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1

[Study on the in-situ measurement of atmospheric CH4 and CO by GC-FID method at the Shangdianzi GAW regional station].  

PubMed

In-situ GC-FID system for atmospheric CH4 and CO mixing ratio measurements at the Shangdianzi (SDZ) GAW regional station in Beijing was designed and optimized in 2009 based on a comparable system at the Waliguan GAW global station in Qinhai. Results from this study indicate that the system's precisions for CH4 and CO are higher than 0.03% and 0.45% respectively, which can meet the quality target on background greenhouse gas observations by the World Meteorology Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. The selection method of working standards for this system was established: two working standards (WH for the high concentration and WL for the low concentration) were selected, the concentrations of CH4 and CO in these two standards can cover the ambient mixing ratios of CH4 (2 007.1 x 10(-9) and 1 809.5 x 10(-9)) and CO (405.6 x 10(-9) and 123.8 x 10(-9)), an injection sequence was programmed so that the two standards were analyzed alternatively for every three runs. The measurement accuracies are high, as shown by the standard deviations less than 1.7 x 10(-9) and 1 x 10(-9), for CH4 and CO, respectively. This method has been applied to in-situ measurement of atmospheric CH4 and CO in North China. PMID:22452181

Wang, Wei; Zhou, Ling-Xi; Fang, Shuang-Xi; Zhang, Fang; Yao, Bo; Liu, Li-Xin

2012-01-01

2

Long-term observations of tropospheric ozone: GAW Measurement Guidelines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) coordinates long-term observations of the chemical composition and physical properties of the atmosphere which are relevant for understanding of atmospheric chemistry and climate change. Atmospheric observations of reactive gases (tropospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) coordinated by the GAW Programme complement local and regional scale air quality monitoring efforts. As part of the GAW quality assurance (QA) system detailed measurement guidelines for atmospheric trace species are developed by international expert teams at irregular intervals. The most recent report focuses on continuous in-situ measurements of ozone in the troposphere, performed in particular at continental or island sites with altitudes ranging from sea level to mountain tops. Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) are defined for different applications of the data (e.g. trend analysis and verification of global model forecasts). These DQOs include a thorough discussion of the tolerable level of measurement uncertainty and data completeness. The guidelines present the best practices and practical arrangements adopted by the GAW Programme in order to enable the GAW station network to approach or achieve the defined tropospheric ozone DQOs. The document includes information on the selection of station and measurement locations, required skills and training of staff, recommendations on the measurement technique and the necessary equipment to perform highest quality measurements, rules for conducting the measurements, preparing the data and archiving them, and more. Much emphasis is given to discussions about how to ensure the quality of the data through tracing calibrations back to primary standards, proper calibration and data analysis, etc. In the GAW Programme the QA system is implemented through Central Facilities (Central Calibration Laboratories, World and Regional Calibration Centers and World Data Centers), Scientific Advisory Groups and GAW Training and Education Center. These bodies support primary standards, provide calibration and data archiving facilities, coordinate comparison campaigns, perform stations audit, provide documentation and training of personnel.

Tarasova, Oksana; Galbally, Ian E.; Schultz, Martin G.

2013-04-01

3

The Wmo Global Atmosphere Watch Programme: Global Framework for Atmospheric Composition Observations and Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme is the only existing long-term international global programme providing an international coordinated framework for observations and analysis of the chemical composition of the atmosphere. GAW is a partnership involving contributors from about 80 countries. It includes a coordinated global network of observing stations along with supporting facilities (Central Facilities) and expert groups (Scientific Advisory Groups, SAGs and Expert Teams, ETs). Currently GAW coordinates activities and data from 27 Global Stations and a substantial number of Regional and Contributing Stations. Station information is available through the GAW Station Information System GAWSIS (http://gaw.empa.ch/gawsis/). There are six key groups of variables which are addressed by the GAW Programme, namely: ozone, reactive gases, greenhouse gases, aerosols, UV radiation and precipitation chemistry. GAW works to implement integrated observations unifying measurements from different platforms (ground based in situ and remote, balloons, aircraft and satellite) supported by modeling activities. GAW provides data for ozone assessments, Greenhouse Gas Bulletins, Ozone Bulletins and precipitation chemistry assessments published on a regular basis and for early warnings of changes in the chemical composition and related physical characteristics of the atmosphere. To ensure that observations can be used for global assessments, the GAW Programme has developed a Quality Assurance system. Five types of Central Facilities dedicated to the six groups of measurement variables are operated by WMO Members and form the basis of quality assurance and data archiving for the GAW global monitoring network. They include Central Calibration Laboratories (CCLs) that host primary standards (PS), Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centres (QA/SACs), World Calibration Centers (WCCs), Regional Calibration Centers (RCCs), and World Data Centers (WDCs) with responsibility for archiving and access to GAW data. Education, training, workshops, comparison campaigns, station audits/visits and twinning are also provided to build capacities in atmospheric sciences in Member countries.

Tarasova, O. A.; Jalkanen, L.

2010-12-01

4

Water watch  

SciTech Connect

In this issue of Water Watch, a summary of precipitation, drought, and streamflow conditions during the summer is presented. In addition, short-term streamflow forecasts (through October) for each region are given. For purposes of reporting, the US is divided into six regions. The data presented can be used to observe how weather conditions affected hydro generation in July.

Not Available

1991-10-01

5

Nature Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nature Watch is a series of volunteer environmental monitoring programs coordinated by the Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMANCO), the Canadian Nature Federation, and the University of Guelph. Nature Watch is a growing network that currently includes Frog Watch, Ice Watch, Plant Watch, and Worm Watch. Site visitors can access the home pages of each of the participating programs for details about each program, how to collect and contribute data, and to view data that has already been collected.

6

Mussel watch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contamination of U.S. coastal areas may be decreasing as a result of environmental regulations that have banned or curtailed toxic chemicals, concludes a report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The report, “Recent Trends in Coastal Environmental Quality: Results from the Mussel Watch Project,” presents results of analyzing chemical concentrations found in mussel and oyster tissues collected every year since 1986.These mollusks are collected once a year at more than 240 sites nationwide and analyzed for over 70 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, butyltins, and toxic trace elements such as copper, cadmium, and lead. The report states that from 1986 to 1993 there were many more decreases than increases in chemical concentrations in coastal regions. These decreasing trends were not unexpected; all of the monitored chlorinated hydrocarbons have been banned for use in the United States, and tributyltin has been banned as a biocide on recreational boats.

7

Nature Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nature Watch is a partnership program of the U.S. Forest Service that provides nature viewing opportunities and encourages safe and sound viewing ethics. The Nature Watch program is for people to experience wildlife, fish, and flowers in their natural settings; to promote recreational viewing opportunities, facilitate learning about the environment, and to promote conservation efforts and wise use of natural resources. This site contains information on Nature Watch programs, coloring books, links to environmental science journals, and information on educational curricula.

8

Worm Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Worm Watch is part of NatureWatch (first reported on in the May 31, 2002, NSDL Scout Report for Life Sciences), which is series of programs--administered collaboratively by the Canadian Nature Federation, the University of Guelph, and the Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network--that "encourage schools, community groups, individuals, naturalists, backyard enthusiasts, Scouts and Guides to engage in the monitoring of soil, air, water and other aspects of environmental quality." For students and teachers, the Worm Watch site offers a number of hands-on activities "designed to help participants learn about the role earthworms play in the ecosystem, as well as the care and handling of these organisms." Other site features include an interactive Taxonomic Key for identifying earthworm species, an animated tour of a worm's digestive system, and a Glossary. For Canadian residents, the website provides information about participating in the National Worm Survey. This site is available in both French and English.

9

Identifying rare variants from exome scans: the GAW17 experience  

PubMed Central

Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 (GAW17) provided a platform for evaluating existing statistical genetic methods and for developing novel methods to analyze rare variants that modulate complex traits. In this article, we present an overview of the 1000 Genomes Project exome data and simulated phenotype data that were distributed to GAW17 participants for analyses, the different issues addressed by the participants, and the process of preparation of manuscripts resulting from the discussions during the workshop.

2011-01-01

10

Ozone Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the Ozone Hole Watch web site, where you can check on the latest status of the ozone layer over the South Pole. Satellite instruments monitor the ozone layer, and their data is used to create the images that depict the amount of ozone. The web site also contains links for classroom activities and instructional materials.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

11

Keeping watch.  

PubMed

Early detection of heart attack means that potentially life saving treatment can begin immediately. HealthWatch offers a distant monitoring service via a call centre run by nurses and doctors to offer reassurance or enable early A&E attendance if required. PMID:15835433

Gooding, Lucy

12

Bird Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this group or individual activity, learners are encouraged to watch birds near home or schoolâpossibly where birds are nesting in a tree, pecking in a park, feeding from a feeder, or flying through the sky. The PDF provides drawings of the heads and bills of many kinds of birds, under categories including nectar feeding, mud probing, dip netting, scavenging, and raptorial.

Science, Lawrence H.

2010-01-01

13

Gendercide Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Website from Gendercide Watch is devoted to raising awareness, facilitating research, and disseminating educational resources on gendercide (i.e. gender-selective mass killing). Undoubtedly the most comprehensive and up-to-date Website of its kind, Gendercide Watch features an annotated listing of current gendercide articles and reports in the news, a comprehensive discussion and definition of the phenomenon, as well as detailed case studies of gendercide occurrences in several countries and contexts, including Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kosovo, Colombia, and gendercide elements in the Jewish Holocaust and the Armenian genocide of 1915-1916. Institutional case studies of gendercide elements in the application of penal punishment -- including the death penalty, maternal mortality, and military conscription are also posted. The site emphasizes male gendercide, reflecting the creators's "conviction that men are, indeed, generally the victims of the most severe gender-selective atrocities in such situations." An extensive, annotated list of gendercide and genocide links is given along with news releases from Gendercide Watch about current gendercide issues around the world. Human rights advocates are likely to want to bookmark this site. Gendercide Watch is "a project of the Gender Issues Education Foundation (GIEF), a registered charitable foundation based in Edmonton, Alberta."

14

Metadata for WIS and WIGOS: GAW Profile of ISO19115 and Draft WIGOS Core Metadata Standard  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) is a key WMO priority to underpin all WMO Programs and new initiatives such as the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). The development of the WIGOS Operational Information Resource (WIR) is central to the WIGOS Framework Implementation Plan (WIGOS-IP). The WIR shall provide information on WIGOS and its observing components, as well as requirements of WMO application areas. An important aspect is the description of the observational capabilities by way of structured metadata. The Global Atmosphere Watch is the WMO program addressing the chemical composition and selected physical properties of the atmosphere. Observational data are collected and archived by GAW World Data Centres (WDCs) and related data centres. The Task Team on GAW WDCs (ET-WDC) have developed a profile of the ISO19115 metadata standard that is compliant with the WMO Information System (WIS) specification for the WMO Core Metadata Profile v1.3. This profile is intended to harmonize certain aspects of the documentation of observations as well as the interoperability of the WDCs. The Inter-Commission-Group on WIGOS (ICG-WIGOS) has established the Task Team on WIGOS Metadata (TT-WMD) with representation of all WMO Technical Commissions and the objective to define the WIGOS Core Metadata. The result of this effort is a draft semantic standard comprising of a set of metadata classes that are considered to be of critical importance for the interpretation of observations relevant to WIGOS. The purpose of the presentation is to acquaint the audience with the standard and to solicit informal feed-back from experts in the various disciplines of meteorology and climatology. This feed-back will help ET-WDC and TT-WMD to refine the GAW metadata profile and the draft WIGOS metadata standard, thereby increasing their utility and acceptance.

Klausen, Jörg; Howe, Brian

2014-05-01

15

Monarch watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Monarch Watch is a cooperative network of students, teachers, volunteers and researchers dedicated to the study of the Monarch butterfly. There are extensive educational resources and projects on the site, including tagging the butterflies and monitoring the larvae, as well as the creation of Monarch Waystations by planting milkweeds needed for restoring the species' habitat (schools and non-profits can apply for free milkweed).

Watch, Monarch

16

Congress Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Congress Watch: An Update on Current National Information Infrastructure (NII) Legislation" gives an overview of United States congressional legislation introduced in the past few years concerning the NII. The article features a list of current legislation, including bill name, number, sponsor, date introduced, a brief description, and current status. It is part of the latest issue of the _NSF Network News_, InterNIC Information Services' bimonthly publication.

17

Mountain Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain Watch is a group of ongoing trail-side citizen science programs that track reproductive (flower/fruit development) plant phenology of a small set of alpine and forest plants in the U.S.'s Eastern Appalachian mountains and other northeast areas. The program encourages hikers, families, school groups and conservationists to help scientists make observations along the trails on the timing of plant flower and fruit development for inclusion in a long-term study to understand how shifts in climate trends may impact mountain flora. Resources to help teachers get started are available at the website.

Club, Appalachian M.

18

Tropospheric CH4 signals as observed by NDACC FTIR at globally distributed sites and comparison to GAW surface in-situ measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present lower/middle tropospheric column-averaged CH4 mole fraction time series measured by nine globally distributed ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) remote sensing experiments of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). We show that these data are well representative of the tropospheric regional-scale CH4 signal, largely independent of the local small-scale signals of the boundary layer, and only weakly dependent on upper tropospheric / lower stratospheric (UTLS) CH4 variations. We estimate a typical precision for daily mean values of about 0.5% and a systematic error of about 2.5%. The theoretical assessments are complemented by an extensive empirical study. For this purpose, we use surface in-situ CH4 measurements made within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) network and compare them to the remote sensing data. We briefly discuss different filter methods for removing the local small-scale signals from the surface in-situ datasets in order to obtain the in-situ regional-scale signals. We find good agreement between the filtered in-situ and the remote sensing data. The agreement is consistent for a variety of time scales that is interesting for CH4 source/sink research: day-to-day, monthly, and inter-annual

Schneider, Matthias; Sepúlveda, Eliezer

2014-05-01

19

Monarch Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This educational outreach program aims to further science education, to promote the conservation of monarch butterflies, and to involve students and adults in a cooperative study of the fall migration of monarchs. Monarch Watch is a collaborative network of students, teachers, volunteers and researchers dedicated to the tagging, rearing, and study of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. Other projects include life history studies, flight vector analysis, and butterfly gardening. A K-8 science curriculum, Monarchs in the Classroom (available through the mail), offers lessons congruent with K-8 National Science Education standards. Each spring, a Season Summary is published that contains tag recovery data, tips and ideas for teachers and students, observations on monarch populations, and new information on monarch biology.

20

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

21

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

The long-established notion that apoptosis would be immunologically silent, and hence it would go unnoticed by the immune system, if not tolerogenic, and hence it would actively suppress immune responses, has recently been revisited. In some instances, indeed, cancer cells undergo apoptosis while emitting a spatiotemporally-defined combination of signals that renders them capable of eliciting a long-term protective antitumor immune response. Importantly, only a few anticancer agents can stimulate such an immunogenic cell death. These include cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and oxaliplatin, which are currently approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple hematologic and solid malignancies, as well as mitoxantrone, which is being used in cancer therapy and against multiple sclerosis. In this Trial Watch, we will review and discuss the progress of recent (initiated after January 2008) clinical trials evaluating the off-label use of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and mitoxantrone.

Vacchelli, Erika; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Kroemer, Guido

2012-01-01

22

Mountain Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wanted to turn your hiking skills into helpful information, the Mountain Watch section of the Appalachian Mountain Club website may be of great interest. The site is designed to turn hikers into "citizen scientists" who can "aid in the collection of data that measures the ecological health of our mountains." The site contains four areas (including "Mountain Plants" and "Mountain Weather") where visitors can submit their own recent findings and observations. First-time visitors will need to fill out the volunteer data section, and this takes just a few minutes. After this, visitors will receive a password which will allow them to report on alpine flowers, air quality, and related subjects. Visitors can also read the observations of others, and read up on their "Naturalist Blog".

23

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic.

Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2014-01-01

24

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

Since the advent of hybridoma technology, dating back to 1975, monoclonal antibodies have become an irreplaceable diagnostic and therapeutic tool for a wide array of human diseases. During the last 15 years, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved by FDA for cancer therapy. These mAbs are designed to (1) activate the immune system against tumor cells, (2) inhibit cancer cell-intrinsic signaling pathways, (3) bring toxins in the close proximity of cancer cells, or (4) interfere with the tumor-stroma interaction. More recently, major efforts have been made for the development of immunostimulatory mAbs that either enhance cancer-directed immune responses or limit tumor- (or therapy-) driven immunosuppression. Some of these antibodies, which are thought to facilitate tumor eradication by initiating or sustaining a tumor-specific immune response, have already entered clinical trials. In this Trial Watch, we will review and discuss the clinical progress of the most important mAbs that are have entered clinical trials after January 2008.

Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

2012-01-01

25

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have first been characterized for their capacity to detect conserved microbial components like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA, resulting in the elicitation of potent (innate) immune responses against invading pathogens. More recently, TLRs have also been shown to promote the activation of the cognate immune system against cancer cells. Today, only three TLR agonists are approved by FDA for use in humans: the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and imiquimod. BCG (an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis) is mainly used as a vaccine against tuberculosis, but also for the immunotherapy of in situ bladder carcinoma. MPL (derived from the LPS of Salmonella minnesota) is included in the formulation of Cervarix®, a vaccine against human papillomavirus-16 and -18. Imiquimod (a synthetic imidazoquinoline) is routinely employed for actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma, and external genital warts (condylomata acuminata). In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recently completed clinical trials and discuss the progress of ongoing studies that have evaluated/are evaluating FDA-approved TLR agonists as off-label medications for cancer therapy.

Vacchelli, Erika; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

2012-01-01

26

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) represents a prominent form of immunotherapy against malignant diseases. ACT is conceptually distinct from dendritic cell-based approaches (which de facto constitute cellular vaccines) and allogeneic transplantation (which can be employed for the therapy of hematopoietic tumors) as it involves the isolation of autologous lymphocytes exhibiting antitumor activity, their expansion/activation ex vivo and their reintroduction into the patient. Re-infusion is most often performed in the context of lymphodepleting regimens (to minimize immunosuppression by host cells) and combined with immunostimulatory interventions, such as the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists. Autologous cells that are suitable for ACT protocols can be isolated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or generated by engineering their circulating counterparts for the expression of transgenic tumor-specific T-cell receptors. Importantly, lymphocytes can be genetically modified prior to re-infusion for increasing their persistence in vivo, boosting antitumor responses and minimizing side effects. Moreover, recent data indicate that exhausted antitumor T lymphocytes may be rejuvenated in vitro by exposing them to specific cytokine cocktails, a strategy that might considerably improve the clinical success of ACT. Following up the Trial Watch that we published on this topic in the third issue of OncoImmunology (May 2012), here we summarize the latest developments in ACT-related research, covering both high-impact studies that have been published during the last 13 months and clinical trials that have been initiated in the same period to assess the antineoplastic profile of this form of cellular immunotherapy.

Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

27

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

Oncolytic virotherapy is emerging as a promising approach for the treatment of several neoplasms. The term “oncolytic viruses” is generally employed to indicate naturally occurring or genetically engineered attenuated viral particles that cause the demise of malignant cells while sparing their non-transformed counterparts. From a conceptual standpoint, oncolytic viruses differ from so-called “oncotropic viruses” in that only the former are able to kill cancer cells, even though both display a preferential tropism for malignant tissues. Of note, such a specificity can originate at several different steps of the viral cycle, including the entry of virions (transductional specificity) as well as their intracellular survival and replication (post-transcriptional and transcriptional specificity). During the past two decades, a large array of replication-competent and replication-incompetent oncolytic viruses has been developed and engineered to express gene products that would specifically promote the death of infected (cancer) cells. However, contrarily to long-standing beliefs, the antineoplastic activity of oncolytic viruses is not a mere consequence of the cytopathic effect, i.e., the lethal outcome of an intense, productive viral infection, but rather involves the elicitation of an antitumor immune response. In line with this notion, oncolytic viruses genetically modified to drive the local production of immunostimulatory cytokines exert more robust therapeutic effects than their non-engineered counterparts. Moreover, the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy is significantly improved by some extent of initial immunosuppression (facilitating viral replication and spread) followed by the administration of immunostimulatory molecules (boosting antitumor immune responses). In this Trial Watch, we will discuss the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating the safety and antineoplastic potential of oncolytic virotherapy.

Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

28

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner’s work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer.

Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

29

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

Dendritic cells (DCs) occupy a central position in the immune system, orchestrating a wide repertoire of responses that span from the development of self-tolerance to the elicitation of potent cellular and humoral immunity. Accordingly, DCs are involved in the etiology of conditions as diverse as infectious diseases, allergic and autoimmune disorders, graft rejection and cancer. During the last decade, several methods have been developed to load DCs with tumor-associated antigens, ex vivo or in vivo, in the attempt to use them as therapeutic anticancer vaccines that would elicit clinically relevant immune responses. While this has not always been the case, several clinical studies have demonstrated that DC-based anticancer vaccines are capable of activating tumor-specific immune responses that increase overall survival, at least in a subset of patients. In 2010, this branch of clinical research has culminated with the approval by FDA of a DC-based therapeutic vaccine (sipuleucel-T, Provenge®) for use in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Intense research efforts are currently dedicated to the identification of the immunological features of patients that best respond to DC-based anticancer vaccines. This knowledge may indeed lead to personalized combination strategies that would extend the benefit of DC-based immunotherapy to a larger patient population. In addition, widespread enthusiasm has been generated by the results of the first clinical trials based on in vivo DC targeting, an approach that holds great promises for the future of DC-based immunotherapy. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recently completed clinical trials and discuss the progress of ongoing studies that have evaluated/are evaluating DC-based interventions for cancer therapy.

Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

2012-01-01

30

Study of atmospheric CH4 mole fractions at three WMO/GAW stations in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CH4 mole fractions were continuously measured from 2009 to 2011 at three WMO/GAW stations in China (Lin'an, LAN; Longfengshan, LFS; and Waliguan, WLG) using three Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instruments. LAN and LFS are GAW regional measurement stations. LAN is located in China's most economically developed region, and LFS is in a rice production area (planting area > 40,000 km2). WLG is a global measurement station in remote northwest China. At LAN, high methane mole fractions are observed in all seasons. Surface winds from the northeast enhance CH4 values, with a maximum increase of 32 ± 15 ppb in summer. The peak to peak amplitude of the seasonal cycle is 77 ± 35 ppb. At LFS, the diurnal cycle amplitude is approximately constant throughout the year except summer, when a value of 196 ± 65 ppb is observed. CH4 values at LFS reach their peak in July, which is different from seasonal variations typically observed in the northern hemisphere. CH4 mole fractions at WLG show both the smallest values and the lowest variability. Maximum values occur during summer, which is different from other northern hemisphere WMO/GAW global stations. The seasonal cycle amplitude is 17 ± 11 ppb. The linear growth rates at LAN, LFS, and WLG are 8.0 ± 1.2, 7.9 ± 0.9, and 9.4 ± 0.2 ppb yr-1, respectively, which are all larger than the global mean over the same 3 year period. Results from this study attempt to improve our basic understanding of observed atmospheric CH4 in China.

Fang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Ling-Xi; Masarie, Kenneth A.; Xu, Lin; Rella, Chris W.

2013-05-01

31

YELLOWSTONE RIVER WATCH (YRW)  

EPA Science Inventory

Yellowstone River Watch seeks to expand its monitoring and education efforts throughout the Yellowstone River Basin by actively recruiting and training new teacher members. Yellowstone River Watch also seeks to advance existing school programs by offering quality assurance/quali...

32

Frontline: On Our Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As the situation in Darfur continues to unfold, a number of media outlets have continued to investigate the United Nations involvement in the region. The journalists and researchers at the PBS program Frontline embarked on their own investigation into the subject. Along the way, they explored China's economic interests in the region, the actions of the Security Council, and those of various UN member nations. Visitors to this site can watch the documentary program in its entirety, and they can also read essays on various aspects of Darfur written by activists, historians, and policy experts. Other features on the site include a map of the region, a list of suggested readings and links, and journal entries from the show's producer, Neil Doherty.

33

Tropospheric CH4 signals as observed by NDACC FTIR at globally distributed sites and comparison to GAW surface in-situ measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present lower/middle tropospheric column-averaged CH4 mole fraction time series measured by nine globally distributed ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) remote sensing experiments of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). We show that these data are well representative of the tropospheric regional-scale CH4 signal, largely independent of the local small-scale signals of the boundary layer, and only weakly dependent on upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) CH4 variations. In order to achieve the weak dependency on the UTLS, we use an a posteriori correction method. We estimate a typical precision for daily mean values of about 0.5% and a systematic error of about 2.5%. The theoretical assessments are complemented by an extensive empirical study. For this purpose, we use surface in-situ CH4 measurements made within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) network and compare them to the remote sensing data. We briefly discuss different filter methods for removing the local small-scale signals from the surface in-situ datasets in order to obtain the in-situ regional-scale signals. We find good agreement between the filtered in-situ and the remote sensing data. The agreement is consistent for a variety of time scales that are interesting for CH4 source/sink research: day-to-day, monthly, and inter-annual. The comparison study confirms our theoretical estimations and proves that the NDACC FTIR measurements can provide valuable data for investigating the cycle of CH4.

Sepúlveda, E.; Schneider, M.; Hase, F.; Barthlott, S.; Dubravica, D.; García, O. E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; González, Y.; Guerra, J. C.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Sadeghi, A.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Brailsford, G. W.; Robinson, J.; Meinhardt, F.; Steinbacher, M.; Aalto, T.; Worthy, D.

2014-01-01

34

Neighborhood Environmental Watch Network  

SciTech Connect

The Neighborhood Environmental Watch Network (NEWNET) is a regional network of environmental monitoring stations and a data archival center that supports collaboration between communities, industry, and government agencies to solve environmental problems. The stations provide local displays of measurements for the public and transmit measurements via satellite to a central site for archival and analysis. Station managers are selected from the local community and trained to support the stations. Archived data and analysis tools are available to researchers, educational institutions, industrial collaborators, and the public across the nation through a communications network. Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Environmental Protection Agency have developed a NEWNET pilot program for the Department of Energy. The pilot program supports monitoring stations in Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, and California. Additional stations are being placed in Colorado and New Mexico. Pilot stations take radiological and meteorological measurements. Other measurements are possible by exchanging sensors.

Sanders, L.D.

1993-10-01

35

Global Forest Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Forest Frontiers Initiative (described in the September 30, 1998 Scout Report for Science & Engineering), the World Resources Institute (WRI) has launched Global Forest Watch, an ambitious, international effort to assemble and provide "objective, quality data" on the state of the world's forests. The site's main function is to introduce viewers to the project, calling attention to regional centers (Central Africa, North America, Southeast Asia, South America, and Russia), and providing "comprehensive information on logging, mining, and other development activities within and around frontier forests as, or before, it happens." A brochure (English or French) can be downloaded (.pdf format) in the Resources section, and the Newsroom will serve as a spotlight for recent information.

36

Can Positive Matrix Factorization identify sources of organic trace gases at the continental GAW site Hohenpeissenberg?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From the rural Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) site Hohenpeissenberg in the pre-alpine area of Southern Germany, a dataset of 24 C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons over a period of seven years was analyzed. Receptor modeling was performed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and the resulting factors were compared to literature source profiles. Photochemical aging during transport to the relatively remote site violates the PMF prerequisite of mass conservation from source to receptor. However, previous studies showed plausible results with this method at remote sites; the applicability and restrictions of the PMF model to such a remote dataset and the influence of photochemical processing on the interpretability of the results are discussed. A six factor solution showed a high stability and the most plausible results. In addition to biogenic sources and remote sources of very stable compounds - reflecting the continental background - four additional anthropogenic factors were resolved that could be divided into two short- and two long-lived patterns from evaporative sources and incomplete combustion processes, respectively. A method to increase the uncertainty for each individual compound by including photochemical reactivity did not improve the results, but decreased the stability of the model output. The contribution of the different source categories at the site over the entire period was, in decreasing order: remote sources, long-lived evaporative sources, residential heating and long-lived combustion sources, short-lived evaporative sources, short-lived combustion sources, and biogenic sources. Despite a low overall impact, biogenic sources played an important role during summer, in particular in terms of reactivity.

Leuchner, M.; Gubo, S.; Schunk, C.; Wastl, C.; Kirchner, M.; Menzel, A.; Plass-Dülmer, C.

2014-03-01

37

Watch holder system  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

The present invention relates to a watch holder system, which is worn on the back side of a hand, comprising a casing, an elastic cord, and a buckle. The casing is provided with two holes passing through from the front end to the back end and accommodating the elastic cord. The lower side of the casing is concave to match the surface of the back side of the hand. By the wearing position of the watch holder system, a novel and beautiful effect is created. In use, the watch will not be covered by a long sleeve, thus allowing for unhindered reading of the displayed time.

1998-07-14

38

BrowserWatch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the BrowserWatch site is to keep you current on the newest developments in Web browsers. It contains a news section offering a variety of newsgroup postings about the latest in browsers; the BrowserWatch Browser Listing, with over 60 browsers, platforms supported, and links to their sites; a "Plug-in Plaza", with a list of plug-ins, their availability by platform, what they do, and links to download sites; and statistics on which browsers have visited the BrowserWatch page. http://browserwatch.internet.com/ For more information on browsers, see the Scout Toolkit browser page. webtools/browsers.html

39

The International Halley Watch.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In preparation for the 1985 to 1986 apparition of Halley's Comet, the International Halley Watch (IHW) has initiated a comprehensive program to simulate, encourage, and coordinate scientific observation of the apparition. The observing groups with which t...

1980-01-01

40

Climatology of new particle formation at Izaña mountain GAW observatory in the subtropical North Atlantic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A climatology of new particle formation (NPF) events at high altitude in the subtropical North Atlantic is presented. A 4-year data set (June 2008-June 2012), which includes number size distributions (10-600 nm), reactive gases (SO2, NOx, and O3), several components of solar radiation and meteorological parameters, measured at Izaña Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) observatory (2373 m above sea level; Tenerife, Canary Islands) was analysed. NPF is associated with the transport of gaseous precursors from the boundary layer by orographic buoyant upward flows that perturb the low free troposphere during daytime. On average, 30% of the days contained an NPF event. Mean values of the formation and growth rates during the study period were 0.46 cm-3 s-1 and 0.42 nm h-1, correspondingly. There is a clearly marked NPF season (May-August), when these events account for 50-60% of the days per month. Monthly mean values of the formation and growth rates exhibit higher values in this season, 0.49-0.92 cm-3 s-1 and 0.48-0.58 nm h-1, respectively. During NPF events, SO2, UV radiation and upslope winds showed higher values than during non-events. The overall data set indicates that SO2 plays a key role as precursor, although other species seem to contribute during some periods. Condensation of sulfuric acid vapour accounts for most of the measured particle growth during most of the year (~70%), except for some periods. In May, the highest mean growth rates (~0.6 nm h-1) and the lowest contribution of sulfuric acid (~13%) were measured, suggesting a significant involvement of other condensing vapours. The SO2 availability seems also to be the most influencing parameter in the year-to-year variability in the frequency of NPF events. The condensation sink showed similar features to other mountain sites, showing high values during NPF events. Summertime observations, when Izaña is within the Saharan Air Layer, suggest that dust particles may play a significant role acting as coagulation sink of freshly formed nucleation particles. The contribution of dust particles to the condensation sink of sulfuric acid vapours seems to be modest (~8% as average). Finally, we identified a set of NPF events in which two nucleation modes, which may evolve at different rates, occur simultaneously and for which further investigations are necessary.

García, M. I.; Rodríguez, S.; González, Y.; García, R. D.

2014-04-01

41

Whale-Watching-Web  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This metasite, by Rauno Lauhakangas of the University of Helsinki, Finland, includes a myriad of whale-related topics, some of which are scientific. The research-oriented sections include: Oceanographic Research (a collection of links to research sites, i.e. The Radio Acoustic Positioning and Telemetry Network -- a useful technique for monitoring whale/fish behavior); Cetacean's Rights (a section providing examples of legislation regulating whale-watching in Argentina, New Zealand, and elsewhere); and Bioacoustics (a section of links dedicated to Cetacean Research Technology). Educators will find useful information and compelling photographic images in the Cetacean Encyclopaedia (an introduction to whale species); Cetacean Pictures; and Virtual Whale Watching (a high-tech, state-of-the-art introduction to virtual whale-watching).

42

Country watch: Malawi.  

PubMed

The Drought Network for information sharing eventually led to the establishment of the more formal Southern Region AIDS Network (SORAN) where representatives from government and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) focused on awareness raising, lobbying, and advocacy. As an initial step towards networking on HIV/AIDS issues, a festival was organized in Blantyre on December 4, 1993, by NGOs, private companies, church groups, school children, and volunteers to bring about behavior change. About 2000 people gathered to listen to music, learn about HIV transmission through drama group presentations, watch videos with HIV/STD prevention messages, and learn about proper condom use. The participants officially established SORAN in February 1994 to act as a coordinating body for organizations working in prevention and care for HIV/STD-infected persons and their families. Network activities endeavored: to assist organizations interested in developing HIV/AIDS programs and activities; to encourage the business communities to participate in multisectoral coordination and to help channel funds from them to HIV/AIDS programs; to act as a resource center for information about HIV/AIDS; and to lobby among politicians as well as traditional local and religious leaders. When the first multi-party parliamentary election approached in May 1994, SORAN challenged representatives of 7 political parties and a women's organization to speak out publicly on what they envisioned doing about HIV/AIDS. The Grand Walk was also organized by SORAN members representing the Catholic Episcopal Conference of Malawi, the Protestant Blantyre Synod, a local brewery, and UNICEF. About 500 walkers received support from passersby. 70% were school children 10-18 years old who sang AIDS awareness songs and passed out flyers. Three months later the National AIDS Program's Big Walk for AIDS, following a National AIDS Crisis Conference, signaled the government's public recognition of the need for a multisectoral approach to combatting HIV/AIDS. PMID:12289026

Knox, G

1995-01-01

43

Sweatshop Watch Newsletter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spring 2007 newsletter of Sweatshop Watch includes coverage of garment workers fighting for justice in the global apparel industry, new anti-sweatshop reforms, the California’s Garment Special Account, and the hiring of an independent monitor to Los Angeles’ sweat-free law.

Sweatshop Watch

2007-01-01

44

Wrist-watch dosimeter  

DOEpatents

The disclosure is directed to a wristwatch dosimeter utilizing a CdTe detector, a microprocessor and an audio and/or visual alarm. The dosimeter is entirely housable within a conventional digital watch case having an additional aperture enabling the detector to receive radiation.

Wolf, M.A.; Waechter, D.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

1982-04-16

45

The Monarch Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science education can be an exciting process of observation and discovery. This article describes the use of the Monarch Watch project by environmental educators to study migratory behavior and scientific research through the tagging of Monarch butterflies. Discusses reasons the national project has been successful. (LZ)

Brown, Ken

1994-01-01

46

Moon Watch Flip Book!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners observe the moon each night for a month and draw their observations in a Moon Watch Log. After twenty-nine days of observations, learners put the pages together to create a flip book to see the Moon pass through all its phases in just a few seconds.

History, American M.

2011-08-20

47

Corn blight watch experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The corn blight problem is briefly described how the experiment was organized and conducted, the effect of the blight on the 1971 crop, and some conclusions that may be drawn as a result of the experiment. The information is based on preliminary reports of the Corn Blight Watch Steering Committee and incorporates much illustrative material conceived at Purdue University.

1974-01-01

48

Capitol Watch Daily News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Capitol Watch On Line offers content on what's going on in the nations capital daily. A dozen or more headline stories plus a special interests section and links to the Federal News Service and other government sites. "Live chat with candidates and the leaders of our nation" is promised to be coming in 2 weeks.

1999-01-01

49

Effectiveness of spoilers on the GA(W)-1 airfoil with a high performance Fowler flap  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine effectiveness of spoilers applied to the GA(W)-1 airfoil. Tests of several spoiler configurations show adequate control effectiveness with flap nested. It is found that providing a vent path allowing lower surface air to escape to the upper surface as the spoiler opens alleviates control reversal and hysteresis tendencies. Spoiler cross-sectional shape variations generally have a modest influence on control characteristics. A series of comparative tests of vortex generators applied to the (GA-W)-1 airfoil show that triangular planform vortex generators are superior to square planform vortex generators of the same span.

Wentz, W. H., Jr.

1975-01-01

50

Human Rights Watch World Report 2002  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Human Rights Watch has just released its twelfth annual review of human rights practices around the globe in the 2002 Human Rights Watch World Report. This report addresses developments in sixty-six countries, covering the period from November 2000 through November 2001. Most of the chapters examine significant human rights developments in a particular country, the response of global actors (such as the European Union, Japan, the United States, the United Nations, and various regional organizations), and the freedom of local human rights defenders to conduct their work. Other chapters address important thematic concerns.

2001-01-01

51

ServerWatch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ServerWatch, provided by Mecklermedia, provides information on "web server technology and supporting tools." It contains information on development tools (audio/video, firewalls, and site monitoring, among others), and comprehensive information (including ratings) of the most popular web servers. However, the highlight of the site lies buried under the "And other..." web servers; a comparison chart of over 100 web servers that includes operating systems and price range. Also included are features tables for seven different variables.

52

Colorado River Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colorado River Watch mission is to work with voluntary stewards to monitor water quality and other indicators of watershed health and utilize this high quality data to educate citizens and inform decision makers about the condition of Colorado's waters. This data is also used in the Clean Water Act decision-making process. See their website for a training schedule, with scholarships available for groups.

53

Bumble Bee Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Bumble Bee Watch is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America's bumble bees. This citizen science project allows for individuals to upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection, identify the bumble bees in their photos, have identifications verified by experts, help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees, help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees, learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts, and connect with other citizen scientists.

Watch, Bumble B.

54

CoralWatch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Built on a research project at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, CoralWatch has developed a cheap, simple, non-invasive method for the monitoring of coral bleaching, and assessment of coral health. In the field, users simply use the Coral Health Chart to compare colors of corals with colors on the chart and record matching codes. Students submit their data and can view data from reefs around the world. Virtual components are also available.

55

CoralWatch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Built on a research project at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, CoralWatch has developed a cheap, simple, non-invasive method for the monitoring of coral bleaching, and assessment of coral health. In the field, users simply use the Coral Health Chart to compare colors of corals with colors on the chart and record matching codes. Students submit their data and can view data from reefs around the world. Virtual components are also available.

2011-07-04

56

Effectiveness of Spoilers on the Ga(W)-1 Airfoil with a High Performance Fowler Flap.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine effectiveness of spoilers applied to the GA(W)-1 airfoil. Tests of several spoiler configurations show adequate control effectiveness with flap nested. It is found that providing a vent path al...

W. H. Wentz

1975-01-01

57

Illinois RiverWatch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Illinois RiverWatch Network is a volunteer stream monitoring program that seeks to engage Illinois citizens by training them as Citizen Scientists. Each year at adopted stream sites in their communities, Citizen Scientists conduct habitat and biological surveys, including the collection and identification of small stream organisms called macroinvertabrates that serve as bioindicators of water quality. The program strives to collect consistent, high-quality data on the conditions of local streams and provide citizens with a hands-on opportunity to be better stewards of our watersheds.

College, Lewis A.

58

FIRST teams watch the competition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

FIRST teams watch robots in action during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

2000-01-01

59

Uncertainty and bias of surface ozone measurements at selected Global Atmosphere Watch sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) program currently coordinates 22 ground-based atmospheric background monitoring stations of global scope. The GAW World Calibration Centre for Surface Ozone, Carbon Monoxide and Methane (WCC-EMPA) is responsible for tracing surface ozone measurements at these stations to the designated reference within the GAW program, the Standard Reference Photometer SRP 2 maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The recommended method for surface ozone measurements is based on UV absorption at 254 nm (Hg line). Repeated and regular intercomparisons of station instruments are necessary to achieve and maintain high and known data quality. In this paper, the traceability chain is explained, and standard uncertainties for each element are evaluated. Data of 26 intercomparisons performed at 14 stations between 1996 and 2002 are analyzed. On 23 occasions, the instruments passed the audit with "good" agreement, in one case with "sufficient" agreement. On 2 occasions, both first audits at the site, the audited instrument did not comply with the minimal data quality requirements. The best instruments in use exhibit a median absolute bias of approximately 0.32 ppbv and a standard uncertainty of approximately 0.8 ppbv (0-100 ppbv). The quantitative improvement of data quality as a result of repeated audits can be demonstrated with several stations.

Klausen, JöRg; Zellweger, Christoph; Buchmann, Brigitte; Hofer, Peter

2003-10-01

60

Continuous measurements of aerosol physical parameters at the Mt. Cimone GAW Station (2165 m asl, Italy).  

PubMed

Particle size distribution in the range 0.3GAW Station of Mt. Cimone (44.10 N, 10.42 E; 2165 m asl) in the northern Italian Apennines. The seasonal aerosol number size distribution, characterized by a bimodal shape, showed a behaviour typical for background conditions, characterized by highest values in summer and lowest in winter. The seasonal and diurnal variations of the larger accumulation mode (0.3regional or long-range transport) represents an important mechanism favouring N 0.3-1 and BC increases at Mt. Cimone. In particular, a trajectory statistical analysis for the period July 2005-July 2006 allowed the identification of the main source regions of BC and N 0.3-1 for Mt. Cimone: north Italy, west Europe and east Europe. PMID:18063017

Marinoni, A; Cristofanelli, P; Calzolari, F; Roccato, F; Bonafè, U; Bonasoni, P

2008-03-01

61

Global Forest Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is happening in forests right now? You can find out with this amazing resource from the World Resources Institute. This interactive map of the world includes remarkable specialty features that allow users to learn about tree cover loss over time, along with some success stories from around the world. In short the Global Forest Watch (GFW) is a "dynamic online forest monitoring and alert system that empowers people everywhere to better manage forests." After first agreeing to terms of use, visitors to the site can navigate to the Map tab to use a sophisticated set of tools that track tree cover loss and gain from 2000 to the present. Additionally, users can toggle on and off various themes such as "Forest Use" and "Conversation" as they see fit. The Stories area is a real delight as it allows users to learn about the folks who are working to conserve and enhance existing forested areas from Ecuador to Egypt.

62

Scholastic: Weather Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Weather Watch series of online projects investigates seasonal weather phenomena. Students discover the scientific explanations for these events, and use tools and resources for enhanced research. The Hurricanes project allows students to monitor patterns and plot the progression of hurricanes. The Winter Storms project contains an interactive weather maker allowing students to create different weather patterns by changing factors. A winter storm timeline provides stories of the harshest blizzards that have occurred in the U.S. The Weather Reporters project includes a selection of hands-on science experiments for classroom participation, leading up to sharing results online with students worldwide. Each project provides assessment tools and lesson plan suggestions for educators. Links are provided for additional resources.

63

29 CFR 1915.504 - Fire watches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fire watches. 1915.504 Section 1915.504...HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Fire Protection in Shipyard Employment § 1915.504 Fire watches. (a) Written fire watch...

2013-07-01

64

First atmospheric observations from the high altitude Chacaltaya GAW station (Bolivia - 5200 m)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

South America is facing dramatic environmental changes linked to deforestation over the Amazon Basin driven primarily by agricultural expansion and logging. Biomass burning activities resulting nowadays dominantly from anthropogenic land-use change are potent sources of CO2 and several Short Lived Climate Forcers (SLCFs). Tropical deep convection introduce both biogenic and pyrogenic aerosols into the free troposphere, where thanks to a lifetime on the order of weeks aerosols can be transported over long-distances with nearly global impact. Presence of high aerosol loads over the Bolivian Altiplano may clearly influence local/regional radiative balance, but also may exert a strong impact on the strength of the convective circulation and hence the precipitation patterns at the arid Altiplano region. The availability of climate and atmospheric data in the region remains however a strong limitation to constrain regional both Climate and Chemistry-Transport models. A joint Bolivian-EU and USA effort to establish a high altitude measuring station in Chacaltaya (5200 asl) was pursued over the last 2 years, under the umbrella of the Global Atmosphere Watch with the specific objectives of 1) characterizing aerosol microphysical, optical, hygroscopic and chemical properties with respect to seasonal variability, source region influence, precipitation and anthropogenic influence and estimate the regional radiative forcing related to changes in aerosol and cloud properties, 2) Identifying of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in South America, and especially the role of the Amazonian forest and 3) understand the variable that constrain the oxidant cycle in the high Cordillera. Measurements at the Chacaltaya station were initiated in December 2011 and deliver information about atmospheric composition from Southern Hemisphere tropical free troposphere. We will present preliminary results from gas and particle observations at the site.

Andrade, M.; Laj, P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Ramonet, M.; Krejci, R.; Sellegri, K.; Weingartner, E.; Whiteman, D.; Ginot, P.; Zaratti, F.

2012-04-01

65

Country watch. Brazil.  

PubMed

A fictional story using publicity-type language was depicted in an AIDS prevention video produced by the Health in Prostitution Project in Rio de Janeiro to support its work with prostitutes. The video was produced through the volunteer efforts of a professional cast and crew who used cultural entertainment codes to raise awareness. Although both established and new actors participated, the cast was comprised of largely famous soap opera and movie artists. This approach was chosen was the understanding that Brazilians watch soap operas 4-5 hours/day and would therefore readily recognize and pay attention to messages conveyed by the protagonists. The video was shot 2 weeks before Carnival when most actors usually rest and received wide media coverage and attention from the public sector. Prostitutes participated in all stages of production, from script-writing to casting to final editing. The video, Venus Fire, describes a pleasure lottery of which the prize is a lucky condom. The video was officially released on World AIDS Day 1992, and broadcast nationwide in January 1993. It was then subsequently aired in public squares and other street worker sites with question-and-answer sessions and public debates among average audience of 200-300 people. Similar health projects elsewhere in Brazil have also show the film with very good audience response. The prostitutes are happy that their profession is being treated with respect, while clients are attracted by the sexy images. PMID:12345382

Szterenfeld, C; Lopes, V

1993-01-01

66

South Asian Aerosols: Observations and regional scale modeling perspectives from the Nepal Himalayas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SHARE (Stations at High Altitude Research on the Environment) project is promoted by Ev-K2-CNR and funded by the Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) through the Italian National Research Council (CNR). Today SHARE monitoring stations span four continents around the globe. This paper will present the results from the SHARE-Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (NCO-P) monitoring station located in the foothills of Mount Everest at an altitude of 5079 m.a.s.l. NCO-P is also one of the Global AtmosphericWatch stations of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO-GAW) and is the only currently operating GAW station in South Asia and the highest station of the UNEP ABC (Atmospheric Brown Clouds) project. Results obtained from the monitoring of aerosols and trace gases for multi years starting from 2006 will be presented. Seasonal distribution, composition, case studies and events related to high aerosol loadings will be discussed. A regional scale meteorological / chemical transport modeling projecthas been initiated to help put the measurements in perspective and provide decision support for policy makers. The paper will also describe themodeling framework,modeled case studiesillustrating sectoral and regional contribution to the aerosol loading over the Himalayan region will be presented.

Adhikary, B.; Bonasoni, P.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Duchi, R.; Calzolari, F.; Landi, T.; Putero, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Decesari, S.; Vuillermoz, E.; Stocchi, P.; Verza, G.; Kulkarni, S.

2012-12-01

67

Economic upturns are good for your heart but watch out for accidents: a study on Swedish regional data 1976–2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the relationship between the regional unemployment rate in total and cause-specific mortality in Sweden during 1976–2005. Overall mortality is unrelated to changes in the unemployment rate, while the biggest cause of death (heart disease) decreases when the unemployment rate decreases. At the same time, other accidents, including job-related accidents, increases when the unemployment rate decreases. Swedish evidence

Mikael Svensson

2010-01-01

68

Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

2011-01-01

69

GOES Weather Satellite Watches The Sun  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA satellites such as STEREO, SOHO, and SDO are dedicated to studying the sun. GOES is a weather satellite but also watches the sun constantly. Watch this video and learn why space weather data i...

70

Watching together: integrating text chat with video  

Microsoft Academic Search

Watching video online is becoming increasingly popular, and new video streaming technologies have the potential to transform video watching from a passive, isolating experience into an active, socially engaging experience. However, the viability of an active social experience is unclear: both chatting and watching video require attention, and may interfere with one another and detract from the experience. In this

Justin D. Weisz; Sara B. Kiesler; Hui Zhang; Yuqing Ren; Robert E. Kraut; Joseph A. Konstan

2007-01-01

71

Boreal Forest Watch: A BOREAS Outreach Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Boreal Forest Watch program was initiated in the fall of 1994 to act as an educational outreach program for the BOREAS project in both the BOREAS Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA). Boreal Forest Watch (13FW) was designed to introduce area high school teachers and their students to the types of research activities occurring as part of the BOREAS study of Canadian boreal forests. Several teacher training workshops were offered to teachers from central and northern Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba between May, 1995 and February, 1999; teachers were introduced to techniques for involving their students in on-going environmental monitoring studies within local forested stands. Boreal Forest Watch is an educational outreach program which brings high school students and research scientists together to study the forest and foster a sustainable relationship between people and the planetary life-support system we depend upon. Personnel from the University of New Hampshire (UNH), Complex Systems Research Center (CSRC), with the cooperation from the Prince Albert National Park (PANP), instituted this program to help teachers within the BOREAS Study Areas offer real science research experience to their students. The program has the potential to complement large research projects, such as BOREAS, by providing useful student- collected data to scientists. Yet, the primary goal of BFW is to allow teachers and students to experience a hands-on, inquiry-based approach to leaming science - emulating the process followed by research scientists. In addition to introducing these teachers to on-going BOREAS research, the other goals of the BFW program were to: 1) to introduce authentic science topics and methods to students and teachers through hands-on, field-based activities; and, 2) to build a database of student-collected environmental monitoring data for future global change studies in the boreal region.

Rock, Barrett N.

1999-01-01

72

ExMC Technology Watch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Technology Watch (Tech Watch) project is a NASA endeavor conducted under the Human Research Programs (HRP) Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element, and focusing on ExMC technology gaps. The project involves several NASA centers, including the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Glenn Research Center (GRC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and the Langley Research Center (LaRC). The objective of Tech Watch is to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current NASA HRP technology development efforts. Identifying such technologies accelerates the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues encountered during human space exploration missions. The aim of this process is to leverage technologies developed by academia, industry and other government agencies and to identify the effective utilization of NASA resources to maximize the HRP return on investment. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion and further NASAs goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. In 2011, the major focus areas for Tech Watch included information dissemination, education outreach and public accessibility to technology gaps and gap reports. The dissemination of information was accomplished through site visits to research laboratories and/or companies, and participation at select conferences where Tech Watch objectives and technology gaps were presented. Presentation of such material provided researchers with insights on NASA ExMC needs for space exploration and an opportunity to discuss potential areas of common interest. The second focus area, education outreach, was accomplished via two mechanisms. First, several senior student projects, each related to an ExMC technology gap, were sponsored by the various NASA centers. These projects presented ExMC related technology problems firsthand to collegiate laboratories. Second, a RASC-AL (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage) topic for FY12 was developed for medical systems and astronaut health under the Human-Focused Mars Mission Systems and Technologies theme. Announcement of the competition was made to the public in August 2011. Finally, critical Tech Watch information was prepared for public release in the form of gap reports. Complementing the ExMC technology gaps in the public domain, gap reports were generated, reviewed and revised through a series of technical, medical and subject matter expert reviews before approval for public release. An important vehicle for the public release of such documents was development of the ExMC wiki website, which will continue to be populated with gap reports and relevant documents throughout the upcoming year.

Krihak, M.; Barr, Y.; Watkins, S.; Fung, P.; McGrath, T.; Baumann, D.

2012-01-01

73

WomenWatch: Feature on Women with Disabilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Millions of women around the world live with disabilities, and this site from the United Nations' Women Watch initiative provides information on this particular group of individuals. On this site, visitors can learn about the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities and also look over a related fact sheet about girls and women with disabilities. Visitors should also look over the "Resources" section, which includes links to online materials from other UN websites, including the Regional Commission for Asia and the Pacific and the World Health Organization. Finally, visitors can also watch a webcast of the United Nations committee Ad Hoc Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

74

Watching How Planets Form  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anatomy of a Planet-Forming Disc around a Star More Massive than the Sun With the VISIR instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have mapped the disc around a star more massive than the Sun. The very extended and flared disc most likely contains enough gas and dust to spawn planets. It appears as a precursor of debris discs such as the one around Vega-like stars and thus provides the rare opportunity to witness the conditions prevailing prior to or during planet formation. "Planets form in massive, gaseous and dusty proto-planetary discs that surround nascent stars. This process must be rather ubiquitous as more than 200 planets have now been found around stars other than the Sun," said Pierre-Olivier Lagage, from CEA Saclay (France) and leader of the team that carried out the observations. "However, very little is known about these discs, especially those around stars more massive than the Sun. Such stars are much more luminous and could have a large influence on their disc, possibly quickly destroying the inner part." The astronomers used the VISIR instrument [1] on ESO's Very Large Telescope to map in the infrared the disc surrounding the young star HD 97048. With an age of a few million years [2], HD 97048 belongs to the Chameleon I dark cloud, a stellar nursery 600 light-years away. The star is 40 times more luminous than our Sun and is 2.5 times as massive. The astronomers could only have achieved such a detailed view due to the high angular resolution offered by an 8-metre size telescope in the infrared, reaching a resolution of 0.33 arcsecond. They discovered a very large disc, at least 12 times more extended than the orbit of the farthest planet in the Solar System, Neptune. The observations suggest the disc to be flared. "This is the first time such a structure, predicted by some theoretical models, is imaged around a massive star," said Lagage. ESO PR Photo 36/06 ESO PR Photo 36/06 A Flared Proto-Planetary Disc Such a geometry can only be explained if the disc contains a large amount of gas, in this case, at least as much as 10 times the mass of Jupiter. It should also contain more than 50 Earth masses in dust. The dust mass derived here is more than thousand times larger than what is observed in debris discs and Kuiper belt-like structures found around older, 'Vega-like' stars, such as Beta Pictoris, Vega, Fomalhaut and HR 4796. The dust around these stars is thought to be produced by collisions of larger bodies. The dust mass observed around HD 97048 is similar to the mass invoked for the (undetected) parent bodies in the more evolved systems. HD 97048's disc is thus most likely a precursor of debris discs observed around older stars. "From the structure of the disc, we infer that planetary embryos may be present in the inner part of the disc," said Lagage. "We are planning follow-up observations at higher angular resolution with ESO's VLT interferometer in order to probe these regions." A video, made by the CEA, is also available. More Information The scientists report their discovery in the 28 September issue of Science Express, the rapid online publication service of the journal Science: "Anatomy of a flaring proto-planetary disc around a young intermediate-mass star", by P.-O. Lagage et al. The team is composed of Pierre-Olivier Lagage, Coralie Doucet, and Eric Pantin, (CEA Saclay, France), Sébastien Charnoz (Paris 7 Denis Diderot University), Emilie Habart (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay, France), Gaspard Duchêne, François Ménard, and Christophe Pinte (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France), and Jan-Willem Pel (Groningen University, The Netherlands).

2006-09-01

75

ExMC Technology Watch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Technology Watch (Tech Watch) project is a NASA project that is operated under the Human Research Programs (HRP) Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element, and focuses on ExMC technology gaps. The project coordinates the efforts of several NASA centers, including the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Glenn Research Center (GRC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and the Langley Research Center (LaRC). The objective of Tech Watch is to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current NASA HRP technology development efforts. Identifying such technologies accelerates the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues encountered during human space exploration missions. The aim of this process is to leverage technologies developed by academia, industry and other government agencies and to identify the effective utilization of NASA resources to maximize the HRP return on investment. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion and further NASAs goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. In 2012, the Tech Watch project expanded the scope of activities to cultivate student projects targeted at specific ExMC gaps, generate gap reports for a majority of the ExMC gaps and maturate a gap report review process to optimize the technical and managerial aspects of ExMC gap status. Through numerous site visits and discussions with academia faculty, several student projects were initiated and/or completed this past year. A key element to these student projects was the ability of the project to align with a specific ExMC technology or knowledge gap. These projects were mentored and reviewed by Tech Watch leads at the various NASA centers. Another result of the past years efforts was the population of the ExMC wiki website that now contains more the three quarters of the ExMC gap reports. The remaining gap reports will be completed in FY13. Finally, the gap report review process for all ExMC gaps was initiated. This review process was instrumental in ensuring that each gap report was thoroughly reviewed for accuracy and relevant content prior to its public release. In the upcoming year, the gap report review process will be refined such that in addition to the gap report update, programmatic information related to gap closure will also be emphasized.

Krihak, M.; Watkins, S.; Fung, Paul P.

2013-01-01

76

Long-term measurements of anthropogenic trace gases at the German GAW site Hohenpeissenberg  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric trace gases show variability on various time scales, e.g. daily, weekly, seasonal and longer time scales due to natural and anthropogenic factors. At Hohenpeissenberg, a global station of the GAW program situated in rural southern Germany, a broad range of different atmospheric trace gases, e.g. VOC, CO, NO, NO2, SO2, O3, OH, has been measured continuously since the mid or end 90'. Thus, time series of 10 or more years are available now. This enables to describe the variability and trends and start to analyse the factors of impact. Weekday - weekend comparisons allow a direct estimation of relative changes in anthropogenic emissions. Such differences are significant and increase with shorter life-times of the respective compounds, e.g. xylene concentrations on Sundays are factor 2 lower than during working days. Winter-summer ratios of directly emitted, anthropogenic compounds generally depend on a combination of changing sources, sinks and transport. Observed winter-summer ratios are mostly between 2 and 6 which are smaller than the summer-winter ratios of OH - radicals of about 8. Trends of the anthropogenic trace gases indicate declining concentrations for most VOC and CO. For NOx, however, concentrations did not decline significantly which is in contrast to current emission inventories.

Plass-Dülmer, C.; Gilge, S.

2009-04-01

77

Notewothy Chemsitry and Patent Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This American Chemical Society website helps users stay up to date on the latest chemistry research articles and patents. Each week, Noteworthy reliable summaries of the latest and most exciting publications in the chemistry-related journals. The Patent Watch helps users understand the importance of new drugs and other chemical innovations to our society. Visitors can find archives of both of these reports since 2002. While the website does not provide copies of the articles because of copyright regulations, the authors do provide references so that users can easily consult the literature.

78

Heart Cut and Patent Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This American Chemical Society website helps users stay up to date on the latest chemistry research articles and patents. Each week, Heart Cut offers reliable summaries of the latest and most exciting publications in the chemistry-related journals. The Patent Watch helps users understand the importance of new drugs and other chemical innovations to our society. Visitors can find archives of both of these reports since 2002. While the website does not provide copies of the articles because of copyright regulations, the authors do provide references so that users can easily consult the literature.

79

Monterey Bay Aquarium: Seafood Watch Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As an old saying goes, "There are only so many fish in the sea", and this is a saying that is becoming more and more true each year. With that in mind, the Monterey Bay Aquarium has developed the Seafood Watch site to help people make informed decisions about purchasing different types of seafood. The site contains sections such as "Which Seafood To Buy & Why" and "What You Can Do". In the "Which Seafood to Buy & Why" section, visitors can take a look at some regional seafood guides and also learn which types of seafood are most endangered. Visitors can also order free copies of these guides online and also sign up to receive their free newsletter.

80

Laser beam microwelding in the watch industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

After the invention of the laser principle and its first application for drilling of jewels in watch movements, the laser was only used for marking. The still ongoing trend of miniaturization and automation opened a new field of application: laser beam micro welding. This paper gives an overview of the new application of laser beam welding in watch industry. The

Alexander M. Olowinsky; Thorsten Kramer; Friedrich Durand

2002-01-01

81

IBM's Linux Watch: The Challenge of Miniaturization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearly four years in development, the IBM Linux watch contains a complete computer system that runs Linux, displays X11 graphics, and has wireless connectivity. The system fits in a case that could pass as a slightly unusual analog timepiece with a somewhat odd shape and an extraordinarily brilliant face. The developers have created two versions of the watch, one with

Chandrasekhar Narayanaswami; Noboru Kamijoh; Mandayam T. Raghunath; Tadanobu Inoue; Thomas M. Cipolla; James L. Sanford; Eugene S. Schlig; Sreekrishnan Venkiteswaran; Dinakar Guniguntala; Vishal Kulkarni; Kazuhiko Yamazaki

2002-01-01

82

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2010-10-01

83

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2011-10-01

84

47 CFR 80.1123 - Watch requirements for ship stations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Watch requirements for ship stations. 80.1123 Section 80.1123 ...Communications § 80.1123 Watch requirements for ship stations. (a) While at sea, all ships must maintain a continuous watch: (1)...

2012-10-01

85

Factors influencing the intention to watch online video advertising.  

PubMed

This study examines the factors influencing consumer intention to watch online video ads, by applying the theory of reasoned action. The attitude toward watching online video ads, the subjective norm, and prior frequency of watching online video ads positively influence the intention to watch online video ads. Further, beliefs held about entertainment and information outcomes from watching online video ads and subjective norm influence attitude toward watching these ads. PMID:21476837

Lee, Joonghwa; Lee, Mira

2011-10-01

86

World Calibration Center for VOC (WCC-VOC), a new Facility for the WMO-GAW-Programme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are recognized to be important precursors of tropospheric ozone as well as other oxidants and organic aerosols. In order to design effective control measures for the reduction of photooxidants, photochemical processes have to be understood and the sources of the precursors known. Reliable and representative measurements of VOCs are necessary to describe the anthropogenic and biogenic sources, to follow the photochemical degradation of VOCs in the troposphere. Measurement of VOCs is of key importance for the understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Tropospheric VOCs have been one of the recommended measurements to be made within the GAW programme. The purpose will be to monitor their atmospheric abundance, to characterize the various compounds with regard to anthropogenic and biogenic sources and to evaluate their role in the tropospheric ozone formation process. An international WMO/GAW panel of experts for VOC measurements developed the rational and objectives for this GAW activity and recommended the configuration and required activities of the WCC-VOC. In reflection of the complexity of VOC measurements and the current status of measurement technology, a "staged" approach was adopted. Stage 1 measurements: C2-C9 hydrocarbons, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and monocyclics. (The WCC-VOC operates currently under this mode). Stage 2 measurements: C10-C14 hydrocarbons, including higher homologs of the Stage 1 set as well as biogenic hydrocarbon compounds. Stage 3 measurements: Oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids. The Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centre (QA/SAC) Germany currently has established the World Calibration Centre for VOC (WCC-VOC). The WCC-VOC has operated in the research mode und has become operational recently. From now on, the WCC-VOC conducts one round-robin calibration audit per year at all global stations that measure VOCs and assists other stations in setting up VOC measurement capabilities. Furthermore, the WCC-VOC will promote inter-com-parison experiments with networks related to other programmes, notably EMEP and IGAC.

Rappenglueck, B.-

2002-12-01

87

Antibodies to watch in 2014.  

PubMed

Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

Reichert, Janice M

2014-01-01

88

Pseudo-global, long-term consistency of satellite occultation and limb ozone profilers with Global Atmosphere Watch ozonometric networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last 20 years, several contiguous satellite missions have recorded the vertical distribution of stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone at 1-3 km vertical resolution. Among them, several are based on the solar occultation technique, either in the visible or the infrared spectral range. Operating from 57° inclination orbits, NASA's Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment II (SAGE-II) aboard Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) in 1984-2005 and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aboard Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in 1991-2005 yielded ozone profile time series with a meridian coverage from about 80° N to 80° S. Operating from a near-polar orbit with sun-synchronous precession, Naval Research Laboratory's Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II and III (POAM-II/III) aboard the French platforms SPOT-3/4 extended in 1993-1996 and in 1998-2005, respectively, the SAGE-II and HALOE data records towards polar regions, focusing on the 63° /88° S and 55° /71° N latitude zones. More recently, Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) aboard Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT-1, started in 2003 a new ozone profile data record, now from a 75° inclination orbit. Complementarily to solar occultation sensors, of which observations are limited to a maximum of 14 or 28 sunrise/sunset events a day, ESA's Envisat caries since 2002 Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), based on stellar occultation and limb infrared emission observations. GOMOS and MIPAS have both recorded ozone profile time series with a nearly daily pole-to-pole coverage. The present paper aims at exploring the long-term and global consistency between contiguous ozone profile data records acquired by the aforementioned satellite sensors. To deal with the differences in meridian coverage and in time period, we confront those data records to the same common reference, consisting in ground-based observations by ozonesonde and lidar networks. Networks considered here are affiliated to WMO's Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme and contributing networks such as the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde (SHADOZ).

Clercq Coralie, De

89

Human Rights Watch: Chemical Warfare in Bosnia?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Human Rights Watch has recently posted a new report. "Chemical Warfare in Bosnia? The Strange Experiences of the Srebrenica Survivors," investigates whether or not Serb forces used chemical agents in an attack against people fleeing Srebrenica in Bosnia and Hercegovina.

90

46 CFR 15.705 - Watches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...certificate of inspection take into consideration routine maintenance requirements and ability of the crew to perform all operational evolutions, including emergencies, as well as those functions which may be assigned to persons in watches. (b) Subject...

2013-10-01

91

World Report 2010: Human Rights Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Human Rights Watch is an organization whose goal is the following: "focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes." Every year over the past twenty years Human Rights Watch has published their World Report, which is an evaluation of more than 90 countries' human rights conditions. The staff of Human Rights Watch works closely with the human rights activists in each country, so as to get an accurate picture. The interactive map on the lower half of the homepage allows visitors to scroll over the map, which will highlight a country, and a dialogue box will open to reveal the country highlighted, and a link to read the chapter from the current World Report, reports from the prior year, and a multimedia feature on the selected country. As a note, only the blue colored countries have had human rights data collected on their human rights condition.

92

Radium dial watches, a potentially hazardous legacy?  

PubMed

This study re-examines the risk to health from radium ((226)Ra) dial watches. Ambient dose equivalent rates have been measured for fifteen pocket watches giving results of up to 30 ?Sv h(-1) at a distance of 2 cm taken with a series 1000 mini-rad from the front face (arithmetic mean ambient dose equivalent for pocket watches being 13.2 ?Sv h(-1)). A pocket compass gave rise to a similar ambient dose equivalent rate, of 20 ?Sv h(-1), to the pocket watches, with its cover open. Eighteen wristwatches have also been assessed, but their dose rates are generally much lower (the arithmetic mean being 3.0 ?Sv h(-1)), although the highest ambient dose equivalent rate noted was 20 ?Sv h(-1). A phantom experiment using a TLD suggested an effective dose equivalent of 2.2 mSv/y from a 1 ?Ci (37 kBq) radium dial worn for 16 h/day throughout the year (dose rate 0.375 ?Sv h(-1)). For this condition we estimated maximum skin dose for our pocket watches as 16 mSv per year, with effective doses of 5.1 mSv and 1.169 mSv when worn in vest and trouser pockets respectively. This assumes exposure from the back of the watch which is generally around 60-67% of that from the front. The maximum skin dose from a wristwatch was 14 mSv, with 4.2 mSv effective dose in vest pocket. Radium ((226)Ra) decays to the radioactive gas radon ((222)Rn), and atmospheric radon concentration measurements taken around a pocket watch in a small sealed glass sphere recorded 18,728 B qm(-3). All watches were placed in a room with a RAD7 real-time radon detector. Radon concentration average was 259±9 Bq m(-3) over 16 h, compared to background average over 24h of 1.02 Bq m(-3). Over 6 weeks highs of the order of 2000 Bq m(-3) were routinely recorded when the heating/ventilation system in the room was operating at reduced rates, peaking at over 3000 Bq m(-3) on several occasions. Estimates of the activity of (226)Ra in the watches ranged from 0.063 to 1.063 ?Ci (2.31 to 39.31 kBq) for pocket watches and from 0.013 to 0.875 ?Ci (0.46 to 32.38 kBq) for wrist watches. The risk from old watches containing radium appears to have been largely forgotten today. This paper indicates a health risk, particular to collectors, but with knowledge and appropriate precautions the potential risks can be reduced. PMID:22580295

Gillmore, Gavin K; Crockett, Robin; Denman, Tony; Flowers, Alan; Harris, Richard

2012-09-15

93

Sustainable ecotourism on Atlantic islands, with special reference to whale watching, Marine Protected Areas and sanctuaries, for cetaceans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecotourism in the Atlantic islands region is well-established and growing. Still, in the whale watching and marine tourism sector, many so-called ecotourism enterprises fail to achieve the minimum standards required to qualify as ecotourism. In the Atlantic islands area, approximately 1.7 million people a year go whale watching, with a total expenditure of US$133 million. In this region, the 90

Erich Hoyt

2005-01-01

94

Department of Energy Support for Operations of the WMO/GAW Quality Control/Science Activity Center for the Americas  

SciTech Connect

As a formal activity of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch, to provide, through agency collaboration, a center of excellence in the United States that would impose quality assurance techniques on data collected by national air and precipitation quality networks operating in the Americas (north, south, and central).

Hicks, B. B.

2003-11-13

95

BioWatch in a Box  

SciTech Connect

BioWatch, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) environmental monitoring program, has been successfully operating in many of the nation's urban centers since early 2003. This early warning environmental monitoring system can detect trace amounts of biological materials in the air, and has been used to provide information to assist public health experts determine whether detected materials are due to an intentional release (bioterrorism incident) or due to minute quantities that occur naturally in the environment. BioWatch information enables federal, state, and local officials to more quickly determine appropriate emergency response, medical care and consequence management.

McBride, M T; Dzentis, J M; Meyer, R M

2006-02-01

96

Disassembly of a Liquid Crystal Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of videos, presented by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, deals with the disassembly of a liquid crystal watch. The experiment involves more than just involving the disassembly, the videos present the reaction of the LCD panel when exposed to things such as pressure, high temperatures, and a hot water bath. Not everything is these videos are reversible, so please use an inexpensive watch. But, other than that, this is a cheap and fun activity for any science classroom. It presents students with ways that science permeates our everyday lives.

2009-01-23

97

Scope on the Skies: Bird watching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In addition to offering great opportunities for planet viewing, this summer is also a god time for observing Earth-orbiting satellites, or "bird-watching." There are several thousand satellites (not counting our Moon) in orbit around our planet. However,

Riddle, Bob

2010-07-01

98

Water Watch Program Overview. Background Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lakes, streams, and wetlands serve many purposes for the people of the state of Kentucky and are necessary and valued elements of its natural resources. The Water Watch program promotes individual responsibility for a common resource, educates people about the use and protection of local water resources, provides recreational opportunities through…

Kentucky State Div. of Water, Frankfort. Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet.

99

10 Trends to Watch in Campus Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College and university presidents are increasingly called upon to make informed choices about technology. The rapidly shifting landscape makes it tough to keep up with change and innovation, let alone stay ahead of the curve. In this article, the authors discuss 10 trends to watch in campus technology. These trends are the following: (1) increased…

Martin, James; Samels, James E.

2007-01-01

100

The Quartz Analog Watch: A Wonder Machine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes how a quartz watch works. Discusses the quartz crystal, its form, and how its frequency is set to a standard; the integrated circuit chip that drives the crystal in vibration, scales its frequency down, and forms pulses that turn the motor; and the motor that drives the gear train that turns the hands. (ZWH)

Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

1993-01-01

101

Whale Watching in the Gulf of Maine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a variety of teaching strategies to prepare a class for a whale watching field trip. Guidelines for recording a sighting, pictures and statistics for commonly and/or occasionally seen whales, and hints for avoiding sea sickness are included. (DH)

Carkin, Clayton A.

1985-01-01

102

Should I Let My Child Watch Television?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the prevalence of autism has been increasing globally, there is a search for the causative factors behind the rise. The point of view presented here examines the possibility of children brought up in social deprivation and watching television being at higher risk for developing autistic symptoms. The association is evident in the clinical…

Bharadwaj, Balaji

2013-01-01

103

Temporal trend and sources of speciated atmospheric mercury at Waliguan GAW station, Northwestern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury were conducted at a remote mountain-top station (Waliguan (WLG) Baseline Observatory) at the edge of northeastern part of the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, Western China. Mean concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM), particulate bound mercury (PBM), and gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) during the whole sampling campaign were 1.98±0.98 ng m-3, 19.4±18.1 pg m-3, and 7.4±4.8 pg m-3, respectively. Levels of speciated Hg at WLG were slightly higher than those reported from remote areas of North America and Europe. Both regional sources and long-rang transport played important roles in the distribution of atmospheric TGM and PBM at WLG, whereas GOM showed major links to the regional sources, likely as well as the in-situ productions via photochemical processes. Regional sources for speciated Hg were mostly located to the east of WLG, which is the most industrial and urbanized areas of Qinghai province. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) results showed that eastern Gansu, western Ningxia and Shanxi Province were likely the potential source regions of WLG, with good accordance with locations of urban areas and industrial centers. Moreover, we found that Northern India may be a significant source region for WLG during the sampling campaign, and this is the first published evidence suggesting long-range transport of atmospheric Hg from India to the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Seasonal and diurnal variations of TGM were in contrast to most of the previous studies in China, with relatively higher levels in warm seasons and night, respectively. The temporal trend of TGM also highlighted the impact of long-range transport on the distribution of TGM in ambient air at WLG.

Fu, X. W.; Feng, X.; Liang, P.; Deliger; Zhang, H.; Ji, J.; Liu, P.

2012-02-01

104

47 CFR 80.1153 - Station log and radio watches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Station log and radio watches. 80...RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES... § 80.1153 Station log and radio watches...maintain radio station logs. (b) When a ship...watches must be maintained in accordance with §§...

2013-10-01

105

Temporal trend and sources of speciated atmospheric mercury at Waliguan GAW station, northwestern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury were conducted at a remote mountain-top station (WLG) at the edge of northeastern part of the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, western China. Mean concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM), particulate mercury (PHg), and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) during the whole sampling campaign were 1.98 ± 0.98 ng m-3, 19.4 ± 18.1 pg m-3, and 7.4 ± 4.8 pg m-3, respectively. Levels of speciated Hg at WLG were slightly higher than those reported from remote areas of North America and Europe. Both regional emissions and long-rang transport played a remarkable role in the distribution of TGM and PHg in ambient air at WLG, whereas RGM showed major links to the regional sources, likely as well as the in-situ productions by photochemical processes. Regional sources for speciated Hg were mostly located to the east of WLG, which is the most developed areas of Qinghai province and accounted for most of the province's anthropogenic Hg emissions. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) results showed a strong impact of long-range transport from eastern Gansu, western Ningxia and Shanxi Province, with good accordance with locations of urban areas and industrial centers. Moreover, we found that northern India was also an important source region of WLG during the sampling campaign, and this is the first time of direct evidence of long-range transport of atmospheric Hg from India to northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Seasonal and diurnal variations of TGM were in contrast with most of the previous studies in China, with relatively higher levels in warm seasons and night, respectively. The temporal trend of TGM also highlighted the impact of long-range transport on the distribution of TGM in ambient air at WLG.

Fu, X. W.; Feng, X.; Liang, P.; Deli-Geer; Zhang, H.; Ji, J.; Liu, P.

2011-11-01

106

Monarch Watch: Planting a Butterfly Garden  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Planting a Butterfly Garden website from Monarch Watch is a great introductory resource for teachers interested in starting an educational butterfly garden at their school. This site provides several useful information pages including Good Nectar Sources and lists of Larval Host Plants organized both by butterfly and by plant. The site also features a simple step-by-step teacher's guide written by a teacher from Maryland who planned and planted a butterfly garden at her middle school.

107

SPARTAN Sprite-Watch 2007 Campaign  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nine PhD students and SPARTAN (Centre of Excellence for Space, Planetary and Astrophysics Research Training and Networking) fellows implemented and participated in the SPARTAN Sprite-Watch 2007 campaign to observe Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) and contribute to the EuroSprite 2007 observation campaign. One SPARTAN Sprite-Watch team installed an observation system at the IMWM High-Mountain Meteorological Observatory at Mount ?nie?ka to run the first optical observations of TLEs from Poland during two weeks in July 2007. A second team made observations during four weeks in July/August 2007 in Leicester, UK, using two remotely controlled Danish systems installed at Pic du Midi de Bigorre and Monte Corona in France. The observations made at ?nie?ka resulted in the first video recordings of red sprite phenomena from Poland on the night 20/21 July 2007. The SPARTAN Sprite-Watch teams have been supported by the Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management who provided continuous information on the meteorological conditions over Poland and Europe and hosted the Polish campaign at ?nie?ka.

Odzimek, A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Kanawade, V.; Cnossen, I.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Faedi, F.; Del Moro, A.; Ural, U.; Byckling, K.; Krzaczkowski, P.; Iwa?ski, R.; Struzik, P.; Pajek, M.; Gajda, W.

2008-12-01

108

Influence of lower stratosphere\\/upper troposphere transport events on surface ozone at the Everest-Pyramid GAW Station (Nepal): first year of analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, we present the first systematic identification of episodes of air mass transport from the lower stratosphere\\/upper troposphere (LS\\/UT) in the middle troposphere of the southern Himalayas. For this purpose, we developed an algorithm to detect LS\\/UT transport events on a daily basis at the Everest-Pyramid GAW station (EV-PYR, 5079 m a.s.l., Nepal). In particular, in situ surface ozone

P. Cristofanelli; P. Bonasoni; U. Bonafe; F. Calzolari; R. Duchi; A. Marinoni; F. Roccato; E. Vuillermoz; M. Sprenger

2009-01-01

109

Tropospheric ozone variations at the Everest-Pyramid GAW-WMO station (5079 m a.s.l., Nepal): natural and anthropogenic contributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface ozone is a key species controlling the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and a powerful greenhouse gas. Since March 2006, continuous measurements of its concentration have been carried out at the Everest-Pyramid GAW-WMO station (5079 m a.s.l., Nepal), which is considered representative for the South-East Himalayas. The aim of this activity, conducted in the framework of Ev-K2-CNR \\

P. Cristofanelli; P. Bonasoni; A. Marinoni; R. Duchi; F. Calzolari; U. Bonafe; F. Roccato; E. Vuillermoz; G. P. Verza; M. Sprenger

2009-01-01

110

Australian Weather Watch Radar Home Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology's Weather Watch Radar website provides up-to-date radar images of the locations of rain in Australia in relation to local features such as coast lines. The newly developed Loops provide four consecutive radar images so that users can view how the weather has been changing in the last forty to fifty minutes. The website provides radar images of past cyclone events as well as updates on severe weather throughout Australia. Those interested in radar systems can discover how the weather radars work and how to interpret the maps. [RME

111

Agnew and Johnson Watch Apollo 11 Lift Off  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Amidst a crowd of other onlookers, U.S. Vice President Spiro T. Agnew (right) and former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson watch the Saturn V vehicle roar skyward carrying the Apollo 11 manned spacecraft into the vast regions of space. On a trajectory to the Moon, the craft lifted off from launch pad 39 at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. The moon bound crew included astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The mission finalized with splashdown on July 24, 1969. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Werher von Braun.

1969-01-01

112

An earth watching satellite constellation: how to manage a team of watching agents with limited communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the problem of management of an Earth watching mission (detection, observation, and tracking of forest fires and volcanic eruptions) by means of a constellation of low-orbit satellites. We show that the mission reactivity requirements and the strictly limited communication means led us to a specific decision architecture. This architecture is based on two components: a

Sylvain Damiani; Gérard Verfaillie; Marie-Claire Charmeau

2005-01-01

113

France's heat health watch warning system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2003, a Heat Health Watch Warning System was developed in France to anticipate heat waves that may result in a large excess of mortality. The system was developed on the basis of a retrospective analysis of mortality and meteorological data in fourteen pilot cities. Several meteorological indicators were tested in relation to levels of excess mortality. Computations of sensibility and specificity were used to choose the meteorological indicators and the cut-offs. An indicator that mixes minimum and maximum temperatures was chosen. The cut-offs were set in order to anticipate events resulting in an excess mortality above 100% in the smallest cities and above 50% in Paris, Lyon, Marseille and Lille. The system was extended nationwide using the 98th percentile of the distribution of minimum and maximum temperatures. A national action plan was set up, using this watch warning system. It was activated on 1st June 2004 on a national scale. The system implies a close cooperation between the French Weather Bureau (Météo France), the National Institute of Health Surveillance (InVS) and the Ministry of Health. The system is supported by a panel of preventive actions, to prevent the sanitary impact of heat waves.

Pascal, Mathilde; Laaidi, Karine; Ledrans, Martine; Baffert, Elsa; Caserio-Schönemann, Céline; Le Tertre, Alain; Manach, Jacques; Medina, Sylvia; Rudant, Jérémie; Empereur-Bissonnet, Pascal

2006-01-01

114

Frequency of College Students' Night-Sky Watching Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College students (N = 112) completed the Noctcaelador Inventory, a measure of psychological attachment to the night-sky, and estimated various night-sky watching related activities: frequency and duration of night-sky watching, astro-tourism, ownership of night-sky viewing equipment, and attendance of observatories or planetariums. The results…

Kelly, William E.; Kelly, Kathryn E.; Batey, Jason

2006-01-01

115

Gender Roles and Night-Sky Watching among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated the relationship between gender roles and night-sky watching in a sample of college students (N=161). The Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Noctcaelador Inventory (NI) were used to investigate the differences between gender role groups for night-sky watching. The results supported the hypothesis that androgynous…

Kelly, William E.; McGee, Catherine M.

2012-01-01

116

Still Watching, from the Edge of Extinction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today, human behavior drives many extinctions and preserves some species. To help understand such behavior, we published a book in 1999 that viewed selected endangered species through the eyes of those who have watched them decline and, in some cases, vanish from the wild. Here we revisit those stories to document what has happened in the interim 10 years, a period that is very short in evolutionary time but that has proven decisive for some endangered species. One species is now extinct in the wild; others have been devastated or scattered; several are on âÂÂlife support.â Some things have not changed: Too many people consume too much, and disagreements among conservationists still impede progress. Some issues have become more prominent, such as emerging diseases and global economic crises. Although there have been some striking successes, it is very clear that more species now depend on human support for their survival than may be sustainable.

Beverly Peterson Stearns (freelance writer;); Stephen Stearns (Yale University;Ecology and Evolutionary Biology)

2010-02-01

117

Additional flow field studies of the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 30-percent chord Fowler flap including slot-gap variations and cove shape modifications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental measurements were made to determine the effects of slot gap opening and flap cove shape on flap and airfoil flow fields. Test model was the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 0.30c Fowler flap deflected 35 degrees. Tests were conducted with optimum, wide and narrow gaps, and with three cove shapes. Three test angles were selected, corresponding to pre-stall and post-stall conditions. Reynolds number was 2,200,000 and Mach number was 0.13. Force, surface pressure, total pressure, and split-film turbulence measurements were made. Results were compared with theory for those parameters for which theoretical values were available.

Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

1983-01-01

118

Time spent watching television, sleep duration and obesity in adults living in Valencia, Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the association of time watching television (TV) and physical activity with obesity in the Mediterranean area of Spain with the highest prevalence of obesity.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Valencia Region in Spain.PARTICIPANTS: A representative sample of 814 men and 958 women, aged 15 y and older, participating in a Health and Nutrition Survey conducted in 1994.MEASUREMENTS: Height and weight

J Vioque; A Torres; J Quiles

2000-01-01

119

47 CFR 80.305 - Watch requirements of the Communications Act and the Safety Convention.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Watch requirements of the Communications Act and the Safety Convention. ...305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY...305 Watch requirements of the Communications Act and the Safety...

2013-10-01

120

Validation of Watch-PAT-200 Against Polysomnography During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To determine the relationships between key variables obtained from ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) and the wrist-worn Watch-PAT 200 device in pregnant women. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, women in their third trimester of pregnancy underwent full overnight home PSG using the 22-channel MediPalm system and the Watch-PAT 200 device. PSGs were scored by a blinded, experienced technologist using AASM 2007 criteria; the Watch-PAT was scored automatically by the manufacturer's proprietary software. Results: A total of 31 pregnant women were studied. Mean age was 30.2 ± 7.1 years; mean gestational age was 33.4 ± 3.0 weeks; mean BMI was 31.9 ± 8.1 kg/m2; 39% of women were nulliparous. Key variables generated by PSG and Watch-PAT correlated well over a wide range, including the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, r = 0.76, p < 0.001); respiratory disturbance index (RDI, r = 0.68, p < 0.001), mean oxygen saturation (r = 0.94, p < 0.001), and minimum oxygen saturation (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). The area under the curve for AHI ? 5 and RDI ? 10 were 0.96 and 0.94, respectively. Association between stage 3 sleep on PSG and deep sleep on Watch-PAT was poor. Watch-PAT tended to overscore RDI, particularly as severity increased. Conclusions: Among pregnant women, Watch-PAT demonstrates excellent sensitivity and specificity for identification of obstructive sleep apnea, defined as AHI ? 5 on full PSG. Watch-PAT may overestimate RDI somewhat, especially at high RDI values. Citation: O'Brien LM; Bullough AS; Shelgikar AV; Chames MC; Armitage R; Chervin RD. Validation of Watch-Pat-200 against polysomnography during pregnancy. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):287-294.

O'Brien, Louise M.; Bullough, Alexandra S.; Shelgikar, Anita V.; Chames, Mark C.; Armitage, Roseanne; Chervin, Ronald D.

2012-01-01

121

The Verification of MACC-II Global Reactive Gas Forecasts with Global Atmosphere Watch Surface Observations and Ozonesonde Measurements from the NDACC, WOUDC, NILU and SHADOZ Databases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate- phase II) project, funded under the 7th framework program of the European Union, provides a comprehensive monitoring and operational forecasting system for atmospheric constituents relevant to climate and air quality issues and surface solar radiation. The MACC-II forecast system is based on the global weather forecasting system operated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) coupled with the chemistry transport models MOZART (Model for OZone and Related chemical Tracers) and TM5. On a near real time (NRT) basis observational data and forecasts, as well as reanalyses are made available for greenhouse and reactive gases, UV radiation and aerosol optical density. The sub group "VAL" is focusing on the evaluation of reactive gases, thus, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone as well as its precursors and aerosols. The GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) network provides the ground-based observational data for the evaluation of model simulation forecast and reanalysis of the reactive gases CO and O3 at surface levels on a global scale. Contributing stations in this validation process provide their data in rapid delivery mode (within 1 day to 1 month), thus enabling a fast evaluation process. Currently, there are 12 stations providing data in Near-Real-Time. The validation process is performed online and daily updates of the results are displayed on the MACC website (http://www.gmes-atmosphere.eu/d/services/gac/verif/grg/gaw/). For the validation of stratospheric and free tropospheric ozone forecasts, balloon sonde measurements from the data bases NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change), WOUDC (World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre), NILU (Norwegian Institute for Air Research) and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional OZon Sondes) are used. Here, we will give an overview on the status and the results of this Near-Real-Time (NRT) validation of the coupled forecast system for surface O3 and CO, based on GAW observational data, as well as for stratospheric ozone based on NDACC, WOUDC, NILU and SHADOZ sonde data. This work is supported by the EU-funded project MACC-II.

Wagner, A.

2012-04-01

122

Watching outside while under a carpet cloak of invisibility.  

PubMed

We demonstrate in this work a unique approach for watching outside while hiding in a carpet cloaking based on transformation optics. Unlike conventional carpet cloaking, which screens all the incident electromagnetic waves, we break the cloak and allow incident light get into the carpet. Hence outside information is detected inside the cloak. To recover the invisible cloaking, complementary techniques are applied in the broken space. Consequently, a hiding-inside and watching-outside (HIWO) carpet cloak is sewed, which works as an invisible cloaking and allows surveillance of the outside at the same time. Our work provides a strategy for an ideal cloak with "hiding" and "watching" functions simultaneously. PMID:22181296

Zhao, Jin-Zhu; Wang, De-Lin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Hu, Qing; Wang, Mu

2011-10-01

123

Y2K Global Status Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Will Y2K be a big yawner or the end of the world as we know it? Either way, users can keep track of worldwide events via this site (provided, of course, they have power and a working phone line). Created by the International Y2K Cooperation Center, the Global Status Watch will serve as a central source for country-specific information on Y2K and infrastructure status. Other governments and the general public can visit the site during the date rollover to view a country summary Webpage which will show the status of all reporting countries and when the information was submitted. The summary page will also offer links to each country's individual report and its national Y2K Webpage. The country summary will be available beginning December 28 and continuing into January as long as needed. A selection of additional Y2K resources is available at the International Y2K Cooperation Center homepage, including surveys, a calender, Y2K coordinator contact information, conference proceedings, and tools and templates.

124

Characteristics of trace gaseous pollutants at a regional background station in Northern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of trace gaseous pollutants were taken at the Shangdianzi site, a WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) background station in Northern China. The results are presented for the period from September 2003 to December 2006. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the O3, NOx, SO2, and CO concentration are characterized and possible causes for them are discussed. The observed levels of the trace gases are comparable to those at some other background sites in polluted regions inside and outside of China. It was shown that the seasonal variation of O3 can change slightly from year to year due to the year-to-year alternation in the meteorological conditions. Higher CO concentrations were observed in some warmer months, particularly in June and July, 2006. Intensive biomass burning in the North China Plain region, in combination with the transport of regional pollution by more frequent southwesterly winds, is believed to be responsible for the elevated CO concentrations. The diurnal variation of O3, with delayed peaking times, suggests that the transport of photochemical aged plume is an important source for O3 at Shangdianzi. The diurnal variations of SO2 in all seasons show higher values during daytime, contradicting the common view. An explanation for this unusual phenomenon is hypothesized. To gain an insight into the impact of transport on the trace gases levels at Shangdianzi, air mass backward trajectories were calculated and analyzed in combination with corresponding pollutant concentrations. The results indicate that the transport of air masses from the North China Plain region and from the major coal mining regions west of Shangdianzi is responsible for the high concentrations of the gaseous pollutants.

Meng, Z. Y.; Xu, X. B.; Yan, P.; Ding, G. A.; Tang, J.; Lin, W. L.; Xu, X. D.; Wang, S. F.

2009-02-01

125

"Walking and watching" in queer London: Sarah Waters' Tipping The Velvet and The Night Watch.  

PubMed

This article argues that Sarah Waters' representation of London in her historical fictions Tipping the Velvet and The Night Watch is used to delineate the gendered bodies and sexual identities of her characters. A historical summary demonstrates that female masculinity was slowly mapped onto sexual identity between the 1880s and 1940s in Britain. The article argues that Waters' "inventive" use of this history allows her to question the construction of both historical and contemporary identifications. The way that Waters' characters are constricted and liberated by London's urban landscape demonstrates the spatial and temporal contingency of both gender and sexuality. PMID:23855943

Wood, Rachel

2013-01-01

126

28 CFR 552.42 - Suicide watch conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Suicide Prevention Program § 552.42 Suicide watch conditions. (a) Housing. Each institution must have one or more...

2009-07-01

127

28 CFR 552.42 - Suicide watch conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Suicide Prevention Program § 552.42 Suicide watch conditions. (a) Housing. Each institution must have one or more...

2013-07-01

128

28 CFR 552.42 - Suicide watch conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Suicide Prevention Program § 552.42 Suicide watch conditions. (a) Housing. Each institution must have one or more...

2010-07-01

129

Quarter of Prostate Cancer Patients May Abandon 'Watchful Waiting' Approach  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Quarter of Prostate Cancer Patients May Abandon 'Watchful Waiting' Approach European ... April 17, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Men's Health Prostate Cancer THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors ...

130

Health Care Workers Wash Hands More When Patients Watching  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Care Workers Wash Hands More When Patients Watching Canadian ... hospital, keep an eye out for hygiene practices: Health care workers are more likely to wash their hands ...

131

47 CFR 80.309 - Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act. 80.309 Section 80.309 Telecommunication...Safety Watches § 80.309 Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act. In addition to the watch...

2013-10-01

132

Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.  

PubMed

The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-04-01

133

Trial watch: Peptide vaccines in cancer therapy.  

PubMed

Prophylactic vaccination constitutes one of the most prominent medical achievements of history. This concept was first demonstrated by the pioneer work of Edward Jenner, dating back to the late 1790s, after which an array of preparations that confer life-long protective immunity against several infectious agents has been developed. The ensuing implementation of nation-wide vaccination programs has de facto abated the incidence of dreadful diseases including rabies, typhoid, cholera and many others. Among all, the most impressive result of vaccination campaigns is surely represented by the eradication of natural smallpox infection, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The idea of employing vaccines as anticancer interventions was first theorized in the 1890s by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it soon became clear that while vaccination could be efficiently employed as a preventive measure against infectious agents, anticancer vaccines would have to (1) operate as therapeutic, rather than preventive, interventions (at least in the vast majority of settings), and (2) circumvent the fact that tumor cells often fail to elicit immune responses. During the past 30 y, along with the recognition that the immune system is not irresponsive to tumors (as it was initially thought) and that malignant cells express tumor-associated antigens whereby they can be discriminated from normal cells, considerable efforts have been dedicated to the development of anticancer vaccines. Some of these approaches, encompassing cell-based, DNA-based and purified component-based preparations, have already been shown to exert conspicuous anticancer effects in cohorts of patients affected by both hematological and solid malignancies. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating purified peptides or full-length proteins as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23264902

Vacchelli, Erika; Martins, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2012-12-01

134

Wind tunnel tests of the GA(W)-2 airfoil with 20% aileron, 25% slotted flap, 30% Fowler flap and 10% slot-lip spoiler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two dimensional wind tunnel tests were conducted for the GA(W)-2 airfoil section with: 20% aileron, 25% slotted flap; 30% Fowler flap, and 10% slot-lip spoiler. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 2,200,000 and a Mach Number of 0.13. In addition to force measurements, tuft studies were conducted for the slotted and Fowler flap configurations. Aileron and spoiler hinge moments were obtained by integration of surface pressure measurements. Tests results show that a value of 3.82 was obtained with 30% Fowler flap. Aileron control effectiveness and hinge moments were similar to other airfoils. The slot-lip spoiler provided powerful, positive roll control at all flap settings.

Wentz, W. H., Jr.

1977-01-01

135

Making the Venus Concept Watch 1.0  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past year we have celebrated the 50th anniversary of planetary exploration, which started with the Venus flyby of Mariner-2; and the 35th anniversary of the Pioneer-Venus multi-probe mission where one large and three small probes descended to the surface of Venus, encountering extreme environmental conditions. At the surface of Venus the temperature is about 460 °C, and the pressure is 92 bar, with a highly corrosive super-critical CO2 atmosphere. At a Venusian altitude of 50 km the pressure and temperature conditions are near Earth-like, but the clouds carry sulfuric acid droplets. Deep probe missions to Jupiter and Saturn, targeting the 100 bar pressure depth encounter similar pressure and temperature conditions as the Pioneer-Venus probes did. Mitigating these environments is highly challenging and requires special considerations for designs and materials. While assessing such space mission concepts, we have found that there is an overlap between the extreme environments in planetary atmospheres and the environments experienced by deep-sea explorers back on Earth. Consequently, the mitigation approaches could be also similar between planetary probes and diver watches. For example, both need to tolerate about 100 bar of pressure-although high temperatures are not factors on Earth. Mitigating these environments, the potential materials are: titanium for the probe and the watch housing; sapphire for the window and glass; resin impregnated woven carbon fiber for the aeroshell?s thermal protection system and for the face of the watch; and nylon ribbon for the parachute and for the watch band. Planetary probes also utilize precision watches; thus there is yet another crosscutting functionality with diver watches. Our team, from the Innovation Design Engineering Program of the Royal College of Art, has designed and built a concept watch to commemorate these historical events, while highlighting advances in manufacturing processes over the past three to five decades, relevant to both future planetary mission designs and can be used to produce deep diver watches. In this paper we describe our design considerations; give a brief overview of the extreme environments these components would experience on both Venus and Earth; the manufacturing techniques and materials we used to build the Venus Watch; and its outreach potential to bring a distant concept of planetary exploration closer to Earth. We will also address lessons learned from this project and new ideas forward, for the next generation of this concept design.

Balint, Tibor S.; Melchiorri, Julian P.

2014-08-01

136

NewsWatch: A Consumer's Guide to the News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for Media and Public Affairs, a nonpartisan research organization that conducts scientific analyses of the media, has recently launched NewsWatch, a new daily Web magazine created for news consumers, promising to "tell you when [news is] accurate, when it's wrong, and why." NewsWatch contains several sections: Today's News, a daily news summary from NewsWatch editors; Media Critic, a daily digest of news about the news media from leading media critics; Spotlight, feature articles analyzing the news media; Resources, a collection of links to online media publications, watchdog organizations, and research institutions; and Talk Back, a directory of news organizations for consumers who want to provide feedback directly to news agencies. The entire site is searchable by keyword(s).

137

Watch - a low-cost, secure-item monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a remote sensor package that provides a low-cost, convenient way of monitoring item movement. Originally, the package was intended for use in valve monitoring, but it is now possible to use it in any sensor application where hardwire installation is impractical or uneconomical. Full system implementation includes a receiver/controller which correlates the arrival time of RF signals generated by item-monitoring transmitters to increase communication security. Wireless Alarm Transmission of Contained Handling (WATCH) is such a system. One important application of WATCH is in storage vaults where there are a number of material containers. Applying WATCH to inventory control reduces inventory workload and employee exposure rates; the system also provides quick access to inventory information by interfacing the system with plant site computer systems.

Sanderson, S.N.

1987-07-01

138

It's About Time:Mark Twain's ``My Watch'' and Relativity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over three decades before Einstein's year of miracles, the American humorist Mark Twain published an essay titled ``My Watch,''1 in which he recounts his experiences with a previously reliable pocket watch and those who tried to rehabilitate it. He begins his essay by confessing his first error: My beautiful new watch had run eighteen months without losing or gaining, and without breaking any part of its machinery or stopping. I had come to believe it infallible in its judgments about the time of day, and to consider its constitution and its anatomy imperishable. But at last, one night, I let it run down. I grieved about it as if it were a recognized messenger and forerunner of calamity. Twain then sets the watch by guess, and takes it to the ``chief jeweler's to set it by the exact time.'' To Twain's dismay, the jeweler insists on opening it up and adjusting the regulator inside the watch, and the watch begins to gain time. It gained faster and faster day by day. Within a week it sickened to a raging fever, and its pulse went up to a hundred and fifty in the shade. At the end of two months, it had left all the timepieces of the town far in the rear, and was a fraction over thirteen days ahead of the almanac. It was away into November enjoying the snow, while the October leaves were still turning. It hurried up house rent, bills payable, and such things, in such a ruinous way that I could not abide it.

Henderson, Hugh

2005-09-01

139

Data for Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 15 Problem 2, genetic causes of rheumatoid arthritis and associated traits  

PubMed Central

For Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 Problem 2, we organized data from several ongoing studies designed to identify genetic and environmental risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis. Data were derived from the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC), collaboration among Canadian researchers, the European Consortium on Rheumatoid Arthritis Families (ECRAF), and investigators from Manchester, England. All groups used a common standard for defining rheumatoid arthritis, but NARAC also further selected for a more severe phenotype in the probands. Genotyping and family structures for microsatellite-based linkage analysis were provided from all centers. In addition, all centers but ECRAF have genotyped families for linkage analysis using SNPs and these data were additionally provided. NARAC also had additional data from a dense genotyping analysis of a region of chromosome 18 and results from candidate gene studies, which were provided. Finally, smoking influences risk for rheumatoid arthritis, and data were provided from the NARAC study on this behavior as well as some additional phenotypes measuring severity. Several questions could be evaluated using the data that were provided. These include comparing linkage analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphisms versus microsatellites and identifying credible regions of linkage outside the HLA region on chromosome 6p13, which has been extensively documented; evaluating the joint effects of smoking with genetic factors; and identifying more homogenous subsets of families for whom genetic susceptibility might be stronger, so that linkage and association studies may be more efficiently conducted.

Amos, Christopher I; Chen, Wei Vivien; Remmers, Elaine; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Seldin, Michael F; Criswell, Lindsey A; Lee, Annette T; John, Sally; Shephard, Neil D; Worthington, Jane; Cornelis, Francois; Plenge, Robert M; Begovich, Ann B; Dyer, Thomas D; Kastner, Daniel L; Gregersen, Peter K

2007-01-01

140

Litter Pollution, Level 2. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

141

Framework for a Technology-Watch Relay Station  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the centre of the PRIME Faraday Partnership's Technology Watch service is a growing series of technology and market reviews for managers and engineers in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) producing "smart" products. Its aim is to help them maintain their awareness of new technologies and markets and thereby seize opportunities to…

Stokes, C. A.; Palmer, P. J.

2004-01-01

142

Cryptanalysis of a pay-as-you-watch system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract In this paper, we exhibit security flaws in MICROCAST pay - as - you - watch system From the sole knowledge of public parameters, we show how any intruder is able to forge a coin and so to freely get access to the service

Marc Joye

2003-01-01

143

Watch Out for Children: A Mothers' Statement to Advertisers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explains that all adults must watch out for all children, cautioning that marketing is harmful to children. Advertisers are aggressively targeting age groups that, until recently, have been considered off-limits and occupying more of children's psychic and physical space. The report presents a commitment by mothers to all children to…

Institute for American Values, New York, NY.

144

Long Lake Whale Watch: Outdoor Education Comes Alive.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Promotes the experiential learning benefits of outdoor education. Describes the experiences of students in grades 4-6 who planned, raised funds for, and participated in a field trip that included a visit to the New England Aquarium, a whale watch cruise, and camping on Cape Cod during a tropical storm. (LP)

Briggs, James N.

1993-01-01

145

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England (foreground and on monitor) watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

146

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to her husband in the shuttle via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). Looking on are amateur radio operators employed at JSC: Gil Carman (WA5NOM); Lou McFaddin (WSDIO), and Candy Torres (KASUKJ).

1985-01-01

147

Science and Technology Text Mining: Global Technology Watch.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Global Technology Watch is the assemblage of methodologies, both human-based and computer-based, required to understand the status of science and technology (S&T) globally. Since one important dissemination avenue for S&T is its literature, analysis of te...

R. N. Kostoff

2003-01-01

148

Watch TV Upside Down on a Piece of Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this optics activity, learners use a television to generate an image with a magnifying glass. Learners will be surprised to see how they can watch TV on a piece of paper, albeit upside down! Use this activity to demonstrate the behavior of light refraction and reflection.

Cobb, Vicki; Cobb, Josh

2008-01-01

149

Electromagnetic Dancer: Connect Her Up and Watch Her Dance!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners use a nail and magnet wire to build an electromagnet, which controls the movements of a paper dancer. Learners will enjoy watching the dancer swirl around when they activate the electromagnet. Use this activity to help learners explore circuits, electromagnets, and currents. Includes pictures, detailed steps for construction, and focus questions to enhance learning.

Workshop, Watsonville E.

2011-01-01

150

Presidential Debate Watching, Issue Knowledge, Character Evaluation, and Vote Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employs NES (National Election Survey) data from several presidential elections to investigate the effects of presidential debate watching on voters' issue knowledge, character evaluation, and vote choice. Debates can instill issue knowledge; however, voters are less likely to learn about incumbent presidents seeking re-election after a…

Benoit, William L.; Hansen, Glenn J.

2004-01-01

151

Trash Treasures, Level 5. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

152

Trash Trends, Level 3. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

153

Assessing Interest Level during Movie Watching with Brain Potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined whether event-related potentials (ERPs) can be used to reflect a participant's level of inter- est in an ongoing audiovisual experience. Previous studies showed that the ERPs elicited by auditory or somatosensory (vibratory) probe stimuli were reduced in amplitude while participants were watching an interesting video clip as com- pared to a boring video clip or still

Yumi Shigemitsu; Hiroshi Nittono

2008-01-01

154

47 CFR 80.308 - Watch required by the Great Lakes Radio Agreement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Watch required by the Great Lakes Radio Agreement. 80.308 ...80.308 Watch required by the Great Lakes Radio Agreement. (a) Each...station for compliance with the Great Lakes Radio Agreement must when...

2013-10-01

155

49 CFR 1560.107 - Use of watch list matching results by covered aircraft operators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY SECURE FLIGHT PROGRAM Collection and Transmission of Secure Flight Passenger Data for Watch List Matching § 1560.107 Use of watch list matching...

2013-10-01

156

Tropospheric ozone variations at the Everest-Pyramid GAW-WMO station (5079 m a.s.l., Nepal): natural and anthropogenic contributions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface ozone is a key species controlling the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and a powerful greenhouse gas. Since March 2006, continuous measurements of its concentration have been carried out at the Everest-Pyramid GAW-WMO station (5079 m a.s.l., Nepal), which is considered representative for the South-East Himalayas. The aim of this activity, conducted in the framework of Ev-K2-CNR "SHARE ASIA" and UNEP -"ABC" projects, is twofold: (a) to characterize the atmospheric background composition at the high Himalayan altitudes; and (b) to investigate the possible influence of polluted air mass transports. In this work, we present the first systematic evaluation about the influence played by natural (i.e. stratospheric intrusion events) and anthropogenic (i.e. transport of polluted air masses) processes in determining the ozone variations at this measurement site. For this purpose, we analysed two years of continuous measurements concerning in-situ surface ozone, black carbon and meteorological parameters as well as total ozone values from OMI satellite measurements. Further information about the origin of air masses affecting the measurement site was gained from three-dimensional backward trajectories (calculated with the LAGRANTO model) and consideration of potential vorticity values along these trajectories. Preliminary results suggest that the stratospheric intrusions and the pollution transport events significantly affect tropospheric ozone levels during pre-monsoon and dry seasons, even if strong episodes of pollution transport are also observed during the onset period of the monsoon season.

Cristofanelli, P.; Bonasoni, P.; Marinoni, A.; Duchi, R.; Calzolari, F.; Bonafe', U.; Roccato, F.; Vuillermoz, E.; Verza, G. P.; Sprenger, M.

2009-04-01

157

Preferred Stock Returns, CreditWatch, and Preferred Stock Rating Changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the announcement effects of CreditWatch placement and reratings upon a sample of preferred stock issues that were placed on CreditWatch and later rerated or affirmed by Standard & Poor's. Results indicate that CreditWatch provides information to market participants and may have reduced the surprise associated with subsequent reratings. CreditWatch placement may be an erroneous signal, however, since

James W. Wansley; Fayez A. Elayan; Brian A. Maris

1990-01-01

158

MedWatch, the FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program  

MedlinePLUS

... Contact Information MedWatch Partners MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program Search the MedWatch ... 24/2014 More What's New FDA Approved Safety Information DailyMed (National Library of Medicine) Current Drug Prescribing ...

159

Losing Sleep to Watch the Night-Sky: The Relationship between Sleep-Length and Noctcaelador  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For most of history, humans have been watching the night-sky (Hawkins, 1983). Historically, individuals have watched the night-sky for aesthetic appreciation and to gain insights and knowledge (Brecher & Feirtag, 1979). Despite the long history of night-sky watching among humans and the apparent importance of the behavior to large groups of…

Kelly, William E.; Rose, Callie

2005-01-01

160

MarketWatch: Map of the Market  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wall Street Journal magazine of personal business SmartMoney.com provides this new financial tool for investors. The Map of the Market allows users to customize their own color-coded maps of stock activity for up to 500 companies. Map regions are divided by industry sector, and each area yields detailed company earnings reports, analyst recommendations, and business news with a click of the mouse. Note: red/green colorblind users may alter map colors to blue/yellow with the Map Control Panel.

161

Seagrass-Watch: Engaging Torres Strait Islanders in marine habitat monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Involvement in scientifically structured habitat monitoring is a relatively new concept to the peoples of Torres Strait. The approach we used was to focus on awareness, and to build the capacity of groups to participate using Seagrass-Watch as the vehicle to provide education and training in monitoring marine ecosystems. The project successfully delivered quality scientifically rigorous baseline information on the seasonality of seagrasses in the Torres Strait—a first for this region. Eight seagrass species were identified across the monitoring sites. Seagrass cover varied within and between years. Preliminary evidence indicated that drivers for seagrass variability were climate related. Generally, seagrass abundance increased during the north-west monsoon ( Kuki), possibly a consequence of elevated nutrients, lower tidal exposure times, less wind, and higher air temperatures. Low seagrass abundance coincided with the presence of greater winds and longer periods of exposure at low tides during the south-east trade wind season ( Sager). No seasonal patterns were apparent when frequency of disturbance from high sedimentation and human impacts was high. Seagrass-Watch has been incorporated in to the Thursday Island High School's Marine Studies Unit ensuring continuity of monitoring. The students, teachers, and other interested individuals involved in Seagrass-Watch have mastered the necessary scientific procedures to monitor seagrass meadows, and developed skills in coordinating a monitoring program and skills in mentoring younger students. This has increased the participants' self-esteem and confidence, and given them an insight into how they may participate in the future management of their sea country.

Mellors, Jane E.; McKenzie, Len J.; Coles, Robert G.

2008-09-01

162

Watching the Stars go `Round and `Round  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I present results from several seasons of photometric observations of X--ray sources in the Orion OB1a and OB1b star formation regions. The initial goal was to measure the rotational periods of several dozen pre--main sequence (PMS) stars. Since the early 1980s, X--rays have been found to be the premier method of identifying PMS stars, especially in highly confused regions. I first describe previous work in rotational studies, beginning with spectrophotographic observations of v sin i through the modern use of charge coupled devices to study the rotational modulation of spotted stars. The optical properties of 105 X--ray sources observed as part of my thesis research are discussed in detail next. Based on optical colors, I find that the X--ray sources in both regions lie along a well defined locus above the main sequence. Infrared and optical data confirm that 90% of the X--ray sources are PMS and about 10% of the PMS stars may have disks. Between V magnitudes 12 and 16, I find that the X--ray sources account for 80% of the pre--main sequence population, as determined by location in the H--R diagram. This photometric study also reveals a population of PMS stars to which the X--ray surveys were insensitive. These PMS stars range in mass from Solar mass objects, down to very close to the brown dwarf limit. This photometric method, augmented by spectra, may supplant X--rays as the premier method for identification of PMS sources in regions of star formation. It may also provide a method for observing stars at the low mass end of the initial mass function. With the PMS nature of these X--ray sources well characterized, I examine the periodic nature of only the stars which were associated with X--ray sources. I use simulated data to demonstrate that for stars with perfectly sinusoidal behavior, accurate periods can be found in a cases of signal to noise greater than 2. that the For more realistic stars, which do not vary in brightness (along our line--of--sight) exactly as a sine wave, the signal to noise must be higher by a factor of two or more. I also discuss the expected color changes due to spot modulation and find that the allowed variations cover a very limited range in phase space. I find rotation periods for five stars at confidence of greater than 99.9%. Five additional rotation periods were found with confidence of greater than 99%. Rotation periods of 49 additional stars were found at much lower confidence. Finally, the relation between the data presented here and other data is discussed. The sampling rate of the data presented here allows for detection of shorter periods than previously reported for T Tauri stars. I note the bimodal distribution of rotation periods which other authors have reported. I further note that the ratio of slow rotators to fast rotators seems to change as a function of the age of the star forming region. Rotation period and various observables are compared. I find weak correlations between slow rotation and high variability and between slow rotation and IR color excess. Both these correlations support the hypothesis that stars with disks are slow rotators. However, there is also a large fraction of slow rotators which do not show evidence for disks. available at http://hea-www.harvard.edu/~swolk/swolk.html

Wolk, Scott J.

1996-12-01

163

137Cs baseline levels in the Mediterranean and Black Sea: A cross-basin survey of the CIESM Mediterranean Mussel Watch programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was selected as unique biomonitor species to implement a regional monitoring programme, the CIESM Mediterranean Mussel Watch (MMW), in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. As of today, and upon standardization of the methodological approach, the MMW Network has been able to quantify 137Cs levels in mussels from 60 coastal stations and to produce the first

Hervé Thébaulta; Alessia M. Rodriguez y Baena; Bruno Andral; Delko Barisic; José Benedicto Albaladejo; Alexandru S. Bologa; Redouane Boudjenoun; Roberta Delfanti; Victor N. Egorov; Tahar El Khoukhi; Heleni Florou; Goran Kniewald; Abdelkader Noureddine; Vasile Patrascu; Mai Khanh Pham; Alfonso Scarpato; Nikolay A. Stokozov; Sayhan Topcuoglu; Michel Warnau

2008-01-01

164

Study of short-lived climate forcers atmospheric variability at Kathmandu and at the WMO/GAW Global Station "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" (5079 m a.s.l.) in the Himalayas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerosols and tropospheric ozone play a key role in the climate system, since they are short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs). South Asia represents a "hot-spot" in terms of climate change, since a vast region extending from the Indian Ocean to the Himalayas appears to be affected by large amounts of aerosols and pollutant gases (the so-called Atmospheric Brown Cloud). In the framework of the SusKat - ABC field campaign, a new measurement station has been installed in Pakanajol, Kathmandu (Nepal) on January 2013. This station is representative of the severe polluted conditions of the Kathmandu valley. Continuous measurements of equivalent black carbon (eqBC), surface ozone (O3), aerosol number concentration and size distribution, on-line PM10-PM1, as well as meteorological parameters, are carried out at this sampling site. In the high Himalayas (150 km north-east from Kathmandu), continuous atmospheric composition measurements are performed at the WMO/GAW Global Station Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (NCO-P, 5079 m a.s.l.) in the Southern Himalayas. This measurement site is representative of the background conditions of the Himalayan ridge and measurements of eqBC, O3, aerosol number size distribution and meteorological parameters are continuously carried out since March 2006. The aim of this work is to compare the variability of atmospheric composition between the two sampling sites, with a particular emphasis on SLCFs, thus providing two complementary perspectives about the Atmospheric Brown Cloud phenomenon. Moreover, hints about the possible role of vertical air-mass transport of SLCFs from the foothills to the high Himalayas will be provided. The seasonal trend of eqBC at Pakanajol is characterized by a decreasing behavior from winter to monsoon, while at NCO-P it is characterized by a clear pre-monsoon maximum. On the other hand, at both sampling sites, O3 and particle number (accumulation and coarse) showed highest values during the pre-monsoon (April-May), even if at NCO-P significantly lower levels of eqBC and aerosol particle number (ratio 7% for eqBC, 29% for accumulation and 12% for coarse particles) were observed in respect to Kathmandu. Moreover, case studies concerning simultaneous events of eqBC and O3 increases in Kathmandu and in the high Himalayas will be investigated.

Putero, Davide; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Marinoni, Angela; Duchi, Rocco; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Landi, Tony Christian; Pietro Verza, Gian; Alborghetti, Marcello; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Lawrence, Mark; Bonasoni, Paolo

2014-05-01

165

The experience of watching dance: phenomenological–neuroscience duets  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies\\u000a in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive\\u000a science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g.\\u000a Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences

Corinne Jola; Shantel Ehrenberg; Dee Reynolds

166

High Level data fusion system for CanCoastWatch  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a goal-driven net-enabled distributed data fusion system is described for CanCoastWatch (CCW) project. Multiple sensors are deployed and managed to achieve the goals of situation assessment using a net-enabled architecture. The local tracks reported by multiple sensors are first integrated into global tracks. Decision making is then performed on basic sub-goals that can be directly derived from

Zhenhua Li; H. Leung; P. Valin; Hans Wehn

2007-01-01

167

Notes from the field: planting, nurturing, and watching things grow.  

PubMed

Editors' Note: We invited a sample of AJPM's Editorial Board, supplement guest editors, and longtime colleagues and contributors to share their experiences and impressions of the impact of AJPM on their respective domains. We were particularly fond of Ken Powell's analogy to being "tenders of the planted seed"--as planters, weeders, and harvesters--watching and nurturing the growth of AJPM, and have elected to lead with his commentary. PMID:24237910

Friends of AJPM

2013-12-01

168

Refocusing Mussel Watch on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs): the California pilot study (2009-10).  

PubMed

To expand the utility of the Mussel Watch Program, local, regional and state agencies in California partnered with NOAA to design a pilot study that targeted contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). Native mussels (Mytilus spp.) from 68 stations, stratified by land use and discharge scenario, were collected in 2009-10 and analyzed for 167 individual pharmaceuticals, industrial and commercial chemicals and current use pesticides. Passive sampling devices (PSDs) and caged Mytilus were co-deployed to expand the list of CECs, and to assess the ability of PSDs to mimic bioaccumulation by Mytilus. A performance-based quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) approach was developed to ensure a high degree of data quality, consistency and comparability. Data management and analysis were streamlined and standardized using automated software tools. This pioneering study will help shape future monitoring efforts in California's coastal ecosystems, while serving as a model for monitoring CECs within the region and across the nation. PMID:23886247

Maruya, Keith A; Dodder, Nathan G; Schaffner, Rebecca A; Weisberg, Stephen B; Gregorio, Dominic; Klosterhaus, Susan; Alvarez, David A; Furlong, Edward T; Kimbrough, Kimani L; Lauenstein, Gunnar G; Christensen, John D

2014-04-30

169

Source regions for CO2 at Cape Point assessed by modelling, 222Rn and meteorological data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores methods of characterising experimental and modelling data to see if trace gas measurements at the Cape Point GAW station could improve our understanding of sources from the continent. Selection criteria have been defined which make it possible to divide the samples into categories with predominant transport to Cape Point from one of four source regions: City (greater

S. Whittlestone; E. Kowalczyk; E.-G Brunke; C. Labuschagne

2009-01-01

170

The GlucoWatch biographer: a frequent automatic and noninvasive glucose monitor.  

PubMed

The GlucoWatch (Cygnus, Inc, Redwood City, CA, USA) biographer provides automatic, frequent and noninvasive blood glucose measurements for up to 12 h. The device extracts glucose through intact skin where it is measured by an amperometric biosensor. Clinical trials in a variety of environments have shown that the biographer provides accurate and precise glucose measurements when compared with serial fingerstick blood glucose measurements. Mean difference between these measurements was 0.26 mmol/L in the home environment (r = 0.80). Over 94% of biographer readings were in the clinically acceptable A+B region of the Clarke Error Grid. A slight positive bias is observed for the biographer readings at low glucose levels. Biographer precision, as measured by coefficient of variation (CV)%, is approximately 10%. The low glucose alert function of the biographer was able to detect up to 75% of hypoglycaemic episodes with a low false alert level. Skin irritation, characterized by erythema and oedema was either nonexistent or mild in over 87% of subjects and resolved in virtually all subjects without treatment in several days. The GlucoWatch biographer has been shown to be a safe and effective method to track glucose level trends and patterns, which should enable improved glycaemic control for many patients. PMID:11209971

Tierney, M J; Tamada, J A; Potts, R O; Eastman, R C; Pitzer, K; Ackerman, N R; Fermi, S J

2000-12-01

171

Watching the World Rev its Heat Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release.) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Without the clouds, more sunlight was allowed to enter the tropical zones and more thermal energy was allowed to leave. The findings may have big implications for climate change and future global warming. 'This suggests that the tropical heat engine increased its speed,' observes Dr. Bruce Wielicki, of NASA Langley Research Center. 'It's as if the heat engine in the tropics has become less efficient, using more fuel in the 1990s than in the 1980s.' Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center

2002-01-01

172

The Regional Extent of Biogenic Aerosols in Borneo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes that control the composition of aerosols are currently not well understood, as are their effects on regional climate and meteorology. This is particularly true when considering tropical regions; the enhanced plant activity and extensive forestation are responsible for large amounts of VOCs being released into the atmosphere, which are responsible for forming secondary aerosol matter. However, the aerosols in these regions are currently poorly characterised both in terms of their concentration, physiochemical properties and the spatial extent of their influence. During the summer of 2008, an extensive suite of instrumentation was deployed on a number of platforms as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) and the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) projects. The principle surface site was the Bukit Atur Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) site in the Danum Valley Conservation Area. This featured a variety of aerosol instrumentation, designed to characterise the aerosol properties in conjunction with gas phase and meteorological measurements. In addition, many more instruments were also deployed aboard the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-S 146 research aircraft. Some of these instruments (including the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Droplet Measurement Technologies Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter) were designed to duplicate the ground based measurements, so that the spatial extent of the aerosols could be assessed in addition to the detailed characterisation work. Typical flights included atmospheric profiles and flights within the boundary layer (BL) over the forest to map out the extent of the aerosols and precursors. The non refractory BL aerosols typically contained a mixture of organic matter and sulphate, the latter possibly of oceanic origin. This is in contrast to the free troposphere where consistently low concentrations were recorded. Of particular interest was studying the differences in atmospheric composition when comparing the BL over primary and mature secondary forest with that over palm oil plantations. Changes were noted during the transitions between the two land use types, relating to the different VOC emission profiles of the two vegetation types and the enhanced human activity.

Allan, J. D.; Robinson, N. H.; Bower, K. N.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Good, N.; Irwin, M.; Whitehead, J.; Gabey, A. M.; Muller, J.; Trembath, J.; Chen, Q.; Martin, S. T.; Gallagher, M.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.

2008-12-01

173

HUBBLE WATCHES STAR TEAR APART ITS NEIGHBORHOOD  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a view of a stellar demolition zone in our Milky Way Galaxy: a massive star, nearing the end of its life, tearing apart the shell of surrounding material it blew off 250,000 years ago with its strong stellar wind. The shell of material, dubbed the Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888), surrounds the 'hefty,' aging star WR 136, an extremely rare and short-lived class of super-hot star called a Wolf-Rayet. Hubble's multicolored picture reveals with unprecedented clarity that the shell of matter is a network of filaments and dense knots, all enshrouded in a thin 'skin' of gas [seen in blue]. The whole structure looks like oatmeal trapped inside a balloon. The skin is glowing because it is being blasted by ultraviolet light from WR 136. Hubble's view covers a small region at the northeast tip of the structure, which is roughly three light-years across. A picture taken by a ground-based telescope [lower right] shows almost the entire nebula. The whole structure is about 16 light-years wide and 25 light-years long. The bright dot near the center of NGC 6888 is WR 136. The white outline in the upper left-hand corner represents Hubble's view. Hubble's sharp vision is allowing scientists to probe the intricate details of this complex system, which is crucial to understanding the life cycle of stars and their impact on the evolution of our galaxy. The results of this study appear in the June issue of the Astronomical Journal. WR 136 created this web of luminous material during the late stages of its life. As a bloated, red super-giant, WR 136 gently puffed away some of its bulk, which settled around it. When the star passed from a super-giant to a Wolf-Rayet, it developed a fierce stellar wind - a stream of charged particles released from its surface - and began expelling mass at a furious rate. The star began ejecting material at a speed of 3.8 million mph (6.1 million kilometers per hour), losing matter equal to that of our Sun's every 10,000 years. Then the stellar wind collided with the material around the star and swept it up into a thin shell. That shell broke apart into the network of bright clumps seen in the image. The present-day strong wind of the Wolf-Rayet star has only now caught up with the outer edge of the shell, and is stripping away matter as it flows past [the tongue-shaped material in the upper right of the Hubble image]. The stellar wind continues moving outside the shell, slamming into more material and creating a shock wave. This powerful force produces an extremely hot, glowing skin [seen in blue], which envelops the bright nebula. A shock wave is analogous to the sonic boom produced by a jet plane that exceeds the speed of sound; in a cosmic setting, this boom is seen rather than heard. The outer material is too thin to see in the image until the shock wave hits it. The cosmic collision and subsequent shock wave implies that a large amount of matter resides outside the visible shell. The discovery of this material may explain the discrepancy between the mass of the entire shell (four solar masses) and the amount of matter the star lost when it was a red super-giant (15 solar masses). The nebula's short-term fate is less spectacular. As the stellar wind muscles past the clumps of material, the pressure around them drops. A decrease in pressure means that the clumps expand, leading to a steady decline in brightness and fading perhaps to invisibility. Later, the shell may be compressed and begin glowing again, this time as the powerful blast wave of the Wolf-Rayet star completely destroys itself in a powerful supernova explosion. The nebula resides in the constellation Cygnus, 4,700 light-years from Earth. If the nebula were visible to the naked eye, it would appear in the sky as an ellipse one-quarter the size of the full moon. The observations were taken in June 1995 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Scientists selected the colors in this composite image to correspond with the ionization (the process of stripping electrons from atoms) state of the gases, with blue r

2002-01-01

174

Intimate partner violence in the Canadian territorial north: perspectives from a literature review and a media watch  

PubMed Central

Introduction Family violence is a complex, multidimensional and pervasive presence in many Aboriginal communities. Although practitioners acknowledge that intimate partner violence (IPV) is a grave concern in the North, as in other jurisdictions in Canada, there is a paucity of literature about IPV and the local response to that violence. Objective The purpose of this study is to report on a synthesis of Northern Territorial literature and a 3-year media watch conducted in the Canadian territories. Design This review is part of a multidisciplinary 5-year study occurring in the Northwest Territories (NT) and northern regions of the Prairie Provinces of Canada. The methods included a review of the literature through CINAHL, PubMed, Academic Search Complete, Social Sciences Index and JSTOR (1990–2012) combined with a media watch from 2009 to 2012. A thematic content analysis was completed. Results Themes included: colonization; alcohol and substance use; effects of residential schooling; housing inadequacies; help-seeking behaviors; and gaps within the justice system. Identified themes from the media watch were: murders from IPV; reported assaults and criminal charges; emergency protection orders; and awareness campaigns and prevention measures. Conclusion When synthesized, the results of the literature review and media surveillance depict a starting context and description of IPV in the Canadian territories. There are many questions left unanswered which build support for the necessity of the current research, outline the public outcry for action in local media and identify the current published knowledge about IPV.

Moffitt, Pertice; Fikowski, Heather; Mauricio, Marshirette; Mackenzie, Anne

2013-01-01

175

Watchful waiting for ventral hernias: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Ventral hernias are a common clinical problem. Immediate repair is recommended for most ventral hernias despite significant recurrence rates. This practice may be related to a lack of understanding of the natural history of ventral hernias. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of ventral hernias and to determine if watchful waiting is an acceptable and safe option. Forty-one patients with ventral hernias were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study of watchful waiting. Primary outcomes were functional impairment resulting from hernia disease as measured by the Activities Assessment Scale (AAS) and changes from baseline to two years in the physical and mental component score of the SF-36 Health Survey. Secondary outcomes included complications such as incarceration. Mixed-effects model for repeated measures and Student's t tests were used to evaluate scale performance. The mean age of enrollees was 64 years, and the mean hernia size was 239 cm(2). Eleven patients were lost to follow-up, and seven patients died of other causes. All remaining patients were followed for two years. There was one incarceration during the follow-up period. There was no deterioration in the AAS score (baseline vs 24 months = 28 vs 25, P = 0.60). There was deterioration of the physical functioning dimension of the SF-36 (baseline vs 24 months = 40 vs 32, P < 0.01), but the mental functioning dimension was improved (45 vs 51; P = 0.01). Watchful waiting was a safe option for patients in this study with ventral hernias. PMID:24666865

Bellows, Charles F; Robinson, Celia; Fitzgibbons, Robert J; Webber, Larry S; Berger, David H

2014-03-01

176

STS-113 visitors watch the Space Shuttle Endeavour launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Watching the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 are NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) and Associate Administrator of Public Affairs Glen Mahone. Liftoff occurred ontime at 7:49:47 p.m. EST. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Also onboard are the Expedition 6 crew, who will replace Expedition 5. Endeavour is scheduled to land at KSC after an 11-day journey.

2002-01-01

177

A ``solar watch'' program for the Human Exploration Initiative  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Because of the healt hazards of solar activity, human traffic in deep space will require facilities for monitoring, predicting, and altering the astronauts to potential danger. This suggests a ``solar watch'' program consisting of a network of platforms at one A.U. from the Sun, capable of monitoring its global behavior. The instrumentation carried by these network platforms can evolve in sophistication with successive launches, in order to lead to a deep understanding of the physical mechanisms of solar activity - the best basis for maximally reliable activity forecasts. The possibility of steroscopic viewing of the solar surface and corona will confer unique advantages for the physical understanding of these physical mechanisms.

Hudson, H.; Hildner, E.

1990-07-01

178

Listening, Watching, and Reading: The Structure and Correlates of Entertainment Preferences  

PubMed Central

People spend considerable amounts of time and money listening to music, watching TV and movies, and reading books and magazines, yet almost no attention in psychology has been devoted to understanding individual differences in preferences for such entertainment. The present research was designed to examine the structure and correlates of entertainment genre preferences. Analyses of the genre preferences of over 3,000 individuals revealed a remarkably clear factor structure. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, data converged to reveal five entertainment-preference dimensions: Communal, Aesthetic, Dark, Thrilling, and Cerebral. Preferences for these entertainment dimensions were uniquely related to demographics and personality traits. Results also indicated that personality accounted for significant proportions of variance in entertainment preferences over and above demographics. The results provide a foundation for developing and testing hypotheses about the psychology of entertainment preferences.

Rentfrow, Peter J.; Goldberg, Lewis R.; Zilca, Ran

2010-01-01

179

Listening, watching, and reading: the structure and correlates of entertainment preferences.  

PubMed

People spend considerable amounts of time and money listening to music, watching TV and movies, and reading books and magazines, yet almost no attention in psychology has been devoted to understanding individual differences in preferences for such entertainment. The present research was designed to examine the structure and correlates of entertainment genre preferences. Analyses of the genre preferences of more than 3,000 individuals revealed a remarkably clear factor structure. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, data converged to reveal five entertainment-preference dimensions: Communal, Aesthetic, Dark, Thrilling, and Cerebral. Preferences for these entertainment dimensions were uniquely related to demographics and personality traits. Results also indicated that personality accounted for significant proportions of variance in entertainment preferences over and above demographics. The results provide a foundation for developing and testing hypotheses about the psychology of entertainment preferences. PMID:20649744

Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Zilca, Ran

2011-04-01

180

Antibody-based therapeutics to watch in 2011  

PubMed Central

This overview of 25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and five Fc fusion protein therapeutics provides brief descriptions of the candidates, recently published clinical study results and on-going Phase 3 studies. In alphanumeric order, the 2011 therapeutic antibodies to watch list comprises AIN-457, bapineuzumab, brentuximab vedotin, briakinumab, dalotuzumab, epratuzumab, farletuzumab, girentuximab (WX-G250), naptumomab estafenatox, necitumumab, obinutuzumab, otelixizumab, pagibaximab, pertuzumab, ramucirumab, REGN88, reslizumab, solanezumab, T1h, teplizumab, trastuzumab emtansine, tremelimumab, vedolizumab, zalutumumab and zanolimumab. In alphanumeric order, the 2011 Fc fusion protein therapeutics to watch list comprises aflibercept, AMG-386, atacicept, Factor VIII-Fc and Factor IX-Fc. Commercially-sponsored mAb and Fc fusion therapeutics that have progressed only as far as Phase 2/3 or 3 were included. Candidates undergoing regulatory review or products that have been approved may also be in Phase 3 studies, but these were excluded. Due to the large body of primary literature about the candidates, only selected references are given and results from recent publications and articles that were relevant to Phase 3 studies are emphasized. Current as of September 2010, the information presented here will serve as a baseline against which future progress in the development of antibody-based therapeutics can be measured.

2011-01-01

181

Antibody-based therapeutics to watch in 2011.  

PubMed

This overview of 25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and 5 Fc fusion protein therapeutics provides brief descriptions of the candidates, recently published clinical study results and on-going Phase 3 studies. In alphanumeric order, the 2011 therapeutic antibodies to watch list comprises AIN-457, bapineuzumab, brentuximab vedotin, briakinumab, dalotuzumab, epratuzumab, farletuzumab, girentuximab (WX-G250), naptumomab estafenatox, necitumumab, obinutuzumab, otelixizumab, pagibaximab, pertuzumab, ramucirumab, REGN88, reslizumab, solanezumab, T1h , teplizumab, trastuzumab emtansine, tremelimumab, vedolizumab, zalutumumab and zanolimumab. In alphanumeric order, the 2011 Fc fusion protein therapeutics to watch list comprises aflibercept, AMG-386, atacicept, Factor VIII and Factor IX-Fc. Commercially-sponsored mAb and Fc fusion therapeutics that have progressed only as far as Phase 2/3 or 3 were included. Candidates undergoing regulatory review or products that have been approved may also be in Phase 3 studies, but these were excluded. Due to the large body of primary literature about the candidates, only selected references are given and results from recent publications and articles that were relevant to Phase 3 studies are emphasized. Current as of September 2010, the information presented here will serve as a baseline against which future progress in the development of antibody-based therapeutics can be measured. PMID:21051951

Reichert, Janice M

2011-01-01

182

A study of four-year HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b in-situ measurements at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric HCFC-22 (CHClF2) and HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) in-situ measurements have been recorded by an automated gas chromatograph-electron capture detectors (GC-ECDs) system and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Medusa-GC/MS) system at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) regional background station Shangdianzi (SDZ), China. The mixing ratios of the two HCFCs at SDZ show frequent events with elevated concentrations due to polluted air from urban or industrialized areas. The mean background mixing ratios for HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b were 205.3 ppt (parts per trillion, 10-12, molar) and 20.7 ppt, respectively, for the study period (March 2007-February 2011). The yearly background mixing ratios for the two HCFCs at SDZ are similar to those measured at Trinidad Head and Mace Head located in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), but larger than Cape Grim and Cape Matatula (located in the Southern Hemisphere) due to inter-hemispheric differences caused by predominantly NH emissions. During the study period, background mixing ratios exhibited positive growth rates of 8.7 ppt yr-1 for HCFC-22 and 0.95 ppt yr-1 for HCFC-142b. HCFC's seasonality exhibits a summer/autumn maximum and a winter minimum. 4-year averaged background seasonal amplitudes (maximum-minimum) are 6.0 ppt for HCFC-22 and 0.9 ppt for HCFC-142b. The seasonal fluctuations (maximum-minimum) in polluted events are 105.4 ppt for HCFC-22 and 29.1 ppt for HCFC-142b, which are much stronger than the fluctuations under background conditions. However, both HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b show summer minima in 2008, which is most likely due to emission control regulations when the Olympic Games were held in Beijing.

Yao, Bo; Vollmer, Martin K.; Xia, Lingjun; Zhou, Lingxi; Simmonds, Peter G.; Stordal, Frode; Maione, Michela; Reimann, Stefan; O'Doherty, Simon

2012-12-01

183

??????????????? Whale-watching price competition and differentiation gift-giving strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the economic benefits of differentiating gift-giving strategy adopted by firms that provide a whale-watching ecotourism activity in the marine tourism industry. Under assumed that tourists may not encounter the whales in the whale- watching activity that results in imposing psychological disappoint upon them, what gift-giving strategies do firms adopt to

Yao-Hsien Lee; Yi-Lun Ho; Tsung-Tai Yang; Ying-Zui Lu

184

Tracking website data-collection and privacy practices with the iWatch web crawler  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we introduce the iWatch web crawler, a tool designed to catalogue and analyze online data practices and the use of privacy related indicators and technologies. Our goal in developing iWatch was to make possible a new type of analysis of trends, the impact of legislation on practices, and geographic and social differences online. In this paper we

Carlos Jensen; Chandan Sarkar; Christian Jensen; Colin Potts

2007-01-01

185

Physical Activity and Television Watching in Relation to Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Television (TV) watching, a major sed- entary behavior in the United States, has been associ- ated with obesity. We hypothesized that prolonged TV watching may increase risk for type 2 diabetes. Methods: In 1986, 37918 men aged 40 to 75 years and free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer com- pleted a detailed physical activity questionnaire. Start- ing from

Frank B. Hu; Michael F. Leitzmann; Meir J. Stampfer; Graham A. Colditz; Walter C. Willett; Eric B. Rimm

2001-01-01

186

Realizing Outdoor Independent Learning with a Butterfly-Watching Mobile Learning System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we describe the development of a mobile butterfly-watching learning (BWL) system to realize outdoor independent learning for mobile learners. The mobile butterfly-watching learning system was designed in a wireless mobile ad-hoc learning environment. This is first result to provide a cognitive tool with supporting the independent…

Chen, Yuh-Shyan; Kao, Tai-Chien; Sheu, Jang-Ping

2005-01-01

187

Dyad of Papers Concerning Joint Verification of Severe Local Storm Watches and Warnings during Tornado Events.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Weather Service issues watches and warnings to alert the public to the threat of severe local storms. The study is based upon a tabulation of whether watches or warnings were in effect during tornado events during 1982-1988. Percentages of to...

P. W. Leftwich J. E. Hales

1990-01-01

188

FDA 101: How to Use the Consumer Complaint System and MedWatch  

MedlinePLUS

... to allowing the product back on the market back to top Problems to Report to MedWatch MedWatch is for reporting ... or call your local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator . back to top This article ... Your Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA FDA 101: Product Recalls - From First ...

189

Media Richness and Social Norms in the Choice to Attend Lectures or to Watch Them Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lectures in a large psychology course were taped and posted online where they could be viewed by streaming video. All students in the course had the option to attend lectures or watch them online, a choice that could be exercised on a lecture-by-lecture basis. The proportion of lectures watched online revealed that students chose between…

Bassili, John N.

2008-01-01

190

Where people look when watching movies: Do all viewers look at the same place?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnification around the most important point of a movie scene (center of interest—COI) might aid people with visual impairments that cause resolution loss. This will be effective only if most people look at the same place when watching a movie. We recorded the eye movements of 20 normally sighted subjects as each watched six movie clips, totaling 37.5 min. More

Robert B. Goldstein; Russell L. Woods; Eli Peli

2006-01-01

191

International Halley watch amateur observers' manual for scientific comet studies. Part 1: Methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Halley Watch is described as well as comets and observing techniques. Information on periodic Comet Halley's apparition for its 1986 perihelion passage is provided. Instructions are given for observation projects valuable to the International Halley Watch in six areas of study: (1) visual observations; (2) photography; (3) astrometry; (4) spectroscopic observations; (5) photoelectric photometry; and (6) meteor observations.

Edberg, S. J.

1983-01-01

192

STS-113 visitors watch the Space Shuttle Endeavour launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Among the visitors watching the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 are NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (top, center) and Glen Mahone, associate administrator for public affairs, NASA (left of O'Keefe). Liftoff occurred ontime at 7:49:47 p.m. EST. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Also onboard are the Expedition 6 crew, who will replace Expedition 5. Endeavour is scheduled to land at KSC after an 11-day journey.

2002-01-01

193

Watching TV and Food Intake: The Role of Content  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a serious and growing health concern worldwide. Watching television (TV) represents a condition during which many habitually eat, irrespective of hunger level. However, as of yet, little is known about how the content of television programs being watched differentially impacts concurrent eating behavior. In this study, eighteen normal-weight female students participated in three counter-balanced experimental conditions, including a ‘Boring’ TV condition (art lecture), an ‘Engaging’ TV condition (Swedish TV comedy series), and a no TV control condition during which participants read (a text on insects living in Sweden). Throughout each condition participants had access to both high-calorie (M&Ms) and low-calorie (grapes) snacks. We found that, relative to the Engaging TV condition, Boring TV encouraged excessive eating (+52% g, P?=?0.009). Additionally, the Engaging TV condition actually resulted in significantly less concurrent intake relative to the control ‘Text’ condition (?35% g, P?=?0.05). This intake was driven almost entirely by the healthy snack, grapes; however, this interaction did not reach significance (P?=?0.07). Finally, there was a significant correlation between how bored participants were across all conditions, and their concurrent food intake (beta?=?0.317, P?=?0.02). Intake as measured by kcals was similarly patterned but did not reach significance. These results suggest that, for women, different TV programs elicit different levels of concurrent food intake, and that the degree to which a program is engaging (or alternately, boring) is related to that intake. Additionally, they suggest that emotional content (e.g. boring vs. engaging) may be more associated than modality (e.g. TV vs. text) with concurrent intake.

Chapman, Colin D.; Nilsson, Victor C.; Thune, Hanna A.; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Le Greves, Madeleine; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S.; Benedict, Christian; Schioth, Helgi B.

2014-01-01

194

76 FR 38671 - Qualification for an STCW Endorsement as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch (OICNW)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for an STCW Endorsement as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch (OICNW) AGENCY...qualification for a STCW endorsement as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch (OICNW). The...for an STCW endorsement for Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch (OICNW)....

2011-07-01

195

Supporting temporal queries on clinical relational databases: the S-WATCH-QL language.  

PubMed Central

Due to the ubiquitous and special nature of time, specially in clinical datábases there's the need of particular temporal data and operators. In this paper we describe S-WATCH-QL (Structured Watch Query Language), a temporal extension of SQL, the widespread query language based on the relational model. S-WATCH-QL extends the well-known SQL by the addition of: a) temporal data types that allow the storage of information with different levels of granularity; b) historical relations that can store together both instantaneous valid times and intervals; c) some temporal clauses, functions and predicates allowing to define complex temporal queries.

Combi, C.; Missora, L.; Pinciroli, F.

1996-01-01

196

Antibodies to watch in 2014: Mid-year update.  

PubMed

The commercial pipeline of monoclonal antibodies is highly dynamic, with a multitude of transitions occurring during the year as product candidates advance through the clinical phases and onto the market. The data presented here add to that provided in the extensive "Antibodies to watch in 2014" report published in the January/February 2014 issue of mAbs. Recent phase transition data suggest that 2014 may be a banner year for first approvals of antibody therapeutics. As of May 2014, three products, ramucirumab (Cyramza®), siltuximab (Sylvant®) and vedolizumab (Entyvio(TM)), had been granted first approvals in the United States, and four additional antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab) are undergoing regulatory review in either the US or the European Union. Other notable events include the start of first Phase 3 studies for seven antibody therapeutics (dupilumab, SA237, etrolizumab, MPDL3280A, bavituximab, clivatuzumab tetraxetan, blinatumomab). Relevant data for these product candidates are summarized, and metrics for antibody therapeutics development are discussed. PMID:24846335

Reichert, Janice M

2014-07-01

197

International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for near-nucleus studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the Near-Nucleus Studies Net is to study the processes taking place in the near-nucleus environment as they relate to the nature of nucleus. This is accomplisghed by measuring the spatial and temporal distribution of dust, gases and ions in the coma on high resolution images taken from many observatories around the world. By modeling the motions of discrete dust features in Comet Halley, it is often possible to determine the locations of the emission sources on the surface and learn about the nucleus structure. In addition to the general goals shared by all IHW nets, the scientific goals of the net has been to determine (1)the gross surface structure of the nucleus, (2)the nucleus spin vector, (3)the distribution and evolution of jet sources and (4)the interrelationships between the gas, dust and ion components of the coma. An additional Comet Giacobini-Zinner watch was carried out by the NNSN in support of the NASA International Cometary Explorer flyby.

Larson, S.; Sekanina, Z.; Rahe, J.

1986-01-01

198

International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for large scale phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The largest scale structures of comets, their tails, are extremely interesting from a physical point of view, and some of their properties are among the most spectacular displayed by comets. Because the tail(s) is an important component part of a comet, the Large-Scale Phenomena (L-SP) Discipline was created as one of eight different observational methods in which Halley data would be encouraged and collected from all around the world under the aspices of the International Halley Watch (IHW). The L-SP Discipline Specialist (DS) Team resides at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center under the leadership of John C. Brandt, Malcolm B. Niedner, and their team of image-processing and computer specialists; Jurgan Rahe at NASA Headquarters completes the formal DS science staff. The team has adopted the study of disconnection events (DE) as its principal science target, and it is because of the rapid changes which occur in connection with DE's that such extensive global coverage was deemed necessary to assemble a complete record.

Brandt, J. C.; Niedner, M. B., Jr.

1986-01-01

199

TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12-15, 2012  

MedlinePLUS

... Youth Fitness Survey, 2012. Were there differences by sex in the percentage of youth who watched TV ... TV plus computer use did not differ by sex. No sex differences were observed in the percentage ...

200

Great Bay Coast Watch Standard Operating Procedures Phytoplankton Monitoring Program, March 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is the result of a volunteer-based phytoplankton monitoring project. The Great Bay Coast Watch (GBCW) and the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension hoped to obtain baseline and continuing information on the toxic phytoplankton pr...

A. Reid C. Dolan K. Diamond S. Cooper

2005-01-01

201

Great Bay Coast Watch Standard Operating Procedures Phytoplankton Monitoring Program, May 1, 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is the result of a volunteer-based phytoplankton monitoring project. The Great Bay Coast Watch (GBCW) and the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension hoped to obtain baseline and continuing information on the toxic phytoplankton pr...

A. Reid C. Dolan K. Diamond S. Cooper

2007-01-01

202

Great Bay Coast Watch Standard Operating Procedures Phytoplankton Monitoring Program, April 1, 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is the result of a volunteer-based phytoplankton monitoring project. The Great Bay Coast Watch (GBCW) and the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension hoped to obtain baseline and continuing information on the toxic phytoplankton pr...

A. Reid C. Dolan K. Diamond S. Cooper

2008-01-01

203

World mussel watch database. National status and trends program for marine environmental quality: Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) is an internationally cooordinated system for systematic operational data collection and analysis. This contribution to GOOS is an attempt to determine the levels of contaminants in mussels and oysters collected worldwide and to compare the results with the long-term Mussel Watch programs of the United States and France. A comprehensive literature search of studies using any species of mussels and/or oysters worldwide to monitor the levels of trace metals and organic contaminants was conducted and the data compiled into the World Mussel Watch database. Data sources and statistics of the database are included. Results of the World Mussel Watch and the US and France Mussel Watch programs were compared and typical levels of some trace metals in uncontaminated mussels and oysters were calculated.

Cantillo, A.Y.

1997-04-01

204

Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

Stahl, S.M.

1994-12-30

205

Inter-Subject Correlation of Brain Hemodynamic Responses During Watching a Movie: Localization in Space and Frequency  

PubMed Central

Cinema is a promising naturalistic stimulus that enables, for instance, elicitation of robust emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inter-subject correlation (ISC) has been used as a model-free analysis method to map the highly complex hemodynamic responses that are evoked during watching a movie. Here, we extended the ISC analysis to frequency domain using wavelet analysis combined with non-parametric permutation methods for making voxel-wise statistical inferences about frequency-band specific ISC. We applied these novel analysis methods to a dataset collected in our previous study where 12 subjects watched an emotionally engaging movie “Crash” during fMRI scanning. Our results suggest that several regions within the frontal and temporal lobes show ISC predominantly at low frequency bands, whereas visual cortical areas exhibit ISC also at higher frequencies. It is possible that these findings relate to recent observations of a cortical hierarchy of temporal receptive windows, or that the types of events processed in temporal and prefrontal cortical areas (e.g., social interactions) occur over longer time periods than the stimulus features processed in the visual areas. Software tools to perform frequency-specific ISC analysis, together with a visualization application, are available as open source Matlab code.

Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Jaaskelainen, Iiro P.; Sams, Mikko; Tohka, Jussi

2009-01-01

206

Corporate entrepreneurship in Switzerland: evidence from a case study of Swiss watch manufacturers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which Swiss companies engage in corporate entrepreneurship. To that\\u000a end, a case study was undertaken to better understand how corporate entrepreneurship is practiced in the watch-making industry.\\u000a Using a stratified sampling method, 18 corporate-level managers of Swiss watch manufacturers were interviewed over a 5-month\\u000a period to determine their perception

Kayhan Tajeddini; Stephen L. Mueller

207

NCI at Frederick: Science Watch Names Pathak's Article "Fast Breaking Paper"  

Cancer.gov

July 2011 article in Science by Vinay Pathak, Ph.D., and colleagues was recently designated a Fast Breaking Paper in Microbiology by Thomson Reuters Science Watch. This designation was based on an analysis by Thomson Reuters, which determined that the paper "displayed a higher bimonthly citation increase than any other paper of comparable age and type in its field," according to the Science Watch website.

208

The association between watching television and obesity in children of school-age in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background: There is little information on the association between watching Television (TV) and obesity in the Arabian Peninsula. Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to explore the association between the watching of television and obesity in Saudi children of school-age. Materials and Methods: A case-controlled study was conducted with students between the ages of 9 and 14 years who attended the school health clinic in King Abdulaziz Housing for National Guard (Iskan), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the study period (February to April 2012). During each clinic, children were selected by simple random sampling (five obese and five non-obese). For data collection, two trained physicians interviewed the participants using a 20-item Arabic questionnaire. Well-trained nurses collected the anthropometric measurements of weight and height. Results: The study included 397 students. Higher (body mass index) BMI was associated with a higher number of televisions at home (P < 0.001), watching TV for more than three hours per day at the weekend (P = 0.047), eating more than three snacks per day (P = 0.005), watching TV at night (P = 0.026), and siblings’ decisions on how much TV to watch (P = 0.025). The prevalence of childhood obesity was significantly lower among those whose mothers determined how much TV they could watch (P = 0.03). In logistic regression analysis, the increase in the child's age, the presence of more than one TV at home, having his or her own TV, and an increase in the number of hours of watching TV over the weekend were significantly associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity. Personal computers and the Internet were not significantly associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity. Conclusion: The present investigation revealed that watching TV represents an important risk factor for obesity in children of school-age.

Al-Ghamdi, Sameer H.

2013-01-01

209

Where people look when watching movies: Do all viewers look at the same place?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnification around the most important point of a movie scene (center of interest—COI) might aid people with visual impairments that cause resolution loss. This will be effective only if most people look at the same place when watching a movie. We recorded the eye movements of 20 normally sighted subjects as each watched six movie clips, totaling 37.5min. More than

Robert B. Goldstein; Russell L. Woods; Eli Peli

2007-01-01

210

A real options approach to watchful waiting: theory and an illustration.  

PubMed

Watchful waiting is a form of clinical management under which immediate curative treatment is not given. Instead, the patient undergoes a period of observation during which periodic tests monitor the progression of the illness. Hitherto, little attention has been given to how such patient management should be modeled from an economic perspective. Watchful waiting preserves an "option" to start treatment some time in the future, and evaluating a watchful waiting regime therefore has close analogies with pricing a financial option in the derivatives market. This article demonstrates how the methods used to price financial options can be used to decide when to pursue a watchful waiting strategy for a particular patient. The principles of option pricing are illustrated with the example of abdominal aortic aneurysm. A simple trinomial model of disease progression is used, in which patients are periodically monitored, and their health state can remain unchanged, deteriorate, or improve. Backward induction is used to solve the model at each period, with optimal treatment recommendations depending on the current health state. At very low levels of expected net benefits, the patient is discharged. At high levels, the patient is treated immediately. At intermediate levels, watchful waiting continues. The authors argue that option pricing methods offer important insights into the evaluation of a watchful waiting strategy. The methods also have potential applications in other domains of medical care. PMID:17409367

Driffield, Tarn; Smith, Peter C

2007-01-01

211

Assessing the Function of Cypress Knees - A Watershed Watch Student Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research presented was conducted as part of Watershed Watch, a two-week hands-on summer program for undeclared entry-level undergraduates, designed to recruit and retain students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The research presented here was conducted on cypress knees of different ages from the campus of Elizabeth City State University in northeastern North Carolina. Samples were collected from Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) knees and thin sections were cut from the distal, medial, and proximal regions of each knee. Three specimens of each of young and old knees were analyzed. Structural differences in the location and amount of wood (secondary xylem), parenchyma, and aerenchyma tissues were compared in order to determine if both younger and older knees function as pneumatophores, and if only the younger knees are capable of providing oxygen to roots in waterlogged soils. Our findings include: younger knees have the most aerenchyma tissue (living cells associated with air canals) and a thinner bark (likely pervious) on the distal tips. The older knees are more woody with distinct growth rings, exhibit less aerenchyma tissue, and have a much thicker (likely impervious) bark at the distal tip. The conclusion regarding the purpose of cypress knees is that the younger knees likely function as aerating organs (peumatophores) for the growing roots tips, while the older knees have reduced amounts of aerenchyma tissue and a thicker bark, and therefore may lose the ability to function as an aerating organ for the older roots.

Harris, M. D.; Rock, B. N.; Hale, S. R.; Hayden, L. B.; Porter, W.

2007-12-01

212

Preliminary Results of Observations of Comets De Vico and Hyakutake by the Ulysses Comet Watch Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cometary interactions with the solar wind allow us to use comets as probes of the inner regions of the heliosphere. During their close passage to the Sun, comets are exposed to different environments depending on their latitude. Until recently, characterizing these environments has been difficult because most spacecraft studying the sun have been confined to studying its mid-latitudes. A valuable source of information about the differing regimes of the solar wind is the joint ESA/NASA ULYSSES mission, which is the first spacecraft to explore the polar regions of the heliosphere. In 1995, ULYSSES' orbit covered a range of solar latitudes from -80 degrees to +80 degrees - an interval referred to as the 'fast latitude scan.' The Ulysses Comet Watch incorporates in-situ measurements during these periods by the ULYSSES spacecraft with images contributed by a world-wide network of observers (both amateur and professional). Bright comets whose paths come within 20 degrees solar latitude of the spacecraft are considered especially good targets for correlation between spacecraft data and plasma tail activity. Ulysses findings of interest to cometary plasma research are: Verification of global differences in solar wind properties (speed and density) at different solar latitudes. At polar latitudes - ranging from roughly +/-30 degrees to +/-80 degrees - the solar wind speed is about 750 kilometers/sec, and has a proton density (1 AU) around 3 cm(exp -3). Changes in properties are small and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is not seen. In the equatorial latitudes (roughly +30 to -30 degrees), the average solar wind speed is about 450 kilometers/sec, with an average proton density (at 1 AU) around 9 cm(exp -3). The HCS is seen and changes in properties can be large. An object, spacecraft or comet, at a given latitude, can be entirely in the polar, entirely in the equatorial, or can experience both - sort of a transition region.

Petersen, C. C.; Brandt, J. C.; Yi, Y.

1996-01-01

213

Forest Watch: A K-12 Outreach Program to Engage Pre-College Students in Authentic, Hands-On Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Forest Watch Program is a K-12 hands-on science outreach program developed at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991. The program has engaged students and their teachers in assisting researchers at UNH in the assessment of the state-of-health of white pine (Pinus strobus), a known bio-indicator species for exposure to elevated levels of ground-level ozone. Students are introduced to the scientific method while participating in an authentic on-going research program. The program was designed in partnership with participating teachers, and thus the field and classroom activities meet specific New England state science and mathematics curricula standards for K-12 education. Student participation in Forest Watch has resulted in an improved understanding and characterization of inter-annual white pine response to changes in air quality across the region over the past two decades. Forest Watch, students participate in three types of activities: 1. the analysis of remote sensing data (Landsat TM) provided for their local area using MultiSpec freeware. Through image processing, students learn the concepts of spatial and spectral resolution; how to identify landcover features; how plants interact with visible and infrared energy; and how to use this information to determine vegetation types and identify vegetation conditions. 2. students select 5 white pine trees to be permanently tagged near their school within a 30x30 meter (pixel sized sampling plot - the spatial resolution of the TM dataset), followed by collection and analysis of needle samples, and a suite of forest plot biometric measurements such as tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and canopy closure and ground cover. 3. the students send a set of their needle samples to UNH for spectral analysis of key reflectance features such as the Red Edge Inflection Point (REIP), the TM 5/4 moisture stress index, and the NIR 3/1. Over 250 schools from all six New England states have participated in the program over the past 19 years. Combining student-derived data plus the reflectance indices and other spectral measures, allows UNH researchers to characterize annual variations in tree state-of-health and relate it to the previous summer’s ozone levels. Results from annual student-provided data between 1991 and 2008 suggest that regional air quality and the state-of-health of white pine have improved since 1991. This improvement in white pine health corresponds with improved regional air quality, in part due to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment.

Gagnon, M. T.; Rock, B. N.

2009-12-01

214

Hydro-climatic control of stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) across northern catchments within the North-Watch program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been an increasing interest in understanding the regulating mechanisms of surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) the last decade. A majority of this recent work has been based on individual well characterized research catchments or on regional synoptic datasets combined with readily available landscape and climatic variables. However, as the production and transport of DOC primarily is a function of hydro-climatic conditions a better description of catchment hydrological functioning across large geographic regions would be favorable for moving the mechanistic understanding forward. To do this we report from a first assessment of catchment DOC within the international inter-catchment comparison program North-Watch (http://www.abdn.ac.uk/northwatch/). North-Watch includes long-term research catchments ranging from northern temperate regions to the boreal and sub-arctic biomes with the aim to better understand the variable hydrological and biogeochemical responses in Northern catchments to climate change. The North-Watch catchments are located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Mharcaidh, Girnock and Strontian), the US (Sleepers River and HJ Andrews) and Canada (Catamaran, Dorset and Wolf Creek). The annual average DOC concentration in the nine catchments investigated were directly linked to hydro-climatic influences (e.g. temperature, water storage) and landscape configuration. In general, the DOC concentration followed a parabolic shape with temperature, where the highest concentrations were found in the boreal and near boreal sites and with the lowest concentrations in the temperate and sub-arctic catchments. The between catchment variability in DOC concentration could also be explained by catchment water storage and amount of wetlands in the catchment. Whereas there is a mechanistic link between long-term climatic conditions and the areal coverage of wetlands, the total catchment storage of water is more strongly linked to topography, parent material and soil depth. The result from this analysis will serve as a conceptual framework for understanding biogeochemical response to environmental change across northern catchments. The next step in this work will be to include more detailed comparisons of the role catchment hydrological functioning for explaining the patterns and dynamics of catchment DOC of these northern watersheds.

Laudon, Hjalmar; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Seibert, Jan; Soulsby, Chris; Carey, Sean; Buttle, Jim; McDonnell, Jeff; McGuire, Kevin; Caissie, Daniel; Shanley, Jamie

2010-05-01

215

US Mussel Watch Program: Transuranic element data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 1976-1983. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Bivalves (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus californianus, Crassostrea virginica and Ostrea equestris) were collected once per year during 1976, 1977, and 1978 along the United States coast and analyzed for (239,240)Pu, (241)Am and (137)Cs as part of the U.S. Mussel Watch program. Monthly samples were collected during 1976-1980 from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island and Bodega Head, California and analyzed for (239,240)Pu, (241)Am, and (137)Cs. There is no evidence in the data for systematic regional or local elevated concentrations of radionuclides as a result of releases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Monthly fluctuations in radionuclide concentrations in the Narragansett Bay mussels appear to be primarily influenced by spawning.

Palmieri, J.; Livingston, H.; Farrington, J.W.

1984-05-01

216

Watching sport on television, physical activity, and risk of obesity in older adults  

PubMed Central

Background Television (TV) viewing has been associated with obesity although the effects of specific TV content on health and other behaviours remains unknown. We examined the association between watching sport on TV, physical activity levels, and risk of obesity. Methods We studied 6,733 (aged 64.9?±?9.2 yrs) men and women from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a prospective study of community dwelling older adults. Data were collected on self reported TV time and content, and physical activity. Nurses measured height and weight for the calculation of body mass index. Results On average, participants reported viewing TV for 5.3?±?4.1 hours per day and 30.3% of the sample watched sport on TV at least twice a week. There was no association between watching sport and physical activity levels. Participants that watched sports every day were at higher risk of obesity [odds ratio?=?1.39, 95% CI, 1.15, 1.68) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, total TV time, disability, and self-rated health. Conclusions Watching elite athletes may have no role in the promotion of physical activity in older adults, which has implications for staging large sporting events with physical activity legacy promises.

2014-01-01

217

WATCH (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling): A low-cost, secure-item monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developd a remote sensor package that provides a low-cost, convenient way of monitoring item movement. Originally, the package was intended for use in valve monitoring, but it is now possible to use it in any sensor application where hardware installation is impractical or uneconomical. Full system implementation includes a receiver/controller which correlates the arrival time of rf signals generated by item-monitoring transmitters to increase communication security. Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling (WATCH) is such a system. One important application of WATCH is in storage vaults where there are a number of material containers. Applying WATCH to inventory control reduces inventory workload and employee exposure rates; the system also provides quick access to inventory information by interfacing the system with plant site computer systems.

Sanderson, S.N.

1987-07-01

218

Use of the noninvasive GlucoWatch Biographer during exercise of varying intensity.  

PubMed

The GlucoWatch Biographer (Cygnus, Inc., Redwood City, CA), a novel, noninvasive method for tracking glucose, makes frequent, automatic glucose measurements. Therefore, it potentially can provide a convenient method of tracking glycemia, particularly with exercise as an added variable in diabetes management. The purpose of the investigation was (1) to measure the effectiveness of this device, and (2) to determine the validity of its readings, during rest and exercise both indoors and outdoors. Four subjects with type 1 diabetes and five controls without diabetes participated in rest, mild [40% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for 45 min], moderate (60% of HRR for 30 min), and heavy exercise (80% of HRR for 15 min) both indoors and outdoors. Subjects monitored blood glucose levels (forearm alternate site testing), and readings were taken by the GlucoWatch during and following testing conditions. Significantly more GlucoWatch readings were obtained during rest (55.6% outdoors, 66.7% indoors) than during moderate (11.1%) or heavy (0%; P < 0.01) exercise. A similar number was obtained during mild outdoor exercise (46.6%), but not indoors (29.2%). Sweating rates corresponded to a reduced effectiveness during indoor exercise only (P < 0.01), where sweating was heavier despite higher outdoor temperatures. A weak association between GlucoWatch and matched glucometer readings (r = 0.81; P < 0.01) was found. The effectiveness of the GlucoWatch Biographer during any moderate to heavy exercise was extremely poor, as was the validity of its readings compared with forearm alternate site testing. Thus, anyone wishing to engage in daily exercise would be best advised to abstain from wearing the GlucoWatch except during rest or mild exercise. PMID:15320999

Nunnold, Tanja; Colberg, Sheri R; Herriott, Matthew T; Somma, C Thomas

2004-08-01

219

Motor familiarity: brain activation when watching kinematic displays of one's own movements.  

PubMed

The perception of action is influenced by the observer's familiarity with its movement. However, how does motor familiarity with own movement patterns modulate the visual perception of action effects? Cortical activation was examined with fMRI while 20 observers were watching videotaped point-light displays of markers on the shoulders, the right elbow, and wrist of an opposing table tennis player. The racket and ball were not displayed. Participants were asked to predict the invisible effect of the stroke, that is, the ball flight direction. Different table tennis models were used without the observers knowing and being informed in advance that some of the presented videos displayed their own movements from earlier training sessions. Prediction had to be made irrespective of the identity of the player represented by the four moving markers. Results showed that participants performed better when observing their "own" strokes. Using a region-of-interest approach, fMRI data showed that observing own videos was accompanied by stronger activation (compared to other videos) in the left angular gyrus of the inferior parietal lobe and the anterior rostral medial frontal cortex. Other videos elicited stronger activation than own videos in the left intraparietal sulcus and right supramarginal gyrus. We suggest that during action observation of motorically familiar movements, the compatibility between the observed action and the observers' motor representation is already coded in the parietal angular gyrus--in addition to the paracingulate gyrus. The activation in angular gyrus is presumably part of an action-specific effect retrieval that accompanies actor-specific prefrontal processing. The intraparietal sulcus seems to be sensitive to incongruence between observed kinematics and internal model representations, and this also influences processing in the supramarginal gyrus. PMID:22609578

Bischoff, Matthias; Zentgraf, Karen; Lorey, Britta; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Balser, Nils; Baumgartner, Elisabeth; Hohmann, Tanja; Stark, Rudolf; Vaitl, Dieter; Munzert, Jörn

2012-07-01

220

OverWatch: Real-Time Narrative Visuals from Live Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a OverWatch is an audio\\/visual performance for two musicians, involving the production of narrative visuals on-the-fly. Presented\\u000a in a theatrical context, with the musicians playing beneath a large projection screen, the piece references early silent movies,\\u000a specifically the expressionist films of the 1920s. However, rather than responding to the formal and narrative content of\\u000a the images onscreen, the musicians in OverWatch

Guy Schofield; Rachel Casey; Patrick Olivier

2010-01-01

221

Sedimentation and drying dissipative structures of colloidal silica (1.2 ?m in diameter) suspensions in a watch glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sedimentation and drying dissipative structural patterns formed in the course of drying aqueous suspensions of colloidal silica spheres (1.2 ?m in diameter) were observed in the various sizes of watch glasses. The macroscopic broad ring patterns were formed on the inner inclined watch glass in suspension state within a short time after suspension was set. The important role of the convectional

Tsuneo Okubo

2006-01-01

222

Naturally Occurring Changes in Time Spent Watching Television Are Inversely Related to Frequency of Physical Activity during Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between changes in time spent watching television and playing video games with frequency of leisure-time physical activity across a 2-year period among adolescent boys and girls (N=4594). Latent growth modelling indicated that a decrease in time spent watching television was associated with…

Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Lytle, Leslie A.

2006-01-01

223

A general and flexible methodology to define thresholds for heat health watch and warning systems, applied to the province of Québec (Canada).  

PubMed

Several watch and warning systems have been established in the world in recent years to prevent the effects of heat waves. However, many of these approaches can be applied only in regions with perfect conditions (e.g., enough data, stationary series or homogeneous regions). Furthermore, a number of these approaches do not account for possible trend in mortality and/or temperature series, whereas others are generally not adapted to regions with low population densities or low daily mortality levels. In addition, prediction based on multiple days preceding the event can be less accurate if it attributes the same importance to each of these days, since the forecasting accuracy actually decreases with the period. The aim of the present study was to identify appropriate indicators as well as flexible and general thresholds that can be applied to a variety of regions and conditions. From a practical point of view, the province of Québec constitutes a typical case where a number of the above-mentioned constraints are present. On the other hand, until recently, the province's watch and warning system was based on a study conducted in 2005, covering only the city of Montreal and applied to the whole province. The proposed approach is applied to each one of the other health regions of the province often experiencing low daily counts of mortality and presenting trends. The first constraint led to grouping meteorologically homogeneous regions across the province in which the number of deaths is sufficient to carry out the appropriate data analyses. In each region, mortality trends are taken into account. In addition, the proposed indicators are defined by a 3-day weighted mean of maximal and minimal temperatures. The sensitivity of the results to the inclusion of traumatic deaths is also checked. The application shows that the proposed method improved the results in terms of sensitivity, specificity and number of yearly false alarms, compared to those of the existing and other classical approaches. An additional criterion based on the Humidex is applied in a second step and a local validation is applied to historical observations at reference forecasting stations. An integrated heat health watch and warning system with thresholds that are adapted to the regional climate has thus been established for each sub-region of the province of Quebec and became operational in June 2010. PMID:23100100

Chebana, Fateh; Martel, Barbara; Gosselin, Pierre; Giroux, Jean-Xavier; Ouarda, Taha B M J

2013-07-01

224

Crewmen of the U.S.S. Wasp watching recovery of Gemini 6 spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Crewmen of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp gather on deck to watch the recovery of the Gemini 6 spacecraft and astronauts. Note the signs hanging from the railings which say 'Seasons Greetings from WASP' and 'Spirit of 76'.

1965-01-01

225

Volunteer Watershed Health Monitoring by Local Stakeholders: New Mexico Watershed Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volunteers monitor watershed health in more than 700 programs in the US, involving over 400,000 local stakeholders. New Mexico Watershed Watch is a student-based watershed monitoring program sponsored by the state's Department of Game and Fish which provides high school teachers and students with instruction on methods for water quality…

Fleming, William

2003-01-01

226

Geostatistical analyses of interactions between killer whales ( Orcinus orca) and recreational whale-watching boats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Johnstone Strait in coastal British Columbia, Canada, is a core habitat for seasonal concentrations of killer whales (Orcinus orca), which have attracted considerable attention from commercial whale-watching operators and recreational boaters. Within the Strait lies the Robson Bight–Michael Bigg Ecological Reserve, a marine reserve set aside as critical habitat for killer whales and closed to recreational boat traffic. The geography

D. E. Jelinski; C. C. Krueger; D. A. Duffus

2002-01-01

227

The Use of Common Planning Time: A Case Study of Two Kentucky Schools to Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interdisciplinary teams with common planning time have been a hallmark of the middle school organizational structure since the 1960s, yet research on the effective use of common planning time is limited. This study explores how interdisciplinary teams at schools designated Kentucky Schools to Watch use common planning time, including the factors…

Cook, Christopher M.; Faulkner, Shawn A.

2010-01-01

228

Developing a Critical View on E-Learning Trend Reports: Trend Watching or Trend Setting?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trend watching reports are an indispensable resource in the e-learning domain. Many HRD departments consider these reports as essential cornerstones for the development of their e-learning strategy. But what is the quality of the forecasts made in these reports? In this article, several methods of forecasting trends are discussed, resulting in a…

Boon, Jo; Rusman, Ellen; van der Klink, Marcel; Tattersall, Colin

2005-01-01

229

Traditional sex role development and amount of time spent watching television  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tested the hypothesis that the amount of time spent watching TV is significantly related to the strength of traditional sex-role development. Data from 80 kindergartners and 2nd, 4th, and 6th graders support the hypothesis and suggest that this relationship holds equally for both sexes and does not change with increasing age.

Terry Frueh; Paul E. McGhee

1975-01-01

230

Effects of Watching Primary Debates in the 2000 U.S. Presidential Campaign.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the results of two studies measuring the effects on undergraduate communication students of watching U.S. presidential primary debates. Concludes that primary debates are capable of influencing both policy and character impressions of the candidates, as well as changing voting intentions and increasing voter confidence. (SG)

Benoit, William L.; McKinney, Mitchell S.; Stephenson, Michael T.

2002-01-01

231

Video Preference Assessment of Students with Autism for Watching Self, Adults, or Peers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The preferences of students with autism for watching themselves, a familiar adult, or a familiar peer in video recordings were examined. A multi-stimulus video preference assessment was used to evaluate the preferences of five students with autism. Three video options of a preferred activity (e.g., vacuuming) or daily/routine activity (e.g., snack…

Mechling, Linda C.; Moser, Sara V.

2010-01-01

232

STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Cameron juggle cassettes on OV-104's middeck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron juggle cassette tapes on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Laughing at Cameron's stunt are Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin (foreground), Commander Steven R. Nagel (behind Cameron), and MS Jerry L. Ross (at floor level). Ross snacks on chocolate candy during the performance.

1991-01-01

233

Technology Watch and Competitive Intelligence: A New Challenge in Education for Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need for education of information professionals in France to change because of changing needs for scientific, technological, and economic information. The functions of technology watch and competitive intelligence based on an organization's critical success factor are shown to be important. (13 references) (EAM)

Dou, Henri; And Others

1993-01-01

234

Exploring Relations between Watchers and Watched in Control(led) Systems: Strategies and Tactics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using ethnographic observation within a number of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) control rooms as evidence, this paper documents the apparently trivial but subjectively meaningful types of technologically mediated interaction taking place between CCTV operators and those watched. It examines the operators' interpretations of the various incidents, individuals and social realities observed. In so doing, the author suggests a number of

Gavin J. D. Smith

2007-01-01

235

Does Watching Television Rot Your Mind? Estimates of the Effect on Test Scores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether the number of hours of television watched by young adults is associated with performance on standardized exams and whether any such relationship is causal. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the High School and Beyond survey and the National Education Longitudinal Study all indicate a negative…

Zavodny, Madeline

2006-01-01

236

Environmental performance rating and disclosure : an empirical investigation of China's green watch program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental performance rating and disclosure has emerged as an alternative or complementary approach to conventional pollution regulation, especially in developing countries. However, little systematic research has been conducted on the effectiveness of this emerging policy instrument. This paper investigates the impact of a Chinese performance rating and disclosure program, Green Watch, which has been operating for 10 years. To assess

Yanhong Jin; Hua Wang; David Wheeler

2010-01-01

237

Learning by watching: extracting reusable task knowledge from visual observation of human performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel task instruction method for future intelligent robots is presented, In our method, a robot learns reusable task plans by watching a human perform assembly tasks. Functional units and working algorithms for visual recognition and analysis of human action sequences are presented. The overall system is model based and integrated at the symbolic level. Temporal segmentation of a continuous

Yasuo Kuniyoshi; Masayuki Inaba; Hirochika Inoue

1994-01-01

238

Community Solutions for Solid Waste Pollution, Level 6. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

239

Watching elderly and disabled person's physical condition by remotely controlled monorail robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are developing a nursing system using robots and cameras. The cameras are mounted on a remote controlled monorail robot which moves inside a room and watches the elderly. It is necessary to pay attention to the elderly at home or nursing homes all time. This requires staffs to pay attention to them at every time. The purpose of our

Yasunori Nagasaka; Yoshinori Matsumoto; Yasutoshi Fukaya; Tomoichi Takahashi; Toru Takeshita

2001-01-01

240

Teachers Steer Their Own Learning: Colorado Middle School becomes a School to Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conrad Ball Middle School in Loveland, Colorado, earned a "School to Watch" Award in 2005 from the National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform and was designated as high-performing by the state. However, in 2002, the school had its lowest test scores ever. Teachers at Conrad Ball received the news and determined they would turn things…

Lauer, Diane; Matthews, Melissa

2007-01-01

241

Differences in autonomic responses between subjects with and without nausea while watching an irregularly oscillating video.  

PubMed

Prodromal signs such as cardiac rhythm disturbance and changes in gastric motility are generally induced before and during nausea in humans. These autonomic reactions were compared in subjects who were or were not experiencing nausea. Nausea was induced by having the subjects view a movie of oscillating pictures. Seventeen healthy volunteers were asked to relax their muscles and watch the movie. Electrogastrogram (EGG), electrocardiogram (ECG), palmar and metopic perspiration, digital blood flow and thoracic movement related to respiration were simultaneously measured while the subjects viewed the movie. A total of 11 of 17 subjects complained of nausea after watching the movie. The characteristic changes in their autonomic responses during exposure to the movie were as follows. The power of the EGG, heart rate and metopic perspiration significantly increased compared to those before watching the movie. The respiratory cycle gradually increased during and even after watching the movie. In contrast, no significant changes in the power of the EGG, heart rate and metopic perspiration were observed in the remaining six subjects who did not experience nausea. The role of the autonomic nervous system in nausea is discussed. These results suggest that these symptoms regarding the sympathetic nervous system could actually be defensive reactions against the sensation of nausea. PMID:15556837

Himi, Naoyuki; Koga, Tomoshige; Nakamura, Emi; Kobashi, Motoi; Yamane, Masanobu; Tsujioka, Katsuhiko

2004-11-30

242

Great Bay Coast Watch Guide to Common Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since 1999, the Great Bay Coast Watch (GBCW) has been monitoring New Hampshire coastal waters for the presence of toxic phytoplankton cells. If present in large numbers, these cells can create the harmful algal blooms known as red tides. When filter feede...

C. Dolan S. Cooper

2006-01-01

243

Indicators of Middle School Implementation: How Do Kentucky's Schools to Watch Measure Up?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

High-performing middle schools are a critical link in the educational continuum. In an effort to stimulate the sluggish reform efforts of middle schools, the National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform established the Schools to Watch recognition program. Using responses of school personnel to a statewide survey, this study examined the perceived level of implementation of key tenets of the middle school concept as outlined by This We Believe: Successful Schools for Young Adolescents (National Middle School Association, 2003) in schools designated Kentucky Schools to Watch as compared to nondesignated schools. Additionally, the study reviewed the academic performance of Kentucky's middle schools on the Kentucky Core Content Test to determine whether the schools identified as Kentucky Schools to Watch experienced higher levels of student academic achievement. Results indicated a slightly higher perceived level of implementation of key tenets of the middle school concept in Kentucky's Schools to Watch and revealed overall higher levels of academic achievement as measured by the Kentucky Core Content Test.

Cook, Christopher M.; Faulkner, Shawn A.; Kinne, Lenore J.

2009-01-01

244

Watching a Drunkard for 10 Nights: A Study of Distributions of Variances.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers a problem of simple random walks to study distributions of variances. Describes watching a drunk over a period of nights, taking a number of steps per night. Explores the full probability distribution for the variance of the data string and discusses the connection of the results to the problem of data binning. (Author/NB)

Zia, R. K. P.; Schmittmann, B.

2003-01-01

245

Crewmen of the U.S.S. Wasp watching recovery of Gemini 7 spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Crewmen of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp gather on deck to watch the recovery of the Gemini 7 spacecraft and astronauts. Note the signs hanging from the railings which say 'Seasons Greetings from WASP' and 'Spirit of 76'.

1965-01-01

246

Natural and Man-Made Objects, Level K. Teacher's Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

247

Let's Waste Less Waste, Level 4. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

248

Waste Out of Place, Level 1. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

249

Is the "Idiot's Box" Raising Idiocy? Early and Middle Childhood Television Watching and Child Cognitive Outcome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is widespread belief that exposure to television has harmful effects on children's cognitive development. Most studies that point to a negative correlation between hours of television watching and cognitive outcomes, fail to establish causality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) we study young children between 5 and 10…

Munasib, Abdul; Bhattacharya, Samrat

2010-01-01

250

"Princess Alice Is Watching You": Children's Belief in an Invisible Person Inhibits Cheating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two child groups (5-6 and 8-9 years of age) participated in a challenging rule-following task while they were (a) told that they were in the presence of a watchful invisible person ("Princess Alice"), (b) observed by a real adult, or (c) unsupervised. Children were covertly videotaped performing the task in the experimenter's absence. Older…

Piazza, Jared; Bering, Jesse M.; Ingram, Gordon

2011-01-01

251

The effect of watching live arthroscopic views on postoperative anxiety of patients.  

PubMed

Surgery is a stressful experience. Many minor interventions have been shown to cause considerable anxiety in patients, but whether arthroscopy leads to such anxiety is not well-known. Methods for lowering perioperative anxiety have been sought and listening to music or watching a movie have been recommended. The method of permitting patients to watch their own endoscopy has been studied infrequently. Our aim in this study was to find out the effect of watching simultaneous arthroscopic views on postoperative anxiety. A total of 63 patients were randomly divided into two groups: those watching their own arthroscopy formed group W, while patients that were only verbally informed formed group NW. The mean age of patients in both groups were 33 and 34, respectively. Meniscal surgery was the most commonly performed procedure (49/63 patients). The patients filled in state scale of State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) forms and the study questionnaire (SQ) prepared for this study, just before and after the arthroscopy. Group W had significantly lower postoperative scores of STAI-S, whole questionnaire (Q-score) and all but one of individual statements in SQ. Having a previous operation history did not affect STAI scores. Age and level of education was not correlated with any of the studied parameters either. The ratio of patients that were pleased with the arthroscopy experience in group W and NW were 94 and 63%, respectively. Watching live arthroscopic views has led to a significant decrease in postoperative anxiety and worries about the surgery and the postoperative period, while increasing overall understanding and satisfaction of the patient. PMID:18566798

Bayar, Ahmet; Tuncay, Ibrahim; Atasoy, Nuray; Ayo?lu, Hilal; Keser, Selçuk; Ege, Ahmet

2008-11-01

252

Visual discomfort under various brightness conditions using eye movements in watching stereoscopic 3D video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Visual discomfort is caused by various factors when watching stereoscopic 3D contents. In particular, brightness change is known as one of the major factors related to visual discomfort. However, most previous research about visual discomfort dealt with binocular disparity as related to accommodation and vergence linkage. In this paper, we analyze visual discomfort caused by brightness change using eye-movements and a subjective test. Eye-movements are computed using eye pupil motion as detected from a near-infrared eye image. We measure eye-blinking and pupil size while watching stereoscopic 3D videos with global and local brightness variations. The results show that viewers felt more visual discomfort in local change than in global change of brightness in a scene.

Cho, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Hang-Bong

2014-03-01

253

Mussel watch update: Long-term trends in selected contaminants from coastal California, 1977-2010.  

PubMed

This study examined trends in contaminants measured during three decades of "Mussel Watch" monitoring on the California coast. Chlorinated organic contaminants and butyltins declined the most rapidly, with tissue concentrations in 2010 that were up to 75% lower than during the 1980s. Silver and lead declined at about half of the stations statewide, but generally exhibited slower rates of decline relative to the organic compounds. In contrast, copper increased at many stations, and PAHs showed little evidence for declines. Mussels from San Francisco Bay and the Southern California Bight were historically the most contaminated and have had the steepest declines. Overall, these data show that the "Mussel Watch" approach to monitoring contaminants in California has provided some of the best evidence of the effectiveness of actions to improve water quality over the past 30years. These datasets also highlight challenges that remain in managing PAHs and copper. PMID:23711838

Melwani, Aroon R; Gregorio, Dominic; Jin, Yujie; Stephenson, Mark; Ichikawa, Gary; Siegel, Emily; Crane, Dave; Lauenstein, Gunnar; Davis, Jay A

2014-04-30

254

Where people look when watching movies: do all viewers look at the same place?  

PubMed

Magnification around the most important point of a movie scene (center of interest-COI) might aid people with visual impairments that cause resolution loss. This will be effective only if most people look at the same place when watching a movie. We recorded the eye movements of 20 normally sighted subjects as each watched six movie clips, totaling 37.5 min. More than half of the time the distribution of subject gaze points fell within an area statistic that was less than 12% of the movie scene. Male and older subjects were more likely to look in the same place than female and younger subjects, respectively. We conclude that the between-subject agreement is sufficient to make the approach practical. PMID:17010963

Goldstein, Robert B; Woods, Russell L; Peli, Eli

2007-07-01

255

A Mobile Butterfly-Watching Learning System for Supporting Independent Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the development of a mobile butterfly-watching learning (BWL) system which supports independent learners by offering a new pattern of outdoor mobile learning (or called as m-learning) activities. The proposed BWL system was designed using a wireless mobile ad-hoc learning environment. In our designed system, each individual learner has a wireless handheld device, which is a

Yuh-shyan Chen; Tai-chien Kao; Gwo-jong Yu; Jang-ping Sheu

2004-01-01

256

[Smoking initiation and watching television, video, DVD among adolescents in Poland].  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between smoking initiation and the time spent watching TV, video, DVD by adolescents 11, 13, and 15-year-old in Poland. The research was conducted in 2010 as a part of Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: A WHO Collaborative Cross-national Study (HBSC) in a sample of 4751 students, using a standard, international HBSC questionnaire. It was found that there is a relationship between smoking attempts made by the young people and time spent watching TV during weekdays. In the analyzes using logistic regression combined variable relating to the time to watch TV on weekdays and weekends was used. Nearly a quarter of respondents (24.3%) were qualified to the group of adolescents spending too much time in front of the screen. Age was the strongest predictor of smoking onset. Between 11 and 13 years of age the risk of taking the first cigarette increased three times, and between 11 and 15 years of age more than seven times. Relative risk of smoking attempts related to gender and frequency of watching television, video or DVD was both equal to 1.5. In smoking prevention focused on adolescents it is should be better to pay more attention on constructive leisure time activities, and the role of parents in shaping pro-health attitudes. This is particularly important in the initial stages of schooling, when to develop and enhance the psychosocial competences as a the protective factor of risk taking behaviors among adolescents. PMID:23421048

Kowalewska, Anna; Mazur, Joanna

2012-01-01

257

Student cognition and motivation during the Classroom BirdWatch citizen science project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the ways various stakeholders (CBW project developer\\/coordinator, elementary and middle school teachers, and 5th through 8th grade students) envisioned, implemented and engaged in the citizen science project, eBird\\/Classroom BirdWatch. A multiple case study mixed-methods research design was used to examine student engagement in the cognitive processes associated with scientific inquiry

Terry Morton Tomasek

2006-01-01

258

Test report of evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flowmeters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document reports the results of testing four different flowmeters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101,241-AN- 103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105 and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m\\/s(50 ft\\/min) to 1\\/78 m\\/s (350

Willingham; Westinghouse Hanford

1996-01-01

259

Wireless glucose monitoring watch enabled by an implantable self-sustaining glucose sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Implantable glucose sensors can measure real time blood glucose as compared to conventional techniques involving drawing blood samples and in-vitro processing. An implantable sensor requires energy source for operation with wire inout provision for power and sending signals. Implants capable of generation-transmission of sensory signals, with minimal or no power requirement, can solve this problem. An implantable nanosensor design has been presented here, which can passively detect glucose concentration in blood stream and transmit data to a wearable receiver-recorder system or a watch. The glucose sensitive component is a redox pair of electrodes that generates voltage proportional to glucose concentration. The bio-electrode, made of carbon nanotubes-enzyme nanocluster, has been investigated because of the large surface area for taping electrical signals. This glucose sensor can charge a capacitor, which can be a part of a LCR resonance/inductive coupling based radio frequency (RF) sensor telemetry. Such a system can measure change in glucose concentration by the induced frequency shift in the LCR circuit. A simultaneous power transmission and signal transmission can be achieved by employing two separate LCR oscillating loops, one for each operation. The corresponding coupling LCR circuits can be housed in the wearable receiving watch unit. The data logged in this glucose monitoring watch can be instrumental in managing blood glucose as trigger for an insulin dispensing payload worn on person or implanted.

Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

2012-10-01

260

Testosterone and cortisol release among Spanish soccer fans watching the 2010 World Cup final.  

PubMed

This field study investigated the release of testosterone and cortisol of a vicarious winning experience in Spanish fans watching the finals between Spain and the Netherlands in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer. Spanish fans (n = 50) watched the match with friends or family in a public place or at home and also participated in a control condition. Consistent with hypotheses, results revealed that testosterone and cortisol levels were higher when watching the match than on a control day. However, neither testosterone nor cortisol levels increased after the victory of the Spanish team. Moreover, the increase in testosterone secretion was not related to participants' sex, age or soccer fandom, but the increase in total cortisol secretion during the match was higher among men than among women and among fans that were younger. Also, increases in cortisol secretion were greater to the degree that people were a stronger fan of soccer. Level of fandom further appeared to account for the sex effect, but not for the age effect. Generally, the testosterone data from this study are in line with the challenge hypothesis, as testosterone levels of watchers increased to prepare their organism to defend or enhance their social status. The cortisol data from this study are in line with social self-preservation theory, as higher cortisol secretion among young and greater soccer fans suggests that especially they perceived that a negative outcome of the match would threaten their own social esteem. PMID:22529940

van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Ijzerman, Hans; van Lange, Paul A M; Salvador, Alicia

2012-01-01

261

Treatment of indolent lymphomas: watchful waiting v aggressive combined modality treatment  

SciTech Connect

Patients with advanced indolent lymphoma often have long survival (median, 4 to 8 years) in spite of frequent relapses. The inability of combination chemotherapy or radiation therapy (RT) to render patients disease free has led to radically divergent treatment approaches. Initial treatment may vary from aggressive combined modality therapy to no initial treatment. We sought to evaluate these two divergent approaches in a randomized trial of advanced indolent lymphomas (nodular, poorly differentiated lymphocytic; nodular mixed; diffuse, well-differentiated lymphocytic; diffuse, intermediately differentiated lymphocytic; and diffuse, poorly differentiated lymphocytic). A total of 104 patients were entered: 44 were randomly assigned to watch and wait in which only carefully defined, limited RT was administered if necessary; 45 were randomly assigned to aggressive combined modality treatment with prednisone, methotrexate, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, plus etoposide plus mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone (ProMACE-MOPP), followed by total nodal irradiation (TNI); and 15, with symptoms requiring initial therapy, received the identical combined treatment but were not randomly assigned. Of 41 evaluable patients on watch and wait, 23 (56%) have still not required systemic therapy, although 16 (39%) have received limited RT. Median time to crossover was 34 months. Of 18 patients crossed over, seven of the 16 who completed therapy (43%) achieved CR; two (11%) have relapsed. Histologic progression was seen in six (15%) of 41 patients on watch and wait without intervening chemotherapy. Of 45 patients randomly assigned to chemotherapy, 37 (82%) have completed induction therapy, and 29 of the 37 (78%) achieved CR.

Young, R.C.; Longo, D.L.; Glatstein, E.; Ihde, D.C.; Jaffe, E.S.; DeVita, V.T. Jr.

1988-04-01

262

Television Watching, Diet Quality, and Physical Activity and Diabetes among Three Ethnicities in the United States  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is a world-wide epidemic associated with multiple environmental factors. Prolonged television viewing (TV) time has been related to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. TV viewing has been positively associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower energy expenditure, over-eating high-calorie and high-fat foods. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of hours of TV viewing with dietary quality, obesity and physical activity for three ethnic minorities with and without type 2 diabetes. Diet quality and physical activity were inversely related to prolonged TV viewing. African Americans and participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to watch more than 4 hours of TV per day as compared to their counterparts. Diet quality was inversely associated with physical activity level. Future studies are needed to establish the risk factors of prolonged TV watching in adult populations for the development of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. Although strategies to reduce TV watching have been proven effective among children, few trials have been conducted in adults. Intervention trials aimed at reducing TV viewing targeting people with type 2 diabetes may be beneficial to improve dietary quality and physical activity, which may reduce diabetes complications.

Huffman, Fatma G.; Vaccaro, Joan A.; Exebio, Joel C.; Zarini, Gustavo G.; Katz, Timothy; Dixon, Zisca

2012-01-01

263

Television watching, diet quality, and physical activity and diabetes among three ethnicities in the United States.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a world-wide epidemic associated with multiple environmental factors. Prolonged television viewing (TV) time has been related to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. TV viewing has been positively associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower energy expenditure, over-eating high-calorie and high-fat foods. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of hours of TV viewing with dietary quality, obesity and physical activity for three ethnic minorities with and without type 2 diabetes. Diet quality and physical activity were inversely related to prolonged TV viewing. African Americans and participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to watch more than 4 hours of TV per day as compared to their counterparts. Diet quality was inversely associated with physical activity level. Future studies are needed to establish the risk factors of prolonged TV watching in adult populations for the development of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. Although strategies to reduce TV watching have been proven effective among children, few trials have been conducted in adults. Intervention trials aimed at reducing TV viewing targeting people with type 2 diabetes may be beneficial to improve dietary quality and physical activity, which may reduce diabetes complications. PMID:22851980

Huffman, Fatma G; Vaccaro, Joan A; Exebio, Joel C; Zarini, Gustavo G; Katz, Timothy; Dixon, Zisca

2012-01-01

264

The Archive of the Amateur Observation Network of the International Halley Watch. Volume 2; Comet Halley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Halley Watch (IHW) was organized for the purpose of gathering and archiving the most complete record of the apparition of a comet, Halley's Comet (1982i = 1986 III = 1P/Halley), ever compiled. The redirection of the International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft, subsequently renamed the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), toward Comet Giacobini- Zinner (1984e = 1985 XIII = 21P/Giacobini-Zinner) prompted the initiation of a formal watch on that comet. All the data collected on P/Giacobini-Zinner and P/Halley have been published on CD-ROM in the Comet Halley Archive. This document contains a printed version of the archive data, collected by amateur astronomers, on these two comets. Volume 1 contains the Comet Giacobini-Zinner data archive and Volume 2 contains the Comet Halley archive. Both volumes include information on how to read the data in both archives, as well as a history of both comet watches (including the organizing of the network of astronomers and lessons learned from that experience).

Edberg, Stephen J. (Editor)

1996-01-01

265

Audience influence on EGM gambling: the protective effects of having others watch you play.  

PubMed

One component of social facilitation on gambling is the potential for an audience of people to observe the play of Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) gamblers and influence their behaviour without participating directly in gambling themselves. An experiment was conducted with an audience of onlookers, purported to be students of research methods, taking notes while watching the participants play an EGM. Forty-three male and 82 female participants (N = 125), aged 18-79 (M = 49.2, SD = 15.6), played a laptop simulated 3-reel EGM using a $20 stake in three conditions: (1) alone, (2) watched by a simulated audience of six persons, or (3) watched by an audience of 26. Outcomes on the poker machine were rigged with a fixed sequence of five wins in the first 20 spins and indefinite losses thereafter. The results found smaller bet-sizes associated with larger audiences of onlookers, and this outcome is consistent with a hypothesized motivation to display more wins to the audience. Moreover, final payouts were greater in the audience conditions compared to the control, further suggesting that an audience may be a protective factor limiting player losses. PMID:20714792

Rockloff, Matthew J; Greer, Nancy

2011-09-01

266

Star Watch: The Amateur Astronomer's Guide to Finding, Observing, and Learning about Over 125 Celestial Objects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Your Passport to the Universe The night sky is alive with many wonders--distant planets, vast star clusters, glowing nebulae, and expansive galaxies, all waiting to be explored. Let respected astronomy writer Philip Harrington introduce you to the universe in Star Watch, a complete beginner's guide to locating, observing, and understanding these celestial objects. You'll start by identifying the surface features of the Moon, the banded cloud tops of Jupiter, the stunning rings of Saturn, and other members of our solar system. Then you'll venture out beyond our solar system, where you'll learn tips and tricks for finding outstanding deep-sky objects from stars to galaxies, including the entire Messier catalog--a primary goal of every serious beginner. Star Watch features a detailed physical description of each target, including size, distance, and structure, as well as concise directions for locating the objects, handy finder charts, hints on the best times to view each object, and descriptions of what you'll really see through a small telescope or binoculars and with the naked eye. Star Watch will transport you to the farthest depths of space--and return you as a well-traveled, experienced stargazer.

Harrington, Philip S.

2003-07-01

267

Television watching and the emotional impact on social modeling of food intake among children.  

PubMed

The main goal of this study was to test whether exposure to happy, neutral, or sad media content influences social modeling effects of (snack) food intake in young children. The study was conducted at 14 Dutch urban and suburban primary schools. The participants (N=112) were asked to watch a movie with a same-sex normal-weight confederate who was instructed to eat either nothing or a standardized amount of snack food (10 chocolate-coated peanuts). The study involved a 3 (movie clips: happy, neutral, and sad)×2 (peer's food intake: no intake versus a standardized intake) between-participants design. A significant interaction between the movie clip condition and intake condition was found (F(2,102)=3.30, P=.04, Cohen's f(2)=.20). Positive as well as negative emotions were found to lead to adjustment to the intake of a peer, as compared to that of children in the neutral movie condition. The findings suggest that children eat more mindlessly when watching an emotional movie and, therefore, respond more automatically to a peer's food intake, whereas children may be less susceptible to a peer's intake while watching a neutral movie. As young children are not in the position to choose their food consumption environment yet, parents and schools should provide consumption settings that limit eating in front of the television. PMID:23274126

Bevelander, Kirsten E; Meiselman, Herbert L; Anschütz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E

2013-04-01

268

World Weather Watch. Consolidated Report on the Voluntary Assistance Programme Including Projects Approved for Circulation in 1976.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

General remarks on the states of the overall Voluntary Assistance Program (VAP) are followed by guidelines for use in the implementation of World Weather Watch projects through VAP. Equipment required to implement VAP projects approved for 1976 is listed ...

1977-01-01

269

World Weather Watch: Consolidated Report on the Voluntary Assistance Program Including Projects Approved for Circulation in 1977.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

General remarks on the status of the overall Voluntary Assistance Program (VAP) are followed by guidelines for use in the implementation of World Weather Watch projects through VAP. Equipment required to implement VAP projects approved for 1977 is listed ...

1978-01-01

270

77 FR 13533 - Allocation of Duty-Exemptions for Calendar Year 2012 for Watch Producers Located in the United...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Calendar Year 2012 for Watch Producers Located in the United States Virgin Islands AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade...producers (``program producers'') located in the United States Virgin Islands (``USVI'') pursuant to Public Law 97-446,...

2012-03-07

271

78 FR 14266 - Allocation of Duty-Exemptions for Calendar Year 2013 for Watch Producers Located in the United...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Calendar Year 2013 for Watch Producers Located in the United States Virgin Islands AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade...producers (``program producers'') located in the United States Virgin Islands (``USVI'') pursuant to Public Law 97-446,...

2013-03-05

272

75 FR 10463 - Office of Insular Affairs; Allocation of Duty-Exemptions for Calendar Year 2010 for Watch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Calendar Year 2010 for Watch Producers Located in the United States Virgin Islands AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade...producers (``program producers'') located in the United States Virgin Islands (``USVI'') pursuant to Public Law 97-446,...

2010-03-08

273

76 FR 12700 - Allocation of Duty-Exemptions for Calendar Year 2011 for Watch Producers Located in the United...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Calendar Year 2011 for Watch Producers Located in the United States Virgin Islands AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade...producers (``program producers'') located in the United States Virgin Islands (``USVI'') pursuant to Public Law 97-446,...

2011-03-08

274

Comparison of Motionlogger Watch and Actiwatch Actigraphs to Polysomnography for Sleep/Wake Estimation in Healthy Young Adults.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sleep/wake identification and sleep parameter estimates from Motionlogger Watch and Actiwatch-64 actigraphs were compared to polysomnography (PSG). Following one night of baseline sleep, 29 volunteers remained awake for 36 h, followed by 11 h of recovery ...

T. J. Balkin T. L. Rupp

2011-01-01

275

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - October 3, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S./French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Oct. 3, 1997 as the warm water associated with El Nino (in white) spreads northward along the entire coast of North America from the equator all the way to Alaska. The warm water pool in tropical Pacific resulting from El Nino seems to have stabilized. The white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The surface area covered by the warm water mass is about one and one-half times the size of the continental United States. The added amount of oceanic warm water near the Americas, with a temperature between 21 and 30 C (70 to 85 F), carries the amount of heat equal to 100 times the amount of fossil fuel energy consumed by the entire U.S. population during one year. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white area) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the coming winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/

1997-01-01

276

Short and Long-term Effects of Whale Watching on Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of cetacean studies have shown that whale watching causes short-term behavioral changes in individuals, but none have yet demonstrated long-term population effects. This is particularly true of killer whales ( Orcinus orca). In British Columbia, killer whales have precisely known population dynamics and there is a well-documented history of whale watching activity. Studies of the effects of vessels

Andrew W. Trites; David E. Bain

277

Watch-and-Comment as an Approach to Collaboratively Annotate Points of Interest in Video and Interactive-TV Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In earlier work we proposed the Watch-and-Comment (WaC) paradigm as the seamless capture of multimodal comments made by one\\u000a or more users while watching a video, resulting in the automatic generation of multimedia documents specifying annotated interactive\\u000a videos. The aim is to allow services to be offered by applying document engineering techniques to the multimedia document\\u000a generated automatically. The WaC

Maria da Graça C. Pimentel; Renan G. Cattelan; Erick L. Melo; Giliard B. Freitas; Cesar A. Teixeira

278

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - October 23, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S./French TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Oct. 23, 1997 as the warm water associated with El Nino (in white) spreads northward along the entire coast of North America from the equator all the way to Alaska. The warm water pool associated with the El Nino has returned to the volume it was in mid-September after dropping to a temporary low at the beginning of October. The sea surface elevation just north of the El Nino warm pool continues to drop (purple area), enhancing the eastward flowing North Equatorial Counter Current. The intensification of this current is another tell-tale sign of the El Nino phenomenon. This flow contributes to the rise in sea level along the western coasts of the Americas that will progress towards both the north and south poles over the next several months. The white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The surface area covered by the warm water mass is about one and one-half times the size of the continental United States. The added amount of oceanic warm water near the Americas, with a temperature between 21-30 degrees Celsius (70- 85 degrees Fahrenheit), is about 30 times the volume of water in all the U.S. Great Lakes combined. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white area) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, (NOAA), has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/

1997-01-01

279

ARTICLE WATCH  

PubMed Central

This column highlights recently published articles that are of interest to the readership of this publication. We encourage ABRF members to forward information on articles they feel are important and useful to Clive Slaughter, Hartwell Center, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale St., Memphis TN 38105-2794. Tel: (901) 495-4844; Fax: (901) 495-2945; email: Clive.Slaughter@stjude.org or to any member of the editorial board. Article summaries reflect the reviewer’s opinions and not necessarily those of the Association.

2007-01-01

280

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs.

Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2014-01-01

281

Nature watch  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shield tails are a group of snakes belonging to the family Uropeltidae, endemic to the Western Ghats and Sri Lanka. They are\\u000a small, beautiful non-poisonous snakes with bright colours, found at high altitudes in the ‘shola’ forests. They spend much\\u000a of their life burrowing 1–2 metres beneath the surface, in search of their favourite food, earthworms. Loss of habitat has

Kartik Shanker

1996-01-01

282

Weather Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests a number of ways in which Federal Aviation Agency weather report printouts can be used in teaching the weather section of meteorology. These weather sequence reports can be obtained free of charge at most major airports. (JR)

Bratt, Herschell Marvin

1973-01-01

283

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

It is now clear that the immune system plays a critical role not only during oncogenesis and tumor progression, but also as established neoplastic lesions respond to therapy. Selected cytotoxic chemicals can indeed elicit immunogenic cell death, a functionally peculiar type of apoptosis that stimulates tumor-specific cognate immune responses. Such immunogenic chemotherapeutics include cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and oxaliplatin (which are approved by FDA for the treatment of various hematological and solid malignancies), mitoxantrone (which is currently employed both as an anticancer agent and against multiple sclerosis) and patupilone (a microtubular poison in clinical development). One year ago, in the second issue of OncoImmunology, we discussed the scientific rationale behind immunogenic chemotherapy and reviewed the status of recent clinical trials investigating the off-label use of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and mitoxantrone in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this area of clinical research, covering both high-impact studies that have been published during the last 13 months and clinical trials that have been initiated in the same period to assess the antineoplastic profile of immunogenic chemotherapeutics.

Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Herve; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

284

Monarch Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classroom study ideas, questions, and multimedia dealing with Monarch butterflies as classroom study organisms. Information about conservation, migration and tagging, biology, and live butterflies for sale is presented.

0002-11-30

285

Bird Watching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This brief Web page from Enchanted Learning.com is actually a broader resource than it appears at first glance. By clicking on the highlighted links kids can learn a bit about how to become a knowledgeable bird watcher, and how to attract birds to their yards. The Zoom Birds link takes the user to a more extensive Enchanted Learning.com page about birds in general.

1997-01-01

286

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

Tumor-targeting immune responses provide a significant contribution to (when they do not entirely account for) the clinical activity of diverse antineoplastic regimens, encompassing not only a large panel of immunotherapeutic strategies but also conventional cytotoxic molecules, targeted anticancer agents and irradiation. In line with this notion, several approaches have been devised to elicit novel or boost existing anticancer immune responses, including the administration of immunomodulatory cytokines. Such a relatively unspecific intervention suffices to mediate clinical effects in (at least a subset of) patients bearing particularly immunogenic tumors, like melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. More often, however, immunostimulatory cytokines are administered to boost the immunogenic potential of other agents, including (but not limited to) immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies, anticancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses and immunogenic chemotherapeutics. Here, we summarize the latest advances in the clinical development of recombinant cytokines as an immunomodulatory intervention for cancer therapy.

Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Cremer, Isabelle; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2014-01-01

287

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

Lenalidomide is a synthetic derivative of thalidomide currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients affected by multiple myeloma (in combination with dexamethasone) and low or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes that harbor 5q cytogenetic abnormalities. For illustrative purposes, the mechanism of action of lenalidomide can be subdivided into a cancer cell-intrinsic, a stromal, and an immunological component. Indeed, lenalidomide not only exerts direct cell cycle-arresting and pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells, but also interferes with their physical and functional interaction with the tumor microenvironment and mediates a robust, pleiotropic immunostimulatory activity. In particular, lenalidomide has been shown to stimulate the cytotoxic functions of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, to limit the immunosuppressive impact of regulatory T cells, and to modulate the secretion of a wide range of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor ?, interferon ? as well as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-12. Throughout the last decade, the antineoplastic and immunostimulatory potential of lenalidomide has been investigated in patients affected by a wide variety of hematological and solid malignancies. Here, we discuss the results of these studies and review the status of clinical trials currently assessing the safety and efficacy of this potent immunomodulatory drug in oncological indications.

Semeraro, Michaela; Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

288

Trial Watch  

PubMed Central

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology, we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists.

Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

289

Trial watch  

PubMed Central

During the past 20 years, dozens—if not hundreds—of monoclonal antibodies have been developed and characterized for their capacity to mediate antineoplastic effects, either as they activate/enhance tumor-specific immune responses, either as they interrupt cancer cell-intrinsic signal transduction cascades, either as they specifically delivery toxins to malignant cells or as they block the tumor-stroma interaction. Such an intense research effort has lead to the approval by FDA of no less than 14 distinct molecules for use in humans affected by hematological or solid malignancies. In the inaugural issue of OncoImmunology, we briefly described the scientific rationale behind the use of monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and discussed recent, ongoing clinical studies investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach in patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of clinical research, focusing on high impact studies that have been published during the last 15 months and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of promising, yet hitherto investigational, monoclonal antibodies.

Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

290

Suicide Watch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers say the best way to prevent suicide is to find and treat kids with depression and substance-abuse problems. Schools should also develop a suicide-prevention policy, make curriculum decisions wisely, train staff as detectives, notify parents, make sure affected children get help, and attend to survivors. (Contains 13 references.) (MLH)

Jones, Rebecca

2001-01-01

291

Aurora Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, visitors can monitor geomagnetic activity and find out when the aurora borealis may be visible from the UK. Lancaster University offers background information on the characteristics and causes of an aurora, plots of both same day and previous day activities, and magnetometer data. Students and educators can learn how to make their own pop-bottle and compass aurora detectors. Individuals can sign up to receive alerts of opportunities to see the aurora. Everyone can treasure the truly amazing collection of northern lights images.

292

Storm Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdisciplinary unit from Intel(R) Teach is an assessment plan that is comprised of continuous assessment opportunities over a six-week period of time. The unit is focused on collecting and analyzing weather data and answering the essential question: How do people respond to change? Included with the lesson overview is the entire unit plan in a zip file, instructional procedures, student samples, standards, and rubrics.

Shirley, Jeanne

2012-01-01

293

Young children in urban areas: Links among neighborhood characteristics, weight status, outdoor play, and television watching  

PubMed Central

Although research consistently demonstrates a link between residential context and physical activity for adults and adolescents, less is known about young children’s physical activity. Using data from the U.S. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=1822, 51% male), we explored whether outdoor play and television watching were associated with children’s body mass indexes (BMIs) at age five using OLS regression models, controlling for a wide array of potential confounders, including maternal BMI. We also tested whether subjective and objective neighborhood measures - socioeconomic status (from U.S. Census tract data), type of dwelling, perceived collective efficacy, and interviewer-assessed physical disorder of the immediate environment outside the home -were associated with children’s activities, using negative binomial regression models. Overall, 19% of the sample were overweight (between the 85th and 95th percentiles), and 16% were obese (?95th percentile). Hours of outdoor play were negatively associated with BMI, and hours of television were positively associated with BMI. Moreover, a ratio of outdoor play to television time was a significant predictor of BMI. Higher maternal perceptions of neighborhood collective efficacy were associated with more hours of outdoor play, fewer hours of television viewing, and more trips to a park or playground. In addition, we found that neighborhood physical disorder was associated with both more outdoor play and more television watching. Finally, contrary to expectations, we found that children living in public housing had significantly more hours of outdoor play and watched more television, than other children. We hypothesize that poorer children may have more unstructured time, which they fill with television time but also with outdoor play time; and that children in public housing may be likely to have access to play areas on the grounds of their housing facilities.

Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; McLanahan, Sara

2011-01-01

294

Young children in urban areas: links among neighborhood characteristics, weight status, outdoor play, and television watching.  

PubMed

Although research consistently demonstrates a link between residential context and physical activity for adults and adolescents, less is known about young children's physical activity. Using data from the U.S. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=1822, 51% male), we explored whether outdoor play and television watching were associated with children's body mass indexes (BMIs) at age five using OLS regression models, controlling for a wide array of potential confounders, including maternal BMI. We also tested whether subjective and objective neighborhood measures - socioeconomic status (from U.S. Census tract data), type of dwelling, perceived collective efficacy, and interviewer-assessed physical disorder of the immediate environment outside the home - were associated with children's activities, using negative binomial regression models. Overall, 19% of the sample were overweight (between the 85th and 95th percentiles), and 16% were obese (? 95th percentile). Hours of outdoor play were negatively associated with BMI, and hours of television were positively associated with BMI. Moreover, a ratio of outdoor play to television time was a significant predictor of BMI. Higher maternal perceptions of neighborhood collective efficacy were associated with more hours of outdoor play, fewer hours of television viewing, and more trips to a park or playground. In addition, we found that neighborhood physical disorder was associated with both more outdoor play and more television watching. Finally, contrary to expectations, we found that children living in public housing had significantly more hours of outdoor play and watched more television, than other children. We hypothesize that poorer children may have more unstructured time, which they fill with television time but also with outdoor play time; and that children in public housing may be likely to have access to play areas on the grounds of their housing facilities. PMID:21324574

Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; McLanahan, Sara

2011-03-01

295

Astronaut David Scott watching hammer and feather fall to lunar surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott, Apollo 15 commander, watches a geological hammer and a feather hit the lunar surface simultaneously in a test of Galileo's law of motion concerning falling bodies, as seen in this color reproduction taken from a transmission made by the RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Scott released the hammer from his right hand and the feather from his left at the same instant. This experiment occured toward the end of the third and final lunar surface extravehicular activity.

1971-01-01

296

Watching a Protein as it Functions with 150-ps Time-Resolved X-ray Crystallography  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction from the myoglobin (Mb) mutant in which Leu29 is replaced by Phe (L29F mutant). The frame-by-frame structural evolution, resolved to 1.8 angstroms, allows one to literally ``watch'' the protein as it executes its function. Time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy of flash-photolyzed L29F MbCO revealed a short-lived CO intermediate whose 140-ps lifetime is shorter than that found

Friedrich Schotte; Manho Lim; Timothy A. Jackson; Aleksandr V. Smirnov; Jayashree Soman; John S. Olson; George N. Phillips; Michael Wulff; Philip A. Anfinrud

2003-01-01

297

This (Sandpiper like) bird, as well as many other species keep watch over Moffett Field wetlands.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This (Sandpiper like) bird, as well as many other species keep watch over Moffett Field wetlands. The shorebird in this picture is a greater yellowlegs (Tinga melanoleuca) which is a common bird found in our coastal salt marsh and tidal zones in winter months. Generally, they summer/breed up north in Canada and Alaska and then migrate in the fall to winter along the west coast of the U.S. and Mexico. Known for their loud call of a slightly descending series of three or more tew notes. Diet consists of small fish, insects, snails, worms, and tadpoles. used in Ames 60 yr. History NASA SP-2000-4314

1991-01-01

298

(137)Cs baseline levels in the Mediterranean and Black Sea: a cross-basin survey of the CIESM Mediterranean Mussel Watch programme.  

PubMed

The common mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was selected as unique biomonitor species to implement a regional monitoring programme, the CIESM Mediterranean Mussel Watch (MMW), in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. As of today, and upon standardization of the methodological approach, the MMW Network has been able to quantify (137)Cs levels in mussels from 60 coastal stations and to produce the first distribution map of this artificial radionuclide at the scale of the entire Mediterranean and Black Seas. While measured (137)Cs levels were found to be very low (usually < 1 Bq kg(-1) wet wt) (137)Cs activity concentrations in the Black Sea and North Aegean Sea were up to two orders of magnitude higher than those in the western Mediterranean Basin. Such effects, far from representing a threat to human populations or the environment, reflect a persistent signature of the Chernobyl fallout in this area. PMID:18314143

Thébault, Hervé; Rodriguez Y Baena, Alessia M; Andral, Bruno; Barisic, Delko; Albaladejo, José Benedicto; Bologa, Alexandru S; Boudjenoun, Redouane; Delfanti, Roberta; Egorov, Victor N; El Khoukhi, Tahar; Florou, Heleni; Kniewald, Goran; Noureddine, Abdelkader; Patrascu, Vasile; Pham, Mai Khanh; Scarpato, Alfonso; Stokozov, Nikolay A; Topcuoglu, Sayhan; Warnau, Michel

2008-01-01

299

The GlobalJetWatch spectrographs: a fibre-fed spectrograph for small telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GlobalJetWatch project (www.globaljetwatch.net) will place small (0.5-metre) commerical telescopes in four schools around the world. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom designed spectrograph, currently being built by the Astrophysics sub-department of the University of Oxford. The scientific goal of the project is to provide continual monitoring of a rosetta stone object, the micro-quasar SS433. In addition, the project has a significant out-reach element, aiming to involve school children on four-continents in front-line astronomical research. The spectrograph is a fibre-fed fixed format cross-dispersed echellete design providing R~6000 spectra from 4300-8500 in a single exposure. The spectrograph is built almost entirely from off-the-shelf components. The four GlobalJetWatch sites (Australia, India, South Africa, Chile) will be commissioned in 2008/09. Here we present the baseline design of the spectrograph, and initial results from the prototype on-sky commissioning in Oxford.

Clarke, Fraser J.; Gosling, Andrew J.; Doolin, Sam; Goodall, Paul; Perez, Sebastian; Pattinson, Paul; Makin, Rick; Blundell, Katherine M.

2008-07-01

300

The three viewpoints for raising a child's natural science literacy -Catch, Touch and Watch -  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are few opportunities to go out for field study, and the difficulty of letting a child and student get an understanding accompanied with realization, in Primary and Junior high schools of Japan (e.g. JST, 2010; 2011). Performing field study using nature near around school is a good opportunity to force the essence of everything. Moreover, it is very important also on the concept formation of the natural science over the things phenomenon of a child and student. In this presentation, I clarify the appearance of the child who wants to educate from a viewpoint of field study, and observe three viewpoints of "Catch", "Touch", and "Watch" which heightens the education effect in the field (nature). In the presentation of this meeting last year (Yoshida and Matsumoto, 2011), I outlined that three viewpoint of "Catch", "Touch", and "Watch" is important. In response to it, I carried out More-Options arrangement about the "natural science literacy" to the child of each viewpoint this time. For that purpose, teacher effective support is required to educate to a child. That is, the focusing to the details in the inside of a large nature, prepare of teaching materials and teaching tools, and a teacher's own independence study are important.

Yoshida, K.; Matsumoto, I.

2012-12-01

301

Clinical evaluation of the GlucoWatch biographer: a continual, non-invasive glucose monitor for patients with diabetes.  

PubMed

A device providing frequent, automatic, and non-invasive glucose measurements for persons with diabetes has been developed: the GlucoWatch biographer. This device extracts glucose through intact skin via reverse iontophoresis where it is detected by an amperometric biosensor. The biographer can provide glucose readings every 20 min for 12 h. The performance of this device was evaluated in two large clinical studies in a controlled clinical environment (n=231), and the home environment (n=124). Accuracy of the biographer was evaluated by comparing the automatic biographer readings to serial finger-stick blood glucose (BG) measurements. Biographer performance was comparable in both environments. Mean difference between biographer and finger-stick measurements was -0.01 and 0.26 mmol l(-1) for the clinical and home environments, respectively. The mean absolute value of the relative difference was 1.06 and 1.18 mmol l(-1) for the same studies. Correlation coefficient (r) between biographer and finger-stick measurements was 0.85 and 0.80 for the two studies. In both studies, over 94% of the biographer readings were in the clinically acceptable A+B region of the Clarke Error Grid. A slight positive bias is observed for the biographer readings at low BG levels. Biographer accuracy is relatively constant over all rates of BG changes, except when BG decreases more than 10 mmol l(-1) h(-1), which occurred for only 0.2% of points in the home environment study. Biographer precision, as measured by CV%, is approx. 10%. Skin irritation, characterized by erythema and edema, was either non-existent or mild in >90% of subjects and resolved in virtually all subjects without treatment in several days. PMID:11679237

Tierney, M J; Tamada, J A; Potts, R O; Jovanovic, L; Garg, S

2001-12-01

302

Investigation of Ultrasonic Motors Using Thin Piezo-Ceramics and a Metal Composite-Plate for Watches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors have developed a 0.4-mm-thick longitudinal bar-type ultrasonic motor for use in watches, using a thin plate stator and a rotor equipped within the same plane. The stator is driven to vibrate length wise by piezo-ceramics oscillated in the first longitudinal mode. The stator then uses a slant projection tooth to pick at the rotor, and drive it. The motor is simply constructed and is easily driven at low voltages. This paper shows that the ultrasonic motor possesses the requisite size and operating characteristics for use in driving the date wheel of a watch.

Miyazawa, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yasuharu; Funasaka, Tsukasa; Furuhata, Makoto

1999-09-01

303

Television Watching, Energy Intake, and Obesity in US Children Results From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine the relationship between tele- vision watching, energy intake, physical activity, and obe- sity status in US boys and girls, aged 8 to 16 years. Methods: We used a nationally representative cross- sectional survey with an in-person interview and a medi- cal examination, which included measurements of height and weight, daily hours of television watching, weekly par- ticipation

Carlos J. Crespo; Ellen Smit; Richard P. Troiano; Susan J. Bartlett; Caroline A. Macera; Ross E. Andersen

304

Test report of evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flowmeters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of testing four different flowmeters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101,241-AN- 103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105 and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1/78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford have forced the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter has been chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

Willingham, W.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-03

305

Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

HEDENGREN, D.C.

2000-09-28

306

Spectators in the stands watch launch of STS-95 and Space Shuttle Discovery.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Amid the thousands of spectators watching the launch of STS-95 are Insurance Commissioner Bill Nelson (second from left, pointing) and Heavyweight Boxing Champion Evander Holyfield (next to him). A former U.S. representative, Nelson flew as a crew member on STS 61-C in January 1986. The STS-95 mission, which lifted off at 2:19:34 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Extra attention has been drawn to the mission due to the addition to the crew of John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio. STS-95 is Glenn's second flight into space after 36 years; he was one of the original Project Mercury astronauts and flew his first mission in February 1962.

1998-01-01

307

Forest Watch: An educational research program of the New Hampshire Space Grant Consortium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forest Watch is a student-scientist partnership and education outreach program to study white pine health in New England. Primary and secondary students collect and process data on air pollution damage to forests near their schools, which is used by University of New Hampshire researchers, and compared with spectral data. These are then compared to tropospheric ozone data, beginning from 1991. Data spreadsheets for the student to enter forest biometric data and spectral curves are provided, as well as EOS-Webster satellite imagery, and GPS, ALTA, and Topo-Map activities forms. The student activities include forest stand assessment, laboratory assessment of damage symptoms, and image processing and data analysis of Thematic Mapper data around their school. There is information on teacher workshops and a message board.

308

Spectators in the stands watch launch of STS-95 and Space Shuttle Discovery.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These stands are filled with spectators watching and photographing the launch of STS-95. The viewing sites and roadways at Kennedy Space Center bulge with people and vehicles wanting to see Space Shuttle Discovery lift off. Extra attention has been drawn to the mission due to the addition to the crew of John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio. STS-95 is Glenn's second flight into space after 36 years; he was one of the original Project Mercury astronauts and flew his first mission in February 1962. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

1998-01-01

309

The International Outer Planets Watch atmospheres node database of giant-planet images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Atmospheres Node of the International Outer Planets Watch (IOPW) is aimed to encourage the observations and study of the atmospheres of the Giant Planets. One of its main activities is to provide an interaction between the professional and amateur astronomical communities maintaining an online and fully searchable database of images of the giant planets obtained from amateur astronomers and available to both professional and amateurs [1]. The IOPW database contains about 13,000 image observations of Jupiter and Saturn obtained in the visible range with a few contributions of Uranus and Neptune. We describe the organization and structure of the database as posted in the Internet and in particular the PVOL software (Planetary Virtual Observatory & Laboratory) designed to manage the site and based in concepts from Virtual Observatory projects.

Hueso, R.; Legarreta, J.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Rojas, J. F.; Gómez-Forrellad, J. M.

2011-10-01

310

FoolWatch: A Case study of econometric analysis and evidenced-based-policy making in the Australian Government  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decision to introduce a national FuelWatch scheme provides a timely case study of `evidence-based- policy' making in Australia. The government based its decision on econometric work by the ACCC who refuse to release the data. They claim that their analysis is robust because it has been subject to scrutiny within the ACCC and by Treasury. Experience with `evidence based

Don Harding

2008-01-01

311

Children's Hostile Attribution Bias Is Reduced after Watching Realistic Playful Fighting, and the Effect Is Mediated by Prosocial Thoughts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hostile attribution bias (HAB) has been found to characterize aggressive children. Watching prosocial media has been shown to have positive effects on children, and the general learning model has been used to account for these observations. This study tested the hypotheses derived from this theory that exposure to playful fighting would lead to a…

Boulton, Michael J.

2012-01-01

312

DirecNet Randomized Trial of the GlucoWatch in the Management of T1DM in Children.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This randomized clinical trial was to assess the proper role of the GlucoWatch G2 (Trademark) Biographer (GW2B; Cygnus, Inc., Redwood City, CA) in the management of type 1 diabetes in children. Primary outcomes were change in HbA1c and frequency of hypogl...

2005-01-01

313

Relationship between Noctcaelador and Aesthetic Sensitivity: Art-Related Personality Factors Associated with College Students' Night-Sky Watching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relationship between positive attitudes and behaviors concerning night-sky watching (noctcaelador) and aesthetic sensitivity. College students (N = 106) completed the Noctcaelador Inventory (Kelly, 2004a) and a shortened version of the Sensitivity Questionnaire (Child, 1965). Noctcaelador was significantly, positively…

Kelly, William E.

2008-01-01

314

The New Classified Research. Corporate Sponsored Biomedical Research and the Reign of Secrecy at Harvard University. A Harvard Watch Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvard Watch asserts that withholding essential information from public scrutiny is not uncommon at Harvard University. Maintaining that Harvard has reversed its position from extolling the virtues of public disclosure to one of imposing secrecy, the document suggests that this about face is linked to the university's recent collaboration with…

Bourke, Jaron

315

Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" and the Influence of Jens Peter Jacobsen's "Marie Grubbe."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that Harlem Renaissance literary figure, Zora Neale Hurston, may have written her novel of a three-times married woman, "Their Eyes Were Watching God," under the influence of and in response to "Marie Grubbe," a novel by a nineteenth-century Danish man. (JB)

Woodson, Jon

1992-01-01

316

Effect of Night Watches and Intermittent Sleep on State of Circadian Rhythms of Physiological Functions of Fishermen (Abstract Only).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of 3 groups of 6 fishermen with different watch schedules measured the effect of interrupted sleep and wakefulness on daily rhythms and adaptability of fishermen on a cruise. Group 1 slept through the night without interruption, groups 2 and 3 had...

V. A. Skrupskiy

1987-01-01

317

Behavioural responses of killer whales (Orcinus orca )t o whale-watching boats: opportunistic observations and experimental approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Johnstone Strait provides important summer habitat for the northern resident killer whales Orcinus orca of British Columbia. The site is also an active whale-watching area. A voluntary code of conduct requests that boats do not approach whales closer than 100 m to address perceived, rather than demonstrated, effects of boat traffic on killer whales. The purpose of the study was

Rob Williams; Andrew W. Trites; David E. Bain

2002-01-01

318

The Energy Expenditure of an Activity-Promoting Video Game compared to Sedentary Video Games and TV Watching  

PubMed Central

Background Screen time continues to be a major contributing factor to sedentariness in children. There have been more creative approaches to increase physical over the last few years. One approach has been through the use of video games. In the present study we investigated the effect of television watching and the use of activity-promoting video games on energy expenditure and movement in lean and obese children. Our primary hypothesis was that energy expenditure and movement decreases while watching television, in lean and obese children. Our secondary hypothesis was that energy expenditure and movement increases when playing the same game with an activity-promoting video game console compared to a sedentary video game console, in lean and obese children. Methods Eleven boys (10 ± 1 year) and eight girls (9 ± 1 year) ranging in BMI from 14–29 kg/m2 (eleven lean and eight overweight or obese) were recruited. Energy expenditure and physical activity were measured while participants were watching television, playing a video game on a traditional sedentary video game console, and while playing the same video game on an activity-promoting video game (Nintendo Wii) console. Results Energy expenditure was significantly greater than television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console when children played the video game on the activity-promoting console(125.3 ± 38.2 Kcal/hr vs. 79.7 ± 20.1 and 79.4 ±15.7, P<0.0001, respectively). When examining movement with accelerometry, children moved significantly more when playing the video game on the Nintendo Wii console (p<0.0001). Conclusion The amount of movement and energy expenditure of television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console is not different. Activity-promoting video games have shown to increase movement, and be an important tool to raise energy expenditure by 50% when compared to sedentary activities of daily living.

Mitre, Naim; Foster, Randal C; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Levine, James A.

2014-01-01

319

Watershed Watch Undergraduate Research Projects: Monitoring Environmental Impacts on Tree Growth - Urban Development and Hurricanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Watershed Watch (NSF 0525433) is designed to engage early undergraduate students from two-year and four-year colleges in student-driven full inquiry-based instruction in the biogeosciences. Program goals for Watershed Watch are to test if inquiry-rich student-driven projects sufficiently engage undeclared students (or noncommittal STEM majors) to declare a STEM major (or remain with their STEM major). The program is a partnership between two four-year campuses - the University of New Hampshire (UNH), and Elizabeth City State University (ECSU, in North Carolina); and two two-year campuses - Great Bay Community College (GBCC, in New Hampshire) and the College of the Albemarle (COA, in North Carolina). Two Watershed Watch students from the 2009 Summer Research Institute (SRI), held on the ECSU campus, August 3-14, 2009 investigated the use of wood cores collected from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum). One student team studied the possible impacts of urban development on tree growth, focusing on the use of dendrochronology to assess the effect of environmental factors on the trees. Tree cores and foliar samples were collected at the ECSU Outdoor Classroom and compared with the same species from the Great Dismal Swamp (GDS) in Virginia. The main targets of this experiment were one aquatic tree, the bald cypress, and a land based tree, the loblolly pine. This allowed us to compare an urbanized area (ECSU) with a more natural setting (GDS) to evaluate factors impacting tree growth. This experiment suggests that there may be potentially harmful impacts of an urban environment with the data that at ECSU. The growth rings of the ECSU campus tree cores are noticeably narrow, especially in the loblolly pine from the ECSU outdoor classroom, and multiple fluctuations in more recent tree rings of the bald cypress in the ECSU campus. Growth ring compression, beginning approximately in 1956 in 100-year old loblolly pines, corresponds in timing with the nearby construction of two student dormitories within 100 feet of the trees. The other student team studied cores for evidence of possible impacts from four recent hurricanes (Isabel, category 5, 2003; Floyd, category 4, 1999; Bonnie, category 3, 1998; and Fran, Category 3, 1996) on trees from the Alligator River (near Cape Hatteras, NC) and from the ECSU campus (well inland). Cores were evaluated for the presence or absence of false growth rings that could be the result of saltwater impoundment associated with storm surges. False growth rings were seen in the cores of loblolly pine from the Alligator River site, but only for the years 2003 and 1999. No false growth rings were seen in the cores of loblolly pine from the ECSU campus. Both hurricanes Isabel and Floyd were stronger storms and had higher storm surges (8-10 ft) than either Bonnie or Fran (storm surges of 3-5 feet). The team hypothesized that the false growth rings were related to the impacts of the two stronger storms.

Rock, B. N.; Hale, S.

2009-12-01

320

Watching elderly and disabled person's physical condition by remotely controlled monorail robot  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are developing a nursing system using robots and cameras. The cameras are mounted on a remote controlled monorail robot which moves inside a room and watches the elderly. It is necessary to pay attention to the elderly at home or nursing homes all time. This requires staffs to pay attention to them at every time. The purpose of our system is to help those staffs. This study intends to improve such situation. A host computer controls a monorail robot to go in front of the elderly using the images taken by cameras on the ceiling. A CCD camera is mounted on the monorail robot to take pictures of their facial expression or movements. The robot sends the images to a host computer that checks them whether something unusual happens or not. We propose a simple calibration method for positioning the monorail robots to track the moves of the elderly for keeping their faces at center of camera view. We built a small experiment system, and evaluated our camera calibration method and image processing algorithm.

Nagasaka, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Fukaya, Yasutoshi; Takahashi, Tomoichi; Takeshita, Toru

2001-10-01

321

Properties of ion-plated TiN films from watch case exteriors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion plating was first proposed in 1963 in the USA and the good cohesion and coverage of the coating attracted much interest. More recently, widespread use has begun to be made of reactive ion-plating, in which the coating is formed while the evaporated material is reacted with an atmospheric gas. Of the various coatings that may be formed by reactive ion-plating, titanium nitride films are now beginning to be widely used for decorative components, chiefly watch case exteriors, on account of their fine gold color coupled with great hardness (Hv greater than 1500). Although, as an alternative to ion plating, titanium nitride coatings can be formed by chemical vapor deposition utilizing titanium halide, this method requires high temperatures (approx. 1000 C) and is unsuitable for decorative applications owing to the coarse grain of the film formed. On the other hand, a variety of ion-plating methods have been devised, examples being active reaction evaporation, the hollow cathode process, and the hot cathode process, and the formation of dense titanium nitride ion-plated films for decorative purposes is described.

Kishi, M.; Watanabe, A.; Shimoyama, R.

1985-11-01

322

Watching bats find food: Do we classify the signals, the strategies, or the bats?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fact that different families, genera, and even species of echolocating bats broadcast characteristic sonar signals has motivated numerous efforts to classify bats according to signal design, which has received support from correlations with both peripheral and central auditory physiology. Signal types vary according to the situations in which bats have been observed hunting for food, so this classification has been extended to the hunting strategies they use. The availability of new technical means for watching and documenting the behavior of echolocating bats in real time (thermal infrared video cameras, night-vision video with infrared illumination, video recorders with ultrasonic audio channels) makes it possible to follow individual bats long enough to observe variations in their behavior over periods of seconds to minutes. These observations reveal that at least some species nominally classified as using just one hunting strategy in fact use several strategies according to prevailing conditions, sometimes using different strategies in the course of only a few minutes. The historic inaccessibility of bats to real-time observation in the dark may have lead to exaggerated stereotyping of their behavior. [Work supported by ONR, NSF.

Simmons, James A.

2001-05-01

323

Discrimination of LINAC photon and sunlight contributions in watch glass analyzed by means of thermoluminescence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research described in this paper shows how to extract from the glow curves of watch glasses exposed to LINAC photons and sunlight a contribution sensitive to LINAC photons dose. As first step, the dependence of the TL signal due to sunlight on the exposure duration was studied and a signal saturation was observed after about 20 weeks. The comparison of TL signals due to solar light and to LINAC photons highlights a partial overlap of the two signals. Here, two different analysis procedures of glow curves (general order kinetics deconvolution and principal components analysis) are reported to point out components which depend differently on LINAC photon radiation dose. For both analyses two components were used and the dependence on dose was investigated. In order to evaluate the ability of both techniques to reconstruct absorbed doses a blind test was performed. The reconstructed dose with both techniques is significantly consistent with the initial dose value. The procedures here described are valuable because they could be used to discriminate any background signal from that due to ionizing radiation irradiation and could be used as useful tools for dose reconstruction in retrospective dosimetry.

Longo, Anna; Brai, Maria; Carlino, Antonio; Marrale, Maurizio

2012-06-01

324

Perception while watching movies: Effects of physical screen size and scene type  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, television screens and display monitors have increased in size considerably, but has this improved our televisual experience? Our working hypothesis was that the audiences adopt a general strategy that “bigger is better.” However, as our visual perceptions do not tap directly into basic retinal image properties such as retinal image size (C. A. Burbeck, 1987), we wondered whether object size itself might be an important factor. To test this, we needed a task that would tap into the subjective experiences of participants watching a movie on different-sized displays with the same retinal subtense. Our participants used a line bisection task to self-report their level of “presence” (i.e., their involvement with the movie) at several target locations that were probed in a 45-min section of the movie “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.” Measures of pupil dilation and reaction time to the probes were also obtained. In Experiment 1, we found that subjective ratings of presence increased with physical screen size, supporting our hypothesis. Face scenes also produced higher presence scores than landscape scenes for both screen sizes. In Experiment 2, reaction time and pupil dilation results showed the same trends as the presence ratings and pupil dilation correlated with presence ratings, providing some validation of the method. Overall, the results suggest that real-time measures of subjective presence might be a valuable tool for measuring audience experience for different types of (i) display and (ii) audiovisual material.

Troscianko, Tom; Meese, Timothy S.; Hinde, Stephen

2012-01-01

325

Tracking temporal trend breaks of anthropogenic change in Mussel Watch (MW) databases.  

PubMed

The potential for structural changes in time trend concentrations of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, was examined in Mussel Watch (MW) databases of metal pollution at eighteen coastal stations over a decadal period, from 1992 to 2007. Simultaneously, by using two statistical methods representing both the classical hypothesis-testing and the Bayesian approaches, we found single and multiple trend breaks for Hg (28% of the stations), Cd (17%), and Pb (11%) within trends in connection with anthropogenic and subtle natural environmental changes. Also called change point problems, if not accounted for, these could bias time trend investigations and interpretations. We calculated trend rate differences of 39% and switches up to 1 order of magnitude from classical linear trend assessments. We discuss sampling, analytical, and environmental (both natural and anthropogenic) sources of data set variabilities, showing that, in practice, the overall 16-year analytical performance could be as elevated as the yearly sampling reproducibility. We demonstrate that environmental time trend interpretations benefit from undertaking prior structural change analysis. After decades of MW marine chemical pollution assessments these have proven extremely useful, although the occurrence of trend breaks directly affects the long-term marine environmental monitoring strategies. Our results suggest a broader concept to design monitoring programs in agreement with rapid global anthropogenic and environmental changes. PMID:23035902

Guitart, Carlos; Hernández-del-Valle, Adrian; Marín, J Miguel; Benedicto, José

2012-11-01

326

Cognitive avionics and watching spaceflight crews think: generation-after-next research tools in functional neuroimaging.  

PubMed

Confinement and isolation have always confounded the extraordinary endeavor of human spaceflight. Psychosocial health is at the forefront in considering risk factors that imperil missions of 1- to 2-yr duration. Current crewmember selection metrics restricted to behavioral observation by definition observe rather than prevent performance degradation and are thus inadequate when preflight training cannot simulate an entire journey. Nascent techniques to monitor functional and task-related cortical neural activity show promise and can be extended to include whole-brain monitoring. Watching spaceflight crews think can reveal the efficiency of training procedures. Moreover, observing subcortical emotion centers may provide early detection of developing neuropsychiatric disorders. The non-invasive functional neuroimaging modalities electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and highlights of how they may be engineered for spacecraft are detailed. Preflight and in-flight applications to crewmember behavioral health from current generation, next generation, and generation-after-next neuroscience research studies are also described. The emphasis is on preventing the onset of neuropsychiatric dysfunctions, thus reducing the risk of mission failure due to human error. PMID:15943214

Genik, Richard J; Green, Christopher C; Graydon, Francis X; Armstrong, Robert E

2005-06-01

327

Digital Earth Watch And Picture Post Network: Measuring The Environment Through Digital Images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital Earth Watch (DEW) involves individuals, schools, organizations and communities in a systematic monitoring project of their local environment, especially vegetation health. The program offers people the means to join the Picture Post network and to study and analyze their own findings using DEW software. A Picture Post is an easy-to-use and inexpensive platform for repeatedly taking digital photographs as a standardized set of images of the entire 360° landscape, which then can be shared over the Internet on the Picture Post website. This simple concept has the potential to create a wealth of information and data on changing environmental conditions, which is important for a society grappling with the effects of environmental change. Picture Posts may be added by anyone interested in monitoring a particular location. The value of a Picture Post is in the commitment of participants to take repeated photographs - monthly, weekly, or even daily - to build up a long-term record over many years. This poster will show examples of Picture Post pictures being used for monitoring and research applications, and a DEW mobile app for capturing repeat digital photographs at a virtual post. We invite individuals, schools, informal education centers, groups and communities to join.; A new post and its website. ; Creating a virtual post using the mobile app.

Schloss, A. L.; Beaudry, J.; Pickle, J.; Carrera, F.

2012-12-01

328

NOAA Coral Reef Watch: Decision Support Tools for Coral Reef Managers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A multitude of natural and anthropogenic stressors exert substantial influence on coral reef ecosystems and contribute to bleaching events, slower coral growth, infectious disease outbreaks, and mortality. Satellite-based observations can monitor, at a global scale, environmental conditions that influence both short-term and long-term coral reef ecosystem health. From research to operations, NOAA Coral Reef Watch (CRW) incorporates paleoclimatic, in situ, and satellite-based biogeophysical data to provide near-real-time and forecast information and tools to help managers, researchers, and other stakeholders interpret coral health and stress. CRW has developed an operational, near-real-time product suite that includes sea surface temperature (SST), SST time series data, SST anomaly charts, coral bleaching HotSpots, and Degree Heating Weeks (DHW). Bi-weekly global SST analyses are based on operational nighttime-only SST at 50-km resolution. CRW is working to develop high-resolution products to better address thermal stress on finer scales and is applying climate models to develop seasonal outlooks of coral bleaching. Automated Satellite Bleaching Alerts (SBAs), available at Virtual Stations worldwide, provide the only global early-warning system to notify managers of changing reef environmental conditions. Currently, CRW is collaborating with numerous domestic and international partners to develop new tools to address ocean acidification, infectious diseases of corals, combining light and temperature to detect coral photosystem stress, and other parameters.

Rauenzahn, J.; Eakin, C.; Skirving, W. J.; Burgess, T.; Christensen, T.; Heron, S. F.; Li, J.; Liu, G.; Morgan, J.; Nim, C.; Parker, B. A.; Strong, A. E.

2010-12-01

329

The effect of left-right reversal on film: Watching Kurosawa reversed  

PubMed Central

The mirror reversal of an image is subtly different from the original. Often such change goes unnoticed in pictures, although it can affect preference. For the first time we studied the effect of mirror reversal of feature films. People watched Yojimbo or Sanjuro in a cinema, both classic films by Akira Kurosawa. They knew that this was a study and filled out a questionnaire. On one day Yojimbo was shown in its original orientation, and on another day the film was mirror reversed. Sanjuro was shown reversed on one day and non-reversed on another day. Viewers did not notice the reversal, even when they had seen the film before and considered themselves fans of Kurosawa. We compared this with estimates from a survey. In addition, the question about the use of space (scenography) revealed that although people who had seen the film before gave higher ratings compared with those who had not, this was only true when the film was not reversed.

Bertamini, Marco; Bode, Carole; Bruno, Nicola

2011-01-01

330

U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon Watches Apollo 11 Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon, aboard the U.S.S. Hornet aircraft carrier, used binoculars to watch the Apollo 11 Lunar Mission recovery. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days post mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

1969-01-01

331

How chocolate keeps you slim. The effect of food temptations on weight watching goal importance, intentions, and eating behavior.  

PubMed

In the Western rich food environment, people are constantly confronted with palatable but unhealthy food products. For those who would like to watch their weight, the appeal of immediate satisfaction is in conflict with their long-term weight watching goal, constituting a classic self-control dilemma. The current studies were designed to test the effect of food temptations on self-regulation mechanisms. Hypotheses were based on counteractive control theory stating that temptations trigger goal-directed behavior, thereby forming an adaptive self-regulation mechanism. Two experimental studies showed that exposure to food temptations, compared to a control condition, yielded enhanced goal importance (Study 1), goal intentions, and goal-directed behavior (i.e., healthy eating; Study 2). It is concluded that confrontation with temptations is not always undermining self-control and may even be beneficial for long-term goal pursuit. PMID:19666065

Kroese, Floor M; Evers, Catharine; De Ridder, Denise T D

2009-12-01

332

Television Watching and Other Sedentary Behaviors in Relation to Risk of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The last few years have seen a number of studies linking a sedentary lifestyle to obesity and an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes. This problem has been rather pronounced in the United States, as more Americans tend towards watching or being "passive" participants in activities. In a study released in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Professor Frank B. Hu and his colleagues at Harvard examined the relationship between various sedentary behaviors (particularly prolonged television watching) and the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in women. Looking at approximately 50,000 women from 11 states, Dr. Hu and his colleagues determined that sedentary behaviors were associated with a significantly elevated risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. For persons interested in public health and women's health in particular, this report will be of great importance.

Colditz, Graham A.; Hu, Frank B.; Li, Tricia Y.; Manson, Joann E.; Willett, Walter.

2003-01-01

333

The development of ShortWatch, a novel overtemperature or mechanical damage sensing technology for wires or cables. Final report  

SciTech Connect

'ShortWatch' is a patented technology which for the first time offers electrical wire/cable products providing real-time, 'in-situ' (1) condition monitoring that warns of insulation damage before an electrical fault occurs, (2) assessment of the ability to perform in a Design Basis event, (3) distributed sensor warning of overtemperature, and (4) insulation leakage measurement capability providing arc sensing and a reliable tool for wire age prediction.

Watkins, Ken; Morris, Jack; Wong, C.P.; Luo, Shijian

2001-09-07

334

Accuracy of StepWatch(TM) and ActiGraph Accelerometers for Measuring Steps Taken among Persons with Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Introduction There has been increased interest in the objective monitoring of free-living walking behavior using accelerometers in clinical research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The current investigation examined and compared the accuracy of the StepWatch activity monitor and ActiGraph model GT3X+ accelerometer for capturing steps taken during various speeds of prolonged, over-ground ambulation in persons with MS who had mild, moderate, and severe disability. Methods Sixty-three persons with MS underwent a neurological examination for generation of an EDSS score and undertook two trials of walking on the GAITRite electronic walkway. Participants were fitted with accelerometers, and undertook three modified six-minute walk (6MW) tests that were interspersed with 10–15 minutes of rest. The first 6MW was undertaken at a comfortable walking speed (CWS), and the two remaining 6MW tests were undertaken above (faster walking speed; FWS) or below (slower walking speed; SWS) the participant's CWS. The actual number of steps taken was counted through direct observation using hand-tally counters. Results The StepWatch activity monitor (99.8%–99.9%) and ActiGraph model GT3X+ accelerometer (95.6%–97.4%) both demonstrated highly accurate measurement of steps taken under CWS and FWS conditions. The StepWatch had better accuracy (99.0%) than the ActiGraph (95.5%) in the overall sample under the SWS condition, and this was particularly apparent in those with severe disability (StepWatch: 95.7%; ActiGraph: 87.3%). The inaccuracy in measurement for the ActiGraph was associated with alterations of gait (e.g., slower gait velocity, shorter step length, wider base of support). Conclusions This research will help inform the choice of accelerometer to be adopted in clinical trials of MS wherein the monitoring of free-living walking behavior is of particular value.

Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Ensari, Ipek; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Klaren, Rachel E.; Balantrapu, Swathi; Riskin, Barry J.

2014-01-01

335

Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m\\/s(50 ft\\/min) to 1.78 m\\/s

Willingham

1996-01-01

336

DECREASES IN MIGRATING SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS (ACCIPITER STRIATUS) AT TRADITIONAL RAPTOR-MIGRATION WATCH SITES IN EASTERN NORTH AMERICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each fall, migrating Sharp-shinned Hawks (Accipiter striatus) are counted at traditional raptor-migration watch sites in eastern North America. During the 1980s and early 1990s, declines in the numbers of Sharp-shinned Hawks sighted at many of these sites raised concerns about the population status of the species. Using count data from Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Pennsylvania, and Cape May Point, New Jersey,

CATHERINE B. VIVERETTE; SUSANNA STRUVE; LAURIE J. GOODRICH; KEITH L. BILDSTEIN

337

A High-Resolution SST Climatology Set for Next Generation NOAA Coral Reef Watch Decision Support System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Satellite-based observations provide a tool for synoptic, near-real-time monitoring of sea surface temperature (SST) at global scales. The current NOAA Coral Reef Watch's (CRW) decision support system uses a suite of operational, near-real-time global satellite products for monitoring and predicting mass coral bleaching. The key products include SST, SST anomaly, coral bleaching HotSpots, and Degree Heating Weeks (DHW). Historically, the

J. Li; C. Eakin; F. E. Muller-Karger; L. S. Guild; R. R. Nemani; C. Hu; S. E. Lynds; M. S. McCaffrey; K. Teleki; T. Christensen; G. Liu; C. Nim; T. Burgess; S. F. Heron; W. J. Skirving; M. Vega-Rodriguez

2010-01-01

338

Multicenter study shows an investigational urine test can predict high-risk prostate cancer in men who choose ‘watchful waiting’  

Cancer.gov

Initial results of a multicenter study coordinated by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center indicates that two investigational urine-based biomarkers are associated with prostate cancers that are likely to be aggressive and potentially life-threatening among men who take a “watchful waiting,” or active-surveillance approach to manage their disease. Ultimately, these markers may lead to the development of a urine test that could complement prostate biopsy for predicting disease aggressiveness and progression.

339

Incurable, invisible and inconclusive: watchful waiting for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and implications for doctor-patient communication.  

PubMed

Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) find it hard to accept a diagnosis of an incurable cancer for which no treatment is recommended and which may not cause symptoms for many years. We used qualitative interviews with 12 people with CLL managed by watchful waiting, drawn from a maximum variation sample of 39 adults with leukaemia, to explore accounts of watchful waiting and implications for clinical management. Patients with CLL recalled being given little information about the condition and wanted to know more about how it might affect them in the future. The invisibility of CLL meant that some chose not to disclose the diagnosis to others. Check-ups sometimes felt cursory, causing dissatisfaction. As symptoms increased, lifestyle adaptations became essential, well before treatment was warranted. Patients with CLL on watchful waiting experience levels of depression, anxiety and quality of life similar to those in active treatment; our qualitative approach has illuminated some of the reasons for the negative psychological impacts. We relate our findings to perceptions of the illness state, doctor-patient communication, and work pressure. We recommend that specialists could better support patients by acknowledging psychological impacts of CLL, actively listening to patients' concerns, and meeting their needs for information. PMID:21883563

Evans, J; Ziebland, S; Pettitt, A R

2012-01-01

340

Children's hostile attribution bias is reduced after watching realistic playful fighting, and the effect is mediated by prosocial thoughts.  

PubMed

Hostile attribution bias (HAB) has been found to characterize aggressive children. Watching prosocial media has been shown to have positive effects on children, and the general learning model has been used to account for these observations. This study tested the hypotheses derived from this theory that exposure to playful fighting would lead to a reduction in HAB, both immediately and after a 1-day delay, and that this effect would be mediated by positive thoughts. Four studies exposed child participants (N=242) to playful fighting versus neutral behavior primes and then tested their HAB. In two studies, thoughts about playful fighting and about children were assessed and tested as mediators. The main hypotheses were supported. The positive effect of watching playful fighting on HAB was evident immediately but not after 1 day. This effect was mediated by positive thoughts. In line with the general learning model, watching playful fighting reduced HAB in children, and positive thoughts contribute to this effect. This extends the realm of the general learning model and suggests interventions to help children avoid aggression. PMID:22704038

Boulton, Michael J

2012-09-01

341

The Archive of the Amateur Observation Network of the International Halley Watch. Volume 1; Comet Giacobini-Zinner  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Halley Watch (IHW) was organized for the purpose of gathering and archiving the most complete record of the apparition of a comet, Halley's Comet (1982i = 1986 III = 1P/Halley), ever compiled. The redirection of the International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft, subsequently renamed the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), toward Comet Giacobini-Zinner (1984e = 1985 XIII = 21P/Giacobini-Zinner) prompted the initiation of a formal watch on that comet. All the data collected on P/Giacobini-Zinner and P/Halley have been published on CD-ROM in the Comet Halley Archive. This document contains a printed version of the archive data, collected by amateur astronomers, on these two comets. Volume 1 contains the Comet Giacobini-Zinner data archive and Volume 2 contains the Comet Halley archive. Both volumes include information on how to read the data in both archives, as well as a history of both comet watches (including the organizing of the network of astronomers and lessons learned from that experience).

Edberg, Stephen J. (Editor)

1966-01-01

342

The Archive of the Amateur Observation Network of the International Halley Watch. Volume 1; Comet Giacobini-Zinner  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Halley Watch (IHW) was organized for the purpose of gathering and archiving the most complete record of the apparition of a comet, Comet Halley (1982i = 1986 III = 1P/Halley), ever compiled. The redirection of the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), toward Comet Giacobini-Zinner (1984e = 1985 XIII = 21P/Giacobini-Zinner) prompted the initiation of a formal watch on that comet. All the data collected on P/Giacobini-Zinner and P/Halley have been published on CD-ROM in the Comet Halley Archive. This document contains a printed version of the archive data, collected by amateur astronomers, on these two comets. Volume 1 contains the Comet Giacobini-Zinner data archive and Volume 2 contains the Comet Halley archive. Both volumes include information on how to read the data in both archives, as well as a history of both comet watches (including the organizing of the network of astronomers and lessons learned from that experience).

Edberg, Stephen J. (Editor)

1996-01-01

343

World Weather Watch: Global Observing System - Satellite sub-System. Information on the Application of Meteorological Satellite Data in Routine Operations and Research: Abstracts, Annual Summaries and Bibliographies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contributions from countries participating in the World Weather Watch program are listed. Emphasis is on the Global Observing System: Satellite sub-system. Bibliographic information and an abstract of each contribution are provided.

1978-01-01

344

Single Molecule Visualization of Protein-DNA Complexes: Watching Machines at Work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We can now watch individual proteins acting on single molecules of DNA. Such imaging provides unprecedented interrogation of fundamental biophysical processes. Visualization is achieved through the application of two complementary procedures. In one, single DNA molecules are attached to a polystyrene bead and are then captured by an optical trap. The DNA, a worm-like coil, is extended either by the force of solution flow in a micro-fabricated channel, or by capturing the opposite DNA end in a second optical trap. In the second procedure, DNA is attached by one end to a glass surface. The coiled DNA is elongated either by continuous solution flow or by subsequently tethering the opposite end to the surface. Protein action is visualized by fluorescent reporters: fluorescent dyes that bind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), fluorescent biosensors for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), or fluorescently-tagged proteins. Individual molecules are imaged using either epifluorescence microscopy or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Using these approaches, we imaged the search for DNA sequence homology conducted by the RecA-ssDNA filament. The manner by which RecA protein finds a single homologous sequence in the genome had remained undefined for almost 30 years. Single-molecule imaging revealed that the search occurs through a mechanism termed ``intersegmental contact sampling,'' in which the randomly coiled structure of DNA is essential for reiterative sampling of DNA sequence identity: an example of parallel processing. In addition, the assembly of RecA filaments on single molecules of single-stranded DNA was visualized. Filament assembly requires nucleation of a protein dimer on DNA, and subsequent growth occurs via monomer addition. Furthermore, we discovered a class of proteins that catalyzed both nucleation and growth of filaments, revealing how the cell controls assembly of this protein-DNA complex.

Kowalczykowski, Stephen

2013-03-01

345

Unintended Consequences of Health Information Technology: Evidence From Veterans Affairs Colorectal Cancer Oncology Watch Intervention  

PubMed Central

Purpose We evaluated the Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Oncology Watch intervention, a clinical reminder implemented in Veterans Integrated Service Network 7 (including eight hospitals) to improve CRC screening rates in 2008. Patients and Methods Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data were used to construct four cross-sectional groups of veterans at average risk, age 50 to 64 years; one group was created for each of the following years: 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2010. We applied hospital fixed effects for estimation, using a difference-in-differences model in which the eight hospitals served as the intervention sites, and the other 121 hospitals served as controls, with 2006 to 2007 as the preintervention period and 2009 to 2010 as the postintervention period. Results The sample included 4,352,082 veteran-years in the 4 years. The adherence rates were 37.6%, 31.6%, 34.4%, and 33.2% in the intervention sites in 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2010, respectively, and the corresponding rates in the controls were 31.0%, 30.3%, 32.3%, and 30.9%. Regression analysis showed that among those eligible for screening, the intervention was associated with a 2.2–percentage point decrease in likelihood of adherence (P < .001). Additional analyses showed that the intervention was associated with a 5.6–percentage point decrease in likelihood of screening colonoscopy among the adherent, but with increased total colonoscopies (all indicators) of 3.6 per 100 veterans age 50 to 64 years. Conclusion The intervention had little impact on CRC screening rates for the studied population. This absence of favorable impact may have been caused by an unintentional shift of limited VA colonoscopy capacity from average-risk screening to higher-risk screening and to CRC surveillance, or by physician fatigue resulting from the large number of clinical reminders implemented in the VA.

Bian, John; Bennett, Charles L.; Fisher, Deborah A.; Ribeiro, Maria; Lipscomb, Joseph

2012-01-01

346

Decision analysis for continuous cover gas monitoring of Ferrocyanide Watch List tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document pertains to underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that have been identified to potentially contain a significant amount of ferrocyanide compounds. This document evaluates the need for continuously monitoring the headspace vapors in Ferrocyanide Watch List tanks to detect flammable gases or gases that could indicate the occurrence of a propagating ferrocyanide-nitrate/nitrite reaction. The results of modeling studies and gas monitoring, and sludge sample analyses of actual ferrocyanide tank wastes have indicated no need to continuously monitor the vapor spaces in ferrocyanide tanks. This conclusion is based in part on the following factors: (1) a study performance on waste aging suggests that the ferrocyanide has degraded in the tanks during the more than 35 years of storage; therefore, the ferrocyanide is not present in concentrations that could support an exothermic reaction, also, the moisture present in the waste is sufficient to preclude a self-sustaining (propagating) ferrocyanide-nitrate reaction; (2) evaluation of core sample results from Tank 241-C-109 and Tank 241-C-112 support laboratory studies showing that ferrocyanide has degraded and the fuel concentration in the tanks is considerably lower than postulated by flowsheet simulants; (3) no gases have been identified that would indicate the occurrence of a ferrocyanide nitrate/nitrite reaction; additionally, a self-sustaining ferrocyanide nitrate/nitrite reaction is not possible under current and future planned storage conditions. After reviewing the available information, it is evident that there would be little safety benefit from continuous in-tank vapor monitoring, and the time and commitment of operations schedule and equipment funds are not justified in the face of competing needs.

Fowler, K.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Graves, R.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-07-01

347

U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon Watches Apollo 11 Recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (center), aboard the U.S.S. Hornet aircraft carrier, used binoculars to watch the Apollo 11 Lunar Mission Recovery. Standing next to the President is astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 Commander. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days post mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

1969-01-01

348

Television Watching, Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Genetic Predisposition in Relation to Body Mass Index in Women and Men  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have mostly focused on the FTO gene and physical activity, while little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. Methods and Results We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure-time physical activity and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years prior to assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 0.8 [SE 0.4], 0.8 [0.2], 1.4 [0.2], 1.5 [0.2] and 3.4 [1.0] kg/m2 higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40h/wk) (P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 1.5 [0.2], 1.3 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2] and 0.8 [0.2] kg/m2 higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. Conclusions Sedentary lifestyle indicated by prolonged TV watching may accentuate predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure-time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association.

Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Kang, Jae H.; Curhan, Gary C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

2013-01-01

349

Biomonitoring of physiological status and cognitive performance of underway submariners undergoing a novel watch-standing schedule  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Submarine watch-standers adhere to a 6 hour-on, 12 hour-off (6/12) watch-standing schedule, yoking them to an 18-hr day, engendering circadian desynchronization and chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, the chronic social crowding, shift work, and confinement of submarine life provide additional stressors known to correlate with elevated secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and cortisol levels, reduced performance, immunologic dysfunction, malignancies, infections, gastrointestinal illness, coronary disease, anxiety, and depression. We evaluated an alternative, compressed, fixed work schedule designed to enhance circadian rhythm entrainment, sleep hygiene, performance, and health on 10 underway submariners, who followed the alternative and 6/12 schedules for approximately 2 weeks each. We measured subjects" sleep, cognitive performance, and salivary biomarker levels. Pilot analysis of the salivary data on one subject utilizing ELISA suggests elevated biomarker levels of stress. Average PM cortisol levels were 0.2 ?g/L (normal range: nondetectable - 0.15 ?g/L), and mean sIgA levels were 562 ?g/ml (normal range: 100-500 ?g/ml). Future research exploiting real-time salivary bioassays, via fluorescent polarimetry technology, identified by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a future Naval requirement, allows researchers to address correlations between stress-induced elaboration of salivary biomarkers with physiological and performance decrements, thereby fostering insight into the underway submariner"s psychoimmunological status. This may help identify strategies that enhance resilience to stressors. Specifically, empirically-based modeling can identify optimal watch-standing schedules and stress-mitigating procedures -- within the operational constraints of the submarine milieu and the mission --that foster improved circadian entrainment and reduced stress reactivity, enhancing physiological health, operational performance, safety, and job satisfaction.

Duplessis, C. A.; Cullum, M. E.; Crepeau, L. J.

2005-05-01

350

Estimation of southern resident killer whale exposure to exhaust emissions from whale-watching vessels and potential adverse health effects and toxicity thresholds.  

PubMed

Southern resident killer whales in British Columbia and Washington are exposed to heavy vessel traffic. This study investigates their exposure to exhaust gases from whale-watching vessels by using a simple dispersion model incorporating data on whale and vessel behavior, atmospheric conditions, and output of airborne pollutants from the whale-watching fleet based on emissions data from regulatory agencies. Our findings suggest that current whale-watching guidelines are usually effective in limiting pollutant exposure to levels at or just below those at which measurable adverse health effects would be expected in killer whales. However, safe pollutant levels are exceeded under worst-case conditions and certain average-case conditions. To reduce killer whale exposure to exhaust we recommend: vessels position on the downwind side of whales, a maximum of 20 whale-watching vessels should be within 800 m at any given time, viewing periods should be limited, and current whale-watch guidelines and laws should be enforced. PMID:21276987

Lachmuth, Cara L; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; Steyn, D Q; Milsom, William K

2011-04-01

351

Choices and Trade-Offs: Reply to McGaw  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contrasts the role and approach taken by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) with that of the OECD in the conduct of their respective large-scale assessment programmes. It is argued that the differences in the approaches taken in the conduct of the respective assessments are not merely…

Wagemaker, Hans

2008-01-01

352

Mussel Watch--Measurements of Chemical Pollutants in Bivalves as One Indicator of Coastal Environmental Quality,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The utility of the bivalve sentinel organism approach to monitoring for some chemicals of environmental concern in coastal and estuarine areas has been evaluated by regional and national programs and by smaller scale research efforts during the past 15 ye...

J. W. Farrington A. C. Davis B. W. Tripp D. K. Phelps W. B. Galloway

1987-01-01

353

Watching it All Come Together: Case Studies Report on Special Event Planning and Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Counties and municipalities throughout the United States host numerous national and regional planned special events including parades, festivals, and demonstrations, as well as many local events such as block parties and neighborhood festivals. Special Ev...

2004-01-01

354

Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1.78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford are forcing the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter shall be chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

Willingham, W.E. [Kaiser Engineers Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-05-02

355

Peritraumatic Distress, Watching Television, and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among Rescue Workers after the Great East Japan Earthquake  

PubMed Central

Background The Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2001 left around 20,000 dead or missing. Previous studies showed that rescue workers, as well as survivors, of disasters are at high risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study examined the predictive usefulness of the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI) among rescue workers of Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) deployed during the acute disaster phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake. Methodology/Principal Findings In this prospective observational study, the DMAT members recruited were assessed 1 month after the earthquake on the PDI and 4 months after the earthquake on the Impact of Event Scale-Revised to determine PTSD symptoms. The predictive value of the PDI at initial assessment for PTSD symptoms at the follow-up assessment was examined by univariate and multiple linear regression analysis. Of the 254 rescue workers who participated in the initial assessment, 173 completed the follow-up assessment. Univariate regression analysis revealed that PDI total score and most individual item scores predicted PTSD symptoms. In particular, high predictive values were seen for peritraumatic emotional distress such as losing control of emotions and being ashamed of emotional reactions. In multiple linear regression analysis, PDI total score was an independent predictor for PTSD symptoms after adjusting for covariates. As for covariates specifically, watching earthquake television news reports for more than 4 hours per day predicted PTSD symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The PDI predicted PTSD symptoms in rescue workers after the Great East Japan Earthquake. Peritraumatic emotional distress appears to be an important factor to screen for individuals at risk for developing PTSD among medical rescue workers. In addition, watching television for extended period of time might require attention at a time of crisis.

Nishi, Daisuke; Koido, Yuichi; Nakaya, Naoki; Sone, Toshimasa; Noguchi, Hiroko; Hamazaki, Kei; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Matsuoka, Yutaka

2012-01-01

356

A software application to improve human rights watching activities and to prepare police stations to face the ISO 9001:2008 certification procedure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is about the conceptual design of the IT support for human rights watching, police transparency and police performance evaluation. Firstly we understand that human rights are rights that humans have by the fact of being human, and which are neither created nor can be abrogated by any governmental institution. These include cultural, economic, and political rights, such as

Narayan Debnath; Roberto Uzal; German Montejano; Daniel Riesco

2011-01-01

357

Openness to Experience and Night-Sky Watching Interest as Predictors of Reading for Pleasure: Path Analysis of a Mediation Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relation between reading for pleasure, night-sky watching interest, and openness to experience were examined in a sample of 129 college students. Results of a path analysis examining a mediation model indicated that the influence of night-sky interest on reading for pleasure was not mediated by the broad personality domain openness to…

Kelly, William E.

2010-01-01

358

Academic Orientation, Academic Achievement, and Noctcaelador: Does Interest in Night-Sky Watching Correlate with Students' Approach to the Academic Environment?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relationship between academic orientation, academic achievement, and interest in night-sky watching (noctcaelador). Participants included 117 students enrolled in undergraduate psychology classes who completed the Survey of Academic Orientations (SAO; Davidson, Beck, & Silver, 1999), Noctcaelador Inventory (NI; Kelly,…

Kelly, William E.; Daughtry, Don

2007-01-01

359

Programed Instruction for Selected CIC Watch Officer Tasks. 2. Evaluation of the Audio Notebook in the Teaching of the Allied Naval Signal Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research evaluated oral program instruction used with a multitape recorder, the audio notebook, as a means of promoting adaptation to student differences and flexibility in instructional scheduling. Use of the Allied Naval Signal Book required by the CIC (Combat Information Center) watch officer position was programed for the audio notebook in…

Brock, John F.

360

Blood\\/Memory in N. Scott Momaday's The Names: A Memoir and Linda Hogan's The Woman Who Watches over the World: A Native Memoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on N. Scott Momaday's The Names: A Memoir and Linda Hogan's The Woman Who Watches over the World: A Native Memoir as comparative texts, this essay dissects the dynamics of indigenous memories as they are retrieved and formulated through critical encounters of disparate bloodlines and cultural legacies, in effect, through the blurring of boundaries between the indigenous and the

Hsinya Huang

361

Journal Watch From ACE (Alliance For Clinical Education): Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals 2006–2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

This journal watch is sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE). The purpose of this article is to summarize medical education manuscripts from specialty journals that are important and relevant to educators across specialties. Specialties included in our review were cardiology, gastroenterology, general internal medicine, pulmonology, nephrology, hematology and oncology, endocrinology, rheumatology, infectious disease, and neurology. We are grateful

Steven J. Durning; Liselotte N. Dyrbye; Alex J. Mechaber; Matthew R. Thomas; Melissa Fischer; Kevin OBrien; Elizabeth A. Baker; Michael J. Battistone; Matthew Mintz; Dario Torre; Andrew R. Hoellein

2009-01-01

362

Conceptualization and implementation of a multi-agent model to simulate whale-watching tours in the St. Lawrence Estuary in Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Saguenay St. Lawrence Marine Park (SSLMP) and the adjacent Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the St. Lawrence Estuary, in Quebec, cover a territory of exceptional biodiversity including 12 species of marine mammals, nearly half of which are considered to be endangered species. Whale-watching trips and other human activities related to commercial shipping, tourism, and recreation generate very intensive traffic

Sk. Morshed Anwar; Cédric A. Jeanneret; Lael Parrott; Danielle J. Marceau

2007-01-01

363

Watching Every Step of the Way: Jun?n Virus Attenuation Markers in the Vaccine Lineage  

PubMed Central

The Arenaviridae family includes several hemorrhagic fever viruses which are important emerging pathogens. Junín virus, a member of this family, is the etiological agent of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (AHF). A collaboration between the Governments of Argentina and the USA rendered the attenuated Junín virus vaccine strain Candid#1. Arenaviruses are enveloped viruses with genomes consisting of two single-stranded RNA species (L and S), each carrying two coding regions separated by a stably structured, non-coding intergenic region. Molecular characterization of the vaccine strain and of its more virulent ancestors, XJ13 (prototype) and XJ#44, allows a systematic approach for the discovery of key elements in virulence attenuation. We show comparisons of sequence information for the S RNA of the strains XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1 of Junín virus, along with other strains from the vaccine lineage and a set of Junín virus field strains collected at the AHF endemic area. Comparisons of nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed different point mutations which might be linked to the attenuated phenotype. The majority of changes are consistent with a progressive attenuation of virulence between XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1. We propose that changes found in genomic regions with low natural variation frequencies are more likely to be associated with the virulence attenuation process. We partially sequenced field strains to analyze the genomic variability naturally occurring for Junín virus. This information, together with the sequence analysis of strains with intermediate virulence, will serve as a starting point to study the molecular bases for viral attenuation.

Stephan, Betina Ines; Lozano, Mario Enrique; Goni, Sandra Elizabeth

2013-01-01

364

Mussel watch - measurements of chemical pollutants in bivalves as one indicator of coastal environmental quality  

SciTech Connect

The utility of the bivalve sentinel organism approach to monitoring for some chemicals of environmental concern in coastal and estuarine areas has been evaluated by regional and national programs and by smaller-scale research efforts during the past 15 years. The extent and severity of coastal contamination by chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, trace metals, and plutonium was assessed in several bivalve sentinel organism programs. Advantages and limitations of this approach are presented and discussed briefly within the context of both national and international efforts.

Farrington, J.W.; Davis, A.C.; Tripp, B.W.; Phelps, D.K.; Galloway, W.B.

1987-01-01

365

Watch Out! Magnetoencephalographic Evidence for Early Modulation of Attention Orienting by Fearful Gaze Cueing  

PubMed Central

Others’ gaze and emotional facial expression are important cues for the process of attention orienting. Here, we investigated with magnetoencephalography (MEG) whether the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression may elicit a selectively early effect of attention orienting on the brain responses to targets. We used the direction of gaze of centrally presented fearful and happy faces as the spatial attention orienting cue in a Posner-like paradigm where the subjects had to detect a target checkerboard presented at gazed-at (valid trials) or non gazed-at (invalid trials) locations of the screen. We showed that the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression resulted in a very early attention orienting effect in the form of additional parietal activity between 55 and 70 ms for the valid versus invalid targets following fearful gaze cues. No such effect was obtained for the targets following happy gaze cues. This early cue-target validity effect selective of fearful gaze cues involved the left superior parietal region and the left lateral middle occipital region. These findings provide the first evidence for an effect of attention orienting induced by fearful gaze in the time range of C1. In doing so, they demonstrate the selective impact of combined gaze and fearful expression cues in the process of attention orienting.

Lachat, Fanny; Farroni, Teresa; George, Nathalie

2012-01-01

366

Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - Water Vapor Measurement, October, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image shows atmospheric water vapor in Earth's upper troposphere, about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument flying aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. These data collected in early October 1997 indicate the presence of El Nino by showing a shift of humidity from west to east (blue and red areas) along the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Nino is the term used when the warmest equatorial Pacific Ocean water is displaced toward the east. The areas of high atmospheric moisture correspond to areas of very warm ocean water. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air then rises, forming tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. The MLS instrument, developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, measures humidity at the top of these clouds, which are very moist. This rain is now occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean and has left Indonesia (deep blue region) unusually dry, resulting in the current drought in that region. This image also shows moisture moving north into Mexico, an effect of several hurricanes spawned by the warm waters of El Nino.

1997-01-01

367

Watch out! Magnetoencephalographic evidence for early modulation of attention orienting by fearful gaze cueing.  

PubMed

Others' gaze and emotional facial expression are important cues for the process of attention orienting. Here, we investigated with magnetoencephalography (MEG) whether the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression may elicit a selectively early effect of attention orienting on the brain responses to targets. We used the direction of gaze of centrally presented fearful and happy faces as the spatial attention orienting cue in a Posner-like paradigm where the subjects had to detect a target checkerboard presented at gazed-at (valid trials) or non gazed-at (invalid trials) locations of the screen. We showed that the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression resulted in a very early attention orienting effect in the form of additional parietal activity between 55 and 70 ms for the valid versus invalid targets following fearful gaze cues. No such effect was obtained for the targets following happy gaze cues. This early cue-target validity effect selective of fearful gaze cues involved the left superior parietal region and the left lateral middle occipital region. These findings provide the first evidence for an effect of attention orienting induced by fearful gaze in the time range of C1. In doing so, they demonstrate the selective impact of combined gaze and fearful expression cues in the process of attention orienting. PMID:23209761

Lachat, Fanny; Farroni, Teresa; George, Nathalie

2012-01-01

368

Radio jets clearing the way through a galaxy: watching feedback in action.  

PubMed

The energy released by an active galactic nucleus (AGN) has a strong impact on the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). This feedback is considered to be the regulating factor for the growth of the central massive black hole and for the rate of star formation in a galaxy. We have located, using very-long-baseline interferometry, the fast outflow of neutral hydrogen in the young, restarted radio-loud AGN 4C12.50. The outflow is located 100 parsec from the nucleus where the radio jet interacts with the ISM, as well as around the associated radio lobe. These observations show that the radio plasma drives the outflow and removes gas from the central regions and that jet-driven outflows can play a relevant role in feedback mechanisms. PMID:24009387

Morganti, Raffaella; Fogasy, Judit; Paragi, Zsolt; Oosterloo, Tom; Orienti, Monica

2013-09-01

369

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - Indonesia Area, December, 1996 and August, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These images of the Pacific Ocean near Indonesia were produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S.-French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The images show sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions during December 1996 and August 1997. The difference in sea level between these months is tied to the movement of warm water away from Indonesia.

In December (left image), red and white areas indicate the presence of warm, higher than average sea level around Indonesia. At this time, massive amounts of warm water were detected around Indonesia by the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The warm, wet air from this water fed the normally heavy rainfall in this region.

By August 1997 (right image), sea level had dropped well below average as shown by purple areas (sea level at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal). The warm water had shifted east towards the west coast of North and South America, taking the rains with it.

The white and red areas indicate patterns of unusually high heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal.

The movement of warm water away from the western Pacific is tied to the weather-disrupting phenomenon known as El Nino. The departure of the large mass of warm water that is normally located near Indonesia has affected where rain clouds form, altered the typical atmospheric patterns and brought devastating drought to Indonesia. The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction.

Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued an advisory indicating the presence of the early indications of El Nino conditions.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/

1997-01-01

370

Modeling the impacts of cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan: observations from cetacean watching boats: 2002-2005.  

PubMed

Cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan has grown rapidly since 1997. This development, measured in terms of both number of tour boats and visitors, has resulted in many resource management challenges stemming from the absence of regulation and scientific data. To fill this void in empirical evidence, we used 464 sighting records from 2002 to 2005 to model the impact of cetacean-focused tourism. Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated cetacean avoidance responses to cetacean watching boats were strongly associated with pod size, mother-calf pairs, and cetacean-vessel distances. Mother-calf pairs abandoned their avoidance tactic by 55% compared to noncalf groups when tour boats approached. Second, the hazard ratio of abundance was 0.996, suggesting that the odds of encountering avoidance responses by the cetaceans decreased by 42% for every 100-member increase in the cetacean pod size. Last, distances maintained by boats from the cetaceans was positively related to avoidance responses (i.e., less avoidance behavior with closer interaction). Based on our findings, we have the following recommendations: (a) limit vessels from approaching mothers with calves, (b) limit vessels from approaching small groups of cetaceans, (c) reduced avoidance behavior to boat traffic may be a red flag for potential long-term disturbance, and (d) apply the "precautionary principle" based on the best scientific information available in cetacean-based tourism in Taiwan. These recommendations will help contribute to the sustainable development of cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan. PMID:20936282

Tseng, Yung-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chin; Kyle, Gerard T; Yang, Ming-Ching

2011-01-01

371

In the here and now: enhanced motor corticospinal excitability in novices when watching live compared to video recorded dance.  

PubMed

Enhanced motor corticospinal excitability (MCE) in passive action observation is thought to signify covert motor resonance with the actions seen. Actions performed by others are an important social stimulus and thus, motor resonance is prevalent during social interaction. However, most studies employ simple/short snippets of recorded movements devoid of any real-life social context, which has recently been criticized for lacking ecological validity. Here, we investigated whether the co-presence of the actor and the spectator has an impact on motor resonance by comparing novices' MCE for the finger (FDI) and the arm (ECR) with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation when watching five-minute solos of ballet dance, Bharatanatyam (Indian dance) and an acting control condition either live or on video. We found that (1) MCE measured in the arm muscle was significantly enhanced in the live compared to the video condition, (2) differences across performances were only evident in the live condition, and (3) our novices reported enjoying the live presentations significantly more. We suggest that novice spectators' MCE is susceptible to the performers' live presence. PMID:24073734

Jola, Corinne; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène

2013-06-01

372

Drying dissipative structures of aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) on a cover glass, a watch glass, and a glass dish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drying dissipative structures of aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of molecular weights ranging from 200 to\\u000a 3,500,000 were studied on a cover glass, a watch glass, and a glass dish on macroscopic and microscopic scales. Any convectional\\u000a and sedimentation patterns did not appear during the course of drying the PEG solutions. Several important findings on the\\u000a drying patterns are

Tsuneo Okubo; Junichi Okamoto; Shinya Takahashi; Akira Tsuchida

2009-01-01

373

Si(100) versus Ge(100): Watching the interface formation for the growth of III-V-based solar cells on abundant substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the atomic surface properties of differently prepared silicon and germanium (100) surfaces during metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy\\/chemical vapour deposition (MOVPE\\/MOCVD), in particular the impact of the MOVPE ambient, and applied reflectance anisotropy\\/difference spectroscopy (RAS\\/RDS) in our MOVPE reactor to in-situ watch and control the preparation on the atomic length scale for subsequent III-V-nucleation. The technological interest in the

S. Bruckner; O. Supplie; E. Barrigon; P. Kleinschmidt; A. Dobrich; I. Rey-Stolle; C. Algora; H. Doscher; T. Hannappel

2011-01-01

374

Task Plan for the selection and evaluation of flow monitoring instrumentation to be used on the primary exhaust ventilation in Double Shell Hydrogen Watch List Tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Task Plan outlines the activities required to select and evaluate flow measuring devices to be used in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts for Double Shell Tanks (DST) on the hydrogen watch list that don`t already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN. The continuous measurement and recording of this flow is necessary to quantify

Hertelendy

1995-01-01

375

Task Plan for the selection and evaluation of flow monitoring instrumentation to be used on the primary exhaust ventilation in Double Shell Hydrogen Watch List Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This Task Plan outlines the activities required to select and evaluate flow measuring devices to be used in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts for Double Shell Tanks (DST) on the hydrogen watch list that don`t already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN. The continuous measurement and recording of this flow is necessary to quantify the amount of hydrogen being off-gased by these tanks for further mitigation studies.

Hertelendy, N.A.

1995-12-01

376

Hubble Watches Planetary Nurseries Being Torched by Radiation from Hot Star  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planet formation is a hazardous process. These four snapshots, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, show dust disks around embryonic stars in the Orion Nebula being 'blowtorched' by a blistering flood of ultraviolet radiation from the region's brightest star. Within these disks are the seeds of planets. The doomed systems look like hapless comets, with wayward tails of gas boiling off the withering, pancake-shaped disks. The Frisbee-shaped disks, called protoplanetary disks, are wider than our solar system and reside in the centers of the cocoons of gas. These cocoons were formed from material evaporating off the surface of the disks. Evidence from Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 suggests that dust grains in the disk are already forming larger particles, which range in size from snowflakes to gravel. But these particles may not have time to grow into full-fledged planets because of the relentless 'hurricane' of radiation from the nebula's hottest star, called Theta 1 Orionis C. In the picture at top left, the disk is the green-colored oval near the center. Radiation from the hot star is heating up the disk, causing matter to dissipate, like steam evaporating from the surface of boiling water. A strong 'stellar wind,' a stream of particles moving at 4,500 to 8,900 miles per hour (7,200 to 14,400 kilometers per hour), is propelling the material away from the disk. The material is glowing because it is being energized by radiation from the hot star. Located 1,500 light-years away, the Orion Nebula is the nearest 'star factory' to Earth. The Hubble pictures were taken Feb. 26, 1998 and Jan. 11, 1999. Credits: NASA, J. Bally (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO), H. Throop (Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO), C.R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN)

2002-01-01

377

Misty picture weather-watch and microbarograph project: Experiments 9412-14-18  

SciTech Connect

Special meteorological observations and predictions for MISTY PICTURE are described. Ground zero measurements of winds and temperatures were used to develop predictions for needed light winds during the night for deployment of the helium bag for the precursor experiment. This also entailed correlations with the White Sands network of automated surface observation stations as well as general circulation and upper air reports from the regional synoptic weather observing and reporting network. Pilot balloon observations of upper winds and Tethersonde observations were made during bag deployment to further document local circulation developments. During the test countdown, radiosonde balloon observations of upper air temperatures and winds were made to allow prediction of atmospheric effects on airblast propagation that could break windows to nearly 200 km range from the MISTY PICTURE explosion yield. These data indicated that there would be no strong off-site propagations on shot day, but at shot time the weak convergence zone in the shot area disturbed the wind pattern and generated a northwestward sound duct. Some banded airblast focusing resulted that gave relatively high overpressures just south of the Admin Park, at the Observer's Area, and in San Antonio where a number of windows were claimed broken. Relatively weak blasts, between caustics or foci, were recorded by microbarographs at Admin Park, Stallion, and Socorro. Very weak and barely detectable waves were propagated eastward to Carrizozo where MINOR SCALE had broken windows in 1985, and to the southeast toward Tularosa and Alamogordo. Five microbarograph stations were also operated around the west side of a 200 km radius circle, to document airblast waves ducted and focused by relatively high temperatures and easterly monsoon winds near 50 km altitudes. 15 refs., 39 figs., 16 tabs.

Reed, J.W.; Church, H.W.; Huck, T.W.

1987-01-01

378

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - El Nino Rhythm, Dec, 10, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S.-French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Dec.10, 1997 and sea surface height is an indicator of the heat content of the ocean. The volume and area of the warm water pool related to El Nino has increased again after reaching a temporary low around Dec. 1. TOPEX/Poseidon has been tracking the fluctuations of the El Nino warm pool since it began early this year. Oceanographers believe the recent increases and decreases in the size of the warm water pool at the equator are part of the natural rhythm of El Nino and that the warm pool is occasionally pumped up by wind bursts blowing from the western and central Pacific Ocean. Each wind burst has triggered a temporary increase in area and volume of the warm pool. These data collected throughout 1997 have provided scientists with their first detailed view of how El Nino's warm pool behaves because the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite measures the changing sea surface height with unprecedented precision. In this image, the white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white area) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, (NOAA), has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov

1997-01-01

379

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - 'Double Peak' Pattern Complete, Dec, 1, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S./French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Dec. 1, 1997. The volume of the warm water related to El Nino has receded to about the level it was in early September. Oceanographers note that this El Nino has just completed a classic 'double peak' pattern in the eastern Pacific with the first peak in sea level occurring in July and the second peak in October. This pattern is very similar to what was observed during the 1982-83 El Nino, although at that time the double peaks occurred in January and April 1983. After the appearance of the double peaks in 1982-83, the sea level then began falling back to normal levels within a few months. In this image, the white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white area) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, (NOAA), has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov

1997-01-01

380

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - Warm Water Pool is Increasing, Nov. 10, 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S./French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Nov. 10, 1997. The volume of extra warm surface water (shown in white) in the core of the El Nino continues to increase, especially in the area between 15 degrees south latitude and 15 degrees north latitude in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The area of low sea level (shown in purple) has decreased somewhat from late October. The white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 centimeters and 32 cm (6 inches to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it is about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The surface area covered by the warm water mass is about one-and-one-half times the size of the continental United States. The added amount of oceanic warm water near the Americas, with a temperature between 21 to 30 degrees Celsius (70 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit), is about 30 times the volume of water in all the U.S. Great Lakes combined. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white areas) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmospheric system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/

1997-01-01

381

Associations between eating meals, watching TV while eating meals and weight status among children, ages 10-12 years in eight European countries: the ENERGY cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the association of eating meals, and never watching TV while eating meals, with weight status among children, ages 10–12 years across Europe. Methods 7915 children (mean age: 11.5 years) in eight European countries (Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland) completed a questionnaire at school. Data on meals eaten the day before questionnaire administration and the frequency of eating meals while watching TV were collected. Height and weight of the children were objectively assessed. Multinomial and binary regression analyses were conducted to test associations of eating meals (adjusted for gender and ethnicity) and never watching TV while eating meals (adjusted for gender, ethnicity and total TV time) with overweight/obesity, and to test for country- and socio-demographic differences. Results The proportions of children reporting eating breakfast, lunch and dinner were 85%, 96%, and 93% respectively, and 55%, 46% and 32% reported to never watch TV at breakfast, lunch and dinner respectively. The children who ate breakfast (OR?=?0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.7)) and dinner (OR?=?0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.5)), had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who did not. The children who never watched TV at lunch (OR?=?0.7 (95% CI 0.7-0.8)) and dinner (OR?=?0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9)) had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who watched TV at the respective meals. Conclusions The odds of being overweight was lower for children who ate breakfast and dinner compared to those who did not eat the respective meals. The odds of being overweight was lower for children who reported to never watch TV at lunch and dinner compared to those who did. A focus towards meal frequency and watching TV during meals in longitudinal and interventions studies in prevention of overweight and obesity, may contribute to a better understanding of causality.

2013-01-01

382

TOPEX/El Nino Watch - El Nino Warm Water Pool Decreasing, Jan, 08, 1998  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S.-French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Jan. 8, 1998, and sea surface height is an indicator of the heat content of the ocean. The volume of the warm water pool related to the El Nino has decreased by about 40 percent since its maximum in early November, but the area of the warm water pool is still about one and a half times the size of the continental United States. The volume measurements are computed as the sum of all the sea surface height changes as compared to normal ocean conditions. In addition, the maximum water temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific, as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is still higher than normal. Until these high temperatures diminish, the El Nino warm water pool still has great potential to disrupt global weather because the high water temperatures directly influence the atmosphere. Oceanographers believe the recent decrease in the size of the warm water pool is a normal part of El Nino's natural rhythm. TOPEX/Poseidon has been tracking these fluctuations of the El Nino warm pool since it began in early 1997. These sea surface height measurements have provided scientists with their first detailed view of how El Nino's warm pool behaves because the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite measures the changing sea surface height with unprecedented precision. In this image, the white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds weaken and even reverse direction. This change in the winds allows a large mass of warm water (the red and white area) that is normally located near Australia to move eastward along the equator until it reaches the coast of South America. The displacement of so much warm water affects evaporation, where rain clouds form and, consequently, alters the typical atmospheric jet stream patterns around the world. Using these global data, limited regional measurements from buoys and ships, and a forecasting model of the ocean-atmosphere system, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, (NOAA), has issued an advisory indicating the presence of a strong El Nino condition throughout the winter.

For more information, please visit the TOPEX/Poseidon project web page at http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov

1998-01-01

383

NASA Keeps Watch on a Potential Disaster in the Icy Andes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A chunk of glacier was threatening to fall into an Andean lake and cause major flooding in a Peruvian city of 60,000. A fissure has appeared in the glacier that feeds Lake Palcacocha near the city of Huaraz, 270 km north of Lima. If the piece breaks off, ensuing floods would take 15 minutes to reach the city. In 1941, the lake overflowed and caused massive destruction, killing 7,000 people. The city can be seen in the lower left part of the two images, acquired this week and 18 months ago. Lake Palcacocha is in the upper right corner of the image at the head of a valley, below the snow and glacier cap. The inset image shows an enlargement of the lake and the glacier occupying the cirque valley above it. The images are being provided to the Peruvian authorities and geologists to help them assess the state of the glacier, and compare the recent image with historic data.

These images were acquired on November 5, 2001 and April 8, 2003 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet. Size: 28.4 x 30.5 km (17.6 x 18.9 miles); 6 x 6 km (3.6 x 3.6 miles) Location: 9.5 deg. South lat., 77.5 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: November 5, 2001 and April 8, 2003

2003-01-01

384

The effect of preapplication of corticosteroids on skin irritation and performance of the GlucoWatch G2 Biographer.  

PubMed

Skin irritation due to iontophoresis may limit the frequency of use of devices for drug delivery or transdermal extraction of analytes of clinical interest. This study examined whether preapplication of corticosteroid preparations could reduce skin irritation from iontophoresis used by the GlucoWatch G2 Biographer (Cygnus, Inc., Redwood City, CA) in monitoring interstitial glucose levels frequently and automatically. Numerous corticosteroid preparations were screened to identify formulations that did not interfere with adhesion of the Biographer to the skin or glucose sensing. Kenalog (Westwood-Squibb Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Buffalo, NY) (triamcinolone acetonide) and Cortizone-10 Quick Shot (Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY) (hydrocortisone) sprays were selected and, in a double-masked, randomized, controlled trial, were applied to the forearms of 66 subjects with diabetes and allowed to dry. Biographers were applied and worn for 15 h, and home blood glucose measurements were taken every 30 min to assess accuracy. Irritation was assessed periodically by trained observers and study subjects. Skin irritation was reduced by both corticosteroid sprays, with the fraction of subjects who experienced moderate irritation reduced by 57% and 43% for the Kenalog and Cortizone-10 Quick Shot sprays, respectively. The treatment effect persisted at the 1-week assessment. Preapplication of these preparations did not affect the clinical utility of interstitial glucose readings. Preapplication of Kenalog or Cortizone-10 Quick Shot sprays significantly reduced skin irritation due to iontophoresis, and did not interfere with glucose measurements. This approach may enable the minority of users who experience moderate to severe skin irritation to use the Biographer more frequently for diabetes management. PMID:15198839

Tamada, Janet A; Davis, Tara L; Leptien, Amy D; Lee, Jonathan; Wang, Betty; Lopatin, Margarita; Wei, Charles; Wilson, Don; Comyns, Kathleen; Eastman, Richard C

2004-06-01

385

Title: Using Video to Enhance a Citizen Science Program: Digital Earth Watch And The Picture Post Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital Earth Watch (DEW) involves individuals, schools, organizations and communities in a systematic monitoring project of their local environment, especially vegetation health. The DEW Picture Post network offers people the means to make and share their own observations. A Picture Post is an easy-to-use and inexpensive platform for repeatedly taking digital photographs as a standardized set of images of the entire 360° landscape, which then can be shared over the Internet on the Picture Post website. This simple concept has the potential to create a wealth of information and data on changing environmental conditions, which is important for a society grappling with the effects of climate change. As a web-based program, it is critical to bring in new participants and to convey technical, scientific, and participant information with little or no human interaction. Once they get going, it is also important to keep participants engaged by getting their feedback as well as by sharing their experiences. This presentation will demonstrate our use of video to enhance the program, in particular the power of video for teaching skills needed to start up and contribute to a picture post, to convey findings and other scientific information collected at picture posts, and to engage participants and the community in an ongoing effort in monitoring and understanding their local environment and changing conditions. A DEW video library is being developed by a collaborative effort led by the University of New Hampshire with the University of Southern Maine, and Concord Academy. We invite individuals, schools, informal education centers, groups and communities to join: visit us atPicture Post is supported by NASA

Smith, J. D.; Beaudry, J.; Schloss, A. L.; Pickle, J.

2012-12-01

386

Processes Controlling the Diurnal and Seasonal Variability in Reactive Gases in the Tropical North Atlantic Boundary Layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tropical marine boundary layer is a key region for the global chemical destruction of gases such methane, carbon monoxide, VOCs and ozone, but there are few measurements of the intra and interannual variability of these reactive processes. The photochemistry of such regions has been considered in principle to be dominated by OH production from photolysis with concomitant ozone loss, occurring in the absence of NOx. The remoteness of the majority of the tropical oceans does not insulate them from anthropogenic emissions however, and there is a significant potential sensitivity to changes in background NOx derived from shipping. Logistics and geography constrain the amount of long-term boundary layer data that is currently available and tropical trends on decadal and longer timescales for some reactive species are yet to be established. The WMO-Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station on Sao Vicente, Cape Verde represents one of a very limited number of GAW observatories now undertaking continuous in situ observations of the reactive gases ozone, CO, non-methane hydrocarbons, and NOx. From four years of observations it is now clear that the factors controlling oxidation rates in this region of the tropical North Atlantic are more complex than previously thought, with [OH] and ozone loss influenced significantly by halogen oxides derived from oceanic emissions and by perturbations to regional scale NOx from commercial shipping. Variability in the frequency and composition of outflow from West Africa also exerts a significant influence on the wider Eastern tropical Atlantic maritime regions. The chemical and meteorological factors controlling the short- (diurnal) and medium-term (seasonal) behaviour of a range of WMO-GAW reactive gases will be discussed, and the surface observations placed in context through comparison to regional measurements from D288 and FAAM146 research aircraft and a global CTM. Inter-annual behaviour of CO, ethane and propane measured from Cape Verde WMO-GAW observatory 2006-2009.

Lewis, A. C.; Carpenter, L. J.; Read, K. A.; Lee, J. D.; Hopkins, J. R.; Moller, S.; Mendes, L. N.; Lopez, H.; Fleming, Z.; Evans, M. J.

2010-12-01

387

Watch What You Say  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This story of a student's misconceptions about quadrilateral properties makes a case for the importance of teachers not only knowing where their students have been and where they are in terms of their learning, but also where their current learning will lead them in the future. Suggested classroom activities are included. (Contains 8 figures.)

Roberts, Sally K.

2007-01-01

388

Country watch: Brazil.  

PubMed

Prior to the successful, low-cost, multimedia campaigns of GAPA-Bahia (GAPA-BA), a nongovernmental organization (NGO), campaigns to educate people about HIV, AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were produced by the Brazilian National AIDS/STD Program. Their first campaign, in 1990, focused on fear; their second, in 1995, known as the Braulio campaign, targeted poor men with little education via a conversation between a man and his penis "which had its own will power, opinions about condoms, and a compulsion to have sex." Both campaigns failed. GAPA-BA, in 1990, joined the chorus protesting the campaigns; the NGO believed the messages failed because 1) frightening people drives them away from information and 2) frequent association of AIDS with death is depressing and carries a subliminal message of guilt to those infected. GAPA-BA became the first NGO to produce low-cost, multimedia campaigns nationwide. They focused on "the social responsibility of fighting the disease while emphasizing the value of life and individual sexual freedom." The first campaign, in 1993 and in 1994, used charismatic singers to send short messages encouraging individual responsibility in condom use. The second campaign, in 1995, used "elements from the local culture by affirming the Afro-Bahain heritage expressed in popular music and dance." The light-hearted prevention message during Carnival was "Don't hide from pleasure, avoid AIDS" as a condom was inflated. The 1996 campaign ("Don't rely on luck; use a condom") required five newspaper ads, radio spots, TV ads, 25,000 posters, billboards, and ads on public buses. Five HIV-infected or HIV-affected persons spoke about their lives. This was the first time people living with HIV/AIDS took on educational roles and shed their dangerous and frightening stereotypes. The campaigns are sponsored by donors or remain low in cost because community-based organizations have sensitized other social actors who respond through the community to the epidemic. Carnival bands, hospitals, and drug industries are now producing campaigns. PMID:12347929

Henriques, H

1996-01-01

389

The International Halley Watch  

Microsoft Academic Search

In early 1985, Comet Halley will cross the orbit of Jupiter, and later that year the accelerating comet will pass the asteroid belt, the orbit of Mars, and arrive again for its once-in-a-human-lifetime visit to Earth (Figure 1). Obviously, this celestial event will be of enormous public interest: Ever since the ancient Chinese astronomers recorded their observations of Halley in

Peter M. Bell

1980-01-01

390

Watching the clock  

PubMed Central

Four rats and four pigeons were monitored while performing retrospective timing tasks. All animals displayed collateral behaviors which could have mediated their temporal judgements. Statistical analysis made a good case for such mediation in the case of two pigeons performing on a spatially-differentiated response, but not for the two responding on a color-differentiated response. For the rats, all of which performed on a spatially-differentiated task, prediction of their temporal judgements was always better if based on collateral activity than if based on the passage of time.

Fetterman, J. Gregor; Killeen, Peter R.; Hall, Scott

2008-01-01

391

Watching for Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... abdominal muscles to work harder than they should, positioning an infant on her back, bearing down with ... feeding may help alleviate this condition. If tummy positioning is used, continuous cardiorespiratory monitoring must be used ...

392

Watching how composites grow  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on a powerful x-ray analysis technique that has been developed to let researchers see, in three dimensions and microscopic detail, inside a ceramic composite as it is forming. The high-resolution imaging technique, called X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM), is similar to medical computed tomography (CT) in which physicians take X-ray images of a patient's body from different angles and then reconstruct the data computationally into three-dimensional pictures of organs. The new method appears to have significant application in fields ranging from materials science to medical bone studies of osteoporosis--situations in which investigators need to visualize the microscopic behavior of complex materials.

Ashley, S.

1993-07-01

393

The Environment is Watching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally assumed that the fundamental laws of physics are those of quantum physics, and that classical physics is only an approximation valid under certain conditions. However, the passage from quantum-to-classical and its conditions of validity are still hotly debated today. We may, for example, ask the following question: in a quantum world, particles exhibit interference phenomena. Why is it that interferences are never observed in a classical world except, of course, with classical waves? Equivalently, why is it that we do not see linear superpositions of macroscopically distinguishable states? A possible answer relies on the concept of decoherence. Although implicit in previous work, this concept was introduced explicitly at the beginning of the 1980s, and after a rather modest start, it has become more and more popular in domains like quantum information (Section 8.4) and quantum measurement (Section 10.3), where it plays a major role. After having explained the concept of decoherence with the help of an elementary example, we shall describe experiments where decoherence is manifest at mesoscopic scales, intermediate between microscopic and macroscopic scales, that is, on the order of a few ?m.

Bellac, Michel Le

2014-11-01

394

Northwest Weather Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This educational module is designed to teach students about predicting weather. This includes a series of activites about clouds, moisture, air and rain for students to complete. There are curriculum connections to art, writing and math as well as links for more resources and live weather data.

Palewicz, Sue; Scurlock, Marianne; Edmon, Harry

395

Article Watch, December 2013  

PubMed Central

This column highlights recently published articles that are of interest to the readership of this publication. We encourage ABRF members to forward information on articles they feel are important and useful to Clive Slaughter, Georgia Regents University–University of Georgia Medical Partnership, 1425 Prince Ave., Athens, GA 30606, USA. Phone: 706-713-2216; Fax: 706-713-2221; E-mail: cslaught@uga.edu; or to any member of the editorial board. Article summaries reflect the reviewer's opinions and not necessarily those of the association.

Slaughter, Clive A.

2013-01-01

396

A Strategy Worth Watching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human resources is out, human capital is in. This article describes how a simple departmental name change has propelled the use of data-driven, observation-based systems that recognize teachers as the primary influence on student achievement. Called the new "it" term in K-12, human capital management (HCM) aligns the development of workers…

Weinstock, Jeff

2010-01-01

397

Watch It Slide!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use inclined planes as they recreate the difficult task of raising a monolith of rock to build a pyramid. They compare the push and pull of different-sized blocks up an inclined plane, determine the angle of inclination, and learn the changes that happen when the angle is increased or decreased.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

398

Country watch: Uganda.  

PubMed

During its work in Rakai district, CONCERN recognized that women lack property/inheritance rights, a situation which increases their vulnerability to HIV infection. Widows are being disinherited of all their properties, including their marital homes. Since many of these women lack both education and skills, their survival often depends upon either marrying again or engaging in sex work. Many women are ignorant of their rights under the national law. Lawyers from the Ugandan Women Lawyers Association help women and children understand their rights, but they do not provide continuously available services. CONCERN therefore initiated a program of community-based legal educators (paralegals) selected by village communities and recommended by local leaders. The paralegals must be over age 28 years, respected by the community, able to maintain confidentiality, and have participated in previous HIV/AIDS sensitization work. Selected candidates are subsequently trained by lawyers from a governmental ministry in the basics of the law pertaining to sexual abuse, marriage, inheritance, divorce, domestic violence, children's rights and responsibilities, and the legal system in Uganda, as well as referrals, gender sensitization, and adult education methods. The paralegals now provide awareness seminars in their communities which include brainstorming, role plays, use of picture codes, group discussions, and lectures. PMID:12347179

Namutebi, S K

1996-01-01

399

Country watch: the Philippines.  

PubMed

The bold, rational approach to condom use brought by Dr. Juan Flavier, Secretary of the Department of Health (DOH), to the Philippines has dramatically increased awareness about AIDS as well as the levels of condom promotion and acceptance. Dr. Flavier became Secretary of the Department in July 1992. Since then, the attention to AIDS-related issues in the Filipino media has dramatically increased. With the moral and tangible support of the President and the Cabinet, and against the platitudes of religious leaders and some senators, Dr. Flavier created media hype over condoms which led to an increase in AIDS awareness from 12% to 86% in little over 1 year. The Secretary is so popular that he received more than 200 speaking invitations/month. December was proclaimed National AIDS Awareness month in 1992 by the DOH and includes special AIDS education and condom distribution activities. An AIDS hotline is operational in Manila; condoms are now openly advertised in the media; and an express door-to-door delivery service has even been launched by a condom distributor. The decision of a 23-year old woman living with AIDS to go public has also helped DOH efforts. Finally, city ordinances in some areas require hotels and motels to provide customers with condoms or make them accessible, and condoms have become part of the standard equipment of the Philippine Armed Forces. PMID:12345381

1993-01-01

400

Country watch: Nicaragua.  

PubMed

The Association of Workers for Education, Health and Social Integration (TESIS) works with commercial sex workers to control HIV and sexually transmitted diseases in Nicaragua through free condom distribution and education. Education includes group work, individual counseling, and demonstrations of correct condom use. Condoms are also distributed to the motels frequented by commercial sex workers. When the Condom Social Marketing (CSM) project in Central America started, it sold condoms of the same quality as the ones offered by TESIS; thus the condom donors reduced their donations, and in turn, TESIS lost its normal quota for free condom distribution. Because of this situation, TESIS dealt with a condom promotion scheme at a lower cost for the poorest women. Condom quality did not deteriorate as products only came with simpler packaging. TESIS fills the gap which CSM missed. PMID:12295467

Pauw, J

1999-01-01

401

Article Watch: July 2014  

PubMed Central

This column highlights recently published articles that are of interest to the readership of this publication. We encourage ABRF members to forward information on articles they feel are important and useful to Clive Slaughter, Georgia Regents University-University of Georgia Medical Partnership, 1425 Prince Ave., Athens, GA 30606, USA. Phone: 706-713-2216; Fax: 706-713-2221; E-mail: cslaught@uga.edu; or to any member of the Editorial Board. Article summaries reflect the reviewer's opinions and not necessarily those of the association.

Slaughter, Clive A.

2014-01-01

402

Watching the watchers: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – While many papers discuss the privacy implications of workplace monitoring, the purpose of this paper is to describe the positive aspects to voluntary monitoring in the workplace. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – These aspects were identified through in-depth qualitative interviews with employees of various organizations chosen for the invasiveness of their monitoring procedures. Specifically, the authors worked with individuals who had

Tara Whalen; Carrie Gates

2010-01-01

403

Whale-Watching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program initiated by the Cabrillo Beach Museum (San Pedro, California) and the American Cetacean Society to take students of the fourth grade through high school on half-day cruises to observe gray whales. College students assist in the program with related field projects and presentations in the schools. (JR)

Lande, Rivian

1973-01-01

404

Country watch: Indonesia.  

PubMed

Together with the Ford Foundation and Lentera PKBI-DIY, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) working on HIV and AIDS issues, the Yogyakarta Institute of Education, Research and Publication (LP3Y) started a program known as the "AIDS Media Center and Training for Journalists (PMP-AIDS)." 27 journalists attended the first workshop in 1994; medical and social experts spoke, and participants received a handbook describing methods of reporting HIV and AIDS with empathy and understanding, rather than with sensationalism. "Emphatic Journalism" was defined as "compassionate journalism that empowers society through its reporting of reality." The handbook, which is entitled "11 Langkah Memahami AIDS" (Eleven Steps to Understanding AIDS), was distributed free of charge to all Indonesian journalists beginning in 1995. The Center provides free HIV/AIDS data on a computer-based bulletin board system which is accessible 24 hours a day; information is also available free of charge by phone or fax. The Center's AIDS newsletter is available in printed form and on the Internet in both English and Bahasa Indonesian. The Center has conducted six more workshops for 123 journalists since the first one in 1994. Applicants are screened and evaluated; for selected participants, all expenses during the 4-day workshop are covered by the Center. After the workshop, the articles of participants are evaluated for empathy, critical attitude, and positive thought. Annual writing competitions are conducted; the prizes are opportunities to cover international events. PMID:12347930

Sabrawi, S R; Blimbingsari, S

1996-01-01

405

Country watch. Uganda.  

PubMed

The example of Julliet Awino, a widowed mother of two daughters in the Tororo District, Uganda, demonstrates how seropositive women can play a valuable role in AIDS education. In addition to acting as a counselor and public speaker at TASO, she also stars in a play called Strings Attached. This dramatic production depicts her personal experience with HIV/AIDS. The title of the play was chosen to reflect the fact that indulging in risky behavior causes a high risk of exposing oneself to HIV infection. One of the play's messages is that the general public should be responsible in marriage. Special attention is given to the fact that women must become conscious of the cultural practices that continue to undermine their role in society and the home and could make them vulnerable to HIV transmission (e.g., male pre- and extramarital sexual activity; hostility from in-laws who blame wives, and abandonment without rights and property if a woman refuses sexual ritual cleansing when she becomes a widow). Other topics were the need to sensitize medical staff so that they have more positive attitudes towards people with HIV/AIDS; the stress of caring for children and family members with AIDS; the transmission dangers inherent in using razor blades for local treatments; the loss of income; and spending cash in search of a miracle cure and for burial rights. Awino's first performance was on World AIDS Day in 1991. The production motivated many people to write their wills. Through wider coverage using a video version, Awino hopes that women will identify the most appropriate messages in campaigns for the specific needs of women. PMID:12318081

1992-01-01

406

Country watch: Uganda.  

PubMed

The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) provides non-medically based care for people with AIDS, those infected with HIV, and their families. Located in Kampala and Masaka, TASO offers a supportive environment designed to boost the quality of life for those living with AIDS. Specifically, clients may discuss their situations with and obtain information from part-time counselors, and meet other clients and client families at the clinic for lunch and/or conversation. Meetings with counselors may take place at either the clinic or in-home depending upon clients' wishes. These counselors also help to find foster parents for clients' children left behind following the death of both parents. Potential foster parents are 1st identified from among a respective client's friends and relatives and educated about HIV/AIDS transmission, with the chosen parents eventually given food, clothing, and financial support for the children's formal education. The clinic also provides free medication, when available, and material assistance in the form of eggs and milk powder. These services are presently offered to over 2000 people with HIV or AIDS and their families. PMID:12284504

1991-01-01

407

Watch Your Waste  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

College and university science programs generate hazardous waste that must be dealt with and disposed of in accordance with state and federal regulations. During a recent renovation and addition project for the State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Biehle, James T.

2011-01-01

408

Watching bismuth nanowires grow  

SciTech Connect

We report real-time high temperature scanning electron microscopy observations of the growth of bismuth nanowires via the on-film formation of nanowires (OFF-ON) method. These observations provide experimental evidence that thermally induced-stress on a Bi film is the driving force for the growth of Bi nanowires with high aspect ratios, uniform diameter, and high-quality crystallinity. Our results show that immobile grain boundaries in the Bi film are required for the growth of nanowires so that grain broadening resulting in hillock formation can be prevented. This study not only provides an understanding of the underlying mechanism, but also affords a strategy for facilitating nanowire growth by OFF-ON.

Ham, Jinhee; Lee, Wooyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Wooyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Kim, Do Hyun; Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Voorhees, Peter W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2011-01-24

409

Country watch: Benin.  

PubMed

HIV/AIDS educators are lacking in some countries which are in the early stages of the AIDS epidemic. The European Community's AIDS Task Force (ATF) has therefore started a self-instruction program based upon printed materials to inform and increase awareness of secondary school students to AIDS. Through them, the ATF hopes that information will also be disseminated among peers and families. This report discusses results from the pilot project implementation of a 16-page booklet on AIDS. Attempting to persuade readers that AIDS exists, the booklet provided basic information on AIDS/HIV from medical authorities, as well as personal testimonies, both supported by photographs of credible individuals. Coverage and impact were assessed via 497 student questionnaires answered in 10 schools, 55 student focus group discussions, and interviews with 230 parents. Coverage was generally good, with each booklet reaching 5 people. Student knowledge and awareness both increased. 6 weeks into circulation, 70% of students had shared the booklet with parents, 15% with siblings, and 26% with friends. Other family and community members saw the booklet through parents. 90% of parents appreciated the booklet, and supported continuation and expansion of the campaign. Given that male teachers often conduct sexual relations with female students, parents prefer expert information in the booklet as being more credible. Also given the strong impact of photographs and testimonies, more photographs and a condom will be added to program booklets. The project will be replicated in Cameroon, the Comores, and Morocco. ATF seeks to institutionalize the programs to help ensure sustainability once their direct involvement ends. PMID:12285810

1992-01-01

410

WebWatch.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews ten Web sites that are designed to answer basic legal questions for the layperson. They provide resources on a broad range of legal topics, such as divorce, real estate, and criminal justice, as well as legal forms and information on finding a lawyer. (LRW)

Newcombe, Pat

2002-01-01

411

Country watch: international.  

PubMed

The International Tribunal for Children's Rights (ITCR) was established to conduct individual and public inquiries and propose concrete solutions to violations of children's rights. This article reports on the efforts of the ITCR to enforce extraterritorial laws in response to the international dimension of child sex exploitation. The primary message being advocated is that travelers cannot go to foreign countries to engage in sexual crimes against children, evade criminal prosecution in the countries where the crimes are committed and then expect to return home without any consequences. In its first public hearings held in Paris, France to the address the effectiveness of extraterritorial legislation, governments and nongovernmental organizations informed the ITCR about their attempts to halt child sexual exploitation. Several changes needed to make extraterritorial laws more effective were cited. These include public awareness-raising; supporting existing instruments; application of preventive approaches to child abuse; and sensitizing and motivating judicial, police and administrative authorities to provide for the needs to fight child sex tourism. PMID:12348687

Dionne, P

1998-01-01

412

2007 Leaders to Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Those who have contributed to the technology education field for many years are known for their teaching, written work, presentations, research, and recognition received from professional groups. This article highlights six selected individuals who have shown outstanding leadership ability as educators early in their careers. They are: (1) Jeff…

Technology Teacher, 2007

2007-01-01

413

Marketing Trends to Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article identifies 13 cultural trends that libraries can turn into opportunites to reach patrons. These trends include: Twitter, online reputation management, value added content, mobile marketing, and emotional connection.

Circle, Alison

2009-01-01

414

Article Watch: April 2014  

PubMed Central

This column highlights recently published articles that are of interest to the readership of this publication. We encourage ABRF members to forward information on articles they feel are important and useful to Clive Slaughter, Georgia Regents University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership, 1425 Prince Ave., Athens, GA 30606, USA (Phone: 706-713-2216; Fax: 706-713-2221; E-mail; cslaught@uga.edu), or to any member of the editorial board. Article summaries reflect the reviewer's opinions and not necessarily those of the association.

Slaughter, Clive A.

2014-01-01

415

Country watch: Brazil.  

PubMed

The Health in Prostitution Project was launched in 1991 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The project offers a multi-year training program of health education designed to both fight the stigmatization of and violence against commercial sex workers and enhance their self-esteem, self-determination, and access to civil rights. The project therefore promotes individual awareness while influencing public opinion and policies. At first, health agents were recruited among women and transvestites who work in street-based sex work. The program was then gradually expanded to include young male sex workers and other locations, such as private parlors, saunas, and escort services. People of all sexes and sexual orientation now comprise the health agent group. The program has a paid staff of five women, three young men, and three transvestites, and approximately 70 sex workers are trained annually. Basic training includes topics such as human sexuality, personal risk assessment, HIV/STD infection, negotiation of safer sex, and STD referral services. Year two training emphasizes reproductive and women's health issues, while year three courses prioritize street work methodologies. Theatrical performances, speaking English as a second language, and performing Bach flower therapy for clients take place during the fourth year. Program trainers include medical specialists, nurses, psychologists, health educators, lawyers, and university students. At least half of the 350 health agents trained thus far are estimated to be currently engaged in paid or voluntary prevention work. Two surveys with female sex workers in 1991 and 1993 found that reported regular condom use increased from 57% to 73%; the health agents are having an effect. The program is constantly evaluated and revised. PMID:12346918

Szterenfeld, C

1995-01-01

416

TV watching (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Television can be a useful tool for parents; it can be used for distraction, substitution, and recreation. Unfortunately, the TV has become a substitute for parent-child interaction and is used in some families as a "baby sitter".

417

Country watch. Zambia.  

PubMed

In Mansa District, Zambia, people are unaware of the risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). To remedy this, the District HIV Prevention and Care Team invited a member of the Positive and Living Squad (PALS), John Luonde, to speak at educational sessions for various target audiences. Goals included providing information, dissipating misinformation, alleviating community fears, and mobilizing people through specific activities that addressed identified needs. The sessions began with the testimony of John Luonde and a simple question and answer period, which were followed by focus groups, often with a video, for more difficult or sensitive topics. Information materials were distributed and a condom demonstration was conducted. Although some institutions initially refused permission because of the holiday season or the possible impact on staff, Luonde returned to cover the missed groups. More than 105 people from 9 sectors of the community participated. Groups that were represented included the Mansa Sports Club, the Mutende Deaf Branch, a factory, the local army and police, and physicians from the Mansa Hospital Board. Questions from the different groups were similar. Participants saw that, although anyone could contract AIDS (the central theme of the project), they could still hope for productive years with proper treatment, self-care, and diet. Most participants wanted to change their sexual behavior and Luonde was asked to return. Women and people with physical disabilities need to be targeted. Although condoms were previously seen as promoting promiscuity, institutions are now requesting their distribution. The team is collaborating with a social marketing organization on condom use promotion. Distribution sites include bars, restaurants, filling stations, supermarkets, and hair dressers. At the request of the community, a meeting was held with the director of the Mansa Hospital Board to develop policy guidelines and to plan sessions on hospital care of persons with HIV and staff attitude toward them. PMID:12288110

Kapyepye, E

1994-01-01

418

Daily Watch on Metabolism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Plants and animals adjust responses to their environments through small molecules, including metabolites, which interact with their circadian clocks.

Takato Imaizumi (University of California, San Diego;); Steve A. Kay (University of California, San Diego;); Julian I. Schroeder (University of California, San Diego;)

2007-11-15

419

Article Watch, April 2012  

PubMed Central

This column highlights recently published articles that are of interest to the readership of this publication. We encourage ABRF members to forward information on articles they feel are important and useful to Clive Slaughter, Georgia Health Sciences University-University of Georgia Medical Partnership, 279 William St., Athens GA 30607-1777. Phone: 706-369-5945; Fax: 706-369-5936; E-mail: cslaught@uga.edu; or to any member of the editorial board. Article summaries reflect the reviewer's opinions and not necessarily those of the association.

Slaughter, Clive

2012-01-01

420

Watching Crystals Grow  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners will compare the growth rate and appearance of crystals forming on small rocks to those growing on miscellaneous objects. Learners will also investigate how temperature (warm vs. cool room) affects crystal growth. Learners will record their observations at the start and then again after 3 hours, 1 day, and 2 days. This resource includes discussion questions to elicit reflection and help learners draw conclusions. Use this activity to introduce learners to the basics of mineral science as well as the scientific process.

History, National M.

2010-01-01

421

Simulation of storm surge, wave, and coastal inundation in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico region during Hurricane Ivan in 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hurricane-induced storm surge, waves, and coastal inundation in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico region during Hurricane Ivan in 2004 are simulated using a fine grid coastal surge model CH3D (Curvilinear-grid Hydrodynamics in 3D) coupled to a coastal wave model SWAN, with open boundary conditions provided by a basin-scale surge model ADCIRC (Advanced CIRCulation) and a basin-scale wave model WW3 (WaveWatch-III).

Y. Peter Sheng; Yanfeng Zhang; Vladimir A. Paramygin

2010-01-01

422

Science and technology needs: Integrated research and development, the path to gaining a defensible understanding on watch list'' tank risk and interim stabilization needs  

SciTech Connect

The watch list'' waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington state are those that the Secretary of the Department of Energy reports upon to the Congress because of the unresolved safety question. As such, they are subject to intense surveillance and an enhanced list of controls and safety procedures. The objective of the Waste Tank Safety Program is to mitigate the safety concerns with respect to these tanks, thereby removing them from the watch list.'' The essential step in this process is the development of a defensible position that reduce the risk of these tanks to an acceptable level. An integrated research and development (R D) program is believed to be the most cost-effective means of achieving the information required to mitigate the safety concern and to resolve the safety issues. This program uses chemical and physical modeling studies of synthetic waste, is substantiated with limited field data and radioactive samples from a tank, and uses numerical modeling to extrapolate results to actual tank-scale operations. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, B.M.; Mellinger, G.; Strachan, D.; Hallen, R.

1991-09-01

423

Comparative effects of TV watching, recreational computer use, and sedentary video game play on spontaneous energy intake in male children. A randomised crossover trial.  

PubMed

To compare the effects of three screen-based sedentary behaviours on acute energy intake (EI) in children. Normal-weight males aged 9-13 years participated in a randomised crossover trial conducted in a laboratory setting between November 2012 and February 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand. EI during an ad libitum meal was compared for three 1-hour conditions: (1) television (TV) watching, (2) sedentary video game (VG) play, and (3) recreational computer use. The primary endpoint was total EI from food and drink. Mixed regression models were used to evaluate the treatment conditions adjusting for age, BMI, and appetite at baseline. A total of 20 participants were randomised and all completed the three conditions. Total EI from food and drink in the TV, computer, and VG conditions was estimated at 820 (SE 73.15), 685 (SE 73.33), and 696 (SE 73.16) kcal, respectively, with EI being significantly greater in the TV versus computer condition (+135; P = 0.04), a trend towards greater intake in the TV versus VG condition (+124; P = 0.06), but not significantly different between the computer and VG conditions (-10; P = 0.87). TV watching was associated with greater EI compared with computer use, and a trend towards greater EI compared with VG play. PMID:24576465

Marsh, Samantha; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jiang, Yannan; Maddison, Ralph

2014-06-01

424

Management of localised prostate cancer: watchful waiting, surgery or radiation therapy, depending on the natural course, which is often relatively slow.  

PubMed

Localised prostate cancer, confined to the prostate gland, occurs mainly in men over 65 years of age. The principal management options are watchful waiting, prostatectomy and radiation therapy. Which of these options has the best harm-benefit balance for patients with localised prostate cancer? To answer this question, we conducted a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The natural history of localised prostate cancer depends on the extent and histologic grade of the tumour, and pretreatment PSA level. Without immediate treatment, the risk of death from prostate cancer that only one involves one lobe, a Gleason histological score of 7 or less, and a PSA level of 20 ng/ml or lower is less than 0.5% per year. The risk is about 4% per year in patients with larger tumours, poorly differentiated cancer cells (Gleason score above 7), or an elevated PSA level. Most data on radical prostatectomy come from a randomised trial versus watchful waiting in 695 men with localised cancer. Prostatectomy reduced all-cause mortality after a median followup of about 13 years (46% versus 53% without treatment), but this benefit was only seen in patients younger than 65 years at diagnosis. After 4 years of follow-up, prostatectomy was associated with erectile dysfunction in approximately 40% of patients and with incontinence in about 25% of patients. External beam radiation therapy reduced overall mortality to a lesser degree than prostatectomy, but the level of evidence is lower for this modality. Brachytherapy (implantation of a radioactive isotope in the prostate) has not been compared directly with other treatments. Transient radiation proctitis is common after external beam radiation therapy. About 15% of patients treated with external beam radiation therapy and 10% of patients treated with brachytherapy experience long-term intestinal disorders. About half of patients treated with external beam radiation therapy and the majority of patients treated with brachytherapy have transient symptoms of radiation cystitis. In the long term, about 5% of patients treated with radiation therapy have urinary incontinence, versus 12% to 25% of surgical patients. In the long term, about 75% of surgical patients experience erectile dysfunction, compared to about 60% of patients treated with external beam radiation therapy and about 50% of patients who opt for watchful waiting. Brachytherapy appears to cause less erectile dysfunction than external beam radiation therapy. In patients treated with external beam radiation therapy, the addition of hormone therapy for 4 to 6 months reduced all-cause mortality in two randomised trials but caused gynaecomastia, more erectile dysfunction, hot flashes, and hepatitis. Hormone therapy has an unfavourable harm-benefit balance when used alone to treat localised prostate cancer. Further studies of cryotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy are needed to determine their respective benefits and harms. In practice, watchful waiting is the most reasonable option for men with low-risk localised prostate cancer and a life expectancy of less than 10 years. In men with low- or intermediate-risk localised prostate cancer and a life expectancy of more than 10 years, there is insufficient data available in early 2012 to show which of the following options is preferable: watchful waiting, radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, or brachytherapy. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with each of these options and should be actively involved in the choice of treatment. Treatment is often warranted for patients with high-risk localised prostate cancer.The main options are either radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy combined with hormone therapy. PMID:23185849

2012-10-01

425

Play, Make, Know, Keep up, Watch, Dream, and Teach: A Kids-eye View of Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

No matter the subject, the best way of dealing with doubters or deniers is to present the scientific evidence in a clear, concise, non-threatening, and compelling way. NASA's Climate Kids website--written for upper-elementary age kids and their teachers and parent--explains the basic science behind the evidence that Earth's climate is changing much more rapidly than can be accounted for by natural cycles, and that human activity is responsible. Climate science is complex, and most non-scientists are in what, for some, is the uncomfortable position of accepting scientists at their word. For young children, this is not the best approach to learning. They need to learn to think critically and evaluate the evidence for themselves. Climate Kids debuted in January 2011. It was redesigned and reorganized this year. From the beginning, educator feedback has been very positive. Teachers are grateful to have these difficult concepts simplified, yet still comprehensively covered to present the compelling evidence for anthropogenic global warming and its current and predicted effects. Climate Kids explains the "big questions" of climate science simply and clearly, giving teachers a valuable resource to supplement the science units they normally teach. The site extends science lessons in a very specific way, presenting understandable, real-world examples of scientific evidence of the changes happening on our planet. The new site design organizes content by topic and by type of presentation. Topics are shown in a left-side menu. They are Weather & Climate, Air, Ocean, Fresh Water, Carbon Travels (carbon cycle), Energy, Plants & Animals, and Technology. Presentation types are shown in a top menu. They are Play games, Make stuff (hands-on activities), Know your world (answers to big questions), Catch the latest (climate-related news), Watch videos, Dream of a career (profiles of individuals in green careers), and Teach climate science (resources for educators and parents). So, for example, if a child is interested in the ocean, she can select it and get an "Ocean" menu, with links to the interactive "Planet Health Report" (including sea ice extent and sea level rise stats), the interactive "Climate Time Machine" (including sea level and sea ice history), "Big Questions" discussion of the ocean (heat storage, CO2 absorption and sea creature health, salinity, currents, sea ice), "Oceans of Climate Change" video, and an animated cartoon story about threatened phytoplankton. Thus, each menu topic is carried in a variety of vehicles. Even if a visitor to Climate Kids just wants to play games, he just might learn something about the importance of recycling ("Recycle This!"), how solar and wind energy can power a city ("Power Up"), how and why to save energy in daily activities ("Leaps and Flutters" and "Go Green"), endangered and threatened species ("Migration Concentration" and "Animal Jeanie"), and more. The site is well-indexed and has a search capability that creates customized menus on the fly. NASA's Climate Kids fills a niche for free, non-commercial, reliable, inspiring, and understandable information on the science of climate change for children in grades 4-6.

Fisher, D. K.; Leon, N.; Fitzpatrick, A. J.; Jackson, R.; Greene, M. P.

2012-12-01

426

Introducing CAT (Centro di Allerta Tsunami), the Italian candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (It-cTWP) for the Mediterranean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recently established CAT (Centro di Allerta Tsunami) at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) will be part of the Italian National Tsunami Warning Center (It-NTWC) and it is a candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (cTWP) for the Mediterranean Sea in the framework of the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAMTWS). It-NTWC is a partnership of three Italian institutions: INGV, the Italian Department of Civil Protection (Dipartimento di Protezione Civile, DPC) and the Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, ISPRA) which provides the sea-level data of the Italian mareographic network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale, RMN) in quasi-real-time. CAT is the operational part of the It-NTWC based at the INGV 24/7 seismic monitoring centre in Rome. CAT will be committed to deliver tsunami warning messages to DPC and, when it will enter its operational cTWP phase, to any IOC/UNESCO member state that will subscribe for the service. The current implementation of CAT is based on the NEAMTWS Decision Matrix (DM). Earthquake parameters are determined automatically by the Early-Est (EE) software, and used as an input to DM and tsunami travel times calculation to provide warning messages, including earthquake parameters, plus level of alert and estimated tsunami arrival time at pre-defined forecast points along threatened coasts. Basing on updated automatic EE solutions, seismologist's revision, and sea-level readings subsequent messages can be delivered until warning status ends. The use of the DM allows a rapid implementation of a tsunami warning system, but it does not consider some important features to better characterize a tsunami forecast, such as the earthquake's focal mechanism, the directivity of tsunami propagation and the morphology of the coast. More sophisticated procedures are currently under development: a database of pre-calculated, or calculated on the fly on GPU cards, tsunami scenarios, and rapid moment tensor calculation. The deployment of deep-sea tsunami (pressure) sensors is envisaged as well subject to budgetary constraints. A Decision Support System (DSS) is under development in order to integrate the different sources of information (earthquake parameters estimates and prior knowledge of the tectonic setting, numerical tsunami forecast, sea-level readings), and assist decision making during the first minutes after an event. CAT participated successfully in several NEAM communication tests within its function of National Tsunami Warning Focal Point (NTWFP) and the delivery of messages to DPC, ISPRA, and local authorities has also been tested. Preliminary CAT procedures have been tested internally, that is without delivering messages, also for two recent Mediterranean earthquakes: the M=6.6 occurred the 12th October 2013 offshore Crete and the M=5.9 occurred the 28th December 2013 offshore between Turkey and Cyprus. Here, we will present the current CAT implementation and describe its future developments.

Michelini, Alberto; Amato, Alessandro; Badiali, Lucio; Basili, Roberto; Bernardi, Fabrizio; Govoni, Aladino; Lauciani, Valentino; Lomax, Anthony; Lorito, Stefano; Mele, Francesco; Melini, Daniele; Molinari, Irene; Piatanesi, Alessio; Romano, Fabrizio; Selva, Jacopo; Selvaggi, Giulio; Sensale, Giampaolo; Tonini, Roberto; Vazzoler, Stefano; Zanolin, Francesco

2014-05-01

427

Regional Guidebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson plan students will be asked to consider the unique physical and human characteristics of their home region and to create guidebooks that describe these features to visitors to the region. In the process, they will gain an awareness of the human and environmental factors that make places unique.

428

Do Images of 'Watching Eyes' Induce Behaviour That Is More Pro-Social or More Normative? A Field Experiment on Littering  

PubMed Central

Displaying images of eyes causes people to behave more pro-socially in a variety of contexts. However, it is unclear whether eyes work by making people universally more pro-social, or by making them more likely to conform to local norms. If the latter, images of eyes could sometimes make people less pro-social if pro-social behaviour is not the local norm. To separate these hypotheses we conducted a field experiment in which we explored whether manipulating a local descriptive norm altered the eyes effect. We recorded litter dropping decisions on a university campus in a 2 x 2 design, comparing situations with and without litter already on the ground (a manipulation of the local descriptive norm) and with and without large signs displaying images of watching eyes. We additionally recorded the number of potential human observers in the vicinity at the time of each littering decision. We observed a norm effect: the presence of litter on the ground increased littering, replicating previous findings. We also found that images of watching eyes reduced littering, although contrary to previous findings this was only when there were larger numbers of people around. With regard to our central aim, we found no evidence that litter on the ground interacted non-additively with images of eyes to induce increased littering behaviour. Our data therefore support the hypothesis that images of eyes induce more pro-social behaviour, independent of local norms. This finding has positive implications for the application of eye images in combating anti-social behaviour.

Bateson, Melissa; Callow, Luke; Holmes, Jessica R.; Redmond Roche, Maximilian L.; Nettle, Daniel

2013-01-01

429

Clinical trials update and cumulative meta-analyses from the American College of Cardiology: WATCH, SCD-HeFT, DINAMIT, CASINO, INSPIRE, STRATUS-US, RIO-LIPIDS and cardiac resynchronisation therapy in heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article continues a series of reports on recent research developments in the field of heart failure. Key presentations made at the American College of Cardiology meeting, held in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA in March 2004 are reported. These new data have been added to existing data in cumulative meta-analyses. The WATCH study randomised 1587 patients with heart failure and

John G. F. Cleland; Justin Ghosh; Nick Freemantle; Gerry C. Kaye; Mansoor Nasir; Andrew L. Clark; Alison P. Coletta

430

Web Application to Improve Police Management Performance: A Web Application to Prepare Police Stations to Face an ISO 9001: 2008 Certification Process and to Improve Watching Activities of Human Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are reporting a very specific and innovative development project, based on Internet technology, oriented both to support human right watch activities and to prepare police stations for ISO 9001:2008 certification. This project includes a Web application that tracks and records all Police Stations activities, provides citizens with the opportunity to evaluate police performance, and establishes citizens' verification and assessment,

Narayan C. Debnath; Roberto Uzal; German Montejano; Daniel Riesco

2010-01-01

431

World Calibration Center for SF6 - supporting the quality system of the global atmosphere observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Strategic Plan: 2008-2015 (WMO, 2009a) WMO/GAW pays attention to systematical improvement of the quality of observations at global or regional monitoring sites. To ensure the comparability and compatibility of the measurements worldwide it is essential to maintain a traceability chain to the primary standard in the different laboratories around the world as well as to establish a quality control system. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), is reported to be very rare in the atmosphere at the global averaged annual mole fraction of about 7 ppt, it is one of the greenhouse gases regulated by Kyoto protocol and is increasing at a rate of 0.22 ppt yr-1. Development of a working (or transfer) standard with very low concentration of SF6 requires expert technologies and several knowhow of gas metrology. In order to meet the Data Quality Objective (DQO), the KMA has cooperated with the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), which is the National Metrology Institute in South Korea. So long as the Central Calibration Laboratory (CCL) for SF6 was established, the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) is now trying to take another step forward to systematically support GAW stations in improving their traceability and quality system for SF6, thereby making a contribution to the WMO/GAW. Through hosting the World Calibration Center for SF6, which is one of GAW facilities, KMA will contribute to harmonization of the global SF6 observations in the long run. This work performed to demonstrate some measurement results on SF6 which complies with the DQOs and is traceable to the WMO mole fraction scale for SF6. In order to produce a working standard which is traceable to the WMO scale, we developed highly precise method of a Gas Chromatography/Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD) calibrated against the five cylinders (from NOAA, 2011) of the WMO scale. For all analysis the measurement repeatability was < 0.02 ppt (standard deviation) and analyzer's stability was controlled within a drift of 0.02 ppt. Finally, a working standard which is consistent with WMO scale and satisfies the WMO DQOs of ±0.02 ppt was successfully produced and is ready to be transferred to the GAW stations.

Lee, J.; Moon, D.; Min, D.; Yun, W.

2012-10-01

432

Final matches of the FIRST regional robotic competition at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four robots vie for position on the playing field during the 1999 FIRST Southeastern Regional robotic competition held at KSC. Powered by 12-volt batteries and operated by remote control, the robotic gladiators spent two minutes each trying to grab, claw and hoist large, satin pillows onto their machines. Student teams, shown behind protective walls, play defense by taking away competitors' pillows and generally harassing opposing machines. Two of the robots have lifted their caches of pillows above the field, a movement which earns them points. Along with the volunteer referees, at the edge of the playing field, judges at right watch the action. FIRST is a nonprofit organization, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. The competition comprised 27 teams, pairing high school students with engineer mentors and corporations. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

1999-01-01

433

Impact of self-watching double j stent insertion on pain experience of male patients: a randomized control study using visual analog scale.  

PubMed

Objective. To confirm safety and feasibility of double J stent insertion under local anesthesia and to assess the effect of detailed explanation and observing double J stent insertion on pain experience of male patients. Material and Methods. Eighty consenting males, randomized and divided prospectively into group A, who were allowed to observe DJ stent insertion, and group B, were not observed. All DJ stent insertions were done by senior urologist in operating urology room with or without fluoroscopy guidance. At the end of the procedure the vital signs and duration of the procedure were documented and patients were asked to fill unmarked 100?mm visual analogue pain scale (VAS) as soon as the surgeon leaves operating room. Results. Mean age of entire study group was 38.8 years; the majority of the patients had DJ stent insertion for obstructed ureteric stone, with uneventful outcomes. Postprocedural systolic blood pressure and mean pain using VAS showed statistically significant difference between groups A and B. Conclusion. DJ stent insertion under local anesthesia is a safe and feasible procedure. We recommended self-watching and detailed explanation to patients who underwent DJ stent insertion to reduce the pain and anxiety associated with the procedure. PMID:23691368

Hussein, Naser S; Norazan, M R

2013-01-01

434

Watchfully checking rapport with the Primary Child Health Care nurses - a theoretical model from the perspective of parents of foreign origin  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, multicultural interaction within health care seems to be challenging and problematic. This is also true among Primary Child Health Care nurses (PCHC nurses) in the Swedish Primary Child Health Care services (PCHC services). Therefore, there was a need to investigate the parents' perspective in-depth. Aim The aim of the study was to construct a theoretical model that could promote further understanding of the variety of experiences of parents of foreign origin regarding their interaction with the PCHC nurses at PCHC services. Method The study used Grounded Theory Methodology. Twenty-one parents of foreign origin in contact with PCHC servicies were interviewed. Results In our study parents were watchfully checking rapport, i.e. if they could perceive sympathy and understanding from the PCHC nurses. This was done by checking the nurse's demeanour and signs of judgement. From these interviews we created a theoretical model illustrating the interactive process between parents and PCHC nurses. Conclusion We found it to be of utmost importance for parents to be certain that it was possible to establish rapport with the PCHC nurse. If not, disruptions in the child's attendance at PCHC services could result. PCHC nurses can use the theoretical model resulting from this study as a basis for understanding parents, avoiding a demeanour and judgements that may cause misunderstandings thus promoting high-quality interaction in PCHC services.

2010-01-01

435

What we are watching--five top global infectious disease threats, 2012: a perspective from CDC's Global Disease Detection Operations Center.  

PubMed

Disease outbreaks of international public health importance continue to occur regularly; detecting and tracking significant new public health threats in countries that cannot or might not report such events to the global health community is a challenge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Global Disease Detection (GDD) Operations Center, established in early 2007, monitors infectious and non-infectious public health events to identify new or unexplained global public health threats and better position CDC to respond, if public health assistance is requested or required. At any one time, the GDD Operations Center actively monitors approximately 30-40 such public health threats; here we provide our perspective on five of the top global infectious disease threats that we were watching in 2012: 1 avian influenza A (H5N1), 2 cholera, 3 wild poliovirus, 4 enterovirus-71, and 5 extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis11†Current address: Division of Integrated Biosurveillance, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, US Department of Defense, Silver Spring, MD, USA. PMID:23827387

Christian, Kira A; Ijaz, Kashef; Dowell, Scott F; Chow, Catherine C; Chitale, Rohit A; Bresee, Joseph S; Mintz, Eric; Pallansch, Mark A; Wassilak, Steven; McCray, Eugene; Arthur, Ray R

2013-01-01

436

Measurement of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in plastic resin pellets from remote islands: toward establishment of background concentrations for International Pellet Watch.  

PubMed

Plastic resin pellets collected from remote islands in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans and the Caribbean Sea were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichloro-diphenyltrichloroethane and its degradation products (DDTs), and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs). Concentrations of PCBs (sum of 13 congeners) in the pellets were 0.1-9.9 ng/g-pellet. These were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than those observed in pellets from industrialized coastal shores. Concentrations of DDTs in the pellets were 0.8-4.1 ng/g-pellet. HCH concentrations were 0.6-1.7 ng/g-pellet, except for 19.3 ng/g-pellet on St. Helena, where current use of lindane is likely influence. This study provides background levels of POPs (PCBs<10 ng/g-pellet, DDTs <4 ng/g-pellet, HCHs <2 ng/g-pellet) for International Pellet Watch. Sporadic large concentrations of POPs were found in some pellet samples from remote islands and should be considered in future assessments of pollutants on plastic debris. PMID:22137935

Heskett, Marvin; Takada, Hideshige; Yamashita, Rei; Yuyama, Masaki; Ito, Maki; Geok, Yeo Bee; Ogata, Yuko; Kwan, Charita; Heckhausen, Angelika; Taylor, Heidi; Powell, Taj; Morishige, Carey; Young, Doug; Patterson, Hugh; Robertson, Bryson; Bailey, Elizabeth; Mermoz, Jorge

2012-02-01

437

Asian Mussel Watch Program: contamination status of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorines in coastal waters of Asian countries.  

PubMed

Mussel samples were used in this study to measure the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorines (OCs) in the coastal waters of Asian countries like Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. PBDEs were detected in all the samples analyzed, and the concentrations ranged from 0.66 to 440 ng/g lipid wt. Apparently higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in mussels from the coastal waters of Korea, Hong Kong, China, and the Philippines, which suggests that significant sources of these chemicals exist in and around this region. With regard to the composition of PBDE congeners, BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100 were the dominant congeners in most of the samples. Among the OCs analyzed, concentrations of DDTs were the highest followed by PCBs > CHLs > HCHs > HCB. Total concentrations of DDTs, PCBs, CHLs, and HCHs in mussel samples ranged from 21 to 58 000, 3.8 to 2000, 0.93 to 900, and 0.90 to 230 ng/g lipid wt., respectively. High levels of DDTs were found in mussels from Hong Kong, Vietnam, and China; PCBs were found in Japan, Hong Kong, and industrialized/urbanized locations in Korea, Indonesia, the Philippines, and India; CHLs were found in Japan and Hong Kong; HCHs were found in India and China. These countries seem to play a role as probable emission sources of corresponding contaminants in Asia and, in turn, may influence their global distribution. PMID:17695900

Ramu, Karri; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Sudaryanto, Agus; Isobe, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Shin; Subramanian, Annamalai; Ueno, Daisuke; Zheng, Gene J; Lam, Paul K S; Takada, Hideshige; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Viet, Pham Hung; Prudente, Maricar; Tana, Touch Seang; Tanabe, Shinsuke

2007-07-01

438

Photodissociation Regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The interstellar medium of galaxies is the reservoir out of which stars are born and into which stars inject newly created elements as they age. The physical properties of the interstellar medium are governed in part by the radiation emitted by these stars. Far-ultraviolet (6 eV< hNu < 13.6 eV) photons from massive stars dominate the heating and influence the chemistry of the neutral atomic gas and much of the molecular gas in galaxies. Predominantly neutral regions of the interstellar medium in which the heating and chemistry are regulated by far ultraviolet photons are termed Photodissociation Regions (PDRs). These regions are the origin of most of the non-stellar infrared (IR) and the millimeter and submillimeter CO emission from galaxies. The importance of PDRs has become increasingly apparent with the advances in IR and submillimeter astronomy. The IR emission from PDRs includes fine structure lines of C, C(+) and O; rovibrational lines of H2; rotational lines of CO; broad mid-IR features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and a luminous underlying IR continuum from interstellar dust. The transition of H to H2 and C(+) to CO occurs within PDRs. Comparison of observations with theoretical models of PDRs enables one to determine the density and temperature structure, the elemental abundances, the level of ionization, and the radiation field. PDR models have been applied to interstellar clouds near massive stars, planetary nebulae, red giant outflows, photoevaporating planetary disks around newly formed stars, diffuse clouds, the neutral intercloud medium, and molecular clouds in the interstellar radiation field-in summary, much of the interstellar medium in galaxies. Theoretical PDR models explain the observed correlations of the [CII] 158, micrometers with the CO J=1-0 emission, the CO J=1-0 luminosity with the interstellar molecular mass, and the [CII] 158 micrometers plus [OI] 63 micrometers luminosity with the IR continuum luminosity. On a more global scale, PDR models predict the existence of two stable neutral phases of the interstellar medium, elucidate the formation and destruction of star-forming molecular clouds, and suggest radiation-induced feedback mechanisms that may regulate star formation rates and the column density of gas through giant molecular clouds.

Hollenbach, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

439

Digital Earth Watch (DEW): How Mobile Apps Are Paving The Way Towards A Federated Web-Services Architecture For Citizen Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dozens of web-based initiatives allow citizens to provide information to programs that monitor the health of our environment. A concerned citizen can participate on-line as a weather "spotter", provide important phenological information to national databases, update bird counts in the area, or record the freezing of ponds, and much more. Many of these programs are developing mobile apps as companion tools to their web sites. Our group was involved in the development of one such companion app as an adjunct to the Picture Post project web site. Digital Earth Watch (DEW) and the Picture Post network support environmental monitoring through repeat digital photography and satellite imagery. A Picture Post is an eight-sided platform on a stand-alone post for taking a panoramic series of photographs. By taking pictures on a regular basis at Picture Post sites and by sharing these pictures on the program's web site (housed at the University of New Hampshire), citizen scientists are creating a photographic library of change-over-time in their local area and contributing to national monitoring programs. Our DEW Android application simplifies participation by allowing users to upload pictures instantly from their smart phone. The app also removes the constraint of the physical picture post, by allowing users to create a virtual post anywhere in the world. Posts have been set up to monitor trails, forests, water, wetlands, gardens and landscapes. The app uses the phone's GPS to position the virtual post in its geographic location and guides the user through the orientations thanks to the internal accelerometers and compass. To aid in the before-and-after comparison of images taken from the same orientation, the DEW app displays an "onionskin" of the prior image overlayed onto the camera viewfinder. With the transparent onionskin as a guide, the user can align the images more accurately, thus allowing differences between pictures to be detectable and measurable. The app interacts with the UNH server via APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) that were created to allow bi-directional machine-to-machine interaction between the mobile device and the web site. Thus, the principal functions that a user can perform on the web site, such as finding post sites on a map and viewing and adding picture sets, are available on the smartphone. The development of the APIs makes it now possible not only to communicate with our own mobile app, but, more importantly, it opens the door for other computer systems to directly interact with our server. Our ongoing discussions with the National Phenology Network and Project Budburst, have highlighted the potential (and perhaps the need) for the creation of a distributed web-service architecture whereby each national program exposes its key functionalities not only to their own mobile phone apps, but also to other organizations, in a federated system of servers, all supporting citizen-based digital earth watch programs.

Carrera, F.; Schloss, A. L.; Guerin, S.; Beaudry, J.; Pickle, J.

2011-12-01

440

Just watching the game ain't enough: striatal fMRI reward responses to successes and failures in a video game during active and vicarious playing.  

PubMed

Although the multimodal stimulation provided by modern audiovisual video games is pleasing by itself, the rewarding nature of video game playing depends critically also on the players' active engagement in the gameplay. The extent to which active engagement influences dopaminergic brain reward circuit responses remains unsettled. Here we show that striatal reward circuit responses elicited by successes (wins) and failures (losses) in a video game are stronger during active than vicarious gameplay. Eleven healthy males both played a competitive first-person tank shooter game (active playing) and watched a pre-recorded gameplay video (vicarious playing) while their hemodynamic brain activation was measured with 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Wins and losses were paired with symmetrical monetary rewards and punishments during active and vicarious playing so that the external reward context remained identical during both conditions. Brain activation was stronger in the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex (omPFC) during winning than losing, both during active and vicarious playing. In contrast, both wins and losses suppressed activations in the midbrain and striatum during active playing; however, the striatal suppression, particularly in the anterior putamen, was more pronounced during loss than win events. Sensorimotor confounds related to joystick movements did not account for the results. Self-ratings indicated losing to be more unpleasant during active than vicarious playing. Our findings demonstrate striatum to be selectively sensitive to self-acquired rewards, in contrast to frontal components of the reward circuit that process both self-acquired and passively received rewards. We propose that the striatal responses to repeated acquisition of rewards that are contingent on game related successes contribute to the motivational pull of video-game playing. PMID:23781195

Kätsyri, Jari; Hari, Riitta; Ravaja, Niklas; Nummenmaa, Lauri

2013-01-01

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