contributing to contamination of surface waters. PMID:19002669

  14. ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL SYSTEMS (1980 EDITION) AND ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS MANUAL (2002 EDITION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) first issued detailed guidance on the design, construction, and operation of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) in 1980. Design Manual: Onsite Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems (USEPA.1980) was the most comprehens...

  15. Evaluation of the fate of perfluoroalkyl compounds in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Sim, Won-Jin; Lee, Eung-Sun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a significant source of perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in natural water. In this study, 10 PFCs were analyzed in influent and effluent wastewater and sludge samples in 15 municipal, 4 livestock and 3 industrial WWTPs in Korea. The observed distribution pattern of PFCs differed between the wastewater and sludge samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was dominant in the sludge samples with a concentration ranging from 3.3 to 54.1 ng/g, whereas perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was dominant in wastewater and ranged from 2.3 to 615 ng/L and 3.4 to 591 ng/L in influent and effluent wastewater, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) results provided an explanation for this variation in PFC distribution patterns in the aqueous and sludge samples. The fates of PFCs in the WWTPs were related with the functional groups. The PFOS concentrations tended to decrease after treatment in most WWTPs, whereas PFOA increased. The different fates of PFOA and PFOS in WWTPs were attributed to the higher organic carbon-normalized distribution coefficient of perfluoroalkylsulfonate (PFASs) than that of the carboxylate analog, indicating the preference of PFASs to partition to sludge. Although industrial WWTPs contained high concentration of PFCs, they are not the main source of PFCs in Korean water environment because of their small release amount. WWTPs located in big cities discharged more PFCs, suggesting household sewage is one of the significant sources of PFCs contamination in the environment. PMID:20417541

  16. Performance evaluation of a full-scale coke oven wastewater treatment plant in an integrated steel plant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Suresh; Vaidya, A N; Shivaraman, N; Bal, A S

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater generated during coke-oven gas cleaning operations in the integrated steel plant contains phenol, cyanide, thiocyanate, and also oil and grease. Although the activated sludge process is widely practiced for biological treatment of coke-oven wastewater, it was observed during the evaluation of performance of full scale coke-oven wastewater treatment plant that oil contamination and poor sludge settleability had resulted in poor maintenance of the activated sludge process. Keeping these aspects in view, treatability studies were conducted and an alternative treatment process is proposed. With these corrective measures the coke-oven wastewater treatment plant will give desired performance. In this paper we present results of the performance evaluation, data on treatability studies and alternative treatment process scheme. PMID:14723281

  17. Sorption and release of organics by primary, anaerobic, and aerobic activated sludge mixed with raw municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Modin, Oskar; Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC) per g volatile suspend solids (VSS) for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215-230 nm were also rapidly removed. PMID:25768429

  18. Sorption and Release of Organics by Primary, Anaerobic, and Aerobic Activated Sludge Mixed with Raw Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Modin, Oskar; Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC) per g volatile suspend solids (VSS) for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215–230 nm were also rapidly removed. PMID:25768429

  19. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Secondary treatment system Pump tank Tablet chlorinator Onsite wastewater treatment systems Tablet chlorination L-5344 9-08 Figure 1: The most common form of disinfection for onsite systems is tablet chlorination. W astewater that is sprayed onto... lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing microorganisms. Wastewater can be disinfected with chlorine, ozone, and ultraviolet light. For onsite wastewater treatment systems, the most common form of disin- fection...

  20. A technical and economic comparison of biofiltration and wet chemical oxidation (scrubbing) for odor control at wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Gao; Tim C. Keener; Lian Zhuang; Kaniz F. Siddiqui

    2001-01-01

    An economic and technical comparison of two odor control systems, a biofilter and a chemical wet scrubber, was conducted over a 1-year time period at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant. The biofilter system was designed to remove hydrogen sulfide gas and other oxidizable sewage odors from four covered gravity sludge thickeners, a gravity sludge thickener effluent channel and an