Science.gov

Sample records for water absorption capacity

  1. Determination of water absorption and water holding capacities of different soil mixtures with MINIDRAIN system to enhance the plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Rauchecker, Markus; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil water holding capacity is the amount of water that a given soil can hold against the force of gravity. Soil texture and organic matter are the key components that determine soil water holding capacity. Soils with smaller particle sizes, such as silt and clay have larger surface area can hold more water compared to sand which has large particle sizes which results in smaller surface area. A study report showed that 1% increase in soil humus will result in a 4% increase in stored soil water (Morris, 2004) and 1 part humus holds 4 parts of water (Wheeler and Ward, 1998). Therefore, the more humus that can be added to the soil, the greater the water holding capacity of the soil. As the level of organic matter increases in a soil, the water holding capacity also increases due to the affinity of organic matter for water. The water holding capacity of the soil is determined by the amount of water held in the soil sample vs. the dry weight of the sample. MINIDRAIN is a patented system made of geo-fabric (fleece) or combination of geosynthetics and humus. MINIDRAIN and vegetation nets developed by the company ÖKO-TEX (Linz, Austria) will improve the distribution of water and air in the soils, increase the growth of vegetation and reduce the soil erosion. Depending on the physical configuration, there are four different combinations of MINIDRAIN systems developed by ÖKO-TEX. a) Geotextile (fleece) strips of different sizes (e.g. 5x10x250 mm) b) Net formed strips (drainage nets) of different sizes c) Multilayer geotextile mats with humus, seeds or compost of different sizes (e.g. 10x30x200 mm) d) Multilayer geotextile net formed mats with humus, seeds or compost This paper describes the experimental results of the water absorption and water holding capacity of different forms of MINIDRAIN under different soil mixes. In this experiment, potting soil, coarse sand and LECA (Light weight clay aggregates) balls are mixed with different proportion of MINIDRAIN systems and the water absorption and water holding capacities are measured. A comparison of the results for an optimal combination of soil and MINIDRAIN system has also been made. The results show that, the soil mix with MINIDRAIN system with multilayer mats (with humus) have highest water absorption and water holding capacity among the tested soil mix combinations.

  2. Influence of particle size on water absorption capacity and mechanical properties of polyethylene-wood flour composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, A. K.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Kolesnikova, N. N.; Popov, A. A.; Olkhov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Biocomposites based on low density polyethylene (LDPE) and birch wood flour (WF) were investigated. The mechanical properties and water absorption capacity were examined depending on the particle size of a filler in biocomposites. The aim of the paper is the investigation of composite properties depending on the filler particle size. The filler particle sizes were 0-80 µm, 80-140 µm, 140-200 µm, and 0-200 µm. The tensile strength of composite samples varied within the range 5.7-8.2 MPa. Elongation at break of composites varied within the range 5.1-7.5%. Highest mechanical properties were found in composites with the lowest filler fraction. Highest water absorption was observed in composition with a complex fraction of the filler. The influence of the filler particle size on composite properties was shown. It was found that an increase of the filler particle size decreases mechanical parameters and increases water absorption.

  3. Capacity for Absorption of Water-Soluble Secondary Metabolites Greater in Birds than in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Karasov, William H.; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Bakken, Bradley Hartman; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites (SMs) are pervasive in animal foods and potentially influence feeding behavior, interspecies interactions, and the distribution and abundance of animals. Some of the major classes of naturally occurring SMs in plants include many water-soluble compounds in the molecular size range that could cross the intestinal epithelium via the paracellular space by diffusion or solvent drag. There are differences among species in paracellular permeability. Using Middle Eastern rodent and avian consumers of fruits containing SMs, we tested the hypothesis that avian species would have significantly higher paracellular permeability than rodent species. Permeability in intact animals was assessed using standard pharmacological methodology to measure absorption of two radiolabeled, inert, neutral water-soluble probes that do not interact with intestinal nutrient transporters, L-arabinose (Mr = 150.1 Da) and lactulose (Mr = 342.3 Da). We also measured absorption of labeled 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3OMD-glucose; Mr = 194.2 Da), which is a nonmetabolized analogue of D-glucose that is passively absorbed through the paracellular space but also transported across the enterocyte membranes. Most glucose was absorbed by all species, but arabinose fractional absorption (f) was nearly three times higher in birds (1.03±0.17, n = 15 in two species) compared to rodents (0.37±0.06, n = 10 in two species) (P<0.001). Surprisingly, the apparent rates of absorption in birds of arabinose exceeded those of 3OMD-glucose. Our findings are in agreement with previous work showing that the paracellular pathway is more prominent in birds relative to nonflying mammals, and suggests that birds may be challenged by greater absorption of water-soluble, dietary SMs. The increased expression of the paracellular pathway in birds hints at a tradeoff: the free energy birds gain by absorbing water-soluble nutrients passively may be offset by the metabolic demands placed on them to eliminate concomitantly absorbed SMs. PMID:22389702

  4. Meta-Analysis of the Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium Absorption Capacities of Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal-Polluted Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yu, Haixin; Luan, Yaning

    2015-01-01

    The use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation is an important method for restoring polluted ecosystems. We sought to analyze the capacity of different aquatic plant species to absorb heavy metals and to summarize available relevant scientific data on this topic. We present a meta-analysis of Cu, Zn, and Cd absorption capacities of aquatic plants to provide a scientific basis for the selection of aquatic plants suitable for remediation of heavy-metal pollution. Plants from the Gramineae, Pontederiaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Typhaceae and Haloragaceae showed relatively strong abilities to absorb these metals. The ability of a particular plant species to absorb a given metal was strongly correlated with its ability to absorb the other metals. However, the absorption abilities varied with the plant organ, with the following trend: roots > stems > leaves. The pH of the water and the life habits of aquatic plants (submerged and emerged) also affect the plant’s ability to absorb elements. Acidic water aids the uptake of heavy metals by plants. The correlation observed between element concentrations in plants with different aquatic life habits suggested that the enrichment mechanism is related to the surface area of the plant exposed to water. We argue that this meta-analysis would aid the selection of aquatic plants suitable for heavy-metal absorption from polluted waters. PMID:26703632

  5. Meta-Analysis of the Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium Absorption Capacities of Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal-Polluted Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Haixin; Luan, Yaning

    2015-12-01

    The use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation is an important method for restoring polluted ecosystems. We sought to analyze the capacity of different aquatic plant species to absorb heavy metals and to summarize available relevant scientific data on this topic. We present a meta-analysis of Cu, Zn, and Cd absorption capacities of aquatic plants to provide a scientific basis for the selection of aquatic plants suitable for remediation of heavy-metal pollution. Plants from the Gramineae, Pontederiaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Typhaceae and Haloragaceae showed relatively strong abilities to absorb these metals. The ability of a particular plant species to absorb a given metal was strongly correlated with its ability to absorb the other metals. However, the absorption abilities varied with the plant organ, with the following trend: roots > stems > leaves. The pH of the water and the life habits of aquatic plants (submerged and emerged) also affect the plant's ability to absorb elements. Acidic water aids the uptake of heavy metals by plants. The correlation observed between element concentrations in plants with different aquatic life habits suggested that the enrichment mechanism is related to the surface area of the plant exposed to water. We argue that this meta-analysis would aid the selection of aquatic plants suitable for heavy-metal absorption from polluted waters. PMID:26703632

  6. Superhydrophobic and superoleophilic polydimethylsiloxane-coated cotton for oil-water separation process: An evidence of the relationship between its loading capacity and oil absorption ability.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yangxin; Jiang, Peng; Ke, Qingping; Cheng, Feihuan; Zhu, Yinshengnan; Zhang, Yixiang

    2015-12-30

    Developing functional porous materials with highly efficient oil-water separation ability are of great importance due to the global scale of severe water pollution arising from oil spillage and chemical leakage. A solution immersion process was used to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated cotton, which exhibited superhydrophobic and superoleophilic properties. The water contact angle of ∼ 157° and mass of ∼ 1.49 g were retained after 1000 compression cycles, indicating that the PDMS was strongly attached to the cotton fibres. The PDMS-coated cotton absorbed various oils and organic solvents with high selectivity, high absorption capacity (up to 7080 wt.%), and good recyclability (exceeding 500 cycles). Notably, the loading capacity of the PDMS-coated cotton against water exhibited a similar trend to its oil absorption capacity. These findings will further the application of superhydrophobic and superoleophilic porous materials in oil/water separation. PMID:26184799

  7. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, E.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Gavioli, N.; Salmoral, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  8. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  9. Absorptive Capacity: A New Perspective on Learning and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Wesley M.; Levinthal, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that ability of a firm to recognize value of new, external information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends is critical to its innovative capabilities. A firm's absorptive capacity is largely a function of its level of prior knowledge. A research and development investment model that contributes to a firm's absorptive capacity is…

  10. The Zone of Inertia: Absorptive Capacity and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how interruptions in organizational learning effect institutional absorptive capacity and contribute to organizational inertia. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory model is presented as a heuristic to describe how interruptions in organizational learning affect absorptive capacity.…

  11. Intestinal Water Absorption Varies with Expected Dietary Water Load among Bats but Does Not Drive Paracellular Nutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Brun, Antonio; Gontero-Fourcade, Manuel; Fernández-Marinone, Guido; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rapid absorption and elimination of dietary water should be particularly important to flying species and were predicted to vary with the water content of the natural diet. Additionally, high water absorption capacity was predicted to be associated with high paracellular nutrient absorption due to solvent drag. We compared the water absorption rates of sanguivorous, nectarivorous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats in intestinal luminal perfusions. High water absorption rates were associated with high expected dietary water load but were not highly correlated with previously measured rates of (paracellular) arabinose clearance. In conjunction with these tests, we measured water absorption and the paracellular absorption of nutrients in the intestine and stomach of vampire bats using luminal perfusions to test the hypothesis that the unique elongated vampire stomach is a critical site of water absorption. Vampire bats' gastric water absorption was high compared to mice but not compared to their intestines. We therefore conclude that (1) dietary water content has influenced the evolution of intestinal water absorption capacity in bats, (2) solvent drag is not the only driver of paracellular nutrient absorption, and (3) the vampire stomach is a capable but not critical location for water absorption. PMID:26658415

  12. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  13. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  14. Cognitive Distance, Absorptive Capacity and Group Rationality: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Krehel, Oleh; Evers, Joep H. M.; Muntean, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a simulation study in which we explore the joint effect of group absorptive capacity (as the average individual rationality of the group members) and cognitive distance (as the distance between the most rational group member and the rest of the group) on the emergence of collective rationality in groups. We start from empirical results reported in the literature on group rationality as collective group level competence and use data on real-life groups of four and five to validate a mathematical model. We then use this mathematical model to predict group level scores from a variety of possible group configurations (varying both in cognitive distance and average individual rationality). Our results show that both group competence and cognitive distance are necessary conditions for emergent group rationality. Group configurations, in which the groups become more rational than the most rational group member, are groups scoring low on cognitive distance and scoring high on absorptive capacity. PMID:25314132

  15. Protective Capacity and Absorptive Capacity: Managing the Balance between Retention and Creation of Knowledge-Based Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In order to understand the pros and cons of an open organization regarding the flow of knowledge between firms, this paper introduces the concept of "protective capacity". The purpose of the paper is to elaborate the concept of "protective capacity" especially in relation to absorptive capacity, by presenting a number of propositions.…

  16. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very-important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  17. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Lawson, M. B.; Lithgow, R. A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and was used to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The variables considered include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicates that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  18. Absorptive Capacity at the Individual Level: Linking Creativity to Innovation in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Silva, Nancy; Davis, Ashley R.

    2011-01-01

    The absorptive capacity construct has been examined across various country, interorganization, and organizational level phenomena. This paper presents a framework that adopts the absorptive capacity framework to explain the relationship between creative and innovative performance at the individual level. The framework is illustrated by predicting…

  19. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  20. Effect of water absorption on the mechanical properties of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/vegetable fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Vithória A. D.; Carvalho, Laura H.; Canedo, Eduardo L.

    2015-05-01

    The present work studies the effect of water absorption on the performance of composites of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) - a fully biodegradable semi-crystalline thermoplastic obtained from renewable resources through low-impact biotechnological process, biocompatible and non-toxic - and vegetable fiber from the fruit (coconut) of babassu palm tree.Water resistance is an important characteristic of structural composites, that may exposed to rain and humid environments. Both water absorption capacity (water solubility in the material) and the rate of water absorption (controlled by the diffusivity of water in the material) are important parameters. However, water absorption per se may not be the most important characteristic, insofar as the performance and applications of the compounds. It is the effect of the water content on the ultimate properties that determine the suitability of the material for applications that involve prolonged exposure to water.PHB/babassu composites with 0-20% load were prepared in an internal mixer. Two different types of babassu fibers having two different article size ranges were compounded with PHB and test specimens molded by compression. The water absorption capacity and the kinetic constant of water absorption were measured in triplicate. Mechanical properties under tension were measured for dry and moist specimens with different amounts of absorbed water.Results indicate that the performance of the composites is comparable to that of the pure matrix. Water absorption capacity increases from 0.7% (pure PHB) to 4% (PHB/20% babassu), but the water diffusivity (4.10□8 cm2/s) was found to be virtually independent of the water absorption level. Water absorption results in moderate drop in elastic modulus (10-30% at saturation, according to fiber content) but has little effect on tensile strength and elongation at break. Fiber type and initial particle size do not have a significant effect on water absorption or mechanical properties.

  1. Preparation of hydrophilic luffa sponges and their water absorption performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Pan, Yanxiong; Shi, Kai; Wang, Weicai; Peng, Chao; Li, Wei; Sha, Di; Wang, Zhe; Ji, Xiangling

    2016-08-20

    Hydrophilic luffa sponges are prepared by grafting polymerization of acrylamide (AM) on luffa cylindrica and subsequent partial hydrolysis under alkaline conditions. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy is used to verify the composition of the grafted (luffa-g-PAM) and hydrolyzed (luffa-g-(PAM-co-PAANa)) samples. Alkalization conditions, including aqueous NaOH concentrations, alkalization temperature, and time, are studied extensively. Optimized conditions are then obtained. The grafting percentage (GP) of polyacrylamide increases with the feed ratios of [AM]/[OH] and [Ce]/[OH], reaction temperature, and time. Furthermore, the GP can reach up to 160%. Pristine, alkalized, grafted, and hydrolyzed luffa sponges show rapid absorption kinetics, and the pseudo second-order rate equation is applied to describe their kinetic procedure. Reaction conditions, such as [AM]/[OH], [Ce]/[OH], reaction temperature and time, influence the water absorption capacities of grafted and hydrolyzed samples. The hydrolyzed luffa sponges particularly exhibit high water absorption capacities of 75gg(-1). The absorption mechanism is also discussed. PMID:27178923

  2. Vitamin B12 absorption capacity in healthy children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.; Krasilnikoff, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    B12 absorption was investigated in 47 healthy children aged 7 months to 15.8 years (median 4.9 years). The patients had either recovered from giardiasis, the post-gastroenteritis syndrome, or had celiac disease in remission (treated with a gluten-free diet). The B12 absorption was measured by a double-isotope technique using /sup 57/CoB12 and /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/, the latter being the inabsorbable marker. The radiation dose was minimal. The results were presented as fractional absorption of B12 (FAB12). Within the different age groups, the absorption test was performed by means of the following oral amounts of B12: 0- less than 1 year, 0.5 microgram; 1-3 years: 1.7 micrograms, 4-6 years, 2.5 micrograms; 7-10 years; 3.3 micrograms; and 11-15 years, 4.5 micrograms. When using these oral amounts of B12, the medians (and ranges) of FAB12 were found to be: 1-3 years (n = 18), 37% (16-80%); 4-6 years (n = 10), 27% (19-40%); 7-10 years (n = 9), 32% (21-44%); and 11-15 years (n = 8), 27% (19-59%). The FAB12 in two children aged 7 and 11 months was 31% and 32%, respectively. These results may be interpretated as reference values for B12 absorption in children. Further absorption tests were performed in seven children representing the four age groups from 1 to 15 years. When a high oral amount of B12 was given (i.e., three times the saturation dose), the FAB12 ranged from 0 to 20% (median 9%), whereas a low amount (i.e., one-ninth of the saturation dose) produced fractional absorptions from 65 to 82% (median 74%).

  3. Absorption Capacities as a Basis of Stability for Closed Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygalov, V.; Pechurkin, N.; Wheeler, R.; Fowler, P.

    Growing plants in highly closed ecological systems (CES) will ultimately require conservation and recycling of plant essential elements to reduce system costs. One method for rapid recycling of elements would be incineration of residual, inedible biomass. The paper attempts to analyze the impact of biomass incineration for mineral recycling in a CES. Depending on system constraints, each CES will have its own range of steady-state operation, and this range becomes narrower as recycling rates increase. The paper presents a metric for CES stability, with the numerical estimates linked to carbon cycling rates. Along w th retrieving somei plant-essential elements, incineration of waste biomass would also release carbon dioxide, water, and other volatile compounds, depending on flue gas handling. Toxic products such as SO2 could damage or disrupt CES stability at high recycling rates. If such toxic species are not neutralized, the system tolerance would then be proportional to CES buffering or absorption capacity, and would be a non-linear function of the tolerance of the biota. We developed formulas to evaluate absorption capacities required for a stable CES by assessing different rates of material turnover. Numerical estimates of system stabilities in relation to carbon cycling rates were calculated for several examples of CES, including the Earth's Biosphere, the BIOS-3 project in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, and the Biosphere-2 project in Tucson, Arizona, USA.

  4. 49 CFR 179.201-10 - Water capacity marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water capacity marking. 179.201-10 Section 179.201... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201-10 Water capacity marking. (a) Water capacity of the tank in pounds stamped plainly and permanently in letters and figures...

  5. 49 CFR 179.201-10 - Water capacity marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water capacity marking. 179.201-10 Section 179.201... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201-10 Water capacity marking. (a) Water capacity of the tank in pounds stamped plainly and permanently in letters and figures...

  6. 49 CFR 179.201-10 - Water capacity marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water capacity marking. 179.201-10 Section 179.201... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201-10 Water capacity marking. (a) Water capacity of the tank in pounds stamped plainly and permanently in letters and figures...

  7. Water addition, evaporation and water holding capacity of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Litter moisture content has been related to ammonia, dust and odour emissions as well as bird health and welfare. Improved understanding of the water holding properties of poultry litter as well as water additions to litter and evaporation from litter will contribute to improved litter moisture management during the meat chicken grow-out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how management and environmental conditions over the course of a grow-out affect the volume of water A) applied to litter, B) able to be stored in litter, and C) evaporated from litter on a daily basis. The same unit of measurement has been used to enable direct comparison-litres of water per square metre of poultry shed floor area, L/m(2), assuming a litter depth of 5cm. An equation was developed to estimate the amount of water added to litter from bird excretion and drinking spillage, which are sources of regular water application to the litter. Using this equation showed that water applied to litter from these sources changes over the course of a grow-out, and can be as much as 3.2L/m(2)/day. Over a 56day grow-out, the total quantity of water added to the litter was estimated to be 104L/m(2). Litter porosity, water holding capacity and water evaporation rates from litter were measured experimentally. Litter porosity decreased and water holding capacity increased over the course of a grow-out due to manure addition. Water evaporation rates at 25°C and 50% relative humidity ranged from 0.5 to 10L/m(2)/day. Evaporation rates increased with litter moisture content and air speed. Maintaining dry litter at the peak of a grow-out is likely to be challenging because evaporation rates from dry litter may be insufficient to remove the quantity of water added to the litter on a daily basis. PMID:26367067

  8. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  9. Toward improving global estimates of field soil water capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field capacity or field water capacity (FC) is defined as the water content of a soil after having been wetted with water and after free drainage is negligible. Different recommendations exist world-wide on which, if any, pressure head should be used in laboratory measurements to approximate the FC ...

  10. Developing and Validating Field Measurement Scales for Absorptive Capacity and Experienced Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadiz, David; Sawyer, John E.; Griffith, Terri L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on knowledge transfer in organizations has been hampered by the lack of tools yielding valid scores for studying critical constructs in concert. The authors developed survey measures of absorptive capacity (the ability to transform new knowledge into usable knowledge) and experienced community of practice (the extent to which a person is…

  11. Absorptive capacity of iron-based magnetic carriers for blood detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarova, Lubov Kh; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Gluchoedov, Nikolas P.; Kutushov, Michael V.; Pluzan, Maria A.

    2001-01-01

    The absorptive capacity of different magnetic carriers was investigated. Restored-iron, iron-carbon and iron-silica do not cause changes in erythrocytes' osmotic resistance and possess high sorption efficiency for substances of different molecular mass. These magnetic carriers can be recommended for extracorporeal blood detoxification of low (barbiturates), middle (bilirubin) and high (heme proteins) molecular weight substances.

  12. Antecedents of Absorptive Capacity: A New Model for Developing Learning Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezaei-Zadeh, Mohammad; Darwish, Tamer K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an integrated framework to indicate which antecedents of absorptive capacity (AC) influence its learning processes, and to propose testing of this model in future work. Design/methodology/approach Relevant literature into the antecedents of AC was critically reviewed and analysed with the objective…

  13. The implementation of a global fund grant in Lesotho: applying a framework on knowledge absorptive capacity.

    PubMed

    Biesma, Regien; Makoa, Elsie; Mpemi, Regina; Tsekoa, Lineo; Odonkor, Philip; Brugha, Ruairi

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest challenges in scaling up health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa for government recipients is to effectively manage the rapid influx of aid from different donors, each with its own requirements and conditions. However, there is little empirical evidence on how governments absorb knowledge from new donors in order to satisfy their requirements. This case study applies Cuellar and Gallivan's (2006) framework on knowledge absorptive capacity (AC) to illustrate how recipient government organisations in Lesotho identified, assimilated and utilised knowledge on how to meet the disbursement and reporting requirements of Lesotho's Round 5 grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (Global Fund). In-depth topic guided interviews with 22 respondents and document reviews were conducted between July 2008 and February 2009. Analysis focused on six organisational determinants that affect an organisation's absorptive capacity: prior-related knowledge, combinative capabilities, motivation, organisational structure, cultural match, and communication channels. Absorptive capacity was mostly evident at the level of the Principal Recipient, the Ministry of Finance, who established a new organisational unit to meet the requirements of Global Fund Grants, while the level of AC was less advanced among the Ministry of Health (Sub-Recipient) and district level implementers. Recipient organisations can increase their absorptive capacity, not only through prior knowledge of donor requirements, but also by deliberately changing their organisational form and through combinative capabilities. The study also revealed how vulnerable African governments are to loss of staff capacity. The application of organisational theory to analyse the interactions of donor agencies with public and non-public country stakeholders illustrates the complexity of the environment that aid recipient governments have to manage. PMID:21907474

  14. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices are... provide the required flow of water for 10 minutes. (b) Where water spray devices are used for...

  15. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

  16. Economic performance of water storage capacity expansion for food security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Abdelaziz A.; Ward, Frank A.; Amer, Saud A.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryContinued climate variability, population growth, and rising food prices present ongoing challenges for achieving food and water security in poor countries that lack adequate water infrastructure. Undeveloped storage infrastructure presents a special challenge in northern Afghanistan, where food security is undermined by highly variable water supplies, inefficient water allocation rules, and a damaged irrigation system due three decades of war and conflict. Little peer-reviewed research to date has analyzed the economic benefits of water storage capacity expansions as a mechanism to sustain food security over long periods of variable climate and growing food demands needed to feed growing populations. This paper develops and applies an integrated water resources management framework that analyzes impacts of storage capacity expansions for sustaining farm income and food security in the face of highly fluctuating water supplies. Findings illustrate that in Afghanistan's Balkh Basin, total farm income and food security from crop irrigation increase, but at a declining rate as water storage capacity increases from zero to an amount equal to six times the basin's long term water supply. Total farm income increases by 21%, 41%, and 42% for small, medium, and large reservoir capacity, respectively, compared to the existing irrigation system unassisted by reservoir storage capacity. Results provide a framework to target water infrastructure investments that improve food security for river basins in the world's dry regions with low existing storage capacity that face ongoing climate variability and increased demands for food security for growing populations.

  17. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  18. Water absorption properties of ultrasonic treated brown rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the effect of ultrasonic treated on brown rice, it is important to research the water absorption processing of brown rice before and after ultrasonic treatment. The objective of this study was investigate and modeling water absorption characteristics of brown rice using Peleg’s equatio...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not be less than the following: Type of equipment Water in gallons (1) Cutting machines 36 (2... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not be less than the following: Type of equipment Water in gallons (1) Cutting machines 36 (2... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not be less than the following: Type of equipment Water in gallons (1) Cutting machines 36 (2... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices...

  2. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Young; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at −10 and −1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at −10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils. PMID:23646290

  3. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  4. Increasing thermal oxidizer capacity with water cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, G.N.; Sudnick, J.J.

    1997-06-01

    Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, as well as state air regulations, require substantial reductions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Industrial facilities affected by these mandated reductions have several options available to comply with the new requirements. These include: process and operational modifications; changes in raw materials; installation of new air pollution control equipment; and modification of existing air pollution control equipment. The focus here will be on some of the process, mechanical and operational changes that need to be considered when modifying existing control equipment. A chemical manufacturer operates a number of processes that generate streams containing VOC and HAP emissions. Stream 1 is from a drying operation and is composed predominantly of air with small amounts of organics. The flow rate is constant, although there may be some variation in the organic concentrations in the stream. Stream 2 is a reactor vent of mostly organics with some nitrogen generated by the reactor purge. This stream is intermittent, having a flow duration of between five and 15 minutes. Stream 3 also is a reactor vent, composed primarily of organics with some nitrogen from the reactor purge. The constituent profile of each stream is given. The three streams are controlled by a thermal oxidizer system. The facility`s plans to add reactor capacity which will create a fourth vent stream. Like streams 2 and 3, this additional stream will consist primarily of organics with some purge nitrogen.

  5. Heat capacity of water: A signature of nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, C.; Conde, M. M.; McBride, C.; Abascal, J. L. F.; Noya, E. G.; Ramirez, R.; Sesé, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this note we present results for the heat capacity at constant pressure for the TIP4PQ/2005 model, as obtained from path-integral simulations. The model does a rather good job of describing both the heat capacity of ice Ih and of liquid water. Classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005, TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, simple point charge/extended, and TIP5P models are unable to reproduce the heat capacity of water. Given that classical simulations do not satisfy the third law of thermodynamics, one would expect such a failure at low temperatures. However, it seems that for water, nuclear quantum effects influence the heat capacities all the way up to room temperature. The failure of classical simulations to reproduce Cp points to the necessity of incorporating nuclear quantum effects to describe this property accurately.

  6. The environmental actions of firms: examining the role of spillovers, networks and absorptive capacity.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Facundo; Cole, Matthew A; Elliott, Robert J R; Ercolani, Marco G

    2014-12-15

    In the light of climate uncertainty and growing concern for the natural environment, an increasingly important aspect of global business is the environmental behaviour of firms. In this paper we consider the factors that influence firms' environmental actions (EAs). Our study of Argentinean firms concentrates on measures of environmental spillovers, informal and formal networks and absorptive capacity by testing four related hypotheses. We find that foreign-owned firms, large firms and those with a greater capacity to assimilate new environmental technologies are more likely to adopt EAs. We also show that formal and informal networks aid the adoption of EAs in the presence of traditional firm-level spillovers. Finally, we show that foreign-owned firms have different motives to domestic firms for undertaking EAs. PMID:25242544

  7. Measured performance of a 3 ton LiBr absorption water chiller and its effect on cooling system operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A three ton lithium bromide absorption water chiller was tested for a number of conditions involving hot water input, chilled water, and the cooling water. The primary influences on chiller capacity were the hot water inlet temperature and the cooling water inlet temperature. One combination of these two parameters extended the output to as much as 125% of design capacity, but no combination could lower the capacity to below 60% of design. A cooling system was conceptually designed so that it could provide several modes of operation. Such flexibility is needed for any solar cooling system to be able to accommodate the varying solar energy collection and the varying building demand. It was concluded that a three-ton absorption water chiller with the kind of performance that was measured can be incorporated into a cooling system such as that proposed, to provide efficient cooling over the specified ranges of operating conditions.

  8. Measured performance of a 3-ton LiBr absorption water chiller and its effect on cooling system operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A 3-ton lithium bromide absorption water chiller was tested for a number of conditions involving hot-water input, chilled water, and the cooling water. The primary influences on chiller capacity were the hot water inlet temperature and the cooling water inlet temperature. One combination of these two parameters extended the output to as much as 125% of design capacity, but no combination could lower the capacity to below 60% of design. A cooling system was conceptually designed so that it could provide several modes of operation. Such flexibility is needed for any solar cooling system to be able to accommodate the varying solar energy collection and the varying building demand. It is concluded that a 3-ton absorption water chiller with the kind of performance that was measured can be incorporated into a cooling system such as that proposed, to provide efficient cooling over the specified ranges of operating conditions.

  9. Global distribution of plant-extractable water capacity of soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, K.A.; Willmott, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plant-extractable water capacity of soil is the amount of water that can be extracted from the soil to fulfill evapotranspiration demands. It is often assumed to be spatially invariant in large-scale computations of the soil-water balance. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that this assumption is incorrect. In this paper, we estimate the global distribution of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. A representative soil profile, characterized by horizon (layer) particle size data and thickness, was created for each soil unit mapped by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)/Unesco. Soil organic matter was estimated empirically from climate data. Plant rooting depths and ground coverages were obtained from a vegetation characteristic data set. At each 0.5?? ?? 0.5?? grid cell where vegetation is present, unit available water capacity (cm water per cm soil) was estimated from the sand, clay, and organic content of each profile horizon, and integrated over horizon thickness. Summation of the integrated values over the lesser of profile depth and root depth produced an estimate of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. The global average of the estimated plant-extractable water capacities of soil is 8??6 cm (Greenland, Antarctica and bare soil areas excluded). Estimates are less than 5, 10 and 15 cm - over approximately 30, 60, and 89 per cent of the area, respectively. Estimates reflect the combined effects of soil texture, soil organic content, and plant root depth or profile depth. The most influential and uncertain parameter is the depth over which the plant-extractable water capacity of soil is computed, which is usually limited by root depth. Soil texture exerts a lesser, but still substantial, influence. Organic content, except where concentrations are very high, has relatively little effect.

  10. Field demonstration of the combined effects of absorption and evapotranspiration on septic system drainfield capacity.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, Ken; Jackson, Andrew; Ingram, Wesley; Lee, Chang Yong; Thompson, David; Mollhagen, Tony; Ramsey, Heyward; Urban, Lloyd

    2005-01-01

    Drainfields for disposal of septic tank effluents are typically designed by considering the loss of water by either upward evapotranspiration into the atmosphere or lateral and downward absorption into the adjacent soil. While this approach is appropriate for evapotranspiration systems, absorption systems allow water loss by both mechanisms. It was proposed that, in areas where high evapotranspiration rates coincide with permeable soils, drainfield sizes could be substantially reduced by accounting for both mechanisms. A two-year field demonstration was conducted to determine appropriate design criteria for areas typical of the Texas High Plains. The study consisted of evaluating the long-term acceptance rates for three different drainfield configurations: evapotranspiration only, absorption only, and combined conditions. A second field demonstration repeated the experiments for additional observation of the combined evapotranspiration and absorption and achieved similar results as the first study. The field tests indicated that the current design loading criteria may be increased by at least a factor of two for the Texas High Plains region and other Texas areas with similar soil composition and evapotranspiration rates, while still retaining a factor of safety of two. PMID:15816679

  11. Absorption of water and lubricating oils into porous nylon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Oil and water absorption from air into sintered porous nylon can be described by infiltration into the pores of the material. This process can be modeled by a diffusion-like mechanism. For water absorption, we find a formal diffusion coefficient of 1.5 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min when the nylon is initially dry. The diffusion coefficient is 4 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min when the nylon is oil-impregnated prior to air exposure. In a 52% RH atmosphere, dry nylon absorbs 3% w/w water, and oil-impregnated nylon absorbs 0.6% w/w water. For oil absorption there are three steps: (1) surface absorption and infiltration into (2) larger and (3) smaller pores. Surface absorption is too fast to be measured in these experiments. The diffusion coefficient for the second step is 6 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for SRG-60 oil into dry nylon and 4 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for air-equilibrated nylon. The diffusion coefficient for the third step is about 1 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min for both cases. The total amount of oil absorbed is 31% w/w. The interaction between water and nylon is not as strong as that between water and cotton-phenolic: oil can replace water, and only a small amount of water can enter previously oil-impregnated nylon.

  12. Absorptive removal of biomass tar using water and oily materials.

    PubMed

    Phuphuakrat, Thana; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common choice of absorption medium selected in many gasification systems. Because of poor solubility of tar in water, hydrophobic absorbents (diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, vegetable oil, and engine oil) were studied on their absorption efficiency of biomass tar and compared with water. The results showed that only 31.8% of gravimetric tar was removed by the water scrubber, whereas the highest removal of gravimetric tar was obtained by a vegetable oil scrubber with a removal efficiency of 60.4%. When focusing on light PAH tar removal, the absorption efficiency can be ranked in the following order; diesel fuel>vegetable oil>biodiesel fuel>engine oil>water. On the other hand, an increase in gravimetric tar was observed for diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel scrubbers because of their easy evaporation. Therefore, the vegetable oil is recommended as the best absorbent to be used in gasification systems. PMID:20801021

  13. [Measuring water ecological carrying capacity with the ecosystem-service-based ecological footprint (ESEF) method: Theory, models and application].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wen-jun; Min, Qing-wen; Li, Wen-hua; Fuller, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Integrated watershed management based on aquatic ecosystems has been increasingly acknowledged. Such a change in the philosophy of water environment management requires recognizing the carrying capacity of aquatic ecosystems for human society from a more general perspective. The concept of the water ecological carrying capacity is therefore put forward, which considers both water resources and water environment, connects socio-economic development to aquatic ecosystems and provides strong support for integrated watershed management. In this paper, the authors proposed an ESEF-based measure of water ecological carrying capacity and constructed ESEF-based models of water ecological footprint and capacity, aiming to evaluate water ecological carrying capacity with footprint methods. A regional model of Taihu Lake Basin was constructed and applied to evaluate the water ecological carrying capacity in Changzhou City which located in the upper reaches of the basin. Results showed that human demand for water ecosystem services in this city had exceeded the supply capacity of local aquatic ecosystems and the significant gap between demand and supply had jeopardized the sustainability of local aquatic ecosystems. Considering aqua-product provision, water supply and pollutant absorption in an integrated way, the scale of population and economy aquatic ecosystems in Changzhou could bear only 54% of the current status. PMID:26259444

  14. Isochoric heat capacity of an n-hexane + water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezgomonova, E. I.; Saidov, S. M.; Stepanov, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    The isochoric heat capacity of an n-hexane + water system at water contents of 0.121, 0.166, 0.2, 0.234, 0.256, and 0.3 mole fraction is studied along different isochors at different temperatures in the 140 to 550 kg/m3 range of densities using a high-temperature adiabatic calorimeter designed at the Amirkhanov Institute of Physics. The tabulated values of isochoric heat capacity C v, x are presented for an H2O concentration of 0.3 mole fraction. The curves of liquid-liquid and liquid-gas phase equilibria are constructed.

  15. Climate Adaptation Capacity for Conventional Drinking Water Treatment Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, A.; Goodrich, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Water supplies are vulnerable to a host of climate- and weather-related stressors such as droughts, intense storms/flooding, snowpack depletion, sea level changes, and consequences from fires, landslides, and excessive heat or cold. Surface water resources (lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and streams) are especially susceptible to weather-induced changes in water availability and quality. The risks to groundwater systems may also be significant. Typically, water treatment facilities are designed with an underlying assumption that water quality from a given source is relatively predictable based on historical data. However, increasing evidence of the lack of stationarity is raising questions about the validity of traditional design assumptions, particularly since the service life of many facilities can exceed fifty years. Given that there are over 150,000 public water systems in the US that deliver drinking water to over 300 million people every day, it is important to evaluate the capacity for adapting to the impacts of a changing climate. Climate and weather can induce or amplify changes in physical, chemical, and biological water quality, reaction rates, the extent of water-sediment-air interactions, and also impact the performance of treatment technologies. The specific impacts depend on the watershed characteristics and local hydrological and land-use factors. Water quality responses can be transient, such as erosion-induced increases in sediment and runoff. Longer-term impacts include changes in the frequency and intensity of algal blooms, gradual changes in the nature and concentration of dissolved organic matter, dissolved solids, and modulation of the microbiological community structure, sources and survival of pathogens. In addition, waterborne contaminants associated with municipal, industrial, and agricultural activities can also impact water quality. This presentation evaluates relationships between climate and weather induced water quality variability and the capacity of treatment facilities and supporting water infrastructure to deliver safe drinking water consistently and reliably. Simulation models of water treatment facilities are used to evaluate the outcome of specific source water quality scenarios on treatment system performance and reliability. Modeling results are used to evaluate the process and operational capacity to respond to transient water quality changes and adapt to longer-term variability in water quality and availability. In some cases, changes in temperature and mineral content serve to improve the overall treatment performance. In addition, the integration of microbially enhanced treatment systems such as biological filtration can provide additional capacity. Conversely, changes in the nutrient and temperature dynamics can trigger algal and cyanobacterial blooms that can impair performance. Research needs are identified and the importance of developing more integrated modeling systems is highlighted.

  16. Absorption of impinging water droplet in porous stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets impacting porous stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in porous stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During impact and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in porous media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the impact velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on impact conditions. PMID:26975034

  17. ERP and Four Dimensions of Absorptive Capacity: Lessons from a Developing Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, María José Álvarez; Aksoy, Dilan; Kulcsar, Borbala

    Enterprise resource planning systems can grant crucial strategic, operational and information-based benefits to adopting firms when implemented successfully. However, a failed implementation can often result in financial losses rather than profits. Until now, the research on the failures and successes were focused on implementations in large manufacturing and service organizations firms located in western countries, particularly in USA. Nevertheless, IT has gained intense diffusion to developing countries through declining hardware costs and increasing benefits that merits attention as much as developed countries. The aim of this study is to examine the implications of knowledge transfer in a developing country, Turkey, as a paradigm in the knowledge society with a focus on the implementation activities that foster successful installations. We suggest that absorptive capacity is an important characteristic of a firm that explains the success level of such a knowledge transfer.

  18. Causal Relationships among Technology Acquisition, Absorptive Capacity, and Innovation Performance: Evidence from the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jieun; Hong, Suckchul; Ohm, Jay; Yang, Taeyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of absorptive capacity in improving a firm’s innovation performance. Specifically, we examine firm interaction with the knowledge and capabilities of outside organizations and the effect on the firm’s bottom line. We use the impulse-response function of the vector auto-regressive model to gain insight into this relationship by estimating the time required for the effect of each activity level to reach outputs, the spillover effects. We apply this methodology to pharmaceutical firms, which we classify into two sub-groups – large firms and medium and small firms – based on sales. Our results show that the impact of an activity on any other activity is delayed by three years for large firms and by one to two years for small and medium firms. PMID:26181440

  19. 49 CFR 179.201-10 - Water capacity marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water capacity marking. 179.201-10 Section 179.201-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks...

  20. 49 CFR 179.201-10 - Water capacity marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water capacity marking. 179.201-10 Section 179.201-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank...

  1. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  2. Absorptive Capacity as a Guiding Concept for Effective Public Sector Management and Conservation of Freshwater Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K.; Roux, D. J.; Nel, J. L.; Driver, A.; Freimund, W.

    2011-05-01

    The ability of an organisation to recognise the value of new external information, acquire it, assimilate it, transform, and exploit it, namely its absorptive capacity (AC), has been much researched in the context of commercial organisations and even applied to national innovation. This paper considers four key AC-related concepts and their relevance to public sector organisations with mandates to manage and conserve freshwater ecosystems for the common good. The concepts are the importance of in-house prior related knowledge, the importance of informal knowledge transfer, the need for motivation and intensity of effort, and the importance of gatekeepers. These concepts are used to synthesise guidance for a way forward in respect of such freshwater management and conservation, using the imminent release of a specific scientific conservation planning and management tool in South Africa as a case study. The tool comprises a comprehensive series of maps that depict national freshwater ecosystem priority areas for South Africa. Insights for implementing agencies relate to maintaining an internal science, rather than research capacity; making unpublished and especially tacit knowledge available through informal knowledge transfer; not underestimating the importance of intensity of effort required to create AC, driven by focussed motivation; and the potential use of a gatekeeper at national level (external to the implementing organisations), possibly playing a more general `bridging' role, and multiple internal (organisational) gatekeepers playing the more limited role of `knowledge translators'. The role of AC as a unifying framework is also proposed.

  3. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric balance measuring thrust and integrated pressure measurements along the length of the nozzle. Assessment of its value as a combustor performance evaluation tool will be conducted.

  4. Determination of fixed water in rocks by infrared absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.; Chandler, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    An infrared absorption technique has been developed for the quantitative determination of "fixed water" (H2O+) in rocks. Potassium bromide disks containing 2-mg samples are scanned in the 3-??m spectral region and absorption at 2.96 ??m is determined. Although the exact nature of this peak is not known, other than that it is caused by an interaction between the potassium bromide and hydroxyl groups and water, it can be used for quantitative analysis. Rock samples, other than those containing significant percentages of clay minerals, can be analyzed with a standard deviation of 0.26%.

  5. Measurement of krypton-85 in water by absorption in polycarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, K.; Pressyanov, D.; Dimitrova, I.; Georgiev, S.; Boshkova, T.; Zhivkova, V.

    2009-05-01

    This article describes a method for quantitative measurements of Kr85 in water by absorption in polycarbonates. The method is based on exposure of polycarbonate samples in water and uses the high absorption ability to noble gases of some polycarbonates like Makrofol® and Makrolon® for sampling Kr85 from the water. After the exposure, the radiation emitted from the samples is measured by gross beta counting or gamma spectrometry. The results from the conducted experiments demonstrate a very good linear correlation between the measured signal and the activity concentration of Kr85 in the water. A possible practical application of the method is to monitor Kr85 concentration in water in at-reactor pools and wet spent fuel storage facilities.

  6. Absorption of Water Vapor into Aqueous Solutions of Lithium Bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Tsutomu; Hayashida, Atsushi; Yabase, Hajime; Hihara, Eiji; Saito, Takamoto

    Heat and mass transfer processes are experimentally investigated for the case of water absorption into aqueous solutions of lithium bromide flowing over a flat plate. Variables considered are inlet solution flow rate,concentration of an additive,and inclination angle of the plate. The use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol as an additive results in about a four to five fold improvement in absorption rate. The occurrence of surface distrbances dose not has a direct connection with the solubility limit of the additive. The cause of the surface disturbances in the presence of additives is investigated through experiments for pool absorption By regulating the flow of water vapor,the form of the Marangoni convection can be controlled. A qualitative discussion of addictives in the role of inducing surface disturbances is presented.

  7. Relating water absorption features to soil moisture characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jia; Philpot, William D.

    2015-09-01

    The spectral reflectance of a sample of quartz sand was monitored as the sample progressed from air-dry to fully saturated, and then back to air-dry. Wetting was accomplished by spraying small amounts of water on the surface of the sample, and collecting spectra whenever change occurred. Drying was passive, driven by evaporation from the sand surface, with spectra collected every 5 minutes until the sample was air dry. Water content was determined by monitoring the weight of the sample through both wetting and drying. There was a pronounced difference in the pattern of change in reflectance during wetting and drying, with the differences being apparent both in spectral details (i.e., the depth of absorption bands) and in the magnitude of the reflectance for a particular water content. The differences are attributable to the disposition of water in the sample. During wetting, water initially occurred only on the surface, primarily as water adsorbed onto sand particles. With increased wetting the water infiltrated deeper into the sample, gradually covering all particles and filling the pore spaces. During drying, water and air were distributed throughout the sample for most of the drying period. The differences in water distribution are assumed to be the cause of the differences in reflectance and to the differences in the depths of four strong water absorption bands.

  8. Modeling sulfur dioxide absorption by fine water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Hsiung Huang

    2005-07-01

    A novel theoretical model was developed to determine the removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide using fine water spray. The droplet pH, diameter, S(IV) concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, and liquid-to-gas ratio are found to influence the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray. The results demonstrate that the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray increases as the droplet diameter falls. The concentration gradient between the interface of the gaseous and liquid phases causes the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the droplets to increase as the initial S(IV) concentration decreases or the sulfur dioxide concentration increases. The results indicate that the performance of the fine water spray in removing sulfur dioxide is generally improved by reducing the droplet diameter or the initial S(IV) concentration, or by increasing the sulfur dioxide concentration, the droplet pH or the liquid-to-gas ratio. The proposed model reveals the parameters that should be controlled in using a fine water spray device and a method for improving its performance in removing sulfur dioxide.

  9. The Role of Cross-Cultural Absorptive Capacity in the Effectiveness of In-Country Cross-Cultural Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarique, Ibraiz; Caligiuri, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theory of absorptive capacity, this study examines the following question. In the context of cross-cultural training, can the amount of previously accumulated cultural knowledge affect the ability of a trainee to absorb further learning about a new culture, thus enhancing total knowledge and presumably cross-cultural adjustment?…

  10. Water Absorption by Atmospheric Organic Particles: Evidence, Causes and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Pradeep

    The optical and chemical properties of atmospheric fine particles and their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei depend strongly upon their affinity for water. Laboratory experiments have shown that water-soluble sulfates and nitrates, which are major inorganic components of atmospheric fine particles, absorb water in an amount proportional to water vapor pressure. Analogous information about the interactions between water and organics is lacking. Moreover, the molecular composition of atmospheric particulate organics remains poorly characterized; information on the molecular composition of the water-soluble fraction is particularly sparse. Here we first analyze concurrent observations of particle chemical composition and water content from a continental nonurban (Grand Canyon) and an urban (Los Angeles) location to determine whether the water content of atmospheric particles is influenced by the presence of organics. We find that the aggregate hygroscopic properties of inorganic particles are altered substantially when organics are also present. For the nonurban location, organics enhance water absorption by inorganics. For the urban location, on the other hand, the net effect of organics is to diminish water absorption of the inorganics. Second, we identify specific compounds that are likely to contribute to the water-soluble fraction by juxtaposing published observations regarding the extraction characteristics and the molecular composition of atmospheric particulate organics with compound-specific solubility and condensibility for a wide variety of organics. We find that water-soluble organics, which constitute a substantial fraction of the total organic mass, include C2 to C7 multifunctional compounds (e.g. diacids, polyols, amino acids). Third, towards developing a simulation capability, we (1) synthesize published laboratory data to evaluate the water absorption behavior of multifunctional oxygenated organic compounds; and (2) test the reliability of the UNIFAC method for estimating water activities of aqueous organic solutions. Laboratory data show that multifunctional oxygenated compounds can absorb water over the entire range of relative humidities. For a wide variety of compounds (e.g., glycols, dicarboxylic acids, keto acids) and a wide range of solute concentrations (0 to over 90% by wt), we find that in most cases, water activities can be estimated within approximately 15% error.

  11. Ammonia/water absorption cycles with relatively high generator temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the performance of single-state ammonia/water absorption cycles (COPs up to 0.8) is appreciably superior to that of commercial single-state water/lithium bromide appliances (COPs up to 0.72), with ammonia/water cycles having the additional advantage of satisfactory operation with air cooling and in refrigeration and heat pump modes, if high-temperature collectors, such as evacuated tubular collectors, are available. In particular, the improved performance of the two-stage cycle should permit improvement in overall steady-state system performance when used in conjunction with evacuated tubular collectors.

  12. Absorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  13. A comparison between ammonia-water and water-lithium bromide solutions in vapor absorption refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horuz, I.

    1998-07-01

    A Vapor Absorption Refrigeration (VAR) System is similar to a Vapor Compression Refrigeration (VCR) System. In both systems the required refrigeration is provided by refrigerants vaporizing in the evaporator. However, in the VAR System, a physico-chemical process replaces the mechanical process of the VCR system and heat rather than a mechanical and electrical energy is used. The advantages of this system lie in the possibility of utilizing of waste energy from industrial plants as well as of using solar energy. The study included an investigation to analyze the Vapor Absorption Refrigeration systems using ammonia-water and water-lithium bromide solutions. A fundamental VAR system is described and the operating sequence is explained. Since the most common VAR systems use ammonia-water solution with ammonia as the refrigerant and water-lithium bromide solution with water as the refrigerant, the comparison of the two is presented in respect of the coefficient of performance (COP), the cooling capacity and the maximum and minimum system pressures. It is concluded that the VAR system using water-lithium bromide solution provided better performance than the system using ammonia-water solution. However, there are some points to be considered such as: the danger of crystallization and impossibility of operating in very low temperatures because of the use of water as the refrigerant.

  14. Water Constraints in an Electric Sector Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Cohen, Stuart; Newmark, Robin; Martinez, Andrew; Sullivan, Patrick; Tidwell, Vince

    2015-07-17

    This analysis provides a description of the first U.S. national electricity capacity expansion model to incorporate water resource availability and costs as a constraint for the future development of the electricity sector. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model was modified to incorporate water resource availability constraints and costs in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions along with differences in costs and efficiencies of cooling systems. Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013b). Scenarios analyzed include a business-as-usual 3 This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. scenario without water constraints as well as four scenarios that include water constraints and allow for different cooling systems and types of water resources to be utilized. This analysis provides insight into where water resource constraints could affect the choice, configuration, or location of new electricity technologies.

  15. Dynamics of absorption properties along a latitudinal gradient: sources of absorption in Australian inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestir, E. L.; Campbell, G.; Malthus, T. J.; Dekker, A.; Botha, E.

    2013-12-01

    Australian inland waters are optically complex and vary spatially and temporally. Inversion of optical remote sensing data for the retrieval of optically active water quality constituents (chlorophyll, colored dissolved organic matter and total suspended solids) is impeded by the scarcity of inherent optical property (IOP) data sets. In 2012 a major measurement program commenced to improve understanding of IOPs in Australia. Seven large lakes were sampled along a latitudinal gradient in Eastern Australia; in situ observations were made of the absorption properties of the water quality during two epochs (wet and dry season). This study documents the seasonal, inter & intra lake variability of the absorption budget of Australian lakes. These data reveal the sources of biogeochemical constituents determining the light climate of lakes. Optically active water quality constituents (total suspended solids, chlorophyll-a, and colored dissolved organic matter) varied significantly between wet and dry season and between lakes. The primary contribution to the absorption budget was from non-algal particulate matter (NAP; 10-60%), followed by colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM; 20-80%). Absorption from phytoplankton contributed only 0-30% of the total budget. This indicates that these lakes are primarily light limited, though the limitation comes from multiple sources. The contribution of NAP to the total absorption budget showed the greatest amount of variance between wet and dry seasons. Examination of the organic matter and estimated phytoplankton biomass contributions to TSS reveal that chlorophyll is not the primary source of organic matter in Australian lakes: allochthonous inputs are the primary trophic driver. Finally, there is strong regional and seasonal variation in the IOPs of the lakes, with the exception of the slope of CDOM. The slope of CDOM was not significantly different between seasons (p=0.94). Non-parametric stepwise multiple comparisons showed the slope of CDOM was significantly different for only one lake, a mid-latitude, shallow, highly turbid diversion dam. The remaining IOP variability casts doubt on the suitability of a single parameterization for inland water remote sensing algorithms, with the possible exception of CDOM. IOP datasets representing the optical complexity and variability of geophysical and trophic conditions are needed for successful remote sensing application.

  16. An Exergy Analysis of LiBr-Water Absorption Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Fujii, Terushige; Wang, Xiao; Origane, Takafumi; Katayama, Masatoshi; Inoue, Umeo

    Absorption refrigerators are very efficient as a heat recovery unit in a co-generation system.In order to design an absorption refrigerator for an arbitrary heat source properly, it is important to consider not only quantity but also quality of heat flow. The evaluation of exergy loss in each component is also effective for the improvement of system. This paper deals with the exergy analysis on a LiBr-water absorption refrigerator consisted of a single-and a double-effect cycle driven by the exhaust gas of the micro gas turbine with the output power of about 30 kW. Moreover, exergy loss in absorption process was eva1uated. As a result, it was shown that 80% of the exergy loss in an absorber was caused in absorption process, and the exergy loss decreased with decreasing the change in solution concentration in absorber. In these calculated results,the maximum cooling load of 77.8 kW was obtained from the exhaust gas with the temperature of 2900C by utilizing both a single-and a double-effect cycles in combination. The energy and exergy efficiency of the system was 88.0% and 25.6%, respectively.

  17. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHUGH, Devesh; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the cycle is recovery of the solution heat energy exiting the desorber by process water (a process-solution heat exchanger ) rather than the absorber exiting solution (the conventional solution heat exchanger ). This approach has enabled heating the process water from an inlet temperature of 15 C to 57 C (conforming to the DOE water heater test standard) and interfacing the process water with absorbent on the opposite side of a single metal sheet encompassing the absorber, process-solution heat exchanger, and desorber. The system under development has a 3.2 kW water heating capacity and a target thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of 1.6.

  18. The role of education and training in absorptive capacity of international technology transfer in the aerospace sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heiden, Patrick; Pohl, Christine; Bin Mansor, Shuhaimi; van Genderen, John

    2015-07-01

    The role of education and training in the aerospace sector for establishing sufficient levels of absorptive capacity in newly industrialized countries is substantial and forms a fundamental part of a nation's ability to establish and cultivate absorptive capacity on a national or organization-specific level. Successful international technology transfer as well as absorption of aerospace technology and knowledge into recipient organizations, depends prodigiously on the types of policy adopted in education and training of all groups and individuals specifically outlined in this paper. The conducted literature review revealed surprisingly few papers that translate these vital issues from theoretical scrutiny into representations that have practical policy value. Through exploration of the seven key aspects of education and training, this paper provides a practical template for policy-makers and practitioners in Asian newly industrialized countries, which may be utilized as a prototype to coordinate relevant policy aspects of education and training in international technology transfer projects across a wide variety of actors and stakeholders in the aerospace realm. A pragmatic approach through tailored practical training for the identified groups and individuals identified in this paper may lead to an enhanced ability to establish and strengthen absorptive capacity in newly industrialized countries through the development of appropriate policy guidelines. The actual coordination between education and training efforts deserves increased research and subsequent translation into policies with practical content in the aerospace sector.

  19. An innovative method for water resources carrying capacity research--Metabolic theory of regional water resources.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chongfeng; Guo, Ping; Li, Mo; Li, Ruihuan

    2016-02-01

    The shortage and uneven spatial and temporal distribution of water resources has seriously restricted the sustainable development of regional society and economy. In this study, a metabolic theory for regional water resources was proposed by introducing the biological metabolism concept into the carrying capacity of regional water resources. In the organic metabolic process of water resources, the socio-economic system consumes water resources, while products, services and pollutants, etc. are output. Furthermore, an evaluation index system which takes into the characteristics of the regional water resources, the socio-economic system and the sustainable development principle was established based on the proposed theory. The theory was then applied to a case study to prove its availability. Further, suggestions aiming at improving the regional water carrying capacity were given on the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the current water resources situation. PMID:26683766

  20. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning the empirical continuum models over the full spectral range of interest for remote sensing and climate applications. Thus, we propose to further develop and refine our existing far-wing formalism to provide an improved treatment applicable from the near-infrared through the microwave. Based on the results of this investigation, we will provide to the remote sensing/climate modeling community a practical and accurate tabulation of the continuum absorption covering the near-infrared through the microwave region of the spectrum for the range of temperatures and pressures of interest for atmospheric applications.

  1. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multispectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/sq m, which compared to the 4 W/sq m magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/sq m estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning, the empirical continuum models over the full spectral range of interest for remote sensing and climate applications. Thus, we propose to further develop and refine our existing, far-wing formalism to provide an improved treatment applicable from the near-infrared through the microwave. Based on the results of this investigation, we will provide to the remote sensing/climate modeling community a practical and accurate tabulation of the continuum absorption covering the near-infrared through the microwave region of the spectrum for the range of temperatures and pressures of interest for atmospheric applications.

  2. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. 75.1107-7 Section 75.1107-7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices...

  3. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Mcllrath, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements

  4. Effect of cecectomy on water and nutrient absorption of birds.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, S B

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the removal of the avian digestive ceca on osmoregulation and on absorption of certain nutrients is reviewed. While data indicate that the ceca have the potential for absorption of a significant quantity of water, several studies have demonstrated that effects of cecectomy on water intake and output are transitory and that compensatory adjustments made within 2 to 3 weeks postsurgery allow cecectomized birds to eat and gain weight normally. However, cecectomized great horned owls exposed to 27 degrees C turned over their body water 1.6 times faster than intact owls under the same conditions, suggesting that the ceca do have a vital role in water balance of thermally stressed horned owls. Cecectomy resulted in slightly lower metabolizability of food, lower digestibility of crude fiber in low fiber diets, and greater loss of certain amino acids in cecectomized birds that were fasted or fed a protein-free diet. The latter suggests that the ceca are important in recovery of amino acids endogenous protein degradation. Loss of cecal function also resulted in higher energy intake and excretion in Japanese quail, amounting to 5.7% of the total daily energy requirement. PMID:2575133

  5. A Study of the Influence of Organizational Knowledge Ability and Knowledge Absorptive Capacity on Organization Performance in Taiwan`s Hi-Tech Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Piao; Liu, Pang-Lo; Tsai, Chih-Hung

    In recent years, business operation tends to be internationalized and the production cost increases day by day, the technology promotion of Taiwan`s hi-tech enterprises met its bottleneck; lots of industries have introduced Knowledge Management (KM) and emphasized the knowledge absorptive capacity of the employees to promote the organizational business performance under this competition environment. This research studied the influence of organizational knowledge ability and knowledge absorptive capacity on organization performance in Taiwan`s hi-tech enterprises. The research found that: the industry with strong organizational knowledge ability has positive influence on organization performance; the industry with strong organizational knowledge ability has positive influence on knowledge absorptive capacity and the industry with strong knowledge absorptive capacity has positive influence on organization performance. Therefore, the organizational knowledge ability and knowledge absorption capacity of Taiwan`s high-tech enterprises have positive influence on the promotion of their organization performance.

  6. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  7. The water absorption effect on the hardness of composites polyester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, A. A.; Issa, T. T.

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated polyester resin (UPE) was used as the matrix .The iron woven wire and E-glass fiber type (0 - 9°), were used as a reinforcements additives of weight percentage (5, 10, 15) respectively. Samples were prepared by the hand lay-up method for (UPE), (UPE -Fe) and (UPE- Glass). Chemical analysis was used to identify the composition of Fe wire. Water immersing at room temperature for all samples were done at (2, 5, 7, 9, 12) days. Hardness test (Brinell) showed decreasing with increasing in immersion time for (UPE) from (67) HB to (95) HP after adding the reinforcement Fe fibers, with increasing in the water absorbed content especially in the days (2, 5). The water content of absorption was found to be either decreasing or increasing depending on the number of reinforcing layers added.

  8. Human skin binding and absorption of contaminants from ground and surface water during swimming and bathing

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I. )

    1989-10-01

    Contaminants exist in ground and surface water. Human skin has the capacity to bind and then absorb these contaminants into the body during swimming and bathing. Powdered human stratum corneum will bind both lipid-soluble (alachlor, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), benzene) and water-soluble (nitroaniline) chemicals. In vitro (Human skin) and in vivo (Rhesus monkey) studies show that these chemicals readily distribute into skin, and then some of the chemical is absorbed into the body. Linearity in binding and absorption exists for nitroaniline over a 10-fold concentration range. Multiple exposure to benzene is at least cumulative. Binding and adsorption can be significant for exposures as short as 30 minutes, and will increase with time. Adsorption with water dilution increased for alachlor, but not for dinoseb. Soap reversed the partitioning of alachlor between human stratum corneum and water. The PCBs could be removed from skin by soap and water for up to 3 hours and the decontamination potential decreased, due to continuing skin absorption. The model that in vitro and in vivo systems used should permit easy estimation of this area of extensive human exposure effect on risk assessment. 5 refs., 9 tabs.

  9. A Water Vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR Design for Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Mead, Patricia F.

    2004-01-01

    This system study proposes the deployment of a water vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system on an Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform. The Altair offers improved payload weight and volume performance, and longer total flight time as compared to other commercial UAV's. This study has generated a preliminary design for an Altair based water vapor DIAL system. The design includes a proposed DIAL schematic, a review of mechanical challenges such as temperature and humidity stresses on UAV deployed DIAL systems, an assessment of the available capacity for additional instrumentation (based on the proposed design), and an overview of possible weight and volume improvements associated with the use of customized electronic and computer hardware, and through the integration of advanced fiber-optic and laser products. The results of the study show that less than 17% of the available weight, less than 19% of the volume capacity, and approximately 11% of the electrical capacity is utilized by the proposed water vapor DIAL system on the Altair UAV.

  10. Investigation of the Emission and Absorption Spectra of Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, N. I.; Il'in, Yu. A.; Sadykov, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Emission and absorption spectra of water vapor are measured and analyzed for temperatures 350-2500 K in the spectral range 0.57-25 μm. Based on the developed mathematical model of radiative transfer, the parameters of spectral transmission functions of N2O vapors are obtained at different temperatures. Practical application of the obtained radiative characteristics is considered for solving problems of radiative heat exchange in high-temperature media and designing optoelectronic systems intended for monitoring of aero carriers.

  11. Energy analysis of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1996-09-01

    Absorption refrigeration systems (ARSs) are run on heat-operated cycles. In these systems a secondary fluid (i.e., absorbent) is used to absorb the primary fluid (i.e., refrigerant) vaporized in the evaporator. ARSs for industrial and domestic applications have been attracting increasing interest throughout the world. A simple energy analysis technique for ammonia-water refrigeration systems is presented and verified with actual experimental data taken from the literature. Comparison was made in terms of the coefficient of performance, and very good agreement was found.

  12. A nonisothermal emissivity and absorptivity formulation for water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Downey, P.

    1986-01-01

    An emissivity approach is taken to modeling fluxes and cooling rates in the atmosphere. The nonisothermal water vapor long wave radiation emissivity and absorptivity model that is developed satisfies the requirements of defining a monochromatic transfer equation for predicting water vapor emissions. Predictions made with the model compare favorably with fluxes predicted by a radiation model for narrow-band emissions in 5 kayser intervals. The spectral resolution assumed in narrow-band models is shown to be an arbitrary parameter and, if a far wing continuum-type opacity is included in the emissivity scheme presented, results can be obtained which are as accurate as predictions made with state of the art line-by-line (LBL) calculations.

  13. Water- Lithium Bromide-γ- Butyrolactone Absorption Refrigerating Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyoki, Shigeki; Uemura, Tadashi

    This investigation was carried out in order to find corrosion inhibitors which would be effective in controlling the corrosion for the water-lithium bromide-γ-butyrolactone (20 moles water/1 mole γ-butyrolactone) absorption refrigerating machine. The experiments were carried out on continuous boiling test, intermittent boiling test and galvanic corrosion test with the use of organic inhibitors and inorganic inhibitors in γ-butyrolactone aqueous solution of lithium bromide. The metals used in these corrosion tests were mainly SS 41 and copper. From these experimental results, the most suitable corrosion inhibitors for SS 41 and copper in γ-butyrolactone aqueous solution of lithium bromide Were recognized to be benzotriazole, tolyltriazole and lithium molybdate.

  14. Public water supplies of North Carolina : a summary of water sources, use, treatment, and capacity of water-supply systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, L.T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Data were collected during 1970-76 on 224 public water supply systems in North Carolina with 500 or more customers. This report summarizes these data that were previously published in five separate regional reports. The data are presented in order to Council of Government region, county, and water system name and include population served, average and maximum daily use, industrial use, water source, allowable draft of surface-water supplies, raw water pumping capacity, raw and finished water storage, type of water treatment, treatment plant capacity, and a summary of the chemical quality of finished water. Tables and maps provide cross references for system names, counties, Council of Government regions and water source.

  15. Water absorption and moisture permeation properties of chitosan/poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) IPC films.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, M; Bajpai, S K; Jyotishi, Pooja

    2016-03-01

    In this work, aqueous solutions of chitosan (Ch) and [poly(acrylamide(AAm)-co-itaconicacid(IA)] have been mixed to yield Ch/poly(AAm-co-IA) Inter-polyelectrolyte complex (IPC) films. The films were characterized by FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). There was remarkable increase in the crystalline nature of IPC films. The films were investigated for their water absorption capacity in the physiological fluid (PF) of pH 7.4 at 37°C. The amount of IA present in the film forming solutions affected the water absorption behavior of the resulting films. The dynamic water uptake data were interpreted by various kinetic models. The effect of pH on the swelling ratio (SR) indicated that the films showed highest swelling in lower as well as higher pH media. The water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) were obtained in the range of 6000-6645g/m(2)/day. PMID:26658228

  16. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  17. Mechanical- and oil-durable superhydrophobic polyester materials for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    The low stability and complicated fabrication procedures seriously hindered practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we present a facile approach for preparing durable superhydrophobic polyester materials by dip-coating in a nanocomposite solution of polymerized tetraethoxysilane and n-hexadecyltriethoxysilane. The coated samples exhibit excellent superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, mechanical and chemical stabilities. This is attributed to the tight binding of the nanocomposite on the polyester fibers and the inherent stability of silicone. The coated samples can quickly absorb petrol, diesel and crude oil, and show very high selectivity in oil/water separation. In addition, the coated samples could maintain their superhydrophobicity, oil absorption capacity and oil/water selectivity after harsh mechanical damage, 90 days of immersion in oils and ten cycles of absorption-desorption. Moreover, this approach is simple and can be easily scaled up for producing samples on a large size, which makes it very promising for practical oil absorption. PMID:24183438

  18. Social Networks, Social Media and Absorptive Capacity in Regional Small and Medium Enterprises (SMES) in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosua, Rachelle; Evans, Nina; Sawyer, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are major sources of prosperity and employment and are viewed as critical to regional development in Australia. A key factor to foster productivity and growth in SMEs is their ability to identify, acquire, transform and exploit external knowledge. This ability, referred to as the "absorptive capacity…

  19. [Seasonal variation of in water constituents' absorption properties in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-feng; Li, Yun-mei; Zha, Yong; Sun, De-yong; Wu, Lan; Wang, Li-zhen

    2008-09-01

    Seasonal variance in absorption properties of water constituents was analyzed and predominant factor of spectrum absorption in different seasons was discussed using the data sets collected in August and November 2006 and March 2007 from Meiliang Bay in Taihu Lake. The results indicate that, the absorption of water constitutions has seasonal variation characteristic. Total suspended sediment has the greatest absorption coefficient in summer, the average absorption at band 440 nm is (7.49 +/- 3.0) m(-1), while the least absorption presents in spring, with average absorption value of (2.86 +/- 0.73) m(-1) at band 440 nm. The total absorption type varies with seasons. Non-algal particle absorption has less seasonal variation than total absorption. The difference of non-algal particle absorption coefficient and slope S were caused by different concentration and composition of non-algal particles. Because of high chlorophyll a concentration, phytoplankton absorption coefficient was great in summer, with average absorption value of (5.49 +/- 3.5) m(-1) at band 675 nm. The average of phytoplankton absorption at band 675 nm in autumn is (2.03 +/- 1.14) m(-1), less than that in summer. The least absorption presents in spring, with average absorption value of (0.62 +/- 0.25) m(-1) at band 675 nm. Difference of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) concentration and constitution, mainly resulted by different source of CDOM, causes the seasonal variation of its absorption coefficient and slope S value. The predominant absorption factor varies with seasons. In spring and autumn, non-algal particles were the predominant spectrum absorption factor in water, because the concentration of inorganic matter is higher than organic matters in the two seasons. While in summer, phytoplankton becomes the main effect factor of spectrum absorption in water. PMID:19068625

  20. Microclimate in ski boots--temperature, relative humidity, and water absorption.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Patrick; Hasler, Michael; Fauland, Gulnara; Bechtold, Thomas; Nachbauer, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Ski boot quality is determined by mechanical properties and comfort. Comfort is strongly affected by cold feet. The purpose of this study was to determine the microclimate in ski boots. Climate chamber tests with five male subjects and field tests with two male subjects were conducted. Temperature and relative humidity were measured using four sensors placed on the foot and one on the liner. Absorbed water in liners and socks was measured with a precision balance. The subjects gave subjective ratings for comfort. The toe sensor temperature dropped below 20C at an ambient temperature of 0C,-10C, and-20C. Relative humidity values at the foot were as high as 78% in the climate chamber and 93% in the field. Water absorption in socks and liners ranged from 4 to 10g in the climate chamber and 19 to 45.5g in the field. The results reveal the importance of keeping the feet and in particular the toes warm during skiing. One possible improvement may be to construct the liner so that sweat and melted snow are kept as far away as possible from the foot. Liner material with high water absorption capacity and hydrophobic socks were suggested to prevent wet feet. PMID:23932378

  1. The Impacts of Different Expansion Modes on Performance of Small Solar Energy Firms: Perspectives of Absorptive Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsing Hung; Shen, Tao; Xu, Xin-long; Ma, Chao

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of firm's expansion by differentiated products and diversified products are quite different. However, the study employing absorptive capacity to examine the impacts of different modes of expansion on performance of small solar energy firms has never been discussed before. Then, a conceptual model to analyze the tension between strategies and corporate performance is proposed to filling the vacancy. After practical investigation, the results show that stronger organizational institutions help small solar energy firms expanded by differentiated products increase consistency between strategies and corporate performance; oppositely, stronger working attitudes with weak management controls help small solar energy firms expanded by diversified products reduce variance between strategies and corporate performance. PMID:24453837

  2. Watching Hydrogen Bonds Break: A Transient Absorption Study of Water

    PubMed Central

    Steinel, Tobias; Asbury, John B.; Zheng, Junrong

    2008-01-01

    Ultrafast infrared transient absorption measurements of the complete hydroxyl OD stretching mode spectrum of HOD in water, from 100 fs to tens of picoseconds, observe hydrogen bond breaking and monitor the equilibration of the hydrogen bond network in water. In addition, the vibrational lifetime, the time constant for hydrogen bond breaking, and the rate of orientational relaxation are determined. The reactant and photoproduct spectra of the hydrogen bond breaking process are identified by decomposing the transient spectra into two components, the initial spectrum associated with vibrational excited states (reactants) and the long-time spectrum associated with broken hydrogen bonds (photoproducts). By properly taking into account the perturbation of the reactant spectrum decay by the growth of the photoproduct spectrum, it is found that the vibrational relaxation (1.45 ps) and orientational relaxation (1.53 ps) are wavelength independent and, therefore, independent of the degree of hydrogen bonding. Energy deposited into water by vibrational relaxation does not immediately break a hydrogen bond by predissociation nor produce a thermally equilibrated hydrogen bond distribution at an elevated temperature. Following deposition of energy by vibrational relaxation, the hydrogen bond breaking time is 800 fs, and there is a transient period of several picoseconds during which the hydrogen bond distribution is not in thermal equilibrium. PMID:19096727

  3. Water-holding capacity of broiler breast muscle during the first 24 h postmortem.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water-holding capacity of poultry muscle influences both the sensory appeal for consumers and the product yield for processors. The underlying mechanisms that control water-holding capacity in poultry are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the evolution of water-hol...

  4. 21 CFR 130.12 - General methods for water capacity and fill of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... container with distilled water at 68 °F to 3/16 inch vertical distance below the top level of the container... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General methods for water capacity and fill of... methods for water capacity and fill of containers. For the purposes of regulations promulgated...

  5. 21 CFR 130.12 - General methods for water capacity and fill of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... container with distilled water at 68 °F to 3/16 inch vertical distance below the top level of the container... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General methods for water capacity and fill of... methods for water capacity and fill of containers. For the purposes of regulations promulgated...

  6. Prospective evaluation of the absorptive capacity of the bowel after major and minor resections in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Liefaard, G; Heineman, E; Molenaar, J C; Tibboel, D

    1995-03-01

    The outcome after major bowel resection in the neonatal period depends primarily on the time needed for bowel adaptation. A prospective study was begun in neonates after small bowel resection to evaluate the absorptive capacity of the bowel and growth parameters as a result of adaptation of the bowel. Twenty-four neonates who underwent bowel resection were included. The underlying diagnoses were necrotising enterocolitis (12), jejunal atresia (3), meconium peritonitis (3), and other (6). During the study, a standardized treatment with respect to nutrition was followed. At predetermined times, enterostomy fluid or faeces were collected for analysis of carbohydrate content, fat content, and fatty acids, together with a xylose test and a hydrogen breath test. Growth parameters included weight and height. The 24 patients were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of eight patients with short bowel syndrome (defined as loss of more than 50% of the original small bowel length related to gestational age). The mean remaining small bowel length in this group was 34.0% (24% to 42%). Group B consisted of 16 patients who had only minor bowel resections. Retarded growth was observed in four group A patients. Low levels of carbohydrate absorption were found 2 and 4 weeks after the initial operation in group A, and 2 weeks after the initial operation in group B. Low levels of fat absorption were found 4 and 8 weeks after the initial operation in group A. The coefficient of absorption of the different fatty acids showed complete absorption of caprylic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7760226

  7. Enhancement of the grafting performance and of the water absorption of cassava starch graft copolymer by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, Suda; Meechai, Nispa

    1997-06-01

    Enhancement of the gamma radiation grafting of acrylonitrile onto gelatinized cassava starch was investigated. Infrared spectrometry was used to follow the chemical changes in the grafting reaction and from saponification. The saponified starch- g-PAN (HSPAN) was then characterized in terms of grafting parameters to provide a guide for the optimum total dose (kGy) and the appropriate ratio of starch/acrylonitrile for a fixed dose rate of 2.5 × 10 -1 kGy/min. Other dose rates were also carried out to obtain the appropriate result of grafting copolymerization and of water absorption. A thin aluminium foil, covering the inner wall of the reaction vessel, was found to be far more effective than any other metal films in the enhancement of the grafting reaction and the water absorption as well. Nitric acid in the medium increases the grafting yield and the water absorption. Methyl ether hydroquinone inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to increase homopolymerization and decrease graft reaction. When styrene was used as a comonomer, it hampered the grafting of acrylonitrile onto starch backbone. The water absorption capacity was improved by freeze-drying the HSPAN. The treatment of the HSPAN with aluminium trichloride hexahydrate was found to enhance the degree of wicking, but to decrease the water absorbency.

  8. Determination of Hydrogen absorption capacity of different nanomaterials using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Susana; Diaz-Droguett, Donovan; Cabrera, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen has become an alternative energy source and a key gas for the fuel cell technology. For these reasons, there is a growing need of developing more efficient materials for hydrogen storage in a safer way and to develop hydrogen sensors for hydrogen detection. We studied hydrogen absorption properties of different nanomaterials-assembled systems using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance. The nanomaterials inspected include palladium-based thin films, metal oxides, polymer-metal composites as well as carbon nanoparticles. Fund from FONDECyT 11130555.

  9. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  10. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  11. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  12. Experimental study of the light absorption in sea water by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, A.; Sira, E.; Silva, S.; Cabrera, H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal lens spectroscopy is well known as highly sensitive technique enabling measurements of low absorption and concentration determination of various compounds. The optical absorption coefficients of doubly distilled water and samples of water from different places of the open Ocean and different coastal regions have been measured at 532.8 nm wavelength using this technique. The method enables sensitive, rapid and reproducible determination of small variations of the absorption coefficient which are related with small trace contaminations in sea water.

  13. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Patridge, Christopher J.; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.; Twigg, Mark E.; Ramaker, David E.

    2013-07-15

    The local structure of nanoscale (∼10–40 nm) LiCoO{sub 2} is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO{sub 2} nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (Δμ) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a Δμ EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO{sub 2}. • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2} and difference spectra. • Full multiple scattering calculations are used to support Δμ analysis.

  14. High COP absorption chiller driven by engine cooling water

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, S.

    1995-06-01

    In cogeneration systems, absorption chillers play an important role for utilizing the heat exhausted from engine, especially during summer. A conventional one has low COP of only about 0.65, and its COP falls abruptly according to going down of the engine cooling water temperature. The temperature falls down with decreasing of engine load, and engine runs generally at the light load lower than 80{approximately}90%, therefore COP becomes low more and more. The new type has higher COP of 0.75, and can keep the COP in the wide range of the engine cooling water temperature from 90{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C. To add to the merit, the new one is 3O%{approximately}40% smaller than the old one. These improvements was achieved by the followings: (1) Minimizing the LiBr solution flow rate to get the higher COP. The flow rate becomes the smaller, the weak solution temperature entering the generator will be the higher, by heat exchanging with the high temperature strong solution leaving the generator. The inlet solution temperature to the generator becomes the higher, the heat input to the generator for concentrating the solution will be the smaller, and the COP will be the higher. (2) Adopting the tubes which outside surface can be perfectly wetted by only the minimized solution flow rate to keep the high heat transfer rate. Changing the generator tube arrangement from conventional horizontally long type to new vertically long type to get high dense distribution. (3) Taking the spray type generator instead of the conventional flowed type to hold the high COP in the wide range of engine cooling water temperature. The heat transfer rate of the flowed type descends with the heat load, but the one of the spray type doesn`t. Supposing the light load of engine, the heat input to the generator and the heat transfer rate of the flooded one falls down, therefore the solution temperature also goes down.

  15. Collision-Induced Dipole Moment and Millimeter and Submillimeter Continuum Absorption in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, M. Yu.; Sysoev, A. A.; Odintsova, T. A.; Kyuberis, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to estimation of the additional absorption of millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths in water vapor arising from collisional interaction of molecules due to the induced dipole moment. Absorption is modeled on the basis of ab initio data on the magnitude of the water molecule dipole moment at high densities, and common knowledge of the water vapor absorption spectrum. Using the model developed, we obtained a simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient as a function of temperature, pressure, and frequency. Comparison of the results with known experimental data leads to the conclusion that in the range of pressures and temperatures typical of water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere this type of absorption is negligible compared with the absorption arising due to association or dimerization of the water vapor molecules.

  16. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  17. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Chen, Baohong; Xiang, Feng; Zhou, Jinxiong; Wang, Hong; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-10-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  18. Tree invasion effects on peat water storage capacity (La Guette peatland, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, Stephane; Viel, Emelie; Gogo, Sebastien; Le Moing, Franck; Laggoun-Defarge, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    In peatlands, carbon fluxes are mainly controlled by peat water saturation state, and this saturation state is an equilibrium between recharge/drainage fluxes and the peat storage capacity. The invasion of Sphagnum peatlands by vascular plants is a current problem in many peat-accumulating systems, raising the question of the relationships between vegetation changes and water storage capacity of peat horizons. To investigate this question, the water storage capacity of the "La Guette" peatland (France), invaded by Betula spp was monitored at the watershed scale since 2008 using a water balance approach and was estimated during the 20th century using historical photographs showing the drainage network and the land cover change. During this period, the site clearly experienced a vegetation change as the site was treeless in 1944. Two main results arise from this experimental device: (1) In this disturbed peatland, tree consumption amplifies the summer drought and the resulting water table drawdown allows an increase of air entrapment in the peat. Even if runoff flows occurred after this drought, the water storage capacity is affected, with about 30% of air that remains trapped in the peat porosity 6 months after the drought period. The effects of a single drought on peat water storage capacity are observed over more than a single hydrological cycle, suggesting a possible cumulative effect of droughts decreasing the peat water storage capacity. (2) Tree invasion is found to drive the drainage network morphology. Hydrological model calibrated for the study site suggested that the development of drainage network had reduced the water storage capacity of the peatland. These observations evidenced a positive feedback between vegetation dynamics and water storage capacity: tree invasion changes the drainage network geometry that decreases the peat water storage capacity, which in return may favor tree development. These two results highlight that the peat water storage capacity is indirectly reduced by tree invasion.

  19. In-situ Field Capacity and Soil Water Retention Measurements in Two Contrasting Soil Textures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the in-situ field capacity and soil-water retention curve for soils is important for effective irrigation management and scheduling. The primary objective of this study was to estimate in-situ field capacity and soil water retention curves in the field using continually monitoring soil ...

  20. 21 CFR 130.12 - General methods for water capacity and fill of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General methods for water capacity and fill of containers. 130.12 Section 130.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD STANDARDS: GENERAL General Provisions § 130.12 General methods for water capacity and...

  1. The effect of canola meal tannins on the intestinal absorption capacity of broilers using a D-xylose test.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, B; Rogiewicz, A; Slominski, B A

    2015-12-01

    In three D-xylose absorption experiments, the effect of 1% HCl/methanol, 70% methanol or 70% acetone extracts of canola meal (CM) or 70% acetone extract of soybean meal (SBM) containing polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and phytic acid on intestinal absorption capacity of broilers was determined. In Exp. 1, the experimental groups received orally D-xylose solution alone or with methanol/HCl, methanol or acetone extracts of CM. In Exp. 2, the experimental groups received D-xylose alone or with acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exp. 3, the experimental groups received D-xylose plus sucrose solution or D-xylose plus acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exps. 2 and 3, the CM extracts contained 2.7 and 2.6, 2.4 and 2.3, 3.2 and 3.2, and 2.4 and 2.2 times higher polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and condensed tannins than the corresponding SBM extracts respectively. Blood samples were collected in 40-min intervals, and plasma D-xylose was measured. Compared to the Control, plasma D-xylose in Exp. 1 was lower (p < 0.001) by 81, 69 and 73% at 40-min, by 41, 44 and 37% at 80-min and by 22, 31, and 23% at 120-min post-ingestion of the HCl/methanol, methanol and acetone extracts respectively. In both Exps. 2 and 3, plasma D-xylose level was lower (p < 0.001) in groups dosed with CM extract or SBM extract at each time of blood collection, when compared to the respective Control group. However, in Exp. 3, birds dosed with SBM extract had higher plasma D-xylose than CM extract-dosed birds by 28, 8 and 21% at 40, 80 and 120 min respectively (p < 0.01). In conclusion, although CM extract caused a lower absorption of D-xylose, based on 5 to 10% of CM inclusion levels in practical broiler rations, the soluble bioactive components of CM will likely have minor impact on the absorption capacity of the chicken intestine. PMID:25865561

  2. Impact of a lowered water table on water holding capacity of high elevation meadow soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Meadow degradation, as a product of overgrazing or disruption of hydrologic regime, is a critical problem facing a variety of environments, including high elevation ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada, California and has become a focus of major research and restoration efforts. Within the historic range of water level in a meadow, it is hypothesized that a meadow will retain its water holding capacity and resiliency. However, if the water table drops below a historic level, due to climate change and/or management practices, the process of soil consolidation will influence the resiliency of the meadow through the irreversible plastic deformation of the soil pores. The subsequent change in soil structure results in decreased porosity, increased bulk density, and a reduction in permeability of the meadow. Such changes can adversely impact the overall water holding capacity of the meadow. This study utilizes a modified triaxial system combined with a multiphysics modeling approach to quantify the historic limit of dryness experienced in a high elevation meadow and degree of consolidation the meadow would experience if that limit was exceeded.

  3. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  4. Comparison of reflectance with backscatter and absorption parameters for turbid waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Usry, J. W.; Houghton, W. M.; Witte, W. G.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The relation of reflectance to backscatter and absorption parameters is investigated for waters more turbid than those of previous investigations. Experimental data are examined for river waters in which beam attenuation values range from 8.9 to 18.9 per m at 550 nm. Attenuation, absorption, backscatter, and irradiance reflectance spectral properties are presented for wavelengths between 450 and 800 nm. Comparisons of reflectance with backscatter to absorption ratio and backscatter with absorption plus backscatter ratio indicate that data for turbid waters do not fit linear or polynomial models which are presently available in the literature.

  5. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  6. EVALUATING CAPACITIES OF GAC PRELOADED WITH NATURAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption studies are conducted to determine how preloading a natural groundwater onto GAC affects the adsorption of cis-1,2-dichloroexthene in small-scale and pilot-scale columns. Capacities are determined from batch-isotherm tests, microcolumns, and pilot columns, which are p...

  7. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method. PMID:14598008

  8. IR Absorption Coefficients for the Quantification of Water in Hydrous Ringwoodite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sylvia-Monique; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Bina, Craig R.; Smyth, Joseph R.; Frost, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy, combined with the 'Comparator technique' has been developed to determine water contents ranging from a few wt ppm to wt% in glasses and nominally anhydrous minerals including garnets, olivine, and SiO2 polymorphs (Thomas et al. 2009). The routine is one promising example of quantification tools to determine mineral specific molar absorption coefficients (ɛ) for IR spectroscopy. Mineral specific absorption coefficients are required because general IR calibrations do not necessarily apply to minerals with water incorporated as hydroxyl point defects. Here we utilize the 'Comparator technique' to provide ɛ-values for a set of synthetic Fe-free (Fo100) and Fe-bearing (Fo90, Fo87, Fo83, Fo60) ringwoodites, as well as for γ-Mg2GeO4. Ringwoodite is considered one of the major phases of the Earth's lower transition zone (520-660 km depth) and the knowledge of its absolute water storage capacity is essential for modeling the Earth's deep water cycle. Samples were synthesized at variable P-T conditions in a multi-anvil press and cover a range of OH contents. Single-crystals were characterized using X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. Mineral specific IR absorption coefficients were calculated from independently determined water contents from Raman spectroscopy. Unpolarized IR spectra of Mg-ringwoodite show broad absorption features in the OH region with band maxima at ~2350, 2538, 3130, 3172, 3598 and 3688 cm-1. In the spectra of Fe-bearing ringwoodite and γ-Mg2GeO4 the maxima of the main OH band are shifted to 3244 cm-1 (Fo60) and 3207 cm-1, respectively. For Mg-ringwoodite with the mean wavenumber (area-weighted average of the peak position) of 3170 cm-1 an ɛ-value of 191500 ± 38300 L cm-2/ molH2O was determined. For the ringwoodites with Fo90, Fo87 and Fo83 composition and the mean wavenumbers of 3229 cm-1, 3252 cm-1 and 3163 cm-1 values of 123600 ± 24700 L cm-2/ molH2O, 176300 ± 52900 L cm-2/ molH2O and 155000 ± 46500 L cm-2/ molH2O were computed. Our value for pure Mg-ringwoodite is in very good agreement with the value according to Libowitzky & Rossman (1997) and the absorption coefficient proposed by Balan et al. (2008), but is higher than the extrapolated value from Koch-Müller & Rhede (2010). However, in case of the sample with Fo60 composition water content and ɛ-value determined here are in excellent agreement with those calculated by Koch-Müller & Rhede (2010). Here, we will further discuss general IR calibrations and the dependence of ɛ on structure, composition and frequency for the (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 polymorphs in the mantle. We agree with the findings of Koch-Müller & Rhede (2010), which report that using the calibrations according to Paterson (1982) and Libowitzky & Rossman (1997) leads to a water content underestimation in case of Fe-rich (Fay-Fo60) samples. At this point this cannot be generalized for Mg-rich ringwoodite. References Thomas et al. (2009), Phys. Chem. Mineral., 36, 489-509. Libowitzky & Rossman (1997), Am. Mineral., 82, 1111-1115. Koch-Müller & Rhede (2010), Am. Mineral., in press. Paterson (1982), Bull. Mineral. (Paris), 105, 20-29.

  9. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  10. Enhanced Water Vapor Absorption within Tropospheric Clouds: A Partial Explanation for Anomalous Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David; Zuffada, Cinzia

    1996-01-01

    Comparisons between solar flux measurements and predictions obtained from theoretical radiative transfer models indicate that most of these models underestimate the globally averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25Wm&sup-2;.The origin of this anomalous absorption has not yet been established, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in the existing models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. We used a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model to provide improved constraints on the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by Earth's atmosphere. The results are described herein.

  11. The high water-holding capacity of petrocalcic horizons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Petrocalcic soil horizons occur in most arid and semi-arid ecosystems around the world, often within the plant rooting zone. Little is known, however, about the water holding characteristic of soils indurated with calcium carbonate. We conducted a replicated experiment to define the soil-water relea...

  12. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  13. Experimentally determined water storage capacity in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferot, A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.

    2010-12-01

    Trace amounts of hydrogen dissolved as defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) in the mantle are believed to play a key role in physical and chemical processes in the Earth’s upper mantle. Hence, the estimation of water storage in mantle phases and solubility mechanisms are important in order to better understand the effect of water. Experimental data on water solubility in NAMs are available for upper mantle minerals such as olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. However, the majority of studies are based on the study of single phases, and at temperatures or pressures that are too low for the Earth’s upper mantle. The aim of this study is to constrain the combined effects of pressure, temperature and composition on water solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene under upper mantle conditions. The solubility of water in coexisting orthopyroxene and olivine was investigated by simultaneously synthesizing the two phases at high pressure and high temperature in a multi-anvil press. Experiments were performed under water-saturated conditions in the MSH systems with Fe and Al at 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 9 GPa and temperatures between 1175 and 1400°C. Integrated OH absorbances were determined using polarized infrared spectroscopy on doubly polished thin sections of randomly oriented crystals. Water solubility in olivine increases with pressure and decreases with temperature as has been described previously (Bali et al., 2008). The aluminum content strongly decreases in olivine with pressure from 0.09 wt% at 2.5 GPa and 1250°C to 0.04 wt% at 9 GPa and 1175°C. The incorporation of this trivalent cation in the system enhances water solubility in olivine even if present in trace amounts, however this behavior appears to reverse at high pressure. The effect of temperature on water solubility follows a bell-shaped curve with a maximum solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene at 1250°C. Aluminum is incorporated in orthopyroxene following the Tschermak substitution and strongly decreases as pressure increases. Water partitioning between orthopyroxene and olivine is always lower than 1 except at low pressure. However, it increases with the incorporation of aluminum wich results in water contents in olivine 5 times greater that in orthopyroxene at 7.5 GPa, despite aluminum preferentially entering into orthopyroxene. Finally, water partitioning between orthopyroxene and olivine decreases with pressure in the Al-free and -bearing system. The effect of temperature is more variable with pressure. The present data allows constructing a model of water solubility in olivine at all pressures and temperatures in the MFASH system. Combining this model with the presently measured partitioning of water between olivine and orthopyroxene, as well as previous data on solubility in clinopyroxene and garnet we are able to build a model of water saturation curve in the upper mantle. References Bali, E., Bolfan-Casanova, N., Koga, K.T., 2008. Pressure and temperature dependence of H solubility in forsterite : an implication to water activity in the Earth interior. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 268, 354-363.

  14. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-02-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10-26 cm2 molecule-1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×1023 cm2, we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths.

  15. The influence of water mixtures on the dermal absorption of glycol ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor, Matthew J.; Wilkinson, Simon C.; Williams, Faith M. . E-mail: F.M.Williams@ncl.ac.uk

    2007-01-15

    Glycol ethers are solvents widely used alone and as mixtures in industrial and household products. Some glycol ethers have been shown to have a range of toxic effects in humans following absorption and metabolism to their aldehyde and acid metabolites. This study assessed the influence of water mixtures on the dermal absorption of butoxyethanol and ethoxyethanol in vitro through human skin. Butoxyethanol penetrated human skin up to sixfold more rapidly from aqueous solution (50%, 450 mg/ml) than from the neat solvent. Similarly penetration of ethoxyethanol was increased threefold in the presence of water (50%, 697 mg/ml). There was a corresponding increase in apparent permeability coefficient as the glycol ether concentration in water decreased. The maximum penetration rate of water also increased in the presence of both glycol ethers. Absorption through a synthetic membrane obeyed Fick's Law and absorption through rat skin showed a similar profile to human skin but with a lesser effect. The mechanisms for this phenomenon involves disruption of the stratum corneum lipid bilayer by desiccation by neat glycol ether micelles, hydration with water mixtures and the physicochemical properties of the glycol ether-water mixtures. Full elucidation of the profile of absorption of glycol ethers from mixtures is required for risk assessment of dermal exposure. This work supports the view that risk assessments for dermal contact scenarios should ideally be based on absorption data obtained for the relevant formulation or mixture and exposure scenario and that absorption derived from permeability coefficients may be inappropriate for water-miscible solvents.

  16. Irrigation scheduling as affected by field capacity and wilting point water content from different data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at field capacity and wilting point water content is critical information for irrigation scheduling, regardless of soil water sensor-based method (SM) or evapotranspiration (ET)-based method. Both methods require knowledge on site-specific and soil-specific Management Allowable De...

  17. Jejunal water and electrolyte absorption from two proprietary enteral feeds in man: importance of sodium content.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Jones, B J; Silk, D B

    1987-01-01

    Jejunostomy losses of Na+ and water during enteral nutrition after massive intestinal resection may be severe. We have attempted to analyse this practical problem by using an in vivo perfusion technique in healthy volunteers to study Na+, water and nutrient absorption from a short (25 cm) segment of jejunum during perfusion of an isotonic solution of the elemental diet Vivonex. Further solutions made from the amino acid and carbohydrate components of Vivonex were also perfused in part I of the study in order to determine the causes of the marked Na+ and water secretion seen during Vivonex perfusion. Low initial Na+ concentration was found to be the major determinant of net Na+ secretion, initial Na+ concentration correlating significantly with Na+ absorption (r = 0.95, n = 7 p less than 0.001). Water absorption correlated with net absorption of NaCl (r = 0.82, n = 7 p less than 0.01). There was, however, a better correlation with total absorption of NaCl plus amino acids (r = 0.99, n = 7, p less than 0.01). In part II of the study separate isotonic solutions of NaCl, glucose, and the polymeric diet, Ensure were also studied. Net sodium secretion occurred during glucose and Ensure perfusion, as predicted from their low Na+ concentration. Owing to rapid sucrose absorption from Ensure there was substantial luminal disappearance of osmotically active particles and hence marked water absorption, which was accurately predicted using the regression equation for water absorption derived in part I, substituting sucrose absorption for amino acid absorption. We conclude that the marked Na+ and water secretion observed during Vivonex perfusion is not a unique property of this amino acid based diet but is due to its low Na+ content. PMID:3114056

  18. ESTIMATES OF PLANT-AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY FOR CLAYPAN LANDSCAPES USING SOIL ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Landscape variability of plant available water (PAW) capacity is useful information for site-specific management, but is expensive to assess using traditional measurements. In this study, we hypothesized that for claypan soils, profile PAW capacity can be approximated by assuming a two-layer soil bo...

  19. Water and tissue equivalency of some gel dosimeters for photon energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Un, Adem

    2013-12-01

    The mass energy absorption coefficients,, effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEAeff, and effective electron numbers for photon-energy absorption, NPEAeff, is calculated for 14 polymer gel dosimeter, five gel dosimeter, soft tissue and water, in the energy range from 1 keV to 20 MeV. The ZPEAeff(Gel)/ZPEAeff(Tissue) and NPEAeff(Gel)/NPEAeff (Tissue) are used to evaluate the tissue equivalency. PMID:24080343

  20. Strong enhancement in light absorption by black carbon due to aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon exerts a strong, yet highly uncertain, warming effect on the climate. One source of uncertainty in predicting black carbon's radiative effects is the absorption per black carbon mass. Although models suggest that light absorption is strongly enhanced if black carbon is coated with non-absorbing aerosol material, recent ambient observations find only weak absorption enhancement from aerosol coatings. In this study, we use a particle-resolved aerosol model to evaluate how oversimplified representations of particle composition impact modeled light absorption by black carbon. We show that oversimplifying the representation of particle composition leads to overestimation of modeled absorption enhancement. In order to improve global model representations of BC absorption, we performed a nonparametric regression on particle-reolved model data from a series of simulations. Through this nonparametric analysis we derived a relationship for absorption enhancement as a function of variables that global models already track, the population-averaged composition and the environmental relative humidity. Finally, we show how this nonparametric relationship can be exploited for use in global models to improve predictions of absorption by black carbon. In order to quantify the global-scale impact of water uptake on light absorption by black carbon, we applied the relationship for absorption enhancement to output of the climate model GISS-MATRIX. We find weak absorption enhancement in locations with low relative humidity, but light absorption is strongly enhanced in humid regions. This enhancement in light absorption by particles taking up water strongly impacts black carbon's radiative effects at the global scale, enhancing light absorption by black carbon by 20% relative to dry conditions.

  1. Capacity factor analysis for evaluating water and sanitation infrastructure choices for developing communities.

    PubMed

    Bouabid, Ali; Louis, Garrick E

    2015-09-15

    40% of the world's population lacks access to adequate supplies of water and sanitation services to sustain human health. In fact, more than 780 million people lack access to safe water supplies and about 2.5 billion people lack access to basic sanitation. Appropriate technology for water supply and sanitation (Watsan) systems is critical for sustained access to these services. Current approaches for the selection of Watsan technologies in developing communities have a high failure rate. It is estimated that 30%-60% of Watsan installed infrastructures in developing countries are not operating. Inappropriate technology is a common explanation for the high rate of failure of Watsan infrastructure, particularly in lower-income communities (Palaniappan et al., 2008). This paper presents the capacity factor analysis (CFA) model, for the assessment of a community's capacity to manage and sustain access to water supply and sanitation services. The CFA model is used for the assessment of a community's capacity to operate, and maintain a municipal sanitation service (MSS) such as, drinking water supply, wastewater and sewage treatment, and management of solid waste. The assessment of the community's capacity is based on seven capacity factors that have been identified as playing a key role in the sustainability of municipal sanitation services in developing communities (Louis, 2002). These capacity factors and their constituents are defined for each municipal sanitation service. Benchmarks and international standards for the constituents of the CFs are used to assess the capacity factors. The assessment of the community's capacity factors leads to determine the overall community capacity level (CCL) to manage a MSS. The CCL can then be used to assist the community in the selection of appropriate Watsan technologies for their MSS needs. The selection is done from Watsan technologies that require a capacity level to operate them that matches the assessed CCL of the community. PMID:26203872

  2. Dataset used to improve liquid water absorption models in the microwave

    DOE Data Explorer

    Turner, David

    2015-12-14

    Two datasets, one a compilation of laboratory data and one a compilation from three field sites, are provided here. These datasets provide measurements of the real and imaginary refractive indices and absorption as a function of cloud temperature. These datasets were used in the development of the new liquid water absorption model that was published in Turner et al. 2015.

  3. Atomic absorption determination of mercury in waters after sorptive preconcentration on a polymeric thioether

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarenko, I.I.; Kislova, I.V.; Kashina, L.I.; Bakhareva, T.V.; Malofeeva, G.I.; Petrukhin, O.M.; Murinov, Yu.I.; Zolotov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-20

    A method is proposed for the sorptive preconcentration of mercury from waters using a polymeric thioether followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. The thioether extracts the mercury as Hg(II), fulvate complexes, and alkyl compounds.

  4. Terahertz absorption spectrum of water vapor at different humidity at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xuying; Altan, Hakan; Matten, David; Saint, Angelamaria; Alfano, Robert

    2006-03-01

    We measured the absorption spectrum of water vapor in 0.2-2.4THz range at different humidity from 17% to 98% at room temperature using Er: doped fiber laser (IMRA America Inc.) based terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The experiments were performed in a nitrogen-purged cage at atmosphere environment to obtain the reference and water absorption information. The seventeen absorption lines were observed due to water molecular rotations in the ground vibration state. The first three absorption lines at low frequencies increase with humidity, following the Beer-Lambert Law, while some of high frequency lines were found to decrease with humidity. These effects will be discussed. The observed line broadening is due to collisions occurring among water and nitrogen molecules.

  5. Carbon nanotube membranes with ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for water desalination and purification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui Ying; Han, Zhao Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Pey, Kin Leong; Ostrikov, Kostya; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Development of technologies for water desalination and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of insufficient water supply and inadequate sanitation, especially for point-of-use applications. Conventional desalination methods are energy and operationally intensive, whereas adsorption-based techniques are simple and easy to use for point-of-use water purification, yet their capacity to remove salts is limited. Here we report that plasma-modified ultralong carbon nanotubes exhibit ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for salt (exceeding 400% by weight) that is two orders of magnitude higher than that found in the current state-of-the-art activated carbon-based water treatment systems. We exploit this adsorption capacity in ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes that can remove salt, as well as organic and metal contaminants. These ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes may lead to next-generation rechargeable, point-of-use potable water purification appliances with superior desalination, disinfection and filtration properties. PMID:23941894

  6. Derivation of water vapour absorption cross-sections in the red region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, M.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectrum in 436 to 448 nm wavelength region gives NO2 and O3 column densities. This spectrum can also give H2O column density. The spectrum in the range of 655 to 667 nm contains absorption due to NO3 and H2O. Combining the absorption spectra in the wavelength ranges of 436 to 448 and 655 to 667 nm, water vapor absorption cross-sections in this range comes out to be of the order of 2.0 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp -2).

  7. A WATER VAPOR MONITOR USING DIFFERENTIAL INFRARED ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water vapor monitor has been developed with adequate sensitivity and versatility for a variety of applications. Two applications for which the instrument has been designed are the continuous monitoring of water in ambient air and the measuring of the mass of water desorbed from...

  8. Analytical simulation of water system capacity reliability, 1. Modified frequency-duration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Beim, Gina K.

    1988-09-01

    The problem addressed is the computation of the unavailability and expected unserved demand of a water supply system having random demand, finished water storage, and unreliable capacity components. Examples of such components include pumps, treatment plants, and aqueducts. Modified frequency-duration analysis estimates these reliability statistics by, first, calculating how often demand exceeds available capacity and, second, comparing the amount of water in storage with how long such capacity deficits last. This approach builds upon frequency-duration methods developed by the power industry for analyzing generation capacity deficits. Three versions of the frequency-duration approach are presented. Two yield bounds to system unavailability and unserved demand and the third gives an estimate of their true values between those bounds.

  9. Beyond peak reservoir storage? A global estimate of declining water storage capacity in large reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisser, Dominik; Frolking, Steve; Hagen, Stephen; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-09-01

    Water storage is an important way to cope with temporal variation in water supply and demand. The storage capacity and the lifetime of water storage reservoirs can be significantly reduced by the inflow of sediments. A global, spatially explicit assessment of reservoir storage loss in conjunction with vulnerability to storage loss has not been done. We estimated the loss in reservoir capacity for a global data set of large reservoirs from 1901 to 2010, using modeled sediment flux data. We use spatially explicit population data sets as a proxy for storage demand and calculate storage capacity for all river basins globally. Simulations suggest that the net reservoir capacity is declining as a result of sedimentation (˜5% compared to the installed capacity). Combined with increasing need for storage, these losses challenge the sustainable management of reservoir operation and water resources management in many regions. River basins that are most vulnerable include those with a strong seasonal flow pattern and high population growth rates such as the major river basins in India and China. Decreasing storage capacity globally suggests that the role of reservoir water storage in offsetting sea-level rise is likely weakening and may be changing sign.

  10. Conformational Contribution to the Heat Capacity of Starch and Starch-Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2000-03-01

    The heat capacities of starch and starch-water have been measured using adiabatic calorimetry, and standard differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and are reported from 5 K to 510 K. The amorphous starch containing 10 wt water shows a glass transition around 350 K. The heat capacities of the solid of amorphous, dry starch is linked to an approximate group vibrational spectrum, and the Tarasov equation is used to estimate the heat capacity contribution due to skeletal vibrations ( theta1 = 830 K and theta2 = 85 K theta3 = 85 K, Nskeletal = 17). The calculated and experimental heat capacities agree to better than ±3between 5 and 250 K. The experimental heat capacities of starch-water and dry starch are compared over the whole range of temperatures. Above the glass transition the differences are interpreted as contributions of different conformational heat capacities from interacting chain of carbohydrate with water. The conformational part is evaluated from a fit of the experimental Cp of starch-water, decreased by the vibrational and the external Cp to a one-dimensional Ising model with two discrete states and stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy parameters. NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., DE-AC05-96OR22464.

  11. Static Characteristics of Absorption Chiller-Heater Supplying Cold and Hot Water Simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Irie, Tomoyoshi

    Absorption chiller-heaters which can supply both chilled water and hot water at the same time, are used for cooling and heating air conditioning systems. In this paper, we classified absorption cold and hot water generating cycles and control methods, studied these absorption cycles by cycle simulation. In economizer cycle, condensed refrigerant which heats hot water is transported to cooling cycle and used effectively for cooling chilled water, Concerning with transported condensed refrigerant, there are two methods, all condensed refrigerant or required refrigerant for cooling are transported to cooling cycle, and required refrigerant method is better for energy saving. Adding improvement of solution control to this economizer cycle, simultaneous cold and hot water supplying chiller-heaters have good characteristics of energy saving in the all region.

  12. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explanation for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 W/sq m. The origin of this anomalous absorption is not yet known, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in these models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere. We found that the amount of sunlight absorbed by a cloudy atmosphere is inversely proportional to the solar zenith angle and the cloud top height, and directly proportional to the cloud optical depth and the water vapor concentration within the clouds. Atmospheres with saturated, optically-thick, low clouds absorbed about 12 W/sq m more than clear atmospheres. This accounts for about 1/2 to 1/3 of the anomalous ab- sorption. Atmospheres with optically thick middle and high clouds usually absorb less than clear atmospheres. Because water vapor is concentrated within and below the cloud tops, this absorber is most effective at small solar zenith angles. An additional absorber that is distributed at or above the cloud tops is needed to produce the amplitude and zenith angle dependence of the observed anomalous absorption.

  13. Changes in Physical Property of Epoxy Resin with Absorption of Methyl Alcohol and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Ken; Nohara, Hiroshi; Shintani, Ryuichi

    1994-05-01

    Changes in physical properties with absorption of methyl alcohol and water were investigated. Upon CH3OH absorption, a boundary front appeared between the shell and core. The change in physical properties with absorption depended on the solvent and the volume absorbed. For example, when CH3OH of about 11 wt% was absorbed, Young's modulus decreased from 3.0×108 to 4.9×106 N/m2. In the case of H2O absorption (1 wt%), Young's modulus changed only slightly to 1.7×108 N/m2. The glass transition temperature T g shifted down to room temperature upon CH3OH absorption, but did not shift upon H2O absorption.

  14. Transporters involved in glucose and water absorption in the Dysdercus peruvianus (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae) anterior midgut.

    PubMed

    Bifano, Thaís D; Alegria, Thiago G P; Terra, Walter R

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about insect intestinal sugar absorption, in spite of the recent findings, and even less has been published regarding water absorption. The aim of this study was to shed light on putative transporters of water and glucose in the insect midgut. Glucose and water absorptions by the anterior ventriculus of Dysdercus peruvianus midgut were determined by feeding the insects with a glucose and a non-absorbable dye solution, followed by periodical dissection of insects and analysis of ventricular contents. Glucose absorption decreases glucose/dye ratios and water absorption increases dye concentrations. Water and glucose transports are activated (water 50%, glucose 33%) by 50 mM K(2)SO(4) and are inhibited (water 46%, glucose 82%) by 0.2 mM phloretin, the inhibitor of the facilitative hexose transporter (GLUT) or are inhibited (water 45%, glucose 35%) by 0.1 mM phlorizin, the inhibitor of the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter (SGLT). The results also showed that the putative SGLT transports about two times more water relative to glucose than the putative GLUT. These results mean that D. peruvianus uses a GLUT-like transporter and an SGLT-like transporter (with K(+) instead of Na(+)) to absorb dietary glucose and water. A cDNA library from D. peruvianus midgut was screened and we found one sequence homologous to GLUT1, named DpGLUT, and another to a sodium/solute symporter, named DpSGLT. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR studies revealed that DpGLUT and DpSGLTs mRNA were expressed in the anterior midgut, where glucose and water are absorbed, but not in fat body, salivary gland and Malpighian tubules. This is the first report showing the involvement of putative GLUT and SGLT in both water and glucose midgut absorption in insects. PMID:20570749

  15. Water absorption by secondary organic aerosol and its effect on inorganic aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric aerosol has generally been associated with its inorganic fraction. In this study, a group contribution method is used to predict the water absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Compared against growth measurements of mixed inorganic-organic particles, this method appears to provide a first-order approximation in predicting SOA water absorption. The growth of common SOA species is predicted to be significantly less than common atmospheric inorganic salts such as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl. Using this group contribution method as a tool in predicting SOA water absorption, an integrated modeling approach is developed combining available SOA and inorganic aerosol models to predict overall aerosol behavior. The effect of SOA on water absorption and nitrate partitioning between the gas and aerosol phases is determined. On average, it appears that SOA accounts for approximately 7% of total aerosol water and increases aerosol nitrate concentrations by approximately 10%. At high relative humidity and low SOA mass fractions, the role of SOA in nitrate partitioning and its contribution to total aerosol water is negligible. However, the water absorption of SOA appears to be less sensitive to changes in relative humidity than that of inorganic species, and thus at low relative humidity and high SOA mass fraction concentrations, SOA is predicted to account for approximately 20% of total aerosol water and a 50% increase in aerosol nitrate concentrations. These findings could improve the results of modeling studies where aerosol nitrate has often been underpredicted.

  16. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  17. INFLUENCE OF AQUEOUS ALUMINUM AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON MEASUREMENT OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is used to quantify the acid-base status of surface waters. Acidic waters have bean defined as having ANC values less than zero, and acidification is often quantified by decreases in ANC. Measured and calculated values of ANC generally agree, exce...

  18. Interrelation between the crystallinity of polysaccharides and water absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusov, A. N.; Prusova, S. M.; Radugin, M. V.; Zakharov, A. G.

    2014-05-01

    The maximum sorption of water and its vapors is calculated using experimental data from calorimetric and effusion studies of flax, wood, and cotton cellulose. X-day diffraction is used to determine the crystallinity of cellulose samples. The equations relating crystallinity ( X) with maximum sorption and the enthalpy of interaction between cellulose and water are presented. Experimental results and the literature data on water sorption by chitin, chitosan and other polysaccharides show that our equations for calculating crystallinity are correct.

  19. Water absorption in polyethylene under external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Bolton, K.; Ahlström, P.

    2007-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the solubility and structure of water in polyethylene in thermodynamic equilibrium with liquid water were performed in external fields ranging from 2×105to4×109V/m. For a given equilibrium temperature and pressure, the water solubility decreases at higher fields. This occurs since it is energetically favorable for water molecules to be in the pure water phase than in the polyethylene matrix at high field strengths, and results in an increased density in the water phase. However, fields relevant to high voltage conduction (in the absence of defects that can lead to large local field strengths) do not change the solubility. In addition, at large fields the number of water clusters decreases for all cluster sizes. The rate of decrease is highest for large clusters, and a larger fraction of water molecules exist as monomers in the polyethylene matrix at high fields. Large fields also cause alignment of the water molecules, which leads to more clusters with linear topologies and hence an increase in the cluster radius of gyration.

  20. Influence of meal composition on canine jejunal water and electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, J A; Zinner, M J; Bastidas, J A; Orandle, M S; Yeo, C J

    1992-02-01

    The absorption of water and electrolytes from the proximal jejunal lumen increases immediately after a meal. This meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in jejunal segments out of normal gastrointestinal continuity. This study was designed to characterize the jejunal absorptive response to a series of isovolumetric gavage-delivered stimuli. Twenty-five-centimeter canine proximal jejunal Thiry-Vella fistulas were constructed, and jejunal absorption studies (n = 66) were performed by luminal perfusion of the jejunal segments with an isotonic buffer containing 14C-labeled polyethylene glycol. Each study consisted of a 1-hour basal period, followed by a 3-hour experimental period. Nine groups were studied, each receiving one of the following isovolumetric stimuli delivered via the gavage route: water, 0.9% saline, mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol (150 mmol/L, 300 mmol/L, and 600 mmol/L). The water and 0.9% saline gavage groups showed no significant changes in integrated postprandial water and electrolyte absorption above basal. The isocaloric mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol groups all had significantly increased integrated postprandial jejunal water and electrolyte absorption above basal (P less than 0.05). These results indicate that a proabsorptive signal for meal-induced jejunal absorption originates from or distal to the stomach. Meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in response to nutrients of diverse composition and is also responsive to nonnutritive solutes such as mannitol. These findings support a new role for gastric or intestinal chemo- or osmo-receptors in stimulating the neurohumoral mechanisms that mediate meal-induced jejunal absorption. PMID:1732119

  1. Marination effects on water states and water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle with different color lightness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of four experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of marination on water states and water-holding capacity (WHC) of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle selected based on raw muscle color lightness. Boneless, skinless p. major were collected at 6-8 h postmortem from deboning li...

  2. Marination effects on water states and water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle with different color lightness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of marination on water states and water-holding capacity (WHC) of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle. Boneless, skinless p. major were collected 6-8 h postmortem from deboning lines at a commercial processing plant, and separated into light, ...

  3. Liquid water absorption and scattering effects in DOAS retrievals over oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Alvarado, L. M. A.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Spectral effects of liquid water are present in absorption (differential optical absorption spectroscopy - DOAS) measurements above the ocean and, if insufficiently removed, may interfere with trace gas absorptions, leading to wrong results. Currently available literature cross sections of liquid water absorption are provided in coarser resolution than DOAS applications require, and vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is mostly not considered, or is compensated for using simulated pseudo cross sections from radiative transfer modeling. During the ship-based TransBrom campaign across the western Pacific in October 2009, MAX-DOAS (Multi-AXis differential optical absorption spectroscopy) measurements of light penetrating very clear natural waters were performed, achieving average underwater light paths of up to 50 m. From these measurements, the retrieval of a correction spectrum (H2Ocorr) is presented, compensating simultaneously for insufficiencies in the liquid water absorption cross section and broad-banded VRS structures. Small-banded structures caused by VRS were found to be very efficiently compensated for by the intensity offset correction included in the DOAS fit. No interference between the H2Ocorr spectrum and phytoplankton absorption was found. In the MAX-DOAS tropospheric NO2 retrieval, this method was able to compensate entirely for all liquid water effects that decrease the fit quality, and performed better than using a liquid water cross section in combination with a simulated VRS spectrum. The decrease in the residual root mean square (rms) of the DOAS fit depends on the measurement's contamination with liquid water structures, and ranges from ≈ 30% for measurements slightly towards the water surface to several percent in small angles above the horizon. Furthermore, the H2Ocorr spectrum was found to prevent misfits of NO2 slant columns, especially for very low NO2 scenarios, and thus increases the reliability of the fit. In test fits on OMI satellite data, the H2Ocorr spectrum was found selectively above ocean surfaces, where it decreases the rms by up to ≈ 11 %.

  4. Determination of RW3-to-water mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio for absolute dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Hanlon, Peta M; Charles, Paul H

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of absorbed dose to water in a solid-phantom may require a conversion factor because it may not be radiologically equivalent to water. One phantom developed for the use of dosimetry is a solid water, RW3 white-polystyrene material by IBA. This has a lower mass-energy absorption coefficient than water due to high bremsstrahlung yield, which affects the accuracy of absolute dosimetry measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of mass-energy absorption coefficient ratios, relative to water, from measurements in plastic water and RW3 with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (6 and 10 MV photon beams) as well as Monte Carlo modeling in BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. From this, the solid-phantom-to-water correction factor was determined for plastic water and RW3. PMID:21960410

  5. A nonisothermal emissivity and absorptivity formulation for water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Downey, P.

    1986-07-01

    This study introduces nonisothermal H2O emissivity (E) and absorptivity (A) formulations for the troposphere and the stratosphere. The nonisothermal effects arise from the wavelength integration of the Planck function, evaluated at the emitting level temperature (Te), with the monochromatic absorption evaluated at the temperature of the absorbing path (Tp). In general, Te and Tp can differ by as much as 20-50 K in the atmosphere. Most of the published emissivities are essentially isothermal emissivities. We formulate a nonisothermal emissivity that satisfies the constraints posed by the monochromatic form of the transfer equation for a nonisothermal atmosphere. The new formulations employ continuous analytical expressions for E and A that retain the following H2O radiative properties: the asymptotic properties at small (≈0) and large (∞) pathlengths; temperature dependence of line parameters; nonisothermal effects; the e- and p-type continuum in the 500-1200 cm-1 region; and the overlap of the e-type continuum with the H2O line absorption. The E and A expressions are derived from a set of reference 5 cm-1 narrow-band calculations for homogeneous atmospheres. When applied to the inhomogeneous atmosphere, including arctic, mid-latitude, tropics, and antarctic atmospheres, the cooling rates from 0 to 40 km computed from the emissivity approach agree within 3% of those from the narrow-band calculations; the surface downflux and the upflux at 50 km agree within 1.5%. A major fraction (>½) of these small errors are due to the strong-line approximation employed in the emissivity model for the 0-800 cm-1 and the 1200-2200 cm-1 regions, and the emissivity approach itself introduces less than a 1% error in the fluxes. The excellent agreement with the narrow-band calculations essentially verifies the nonisothermal emissivity approach proposed here. We also show that emissivities, fluxes, and cooling rates computed by narrow-band models depend very strongly on the spectral resolution adopted in the model for computing transmittances. Thus the spectral resolution in the narrow-band model is an arbitrary parameter. Furthermore, by comparing the narrow-band model fluxes with line-by-line (LBL) calculations we conclude that the 5 cm-1 resolution model underestimates atmospheric opacity due to inadequate treatment of the far wing opacity of lines. We employ a simple continuum-type opacity in our emissivity scheme to bring the present nonisothermal emissivity scheme into excellent agreement with available state-of-the-art LBL calculations.

  6. Grapevine water absorption in different soils. A spatio-temporal analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillante, Luca; Bois, Benjamin; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Hillslope vineyards show complex water dynamics between soil and plants. To gain further insight of this relationship, 8 grapevine plots were monitored during two vintages (2011-2013), on Corton Hill, Burgundy, France. Grapevine water status was monitored weekly by surveying water potential, and at harvest, using δ13C analysis of grape juice. Soil volumetric humidity was also measured weekly, using TDR probes. A pedotransfer function was developed to transform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) into Soil Volume Water and therefore to spatialise and describe variations in space and time in the Fraction of Transpirable Soil Water (FTSW). During the two years of monitoring, grapevines experienced great variation in water status, which ranged from low to substantial water deficit. With this freshly developed method, it was possible to observe differences in water absorption pattern by roots, in different soils, and at different depth. Great heterogeneity was observed, both laterally and vertically in grapevine water absorption. The contribution of each soil region to plant water status varies according to grapevine water status. It is different between day and night and depends from soil characteristics. It is to our knowledge the first time that water absorption by grapevine is revealed in space (2D) and time, and has therefore allowed a deeper comprehension of plant and soil dynamics in grapevine.

  7. On the relative absorption strengths of water vapour in the blue wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, J.; Pöhler, D.; Tschritter, J.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-10-01

    In recent updates of the HITRAN water vapour H2O spectroscopic compilation covering the blue spectral region (here: 394-480 nm) significant changes for the absorption bands at 416 and 426 nm were reported. In order to investigate the consistency of the different cross-sections calculated from these compilations, H2O vapour column density ratios for different spectral intervals were retrieved from long-path and multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements. We observed a significant improvement of the DOAS evaluation when using the updated HITRAN water vapour absorption cross-sections for the calculation of the reference spectra. In particular the magnitudes of the residual spectra as well as the fit errors were reduced. However, we also found that the best match between measurement and model is reached when the absorption cross-section of groups of lines are scaled by factors ranging from 0.5 to 1.9, suggesting that the HITRAN water vapour absorption compilation still needs significant corrections. For this spectral region we present correction factors for HITRAN 2009, HITRAN 2012, HITEMP and BT2 derived from field measurements. Additionally, upper limits for water vapour absorption in the UV-A range from 330 to 390 nm are given.

  8. On the relative absorption strengths of water vapour in the blue wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, J.; Pöhler, D.; Tschritter, J.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-06-01

    In recent updates of the HITRAN water vapour H2O spectroscopic compilation covering the blue spectral region (here: 394-480 nm) significant changes for the absorption bands at 416 and 426 nm were reported. In order to investigate the consistency of the different cross-sections calculated from these compilations, H2O vapour column density ratios for different spectral intervals were retrieved from Long-path and Multi-Axis - Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements. We observed a significant improvement of the DOAS evaluation when using the updated HITRAN water vapour absorption cross-sections for the calculation of the reference spectra. In particular the magnitudes of the residual spectra as well as the fit errors were reduced. However we also found that the best match between measurement and model is reached when the absorption cross-section of groups of lines are scaled by factors ranging from 0.5 and 1.9, suggesting that the HITRAN water vapour absorption compilation still needs significant corrections. For this spectral region we present correction factors for HITRAN 2009, HITRAN 2012, HITEMP and BT2 derived from field measurements. Additionally, upper limits for water vapour absorption in the UV-A range from 330-390 nm are given.

  9. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  10. Computer simulation and optimization of ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    The ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is attracting increasing research interests, since the system can be powered by waste thermal energy, thus avoiding using ozone-depletion refrigerants and reducing demand on electricity supply. In the article, a mathematical model coupled with detailed equations for thermodynamic properties of an ammonia-water mixture is described. A computer simulation software based on the model is developed. With the software, the performance characteristics of ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems are analyzed, and detailed optimum operation maps for the systems are presented. These maps can be used as guides in choosing operating conditions for designing such systems or for existing systems.

  11. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  12. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  13. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  14. Easy preparation of dietary fiber with the high water-holding capacity from food sources.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Eiji; Murakami, Kazumi; Kurita, Osamu

    2005-03-01

    Dietary fibers were prepared as alkali- and acid-insoluble fractions with chemical phosphorylation from Tossa jute (Corchorus olitorius), defatted soybean (Glycine max), and Shiitake (Lentinula edodes). The dietary fiber fractions treated with alkaline solution containing sodium metaphosphate had the lower protein content and higher total dietary fiber content than those of the preparations without phosphorylation. Alkaline extraction followed by phosphorylation led to a 1.5-fold increase in the water holding capacity of dietary fiber compared with no phosphorylation, whereas the binding capacity to bile acids of dietary fiber was almost the same. The alkali- and acid-insoluble extraction with phosphorylation provided an efficient preparation of water-insoluble dietary fiber with high-water holding capacity from various food sources. PMID:15898355

  15. Modeling water resources as a constraint in electricity capacity expansion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R. L.; Macknick, J.; Cohen, S.; Tidwell, V. C.; Woldeyesus, T.; Martinez, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, the electric power sector is the largest withdrawer of freshwater in the nation. The primary demand for water from the electricity sector is for thermoelectric power plant cooling. Areas likely to see the largest near-term growth in population and energy usage, the Southwest and the Southeast, are also facing freshwater scarcity and have experienced water-related power reliability issues in the past decade. Lack of water may become a barrier for new conventionally-cooled power plants, and alternative cooling systems will impact technology cost and performance. Although water is integral to electricity generation, it has long been neglected as a constraint in future electricity system projections. Assessing the impact of water resource scarcity on energy infrastructure development is critical, both for conventional and renewable energy technologies. Efficiently utilizing all water types, including wastewater and brackish sources, or utilizing dry-cooling technologies, will be essential for transitioning to a low-carbon electricity system. This work provides the first demonstration of a national electric system capacity expansion model that incorporates water resources as a constraint on the current and future U.S. electricity system. The Regional Electricity Deployment System (ReEDS) model was enhanced to represent multiple cooling technology types and limited water resource availability in its optimization of electricity sector capacity expansion to 2050. The ReEDS model has high geographic and temporal resolution, making it a suitable model for incorporating water resources, which are inherently seasonal and watershed-specific. Cooling system technologies were assigned varying costs (capital, operations and maintenance), and performance parameters, reflecting inherent tradeoffs in water impacts and operating characteristics. Water rights supply curves were developed for each of the power balancing regions in ReEDS. Supply curves include costs and availability of freshwater (surface and groundwater) and alternative water resources (municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater). In each region, a new power plant must secure sufficient water rights for operation before being built. Water rights constraints thus influence the type of power plant, cooling system, or location of new generating capacity. Results indicate that the aggregate national generating capacity by fuel type and associated carbon dioxide emissions change marginally with the inclusion of water rights. Water resource withdrawals and consumption, however, can vary considerably. Regional water resource dynamics indicate substantial differences in the location where power plant-cooling system technology combinations are built. These localized impacts highlight the importance of considering water resources as a constraint in the electricity sector when evaluating costs, transmission infrastructure needs, and externalities. Further scenario evaluations include assessments of how climate change could affect the availability of water resources, and thus the development of the electricity sector.

  16. Deriving in situ phytoplankton absorption for bio-optical productivity models in turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar; Bergmann, Trisha; Glenn, Scott; Orrico, Cristina; Moline, Mark

    2004-07-01

    As part of Hyperspectral Coupled Ocean Dynamics Experiment, a high-resolution hydrographic and bio-optical data set was collected from two cabled profilers at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO). Upwelling- and downwelling-favorable winds and a buoyant plume from the Hudson River induced large changes in hydrographic and optical structure of the water column. An absorption inversion model estimated the relative abundance of phytoplankton, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and detritus, as well as the spectral exponential slopes of CDOM and detritus from in situ WET Labs nine-wavelength absorption/attenuation meter (ac-9) absorption data. Derived optical weights were proportional to the parameter concentrations and allowed for their absorptions to be calculated. Spectrally weighted phytoplankton absorption was estimated using modeled spectral irradiances and the phytoplankton absorption spectra inverted from an ac-9. Derived mean spectral absorption of phytoplankton was used in a bio-optical model estimating photosynthetic rates. Measured radiocarbon uptake productivity rates extrapolated with water mass analysis and the bio-optical modeled results agreed within 20%. This approach is impacted by variability in the maximum quantum yield (ϕmax) and the irradiance light-saturation parameter (Ek(PAR)). An analysis of available data shows that ϕmax variability is relatively constrained in temperate waters. The variability of Ek(PAR) is greater in temperate waters, but based on a sensitivity analysis, has an overall smaller impact on water-column-integrated productivity rates because of the exponential decay of light. This inversion approach illustrates the utility of bio-optical models in turbid coastal waters given the measurements of the bulk inherent optical properties.

  17. Intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hamid M.

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms and regulation of intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins under normal physiological conditions, and of the factors/conditions that affect and interfere with theses processes has been significantly expanded in recent years as a result of the availability of a host of valuable molecular/cellular tools. Although structurally and functionally unrelated, the water-soluble vitamins share the feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development, and that their deficiency leads to a variety of clinical abnormalities that range from anaemia to growth retardation and neurological disorders. Humans cannot synthesize water-soluble vitamins (with the exception of some endogenous synthesis of niacin) and must obtain these micronutrients from exogenous sources. Thus body homoeostasis of these micronutrients depends on their normal absorption in the intestine. Interference with absorption, which occurs in a variety of conditions (e.g. congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive system, intestinal disease/resection, drug interaction and chronic alcohol use), leads to the development of deficiency (and sub-optimal status) and results in clinical abnormalities. It is well established now that intestinal absorption of the water-soluble vitamins ascorbate, biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamin is via specific carrier-mediated processes. These processes are regulated by a variety of factors and conditions, and the regulation involves transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanisms. Also well recognized now is the fact that the large intestine possesses specific and efficient uptake systems to absorb a number of water-soluble vitamins that are synthesized by the normal microflora. This source may contribute to total body vitamin nutrition, and especially towards the cellular nutrition and health of the local colonocytes. The present review aims to outline our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins, their regulation, the cell biology of the carriers involved and the factors that negatively affect these absorptive events. PMID:21749321

  18. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F{sup -} and a Na{sup +} ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na{sup +} and F{sup -} ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity {Delta}C{sub p} stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na{sup +} ion, it decreases upon charging the F{sup -} ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q=-0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  19. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  20. Water vapor spectroscopy in the 815-nm wavelength region for Differential Absorption Lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique was first applied to the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles from airborne platforms in 1981. The successful interpretation of the lidar profiles relies strongly on an accurate knowledge of specific water vapor absorption line parameters: line strength, pressure broadening coefficient, pressure-induced shift coefficient and the respective temperature-dependence factors. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and is currently testing an autonomous airborne water vapor lidar system: LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment). This DIAL system uses a Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser seeded by a diode laser as a lidar transmitter. The tunable diode has been selected to operate in the 813-818 nm wavelength region. This 5-nm spectral interval offers a large distribution of strengths for temperature-insensitive water vapor absorption lines. In support of the LASE project, a series of spectroscopic measurements were conducted for the 16 absorption lines that have been identified for use in the LASE measurements. Prior to this work, the experimental data for this water vapor absorption band were limited - to our knowledge - to the line strengths and to the line positions.

  1. Sodium detection during the water absorption response in Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Kostinsky, S J; Miller, K; Stewart, C N

    2000-01-01

    Although taste in vertebrates is typically associated with specialized receptors in the lingual epithelium, Hoff and Hillyard reported that the toad, Bufo punctatus, is able to "taste" sodium with the abdominal skin. This was reflected in a differential behavioral response to hypertonic NaCl. The present study tests for the presence of such abdominal chemoreceptors in the frog Rana pipiens. The experiment was a five-condition design in which frogs were placed on filter paper saturated with: deionized water, 250 mM NaCl, 350 mM NaCl, 12.9 microM amiloride, or 350 mM NaCl + 12.9 microM amiloride. The time that the frogs remained on the test substrate before moving to a surface of deionized water was recorded. It was necessary to dehydrate the frogs to 80% of their body weight to elicit a behavioral response to the NaCl whereas dehydration to 90% of their body weight has been reported effective in Bufo punctatus. The frogs displayed significantly shorter mean times to move on both concentrations of NaCl compared to deionized water, with the shortest times occurring when 350 mM NaCl was used. Amiloride alone did not have an effect upon times to move to deionized water, but did significantly reduce the response to 350 mM NaCl. Movement to amiloride + 350 mM NaCl did not differ significantly from that to deionized water. The results indicate that Rana pipiens, like Bufo punctatus, have epithelial chemoreceptors for the detection of NaCl on hydrated surfaces and that these receptors, like those of mammals, are amiloride sensitive. PMID:10716547

  2. Foliar absorption of intercepted rainfall improves woody plant water status most during drought.

    PubMed

    Breshears, David D; McDowell, Nathan G; Goddard, Kelly L; Dayem, Katherine E; Martens, Scott N; Meyer, Clifton W; Brown, Karen M

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of rainfall in dryland ecosystems is intercepted by plant foliage and is generally assumed to evaporate to the atmosphere or drip onto the soil surface without being absorbed. We demonstrate foliar absorption of intercepted rainfall in a widely distributed, continental dryland, woody-plant genus: Juniperus. We observed substantial improvement in plant water status, exceeding 1.0 MPa water potential for drought-stressed plants, following precipitation on an experimental plot that excluded soil water infiltration. Experiments that wetted shoots with unlabeled and with isotopically labeled water confirmed that water potential responded substantially to foliar wetting, that these responses were not attributable to re-equilibration with other portions of the xylem, and that magnitude of response increased with water stress. Foliar absorption is not included in most ecological, hydrological, and atmospheric models; has implications for interpreting plant isotopic signatures; and not only supplements water acquisition associated with increases in soil moisture that follow large or repeated precipitation events, but also enables plants to bypass soil water uptake and benefit from the majority of precipitation events, which wet foliage but do not increase soil moisture substantially. Foliar absorption of intercepted water could be more important than previously appreciated, especially during drought when water stress is greatest. PMID:18376545

  3. Conformational Contribution to the Heat Capacity of Interacting System of Carbohydrate Polymer - Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2001-03-01

    Based on the measured heat capacities of amorphous, dry starch and starch with low concentration of water above the partial glass transition of starch, the calculated Cp has been estimated from its vibrational, external, and conformational contributions. The conformational part is evaluated from a fit of the experimental Cp of starch and starch-water, decreased by the vibrational and the external Cp to a one-dimensional Ising-type model for two discrete states, and stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy parameters. These differences above the glass transition are interpreted as contributions of different conformational heat capacities from interacting chains of carbohydrate with water. The vibrational contribution was calculated as the heat capacity contributions from group and skeletal vibrations. The external contribution was computed based on thermal expansivity and compressibility as a function of temperature from experimental data of the partial liquid state of both dry starch and starch-water. The calculated and experimental heat capacities of starch-water and dry starch are compared over the whole range of temperatures measurements from 8 to 490 K. NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DOE- AC05-00OR22725.

  4. Conformational Heat Capacity of Liquid Biodegradable Polymers in the Absence and Presence Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Nowak-Pyda, Elzbieta

    2007-03-01

    The conformational heat capacity of biodegradable polymers such as amorphous poly(lactic acid) PLA and starch with and without water have been evaluated from a fit of experimental data to a one-dimensional Ising-like model for two discrete states, characterized by parameters linked to stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy. For the starch-water system the additional changes in the conformational heat capacity arise from the interaction of the carbohydrate chains with water. The liquid heat capacities at constant pressure Cp, of amorphous PLA and partially liquid state of starch, starch-water have been computed as the sum of vibrational, external, and conformational contributions. The vibrational contribution was calculated as the heat capacity arising from group and skeletal vibrations. The external contribution was estimated from experimental data of the thermal expansivity and compressibility in the liquid state. The experimental liquid Cp agrees with these calculations to better than ±3%. The calculated liquid Cp with the solid Cp was employed in the quantitative thermal analysis of the experimental Cp of biodegradable polymer PLA, starch, and starch-water. Supported by European Union, grant (MIRG-CT-2006-036558), Cargill Dow LLC

  5. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  6. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahui; Fang, Xuliang; He, Yiliang; Jin, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditional chlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaks in the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose. Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditions on the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration, liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9% was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically found to be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammonia removal rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plant membrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatment plant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application. PMID:19143342

  7. Impact of MIE-Resonances on the Atmospheric Absorption of Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Kinne, S.; Nussenzveig, H.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Clouds strongly modulate radiative transfer processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Studies, which simulate bulk properties of clouds, such as absorption, require methods that accurately account for multiple scattering among individual cloud particles. Multiple scattering processes are well described by MIE-theory, if interacting particles have a spherical shape. This is a good assumption for water droplets. Thus, simulations for water clouds (especially for interactions with solar radiation) usually apply readily available MIE-codes. The presence of different drop-sizes, however, necessitates repetitive calculations for many sizes. The usual representation by a few sizes is likely to miss contributions from densely distributed, sharp resonances. Despite their usually narrow width, integrated over the entire size-spectrum of a cloud droplet distribution, the impact of missed resonances could add up. The consideration of these resonances tends to increase cloud extinction and cloud absorption. This mechanism for a larger (than by MIE-methods predicted) solar absorption has the potential to explain observational evidence of larger than predicted cloud absorption at solar wavelengths. The presentation will address the absorption impact of added resonances for typical properties of water clouds (e.g. drop size distributions, drop concentrations and cloud geometry). Special attention will be given to scenarios with observational evidence of law than simulated solar absorption; particularly if simultaneous measurements of cloud micro- and macrophysical properties are available.

  8. Hydraulic power capacity of water distribution networks in uncertain conditions of deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joshua I.; Lambert, James H.; Haimes, Yacov Y.

    1998-12-01

    Water distribution systems throughout the United States are in various and uncertain stages of deterioration. Large capital expenditures are needed for their maintenance, modernization, and revitalization. Failures of the systems to supply adequate flow and pressure are adverse to the long-term economic growth and prosperity of the nation. Modeling the uncertain capacity of the distribution network is essential to allocating limited resources to components requiring the most rehabilitation. Network capacity and reliability are related to the uncertain conditions of pipes in the system. Some approaches to measuring a hydraulic capacity have been based on specifying flow volume alone without accounting for pressure. This paper introduces the combining of requirements for volume and pressure in a single dimension, the hydraulic power. Next, the hydraulic power capacity is defined as the probability that there exists a feasible flow of hydraulic power in the water distribution network. The probabilistic assessment of hydraulic power capacity is demonstrated in a small example under the assumptions of (1) fixed, known maximum inflows (supply) and minimum outflows (demand), (2) uncertain capacities for hydraulic power in individual pipes, reflecting uncertain conditions of pipe decay and roughness, and (3) an optional operating rule corresponding to a fixed minimum total loss of power in the network.

  9. Low-Dimensional Water on Ru(0001)Model System for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, D

    2012-02-14

    We present an x-ray absorption spectroscopy results for fully broken to a complete H-bond network of water molecules on Ru(0001) by varying the morphology from isolated water molecules via two-dimensional clusters to a fully covered monolayer as probed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The sensitivity of x-ray absorption to the symmetry of H-bonding is further elucidated for the amino (-NH{sub 2}) group in glycine adsorbed on Cu(110) where the E-vector is parallel either to the NH donating an H-bond or to the non-H-bonded NH. The results give further evidence for the interpretation of the various spectral features of liquid water and for the general applicability of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze H-bonded systems.

  10. Low-Dimensional Water on Ru(0001); Model System for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, D.; Ogasawara, H.; Andersson, K.J.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Salmeron, M.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Nilsson, A.

    2009-05-11

    We present an x-ray absorption spectroscopy results for fully broken to a complete H-bond network of water molecules on Ru(0001) by varying the morphology from isolated water molecules via two-dimensional clusters to a fully covered monolayer as probed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The sensitivity of x-ray absorption to the symmetry of H-bonding is further elucidated for the amino (-NH{sub 2}) group in glycine adsorbed on Cu(110) where the E-vector is parallel either to the NH donating an H-bond or to the non-H-bonded NH. The results give further evidence for the interpretation of the various spectral features of liquid water and for the general applicability of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze H-bonded systems.

  11. [Study of high temperature water vapor concentration measurement method based on absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu-ying; Liu, Jian-guo; He, Jun-feng; He, Ya-bai; Zhang, Guang-le; Xu, Zhen-yu; Gang, Qiang; Wang, Liao; Yao, Lu; Yuan, Song; Ruan, Jun; Dai, Yun-hai; Kan, Rui-feng

    2014-12-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been developed to realize the real-time and dynamic measurement of the combustion temperature, gas component concentration, velocity and other flow parameters, owing to its high sensitivity, fast time response, non-invasive character and robust nature. In order to obtain accurate water vapor concentration at high temperature, several absorption spectra of water vapor near 1.39 μm from 773 to 1273 K under ordinary pressure were recorded in a high temperature experiment setup using a narrow band diode laser. The absorbance of high temperature absorption spectra was calculated by combined multi-line nonlinear least squares fitting method. Two water vapor absorption lines near 7154.35 and 7157.73 cm(-1) were selected for measurement of water vapor at high temperature. A model method for high temperature water vapor concentration was first proposed. Water vapor concentration from the model method at high temperature is in accordance with theoretical reasoning, concentration measurement standard error is less than 0.2%, and the relative error is less than 6%. The feasibility of this measuring method is verified by experiment. PMID:25881402

  12. Dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestfálová, Magda; Šafařík, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental base for the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of substances is the thermal equation of state and the dependence of some of the basic specific heat capacities on temperature. Dependence of isobaric specific heat capacity on the pressure can already be deduced from these relations. International standards of the properties of water and steam are based on the new scientific formulation IAPWS-95. The equation is in the form of Helmholtz dimensionless function with very much parameters. The aim of this paper is to design the simple dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature in the range in which the steam occurs in the atmospheric moist air.

  13. Mechanisms of guanylin action on water and ion absorption at different regions of seawater eel intestine.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masaaki; Wong, Marty K S; Takei, Yoshio

    2014-09-15

    Guanylin (GN) inhibited water absorption and short-circuit current (Isc) in seawater eel intestine. Similar inhibition was observed after bumetanide, and the effect of bumetanide was abolished by GN or vice versa, suggesting that both act on the same target, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC), which is a key player for the Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) transport system responsible for water absorption in marine teleost intestine. However, effect of GN was always greater than that of bumetanide: 10% greater in middle intestine (MI) and 40% in posterior intestine (PI) for Isc, and 25% greater in MI and 34% in PI for water absorption. After treatment with GN, Isc decreased to zero, but 20-30% water absorption still remained. The remainder may be due to the Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger and Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), since inhibitors for these transporters almost nullified the remaining water absorption. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed the presence of major proteins involved in water absorption; the NKCC2β and AQP1 genes whose expression was markedly upregulated after seawater acclimation. The SLC26A6 (anion exchanger) and NCCβ genes were also expressed in small amounts. Consistent with the inhibitors' effect, expression of NKCC2β was MI > PI, and that of NCCβ was MI < PI. The present study showed that GN not only inhibits the bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) transport system governed by NKCC2β, but also regulates unknown ion transporters different from GN-insensitive SLC26A6 and NCC. A candidate is cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel, as demonstrated in mammals, but its expression is low in eel intestine, and its role may be minor, as indicated by the small effect of its inhibitors. PMID:24990857

  14. Cd-Resistant Strains of B. cereus S5 with Endurance Capacity and Their Capacities for Cadmium Removal from Cadmium-Polluted Water

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huiqing; Wu, Qingping; Wu, Guojie; Gu, Qihui; Wei, Linting

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify Cd-resistant bacterial strains with endurance capacity and to evaluate their ability to remove cadmium ions from cadmium-polluted water. The Bacillus cereusS5 strain identified in this study had the closest genetic relationship with B. cereus sp. Cp1 and performed well in the removal of Cd2+ions from solution. The results showed that both the live and dead biomasses of the Cd2+-tolerant B. cereus S5 strain could absorb Cd2+ ions in solution but that the live biomass of the B. cereus S5 strain outperformed the dead biomass at lower Cd2+concentrations. An analysis of the cadmium tolerance genes of B. cereus S5 identified ATPase genes that were associated with cadmium tolerance and involved in the ATP pumping mechanism. The FTIR spectra revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on the pristine biomass and indicated that the cadmium ion removal ability was related to the structure of the strain. The maximum absorption capacity of the B. cereus S5 strain in viable spore biomass was 70.16 mg/g (dry weight) based on a pseudo-second-order kinetic model fit to the experimental data. The Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm adsorption models fit the cadmium ion adsorption data well, and the kinetic curves indicated that the adsorption rate was second-order. For Cd2+ concentrations (mg/L) of 1–109 mg/L, good removal efficiency (>80%) was achieved using approximately 3.48–10.3 g/L of active spore biomass of the B. cereus S5 strain. A cadmium-tolerant bacteria-activated carbon-immobilized column could be used for a longer duration and exhibited greater treatment efficacy than the control column in the treatment of cadmium-polluted water. In addition, a toxicity assessment using mice demonstrated that the biomass of the B. cereus S5 strain and its fermentation products were non-toxic. Thus, the isolated B. cereus S5 strain can be considered an alternative biological adsorbent for use in emergency responses to severe cadmium pollution and in the routine treatment of trace cadmium pollution. PMID:27077388

  15. Simulation of Water Environmental Capacity and Pollution Load Reduction Using QUAL2K for Water Environmental Management

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruibin; Qian, Xin; Yuan, Xingcheng; Ye, Rui; Xia, Bisheng; Wang, Yulei

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, water quality degradation associated with rapid socio-economic development in the Taihu Lake Basin, China, has attracted increasing attention from both the public and the Chinese government. The primary sources of pollution in Taihu Lake are its inflow rivers and their tributaries. Effective water environmental management strategies need to be implemented in these rivers to improve the water quality of Taihu Lake, and to ensure sustainable development in the region. The aim of this study was to provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. In this study, the QUAL2K model for river and stream water quality was applied to predict the water quality and environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, which is a polluted tributary in the Taihu Lake Basin. The model parameters were calibrated by trial and error until the simulated results agreed well with the observed data. The calibrated QUAL2K model was used to calculate the water environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, and the water environmental capacities of CODCr NH3-N, TN, and TP were 17.51 t, 1.52 t, 2.74 t and 0.37 t, respectively. The results showed that the NH3-N, TN, and TP pollution loads of the studied river need to be reduced by 50.96%, 44.11%, and 22.92%, respectively to satisfy the water quality objectives. Thus, additional water pollution control measures are needed to control and reduce the pollution loads in the Hongqi River watershed. The method applied in this study should provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. PMID:23222206

  16. Evaluation of the purification capacity of nine portable, small-scale water purification devices.

    PubMed

    Hörman, A; Rimhanen-Finne, R; Maunula, L; von Bonsdorff, C H; Rapala, J; Lahti, K; Hänninen, M L

    2004-01-01

    A test was performed to evaluate the microbial and chemical purification capacity of nine portable, small-scale water purification filter devices with production capacity less than 100 L/h. The devices were tested for simultaneous removal capacity of bacteria (cultured Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae), enteric protozoans (formalin-stored Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts), viral markers (F-RNA bacteriophages) and microcystins produced by toxic cyanobacterial cultures. In general, the devices tested were able to remove bacterial contaminants by 3.6-6.9 log10 units from raw water. Those devices based only on filtration through pores 0.2-0.4 microm or larger failed in viral and chemical purification. Only one device, based on reverse osmosis, was capable of removing F-RNA phages at concentrations under the detection limit and microcystins by 2.5 log10. The present study emphasised the need for evaluation tests of water purification devices from the public safety and HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) points of view. Simultaneous testing for various pathogenic/indicator microbes and microcystins was shown to be a useful and practical way to obtain essential data on actual purification capacity of commercial small-scale drinking-water filters. PMID:15318506

  17. 21 CFR 130.12 - General methods for water capacity and fill of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General methods for water capacity and fill of containers. 130.12 Section 130.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD STANDARDS: GENERAL General Provisions § 130.12...

  18. Water holding capacity and evaporative loss from organic bedding materials used in livestock facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical and chemical characteristics of organic bedding materials determine how well they will absorb and retain moisture and may influence the environment in livestock facilities where bedding is used. The objective of this study was to determine water holding capacity (WHC) and rate of evaporativ...

  19. 21 CFR 130.12 - General methods for water capacity and fill of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section 401 of the act: (a) The term general method for water capacity of containers means the following method: (1) In the case of a container with lid attached by double seam, cut out the lid without removing... from the weight found in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. The difference shall be considered to be...

  20. Effect of deboning time and cold storage on water-holding capacity of chicken breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) is a very important qualitative characteristic of meat and directly affects the yield of further processed meat and consumer acceptance of bagged pre-packaged fresh meat. Boneless skinless chicken breast meat for further processing and consumer usage is commonly deboned...

  1. Landscape influences on soil nitrogen supply and water holding capacity for irrigated corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water and nitrogen (N) supply to a crop can interact throughout the growing season to influence yield potential. The increasing availability of variable rate irrigation systems to growers in irrigated regions, along with existing capacity for variable rate fertilization, provides the opportunity for...

  2. Role of protein solubility in water-holding capacity of broiler breast meat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role muscle protein denaturation plays in determining water-holding capacity (WHC) in broiler breast meat is not well understood. Alterations in muscle protein solubility due to postmortem pH and temperature decline can be used as indicators of protein denaturation. In order to determine the i...

  3. Relationship between water-holding capacity and protein denaturation in broiler breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between protein denaturation and water-holding capacity (WHC) attributes in broiler breast meat. Boneless skinless breast fillets (n=72) were collected from a commercial processing plant at 2 h postmortem and segregated into low-WHC and ...

  4. Water-holding capacity and protein denatunation in broiler breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of protein denaturation on water-holding capacity (WHC) in broiler breast meat. Breast fillets were collected at 2 h postmortem and segregated into two groups (low-WHC and high-WHC) based on pH and color. Protein solubility was measured at 6 and 24...

  5. [Actinobacteria and their odor-producing capacities in a surface water in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Bai, Xiao-hui; Lu, Ning; Wang, Xian-yun; Zhang, Yong-hui; Wu, Pan-cheng; Guo, Xin-chi

    2014-10-01

    The odor in raw water is one of the main sources of odor in drinking water. The occurrence of actinobacteria and their odor producing capacities in a reservoir in.Shanghai were investigated. Gauze's medium and membrane filtration were used for actinobacteria isolation. Through combined methods of 16S rRNA sequencing, colony and hyphae morphology, carbon source utilization, physiological and biochemical characteristics, 40 strains of actinobacteria were identified from the reservoir. Results showed that there were 38 Streptomyces, an Aeromicrobium and a Pseudonocardia. Liquid culture medium and the real reservoir water were used to test the odor producing capacity of these 40 strains of actinobacteria, and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and high resolution gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) were used to analyze the odor compounds 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin (GSM) in the fermentation liquor. The test results showed that, the odor-producing capacities of these actinobacteria in different fermentation media showed different variation trends, even within the genera Streptomyces. The odor-producing capacity of actinobacteria in the liquid culture medium could not represent their states in the reservoir water or their actual odor contribution to the aquatic environment. PMID:25693381

  6. ESTIMATING PLANT-AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY FOR CLAYPAN LANDSCAPES USING APPARENT ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within-field variability of plant available water (PAW) capacity is useful information for site-specific management, but is expensive to assess using traditional measurements. For Missouri claypan soils, relationships between soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and topsoil thickness have bee...

  7. Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy to predict water holding capacity in broiler breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible/Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis/NIRS) was examined as a tool for rapidly determining water holding capacity (WHC) in broiler breast meat. Both partial least squares (PLS) and principal component analysis (PCA) models were developed to relate Vis/NIRS spectra of 85 broiler breast meat sample...

  8. Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy to predict pale broiler breast meat by measuring water holding capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible/Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis/NIRS) was examined as a tool for rapidly determining water holding capacity (WHC) in broiler breast meat. Reflectance measurements for 85 breast filets were recorded over the 400 to 2498 nm wavelength range at 0.5 nm intervals and 32 scans. Chemometric analys...

  9. Intergrating cavity absorption meter measurements of dissolved substances and suspended particles in ocean water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robin M.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Fry, Edward S.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new device to measure the separate contributions to the spectral absorption coefficient due to a pure liquid, due to the particles suspended in it, and due to the substances dissolved in it. This device, the Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter (ICAM), is essentially independent of scattering effects in the sample. In April 1993, a prototype of the ICAM was field tested on board the research vessel USNS Bartlett. A major part of the cruise track included criss-crossing the area where the Mississippi flows into the Gulf of Mexico at various ranges from the mouth of the river; thus samples were collected from areas of blue, green, and brown/black water. We evaluated 35 seawater samples collected with 5-l Niskin bottles from 22 locations to determine absorption spectra (380-700 nm) of suspended particles and dissolved substances (gelbstoff). Results validate the ICAM as a viable tool for marine optical absorption research. Gelbstoff absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.024 to 0.603 m -1. Over the spectral region 380→560 nm, gelbstoff absorption by each of the samples could be accurately fit to a decaying exponential. The particle absorption spectra are generally characteristic of those of phytoplankton and exhibit a local maximum at 430-440 nm. Absorption values at 432.5 nm ranged from ˜zero to ˜1.0 m -1. Some samples with moderate particulate absorption, however, did not show the characteristic local maximum of phytoplankton in the blue and instead resembled the characteristic decaying exponential of detritus with a shape similar to that observed in the gelbstoff. The ratio of gelbstoff to particulate absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.46 to 152.

  10. Potential Water Retention Capacity as a Factor in Silage Effluent Control: Experiments with High Moisture By-product Feedstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Okine Abdul; Masaaki, Hanada; Yimamu, Aibibula; Meiji, Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    The role of moisture absorptive capacity of pre-silage material and its relationship with silage effluent in high moisture by-product feedstuffs (HMBF) is assessed. The term water retention capacity which is sometimes used in explaining the rate of effluent control in ensilage may be inadequate, since it accounts exclusively for the capacity of an absorbent incorporated into a pre-silage material prior to ensiling, without consideration to how much the pre-silage material can release. A new terminology, ‘potential water retention capacity’ (PWRC), which attempts to address this shortcoming, is proposed. Data were pooled from a series of experiments conducted separately over a period of five years using laboratory silos with four categories of agro by-products (n = 27) with differing moisture contents (highest 96.9%, lowest 78.1% in fresh matter, respectively), and their silages (n = 81). These were from a vegetable source (Daikon, Raphanus sativus), a root tuber source (potato pulp), a fruit source (apple pomace) and a cereal source (brewer’s grain), respectively. The pre-silage materials were adjusted with dry in-silo absorbents consisting wheat straw, wheat or rice bran, beet pulp and bean stalks. The pooled mean for the moisture contents of all pre-silage materials was 78.3% (±10.3). Silage effluent decreased (p<0.01), with increase in PWRC of pre-silage material. The theoretical moisture content and PWRC of pre-silage material necessary to stem effluent flow completely in HMBF silage was 69.1% and 82.9 g/100 g in fresh matter, respectively. The high correlation (r = 0.76) between PWRC of ensiled material and silage effluent indicated that the latter is an important factor in silage-effluent relationship. PMID:25049587

  11. Leaf Photosynthetic Rate of Tropical Ferns Is Evolutionarily Linked to Water Transport Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kun-Fang; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Jiao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Ferns usually have relatively lower photosynthetic potential than angiosperms. However, it is unclear whether low photosynthetic potential of ferns is linked to leaf water supply. We hypothesized that there is an evolutionary association of leaf water transport capacity with photosynthesis and stomatal density in ferns. In the present study, a series of functional traits relating to leaf anatomy, hydraulics and physiology were assessed in 19 terrestrial and 11 epiphytic ferns in a common garden, and analyzed by a comparative phylogenetics method. Compared with epiphytic ferns, terrestrial ferns had higher vein density (Dvein), stomatal density (SD), stomatal conductance (gs), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), but lower values for lower epidermal thickness (LET) and leaf thickness (LT). Across species, all traits varied significantly, but only stomatal length (SL) showed strong phylogenetic conservatism. Amax was positively correlated with Dvein and gs with and without phylogenetic corrections. SD correlated positively with Amax, Dvein and gs, with the correlation between SD and Dvein being significant after phylogenetic correction. Leaf water content showed significant correlations with LET, LT, and mesophyll thickness. Our results provide evidence that Amax of the studied ferns is linked to leaf water transport capacity, and there was an evolutionary association between water supply and demand in ferns. These findings add new insights into the evolutionary correlations among traits involving carbon and water economy in ferns. PMID:24416265

  12. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy of water vapor in a scramjet combustor.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Alan D; Houwing, A Frank P

    2005-11-01

    A sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was constructed for time-resolved temperature and water vapor concentration measurements in a scramjet combustor. The sensor probed two absorption lines near 1390 nm with two time-multiplexed lasers used to measure temperature and water vapor concentration at up to 20 kHz. A demonstration experiment was performed in the supersonic, expanding exhaust region of the combustor, showing the measurement to be repeatable, able to resolve temporal trends during tunnel operation, and sensitive to changes in combustor operating conditions. PMID:16270554

  13. Effective global soil profile depth and water holding capacity inferred from GRACE time-variable gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reager, J. T., II; Lo, M. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil depth and soil water holding capacity are fundamental controls on land surface processes and terrestrial ecology, and are critically important in understanding links between water and climate globally. However, field surveys of soil water below 1-meter are sparse, and sub-surface water storage variability is nearly impossible to monitor over a global domain. NASA's GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission has been observing global terrestrial water storage anomalies at consistent, monthly intervals over a longer than 10-year record, allowing us to measure dynamic soil water storage as a component of that signal. Here, we combine 1-degree scaled GRACE water storage observations with estimates of surface and snow water storage to derive a global, sub-surface water storage anomaly time series with uncertainty. We convolve this result with global maps of soil porosity from the FAO/UNESCO Harmonized Soil Database and a simple model of soil saturation to produce an observation-based estimate of effective soil profile depth with global coverage. Our results show 1-degree global soil storage requirements typically ranging between 2 to 100 cm, for a total terrestrial soil water storage capacity of roughly 15x103 km3. The observed storage indicates effective soil depths between 0.5 and 10 meters, with a global mean value of 1.5 +/- 0.5 meters. Effective soil depths are correlated with land cover type, temperature and precipitation. Comparisons with previous statistical and empirical methods suggest greater capacity and greater depth using the GRACE-based method. This methodology offers a new tool for ongoing monitoring of global soils, and has implications for hydrological fluxes in Earth System models which usually assume a globally uniform soil depth.

  14. Thermodynamic optimization of a solar system for cogeneration of water heating/purification and absorption cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovsapian, Zohrob O.

    This dissertation presents a contribution to understanding the behavior of solar powered air conditioning and refrigeration systems with a view to determining the manner in which refrigeration rate; mass flows, heat transfer areas, and internal architecture are related. A cogeneration system consisting of a solar concentrator, a cavity-type receiver, a gas burner, and a thermal storage reservoir is devised to simultaneously produce water heating/purification and cooling (absorption refrigerator system). A simplified mathematical model, which combines fundamental and empirical correlations, and principles of classical thermodynamics, mass and heat transfer, is developed. An experimental setup was built to adjust and validate the numerical results obtained with the mathematical model. The proposed model is then utilized to simulate numerically the system transient and steady state response under different operating and design conditions. A system global optimization for maximum performance (or minimum exergy destruction) in the search for minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum system second law efficiency is performed with low computational time. Appropriate dimensionless groups are identified and the results presented in normalized charts for general application. The numerical results show that the three way maximized system second law efficiency, etaII,max,max,max, occurs when three system characteristic mass flow rates are optimally selected in general terms as dimensionless heat capacity rates, i.e., (Psisps , Psiwxwx, PsiHs)opt ≅ (1.43, 0.17, 0.19). The minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum second law efficiencies found with respect to the optimized operating parameters are sharp and, therefore important to be considered in actual design. As a result, the model is expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design, and optimization of solar energy systems in the context of distributed power generation.

  15. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa

    2014-04-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O-H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  16. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa; Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa; Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP

    2014-04-28

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O–H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  17. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  18. Capacity building in water demand management as a key component for attaining millennium development goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Forster, Laura; Arntzen, Jaap

    Successful water demand management (WDM) implementation as a component of integrated water resource management (IWRM) can play a significant role in the alleviation of poverty through more efficient use of available water resources. The urban population in Southern African cities is characterised by so-called ‘water poor’ communities who typically expend a high percentage of their household income on poor quality water. Usually they have no access to an affordable alternative source. Although WDM as a component of IWRM is not a panacea for poverty, it can help alleviate poverty by facilitating water services management by municipal water supply agencies (MWSAs) in the region. WDM is a key strategy for achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs) and, as such, should be given due attention in the preparation of national IWRM and water efficiency plans. Various studies in the Southern African region have indicated that capacity building is necessary for nations to develop IWRM and water-use efficiency plans to meet the targets set out in the MDGs. WDM education and training of water professionals and end-users is particularly important in developing countries, which are resource and information-access poor. In response to these findings, The World Conservation Union (IUCN) and its consulting partners, the Training and Instructional Design Academy of South Africa (TIDASA), and Centre for Applied Research (CAR) designed, developed and presented a pilot WDM Guideline Training Module for MWSAs as part of Phase II of IUCN’s Southern Africa regional WDM project. Pilot training was conducted in July 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia for a group of 36 participants involved in municipal water supply from nine Southern African countries. This paper looks at the links between building the capacity of professionals, operational staff and other role-players in the municipal water supply chain to implement WDM as part of broader IWRM strategies, and the subsequent potential for poverty relief resulting from more effective, efficient and equitable use and allocation of municipal water supplies.

  19. Near-infrared diode laser absorption diagnostic for temperature and water vapor in a scramjet combustor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jonathan T C; Rieker, Gregory B; Jeffries, Jay B; Gruber, Mark R; Carter, Campbell D; Mathur, Tarun; Hanson, Ronald K

    2005-11-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of gas temperature and water concentration were made at the exit of a model scramjet combustor fueled on JP-7. Multiplexed, fiber-coupled, near-infrared distributed feedback lasers were used to probe three water vapor absorption features in the 1.34-1.47 microm spectral region (2v1 and vl + v3 overtone bands). Ratio thermometry was performed using direct-absorption wavelength scans of isolated features at a 4-kHz repetition rate, as well as 2f wavelength modulation scans at a 2-kHz scan rate. Large signal-to-noise ratios demonstrate the ability of the optimally engineered optical hardware to reject beam steering and vibration noise. Successful measurements were made at full combustion conditions for a variety of fuel/air equivalence ratios and at eight vertical positions in the duct to investigate spatial uniformity. The use of three water vapor absorption features allowed for preliminary estimates of temperature distributions along the line of sight. The improved signal quality afforded by 2f measurements, in the case of weak absorption, demonstrates the utility of a scanned wavelength modulation strategy in such situations. PMID:16270559

  20. Water vapor self-continuum absorption in near-infrared windows derived from laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptashnik, Igor V.; McPheat, Robert A.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin M.; Williams, R. Gary

    2011-08-01

    In most near-infrared atmospheric windows, absorption of solar radiation is dominated by the water vapor self-continuum, and yet there is a paucity of measurements in these windows. We report new laboratory measurements of the self-continuum absorption at temperatures between 293 and 472 K and pressures from 0.015 to 5 atm in four near-infrared windows between 1 and 4 ?m (10000-2500 cm-1); the measurements are made over a wider range of wavenumbers, temperatures, and pressures than any previous measurements. They show that the self-continuum in these windows is typically one order of magnitude stronger than given in representations of the continuum widely used in climate and weather prediction models. These results are also not consistent with current theories attributing the self-continuum within windows to the far wings of strong spectral lines in the nearby water vapor absorption bands; we suggest that they are more consistent with water dimers being the major contributor to the continuum. The calculated global average clear-sky atmospheric absorption of solar radiation is increased by 0.75 W/m2 (which is about 1% of the total clear-sky absorption) by using these new measurements as compared to calculations with the MT_CKD-2.5 self-continuum model.

  1. Climate Change and Water Infrastructure in Central Asia: adaptation capacities and institutional challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, Iskandar; Rakhmatullaev, Shavkat

    2014-05-01

    The paper discusses vulnerability areas of water sector in arid Central Asia due to climate change projections with particular focus on adaptation to sustainable operation of physical infrastructure capacities (from legal, institutional and technical aspects). Two types of technical installations are the main focus of this paper, i.e., electrical lift irrigation systems and water reservoirs. The first set of electrical lift infrastructure is strategic for delivering water to water users via pumps, diversion structures, vertical drainage facilities and groundwater boreholes; on the other hand, the primarily task of second set of structures is to accumulate the water resources for sectors of economy. In Central Asia, approximately, 20-50% of irrigation water is lifted, yet major of lift structures are in very poor technical conditions coupled with ever increasing of electricity tariffs. Furthermore, useful volumes capacities of water reservoirs are being severely diminished due to bio-physical geomorphologic processes, improper operational regimes and chronic financing for special in-house sedimentation surveys. Most importantly, the key argument is that irrigation sector should internalize its adaptation efforts, i.e., integrate renewable energy technologies, energy audit programs and lastly design comprehensive investment prioritization processes and programs. Otherwise, water sector will be at great risk for continued provision of fundamental services to the public, food security and industry

  2. Predicting inhomogeneous water absorption in an ionic diblock polymer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Daniel; Witten, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Fuel cells convert fuel directly into electrical power. Their performance depends on a permeable (yet strong) membrane to allow ion conduction (while preventing combustion). Anion-exchange membrane fuel-cells are especially economical to produce, but technological hurdles currently limit durability and OH- conductivity of the membrane. One solution to these problems is a diblock morphology. Layers of stiff hydrophobic polymer provide structure, while interspersed layers of polyelectrolyte provide avenues for conduction. Previously, little was known about the structure within the conducting layer. We adapted Scheutjens-Fleer polymer-brush theory to a lamellar geometry. The calculation tells where the polyelectrolytes congregate within a lamella, and hence how conduction occurs. This talk focuses on a new diblock material, PMB-PVBTMA. We show how the features of the material determine the intra-lamellar structure. We conclude that at low humidity, the bulkiness of PVBTMA causes it to adopt a near-uniform distribution within the conducting block. At high humidity, however, a phase separation may induce abrupt water channels. Understanding the architecture within the conducting layer will help guide research into better anion-exchange membranes materials. The authors would like to thank the Army Research Office for support of this research under the MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  3. Using a non-invasive stable isotope tracer to measure the absorption of water in humans.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rebecca J; Bluck, Leslie J C; Davies, Peter S W

    2004-01-01

    The development of solutions that prevent dehydration or promote adequate re-hydration play a vital role in preventing fatigue during exercise, however, the methods commonly used to assess the hydration ability of such solutions are invasive and often assess the components of absorption separately. This paper describes using a non-invasive deuterium tracer technique that assesses gastric emptying and intestinal absorption simultaneously to evaluate the uptake of water during rest and exercise. The kinetics of absorption are further examined by mathematical modelling of the data generated. For the rest group, 0.05 g/kg of body weight of deuterium, contained in gelatine capsules, was ingested with ordinary tap water and saliva samples were collected every 5 min for one hour while the subject remained seated. The deuterium was administered as above for the exercise group but sample collection was during one hour of exercise on a treadmill at 55% of the subject's maximum heart rate. The enrichment data for each subject were mathematically modelled and the parameters obtained were compared across groups using an independent samples t-test. Compared with the rest condition, the exercise group showed delayed absorption of water as indicated by significant differences for the modelling parameters t2, t1/2, maximum absorption rate and solution absorption amount at t1. Labelling with a deuterium tracer is a good measure of the relative rate ingested fluids are absorbed by the body. Mathematical modelling of the data generates rates of maximum absorption and allows calculation of the percentage of the solution that is absorbed at any given time during the testing period. PMID:15052581

  4. Studies of Water Absorption Behavior of Plant Fibers at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-05-01

    Moisture absorption of natural fiber plastic composites is one major concern in their outdoor applications. The absorbed moisture has many detrimental effects on the mechanical performance of these composites. A knowledge of the moisture diffusivity, permeability, and solubility is very much essential for the application of natural fibers as an excellent reinforcement in polymers. An effort has been made to study the water absorption behavior of some natural fibers such as bowstring hemp, okra, and betel nut at different temperatures to improve the long-term performance of composites reinforced with these fibers. The gain in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption was measured as a function of exposure time at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 340 K. The thermodynamic parameters of the sorption process, such as diffusion coefficients and corresponding activation energies, were estimated.

  5. Drought planning and water allocation: an assessment of local capacity in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Rebecca L; de Loë, Rob C; Kreutzwiser, Reid

    2004-10-01

    Water allocation systems are challenged by hydrologic droughts, which reduce available water supplies and can adversely affect human and environmental systems. To address this problem, drought management mechanisms have been instituted in jurisdictions around the world. Historically, these mechanisms have involved a crisis management or reactive approach. An important trend during the past decade in places such as the United States has been a shift to a more proactive approach, emphasizing drought preparedness and local involvement. Unfortunately, local capacity for drought planning is highly variable, with some local governments and organizations proving to be more capable than others of taking on new responsibilities. This paper reports on a study of drought planning and water allocation in the State of Minnesota. Factors facilitating and constraining local capacity for drought planning were identified using in-depth key informant interviews with state officials and members of two small Minnesota cities, combined with an analysis of pertinent documentation. A key factor contributing to the effectiveness of Minnesota's system is a water allocation system with explicit priorities during shortages, and provisions for restrictions. At the same time, the requirement that water suppliers create Public Water Supply Emergency Conservation Plans (PWSECP) clarifies the roles and responsibilities of key local actors. Unfortunately, the research revealed that mandated PWSECP are not always implemented, and that awareness of drought and drought planning measures in general may be poor at the local level. From the perspective of the two cities evaluated, factors that contributed to local capacity included sound financial and human resources, and (in some cases) effective vertical and horizontal linkages. This analysis of experiences in Minnesota highlights problems that can occur when senior governments establish policy frameworks that increase responsibilities at the local level without also addressing local capacity. PMID:15327844

  6. Water storage capacity of natural wetland depressions in the Devils Lake basin of North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludden, A.P.; Frink, D.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    Photogrammetric mapping techniques were used to derive the water storage capacities of natural wetland depressions other than lakes in the Devils Lake Basin of North Dakota. Results from sample quarter-section areas were expanded to the entire basin. Depressions in the Devils Lake Basin have a maximum storage capacity of nearly 811,000 cubic dekameters (657,000 acre-feet). The depressions store about 72 percent of the total runoff volume from a 2-year-frequency runoff and about 41 percent of the total runoff volume from a 100-year-frequency runoff.

  7. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  8. The local structure of protonated water from x-ray absorption and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, Matteo; Näslund, Lars-Ake; Edwards, David C; Wernet, Philippe; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Myneni, Satish; Ojamäe, Lars; Odelius, Michael; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2006-05-21

    We present a combined x-ray absorption spectroscopy/computational study of water in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions of varying concentration to address the structure and bonding of excess protons and their effect on the hydrogen bonding network in liquid water. Intensity variations and energy shifts indicate changes in the hydrogen bonding structure in water as well as the local structure of the protonated complex as a function of the concentration of protons. In particular, in highly acidic solutions we find a dominance of the Eigen form, H(3)O(+), while the proton is less localized to a specific water under less acidic conditions. PMID:16729826

  9. Radiation modification of water absorption of cassava starch by acrylic acid/acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, Suda; Chomsaksakul, Wararuk; Sonsuk, Manit

    2000-10-01

    Graft copolymerizations of acrylamide and/or acrylic acid onto cassava starch by a simultaneous irradiation technique using gamma-rays as the initiator were studied with regard to various parameters of importance: the monomer-to-cassava starch ratio, total dose (kGy), dose rate (kGy h -1), acrylamide-to-acrylic acid ratio, and the addition of nitric acid and maleic acid as the additives. Grafting parameters were determined in relation to the water absorption of the saponified graft copolymer. The water absorption of the saponified graft copolymer in salt and buffer solutions of different ionic strengths was also measured, from which the superabsorbent properties are found to be pH sensitive. The starch graft copolymers of acrylamide and acrylic acid give higher water absorption than the starch graft copolymers of either acrylamide or acrylic acid alone. The porosity of the saponified starch graft copolymers prepared by the acrylamide/acrylic acid ratios of 70:30 and 50:50 was much higher than the porosity of copolymers in terms of fine networks. Ionic strength and multi-oxidation states of the saline and buffer solutions markedly decreased the water absorption of the saponified cassava starch grafted superabsorbent polymers.

  10. Ultraviolet-visible absorptive features of water extractable and humic fractions of animal manure and compost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UV-vis spectroscopy is a useful tool for characterizing water extractable or humic fractions of natural organic matter (WEOM). Whereas the whole UV-visible spectra of these fractions are more or less featureless, the specific UV absorptivity at 254 and 280 nm as well as spectral E2/E3 and E4/E6 rat...

  11. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  12. TPS/PCL composite reinforced with treated sisal fibers: property, biodegradation and water-absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sisal fibers bleached with sodium-hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide treatment were incorporated in a thermoplastic starch;-polycaprolactone (TPS/PCL) blend via extrusion processing and examined for their property, biodegradability and water-absorption. Scanning electron microscopy revealed wel...

  13. State-of-the-Art Review on Crystallization Control Technologies for water/LiBr Absorption Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Abdelaziz, Omar; Kisari, Padmaja; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    The key technical barrier to using water/lithium bromide (LiBr) as the working fluid in aircooled absorption chillers and absorption heat-pump systems is the risk of crystallization when the absorber temperature rises at fixed evaporating pressure. This article reviews various crystallization control technologies available to resolve this problem: chemical inhibitors, heat and mass transfer enhancement methods, thermodynamic cycle modifications, and absorption system-control strategies. Other approaches, such as boosting absorber pressure and J-tube technology, are reviewed as well. This review can help guide future efforts to develop water/LiBr air-cooled absorption chillers and absorption heatpump systems.

  14. Water-controlled wealth of nations: Using Water Footprints to Estimate Nations Carrying Capacities and Demographic Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suweis, Samir; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Population growth is in general constrained by food production, which in turn depends on the access to water resources. At a country level, some populations use more water than they control because of their ability to import food and the virtual water required for its production. Here, we investigate the dependence of demographic growth on available water resources for exporting and importing nations. By quantifying the carrying capacity of nations based on calculations of the virtual water available through the food trade network, we point to the existence of a global water unbalance. We suggest that current export rates will not be maintained and consequently we question the long-run sustainability of the food trade system as a whole. Water rich regions are likely to soon reduce the amount of virtual water they export, thus leaving import-dependent regions without enough water to sustain their populations. We also investigate the potential impact of possible scenarios that might mitigate these effects through (1) cooperative interactions among nations whereby water rich countries maintain a tiny fraction of their food production available for export; (2) changes in consumption patterns; and (3) a positive feedback between demographic growth and technological innovations. We find that these strategies may indeed reduce the vulnerability of water-controlled societies.

  15. Wide absorption spectrum measuring methods by DFB-LDs in water vapor detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. N.; Chang, J.; Lian, J.; Wang, Q.; Lv, G. P.; Wang, W. J.; Liu, Z.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhang, S. S.; Wang, Z. L.; Jiang, S.; Zhu, C. G.; Wei, W.; Sun, B. N.

    2014-09-01

    Two measuring methods of the wide absorption spectrum by distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LDs) are presented in detecting the water vapor absorption line. One is the subsection scanning method, and it takes advantage of the wide spectrum tuning range by the temperature modulation and fast spectrum tuning speed by current modulation. Specifically, this method is realized by dividing a target spectral region into several sections which correspond to the specific temperature of DFB-LD, scanning every section by current modulation for hundreds times, and averaging the data to raise the signal to noise ratio (SNR), then combining all sections to get the whole spectrum. An accuracy of 10 ppmv had been obtained in the measurement of water vapor with a 10-cm path length by this method. Another is data fitting method, based on the absorption line-shape function; the absorption line can be described by fitting with partial measured data. The fitting absorption line was fitted well with the measured data, and the square of correlation coefficient (R-square) was no less than 0.99.

  16. Heat and Mass Diffusions in the Absorption of Water Vapor by Aqueous Solution of Lithium Bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Takao; Kurosaki, Yasuo; Nikai, Isao

    The recent development of absorption-type heat pump is highly essential from the viewpoint of extracting the effective energy from waste heat or solar energy. To increase the efficiency of energy conversion, it is important to improve the performance of absorbers. The objective of this paper is to obtain an increased understanding of the fine mechanisms of vapor absorption. A system combining holographic interferometry wity thermometry is adopted to observe the progress of one-dimensional water vapor absorption by aqueous solution of lithium bromide (LiBr) and also to measure the unsteady temperature and concentration distributions in the absorption process. The experiments are carried out under the condition that the solution surface is exposed to the saturated water vapor at reduced pressure, and the effects of LiBr mass concentration on absorption mechanism are examined in the concentration range 20-60 mass%. The interference fringes are analyzed to distinguish between the layers of heat conduction and mass diffusion. The temperature and concentration distributions thus determined experimentally are compared with numerical solutions obtained by the equations for unsteady heat conduction and mass diffusion taking into consideration the effect of heat by dilution, to give reasonable values of mass diffusivity hitherto remaining unknown. Especially in the range of 40-60 mass%, the mass diffusivity decreases extremely with the increase of mass concentration of LiBr and it falls down to 0.7-0.8×10-9 m2/s in case of 60 mass% solution.

  17. NASA's Contribution to Water Research, Applications and Capacity Building in the America's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, D. L.; Searby, N. D.; Doorn, B.; Lawford, R. G.; Entin, J. K.; Mohr, K. I.; Lee, C.; NASA International Water Team

    2013-05-01

    NASA's water research, applications and capacity building activities use satellites and models to contribute to regional water information and solutions for the Americas. Free and open exchange of Earth data observations and products helps engage and improve integrated observation networks and enables national and multi-national regional water cycle research and applications. NASA satellite and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data extending back over 50 years across a broad range of spatial (local to global) and temporal (hourly to decadal) scales and include many products that are available in near real time (see earthdata.nasa.gov). In addition, NASA's work in hydrologic predictions are valuable for: 1) short-term and hourly data that is critical for flood and landslide warnings; 2) mid-term predictions of days to weeks useful for reservoir planning and water allocation, and 3) long term seasonal to decadal forecasts helpful for agricultural and irrigation planning, land use planning, and water infrastructure development and planning. To further accomplish these objectives NASA works to actively partner with public and private groups (e.g. federal agencies, universities, NGO's, and industry) in the U.S. and internationally to ensure the broadest use of its satellites and related information and products and to collaborate with regional end users who know the regions and their needs best. Through these data, policy and partnering activities, NASA addresses numerous water issues including water scarcity, the extreme events of drought and floods, and water quality so critical to the Americas. This presentation will outline and describe NASA's water related research, applications and capacity building programs' efforts to address the Americas' critical water challenges. This will specifically include water activities in NASA's programs in Terrestrial Hydrology (e.g., land-atmosphere feedbacks and improved stream flow estimation), Water Resources (e.g., drought, snow-pack and agriculture projects), and Disasters (e.g., flooding and landslides), and Capacity Building (e.g., 'SERVIR' science visualizations and environmental monitoring). The presentation will also demonstrate how NASA is a major contributor to water tasks and activities in GEOSS (Global Earth Observing System of Systems) in the Americas as well as USGEO and the international GEO (Group on Earth Observations) activities and to global environmental change research.

  18. Impact of the hydraulic capacity of plants on water and carbon fluxes in tropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Boyce, Kevin

    2010-12-01

    Angiosperms (flowering plants) have higher transpirational capacities than any other plants. Here we use climate model simulation to test the hypothesis that the high transpirational capacity of angiosperms plays a unique role in the maintenance of tropical rainforest. Their elevated transpiration rates are shown to increase recycling of precipitation up to ˜300 mm/yr (˜20% of total precipitation) averaged over the whole of tropical South America and to increase the wet season duration over the Amazon basin. Transpiration triggers convection by increasing moisture in the boundary layer and thereby decreasing atmospheric stability. If the moisture content of the boundary layer is sufficient, a double Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is generated in October around 60°W-50°W, as observed in present-day climate, and the eastern part of the Amazon basin becomes wet (˜200 mm/month of precipitation). This double ITCZ is lost, however, and the region becomes dry (<50 mm/month of precipitation) in the absence of full angiosperm transpiration. Although higher water use efficiency is usually associated with plants with lower transpiration rates, water use efficiency actually increases with higher hydraulic capacity in our simulations as a result of the higher humidity and, thus, lower vapor pressure gradient between the intercellular air space within the leaf and the external atmosphere. We speculate that the high transpirational capacity of angiosperms played a significant role in the expansion of tropical rain forest.

  19. Effects of Thinning Intensities on Soil Infiltration and Water Storage Capacity in a Chinese Pine-Oak Mixed Forest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lili; Yuan, Zhiyou; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Dexiang; Mu, Xingmin

    2014-01-01

    Thinning is a crucial practice in the forest ecosystem management. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity of pine-oak mixed forest under three different thinning intensity treatments (15%, 30%, and 60%) were studied in Qinling Mountains of China. The thinning operations had a significant influence on soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity in different thinning treatments followed the order of control (nonthinning): <60%, <15%, and <30%. It demonstrated that thinning operation with 30% intensity can substantially improve soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity of pine-oak mixed forest in Qinling Mountains. The soil initial infiltration rate, stable infiltration rate, and average infiltration rate in thinning 30% treatment were significantly increased by 21.1%, 104.6%, and 60.9%, compared with the control. The soil maximal water storage capacity and noncapillary water storage capacity in thinning 30% treatment were significantly improved by 20.1% and 34.3% in contrast to the control. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity were significantly higher in the surface layer (0~20 cm) than in the deep layers (20~40 cm and 40~60 cm). We found that the soil property was closely related to soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity. PMID:24883372

  20. Electromagnetic energy absorption potential and microwave heating capacity of SiC thin films in the 1-16 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aïssa, B.; Tabet, N.; Nedil, M.; Therriault, D.; Rosei, F.; Nechache, R.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the electromagnetic (EM) absorption potential and microwave heating capacity of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide thin films (a-SiC:H) in the 1-16 GHz frequency domain. a-SiC:H thin films with typical thickness of 1 μm were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on [1 0 0] undoped silicon substrates, and exhibit a deep EM absorption - up to 96% of the total EM energy irradiation - which is systematically converted into heat. Two-wavelength pyrometer tests show that temperatures exceeding 2000 K can be reached in a very short time, less than 100 s exposure to microwaves, showing a promising potential for specific microwave heating applications.

  1. Water Absorption and Thickness Swelling Behavior of Polypropylene Reinforced with Hybrid Recycled Newspaper and Glass Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Alireza; Ghasemian, Ali

    2010-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the moisture absorption of recycled newspaper fiber and recycled newspaper-glass fiber hybrid reinforced polypropylene composites to study their suitability in outdoor applications. In this work composite materials were made from E-glass fiber (G), recycled newspaper (NP) and polypropylene (PP), by using internal mixing and hot-pressing molding. Long-term water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS) kinetics of the composites was investigated with water immersion. It was found that the WA and TS increase with NP content in composite and water immersion time before an equilibrium condition was reached. Composites made from the NP show comparable results as those made of the hybrid fiber. The results suggest that the water absorption and thickness swelling composite decrease with increasing glass fiber contents in hybrid fiber composite. It is interesting to find that the WA and TS can be reduced significantly with incorporation of a coupling agent (maleated polypropylene) in the composite formulation. Further studies were conducted to model the water diffusion and thickness swelling of the composites. Diffusion coefficients and swelling rate parameters in the models were obtained by fitting the model predictions with the experimental data.

  2. Parameterization of the Mie extinction and absorption coefficients for water clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    It was found that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) could be made to approximate Mie theory for absorption and extinction in water clouds by parameterizing the missing physics: (1) internal reflection/refraction, (2) photon tunneling, and (3) edge diffraction. Tunneling here refers to processes by which tangential or grazing photons beyond the physical cross section of a spherical particle may be absorbed. Contributions of the above processes to extinction and/or absorption were approximated in terms of particle size, index of refraction, and wavelength. It was found that tunneling can explain most of the difference between ADA and Mie theory for water clouds in the thermal IR. The modified ADA yielded analytical expressions for the absorption and extinction efficiencies, Q{sub abs} and Q{sub ext}, which were integrated over a gamma size distribution to yield expressions for the absorption and extinction coefficients, {beta}{sub abs} and {beta}{sub ext}. These coefficients were expressed in terms of the three gamma distribution parameters, which were related to measured properties of the size distribution: liquid water content, mean, and mass-median diameter. Errors relative to Mie theory for {beta}{sub abs} and {beta}{sub ext} were generally {le}10% for the effective radius range in water clouds of 5--30 {micro}m, for any wavelength in the solar or terrestrial spectrum. For broadband emissivities and absorptivities regarding terrestrial and solar radiation, the errors were less than 1.2% and 4%, respectively. The modified ADA dramatically reduces computation times relative to Mie theory while yielding reasonably accurate results.

  3. The mechanism of salt and water absorption in the intestine of the eel (Anguilla anguilla) adapted to waters of various salinities

    PubMed Central

    Skadhauge, Erik

    1969-01-01

    1. The absorption of NaCl and water was studied by intraluminal in vivo perfusion of the intestine of the yellow European eel (Anguilla anguilla) adapted to fresh water (FW), to sea water (SW), and to double strength SW (DSW). 2. The net lumen to plasma NaCl transport from diluted SW perfusion fluids was independent of the NaCl concentration in the Na+ concentration range tested. The NaCl absorption (expressed as μ-equiv/100 g.hr.) increased from FW (mean ± S.E.): Na+ 166 ± 17, Cl- 205 ± 24 to SW: Na+ 363 ± 33, Cl- 423 ± 37, and again in DSW: Na+ 640 ± 110, Cl- 676 ± 149. 3. The osmolality of the perfusion fluid which resulted in zero net water transport was higher than plasma osmolality by 73 ± 3 m-osmole in FW, 126 ± 5 m-osmole in SW, and 244 ± 32 m-osmole in DSW (mean ± S.E.). A fairly constant ratio between net NaCl transport and this osmolality difference prevailed. 4. The general osmotic permeability to water in the serosa—mucosa direction (expressed as μl./100 g. hr. m-osmole) measured from experiments with impermeant solute increased from FW: 3·7 ± 0·5 to SW: 7·2 ± 1·0 (mean ± S.E.). 5. These results are compatible with the interpretation that the water flow occurring in the absence of a general transmural osmotic gradient, the `solute-linked water flow', is linearly related both to net NaCl transport and to the osmotic permeability to water. The findings support the view that the `solute-linked water flow' is, indeed, secondary to the salt movement and is due to osmotic force. 6. The amount of water absorbed from dilute SW perfusion fluids isosmotic with plasma was larger than in most other intestinal epithelia. FW: 650, SW: 1620 μl./100 g. hr. The NaCl concentration of the absorbate was hypertonic to plasma. 7. The passive permeability of the intestine to NaCl was very low, and the reflexion coefficient was close to unity. Therefore metabolic energy will be used to absorb NaCl, even when the NaCl concentration in the gut is higher than that of plasma due to ingestion of SW. There appears to be a limited interaction in the intestinal wall between passive salt and water flow. 8. In DSW the Na+ ingestion with the oral intake of the surrounding fluid matched the gut absorption capacity. Since DSW is close to the tolerance limit, it is concluded that the gut NaCl transport capacity may be one of the factors limiting the tolerance to water or higher salinity. PMID:5352039

  4. Optimization of industrial structure based on water environmental carrying capacity in Tieling City.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qiang; Hou, Limin; Wang, Tong; Wang, Liusuo; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Xiu; Cheng, Xilei

    2015-01-01

    A system dynamics optimization model of the industrial structure of Tieling City based on water environmental carrying capacity has been established. This system is divided into the following subsystems: water resources, economics, population, contaminants, and agriculture and husbandry. Three schemes were designed to simulate the model from 2011 to 2020, and these schemes were compared to obtain an optimal social and economic development model in Tieling City. Policy recommendations on industrial structure optimization based on the optimal solution provide scientific decision-making advice to develop a strong and sustainable economy in Tieling. PMID:25909738

  5. Determination of traces of silver in waters by anion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Fishman, M. J.; Ball, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of 0.1-1 ??g of silver per liter of water. The method permits stabilization of silver in water without loss to container walls. Optimum conditions have been established for the complete recovery of silver from water with an anion-exchange column, for quantitative elution of silver from the resin, and for measurement of silver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extraction of the chelate with MIBK. Silver in the 1-10 ??g 1 range can be determined by extraction without pre-concentration on an ion-exchange resin. ?? 1969.

  6. Application of multiobjective optimization to scheduling capacity expansion of urban water resource systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi-Naeini, Mohammad; Kuczera, George; Cui, Lijie

    2014-06-01

    Significant population increase in urban areas is likely to result in a deterioration of drought security and level of service provided by urban water resource systems. One way to cope with this is to optimally schedule the expansion of system resources. However, the high capital costs and environmental impacts associated with expanding or building major water infrastructure warrant the investigation of scheduling system operational options such as reservoir operating rules, demand reduction policies, and drought contingency plans, as a way of delaying or avoiding the expansion of water supply infrastructure. Traditionally, minimizing cost has been considered the primary objective in scheduling capacity expansion problems. In this paper, we consider some of the drawbacks of this approach. It is shown that there is no guarantee that the social burden of coping with drought emergencies is shared equitably across planning stages. In addition, it is shown that previous approaches do not adequately exploit the benefits of joint optimization of operational and infrastructure options and do not adequately address the need for the high level of drought security expected for urban systems. To address these shortcomings, a new multiobjective optimization approach to scheduling capacity expansion in an urban water resource system is presented and illustrated in a case study involving the bulk water supply system for Canberra. The results show that the multiobjective approach can address the temporal equity issue of sharing the burden of drought emergencies and that joint optimization of operational and infrastructure options can provide solutions superior to those just involving infrastructure options.

  7. Aggregating available soil water holding capacity data for crop yield models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seubert, C. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Holt, D. A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The total amount of water available to plants that is held against gravity in a soil is usually estimated as the amount present at -0.03 MPa average water potential minus the amount present at -1.5 MPa water potential. This value, designated available water-holding capacity (AWHC), is a very important soil characteristic that is strongly and positively correlated to the inherent productivity of soils. In various applications, including assessing soil moisture status over large areas, it is necessary to group soil types or series as to their productivity. Current methods to classify AWHC of soils consider only total capacity of soil profiles and thus may group together soils which differ greatly in AWHC as a function of depth in the profile. A general approach for evaluating quantitatively the multidimensional nature of AWHC in soils is described. Data for 902 soil profiles, representing 184 soil series, in Indiana were obtained from the Soil Characterization Laboratory at Purdue University. The AWHC for each of ten 150-mm layers in each soil was established, based on soil texture and parent material. A multivariate clustering procedure was used to classify each soil profile into one of 4, 8, or 12 classes based upon ten-dimensional AWHC values. The optimum number of classes depends on the range of AWHC in the population of oil profiles analyzed and on the sensitivity of a crop to differences in distribution of water within the soil profile.

  8. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  9. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore » FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  10. Improving the performance of ammonia-water absorption cycles using salt additives and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, O.M.; Barnett, S.M.; Balamuru, V.G.

    1997-12-31

    This paper proposes a new design of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration cycle for low-temperature heat sources such as solar energy and waste heat. The proposed cycle uses a salt additive to shift the chemical equilibrium toward more effective separation of ammonia molecules from aqueous solution (i.e., salting out). Since salt additives can affect all aspects of the absorption cycle, membranes have been chosen to control the flow of ions in the cycle and limit their effects to the generation side. This paper describes an absorption cycle that uses membrane separation processes, such as reverse osmosis, dialysis, and electrodialysis. To optimize the performance of the cycle, however, the membranes and salts must be carefully chosen.

  11. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  12. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  13. Interaction between Bisphosphonates and Mineral Water: Study of Oral Risedronate Absorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Akihisa; Akagi, Yuuki; Shimomura, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are antiosteoporotic agents prescribed for patients with osteoporosis. Drug package inserts for bisphosphonate supplements indicate that their bioavailability is reduced by high levels of metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), etc.). However, standards for these cations in water used for taking risedronate have not been defined. Here, we examined the effect of calcium and magnesium in mineral waters on the bioavailability of the third-generation bisphosphonate, risedronate, following oral administration in rats. As risedronate is unchanged and eliminated renally, risedronate absorption was estimated from the amount excreted in the urine. Risedronate was dissolved in mineral water samples and administered orally at 0.35 mg/kg. Urine samples were collected for 24 h after dosing. Risedronate was extracted from urine using ion-pair solid-phase cartridges and quantified by HPLC with UV detection (262 nm). Cumulative recovery of risedronate was calculated from the amount excreted in the urine. The 24-h recovery of risedronate from evian® (0.32±0.02% [mean±standard deviation (S.D.)], n=4) and Contrex(®) (0.22±0.05%) mineral waters was significantly lower than that from tap water (0.47±0.04%, p<0.01). Absorption of risedronate in calcium chloride and magnesium chloride aqueous solutions of the same hardness (822 mg/L) was 54% (0.27±0.04%) and 12% (0.51±0.08%) lower, respectively, compared with ultrapure water; suggesting that absorption of risedronate declines as the calcium concentration of mineral waters increases. Consumption of mineral waters containing high levels of calcium (80 mg/L or above), such as evian® and Contrex(®), is therefore not recommended when taking risedronate. PMID:26934925

  14. The water vapour self- and water-nitrogen continuum absorption in the 1000 and 2500 cm(-1) atmospheric windows.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Yu I; Lafferty, W J

    2012-06-13

    The pure water vapour and water-nitrogen continuum absorption in the 1000 and 2500?cm(-1) atmospheric windows has been studied using a 2?m base-length White-type multi-pass cell coupled with a BOMEM DA3-002 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The measurements were carried out at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD) over the course of several years (2004, 2006-2007, 2009). New data on the H(2)O:N(2) continuum in the 1000?cm(-1) window are presented and summarized along with the other experimental results and the continuum model. The experimental data reported on the water vapour continuum in these atmospheric windows basically agree with the most reliable laboratory data from the other sources. The MT_CKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) continuum model significantly departs from the experimental data in both windows. The deviation observed includes the continuum magnitude, spectral behaviour and temperature dependence. In the 2500?cm(-1) region, the model does not allow for the nitrogen fundamental collision-induced absorption (CIA) band intensity enhancement caused by H(2)O:N(2) collisions and underestimates the actual absorption by over two orders of magnitude. The water vapour continuum interpretation as a typical CIA spectrum is reviewed and discussed. PMID:22547233

  15. Bathymetric surveys and area/capacity tables of water-supply reservoirs for the city of Cameron, Missouri, July 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Years of sediment accumulation and dry conditions in recent years have led to the decline of water levels and capacities for many water-supply reservoirs in Missouri, and have caused renewed interest in modernizing outdated area/capacity tables for these reservoirs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, surveyed the bathymetry of the four water-supply reservoirs used by the city of Cameron, Missouri, in July 2013. The data were used to provide water managers with area/capacity tables and bathymetric maps of the reservoirs at the time of the surveys.

  16. Water vapor and greenhouse trapping: The role of far infrared absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.; Harries, J.E.

    1995-08-15

    Few observations have been made of atmospheric absorption across the far infra-red. Yet water vapour absorption in this spectral region may significantly effect climate. The impact of far infra-red absorption is assessed by calculating the spectral variation of the total and water vapour greenhouse effects, for the sub-arctic winter (SAW) and tropical (TRP) standard atmospheres. Although the calculated efficiency of greenhouse trapping peaks outside of the far infra-red, the low strength there of the Planck function causes relatively small absolute forcings, except in the carbon dioxide and ozone bands. The sensitivity of the normalised greenhouse effect to water vapour concentration is largest in the far infra-red for the SAW atmosphere, and in the window region for the TRP. The sensitivity differs most between the two atmospheres in the far infra-red, over the middle/upper troposphere; in the SAw case the contribution from the water vapour continuum is virtually eliminated. Improved spectral observations and simulations at far infra-red wavelengths thus appear necessary to better understand the contemporary greenhouse effect, and to validate models of climate change. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  18. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anheier, N. C., Jr.; McDonald, C. E.; Cuta, J. M.; Cuta, F. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH4(+)). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  19. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-01

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core.

  20. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet.

    PubMed

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-25

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core. PMID:25254473

  1. Fractional water allocation and reservoir capacity sharing concepts: An adaptation for the Komati Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Enoch M.; Dhlamini, Sidney; Mthimkhulu, Sindy

    This paper presents an adaptation of fractional water allocation and reservoir capacity sharing (FWARCS) concepts for application in the Komati Basin, a river system shared between South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique. Many traditional methods for allocating water are based on volume-per-unit-time allocation that is supplied at some level of assurance and managed using priority-based reservoir and river system operating rules, as well as on the “use it or lose it” principle, which is considered exclusive by water users as it leaves them out of the management of their water allocations. In the Komati Basin, these traditional methods of water allocation led to frequent conflicts among users and with water managers. However, the introduction of the modified FWARCS, which assigns available water in the system to water users according to the proportions of their water entitlements and allows water to be banked in reservoirs, appears to be a solution to some of these problems. This method allows water users to decide when and how much of that entitlement they may use. Since the implementation of the modified FWARCS technique in the Komati Basin in 2002, the regulation, transparency and efficiency of operating the system improved and subsequently the number of disputes over water has declined. South Africa improved from an overuse of 8.2 Mm 3 in 2002/03 water year to realize a saving of 29.5 Mm 3 in 2005/06. Similarly, Swaziland improved from an overuse of 3.9 Mm 3 in 2002/03 to achieve a saving of 14.6 Mm 3 in 2005/06. Users have recognised and embraced the transparency and flexibility of the modified FWARCS. They choose, as the need and opportunity arise, when and how much water they utilise, whether to “bank” and/or “trade” the water they save subject to the conditions of their entitlements. The implementation of the modified FWARCS was also made successful by the existence of proper institutional structures, appropriate decision support tools, good water measurement infrastructure and reliable water accounting systems. The establishment, development and utilization of these elements of water management, as well as the challenges encountered in relation to the adoption of modified FWARCS in the Komati Basin are discussed in this paper.

  2. Surface Water Storage Capacity of Twenty Tree Species in Davis, California.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingfu; McPherson, E Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Urban forestry is an important green infrastructure strategy because healthy trees can intercept rainfall, reducing stormwater runoff and pollutant loading. Surface saturation storage capacity, defined as the thin film of water that must wet tree surfaces before flow begins, is the most important variable influencing rainfall interception processes. Surface storage capacity is known to vary widely among tree species, but it is little studied. This research measured surface storage capacities of 20 urban tree species in a rainfall simulator. The measurement system included a rainfall simulator, digital balance, digital camera, and computer. Eight samples were randomly collected from each tree species. Twelve rainfall intensities (3.5-139.5 mm h) were simulated. Leaf-on and leaf-off simulations were conducted for deciduous species. Stem and foliar surface areas were estimated using an image analysis method. Results indicated that surface storage capacities varied threefold among tree species, 0.59 mm for crape myrtle ( L.) and 1.81 mm for blue spruce ( Engelm.). The mean value across all species was 0.86 mm (0.11 mm SD). To illustrate application of the storage values, interception was simulated and compared across species for a 40-yr period with different rainfall intensities and durations. By quantifying the potential for different tree species to intercept rainfall under a variety of meteorological conditions, this study provides new knowledge that is fundamental to validating the cost-effectiveness of urban forestry as a green infrastructure strategy and designing functional plantings. PMID:26828174

  3. Effects of rainfall seasonality and soil moisture capacity on mean annual water balance for Australian catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, N.J.; Zhang, L.; Milly, P.C.D.; McMahon, T.A.; Jakeman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    An important factor controlling catchment-scale water balance is the seasonal variation of climate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the seasonal distributions of water and energy, and their interactions with the soil moisture store, on mean annual water balance in Australia at catchment scales using a stochastic model of soil moisture balance with seasonally varying forcing. The rainfall regime at 262 catchments around Australia was modeled as a Poisson process with the mean storm arrival rate and the mean storm depth varying throughout the year as cosine curves with annual periods. The soil moisture dynamics were represented by use of a single, finite water store having infinite infiltration capacity, and the potential evapotranspiration rate was modeled as an annual cosine curve. The mean annual water budget was calculated numerically using a Monte Carlo simulation. The model predicted that for a given level of climatic aridity the ratio of mean annual evapotranspiration to rainfall was larger where the potential evapotranspiration and rainfall were in phase, that is, in summer-dominant rainfall catchments, than where they were out of phase. The observed mean annual evapotranspiration ratios have opposite results. As a result, estimates of mean annual evapotranspiration from the model compared poorly with observational data. Because the inclusion of seasonally varying forcing alone was not sufficient to explain variability in the mean annual water balance, other catchment properties may play a role. Further analysis showed that the water balance was highly sensitive to the catchment-scale soil moisture capacity. Calibrations of this parameter indicated that infiltration-excess runoff might be an important process, especially for the summer-dominant rainfall catchments; most similar studies have shown that modeling of infiltration-excess runoff is not required at the mean annual timescale. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres with a versatile adsorption capacity for water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Yu, Jie; Ji, Xixi; Qian, Muqi

    2015-01-28

    Here, we report the synthesis of nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres (NSBNSs) by a catalyzing thermal evaporation method from solid B powders. The NSBNSs consist of radially oriented ultrathin nanosheets with the sheet edges oriented on the surface. Formation of this unique structure occurs only at a certain reaction temperature. The diameter from 4 μm to 700 nm and the nanosheet thickness from 9.1 to 3.1 nm of the NSBNSs can be well-controlled by appropriately changing the mass ratio of boron powders and catalyst. The NSBNSs possess versatile adsorption capacity, exhibiting excellent adsorption performance for oil, dyes, and heavy metal ions from water. The oil uptake reaches 7.8 times its own weight. The adsorption capacities for malachite green and methylene blue are 324 and 233 mg/g, while those for Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Cd(2+) are 678.7, 536.7, and 107.0 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption capacities of the NSBNSs for Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) are higher or much higher than those of the adsorbents reported previously. These results demonstrate the great potential of NSBNSs for water treatment and cleaning. PMID:25552343

  5. Polder Effects on Sediment-to-Soil Conversion: Water Table, Residual Available Water Capacity, and Salt Stress Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Radimy, Raymond Tojo; Dudoignon, Patrick; Hillaireau, Jean Michel; Deboute, Elise

    2013-01-01

    The French Atlantic marshlands, reclaimed since the Middle Age, have been successively used for extensive grazing and more recently for cereal cultivation from 1970. The soils have acquired specific properties which have been induced by the successive reclaiming and drainage works and by the response of the clay dominant primary sediments, that is, structure, moisture, and salinity profiles. Based on the whole survey of the Marais Poitevin and Marais de Rochefort and in order to explain the mechanisms of marsh soil behavior, the work focuses on two typical spots: an undrained grassland since at least 1964 and a drained cereal cultivated field. The structure-hydromechanical profiles relationships have been established thanks to the clay matrix shrinkage curve. They are confronted to the hydraulic functioning including the fresh-to-salt water transfers and to the recording of tensiometer profiles. The CE1/5 profiles supply the water geochemical and geophysical data by their better accuracy. Associated to the available water capacity calculation they allow the representation of the parallel evolution of the residual available water capacity profiles and salinity profiles according to the plant growing and rooting from the mesophile systems of grassland to the hygrophile systems of drained fields. PMID:23990758

  6. Diode laser frequency stabilisation for water-vapour differential absorption sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, R.; Schilt, S.; Werner, D.; Affolderbach, C.; Thvenaz, L.; Mileti, G.

    2006-11-01

    We describe a low-power continuous-wave laser system for water-vapour sensing applications in the 935-nm region. The system is based on extended-cavity diode lasers and distributed-feedback lasers and delivers four single-mode frequency-stabilised optical signals. Three lasers are locked to three water-vapour absorption lines of different strengths, whereas the fourth lies outside any absorption line. On-line stabilisation is performed by wavelength-modulation spectroscopy using compact water-vapour reference cells. An offset-locking technique implemented around an electrical filter is applied for the stabilisation of the off-line slave laser to an on-line master laser at a frequency detuning of 18.8 GHz. Stabilities in the order of 15 MHz over one day were observed for the strongest lines, at the detection limit of the measurement instrumentation. The developed techniques and schemes can be applied to other wavelength ranges and molecular species. Differential absorption lidar instrumentation can in particular benefit from such a system when the stabilised lasers serve as injection seeders to pulsed power oscillators.

  7. Capacity and transparency of potable water regulation in Tijuana, Mexico: challenges for ensuring water quality at community level.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Kaya; Eyles, John

    2004-03-01

    The ability of public institutions to provide efficient and equitable potable water services is key to reducing water-borne diseases, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In this article, a case study of potable water and public health programs in Tijuana, Mexico, is used to direct attention to practical examples of policy and institutional incapacities. A qualitative methodology was used to gain access to local context and the formal and informal actions of the key informants. This paper concludes that public health agencies are creating the illusion of program action through disease surveillance, however capacity gaps demonstrate that institutional policy is not pragmatically reflected on the local community level. Political client-patron relationships are used to circumvent bureaucratic barriers and distribute resources at the local level. This raises the question of whether further accountability will bring the much-expected equitable distribution of public goods in the developing world. PMID:14976175

  8. Automated atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total arsenic in water and streambed materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M.

    1977-01-01

    An automated method to determine both inorganic and organic forms of arsenic In water, water-suspended mixtures, and streambed materials Is described. Organic arsenic-containing compounds are decomposed by either ultraviolet radiation or by suHurlc acid-potassium persulfate digestion. The arsenic liberated, with Inorganic arsenic originally present, is reduced to arsine with sodium borohydrlde. The arable Is stripped from the solution with the aid of nitrogen and Is then decomposed In a tube furnace heated to 800 ??C which Is placed in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. Thirty samples per hour can be analyzed to levels of 1 ??g arsenic per liter.

  9. Water vapor absorption spectra of the upper atmosphere (45-185 cm(-1)).

    PubMed

    Augason, G C; Mord, A J; Witteborn, F C; Erickson, E F; Swift, C D; Caroff, L J; Kunz, L W

    1975-09-01

    The far ir nighttime absorption spectrum of the earth's atmosphere above 14 km is determined from observations of the bright moon. The spectra were obtained using a Michelson interferometer attached to a 30-cm telescope aboard a high-altitude jet aircraft. Comparison with a single-layer model atmosphere implies a vertical column of 3.4 +/- 0.4 mum of percipitable water on 30 August 1971 and 2.4 +/- 0.3 mum of precipitable water on 6 January 1972. PMID:20154976

  10. Water vapor absorption spectra of the upper atmosphere /45-185 per cm/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augason, G. C.; Mord, A. J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Erickson, E. F.; Swift, C. D.; Caroff, L. J.; Kunz, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The far IR nighttime absorption spectrum of the earth's atmosphere above 14 km is determined from observations of the bright moon. The spectra were obtained using a Michelson interferometer attached to a 30-cm telescope aboard a high-altitude jet aircraft. Comparison with a single-layer model atmosphere implies a vertical column of 3.4 plus or minus 0.4 microns of precipitable water on 30 August 1971 and 2.4 plus or minus 0.3 microns of precipitable water on 6 January 1972.-

  11. Moisture absorption characteristics of the Orbiter thermal protection system and methods used to prevent water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L.; Tillian, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter's silica tile Thermal Protection System (TPS) is beset by the moisture absorption problems inherently associated with low density, highly porous insulation systems. Attention is presently given to the comparative success of methods for the minimization and/or prevention of water ingestion by the TPS tiles, covering the development of water-repellent agents and their tile application techniques, flight test program results, and materials improvements. The use of external films for rewaterproofing of the TPS tiles after each mission have demonstrated marginal to unacceptable performance. By contrast, a tile interior waterproofing agent has shown promise.

  12. Water holding capacity and collagen profile of bovine m. infraspinatus during postmortem ageing.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska-Kapituła, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Jankowska, Barbara; Dąbrowska, Ewa

    2015-02-01

    Changes in the water holding capacity (WHC) and collagen profile in bovine m. infraspinatus during ageing in a vacuum at 3 °C up to 20 days were studied. Moisture, expressible water and total collagen content were determined in raw samples and muscles were then subjected to thermal treatment in steam. Moisture, collagen fractions (total, water-soluble, insoluble, acetic acid-soluble, total soluble) and cooking loss were determined in the cooked meat. Ageing time did not significantly influence WHC (expressible water content as a % of moisture), moisture content in raw and cooked meat or cooking loss. Between the 5th and 10th day of ageing a significant increase was noted in acetic acid-soluble collagen and total soluble collagen content along with a decrease in insoluble collagen content (p b 0.05). A significant negative relationship was found between the expressible water content and the water-soluble collagen. It was concluded that connective tissue ageing of bovine m. infraspinatus might be finished after 10 days. PMID:25460127

  13. [An ecological compensation standard based on water environmental capacity of Kouhe River, Liaoning Province, China].

    PubMed

    Hou, Chun-fang; Cheng, Quan-guo; Li, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Kouhe River water pollution caused by industry, agriculture and life sewage, not only reduced the water use function, but also directly affected the quality of Qinghe River. Due to the lack of effective management of water resources, the irrational use and water environment pollution occurred in Kouhe River basin. In this paper, in order to maintain the sustainable development of Kouhe River basin, taking Xifeng County and Kaiyuan City as two control units, COD as pollution factor, the water environmental capacity of Kouhe River basin was calculated. Combined with water quality monitoring data, river environment functional zone, pollution census data and the recovery cost of COD, an ecological compensation standard was determined. When the guarantee rates were 50%, 75%, and the average flow of the driest month in recent 10 years, the corresponding compensation standards of Xifeng County to downstream Kaiyuan City were 390.9 x 10(4), 448.6 x 10(4) and 514 x 10(4) yuan · a(-1), respectively. The river basin ecological compensation mechanism was put forward which should include ecological compensation fund raising, allocation and supervision. PMID:26685611

  14. Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Fast CO2 Absorption by MgO-Based Absorbents with High Cycling Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Weizhen; Rohatgi, Aashish; Duan, Yuhua; Singh, Prabhakar; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 capture from pre-combustion syngas in the temperature range of 250-400C is highly desirable from an energy efficiency perspective. Thermodynamically, MgO is a promising material for CO2 capture, but the gas-solid reaction to produce MgCO3 is kinetically slow due to high lattice energy. We report here fast CO2 absorption over a solid MgO-molten nitrate/nitrite aggregate through phase transfer catalysis, in which the molten phase serves as both a catalyst and reaction medium. Reaction with CO2 at the gas-solid-liquid triple phase boundary results in formation of MgCO3 with significant reaction rate and a high conversion of MgO. This methodology is also applicable to other alkaline earth oxides, inspiring the design of absorbents which require activation of the bulk material.

  15. In-Line Capacitance Sensor for Real-Time Water Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Perusich, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A capacitance/dielectric sensor was designed, constructed, and used to measure in real time the in-situ water concentration in a desiccant water bed. Measurements were carried out with two experimental setups: (1) passing nitrogen through a humidity generator and allowing the gas stream to become saturated at a measured temperature and pressure, and (2) injecting water via a syringe pump into a nitrogen stream. Both water vapor generating devices were attached to a downstream vertically-mounted water capture bed filled with 19.5 g of Moisture Gone desiccant. The sensor consisted of two electrodes: (1) a 1/8" dia stainless steel rod placed in the middle of the bed and (2) the outer shell of the stainless steel bed concentric with the rod. All phases of the water capture process (background, heating, absorption, desorption, and cooling) were monitored with capacitance. The measured capacitance was found to vary linearly with the water content in the bed at frequencies above 100 kHz indicating dipolar motion dominated the signal; below this frequency, ionic motion caused nonlinearities in the water concentration/capacitance relationship. The desiccant exhibited a dielectric relaxation whose activation energy was lowered upon addition of water indicating either a less hindered rotational motion or crystal reorientation.

  16. Estimating a Global Hydrological Carrying Capacity Using GRACE Observed Water Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, K.; Reager, J. T.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global population is expected to reach 9 billion people by the year 2050, causing increased demands for water and potential threats to human security. This study attempts to frame the overpopulation problem through a hydrological resources lens by hypothesizing that observed groundwater trends should be directly attributed to human water consumption. This study analyzes the relationships between available blue water, population, and cropland area on a global scale. Using satellite data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) along with land surface model data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), a global groundwater depletion trend is isolated, the validity of which has been verified in many regional studies. By using the inherent distributions of these relationships, we estimate the regional populations that have exceeded their local hydrological carrying capacity. Globally, these populations sum to ~3.5 billion people that are living in presently water-stressed or potentially water-scarce regions, and we estimate total cropland is exceeding a sustainable threshold by about 80 million km^2. Key study areas such as the North China Plain, northwest India, and Mexico City were qualitatively chosen for further analysis of regional water resources and policies, based on our distributions of water stress. These case studies are used to verify the groundwater level changes seen in the GRACE trend . Tfor the many populous, arid regions of the world that have already begun to experience the strains of high water demand.he many populous, arid regions of the world have already begun to experience the strains of high water demand. It will take a global cooperative effort of improving domestic and agricultural use efficiency, and summoning a political will to prioritize environmental issues to adapt to a thirstier planet. Global Groundwater Depletion Trend (Mar 2003-Dec 2011)

  17. Heat capacity anomaly in a self-aggregating system: Triblock copolymer 17R4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumancas, Lorenzo V.; Simpson, David E.; Jacobs, D. T.

    2015-05-01

    The reverse Pluronic, triblock copolymer 17R4 is formed from poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO): PPO14 - PEO24 - PPO14, where the number of monomers in each block is denoted by the subscripts. In water, 17R4 has a micellization line marking the transition from a unimer network to self-aggregated spherical micelles which is quite near a cloud point curve above which the system separates into copolymer-rich and copolymer-poor liquid phases. The phase separation has an Ising-like, lower consolute critical point with a well-determined critical temperature and composition. We have measured the heat capacity as a function of temperature using an adiabatic calorimeter for three compositions: (1) the critical composition where the anomaly at the critical point is analyzed, (2) a composition much less than the critical composition with a much smaller spike when the cloud point curve is crossed, and (3) a composition near where the micellization line intersects the cloud point curve that only shows micellization. For the critical composition, the heat capacity anomaly very near the critical point is observed for the first time in a Pluronic/water system and is described well as a second-order phase transition resulting from the copolymer-water interaction. For all compositions, the onset of micellization is clear, but the formation of micelles occurs over a broad range of temperatures and never becomes complete because micelles form differently in each phase above the cloud point curve. The integrated heat capacity gives an enthalpy that is smaller than the standard state enthalpy of micellization given by a van't Hoff plot, a typical result for Pluronic systems.

  18. Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrum of Malonaldehyde in Water Is Dominated by Solvent-Stabilized Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xuefei; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-07-01

    Free energy calculations for eight enol isomers of malonaldehyde (MA) and simulation of the ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum in both the gas phase and water (pH = 3, where the molecule exists in neutral undeprotonated form) show that in water the two s-trans nonchelated enol conformers of MA become thermodynamically more stable than the internally hydrogen-bonded (“chelated enol”) conformer (CE). The pure CE conformer in water has a slightly red-shifted UV spectrum with respect to that in the gas phase, but the blue-shifted spectrum observed in water at pH 3 is dominated by solvent-stabilized conformations that have negligible populations in the gas phase. Density functional calculations with the solvation model based on density (SMD) and an ensemble-averaged vertical excitation model explain the experimental observations in detail.

  19. Hydrogen-rich water enhances cadmium tolerance in Chinese cabbage by reducing cadmium uptake and increasing antioxidant capacities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Cai, Jiangtao; Shen, Zhenguo; Cui, Jin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present paper was to understand the specific mechanism of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in alleviating cadmium (Cd) toxicity in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris spp. chinensis L.). Our results showed that the addition of 50% saturation HRW significantly alleviated the Cd toxic symptoms, including the improvement of both root elongation and seedling growth inhibition. These responses were consistent with a significant decrease of Cd accumulation in roots and shoots, which was further confirmed by the histochemical staining. Molecular evidence illustrated that Cd-induced up-regulations of IRT1 and Nramp1 genes, responsible for Cd absorption, were blocked by HRW. By contrast, Cd-induced up-regulation of the HMA3 gene, which regulates Cd sequestration into the root vacuoles, was substantially strengthened by HRW. Furthermore, compared with those in Cd stress alone, the expressions of HMA2 and HMA4, which function in the transportation of Cd to xylem, were repressed by co-treatment with HRW. HRW enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase. These results were further confirmed by the alleviation of oxidative damage, as indicated by the decrease of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Taken together, these results suggest that the improvement of Cd tolerance by HRW was associated with reduced Cd uptake and increased antioxidant defense capacities. Therefore, the application of HRW may be a promising strategy to improve Cd tolerance of Chinese cabbage. PMID:25543863

  20. Water vapor profiling using a widely tunable amplified diode laser Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, Michael Drew

    Water vapor is one of the most significant constituents of the atmosphere because of its role in cloud formation, precipitation, and interactions with electromagnetic radiation, especially its absorption of longwave infrared radiation. Some details of the role of water vapor and related feedback mechanisms in the Earth system need to be characterized better if local weather, global climate, and the water cycle are to be understood. Water vapor profiles are currently obtained with several remote sensing techniques, such as microwave radiometers, passive instruments like the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and Raman lidar. Each of these instruments has some disadvantage, such as only producing column-integrated water vapor amounts or being large, overly customized, and costly, making them difficult to use for deployment in networks or onboard satellites to measure water vapor profiles. This thesis work involved the design, construction, and testing of a highly-tunable Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument utilizing an all-semiconductor transmitter. It was an attempt to take advantage of semiconductor laser technology to obtain range-resolved water vapor profiles with an instrument that is cheaper, smaller, and more robust than existing field instruments. The eventual goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of this DIAL instrument as a candidate for deployment in multi-point networks or satellite arrays to study water vapor flux profiles. This new DIAL instrument transmitter has, for the first time in any known DIAL instrument, a highly-tunable External Cavity Diode Laser (ECDL) as a seed laser source for two cascaded commercial tapered amplifiers. The transmitter has the capability of tuning over a range of ˜17 nm to selectively probe several available water vapor absorption lines, depending on current environmental conditions. This capability has been called for in other recent DIAL experiments. Tests of the DIAL instrument to prove the validity of its measurements are presented. Initial water vapor profiles, taken in the Bozeman, MT, area, were taken, analyzed, and compared with co-located radiosonde measurements. Future improvements and directions for the next generation of this DIAL instrument are discussed.

  1. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  2. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions. PMID:20941181

  3. A comparison of methods for the measurement of the absorption coefficient in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegau, W. Scott; Cleveland, Joan S.; Doss, W.; Kennedy, C. Dan; Maffione, Robert A.; Mueller, James L.; Stone, R.; Trees, Charles C.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Wells, Willard H.

    1995-01-01

    In the spring of 1992 an optical closure experiment was conducted at Lake Pend Orielle, Idaho. A primary objective of the experiment was to compare techniques for the measurement of the spectral absorption coefficent and other inherent optical properties of natural waters. Daily averages of absorption coefficents measured using six methods are compared at wavelengths of 456, 488, and 532 nm. Overall agreement was within 40% at 456 nm and improved with increasing wavelength to 25% at 532 nm. These absorption measurements were distributed over the final 9 days of the experiement, when bio-optical conditions in Lake Pend Oreille (as indexed by the beam attenuation coefficent c(sub p)(660) and chlorophyll a fluorescence profiles) were representative of those observed throughout the experiment. However, profiles of stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence and beam transmission showed that bio-optical properties in the lake varied strongly on all time and space scales. Therefore environmental variabilty contributed significantly to deviations between daily mean absorption coefficients measured using the different techniques.

  4. In vitro percutaneous absorption of cadmium from water and soil into human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; DiZio, S.; Wade, M. )

    1992-07-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of cadmium as the chloride salt from water and soil into and through human skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil retained by 80 mesh was mixed with radioactive cadmium-109 at 13 ppb. Water solutions of cadmium-109 at 116 ppb were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500-microns, and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 16-hr skin application time. Cadmium in water (5 microliters/cm2) penetrated skin to concentrations of 8.8 +/- 0.6 and 12.7 +/- 11.7% of the applied dose from two human skin sources. Percentage doses absorbed into plasma were 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 0.6 +/- 0.6%, respectively. Cadmium from soil (0.04 g soil/cm2) penetrated skin at concentrations of 0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.13 +/- 0.05% for the two human skin sources. Amounts absorbed into plasma were 0.01 +/- 0.01 and 0.07 +/- 0.03%. Most of the nonabsorbed cadmium was recovered in the soap and water skin surface wash. Binding of cadmium from water to soil was greater than binding from water to powdered human stratum corneum, supporting the lower absorption from soil than from water. Short-term exposure of cadmium in water to human skin for 30 min (bath or swim) resulted in skin uptake, which upon further perfusion (48 hr), absorbed into the plasma receptor fluid (systemic). Cadmium in soil was increased from 6.5 to 65 ppb.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Seasonal variability in the light absorption properties of western Arctic waters: Parameterization of the individual components of absorption for ocean color applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Atsushi; Hill, Victoria; Huot, Yannick; Babin, Marcel; Bricaud, Annick

    2011-02-01

    The light absorption properties of particulate and dissolved materials strongly influence the propagation of visible light in oceanic waters and therefore the accuracy of ocean color algorithms. While the general absorption properties of these materials have been reported for Arctic waters, their seasonal variability remains unknown. We investigated the light absorption coefficients of phytoplankton [aϕ(λ)], nonalgal particles [aNAP(λ)], and colored dissolved organic matter [aCDOM(λ)] in both coastal and oceanic waters of the western Arctic Ocean from spring to autumn. Values for the chlorophyll a-specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton [a*ϕ(440)] declined significantly from the ice melt period in the early spring to the summer. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we show that the decrease in a*ϕ(440) was due to a strong package effect that overwhelmed the influence of the pigment composition. A decrease in the aNAP(λ) values from spring and summer to autumn likely originated from a decrease in the concentration of phytoplanktonic detritus. The aCDOM(λ) near the surface decreased by 34% from spring to summer as a result of photobleaching by solar radiation. The colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption values then increased significantly during autumn, resulting from the cumulative injection of Alaskan Coastal Waters into the Arctic as well as CDOM generated in situ. Our results suggest that all of the absorption components are tightly linked to biogeochemical processes, and thus the seasonal variability in aϕ(λ), aNAP(λ), and aCDOM(λ) should be taken into account in bio-optical models.

  6. In vivo and in vitro absorption and binding to powdered stratum corneum as methods to evaluate skin absorption of environmental chemical contaminants from ground and surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Mobayen, M.; Maibach, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare methods to determine the binding and absorption of water contaminants to skin, to examine linearity of response, and to determine whether skin was an environmental route for water contaminants to enter the body. The three chemical examined were (/sup 14/C)-p-nitroaniline (10.1 mCi/mM), (/sup 14/C)benzene (56 mCi/mM, and /sup 14/C-labeled 54% PCB (32 mCi/mM). The chemical were added to distilled water and the concentration in water was determined by liquid scintillation counting.

  7. Improvement of intestinal absorption of water-soluble macromolecules by various polyamines: intestinal mucosal toxicity and absorption-enhancing mechanism of spermine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; He, Lin; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Fujita, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akira

    2008-04-16

    The absorption-enhancing effects of three different polyamines, spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and putrescine (PUT) on the intestinal absorption of water-soluble macromolecules were examined in rats. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextrans (FDs) with different average molecular weights were chosen as models of water-soluble macromolecules and intestinal absorption of FDs with or without these polyamines was examined by an in situ closed loop method. The intestinal absorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran with an average molecular weight of 4400 (FD4) was relatively low in the absence of these polyamines. However, its absorption was improved in the presence of 5-10mM SPM and 10mM SPD in the jejunum and 10mM SPM in the colon, while 10mM PUT had almost no absorption-enhancing effect on the intestinal absorption of FD4. Overall, the enhancing effects of these polyamines were greater in the jejunal membranes than in the colonic membranes. The absorption-enhancing effect of SPM decreased as the molecular weights of FDs increased. The intestinal membrane toxicity of 10mM SPM was evaluated by measuring the amount of protein and activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from the intestinal epithelial cells. We also observed the morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in the presence or absence of SPM. The results indicated that the amount of protein and LDH was not changed in the presence of 10mM SPM, although we observed a significant increase in these biological markers in the presence of 3% Triton X-100, as a positive control. Furthermore, we found no significant change in the intestinal membrane with 10mM SPM by the morphological observation. These findings suggested that 10mM SPM did not cause any significant membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. To investigate the absorption-enhancing mechanism of SPM, the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of the rat jejunal membranes was studied by using a diffusion chamber method. SPM decreased the TEER values in a concentration dependent manner and 10mM SPM had almost the same effect to decrease the TEER value compared with 10mM EDTA as a positive control. These findings suggest that SPM may loosen the tight junction of the epithelium, thereby increasing the intestinal absorption of drugs via a paracellular route. In summary, polyamines, especially SPM would be one of the suitable absorption enhancers with high effectiveness and low intestinal membrane toxicity. PMID:18206325

  8. Improvement of intestinal absorption of water-soluble macromolecules by various polyamines: intestinal mucosal toxicity and absorption-enhancing mechanism of spermine.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Gao Y; He L; Katsumi H; Sakane T; Fujita T; Yamamoto A

    2008-04-16

    The absorption-enhancing effects of three different polyamines, spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and putrescine (PUT) on the intestinal absorption of water-soluble macromolecules were examined in rats. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextrans (FDs) with different average molecular weights were chosen as models of water-soluble macromolecules and intestinal absorption of FDs with or without these polyamines was examined by an in situ closed loop method. The intestinal absorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran with an average molecular weight of 4400 (FD4) was relatively low in the absence of these polyamines. However, its absorption was improved in the presence of 5-10mM SPM and 10mM SPD in the jejunum and 10mM SPM in the colon, while 10mM PUT had almost no absorption-enhancing effect on the intestinal absorption of FD4. Overall, the enhancing effects of these polyamines were greater in the jejunal membranes than in the colonic membranes. The absorption-enhancing effect of SPM decreased as the molecular weights of FDs increased. The intestinal membrane toxicity of 10mM SPM was evaluated by measuring the amount of protein and activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from the intestinal epithelial cells. We also observed the morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in the presence or absence of SPM. The results indicated that the amount of protein and LDH was not changed in the presence of 10mM SPM, although we observed a significant increase in these biological markers in the presence of 3% Triton X-100, as a positive control. Furthermore, we found no significant change in the intestinal membrane with 10mM SPM by the morphological observation. These findings suggested that 10mM SPM did not cause any significant membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. To investigate the absorption-enhancing mechanism of SPM, the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of the rat jejunal membranes was studied by using a diffusion chamber method. SPM decreased the TEER values in a concentration dependent manner and 10mM SPM had almost the same effect to decrease the TEER value compared with 10mM EDTA as a positive control. These findings suggest that SPM may loosen the tight junction of the epithelium, thereby increasing the intestinal absorption of drugs via a paracellular route. In summary, polyamines, especially SPM would be one of the suitable absorption enhancers with high effectiveness and low intestinal membrane toxicity.

  9. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  10. Changes on image texture features of breakfast flakes cereals during water absorption.

    PubMed

    Medina, Wenceslao T; Quevedo, Roberto A; Aguilera, José M

    2013-02-01

    Normally breakfast cereal flakes are consumed by pouring them into a bowl and covering them with fresh or cold milk. During this process the liquid uptake causes changes in the surface and internal matrix of breakfast cereals that influence texture and integrity. Some breakfast cereal as flakes have a translucent structure that could provide information about the solid matrix and air cells and how they change during liquid absorption. The objective of the study was to assess the image texture changes of corn flakes and frosted flakes during water absorption at 5, 15 and 25 °C, employing 11 image feature textures extracted from grey-level co-occurrence matrix and grey-level run length matrix (at three directions) and to relate the fractal dimension (FD) of images with rupture force (RF) reduction during soaking of both flakes at 5 °C. The most relevant result from principal component analysis calculated with a matrix of 54 (soaking times) × 22 (texture features), shows that it was possible to distinguish an isolated group consisting of different soaking times at the same water temperature in each breakfast cereal flakes evaluated, corroborating that superficial liquid imbibition is important during the liquid absorption process when flakes are soaked. Furthermore, standardized FD could be related to RF in the period when samples tend to search for an equilibrium state. PMID:23345324

  11. Surface Arsenic Speciation of a Drinking-Water Treatment Residual Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, K.C.; Sarkar, D.; Parsons, J.G.; Datta, R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-03

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  12. Exploring the capacity of radar remote sensing to estimate wetland marshes water storage.

    PubMed

    Grings, F; Salvia, M; Karszenbaum, H; Ferrazzoli, P; Kandus, P; Perna, P

    2009-05-01

    This paper focuses on the use of radar remote sensing for water storage estimation in wetland marshes of the Paraná River Delta in Argentina. The approach followed is based on the analysis of a temporal set of ENVISAT ASAR data which includes images acquired under different polarizations and incidence angles as well as different environmental conditions (water level, precipitation, and vegetation condition). Two marsh species, named junco and cortadera, were monitored. This overall data set gave us the possibility of studying and understanding the basic interactions between the radar, the soil under different flood conditions, and the vegetation structure. The comprehension of the observed features was addressed through electromagnetic models developed for these ecosystems. The procedure used in this work to estimate water level within marshes combines a direct electromagnetic model, field work data specifically obtained to feed the model, the actual ASAR measurements and a well known retrieval scheme based on a cost function. Results are validated with water level evaluations at specific points. A map showing an estimation of the water storage capacity and its error in junco and cortadera areas for the date where the investigation was done is also presented. PMID:18367312

  13. Fluctuation of the Water Environmental Carrying Capacity in a Huge River-Connected Lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Zhou, Yiyi; Tang, Yang; Wu, Mengan; Deng, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    A new method, with the non-fully mixed coefficient (NFMC) considered, was put forward to calculate the water environmental carrying capacity (WECC) for huge river-connected lakes, of which the hydrological conditions always vary widely during a year. Poyang Lake, the most typical river-connected lake and the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on field investigations and numerical simulation, the monthly pollutant degradation coefficients and non-fully mixed coefficients of different lake regions were determined to explore the WECCs of COD, TN and TP of Poyang Lake in a common water year. It was found that under the hydrological conditions of a common water year the total WECCs of COD, TN and TP in the lake were respectively 181.9 × 104 t, 33.3 × 104 t and 1.86 × 104 t. Due to the varied lake water volume and self-purification ability, an evident temporal fluctuation of WECCs in Poyang Lake was observed. The dry seasons were characterized by a higher NFMCs but lower WECCs owing to the lower water level and degradation ability. Variation coefficients of COD and TN WECC were close to each other, of which the average level was about 58.5%, a little higher than that of TP. PMID:25830284

  14. Impact of cooking formulation on flavor and hydrophilic oxygen radical absorption capacity values of whole grain pigmented rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole grain rice is rich in healthful phenolic compounds that can impart flavors. Rice is prepared with water, salt, and/or oil. There is little opportunity to influence the flavor of plain rice during preparation. This research examines how cooking whole grain rice with salt, oil, or salt with o...

  15. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  16. Body centered cubic magnesium niobium hydride with facile room temperature absorption and four weight percent reversible capacity.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Holt, Chris M B; Zahiri, Beniamin; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2012-08-21

    We have synthesized a new metastable metal hydride with promising hydrogen storage properties. Body centered cubic (bcc) magnesium niobium hydride (Mg(0.75)Nb(0.25))H(2) possesses 4.5 wt% hydrogen gravimetric density, with 4 wt% being reversible. Volumetric hydrogen absorption measurements yield an enthalpy of hydride formation of -53 kJ mol(-1) H(2), which indicates a significant thermodynamic destabilization relative to the baseline -77 kJ mol(-1) H(2) for rutile MgH(2). The hydrogenation cycling kinetics are remarkable. At room temperature and 1 bar hydrogen it takes 30 minutes to absorb a 1.5 μm thick film at sorption cycle 1, and 1 minute at cycle 5. Reversible desorption is achieved in about 60 minutes at 175 °C. Using ab initio calculations we have examined the thermodynamic stability of metallic alloys with hexagonal close packed (hcp) versus bcc crystal structure. Moreover we have analyzed the formation energies of the alloy hydrides that are bcc, rutile or fluorite. PMID:22782120

  17. Performance characteristics of single effect lithium bromide/ water absorption chiller for small data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysore, Abhishek Arun Babu

    A medium data center consists of servers performing operations such as file sharing, collaboration and email. There are a large number of small and medium data centers across the world which consume more energy and are less efficient when compared to large data center facilities of companies such as GOOGLE, APPLE and FACEBOOK. Such companies are making their data center facilities more environmental friendly by employing renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar to power the data center or in data center cooling. This not only reduces the carbon footprint significantly but also decreases the costs incurred over a period of time. Cooling of data center play a vital role in proper functioning of the servers. It is found that cooling consumes about 50% of the total power consumed by the data center. Traditional method of cooling includes the use of mechanical compression chillers which consume lot of power and is not desirable. In order to eliminate the use of mechanical compressor chillers renewable energy resources such as solar and wind should be employed. One such technology is solar thermal cooling by means of absorption chiller which is powered by solar energy. The absorption chiller unit can be coupled with either flat plate or evacuated tube collectors in order to achieve the required inlet temperature for the generator of the absorption chiller unit. In this study a modular data center is considered having a cooling load requirement of 23kw. The performance characteristics of a single stage Lithium Bromide/ water refrigeration is presented in this study considering the cooling load of 23kw. Performance characteristics of each of the 4 heat exchangers within the unit is discussed which helps in customizing the unit according to the users' specific needs. This analysis helps in studying the importance of different properties such as the effect of inlet temperatures of hot water for generator, inlet temperatures of cooling water for absorber and condenser and outlet chilled water temperatures of the evaporator.

  18. Graphical expression of thermodynamic characteristics of absorption process in ammonia-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospíšil, Jiří; Fortelný, Zdeněk

    2012-04-01

    The adiabatic sorption is very interesting phenomenon that occurs when vapor of refrigerant is in contact with unsaturated liquid absorbent-refrigerant mixture and exchange of heat is forbid between the system and an environment. This contribution introduces new auxiliary lines that enable correct position determination of the adiabatic sorption process in the p-T-x diagram of ammoniawater system. The presented auxiliary lines were obtained from common functions for fast calculation of water-ammonia system properties. Absorption cycles designers often utilize p-t-x diagrams of working mixtures for first suggestion of new absorption cycles. The p-t-x diagrams enable fast correct determination of saturate states of liquid (and gaseous) mixtures of refrigerants and absorbents. The working mixture isn't only at saturated state during a real working cycle. If we know pressure and temperature of an unsaturated mixture, exact position determination is possible in the p-t-x diagrams too.

  19. Anomalous components of supercooled water expansivity, compressibility, and heat capacity (Cp and Cv) from binary formamide+water solution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguni, M.; Angell, C. A.

    1983-06-01

    Recently reported heat capacity studies of N2H4+H2O and H2O2+H2O solutions, from which an anomalous component of the pure water behavior could be extracted by extrapolation, have been extended to a system NH2CHO+H2O which has the chemical stability needed to permit expansivity and compressibility measurements as well. Data accurate to ±2% for each of these properties as well as for the heat capacity are reported. The expansivity data support almost quantitatively an earlier speculative separation of the bulk and supercooled water expansivity into a ``normal'' (or ``background'') part and an ``anomalous'' part, the latter part fitting a critical law αanom=A(T/Ts-1)-γ with exponent γ=1.0. According to the present analysis, the anomalous part of the expansivity which is always negative, yields Ts in the range 225-228, γ in the range 1.28-1.0, depending on the choice of background extrapolation function. The normal contribution to the heat capacity obtained from the present work is intermediate in character to that from the previous two systems and leads to similar equation parameters. The normal contribution to the compressibility on the other hand is very different from that speculated earlier by Kanno and Angell and approximately verified by Conde et al. for ethanol-water solutions. The background component from the present analysis is ˜50% larger, with the result that the anomalous component, at least when values above 0 °C are included in the analysis, cannot be sensibly fitted to the critical point equation. The possible origin and interest content of these differences is discussed. Combination of the new thermodynamic data permit estimation of Cv values for the solution, and by extrapolation, a normal Cv component for water. The anomalous component of Cv for pure water obtained by difference has the form of a Shottky anomaly in contrast with the corresponding Cp component which diverges.

  20. Optimizing available water capacity using microwave satellite data for improving irrigation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manika; Bolten, John; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2015-04-01

    This work addresses the improvement of available water capacity by developing a technique for estimating soil hydraulic parameters through the utilization of satellite-retrieved near surface soil moisture. The prototype involves the usage of Monte Carlo analysis to assimilate historical remote sensing soil moisture data available from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) within the hydrological model. The main hypothesis used in this study is that near-surface soil moisture data contain useful information that can describe the effective hydrological conditions of the basin such that when appropriately In the method followed in this study the hydraulic parameters are derived directly from information on the soil moisture state at the AMSR-E footprint scale and the available water capacity is derived for the root zone by coupling of AMSR-E soil moisture with the physically-based hydrological model. The available capacity water, which refers to difference between the field capacity and wilting point of the soil and represent the soil moisture content at 0.33 bar and 15 bar respectively is estimated from the soil hydraulic parameters using the van Genuchten equation. The initial ranges of soil hydraulic parameters are taken in correspondence with the values available from the literature based on Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database within the particular AMSR-E footprint. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, the ranges are narrowed in the region where simulation shows a good match between predicted and near-surface soil moisture from AMSR-E. In this study, the uncertainties in accurately determining the parameters of the nonlinear soil water retention function for large-scale hydrological modeling is the focus of the development of the Bayesian framework. Thus, the model forecasting has been combined with the observational information to optimize the model state and the soil hydraulic parameters simultaneously. The optimization process is divided into two steps during one time interval: the state variable is optimized through the state filter and the optimal parameter values are then transferred for retrieving soil moisture. However, soil moisture from sensors such as AMSR-E can only be retrieved for the top few centimeters of soil. So, for the present study, a homogeneous soil system has been considered. By assimilating this information into the model, the accuracy of model structure in relating surface moisture dynamics to deeper soil profiles can be ascertained. To evaluate the performance of the system in helping improve simulation accuracy and whether they can be used to obtain soil moisture profiles at poorly gauged catchments alongwith the available water capacity, the root mean square error (RMSE) and Mean Bias error (MBE) are used to measure the performance of the soil moisture simulations. The optimized parameters as compared to the pedo-transfer based parameters were found to reduce the RMSE from 0.14 to 0.04 and 0.15 to 0.07 in surface layer and root zone respectively.

  1. Water and solute absorption from a new hypotonic oral rehydration solution: evaluation in human and animal perfusion models.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J B; Thillainayagam, A V; Salim, A F; Carnaby, S; Elliott, E J; Farthing, M J

    1992-01-01

    Controversy continues regarding the optimal composition of glucose electrolyte oral rehydration solutions for the treatment of acute diarrhoea. Four perfusion models (normal human jejunum, normal rat small intestine, cholera toxin treated secreting rat small intestine and rotavirus infected rat small intestine) have been developed and used to compare the efficacy of a hypotonic oral rehydration solution with standard United Kingdom British National formulary and developing world oral rehydration solutions (WHO). Despite obvious physiological and pathophysiological differences between these models there was general congruence in the water and solute absorption profiles of the different oral rehydration solutions. Hypotonic oral rehydration solution promoted significantly greater water absorption than other oral rehydration solutions in all rat models (p < 0.001) but apparently increased water absorption failed to achieve significance in human jejunum. British National Formulary-oral rehydration solution was unable to reverse net water secretion in both rotavirus and cholera toxin models. Net sodium absorption from hypotonic and WHO-oral rehydration solutions was significantly greater than from the low sodium British National Formulary-oral rehydration solutions (p < 0.001) except in the rotavirus model when absorption was similar to hypotonic-oral rehydration solutions. These findings show that there is agreement in the apparent efficacy of oral rehydration solutions in these animal and human perfusion models, and that improved water absorption with adequate sodium absorption may be achieved by reducing oral rehydration solution osmolality. PMID:1487167

  2. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  3. Spectral structure of the water vapour continuum absorption in 2.7 and 6.25 μm bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptashnik, Igor V.; Klimeshina, Tatyana E.; Petrova, Tatyana M.; Solodov, Alexander A.; Solodov, Alexander M.

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, the low-temperature (from -9 to 15 ° C) Fourier Transform Spectroscopy laboratory measurements of the pure water vapor absorption spectra are performed in the near-infrared spectral region, and self-continuum absorption is retrieved within 1600 cm-1 (6.25 μm) and 3600 cm-1 (2.7μm) absorption bands. The proportion of true-bound and quasi-bound water dimers in the equilibrium water vapor is derived by fitting their model spectra to the spectral features of the retrieved continuum. The results are in reasonable agreement with statistical calculations and support the idea of complimentary contribution stable and metastable dimers to the spectral structure of water vapor continuum within absorption bands.

  4. Kenaf/recycled Jute Natural Fibers Unsaturated Polyester Composites: Water Absorption/dimensional Stability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ekhlas A.; Vakhguelt, Anatoli; Sbarski, Igor; Mutasher, Saad A.

    2012-03-01

    Effects of water absorption on the flexural properties of kenaf-unsaturated polyester composites and kenaf/recycled jute-unsaturated polyester composites were investigated. In the hybrid composites, the total fiber content was fixed to 20 wt%. In this 20 wt%, the addition of jute fiber varied from 0 to 75%, with increment of 25%. The result demonstrates the water absorption and the thickness swelling increased with increase in immersion time. Effects of water absorption on flexural properties of kenaf fiber composites can be reduced significantly with incorporation of recycled jute in composites formulation. The process of absorption of water was found to approach Fickian diffusion behavior for both kenaf composites and hybrid composites.

  5. Kinetic study of the quenching reaction of singlet oxygen by carotenoids and food extracts in solution. Development of a singlet oxygen absorption capacity (SOAC) assay method.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Aya; Aizawa, Koichi; Iwasaki, Yuko; Inakuma, Takahiro; Terao, Junji; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2010-09-22

    A kinetic study of the quenching reaction of singlet oxygen (1O2) with eight kinds of carotenoids and α-tocopherol was performed in ethanol/chloroform/D2O (50:50:1, v/v/v) solution at 35 °C. The overall rate constants, kQ (=kq+kr, physical quenching+chemical reaction), for the reaction of carotenoids with 1O2 were measured, using the competition reaction method, where endoperoxide was used as a singlet oxygen generator, 2,5-diphenyl-3,4-benzofuran (DPBF) as an UV-vis absorption prove, and α-tocopherol as a standard compound. The rate constants, kQ (S) and kQ (t1/2), were determined by analyzing the first-order rate constant (S) and the half-life (t1/2) of the decay curve of DPBF with carotenoids, respectively, showing good accordance with each other. Similar measurements were performed for tomato and carrot extracts. From the results, a new assay method that can quantify the singlet oxygen absorption capacity (SOAC) of antioxidants, including carotenoids, α-tocopherol, and vegetable extracts, has been proposed. PMID:20726555

  6. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  7. SOFIA/EXES detection of absorption by water vapor in a massive protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick; DeWitt, Curtis N.; Richter, Matthew; Boogert, Adwin; Harper, Graham; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Kulas, Kristin; McKelvey, Mark; Ryde, Nils; Vacca, William

    2015-08-01

    Using the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), we have detected ten absorption features of water vapor toward the massive protostar AFGL 2591. These features, detected in the 6.086 - 6.135 μm spectral region, have been observed with a resolving power λ/dλ ~ 85,000, allowing individual rovibrational transitions to be cleanly separated from each other and from telluric lines. The observations provide an unequivocal detection of the 6.116 μm ν2 111 - 000 line, Doppler-shifted out of its telluric counterpart, which probes the ground rotational state of para-H2O and demonstrates the potential of SOFIA/EXES to observe absorption by cold interstellar water toward bright 6 μm continuum sources. EXES on SOFIA provides our first opportunity to observe the 6 μm vibrational band of astrophysical water vapor since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the late-1990s, and provides a spectral resolution that is almost two orders of magnitude better than what had previously been possible with ISO. A simultaneous fit to the EXES-observed transitions toward AFGL 2591 yields an inferred H2O column density of (1.3 ± 0.3) x 1019 cm-2, a source covering factor of 0.25, and a rotational temperature of 640 ± 80 K.

  8. Absorption of crystalline water ice in the far infrared at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, C.; Mutschke, H.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Mohr, P.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of ice in the far infrared are important for models of protoplanetary and debris disks. In this report, we derive a new set of data for the absorption (represented by the imaginary part of the refractive index κ) of crystalline water ice in this spectral range. The study includes a detailed inspection of the temperature dependence, which has not been conducted in such detail before. We measured the transmission of three ice layers with different thicknesses at temperatures ϑ = 10...250 K and present data at wavelengths λ = 80...625 μm. We found a change in the spectral dependence of κ at a wavelength of 175 ± 6 μm. At shorter wavelengths, κ exhibits a constant flat slope and no significant temperature dependence. Long-ward of that wavelength, the slope gets steeper and has a clear, approximately linear temperature dependence. This change in behaviour is probably caused by a characteristic absorption band of water ice. The measured data were fitted by a power-law model that analytically describes the absorption behaviour at an arbitrary temperature. This model can readily be applied to any object of interest, for instance a protoplanetary or debris disk. To illustrate how the model works, we simulated the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the resolved, large debris disk around the nearby solar-type star HD 207129. Replacing our ice model by another, commonly used data set for water ice results in a different SED slope at longer wavelengths. This leads to changes in the characteristic model parameters of the disk, such as the inferred particle size distribution, and affects the interpretation of the underlying collisional physics of the disk.

  9. Impact of scattering and absorption of photosynthetic pigments on fluorescence retrieval algorithms for coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Gilerson, A.; Zhou, J.; Hlaing, S.; Ioannou, I.; Jerez, W.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.

    2007-10-01

    Fluorescence Line Height (FLH) algorithms are effective for fluorescence retrieval in the open ocean where elastic reflectance in the fluorescence zone does not deviate much from the baseline. In coastal waters, FLH algorithms are significantly complicated by the overlap of the fluorescence and elastic reflectance peaks. To test accuracy of MODIS, MERIS and other FLH algorithms, we compared numerical simulations using an extensive synthetic database suitable for case II waters, with results of extensive field measurements of reflectance, absorption and attenuation spectra by us in the Chesapeake Bay, as well as satellite FLH data from several areas that typically show low correlation between [Chl] and FLH. Our synthetic datasets were created using the HYDROLIGHT radiative transfer code with IOP's connected to parameterized microphysical models in accordance with procedures used to generate the IOCCG dataset, but with some added improvements. These included higher (1 nm) spectral resolution, a wider range of parameters typical for coastal waters, including chlorophyll specific absorptions with significant variations in spectral shapes and magnitude. HYDROLIGHT simulations of elastic reflectance using measured attenuation/extinction spectra followed by subtraction from measured reflectance, permitted retrieval of the fluorescence contribution to the latter, for comparisons with the data set simulations. We find relatively small fluorescence contributions to surface reflectance for mineral concentrations > 5 mg/l because of strong attenuation in the excitation zone and enhanced elastic reflectance making fluorescence detection unrealistic. For lower mineral concentrations, we find that some combinations of NIR observation bands permit reasonably good FLH retrievals in conditions where specific absorption spectral variation is not very high, and that application of multi-spectral algorithms can be more efficient for the retrieval of fluorescence contributions in coastal areas.

  10. Arsenic Exposure From Drinking Water, Arsenic Methylation Capacity, and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Fen; Graziano, Joseph H.; Parvez, Faruque; Liu, Mengling; Paul, Rina Rani; Shaheen, Ishrat; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the interrelationships between past arsenic exposure, biomarkers specific for susceptibility to arsenic exposure, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in 959 subjects from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh. We measured cIMT levels on average 7.2 years after baseline during 2010–2011. Arsenic exposure was measured in well water at baseline and in urine samples collected at baseline and during follow-up. Every 1-standard-deviation increase in urinary arsenic (357.9 µg/g creatinine) and well-water arsenic (102.0 µg/L) concentration was related to a 11.7-µm (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 21.6) and 5.1-µm (95% CI: −0.2, 10.3) increase in cIMT, respectively. For every 10% increase in monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) percentage, there was an increase of 12.1 µm (95% CI: 0.4, 23.8) in cIMT. Among participants with a higher urinary MMA percentage, a higher ratio of urinary MMA to inorganic arsenic, and a lower ratio of dimethylarsinic acid to MMA, the association between well-water arsenic and cIMT was stronger. The findings indicate an effect of past long-term arsenic exposure on cIMT, which may be potentiated by suboptimal or incomplete arsenic methylation capacity. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm the association between arsenic methylation capacity and atherosclerosis-related outcomes. PMID:23788675

  11. Simulation model of a single-stage lithium bromide-water absorption cooling unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miao, D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer model of a LiBr-H2O single-stage absorption machine was developed. The model, utilizing a given set of design data such as water-flow rates and inlet or outlet temperatures of these flow rates but without knowing the interior characteristics of the machine (heat transfer rates and surface areas), can be used to predict or simulate off-design performance. Results from 130 off-design cases for a given commercial machine agree with the published data within 2 percent.

  12. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explaination for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1996-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 Wm(sup -2)...Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere.

  13. A new device for acquiring ground truth on the absorption of light by turbid waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Srna, R.; Treasure, W.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new device, called a Spectral Attenuation Board, has been designed and tested, which enables ERTS-1 sea truth collection teams to monitor the attenuation depths of three colors continuously, as the board is being towed behind a boat. The device consists of a 1.2 x 1.2 meter flat board held below the surface of the water at a fixed angle to the surface of the water. A camera mounted above the water takes photographs of the board. The resulting film image is analyzed by a micro-densitometer trace along the descending portion of the board. This yields information on the rate of attenuation of light penetrating the water column and the Secchi depth. Red and green stripes were painted on the white board to approximate band 4 and band 5 of the ERTS MSS so that information on the rate of light absorption by the water column of light in these regions of the visible spectrum could be concurrently measured. It was found that information from a red, green, and white stripe may serve to fingerprint the composition of the water mass. A number of these devices, when automated, could also be distributed over a large region to provide a cheap method of obtaining valuable satellite ground truth data at present time intervals.

  14. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Royce K; Smith, Jacob W; Saykally, Richard J

    2016-05-21

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility. PMID:27208929

  15. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  16. Effect of water on the carbon dioxide absorption by 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Stéphane; Podgoršek, Ajda; Pádua, Agilio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F

    2012-12-13

    The absorption of carbon dioxide by the pure ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(2)Im][OAc]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(4)Im][OAc]) was studied experimentally from 303 to 343 K. As expected, the mole fraction of absorbed carbon dioxide is high (0.16 at 303 K and 5.5 kPa and 0.19 at 303 and 9.6 KPa for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc], respectively), does not obey Henry's law, and is compatible with the chemisorption of the gas by the liquid. Evidence of a chemical reaction between the gas and the liquid was found both by NMR and by molecular simulation. In the presence of water, the properties of the liquid absorber significantly change, especially the viscosity that decreases by as much as 25% (to 78 mPa s) and 30% (to 262 mPa s) in the presence of 0.2 mol fraction of water for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] at 303 K, respectively. The absorption of carbon dioxide decreases when the water concentration increases: a decrease of 83% in CO(2) absorption is found for [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc] with 0.6 mol fraction of water at 303 K. It is proved in this work, by combining experimental data with molecular simulation, that the presence of water not only renders the chemical reaction between the gas and the ionic liquid less favorable but also lowers the (physical) solubility of the gas as it competes by the same solvation sites of the ionic liquid. The lowering of the viscosity of the liquid absorbent largely compensates these apparent drawbacks and the mixtures of [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] with water seem promising to be used for carbon dioxide capture. PMID:23145571

  17. Heat Capacity Anomaly Near the Lower Critical Consolute Point of Triethylamine-Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flewelling, Anne C.; DeFonseka, Rohan J.; Khaleeli, Nikfar; Partee, J.; Jacobs, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    The heat capacity of the binary liquid mixture triethylamine-water has been measured near its lower critical consolute point using a scanning, adiabatic calorimeter. Two data runs are analyzed to provide heat capacity and enthalpy data that are fitted by equations with background terms and a critical term that includes correction to scaling. The critical exponent a was determined to be 0.107 +/- 0.006, consistent with theoretical predictions. When alpha was fixed at 0.11 to determine various amplitudes consistently, our values of A(+) and A(-) agreed with a previous heat capacity measurement, but the value of A(-) was inconsistent with values determined by density or refractive index measurements. While our value for the amplitude ratio A(+)/ A(-) = 0.56 +/- 0.02 was consistent with other recent experimental determinations in binary liquid mixtures, it was slightly larger than either theoretical predictions or recent experimental values in liquid-vapor systems. The correction to scaling amplitude ratio D(+)/D(-) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 was half of that predicted. As a result of several more precise theoretical calculations and experimental determinations, the two-scale-factor universality ratio X, which we found to be 0.019 +/- 0.003, now is consistent among experiments and theories. A new 'universal' amplitude ratio R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) involving the amplitudes for the specific heat was tested. Our determination of R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) = -0.5 +/- 0.1 and R(sup -)(sub Bcr) = 1.1 +/- 0.1 is smaller in magnitude than predicted and is the first such determination in a binary fluid mixture.

  18. Depth of cinder deposits and water-storage capacity at Cinder Lake, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Amoroso, Lee; Kennedy, Jeff; Unema, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Schultz fire northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona, burned more than 15,000 acres on the east side of San Francisco Mountain from June 20 to July 3. As a result, several drainages in the burn area are now more susceptible to increased frequency and volume of runoff, and downstream areas are more susceptible to flooding. Resultant flooding in areas downgradient of the burn has resulted in extensive damage to private lands and residences, municipal water lines, and roads. Coconino County, which encompasses Flagstaff, has responded by deepening and expanding a system of roadside ditches to move flood water away from communities and into an area of open U.S. Forest Service lands, known as Cinder Lake, where rapid infiltration can occur. Water that has been recently channeled into the Cinder Lake area has infiltrated into the volcanic cinders and could eventually migrate to the deep regional groundwater-flow system that underlies the area. How much water can potentially be diverted into Cinder Lake is unknown, and Coconino County is interested in determining how much storage is available. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys and drilled four boreholes to determine the depth of the cinder beds and their potential for water storage capacity. Results from the geophysical surveys and boreholes indicate that interbedded cinders and alluvial deposits are underlain by basalt at about 30 feet below land surface. An average total porosity for the upper 30 feet of deposits was calculated at 43 percent for an area of 300 acres surrounding the boreholes, which yields a total potential subsurface storage for Cinder Lake of about 4,000 acre-feet. Ongoing monitoring of storage change in the Cinder Lake area was initiated using a network of gravity stations.

  19. Chemical Characterization and Water Holding Capacity of Fibre-rich Feedstuffs Used for Pigs in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Ngoc, T. T. B.; Len, N. T.; Lindberg, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    During two years, four samples per year were collected in Vietnam from rice bran, cassava residue, brewer’s grain, tofu residue, soybean meal, coconut cake, sweet potato vines and water spinach for chemical analysis and assessment of water holding capacity (WHC). The selected feedstuffs represent fibre-rich plant sources and agro-industry co-products commonly used in pig feeding in Vietnam. The content (g/kg DM) of crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE) and non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) varied between feedstuffs and ranged from 21 to 506 for CP, from 14 to 118 for EE and from 197 to 572 for NSP. Cassava residue had a high starch content of 563 g/kg DM, while sweet potato vines, water spinach, coconut cake and soybean meal had a high content of sugars (63–71 g/kg DM). The content of individual neutral sugars varied between feed ingredients, with the highest content of arabinose, galactose and glucose in tofu residue, the highest content of xylose in brewer’s grain and the highest content of mannose in coconut cake. The content of uronic acid was high for cassava residue, tofu residue, sweet potato vines and water spinach (57–88 g/kg DM). The content of soluble non-cellulosic polysaccharides (S-NCP) was positively correlated (r2 = 0.82) to the WHC. The content (g/kg DM) of CP, NDF, neutral sugars, total NSP, total NCP, S-NCP and total dietary fibre in tofu residue, water spinach and coconut cake varied (p<0.05) between years. In conclusion, diet formulation to pigs can be improved if the variation in chemical composition of the fibre fraction and in WHC between potential feed ingredients is taken into account. PMID:25049638

  20. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mathew L.; Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joe A.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada’s oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings–oil sands process water (OSPW)–are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni) were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb). Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment. PMID:26849649

  1. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mathew L; Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada's oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings-oil sands process water (OSPW)-are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni) were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb). Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment. PMID:26849649

  2. The role of storage capacity in coping with intra- and inter-annual water variability in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaupp, Franziska; Hall, Jim; Dadson, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Societies and economies are challenged by variable water supplies. Water storage infrastructure, on a range of scales, can help to mitigate hydrological variability. This study uses a water balance model to investigate how storage capacity can improve water security in the world’s 403 most important river basins, by substituting water from wet months to dry months. We construct a new water balance model for 676 ‘basin-country units’ (BCUs), which simulates runoff, water use (from surface and groundwater), evaporation and trans-boundary discharges. When hydrological variability and net withdrawals are taken into account, along with existing storage capacity, we find risks of water shortages in the Indian subcontinent, Northern China, Spain, the West of the US, Australia and several basins in Africa. Dividing basins into BCUs enabled assessment of upstream dependency in transboundary rivers. Including Environmental Water Requirements into the model, we find that in many basins in India, Northern China, South Africa, the US West Coast, the East of Brazil, Spain and in the Murray basin in Australia human water demand leads to over-abstraction of water resources important to the ecosystem. Then, a Sequent Peak Analysis is conducted to estimate how much storage would be needed to satisfy human water demand whilst not jeopardizing environmental flows. The results are consistent with the water balance model in that basins in India, Northern China, Western Australia, Spain, the US West Coast and several basins in Africa would need more storage to mitigate water supply variability and to meet water demand.

  3. Sources of error in direct solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry analyses of biological samples with high water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lcker, Ernst; Schuierer, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Analytical errors were quantified in the direct analyses of trace elements in samples with high water content by means of solid sampling atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman effect background correction (direct SS-ZAAS). Time versus mass curves for HNO 3 (0.1 mol 1 -1), blood, kidney and liver at different temperatures (+20, +4, -20C) and mass input (0.07 to 42 mg) were observed. Following a stabilization period, mass losses appeared to be nearly linear and independent of input mass. By means of a function using observed stabilization time and mass losses a 10% increase in analyte content was calculated as occurring at and below 0.06 mg. Experimentally, 10% increases were found to occur within a range 0-0.07 mg for weighed Cd solutions (0.1 and 0.2 ng mg -1 in 0.1 mol 1 -1 HNO 3 at 5C). An automated solid sampling system consisting of microbalance, dispenser, transport system and electronics was integrated in the experiments. Manual working time and the necessity of operator presence were reduced by at least 80%. Performance and capacity compared well to the manual SS-ZAAS mode. Automated SS-ZAAS analysis in fresh animal tissues is proposed for use as a screening and reference method in official residue control.

  4. Do osmoregulators have lower capacity of muscle water regulation than osmoconformers? A study on decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clarice; Amado, Enelise M; Souza, Marta M; Freire, Carolina A

    2010-02-01

    Decapod crustaceans occupy various aquatic habitats. In freshwater they are osmoregulators, while marine species are typically osmoconformers. Freshwater crustaceans are derived from marine ancestors. The hypothesis tested here was that osmoregulators, which can rely on salt transport by interface epithelia to prevent extracellular disturbance, would have a lower capacity of tissue water regulation when compared with osmoconformers. Four species of decapod crustaceans (the marine osmoconformer crab Hepatus pudibundus, and three osmoregulators of different habitats) have been exposed in vivo to a salinity challenge, for up to 24 hr. Osmoregulators were: the estuarine shrimp Palaemon pandaliformis, the diadromous freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium acanthurus, and the hololimnetic red crab Dilocarcinus pagei. H. pudibundus displayed hemolymph dilution already after 0.5 hr in 25 per thousand, reaching approximately 30% reduction in osmolality, but its muscle degree of hydration did not increase. To make the different in vivo salinity challenges directly comparable, the ratio between the maximum change in muscle hydration with respect to the control value measured for the species and the maximum change in hemolymph osmolality was calculated (x 1,000): H. pudibundus (25 per thousand, 8.1% kg H(2)O/mOsm x 10(3))>P. pandaliformis (2 per thousand, 9.2)>M. acanthurus (30 per thousand, 12.6)>P. pandaliformis (35 per thousand, 16.7)>D. pagei (7 per thousand, 60.4). Muscle slices submitted in vitro to a 30% osmotic challenge confirmed in vivo results. Thus, the estuarine/freshwater osmoregulators displayed a lower capacity to hold muscle tissue water than the marine osmoconformer, despite undergoing narrower variations in hemolymph osmolality. PMID:19844979

  5. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  6. Evidence for direct water absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants in desert-oasis ecotone, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Besides the absorption by roots from the soil substrate, it has long been known that plants exhibit alternative water-absorption strategies, particularly in drought-prone environments. For many tropical epiphytic orchids, air moisture can be absorbed directly by aerial roots. Some conifers are also found to utilize air moisture by foliar absorption during the summer fog season. However, few studies have been carried out on the atmospheric water vapor absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants. We conducted experiments in desert-oasis ecotone and investigated the effects of dew absorbed by three kinds of shallow-rooted seedlings on net photosynthesis rate, as well as on other water relations variables. Three kinds of typical shallow-rooted desert species (Bassia dasyphylla, Salsola collina and Corispermum declinatum) have been chosen and potted. Each species were subjected to contrasting watering regimes (normal and deficient) and different air moisture conditions (having dew and having no dew) for 10 weeks. Net photosynthesis rate was measured on six occasions during the study. Other water relations variables (midday shoot water potential, relative water content, stomatal conductance) were also measured. Under the dew conditions, average net photosynthesis rate, shoot water potential, leaf relative water content and stomatal conductance increased, with greater responses observed for plants subjected to a deficient watering regime than for well-watered plants. These results indicated dew occurred in arid region could be utilized through foliar absorption by some shallow-rooted plants, and for the shallow-rooted plants, the presence of dew could significantly relieve the deficit of water in water-stressed regime.

  7. Effects of stretching and stirring on water and glucose absorption by canine mucosal membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S

    1983-01-01

    A 'mini' canine mucosal membrane preparation permitting simultaneous determination of water (Jv) and glucose (Jg) absorption rates, microscopic examination or micropuncture of the villi was used in this study. The small membranes were more stretched than the large ones, with more than a one-fold increase in both Jv and Jg, apparently due to a change in architectural orientation between the villi and subvillous supporting tissue so as to facilitate water transport via the lymphatic system. During stirring of the bathing solution, the villi in the small membranes were widely separated from each other with more to-and-fro swaying movements than in the large ones. Stirring was seen to cause up-and-down movements of the loosely suspended large membranes but not the small ones. In the small membranes stirring caused no change in Jv but an increase in Jg due to the increase in glucose concentration in the absorbate, while in the large membranes both Jv and Jg were greatly increased. It is thus considered that the increase in absorption in the large membranes caused by stirring is mainly due to the increased membrane movements promoting lymph flow. PMID:6875881

  8. Changes of color and water-absorption of Hungarian porous limestone due to biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, P.; Kopecskó, K.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria induced calcium carbonate precipitation nowadays is a widely examined process being a possible alternative for traditional stone conservation methods. While research has been mostly limited to laboratory measurements, application connected, further in situ experiments should be performed in order to evaluate the applicability of the method. In our experiment, several bio-based treating compounds were compared, which have already been analyzed in different laboratories. Method for the treatment was based on the treatment of a French research group, and the compounds were applied on Hungarian porous limestone slabs, in situ. For inoculation bacteria strains Bacillus cereus and Myxococcus xanthus were used, and non-inoculated compounds were also analyzed. After the treatment, specimens were analyzed by means of discoloration effect, water absorption and migration characteristics. Almost all the treating compounds gave favorable or acceptable results for the examined properties, comparing to the properties measured in the non-cured state. Measurements on the chromatic- and on the water absorption aspects gave significant results, while further measurements are running for the more exact evaluation of the migration characteristics, i.e. effective migration depth and wetted volume.

  9. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  10. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  11. Dynamic registration of the absorption spectrum of water in the SiO(2) nanopores in high-frequency range.

    PubMed

    Sinitsa, L N; Lugovskoy, A A

    2010-11-28

    The high-frequency region was used to record the absorption spectrum of water in nanoscale pores during vacuum pumping or injection of water. The wide spectral range, which included the vibration overtones, allowed to resolve the structure of the absorption bands with variation of water concentration in the pores of SiO(2). The absorption bands of water clusters in the 4570-5400 cm(-1) range consist of well-resolved sub-bands with interpeak intervals of up to 580 cm(-1). When the pore diameter is decreased from 11.8 to 2.6 nm, the absorption bands of clusters in this frequency range are shifted by 530 cm(-1) in the direction of the water monomer which indicates an increase of hydrogen bond strength in confined water with an increase of the pore diameter. The spectrum recorded during water pumping is extremely variable in time, and the cluster dynamics in large pores (11.8 nm) differs greatly from the dynamics in small pores (2.6 nm). While all types of water clusters are removed from small pores uniformly, in the case of large pores, the water clusters relating to strong hydrogen bonds are removed from the sample at the beginning of the vacuum pumping and the loosely coupled clusters are removed later. The rate of this process is not steady and varies throughout pumping. PMID:21133445

  12. [Absorption Characteristics of Particulates and CDOM in Waters of Chagan Lake and Xinlicheng Reservoir in Autumn].

    PubMed

    Li, Si-jia; Song, Kai-shan; Zhao, Ying; Mu, Guang-yi; Shao, Tian-tian; Ma, Jian-hang

    2016-01-15

    Field surveys and laboratory analysis were carried out in Chagan Lake and Xinlicheng Reservoir under different salinity conditions in September 2012. In the laboratory, the absorption coefficients of particulates and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured, aiming to compare the absorption features, source of optical active substances and relative contribution of optical active constituents over the range of PAR (400-700 nm) in Chagan Lake and Xinlicheng Reservoir. The results showed that the Chagan Lake and Xinlicheng Reservoir were water bodies with medium eutrophication in autumn by TAL nutrient index and the absorption spectra of particulates matters were similar to those of phytoplankton. For the Chagan Lake with high salinity( EC = 988. 87 micro S x cm(-1)), the total particulate absorption was dominated by the nonalgal particles, and the contribution rate was in the order of nonalgal particles > phytoplankton > CDOM. For the Xinlicheng Reservoir with low salinity (EC = 311.67 microS x -cm(-1)), the total particulate absorption was dominated by the phytoplankton, and the contribution rate was ranked as phytoplankton > nonalgal particles > CDOM. Positive correlation was observed between a(p) (440), a(p) (675), a(d) (440) and total suspended matter (TSM), inorganic suspended matter (ISM), organic suspended matter (OSM) and Chl-a respectively in Chagan Lake, with correlation coefficients all above 0.55. Positive correlation was observed between a(p)(440), a(p) (675) and Chl-a (0.77 and 0.85, P < 0.05) , so did a(d) (440) and ISM (0.74, P < 0.01), while negative correlation was observed between a(p) (440) and OSM in the Xinlicheng Reservoir. In terms of Chagan Lake, negative correlation was merely observed between a(g) (440) and OSM (-0.54, P < 0.05) , but not in the Xinlicheng Reservoir. Both Sg, which was calculated by the fitting absorption curve from 250 to 400 nm, and relative molecular weight M showed that Sg[ (0.021 +/- 0.001) m(-1)] in Chagan Lake was greater than that in the Xinlicheng Reservoir [(0.0176 +/- 0.001) m(-1)], and Mr, in Chagan Lake was 11.44 +/- 2.00 (7.5-15.09), which was greater than that in Xinlicheng Reservoir 7.53 +/- 0.79 (6.17-8.89), indicating that the relative molecular weight of CDOM in the Chagan Lake was less than that in the Xinlicheng Reservoir. The Chagan Lake was greatly affected by wind speed and shore collapse to produce suspended mineral and sediment particles. Thereby the total particulate absorption was dominated by the nonalgal particles. The waters in the Xinlicheng Reservoir were greatly impacted by terrestrial inorganic matter, and the growth of phytoplankton was weakened and microbes activities were strengthened simultaneously, which led to the negative correlations between a(g)(lamda) and OSM. PMID:27078948

  13. Experimental study of soil water storage capacity on rocky slopes in the Negev Highlands, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikel, Harald; Kuhn, Nikolaus; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Deserts and semi-deserts cover more than one-third of the global land surface. That means that in total about 49 million km2 are affected by aridity. Arid regions are characterized by sparse and patchy vegetation, forming so called "fertility islands". The mosaic of vegetated and non-vegetated patches is dynamically interdependent and has shown to be an adaptation of the ecosystem to limited water availability and soil resources. To understand spatial heterogeneity of vegetation in (semi-)arid regions and vegetation response to climate change, studies on small scale runoff patterns, infiltration and their role in ecohydrology are required. Dryland vegetation is expected to respond sensitively to climate change and the projected variability of rainfall events. While rainfall as a water source is an obvious factor for vegetation water supply, the ability of patchy soil coverage to store water has not been studied in detail for dryland hydrological systems. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between climate change and plant available water on patchy soils in the Negev desert / Israel. Understanding rainfall-soil interaction will improve our understanding of the impact of climate change on vegetation in arid environments. Ten micro-catchments in different landscape units near Sede Boqer were examined. Topographic variables were extracted from high resolution (~0.02m) digital elevation models for each micro-catchment. Soil volume was estimated by laser scanning before and after soil excavation. Bulk density was estimated by weighing the excavated soil. To study the formation of runoff and redistribution of precipitation at the different catchment surface units, sprinkling experiments were conducted. Rainfall of 18mm/h was applied on 20 plots with an area of 1m2 each. The experiments lasted 25 to 40 minutes, until equilibrium runoff rates were achieved. Furthermore, rainfall records for the period of 1976-2008 of the vegetation periods (November - February) were analyzed. Based on experiments, analysis of rainfall records, soil properties and infiltration rates, it was possible to estimate the recurrence interval of events generating sufficient runoff to wet soil patches to a degree that is suitable for plant growth. The preliminary results indicate that a minimum effective rainfall amount of 2.5 mm in the soil patch contribution area is required to saturate soil patches with water. Such low rainfall events are relatively frequent in this region of the Negev, indicating that there is potential to frequently fill soil pore volume. The storage capacity of the soil is particularly relevant for plant water supply during periods without rain. Our results therefore show that the impact of climate change in drylands can only be predicted by taking the soil water storage capacity into account. The study also illustrates how rainfall simulation experiments and the analysis of meteorological records can be combined as a tool for the assessment of environmental change.

  14. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO(-) 2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  15. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO−2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  16. Study of Water Absorption in Raffia vinifera Fibres from Bandjoun, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Sikame Tagne, N. R.; Njeugna, E.; Fogue, M.; Drean, J.-Y.; Nzeukou, A.; Fokwa, D.

    2014-01-01

    The study is focused on the water diffusion phenomenon through the Raffia vinifera fibre from the stem. The knowledge on the behavior of those fibres in presence of liquid during the realization of biocomposite, is necessary. The parameters like percentage of water gain at the point of saturation, modelling of the kinetic of water absorption, and the effective diffusion coefficient were the main objectives. Along a stem of raffia, twelve zones of sampling were defined. From Fick's 2nd law of diffusion, a new model was proposed and evaluated compared to four other models at a constant temperature of 23°C. From the proposed model, the effective diffusion coefficient was deduced. The percentage of water gain was in the range of 303–662%. The proposed model fitted better to the experimental data. The estimated diffusion coefficient was evaluated during the initial phase and at the final phase. In any cross section located along the stem of Raffia vinifera, it was found that the effective diffusion coefficient increases from the periphery to the centre during the initial and final phases. PMID:24592199

  17. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor Utilizing Robotic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Ngoc; DeYoung, Russell J.; Prasad, Coorg R.; Laufer, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    A new unpiloted air vehicle (UAV) based water vapor DIAL system will be described. This system is expected to offer lower operating costs, longer test duration and severe weather capabilities. A new high-efficiency, compact, light weight, diode-pumped, tunable Cr:LiSAF laser will be developed to meet the UAV payload weight and size limitations and its constraints in cooling capacity, physical size and payload. Similarly, a new receiver system using a single mirror telescope and an avalanche photo diode (APD) will be developed. Projected UAV parameters are expected to allow operation at altitudes up to 20 km, endurance of 24 hrs and speed of 400 km/hr. At these conditions measurements of water vapor at an uncertainty of 2-10% with a vertical resolution of 200 m and horizontal resolution of 10 km will be possible.

  18. Soil water availability and capacity of nitrogen accumulation influence variations of intrinsic water use efficiency in rice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei; Nay-Htoon, Bhone; Lindner, Steve; Dubbert, Maren; Otieno, Dennis; Ko, Jonghan; Werner, Christiane; Tenhunen, John

    2016-04-01

    Leaf intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) coupling maximum assimilation rate (Amax) and transpirable water lost via stomatal conductance (gsc) has been gaining increasing concern in sustainable crop production. Factors that influence leaf Amax and WUEi in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Unkang) at flooding and rainfed conditions were evaluated. Positive correlations for leaf nitrogen content (Nm) and maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax), for nitrogen allocation in Rubisco enzymes and mesophyll conductance (gm) were evident independent of cropping cultures. Rainfed rice exhibited enriched canopy leaf average Nm resulting in higher Amax, partially supporting improved leaf WUEi. Maximum WUEi (up to 0.14μmolmmol(-1)) recorded in rainfed rice under drought conditions resulted from increasing gm/gsc ratio while at cost of significant decline in Amax due to hydraulically constrained gsc. Amax sensitivity related to gsc which was regulated by plant hydraulic conductance. WUEi was tightly correlated to Vcmax/gsc and gm/gsc ratios across the paddy and rainfed not to light environment, morphological and physiological traits, highlighting enhance capacity of Nm accumulation in rainfed rice with gsc at moderately high level similar to paddy rice facilitate optimization in Amax and WUEi while, is challenged by drought-vulnerable plant hydraulic conductance. PMID:26938938

  19. Water absorption characteristics of novel Cu/LDPE nanocomposite for use in intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xianping; Cai, Shuizhou; Hu, Junhui; Xie, Changsheng

    2006-11-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs), especially the copper-containing IUDs (Cu-IUDs), are one of the worldwide used forms for birth control, owing to their advantages of long-lasting and high efficacy, economy, safety, and reversibility. However, it is not perfect for the existing Cu-IUDs; some shortcomings related to its side effects have not been overcome yet. For this reason, a new Cu-IUDs material, the copper/low-density polyethylene (Cu/LDPE) nanocomposite, has been developed in our research team. The structure and water uptake characteristics of this new Cu-IUDs material have been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and gravimetric analysis in this paper. The results of XRD, SEM, EDS, and FT-IR show three important outcomes associated with the structure of the nanocomposite. First, the nanocomposite is hybrid of the polymer and the copper nanoparticles (nano-Cu). Second, porosities, nano-Cu aggregates, and primary alcohol (R--CH(2)--OH) are existed in the nanocomposite. Third, the nano-Cu aggregates are distributed uniformly in the polymer matrix in general. The results of Gravimetric analysis, which associated with the water uptake characteristics of the nanocomposite, exhibit that the water absorption behavior of the nanocomposite obeys the classical diffusion theory very well, the water uptake of the nanocomposite increases with the increasing of the nano-Cu loading, and that the water uptake ability of the nanocomposite with 15.0 wt % nano-Cu (50 nm in diameter) is about 150 times larger than that of the base resin and about 45 times higher than that of the Cu/LDPE microcomposite with 15.0 wt % copper microparticles (5 microm in diameter). These water uptake characteristics are mainly attributed to the structure of the Cu/LDPE composites and the size effect of the nano-Cu. PMID:16637033

  20. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  1. Comparison of x-ray absorption spectra between water and ice: New ice data with low pre-edge absorption cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Kaya, Sarp; Segtnan, Vegard H.; Chen, Chen; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2014-07-21

    The effect of crystal growth conditions on the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of ice is investigated through detailed analysis of the spectral features. The amount of ice defects is found to be minimized on hydrophobic surfaces, such as BaF{sub 2}(111), with low concentration of nucleation centers. This is manifested through a reduction of the absorption cross-section at 535 eV, which is associated with distorted hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, a connection is made between the observed increase in spectral intensity between 544 and 548 eV and high-symmetry points in the electronic band structure, suggesting a more extended hydrogen-bond network as compared to ices prepared differently. The spectral differences for various ice preparations are compared to the temperature dependence of spectra of liquid water upon supercooling. A double-peak feature in the absorption cross-section between 540 and 543 eV is identified as a characteristic of the crystalline phase. The connection to the interpretation of the liquid phase O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum is extensively discussed.

  2. Effect of line, soaking and cooking time on water absorption, texture and splitting of red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Zamindar, Nafiseh; Baghekhandan, Mohamad Shahedi; Nasirpour, Ali; Sheikhzeinoddin, Mahmoud

    2013-02-01

    Dry beans are rich sources of dietary fiber and phytochemicals such as flavonoids and phenolics that exhibit good functional properties. In current study line, cooking and soaking time effects were investigated on water absorption, splitting and texture of different Iranian red kidney beans to determine the best lines and the best soaking time related to them for industrial use. D81083 line had the highest level of water absorption after 24 h soaking followed by Akhtar and KS31164 lines while Azna, Goli and Naz lines had the lowest level of water absorption (p < 0.05). Akhtar and Sayyad had the highest level of splitting while KS31164 had the lowest level of splitting (p < 0.05). Soaking of Akhtar line for 24 h caused the highest level of water absorption accompanied with low splitting level. 24 h soaking and longer cooking time is recommended for Sayyad, while 12 h soaking and longer cooking time is recommended for KS31164 line. 24 h soaking causes higher level of water absorption and lower level of splitting in Derakhshan line. The effects of line, cooking and soaking time on red bean texture were significant (p < 0.01). PMID:24425894

  3. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the water continuum absorption in the infrared region. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The present theory for the continuous absorption that is due to the far-wing contribution of allowed lines is based on the quasistatic approximation for the far wing limit and the binary collision approximation of one absorber molecule and one bath molecule. The validity of the theory is discussed, and numerical results of the water-continuum absorption in the IR region are presented for comparison with experimental data. Good agreement is obtained for both the magnitude and temperature dependence of the absorption coefficients.

  4. Influence of drug physicochemical properties on absorption of water insoluble drug nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Quan, Peng; Zhang, Yaqiong; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Jie; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Fang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of drug physicochemical properties on bioavailability of water insoluble drug nanosuspensions, five drug nanosuspensions were prepared using high pressure homogenization. These nanosuspensions were similar in particle size and same in stabilizer. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction analysis showed the crystalline state of the freeze dried nanocrystals did not change. In vitro dissolution test in fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and in vivo bioavailability study in rats demonstrated that the nanosuspensions had higher dissolution rate and higher AUC0-t and the ratios of dissolvednano/dissolvedmicro in 120 min were well correlated with the ratios of AUC0-t nano/AUC0-t micro. Correlation analysis between drug physicochemical properties and AUC0-t nano was performed and four-grid interpolation method was employed for interpolation and smooth surface fitting to give a visible trend. The results revealed that drug with smaller melting point, logP value around 5 and polar surface area value in the range of 50-60 would gain higher AUC0-t nano and accordingly better absorption of its nanosuspension. Melting point, logP and polar surface area were factors that influence the absorption of drug nanosuspensions in this study. PMID:24184036

  5. Predictions of silicon avalanche photodiode detector performance in water vapor differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenimer, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance analyses are presented which establish that over most of the range of signals expected for a down-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operated at 16 km the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) is the preferred detector for DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor in the 730 nm spectral region. The higher quantum efficiency of the APD's, (0.8-0.9) compared to a photomultiplier's (0.04-0.18) more than offsets the higher noise of an APD receiver. In addition to offering lower noise and hence lower random error the APD's excellent linearity and impulse recovery minimize DIAL systematic errors attributable to the detector. Estimates of the effect of detector system parameters on overall random and systematic DIAL errors are presented, and performance predictions are supported by laboratory characterization data for an APD receiver system.

  6. Granular activated carbon adsorption of organic micro-pollutants in drinking water and treated wastewater - Aligning breakthrough curves and capacities.

    PubMed

    Zietzschmann, Frederik; Stützer, Christian; Jekel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) tests for the adsorption of organic micro-pollutants (OMP) were conducted with drinking water and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. In both waters, three influent OMP concentration levels were tested. As long as the influent OMP concentrations are below certain thresholds, the relative breakthrough behavior is not impacted in the respective water. Accordingly, the GAC capacity for OMP is directly proportional to the influent OMP concentration in the corresponding water. The differences between the OMP breakthrough curves in drinking water and WWTP effluent can be attributed to the concentrations of the low molecular weight acid and neutral (LMW) organics of the waters. Presenting the relative OMP concentrations (c/c0) over the specific throughput of the LMW organics (mg LMW organics/g GAC), the OMP breakthrough curves in drinking water and WWTP effluent superimpose each other. This superimposition can be further increased if the UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) of the LMW organics is considered. In contrast, using the specific throughput of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) did not suffice to obtain superimposed breakthrough curves. Thus, the LMW organics are the major water constituent impacting OMP adsorption onto GAC. The results demonstrate that knowing the influent OMP and LMW organics concentrations (and UV254) of different waters, the OMP breakthroughs and GAC capacities corresponding to any water can be applied to all other waters. PMID:26854606

  7. Evaluation of tropospheric water vapor profiling using eye-safe, infrared differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, B.J. |; Machol, J.L.; Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1996-05-14

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. In addition, these should be acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. To date, application of profiles have been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness and high operating cost, or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost. Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the studies reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of solving some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameters representative of current technologies. These simulations are also applied to determine the strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application.

  8. Determination of aromatic compounds in water by solid phase microextraction and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. 1. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wittkamp, B.L.; Hawthorne, S.B.; Tilotta, D.C.

    1997-03-15

    A simple method is described for determining aromatic compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, etc.) in water that combines solid phase microextraction (SPME) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. The extraction medium consists of a small `chip` of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (total volume of nearly 80 {mu}L) that is immersed in a water sample contaminated with an aromatic compound. Equilibrium is first allowed to establish between the analyte in the water and the extraction medium, and the concentration of the aromatic compound is then determined directly in the sorbent chip by UV spectroscopy. Calibration information on this new method was obtained for 11 aromatic compounds commonly found in unleaded gasoline (e.g., benzene, toluene, naphthalene, etc). It was found that equilibrium is established in the range of 30-50 min, with the exception of 1-methylnaphthalene and naphthalene, which equilibrated within 100 min. Detection limits for the aromatic compounds at their equilibration times range from 0.40 to 12 ppb except for benzene (97 ppb). Relative standard deviations of the SPME-UV measurements are 3-12%. 17 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Diffusion Coefficients of Water and Leachables in Methacrylate-based Crosslinked Polymers using Absorption Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Park, Jonggu; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of water into dentin adhesive polymers and leaching of unpolymerized monomer from the adhesive are linked to their mechanical softening and hydrolytic degradation. Therefore, diffusion coefficient data are critical for the mechanical design of these polymeric adhesives. In this study, diffusion coefficients of water and leachables were obtained for sixteen methacrylate-based crosslinked polymers using absorption experiments. The experimental mass change data was interpreted using numerical solution of the two-dimensional diffusion equations. The calculated diffusion coefficients varied from 1.05 × 10−8 cm2/sec (co-monomer TMTMA) to 3.15 × 10−8 cm2/sec (co-monomer T4EGDMA). Correlation of the diffusion coefficients with crosslink density and hydrophilicity showed an inverse trend (R2 = 0.41). The correlation of diffusion coefficient with crosslink density and hydrophilicity are closer for molecules differing by simple repeat units (R2 = 0.95). These differences in the trends reveal mechanisms of interaction of the diffusing water with the polymer structure. PMID:22430592

  10. Ground-based differential absorption lidar for water-vapor and temperature profiling: methodology.

    PubMed

    Bsenberg, J

    1998-06-20

    A comprehensive formulation of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) methodology is presented that explicitly includes details of the spectral distributions of both the transmitted and the backscattered light. The method is important for high-accuracy water-vapor retrievals and in particular for temperature measurements. Probability estimates of the error that is due to Doppler-broadened Rayleigh scattering based on an extended experimental data set are presented, as is an analytical treatment of errors that are due to averaging in the nonlinear retrieval scheme. System performance requirements are derived that show that water-vapor retrievals with an accuracy of better than 5% and temperature retrievals with an accuracy of better than 1 K in the entire troposphere are feasible if the error that results from Rayleigh-Doppler correction can be avoided. A modification of the DIAL technique, high-spectral-resolution DIAL avoids errors that are due to Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscatter and permits simultaneous water-vapor and wind measurements with the same system. PMID:18273353

  11. Investigation on liquid film of urea-water solutions with diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huinan; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Chen, Benting; Hu, Jiarui; Su, Mingxu; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of multiparameter of liquid films (e.g., film thickness and concentration) is very important to understand the film formation processes in industrial applications. Here, a novel diode laser absorption spectroscopy (DLAS) sensor was developed to simultaneously measure the liquid film thickness and concentration of urea-water solutions by forming the transmittance ratio at two wavenumber positions. The performance of the sensor employed two diode lasers (6613.25 and 7187.50 cm-1) was first validated using a calibration tool providing liquid film of urea-water solutions with known film thickness (100-1000 μm) and mass fractions (5-50 wt%), and then, the sensor was applied to study a free-falling film of urea-water solutions on a vertical transparent quartz plate. Shadowgraph images were simultaneously taken as a means to obtain falling film thickness, and it was observed that measured film thickness was in good agreement with DLAS method and shadowgraph technique, and the deviation between these two techniques was 4.1 % when the falling film was stable.

  12. Water absorption of poly(methyl methacrylate) measured by vertical interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    N'Diaye, Mambaye; Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Massin, Philippe; Baslé, Michel Felix; Chappard, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) is widely used to prepare orthopedic cements. They are in direct contact with cells and body fluids. PMMA, despite its hydrophobic nature, can absorb ~2% w/w water. We have evaluated by vertical interference microscopy if water absorption can produce a significant swelling in different types of PMMA blocks: pure, with a plasticizer, with a cross-linker, and in two types of commercial bone cements. Graphite rods which do not swell in water were used as internal standard. Hardness, indentation modulus, plastic, and elastic works were determined by nanoindentation under a 25mN fixed force. Vertical interference microscopy was used to image the polymer in the dry state and hydrated states (after 24 h in distilled water). On the surface of the polished polymers (before and after hydration), we measured roughness by the fractal dimension, the swelling in the vertical and the lateral directions. For each polymer block, four images were obtained and values were averaged. Comparison and standardization of the images in the dry and hydrated states were done with Matlab software. The average value measured on the graphite rod between the two images (dried and hydrated) was used for standardization of the images which were visualized in 3D. After grinding, a small retraction was noticeable between the surface of the rod and the polymers. A retraction ring was also visible around the graphite rod. After hydration, only the pure PMMA and bone cements had a significant swelling in the vertical direction. The presence of polymer beads in the cements limited the swelling in the lateral direction. Swelling parameters correlated with the nanoindentation data. PMMA can swell by absorbing a small amount of water and this induces a swelling that varies with the polymer composition and particle inclusions. PMID:22799564

  13. VARIABILITY OF WATER AND OXYGEN ABSORPTION BANDS IN THE DISK-INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5%-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H{sub 2}O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared with atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.

  14. Forest structure and biomass estimates derived from red edge and water absorption geometry using AVIRIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Nelson Wellausen

    Geometric analysis of spectral signatures collected from known forest sites using narrow spectral bands in the red-edge and five water absorption regions are the basis for developing ratios to estimate forest biomass and canopy structure. The study area used to test the methodology was located within Congaree Swamp National Monument in central South Carolina. This is one of the oldest stands of hardwood bottomland forest preserved in the United States. Low altitude-high spatial resolution AVIRIS data collected at 3,800-meter altitude, that produced a 3.8 meter spatial resolution, were associated with USGS-NPS National Vegetation Inventory data in order to develop narrow band spectral analysis. Ratios were developed based on geometric properties of spectral signatures associated with biomass and canopy categories identified during spectral analysis and used as input data for a series of high dimensional unsupervised classifications. The ratios were developed from the four best performing spectral intervals: the red edge and three water absorption regions. Classification results were compared to test sites for accuracy assessment. The ratios produced from selected spectral bands in the regions between 707 and 754 nm, 918 and 994 nm, 1448 and 1480nm, and 1963 and 1993 nm showed significant spectral discrimination of vegetation features associated with the three categories of biomass and canopy. The research indicates that the limited areal coverage provided by ground truth data prevented a good correlation between image processing results and vegetation inventory data. Nonetheless, results of spectral analyses showed that biomass and canopy attributes could be identified using band ratios based on geometric properties of electromagnetic responses in the spectral regions selected. It is recommended that further research should be based on more extensive ground truth in order to evaluate forest feature detection ability of the ratios proposed. This methodology can be applied to other forest areas with minor adjustments.

  15. Thermodynamic assessment of the effect of strongly swelling polymer hydrogels on the water retention capacity of model porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikova, N. B.; Smagin, A. V.; Sidorova, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of different rates and fractions of strongly swelling polymer hydrogel (SSPH) based on radiation-grafted polyacrylamide on the water retention capacity and structural state of model porous media in the form of quartz sand fractions with different degrees of dispersion has been studied. The water retention curve (WRC) of sandy porous media obtained by the capillarimetric method has been used as a basic thermodynamic parameter. An original method has been proposed for the comparative study of the effect of SSPHs on the WRC based on the approximation of data by the nonlinear van Genuchten function followed by differential analysis. Equations are given for the calculation of capillary water capacity and structural curves of pore size distribution. SSPH concentrations in the range 0.05-0.2% of enclosing material weight reliably increase the water retention capacity of sandy fractions and the total, capillary, and field capacities (determined by the Voronin secant method) by 2-3 times; as well as the range of available water and the contents of fine macropores and mesopores. Factors limiting the swelling of SSPHs in model porous media have been revealed.

  16. Ground-state ammonia and water in absorption towards Sgr B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, E. S.; Bergman, P.; Black, J. H.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Larsson, B.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Falgarone, E.; Frisk, U.; Olberg, M.; Sandqvist, Aa.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Observations of transitions to the ground-state of a molecule are essential to obtain a complete picture of its excitation and chemistry in the interstellar medium, especially in diffuse and/or cold environments. For the important interstellar molecules H2O and NH3, these ground-state transitions are heavily absorbed by the terrestrial atmosphere, hence not observable from the ground. Aims: We attempt to understand the chemistry of nitrogen, oxygen, and their important molecular forms, NH3 and H2O in the interstellar medium of the Galaxy. Methods: We have used the Odin* submillimetre-wave satellite telescope to observe the ground state transitions of ortho-ammonia and ortho-water, including their 15N, 18O, and 17O isotopologues, towards Sgr B2. The extensive simultaneous velocity coverage of the observations, >500 km s-1, ensures that we can probe the conditions of both the warm, dense gas of the molecular cloud Sgr B2 near the Galactic centre, and the more diffuse gas in the Galactic disk clouds along the line-of-sight. Results: We present ground-state NH3 absorption in seven distinct velocity features along the line-of-sight towards Sgr B2. We find a nearly linear correlation between the column densities of NH3 and CS, and a square-root relation to N2H+. The ammonia abundance in these diffuse Galactic disk clouds is estimated to be about 0.5-1 × 10-8, similar to that observed for diffuse clouds in the outer Galaxy. On the basis of the detection of H_218O absorption in the 3 kpc arm, and the absence of such a feature in the H_217O spectrum, we conclude that the water abundance is around 10-7, compared to ~10-8 for NH3. The Sgr B2 molecular cloud itself is seen in absorption in NH3, 15NH3, H2O, H_218O, and H_217O, with emission superimposed on the absorption in the main isotopologues. The non-LTE excitation of NH3 in the environment of Sgr B2 can be explained without invoking an unusually hot (500 K) molecular layer. A hot layer is similarly not required to explain the line profiles of the 11,0≥ts10,1 transition from H2O and its isotopologues. The relatively weak 15NH3 absorption in the Sgr B2 molecular cloud indicates a high [ 14N/15N] isotopic ratio >600. The abundance ratio of H_218O and H_217O is found to be relatively low, 2.5-3. These results together indicate that the dominant nucleosynthesis process in the Galactic centre is CNO hydrogen burning. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes), and the centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES, France). The Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) was the industrial prime contractor and is also responsible for the satellite operation.

  17. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was humidified. The difference in perceived CO concentration showed a clear correlation to the water vapor content in the sample air. For COS we could show that changes in water vapor also impacted on the perceived COS concentrations; the raise of the water vapor concentration would lead to an increasing underestimation of the COS concentration. Drying the air using a Nafion Dryer before entering the COS/CO Analyzer eliminated any water vapor induced artifacts and showed no adverse effects on the quality of the conducted measurements. *Integrated cavity output spectroscopy

  18. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  19. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the hydrogen bond network in the bulk water of aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Näslund, Lars-Ake; Edwards, David C; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G M; Myneni, Satish; Nilsson, Anders

    2005-07-14

    We utilized X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) in order to study the ion solvation effect on the bulk hydrogen bonding structure of water. The fine structures in the X-ray absorption spectra are sensitive to the local environment of the probed water molecule related to the hydrogen bond length and angles. By varying the concentration of ions, we can distinguish between contributions from water in the bulk and in the first solvation sphere. We show that the hydrogen bond network in bulk water, in terms of forming and breaking hydrogen bonds as detected by XAS/XRS, remains unchanged, and only the water molecules in the close vicinity to the ions are affected. PMID:16833935

  1. Estimation of the CO{sub 2} absorption capacities in aqueous 2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethanol and its blends with MDEA and TEA in the presence of SO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bonenfant, D.; Minleault, M.; Hausler, R.

    2007-12-15

    A study of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2})/CO{sub 2} mixtures absorption has been carried out in aqueous 2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethanol (AEE) solution and its blends with N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and triethanolamine (TEA) to estimate the influence of SO{sub 2}, MDEA, and TEA on the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of the AEE. The CO{sub 2} absorption loading has been estimated in 15 wt % AEE alone and in the presence of either 5 and 10 wt % MDEA or 5 and 10 wt % TEA solutions with 100 vol % CO{sub 2} and 5.03 and 15.02 vol % SO{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures at a starting temperature of 296 K and flow rates of 3.067, 3.229, and 3.605 L/min, respectively. The results revealed that the presence of SO{sub 2} in the gas decreases the CO{sub 2} absorption rate and loading in the AEE solution as a function of the concentration of SO{sub 2}. The additions of 5 and 10 wt % of MDEA and TEA do not seem to influence the CO{sub 2} absorption rate in the AEE solution. Moreover, the addition of MDEA increases slightly the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of AEE, while TEA decreases the absorption capacity of AEE in the absence and presence Of SO{sub 2}. These effects were enhanced with increases of MDEA and TEA. Altogether, the results indicated that the blend of 15 wt % AEE + 10 wt % MDEA represents an interesting solvent which could be used as absorbent for the removal of CO{sub 2} from emission into the atmosphere by industries.

  2. Atmospheric-water absorption features near 2.2 micrometers and their importance in high spectral resolution remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Clark, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atmospheric gases and water vapor is an accepted fact in terrestrial remote sensing. Until recently, only a general knowledge of atmospheric effects was required for analysis of remote sensing data; however, with the advent of high spectral resolution imaging devices, detailed knowledge of atmospheric absorption bands has become increasingly important for accurate analysis. Detailed study of high spectral resolution aircraft data at the U.S. Geological Survey has disclosed narrow absorption features centered at approximately 2.17 and 2.20 micrometers not caused by surface mineralogy. Published atmospheric transmission spectra and atmospheric spectra derived using the LOWTRAN-5 computer model indicate that these absorption features are probably water vapor. Spectral modeling indicates that the effects of atmospheric absorption in this region are most pronounced in spectrally flat materials with only weak absorption bands. Without correction and detailed knowledge of the atmospheric effects, accurate mapping of surface mineralogy (particularly at low mineral concentrations) is not possible.

  3. Ultra-high adsorption capacity of zeolitic imidazole framework-67 (ZIF-67) for removal of malachite green from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chang, Hsuan-Ang

    2015-11-01

    Zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs), a new class of adsorbents, are proposed to adsorb Malachite Green (MG) in water. Particularly, ZIF-67 was selected owing to its stability in water and straightforward synthesis. The as-synthesized ZIF-67 was characterized and used to adsorb MG from water. Factors affecting the adsorption capacity were investigated including mixing time, temperature, the presence of salts and pH. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and thermodynamics of the MG adsorption to ZIF-67 were also studied. The adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 for MG could be as high as 2430mgg(-1) at 20°C, which could be improved at the higher temperatures. Such an ultra-high adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 was almost 10-times of those of conventional adsorbents, including activated carbons and biopolymers. A mechanism for the high adsorption capacity was proposed and possibly attributed to the π-π stacking interaction between MG and ZIF-67. ZIF-67 also could be conveniently regenerated by washing with ethanol and the regeneration efficiency could remain 95% up to 4 cycles of the regeneration. ZIF-67 was also able to remove MG from the aquaculture wastewater, in which MG can be typically found. These features enable ZIF-67 to be one of the most effective and promising adsorbent to remove MG from water. PMID:25697373

  4. Genetic determinants for intramuscular fat content and water-holding capacity in mice selected for high muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Riyan; Schmitt, Armin O.; Yang, Hyuna; de Villena, Fernando Pardo Manuel; Palmer, Abraham A.; Brockmann, Gudrun A.

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat content and water-holding capacity are important traits in livestock as they influence meat quality, nutritive value of the muscle, and animal health. As a model for livestock, two inbred lines of the Berlin Muscle Mouse population, which had been long-term selected for high muscle mass, were used to identify genomic regions affecting intramuscular fat content and water-holding capacity. The intramuscular fat content of the Musculus longissimus was on average 1.4 times higher in BMMI806 than in BMMI816 mice. This was accompanied by a 1.5 times lower water-holding capacity of the Musculus quadriceps in BMMI816 mice. Linkage analyses with 332 G3 animals of reciprocal crosses between these two lines revealed quantitative trait loci for intramuscular fat content on chromosome 7 and for water-holding capacity on chromosome 2. In part, the identified loci coincide with syntenic regions in pigs in which genetic effects for the same traits were found. Therefore, these muscle-weight-selected mouse lines and the produced intercross populations are valuable genetic resources to identify genes that could also contribute to meat quality in other species. PMID:21732194

  5. Integrated Water Resources Management: Relevant concept or irrelevant buzzword? A capacity building and research agenda for Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zaag, Pieter

    This article examines the concept ‘Integrated Water Resources Management’ (IWRM) and inquires as to its relevance for the Southern African region. The paper first acknowledges the contributions made to IWRM by three regional initiatives-WaterNet, the Water Research Fund for Southern Africa (WARFSA), and the Southern African chapter of the Global Water Partnership. Then, three important aspects of IWRM are highlighted: that IWRM requires institutional capacity to integrate, which often is a scarce resource; that IWRM is neither solution nor recipe, but rather a perspective or way of looking at problems with a view to solving them through transparent and inclusive decision-making processes; and that IWRM should explicitly deal with the fact that water tends to build asymmetrical relationships between people, communities and nations. An IWRM agenda is subsequently set out, focussing on five critical issues: the dilemma between economic development and sustainability; the unresolved issue of water as an economic good; the place and role of rainfed farmers in IWRM; the importance of training and teaching; and the need for building reflexive capacity in the new and existing water institutions. The paper concludes that IWRM is a relevant, yet elusive and fuzzy concept. Evidence from Southern Africa and around the world shows that IWRM inspires a new generation of water managers and researchers to act creatively; assists in addressing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and instils mutual respect, understanding and co-operation among water professionals in Southern Africa.

  6. Effect of a Disintegration Mechanism on Wetting, Water Absorption, and Disintegration Time of Orodispersible Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Pabari, RM; Ramtoola, Z

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of disintegration mechanism of various types of disintegrants on the absorption ratio (AR), wetting time (WT), and disintegration time (DT) of orodispersible tablets (ODTs). ODTs were prepared by direct compression using mannitol as filler and disintegrants selected from a range of swellable, osmotic, and porous disintegrants. Tablets formed were characterized for their water AR, WT, and DT. The porosity and mechanical strength of the tablets were also measured. Results show that the DT of formulated ODTs was directly related to the WT and was a function of the disintegration mechanism of the disintegrant used. The lowest WT and DT were observed for tablets formulated using the osmotic disintegrant sodium citrate and these tablets also showed the lowest AR and porosity. The wetting and disintegration of tablets containing the highly swellable disintegrant, sodium starch glycollate, was slowest despite their high water AR and high tablet porosity. Rapid wetting and disintegration of ODTs were therefore not necessarily related to the porosity of the tablets. PMID:23112534

  7. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-10-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (~2.5 eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350 °C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ~0.2 eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron-hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge.

  8. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-01-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (?2.5?eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350?C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ?0.2?eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron-hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26498984

  9. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-01-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (∼2.5 eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350 °C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ∼0.2 eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron–hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26498984

  10. Terahertz Absorption of Chemicals in Water: Ideal and Real Solutions and Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkner, Stefan; Niehues, Gudrun; Schmidt, Diedrich A.; Bründermann, Erik

    2013-08-01

    Complex biomolecules, such as proteins in liquids, show specific terahertz dynamics in reactions or in protein folding as measured by static or kinetic absorption. The complex nature of biomolecules requires investigating their frequency, space, and time characteristics via a multimodal approach that changes external parameters such as temperature, pressure, concentration, and solvents. Terahertz spectroscopy can add a new and deeper understanding to existing techniques in other spectral regions of the biological dynamics in the solvent of life, i.e. water. To understand more deeply complex liquids or macromolecules in water, it is essential to understand the building blocks of solutions, which may contain salts, or are components of larger molecules such as amino acids. Although this research mainly affects basic science, a few applications are in progress, some create interest in industry, and several pathways for new applications relevant to medical science are in view. In this article, we review THz spectroscopy of solutions and concentrate our description to liquids with small solutes such as salts and amino acids, and review the prerequisites for obtaining THz data from aqueous solutions.

  11. Estimating Dispersivity, Mass Recovery, and Water Hold Up in Field-Scale Leaching Studies by Use of a Capacity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. F.; Carleton, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    The USEPA uses field-scale tests (about 1 ha) to evaluate the leaching potential of pesticides used under realistic agricultural conditions. These tests include a bromide tracer to assess the hydrodynamics of the study site. We analyzed 21 of these bromide leaching studies to determine dispersivity, applied tracer mass recovery, and water retention in the vadose zone. Breakthrough curves were generated for various depths (typically 3 to 4 depths at 1-m intervals) at each of the 21 sites as functions of cumulative infiltration, using measured bromide pore water concentrations. Because the field sites were subjected to natural hydrologic conditions (i.e., evaporation, precipitation, and occasional irrigation), the leaching flow rate at each depth was not directly measurable, so leaching rates were estimated using a capacity model driven by measured daily rainfall, evaporation, and temperature. With the leaching rate thus estimated, the first moment of the bromide breakthrough at each depth was determined. Using the first moment, the effective soil-pore water volume was estimated, which allowed the fitting of a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model and optimization of a dispersion coefficient. Results showed indication of an increase in dispersivity with depth (e.g. dispersivity averaged about 10 cm at the 1-m depth, and around 35 cm at the 4-m depth). Peclet numbers ranged from 4 to 40, but averaged about 10 and varied little with depth. Using this method, apparent recovery of applied bromide varied widely from 8% to 250%, with an average of 60% (standard deviation also 60%) indicating the uncertainty involved in estimating breakthrough curves using field-scale data. Apparent water holdup was consistently greater than the reported field capacity, indicating that measured field capacity may provide low estimates of soil water for use in capacity models. It is important to note that the capacity model concept coupled to the advection dispersion model is the USEPA standard model (e.g., PRZM) used to assess pesticide leaching, and the work here will assist in properly parameterizing dispersivity and water holdup for that model. Plot showing that the capacity model's effective water requirements (y axis) are greater than field capacity (x axis). A 1:1 line also shown.

  12. A theoretical investigation of gaseous absorption by water droplets from SO2-HNO3-NH3-CO2-HCl mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adewuyi, Y. G.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    A physical-chemical model is developed and used to investigate gaseous absorption by water droplets from trace gas mixtures. The model is an extension of that of Carmichael and Peters (1979) and includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, HNO3, CO2, and HCl. Gas phase depletion is also considered. Presented results demonstrate that the absorption behavior of raindrops is strongly dependent on drop size, fall distance, trace gas concentrations, and the chemical and physical properties of the constituents of the mixture. In addition, when gas phase depletion is considered, the absorption rates and equilibrium values are also dependent on the precipitation rate itself. Also, the trace constituents liquid phase concentrations may be a factor of six or more lower when gas depletion is considered then when the depletion is ignored. However, the hydrogen ion concentration may be insensitive to the gas phase depletion.

  13. Infiltration, water holding capacity and growth patterns of biological soil crusts on sand dunes under arid and temperate climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Yair, A.; Veste, M.

    2012-04-01

    Water repellency and, once wetted, finer pores and grains, pore clogging as well as higher water holding capacities of biological soil crusts (BSCs) are known to inhibit infiltration and to promote surface runoff, thereby holding moisture inside the crusts and redirecting rain off the slope towards the dune base. On the other hand, available water is crucial for growth and development of crust microphytes, mosses and vascular plants. In a 2-factorial design we studied the relation between crust microstructure, infiltration and water holding capacity under arid and temperate conditions (Factor A: Climate) on BSCs sampled along a catena on mobile sand dunes (Factor B: Catena). The arid and temperate study sites were located near Nizzana, Israel (precipitation: ~80 mm a-1, PET: ~2500 mm a-1) and Lieberose, Germany (precipitation: ~600 mm a-1, PET: ~750 mm a-1), respectively. BSCs were sampled near the dune crest, at the center of the dune slope and at the dune base at each site. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize BSC development and microstructure. Infiltration was determined using microinfiltrometry under controlled moisture conditions in the lab, water holding capacities were determined after water saturation of the dry BSCs. Wettability of the crusts was characterized using a "repellency index", which was calculated from water and ethanol sorptivities. It was found that thickness and density of biogenic elements in the BSCs increased downslope at each study site and correlated positively with water holding capacities and negatively with infiltration and wettability with one exception: At the dune base of the temperate site, where water holding capacity was highest, infiltration and wettability increased again due to emergence of mosses. It is hypothesized that a positive feedback between crust growth and surface runoff intensifies downslope, resulting in highest water availability in the topsoil of the dune base. Under arid conditions, low amounts of total precipitation as well as extended periods of drought preclude growth of mosses and vascular vegetation, and facilitate the development of thicker microbiotic crusts. Under temperate conditions, however, BSCs, initially present in young ecosystems at the dune base, promote favorable for moss and vascular plant growth moisture conditions, which then take over. Hence, BSC induced water redistribution has important implications for the development of vegetational patterns on a dune scale.

  14. Mixed base of hydrophilic ointment and purified lanolin to improve the drug release rate and absorption of water of minocycline hydrochloride ointment for treatment of bedsores.

    PubMed

    Shigeyama, M; Ohgaya, T; Kawashima, Y; Takeuchi, H; Hino, T

    1999-06-01

    A desired ointment bases for better treatment of bedsores was developed to improve the release rate of minocycline hydrochloride (MH) and the water absorption capacity using various types of hydrophobic to hydrophilic ointment base. The influence of purified lanolin (PL) on the release behavior of MH from hydrophilic ointment (HO) base was primarily focused on. It was found that the release rate of drug increased with increase in the hydrophilicity of the base. A linear correlation between the apparent release rate constant of drug from the HO and PL mixed ointment base at various combination ratios and the elution of ointment base was noted. The HO ointment base containing 30% PL had the highest apparent release rate constant of MH. The mixed ointment base with the lowest viscosity showed the highest absorption of water and elution of ointment base. In conclusion, it was found that HO (70%) and PL (30%) mixed ointment base was a promising candidate for better treatment of bedsores. PMID:10399832

  15. Collaboration with HEIs: A Key Capacity Building Block for the Uganda Water and Sanitation Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaga, Sam

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of public service staff in developing countries is crucial for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Literature from developed countries shows that, working with higher education institutions (HEIs), industries have improved their human resource capacity through continuing professional development. This paper reports on research…

  16. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1995-04-03

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution, acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost, are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. Application of profiles acquired with current techniques, have, to date, been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness of solution [e.g. high resolution infrared (IR) Fourier transform radiometry], poor spatial and temporal coverage and high operating cost (e.g. radiosondes), or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost (e.g. Raman lidar). Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the study reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of to solve some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameterizations representative of current technologies. These models are also applied to diagnose and evaluate other strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application. This work is to continue in the direction of evaluating yet smaller and lower-cost laser diode-based systems for routine monitoring of the lower altitudes using photon counting detection methods. We regard the present report as interim in nature and will update and extend it as a final report at the end of the term of the contract.

  17. Seed ultrastructure and water absorption pathway of the root-parasitic plant Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Joel, Daniel M.; Bar, Hilla; Mayer, Alfred M.; Plakhine, Dina; Ziadne, Hammam; Westwood, James H.; Welbaum, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Obligate root parasitic plants of the Orobanchaceae do not germinate unless they chemically detect a host plant nearby. Members of this family, like Orobanche, Phelipanche and Striga, are noxious weeds that cause heavy damage to agriculture. In spite of their economic impact, only a few light microscopical studies of their minute seeds have been published, and there is no knowledge of their ultrastructure and of the role each tissue plays during the steps preceding germination. This paper describes the ultrastructure of Phelipanche seeds and contributes to our understanding of seed tissue function. Methods Seeds of P. aegyptiaca were examined under light, scanning electron, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy following various fixations and staining protocols. The results were interpreted with physiological data regarding mode of water absorption and germination stimulation. Key Results and Conclusions The endothelium, which is the inner layer of the testa, rapidly absorbs water. Its interconnected cells are filled with mucilage and contain labyrinthine walls, facilitating water accumulation for germination that starts after receiving germination stimuli. Swelling of the endothelium leads to opening of the micropyle. The perisperm cells underneath this opening mediate between the rhizosphere and the embryo and are likely to be the location for the receptors of germination stimuli. The other perisperm cells are loaded with lipids and protein bodies, as are the endosperm and parts of the embryo. In the endosperm, the oil bodies fuse with each other while they are intact in the embryo and perisperm. Plasmodesmata connect the perisperm cells to each other, and the cells near the micropyle tightly surround the emerging seedling. These perisperm cells, and also the proximal embryo cells, have dense cytoplasmic contents, and they seem to represent the two seed components that are actively involved in transfer of reserve nutrients to the developing seedling during germination. PMID:22025523

  18. Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy of Amphipathic Model Peptides at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Kerth, Andreas; Erbe, Andreas; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    The linear sequence KLAL (KLALKLALKALKAALKLA-NH2) and its corresponding d,l-isomers k9a10-KLAL (KLALKLALkaLKAALKLA-NH2) and l11k12-KLAL (KLALKLALKAlkAALKLA-NH2) are model compounds for potentially amphipathic α-helical peptides which are able to bind to membranes and to increase the membrane permeability in a structure- and target-dependent manner (Dathe and Wieprecht, 1999) We first studied the secondary structure of KLAL and its analogs bound to the air/water using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. For the peptide films the shape and position of the amide I and amide II bands indicate that the KLAL adopts at large areas per molecule an α-helical secondary structure, whereas at higher surface pressures or smaller areas it converts into a β-sheet structure. This transition could be observed in the compression isotherm as well as during the adsorption at the air/water interface from the subphase as a function of time. The secondary structures are essentially orientated parallel to the air/water interface. The analogs with d-amino acids in two different positions of the sequence, k9a10-KLAL and l11k12-KLAL, form only β-sheet structures at all surface pressures. The observed results are interpreted using a comparison of hydrophobic moments calculated for α-helices and β-sheets. The differences between the hydrophobic moments calculated using the consensus scale are not large. Using the optimal matching hydrophobicity scale or the whole-residue hydrophobicity scale the β-sheet even has the larger hydrophobic moment. PMID:15189871

  19. Chemical forces and water holding capacity study of heat-induced myofibrillar protein gel as affected by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziye; Yang, Yuling; Tang, Xiaozhi; Chen, Yinji; You, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effects of high pressure (100-500 MPa) on chemical forces and water holding capacity of heat-induced myofibrillar protein (MP) gel were investigated. As pressure increased, total sulfhydryl (SH) group content decreased and absolute value of zeta potential increased, which suggested the formation of disulfide bonds and increased the strength of electrostatic repulsion. Surface hydrophobicity and normalized intensity of the 760 cm(-1) band showed a maximum value at 200 MPa, indicating that 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for hydrophobic interactions. Hydrogen bonding of MP gel was strengthened at pressures of 300 MPa and above. Bound water (T2b) had lower water mobility and was more closely associated with proteins. Free water (T22) had higher water mobility. More free water was attracted by proteins or trapped in gel structure, and transferred to bound or immobilized water as pressure increased. A value of 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for the water holding capacity of MP gel. PMID:26041172

  20. Using the solvent retention capacity test when breeding wheat for diverse production environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solvent retention capacity (SRC) test is used to predict commercial baking performance of soft wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by measuring the capacity of flour to retain each of four sol- vents—water, Na 2CO3, sucrose, and lactic acid— to assess overall absorption capacity, starch damage, pentosa...

  1. A three-dimensional water quality model to evaluate the environmental capacity of nitrogen and phosphorus in Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Keqiang; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Zhang, Longjun; Wang, Xiulin

    2015-02-15

    Jiaozhou Bay has recently suffered from serious problems with pollution and eutrophication. Thus, land-based pollutant load must be reduced through a national control program. In this study, we developed a 3D water quality model to determine the environmental capacity of nitrogen and phosphorus in Jiaozhou Bay. A 3D hydrodynamic model (the estuarine, coastal, and ocean modeling system with sediments) was coupled with a water quality model, which was adapted from the dynamic model of nitrogen and phosphorus for a mesocosm near Jiaozhou Bay. The water quality model is divided into seven components: dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, phytoplankton, zooplankton, detritus, dissolved organic nitrogen, and dissolved organic phosphorus. Furthermore, it was calibrated based on data collected from Jiaozhou Bay in 2003. The proposed model effectively reproduced the spatiotemporal variability in nutrient concentration, thus suggesting that a reasonable numerical representation of the prototype system must be developed for further evaluation of environmental capacity. PMID:25549824

  2. Longitudinal dose distribution and energy absorption in PMMA and water cylinders undergoing CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of longitudinal dose distribution provides the most direct view of the accumulated dose in computed tomography (CT) scanning. The purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive study of dose distribution width and energy absorption with a wide range of subject sizes and beam irradiated lengths. Methods: Cumulative dose distribution along the z-axis was calculated based on the previously published CT dose equilibration data by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)] and a mechanism for computing dose on axial lines by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. Full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), the total energy (E) absorbed in a small cylinder of unit mass per centimeter square about the central or peripheral axis, and the energy (E{sub in}) absorbed inside irradiated length (L) were subsequently extracted from the dose distribution. Results: Extensive results of FWHM, FWTM, and E{sub in}/E were presented on the central and peripheral axes of infinitely long PMMA (diameters 6–50 cm) and water (diameters 6–55 cm) cylinders with L < 100 cm. FWHM was greater than the primary beam width only on the central axes of large phantoms and also with L ranging from a few centimeter to about 33 cm. FWTM generally increased with phantom diameter, and could be up to 32 cm longer than irradiated length, depending on L, phantom diameter and axis, but was insensitive to phantom material (PMMA or water). E{sub in}/E increased with L and asymptotically approached unity for large L. As phantom diameter increased, E{sub in}/E generally decreased, but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. A heuristic explanation of dose distribution width results was presented. Conclusions: This study enables the reader to gain a comprehensive view of dose distribution width and energy absorption and provides useful data for estimating doses to organs inside or beyond the irradiated region. The dose length product (DLP) presented by CT scanners is equal to neither E nor E{sub in}. Both E and E{sub in} can be evaluated using the equations and results presented in this paper and are robust with both constant and variable tube current scanning techniques.

  3. Influence of wave and current flow on sediment-carrying capacity and sediment flux at the water-sediment interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Ruijie; Yu, Yonghai; Suo, Anning

    2014-01-01

    In nearshore waters, spatial and temporal scales of waves, tidal currents, and circulation patterns vary greatly. It is, therefore, difficult to combine these factors' effects when trying to predict sediment transport processes. This paper proposes the concept of significant wave velocity, which combines the effects of waves, tides, and ocean currents using the horizontal kinetic energy superposition principle. Through a comparison of the relationship between shear stress at the water-sediment interface and sediment-carrying capacity, assuming equilibrium sediment flux, a new formula for sediment-carrying capacity, which incorporates the concept of significant wave velocities, is derived. Sediment-carrying capacity is a function of the critical velocity, which increases with water depth and decreases with increasing relative roughness of the sea bed. Finally, data from field observation stations and simulations are used to test the proposed formula. The results show that the new formula is in good agreement with both field and simulation data. This new formula for sediment-carrying capacity can be used to simulate nearshore sediment transport. PMID:25259499

  4. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 data

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaepfer, D.; Borel, C.C.; Keller, J.

    1996-03-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 run resolution. This data includes information on constituents of the earth`s surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various rationing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. This work testS the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of tropospheric water vapor.

  5. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of tropospheric water vapor.

  6. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer stabilities.

  7. Field deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2014-11-01

    A field deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes has been constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including: a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with opto-mechanical and thermal stability, multi-stage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions, rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions, and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing and intercomparisons have been performed and are discussed. In general, the instrument has 150 m range resolution with 10 min temporal resolution - 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument was shown capable of autonomous long term field operation - 50 days with a >95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  8. Field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    A field-deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes was constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with optomechanical and thermal stability; multistage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions; rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions; and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing, and intercomparisons are performed and discussed. In general, the instrument has a 150 m range resolution with a 10 min temporal resolution; 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument is shown capable of autonomous long-term field operation - 50 days with a > 95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  9. Measurement of the spectral absorption of liquid water in melting snow with an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. We present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation, the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  10. Ultra Narrowband Optical Filters for Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Ingrid; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are being deployed to make vertical profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor from ground and airborne platforms. One goal of this work is to improve the technology of such DIAL systems that they could be deployed on space-based platforms. Since background radiation reduces system performance, it is important to reduce it. One way to reduce it is to narrow the bandwidth of the optical receiver system. However, since the DIAL technique uses two or more wavelengths, in this case separated by 0.1 nm, a fixed-wavelength narrowband filter that would encompass both wavelengths would be broader than required for each line, approximately 0.02 nm. The approach employed in this project is to use a pair of tunable narrowband reflective fiber Bragg gratings. The Bragg gratings are germanium-doped silica core fiber that is exposed to ultraviolet radiation to produce index-of-refraction changes along the length of the fiber. The gratings can be tuned by stretching. The backscattered laser radiation is transmitted through an optical circulator to the gratings, reflected back to the optical circulator by one of the gratings, and then sent to a photodiode. The filter reflectivities were >90 percent, and the overall system efficiency was 30 percent.

  11. Measurements of Water Absorption in the Warm Exo-Uranus GJ 3470b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Björn; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; McCullough, Peter; Lothringer, Joshua; Howard, Andrew; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan; Dragomir, Diana; Gilliland, Ron

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of short-period planets with masses and radii intermediate between Earth and Neptune was one of the biggest surprises in the brief history of exoplanet science. These “super-Earths” and “sub-Neptunes” are an order of magnitude more abundant than close-in giant planets. Despite this ubiquity, we know little about their typical compositions and formation histories. Spectroscopic transit observations can shed new light on these mysterious worlds by probing their atmospheric compositions. In this talk, we will give an overview of our ongoing 124-orbit (200-hour) Hubble Space Telescope program to reveal the chemical diversity and formation histories of super-Earths. This unprecedented survey will provide the first comprehensive look at this intriguing new class of planets ranging from 1 Neptune mass and temperatures close to 2000K to a 1 Earth mass planet near the habitable zone of its host star. In this talk, I will discuss the scope of the program and present early science results including measurements of water absorption in the atmosphere of the warm exo-Uranus GJ3470b.

  12. Water Resource Management Mechanisms for Intrastate Violent Conflict Resolution: the Capacity Gap and What To Do About It.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, M.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Violent conflict and issues surrounding available water resources are both global problems and are connected. Violent conflict is increasingly intrastate in nature and coupled with increased hydrological variability as a function of climate change, there will be increased pressures on water resource use. The majority of mechanisms designed to secure water resources are often based on the presence of a governance framework or another type of institutional capacity, such as offered through a supra- or sub-national organization like the United Nations or a river basin organization. However, institutional frameworks are not present or loose functionality during violent conflict. Therefore, it will likely be extremely difficult to secure water resources for a significant proportion of populations in Fragile and Conflict Affected States. However, the capacity in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations for the appropriate interventions to address this problem is reduced by an increasing reluctance to participate in interventionist operations following a decade of expeditionary warfighting mainly in Iraq and Afghanistan, and related defence cuts. Therefore, future interventions in violent conflict and securing water resources may be more indirect in nature. This paper assesses the state of understanding key areas in the present literature and highlights the gap of securing water resources during violent conflict in the absence of institutional capacity. There is a need to close this gap as a matter of urgency by formulating frameworks to assess the lack of institutional oversight / framework for water resources in areas where violent conflict is prevalent; developing inclusive resource management platforms through transparency and reconciliation mechanisms; and developing endogenous confidence-building measures and evaluate how these may be encouraged by exogenous initiatives including those facilitated by the international community. This effort will require the development of collaborations between academic, NGO sectors, and national aid agencies in order to allow the development of the appropriate tools, understanding in a broad range of contexts, and the mechanisms that can be brought to bear to address this increasingly important area.

  13. Relationship between water-holding capacity and protein denaturation in broiler breast meat.

    PubMed

    Bowker, B; Zhuang, H

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between water-holding capacity (WHC) attributes and protein denaturation in broiler breast meat. Boneless skinless breast fillets (n = 72) were collected from a commercial processing plant at 2 h postmortem and segregated into low-WHC and high-WHC groups based on muscle pH and color (L*a*b*). At 6 and 24 h postmortem, brine uptake (%), cooking loss (%), and protein solubility (sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar) were measured and protein fractions were analyzed using SDS-PAGE. Drip loss accumulation (%) was measured after storage for 2 and 7 days postmortem. High-WHC fillets exhibited lower L*-lightness values and greater pH values at 2 and 24 h postmortem than low-WHC fillets. High-WHC fillets had greater brine uptake and less cooking loss at both 6 and 24 h postmortem compared to low-WHC fillets. Aging from 6 to 24 h postmortem increased brine uptake in high-WHC fillets, but did not affect cooking loss in either low-WHC or high-WHC fillets. Drip loss accumulation was greater in low-WHC fillets at both 2 and 7 days postmortem. Myofibrillar protein solubility decreased with postmortem time but was not different between low-WHC and high-WHC fillets. Sarcoplasmic protein solubility increased with postmortem time and was greater in high-WHC fillets. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that low-WHC fillets exhibited more glycogen phosphorylase denaturation than high-WHC fillets as evidenced by a more extensive shift of the protein from the sarcoplasmic to the myofibrillar protein fraction. Correlation analysis revealed that overall protein solubility measurements were not related to WHC attributes but that the degree of glycogen phosphorylase denaturation was significantly correlated (|r| = 0.52 to 0.80) to measures of WHC. Data indicated that WHC differences in broiler breast fillets were not due to differences in myofibrillar protein denaturation and suggested that the denaturation of sarcoplasmic proteins onto myofibrils may influence WHC in breast meat. PMID:26009757

  14. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the foreign-broadened water continuum absorption. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The far wing line shape theory developed previously and applied to the calculation of the continuum absorption of pure water vapor is extended to foreign-broadened continua. Explicit results are presented for H2O-N2 and H2O-CO2 in the frequency range from 0 to 10,000/cm. For H2O-N2 the positive and negative resonant frequency average line shape functions and absorption coefficients are computed for a number of temperatures between 296 and 430 K for comparison with available laboratory data. In general the agreement is very good.

  15. How to remove the influence of trace water from the absorption spectra of SWNTs dispersed in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daqi

    2011-01-01

    Summary Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be efficiently dispersed in the imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), at relatively high concentration, with their intrinsic structure and properties retained. Due to the hygroscopicity of the ILs, water bands may be introduced in the absorption spectra of IL-dispersed SWNTs and cause problems in spectral deconvolution and further analysis. In order to remove this influence, a quantitative characterization of the trace water in [BMIM]+[PF6]− and [BMIM]+[BF4]− was carried out by means of UV–vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. A simple yet effective method involving spectral subtraction of the water bands was utilized, and almost no difference was found between the spectra of the dry IL-dispersed SWNT samples treated under vacuum for 10 hours and the spectra of the untreated samples with subtraction of the pure water spectrum. This result makes it more convenient to characterize SWNTs with absorption spectra in the IL-dispersion system, even in the presence of trace amount of water. PMID:22003471

  16. Understanding enabling capacities for managing the 'wicked problem' of nonpoint source water pollution in catchments: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James J; Smith, Carl; Bellamy, Jennifer

    2013-10-15

    Nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution in catchments is a 'wicked' problem that threatens water quality, water security, ecosystem health and biodiversity, and thus the provision of ecosystem services that support human livelihoods and wellbeing from local to global scales. However, it is a difficult problem to manage because water catchments are linked human and natural systems that are complex, dynamic, multi-actor, and multi-scalar in nature. This in turn raises questions about understanding and influencing change across multiple levels of planning, decision-making and action. A key challenge in practice is enabling implementation of local management action, which can be influenced by a range of factors across multiple levels. This paper reviews and synthesises important 'enabling' capacities that can influence implementation of local management action, and develops a conceptual framework for understanding and analysing these in practice. Important enabling capacities identified include: history and contingency; institutional arrangements; collaboration; engagement; vision and strategy; knowledge building and brokerage; resourcing; entrepreneurship and leadership; and reflection and adaptation. Furthermore, local action is embedded within multi-scalar contexts and therefore, is highly contextual. The findings highlight the need for: (1) a systemic and integrative perspective for understanding and influencing change for managing the wicked problem of NPS water pollution; and (2) 'enabling' social and institutional arenas that support emergent and adaptive management structures, processes and innovations for addressing NPS water pollution in practice. These findings also have wider relevance to other 'wicked' natural resource management issues facing similar implementation challenges. PMID:23792915

  17. Pathways for building capacity and ensuring effective transboundary water resources management in Africa: Revisiting the key issues, opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikozho, Claudious

    The performance of most organizations and institutions set up to facilitate transboundary water resources management in Africa remains unsatisfactory and new frameworks are required to address this performance gap. Using the Nile and Senegal River Basins as case studies, this paper applies qualitative research methods to explore the transboundary river basin management terrain in Africa with a view to identifying and articulating some of the major issues, challenges and opportunities faced in building the capacity of the main actors and institutions in the sector. The paper establishes that the creation of basin management institutions as the assumed panacea to challenges evident in this sector has not delivered the desired results. Some of the institutions established for this purpose in Africa have remained functionally weak and ineffective. Thus, demand for capacity-building interventions in this landscape remains high. The paper concludes that comprehensive capacity-building interventions should seek to improve the competencies and skills of key actors in implementing the broad range of activities constituting integrated water resources management in transboundary basins. In-depth analysis of the fundamental capacity constraints and challenges that key players face in relation to key drivers for cooperation is the absolutely necessary ingredient.

  18. PTHrP regulates water absorption and aquaporin expression in the intestine of the marine sea bream (Sparus aurata, L.).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Canário, Adelino V M; Power, Deborah M; Fuentes, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Water ingestion by drinking is fundamental for ion homeostasis in marine fish. However, the fluid ingested requires processing to allow net water absorption in the intestine. The formation of luminal carbonate aggregates impacts on calcium homeostasis and requires epithelial HCO3(-) secretion to enable water absorption. In light of its endocrine importance in calcium handling and the indication of involvement in HCO3(-) secretion the present study was designed to expose the role of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in HCO3(-) secretion, water absorption and the regulation of aqp1 gene expression in the anterior intestine of the sea bream. HCO3(-) secretion rapidly decreased when PTHrP(1-34) was added to anterior intestine of the sea bream mounted in Ussing chambers. The effect achieved a maximum inhibition of 60% of basal secretion rates, showing a threshold effective dose of 0.1 ng ml(-1) compatible with reported plasma values of PTHrP. When applied in combination with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor (SQ 22.536, 100 μmol l(-1)) or the phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122, 10 μmol l(-1)) the effect of PTHrP(1-34) on HCO3(-) secretion was reduced by about 50% in both cases. In parallel, bulk water absorption measured in intestinal sacs was sensitive to inhibition by PTHrP. The inhibitory action conforms to a typical dose-response curve in the range of 0.1-1000 ng ml(-1), achieves a maximal effect of 60-65% inhibition from basal rates and shows threshold significant effects at hormone levels of 0.1 ng ml(-1). The action of PTHrP in water absorption was completely abolished in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor (SQ 22.536, 100 μmol l(-1)) and was insensitive to the phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122, 10 μmol l(-1)). In vivo injections of PTHrP(1-34) or the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist PTHrP(7-34) evoked respectively, a significant decrease or increase of aqp1ab, but not aqp1a. Overall the present results suggest that PTHrP acts as a key regulator of carbonate aggregate formation in the intestine of marine fish via its actions on water absorption, calcium regulation and HCO3(-) secretion. PMID:25562629

  19. Assessing water resources adaptive capacity to climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest Region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, A. F.

    2010-07-01

    Climate change impacts in Pacific Northwest Region of North America (PNW) are projected to include increasing temperatures and changes in the seasonality of precipitation (increasing precipitation in winter, decreasing precipitation in summer). Changes in precipitation are also spatially varying, with the northwestern parts of the region generally experiencing greater increases in cool season precipitation than the southeastern parts. These changes in climate are projected to cause loss of snowpack and associated streamflow timing shifts which will increase cool season (October-March) flows and decrease warm season (April-September) flows and water availability. Hydrologic extremes such as the 100 year flood and extreme low flows are also expected to change, although these impacts are not spatially homogeneous and vary with mid-winter temperatures and other factors. These changes have important implications for natural ecosystems affected by water, and for human systems. The PNW is endowed with extensive water resources infrastructure and well-established and well-funded management agencies responsible for ensuring that water resources objectives (such as water supply, water quality, flood control, hydropower production, environmental services, etc.) are met. Likewise, access to observed hydrological, meteorological, and climatic data and forecasts is in general exceptionally good in the United States and Canada, and access to these products and services is often supported by federally funded programs that ensure that these resources are available to water resources practitioners, policy makers, and the general public. Access to these extensive resources support the argument that at a technical level the PNW has high capacity to deal with the potential impacts of natural climate variability on water resources. To the extent that climate change will manifest itself as moderate changes in variability or extremes, we argue that existing water resources infrastructure and institutional arrangements provide a solid foundation for coping with climate change impacts, and that the mandates of existing water resources policy and water resources management institutions are at least consistent with the fundamental objectives of climate change adaptation. A deeper inquiry into the underlying nature of PNW water resources systems, however, reveals significant and persistent obstacles to climate change adaptation, which will need to be overcome if effective use of the region's extensive water resources management capacity can be brought to bear on this problem. Primary obstacles include assumptions of stationarity as the fundamental basis of water resources system design, entrenched use of historic records as the sole basis for planning, problems related to the relatively short time scale of planning, lack of familiarity with climate science and models, downscaling procedures, and hydrologic models, limited access to climate change scenarios and hydrologic products for specific water systems, and rigid water allocation and water resources operating rules that effectively block adaptive response. Institutional barriers include systematic loss of technical capacity in many water resources agencies following the dam building era, jurisdictional fragmentation affecting response to drought, disconnections between water policy and practice, and entrenched bureaucratic resistance to change in many water management agencies. These factors, combined with a federal agenda to block climate change policy in the US during the Bush administration has (with some exceptions) led to institutional "gridlock" in the PNW over the last decade or so despite a growing awareness of climate change as a significant threat to water management. In the last several years, however, significant progress has been made in surmounting these obstacles, and the region's water resources agencies at all levels of governance are making progress in addressing the fundamental challenges inherent in adapting to climate change.

  20. Assessing water resources adaptive capacity to climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest Region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, A. F.

    2011-05-01

    Climate change impacts in Pacific Northwest Region of North America (PNW) are projected to include increasing temperatures and changes in the seasonality of precipitation (increasing precipitation in winter, decreasing precipitation in summer). Changes in precipitation are also spatially varying, with the northwestern parts of the region generally experiencing greater increases in cool season precipitation than the southeastern parts. These changes in climate are projected to cause loss of snowpack and associated streamflow timing shifts which will increase cool season (October-March) flows and decrease warm season (April-September) flows and water availability. Hydrologic extremes such as the 100 yr flood and extreme low flows are also expected to change, although these impacts are not spatially homogeneous and vary with mid-winter temperatures and other factors. These changes have important implications for natural ecosystems affected by water, and for human systems. The PNW is endowed with extensive water resources infrastructure and well-established and well-funded management agencies responsible for ensuring that water resources objectives (such as water supply, water quality, flood control, hydropower production, environmental services, etc.) are met. Likewise, access to observed hydrological, meteorological, and climatic data and forecasts is in general exceptionally good in the United States and Canada, and is often supported by federally funded programs that ensure that these resources are freely available to water resources practitioners, policy makers, and the general public. Access to these extensive resources support the argument that at a technical level the PNW has high capacity to deal with the potential impacts of natural climate variability on water resources. To the extent that climate change will manifest itself as moderate changes in variability or extremes, we argue that existing water resources infrastructure and institutional arrangements provide a reasonably solid foundation for coping with climate change impacts, and that the mandates of existing water resources policy and water resources management institutions are at least consistent with the fundamental objectives of climate change adaptation. A deeper inquiry into the underlying nature of PNW water resources systems, however, reveals significant and persistent obstacles to climate change adaptation, which will need to be overcome if effective use of the region's extensive water resources management capacity can be brought to bear on this problem. Primary obstacles include assumptions of stationarity as the fundamental basis of water resources system design, entrenched use of historical records as the sole basis for planning, problems related to the relatively short time scale of planning, lack of familiarity with climate science and models, downscaling procedures, and hydrologic models, limited access to climate change scenarios and hydrologic products for specific water systems, and rigid water allocation and water resources operating rules that effectively block adaptive response. Institutional barriers include systematic loss of technical capacity in many water resources agencies following the dam building era, jurisdictional fragmentation affecting response to drought, disconnections between water policy and practice, and entrenched bureaucratic resistance to change in many water management agencies. These factors, combined with a federal agenda to block climate change policy in the US during the Bush administration have (with some exceptions) contributed to widespread institutional "gridlock" in the PNW over the last decade or so despite a growing awareness of climate change as a significant threat to water management. In the last several years, however, significant progress has been made in surmounting some of these obstacles, and the region's water resources agencies at all levels of governance are making progress in addressing the fundamental challenges inherent in adapting to climate change.

  1. Interaction of plasma-generated water cluster ions with chemically-modified Si surfaces investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Matsumura, Ryosuke; Ma, Teng; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio; Nishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the interaction of water cluster ions generated by discharge plasma, with chemically modified Si surfaces using infrared absorption spectroscopy in the multiple internal reflection geometry. We observe that water cluster ions readily adsorb on SiO2-covered Si surfaces to form water droplets. We demonstrate that positively- and negatively-charged cluster ions adsorb on the SiO2-covered Si surface in different manners, indicating ionic interaction of the water droplets with the negatively-charged SiO2 surface. Water droplets formed on the protein-coated surface rupture the amide bond of the proteins, suggesting the function of protein decomposition of water cluster ions.

  2. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  3. Non-isothermal effects on SO2 absorption by water droplets. I - Model development. II - Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    An analytic model of SO2 absorption in a falling water droplet is developed and a simulation of SO2 washout is performed. Nonisothermic effects on drop growth, droplet physical parameters, reaction rates, and multicomponent diffusion are treated in the model. The gas-liquid interface is assumed to be at equilibrium, and interfacial resistance is negligible. Raindrops are simulated as falling from a 2 km height through an atmospheric region containing SO2. The droplets decrease in size from evaporation and cooling, and their slightly basic pH aids SO2 absorption. The simulation indicates higher SO2 absorption at higher altitudes, and desorption may occur at ground level. Isothermal effects are concluded to be significant, and quantification of effects will depend on further modelling.

  4. Simulation and performance analysis of an ammonia-water absorption heat pump based on the generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; DeVault, R.C.; Creswick, F.A.

    1995-02-01

    A computer simulation has been conducted to investigate the performance of an absorption heat pump, based on the Generator-Absorber Heat Exchange (GAX) cycle employing ammonia-water as the working fluid pair. The particular feature of this cycle is the ability to recover heat from the absorber and employ it to partially heat the generator, thus improving the COP. In the present study, a detailed simulation has been conducted of one of the preferred configurations for the cycle. A modular computer code for flexible simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was employed. Performance parameters, including COP and capacity, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters over a wide range of conditions in both the cooling and heating mode. The effect of the ambient temperature, the rectifier performance, the flowrate in the GAX heat transfer loop and the refrigerant flow control were investigated. COP`s on the order of 1.0 for cooling and 2.0 for heating have been calculated.

  5. Validation of phenol red versus gravimetric method for water reabsorption correction and study of gender differences in Doluisio's absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tuğcu-Demiröz, Fatmanur; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Marta; Bermejo, Marival

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a method for water flux reabsorption measurement in Doluisio's Perfusion Technique based on the use of phenol red as a non-absorbable marker and to validate it by comparison with gravimetric procedure. The compounds selected for the study were metoprolol, atenolol, cimetidine and cefadroxil in order to include low, intermediate and high permeability drugs absorbed by passive diffusion and by carrier mediated mechanism. The intestinal permeabilities (Peff) of the drugs were obtained in male and female Wistar rats and calculated using both methods of water flux correction. The absorption rate coefficients of all the assayed compounds did not show statistically significant differences between male and female rats consequently all the individual values were combined to compare between reabsorption methods. The absorption rate coefficients and permeability values did not show statistically significant differences between the two strategies of concentration correction. The apparent zero order water absorption coefficients were also similar in both correction procedures. In conclusion gravimetric and phenol red method for water reabsorption correction are accurate and interchangeable for permeability estimation in closed loop perfusion method. PMID:24887261

  6. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  7. Measurements of the temperature and water vapor concentration in a hot zone by tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Y. A.; Liger, V. V.; Mironenko, V. R.; Leonov, S. B.; Yarantsev, D. A.

    2010-08-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique and appropriate instrumentation was developed for the measurement of temperature and water vapor concentrations in heated gases. The technique is based on the detection of the spectra of H2O absorption lines with different energies of low levels. The following absorption lines of H2O were used: 7189.344 cm-1 ( E?=142 cm-1), 7189.541 cm-1 ( E?=1255 cm-1), 7189.715 cm-1 ( E?=2005 cm-1). Spectra were recorded using fast frequency scanning of a single distributed feedback (DFB) laser. A unique differential scheme for the recording of the absorption spectra was developed. An optimal technique for fitting the experimental spectra was developed. The validated TDLAS technique was applied for detection of temperature and H2O concentration in the post-combustion zone of a supersonic ( M=2) air-fuel flow. Hydrogen and ethylene were used as the fuel. The combustion process was ignited and sustained by a pulsed electric discharge. Presentation of the transient absorption spectra as 2D images was used as the first step of data processing. The estimated precision of the temperature measurement was 40 K. The high signal-to-noise ratio enabled the reconstruction of the temporal behavior of temperature with a resolution of 1 ms.

  8. USING AN ENERGY MODEL TO DESCRIBE THE CONTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON TO SOIL WATER HOLDING CAPACITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model of the water holding characteristics of soil is needed to develop a systematic method for valuing organic C in soil. Water is held in soil between two energy limits: hygroscopic water (-1500 kPa) and capillary rise (about -33 kPa). The General Energy Model for Limited Systems (GEMLS) was use...

  9. WVR-GPS comparison measurements and calibration of the 20-32 GHz tropospheric water vapor absorption model.

    SciTech Connect

    Keihm, S. J.; Bar-Server, Y.; Liljegren, J. C.; Environmental Research; NASA

    2002-06-01

    Collocated measurements of opacity (from water vapor radiometer brightness temperatures) and wet path delay (from ground-based tracking of global positioning satellites) are used to constrain the model of atmospheric water vapor absorption in the 20-32 GHz band. A differential approach is presented in which the slope of opacity-versus-wet delay data is used as the absorption model constraint. This technique minimizes the effects of radiometric calibration errors and oxygen model uncertainties in the derivation of a best-fit vapor absorption model. A total of approximately five months of data was obtained from two experiment sites. At the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma, three independent water vapor radiometers (WVRs) provided near-continuous opacity measurements over the interval July-September 1998. At the NASA/Goldstone tracking station in the California desert two WVRs; obtained opacity data over the September-October 1997 interval. At both sites a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receiver and surface barometer obtained the data required for deriving the zenith wet delays over the same time frames. Measured values of the opacity-versus-wet delay slope parameter were obtained at four WVR frequencies (20.7, 22.2, 23.8, and 31.4 GHz) and compared with predictions of four candidate absorption models referenced in the literature. With one exception, all three models provide agreement within 5% of the opacity-versus-wet delay slope measurements at all WVR frequencies at both sites. One model provides agreement for all channels at both sites to the 2-3% level. This absorption model accuracy level represents a significant improvement over that attainable using radiosondes.

  10. Design And Implementation Of A Water-Quality Monitoring Program In Support Of Establishing User Capacities In Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peavler, R. S.; Clow, D. W.; Panorska, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    Under the 1968 Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the managing agency of the designated river is required to develop a comprehensive management plan that protects the characteristics of the river segment meriting special protection and that addresses user capacities. We analyzed water quality in the upper Merced and Tuolumne Rivers of Yosemite National Park, designated as Wild and Scenic, to provide baseline data in support of establishing park-specific water-quality standards as part of an adaptive management framework that addresses user capacities. Samples collected from 2004 to 2007 were analyzed for nitrate, total dissolved nitrogen, total dissolved phosphorus, and total phosphorus at all sites, and for E.coli, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and waste water compounds at a subset of sites. Water quality in the upper Merced and Tuolumne River basins was dilute, with concentrations in most samples falling near or below minimum detection limits for the constituents of concern. Results indicate that spatial and seasonal variability in nutrient concentrations is a function of local basin characteristics, particularly elevation. Generally, nitrate- plus-nitrite increased with elevation, while total dissolved nitrogen decreased with elevation. Anomalous high nitrate-plus-nitrite concentrations occurred during low flow at several sites, such as below Yosemite National Park's primary waste water treatment facility, making those sites good candidates for further investigation. Bootstrapping was used to characterize the distribution of concentrations at each site and to make inferences regarding background reference conditions, which could be used by the National Park Service to select anti- degradation water-quality standards and establish water-quality based user capacities. Results suggest that future monitoring efforts should emphasize storm-event sampling, which is necessary to capture infrequent elevated nutrient concentrations, and sampling in the head-waters of each basin where further data is needed to characterize possible impacts from atmospheric deposition of pollutants. Additional water-quality monitoring in Merced River tributaries throughout Yosemite Valley is needed to identify sources of nutrient inputs and to determine whether visitor use is contributing to the overall water quality.

  11. The role of skin absorption as a route of exposure for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.S.; Bishop, D.R.; Rowan, C.A.

    1984-05-01

    Assessments of drinking water safety rely on the assumption that ingestion represents the principal route of exposure. A review of the experimental literature revealed that skin penetration rates for solvents are remarkably high, and that the stratum corneum is a less effective barrier to penetration than traditionally assumed. Based on published skin absorption rates, we used Fick's law (Jos . Kop delta Cos) to determine permeability constants for selected compounds. We then calculated dose per kilogram for nine different exposure situations and compared this to the oral dose per kilogram. We found that skin absorption contributed from 29-91 per cent of the total dose, averaging 64 per cent. Dose per kilogram body weight ranged from .0002 mg/kg-.18 mg/kg, with an average of .03 mg/kg. In weak aqueous solutions, flux of the solute is directly proportional to concentration. Laboratory approaches differ markedly from environmental exposures and can underestimate absorption. We conclude that skin absorption of contaminants in drinking water has been underestimated and that ingestion may not constitute the sole or even primary route of exposure.

  12. Ponding-test procedure for assessing the infiltration capacity of storm-water basins, Nassau County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prill, Robert C.; Aronson, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure to obtain field data for assessing performance of storm-water basins having high infiltration rates is described. The basin selected is divided into test plots, and treated municipal water from a fire hydrant is ponded to the desired depth so that infiltration rates and flow patterns in the unsaturated zone can be determined by standard methods. The study was made at a storm-water basin excavated in glacial outwash deposits in Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. in 1971-72. The types of interpretations and evaluations that can be made from test data are described, and applications of the procedure as well as guidelines for developing a similar testing program are given. Observations of special significance were: (1) Infiltration rate of the basin at low water stage is about 1.5 feet per hour but increases with increased water level; (2) flow through the unsaturated zone is essentially vertical; (3) infiltration rate is controlled by a surface stratum --in this case a gravelly, sandy loam; and (4) the position of the water table has little effect on infiltration rate provided it is below the lower boundary of the controlling zone. These observations can be used in evaluating a storm-water basin's suitability for supplemental recharge with treated wastewater, in comparing procedures for increasing a basin's infiltration capacity, or in the design of new storm-water basin systems.

  13. Influence of a surfactant additive on absorption heat pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J. W.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1985-06-01

    Surfactant additives have been known for some time to influence the boiling characteristics of water and water-salt solutions. An enhancement of boiling transfer coefficients can be obtained by a proper choice of additives. When the capacity of an absorption heat pump is limited by its generator capacity and the generator is of the boiling-pool type, it is possible to increase the machine capacity by means of surfactant addition. In this paper, the preliminary experiments leading to the selection of a surfactant for a lithium bromide-water absorption heat pump are described. Minimum foaming was the most important consideration in this selection process. The measured machine performance shows that the generator capacity may be increased by values ranging from 5% to 10% of the original capacity. The actual value depends on the operating conditions as given by solution concentration, flow rate, and temperatures.

  14. A comparative study of sodium dodecyl sulfate and freezing/thawing treatment on wheat starch: The role of water absorption.

    PubMed

    Tao, Han; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Bao; Wu, Fengfeng; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of freezing on functionality of native and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated wheat starches was investigated, with the aim of understanding the role of water absorption during freezing process. SDS is one of most efficient detergents to remove non-starch components (such as proteins and lipids) for starches but does not cause any apparent damage on granular structure. Slow swelling could be converted to rapid swelling by SDS washing, indicating higher water absorption. Freezing process induced slight roughness on starch granules but the non-starch components content was little affected. Combined SDS+freezing treatment significantly decreased both amylose and proteins non-starch components contents, which was accompanied with high gelatinization temperatures, melting enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. A smaller bread specific volume was obtained from SDS+freezing-treated starches while the crumb firmness significantly increased (p<0.05). SDS mainly extracted the surface components from starch granules, leading to high water absorption and making granules sensitive to the freezing treatment. PMID:27083354

  15. Study on arsenic level in public water supply of Delhi using hydride generator accessory coupled with atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Sanjeev; Dogra, T D; Bhardwaj, D N; Sharma, R K; Murty, O P

    2006-03-01

    Exposure to arsenic has been associated with several health hazards. Worldwide the main reason for chronic human intoxication with arsenic is intake of contaminated drinking water. Air acetylene type of atomic absorption spectrophotometer in combination with hydride generator accessory was used to analyze arsenic level in 25 water samples collected from 25 booster pumping stations and 313 water samples collected from tap water supply of 62 areas of Delhi. Results were analyzed using SPSS and Barlett's Chi Square Test. Mean arsenic level detected in water samples collected from booster pumping stations was 0.00976 ppm (Range 0.000-0.017 ppm, Standard Deviation 0.006 and Standard error of Mean 0.00118). Maximum arsenic level (0.017 ppm) was found in water samples of booster pumping stations of Mehrauli, Punjabi Bagh and Ramjas Road. Mean arsenic level detected in samples collected from tap water supply was 0.013 ppm (Range 0-0.0430 ppm, Standard Deviation 0.00911 and Standard error of Mean 0.000515). In water samples of 42 areas arsenic level detected was exceeding WHO/EPA permissible limit of 0.01 ppm (10 ppb). The mean arsenic level detected in water samples of booster pumping station was within WHO/EPA permissible limit while mean arsenic level detected in tap water samples was marginally higher. Mixing of ground water and contamination through broken or leaking channel could be the possible reason of higher arsenic level in tap water. Continuous monitoring of quality of drinking water is required particularly in view of water contamination caused by industrial waste and uncontrolled ground water extraction. PMID:23105572

  16. BELINDA: Broadband Emission Lidar with Narrowband Determination of Absorption. A new concept for measuring water vapor and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theopold, F. A.; Weitkamp, C.; Michaelis, W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new concept for differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor and temperature profiles. The idea is to use one broadband emission laser and a narrowband filter system for separation of the 'online' and 'offline' return signals. It is shown that BELINDA offers improvements as to laser emission shape and stability requirements, background suppression, and last and most important a significant reduction of the influence of Rayleigh scattering. A suitably designed system based on this concept is presented, capable of measuring water vapor or temperature profiles throughout the planetary boundary layer.

  17. Water vapor absorption in porous media polluted by calcium nitrate studied by time domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gombia, Mirko; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J S; Camaiti, Mara; Cavallero, Luisa; Fantazzini, Paola

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis of liquid water (1)H nuclei in real porous media, selected for their similar composition (carbonate rocks) and different pore space architecture, polluted with calcium nitrate, is presented to study the kinetics of water condensation and salt deliquescence inside the pore space. These phenomena are responsible for deterioration of porous materials when exposed to environmental injury by pollution in a humid atmosphere. The theory is well described for simple pore geometries, but it is not yet well understood in real porous media with wide distributions of pore sizes and connections. The experiment is performed by following in time the formation of liquid water inside the pore space by T(1) and T(2) relaxation time distributions. The distributions allow one to see the effects of both the salt concentration and the pore space structure on the amount of water vapor condensed and its kinetics. It is shown that, for a given lithotype, even with different amounts of pollutant, the rate-average relaxation time T(1ra) tends to increase monotonically with NMR signal, proportional to the amount of liquid water. T(1ra) is often inversely associated with surface-to-volume ratio. This suggests a trend toward the filling of larger pores as amounts of liquid water increase, but it does not indicate a strict sequential filling of pores in order of size and starting with the smallest; in fact, relaxation time distributions show clearly that this is not the case. Increased amounts of salt lead to both markedly increased rates and markedly increased amounts of water absorption. NMR measurements of amounts of water, together with relaxation time distributions, give the possibility of information on the effect of pollution in porous materials exposed to humid atmospheres but sheltered from liquid water, even before the absorption of large amounts of moisture and subsequent damage. These phenomena are of importance also in other fields, such as the exploitation of geothermal energy. PMID:19594125

  18. Effect of low-voltage electrical stimulation after dressing on color stability and water holding capacity of bovine longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunbao; Li, Jing; Li, Xin; Hviid, Marchen; Lundström, Kerstin

    2011-07-01

    The effect of low voltage electrical stimulation after dressing (ES) on color stability and water holding capacity (WHC) of beef was investigated. Nine Swedish red cattle were slaughtered and the left side was electrically stimulated (80 V, 35 s) approximately 30 min after stunning, whereas the other side was not treated and used as control. Color and its stability, WHC, and protein solubility were evaluated on longissimus lumborum muscles from the two sides. ES produced a brighter red color at 24h mainly by increasing the oxygenation capacity of myoglobin (P<0.01), which was attenuated by postmortem aging. ES did not affect WHC, protein solubility and color stability (P>0.05). Therefore, this technology could accelerate meat tenderization without any negative effect on commercial attributes, such as color or drip of bovine longissimus muscle. PMID:21382673

  19. INTEGRATION OF HEAT CAPACITY AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY SENSORS FOR ROOT MODULE WATER AND NUTRIENT ASSESSMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of water content and nutrient status during space flight is a critical necessity in plant production systems. Our objectives were to determine if dual-probe heat pulse sensors could improve water content determination accuracy over single-probe heat-pulse sensors, and to test a design usi...

  20. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Alan L.; Anderson, David M.; Winiarski, David W.; Carmichael, Robert T.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Fisher, Andrew R.

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  1. LABORATORY CAPACITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER UTILITIES: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fully-functioning analytical laboratories capable of producing quality data are essential components of well-run drinking water utilities. In Europe and the US, drinking water laboratory performance is closely monitored and regulated; this is not always the case in the less indu...

  2. Water storage capacity exceedance controls the timing and amount of runoff generated from Arctic hillslopes in Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushlow, C. R.; Godsey, S.

    2014-12-01

    Within the hydrologic community, there is a growing recognition that different runoff generation mechanisms can be unified within a "fill-and-spill" or storage exceedance paradigm. However, testing this unifying paradigm requires observing watersheds at a variety of scales under their full range of storage conditions, which are difficult to observe on typical human timescales in most environments. Polar watersheds underlain by continuous permafrost provide an opportunity to address these issues, because their total capacity for water storage follows a consistent annual cycle of expansion and contraction as a direct consequence of the extreme seasonality of solar energy availability. Cryotic conditions usually limit water storage to the surface snowpack and frozen soils, but summer warming allows the shallow subsurface to progressively thaw, providing a dynamic storage reservoir that is the convolved expression of several factors, including substrate hydrologic properties, watershed structure, and stochastic precipitation. We hypothesize that the amount of remaining water storage capacity in the system directly controls the amount and timing of runoff production for a given input. We test this prediction for six hillslope watersheds in Arctic Alaska over the 2013 and 2014 summer seasons from snowmelt in May through plant senescence in mid-August. We compare water table position to runoff produced from a given storm event or series of storm events. We find that no runoff is produced until a threshold water table position is exceeded; that is, as seasonal storage changes, runoff depends on watershed storage capacity exceedance. Preliminary results suggest that once that threshold is met, hydrologic response is proportional to storage exceedance. Thus, runoff production from Arctic hillslopes can be modeled from the surface energy balance and a reasonable estimate of shallow subsurface material properties. If storage exceedance is the key control on water export from Arctic watersheds, then the state of downstream aquatic ecosystems is strongly tied with upstream changes in surface energy balance and precipitation regimes. Future analyses will relate storage exceedance and water flux to biogeochemical cycling and solute fluxes in these hillslope watersheds.

  3. Biochar increased water holding capacity but accelerated organic carbon leaching from a sloping farmland soil in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Honglan; Tang, Xiangyu; Guan, Zhuo; Reid, Brian J; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Ok, Yong Sik; Sun, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A hydrologically contained field study, to assess biochar (produced from mixed crop straws) influence upon soil hydraulic properties and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leaching, was conducted on a loamy soil (entisol). The soil, noted for its low plant-available water and low soil organic matter, is the most important arable soil type in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River catchment, China. Pore size distribution characterization (by N2 adsorption, mercury intrusion, and water retention) showed that the biochar had a tri-modal pore size distribution. This included pores with diameters in the range of 0.1-10 μm that can retain plant-available water. Comparison of soil water retention curves between the control (0) and the biochar plots (16 t ha(-1) on dry weight basis) demonstrated biochar amendment to increase soil water holding capacity. However, significant increases in DOC concentration of soil pore water in both the plough layer and the undisturbed subsoil layer were observed in the biochar-amended plots. An increased loss of DOC relative to the control was observed upon rainfall events. Measurements of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence indicated the DOC increment originated primarily from the organic carbon pool in the soil that became more soluble following biochar incorporation. PMID:26109221

  4. Proteomic analysis and differential expression in protein extracted from chicken with a varying growth rate and water-holding capacity.

    PubMed

    Phongpa-Ngan, Phodchanee; Grider, Arthur; Mulligan, Jake H; Aggrey, Samuel E; Wicker, Louise

    2011-12-28

    Chickens from a randomly bred genetic line were segregated into high and low growth rates and high and low water-holding capacities (WHCs). The objective of this study was to identify protein markers associated with slow and fast growth rates and low and high WHCs from water-soluble protein (WSP) and crude myofibrillar protein (CMP) extracts of chicken breast muscle. Proteins were fractionated using two-dimensional electrophoresis, and a total of 22 protein spots were selected, excised, and analyzed by in-gel tryptic digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteins expressed in extracts from slow and fast growth rates and low and high WHCs included metabolic enzymes, such as creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and ubiqitin; housekeeping proteins, such as heat shock protein; contractile proteins, such as myosin heavy chain; actin; and also MHC isoforms and actin isoforms. The mass spectra of 20 protein spots significantly matched (protein score >83; P < 0.05) an online database. In CMP, there were unique proteins that were present only in the fast-growth population: gi|118099530 , gi|20664362 , gi|71895043 , gi|114794125 , gi|297343122 , and gi|71895043 . This information identified protein markers associated with growth rate and water holding capacity. Some of those protein markers could be added to the chicken database. PMID:22010637

  5. Flow-through PSICAM: a new approach for determining water constituents absorption continuously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Grunwald, Maik; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Petersen, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    Determination of spectral absorption coefficients in seawater is of interest for biologic oceanographers for various reasons, but faces also several problems, especially if continuous measurements are required. We introduce the flow-through point-source integrating cavity absorption meter (ft-PSICAM) as a new tool for the continuous measurement of spectral absorption coefficients in a range of 400-710 nm. A description of the system is given and its performance in comparison with a conventional PSICAM has been evaluated on two cruises in 2011 in the southern part of the North Sea (German Bight). Furthermore, factors influencing the measurement are discussed. When comparing the data of both systems, a good linear correlation has been found for all wavelengths ( r 2 > 0.91). Deviations between systems were different with respect to the wavelength examined with slopes of linear fits between 1.1 and 1.65 and offsets between -0.1 and 0.01, with the higher values at shorter wavelengths. They were caused mainly due to contamination of the flow-through system during operation by phytoplankton particles. Focus was also laid on the measurement of chlorophyll- a concentrations ([chl- a]) and total suspended matter concentrations ([TSM]) on the basis of absorption coefficient determination. For this, appropriate relationships were established and [chl- a] and [TSM] values were calculated from the relevant ft-PSICAM absorption coefficients. Their progression matches well with the progression of fluorescence and turbidity measurements made in parallel. In conclusion, the ft-PSICAM is successful in measuring spectral absorption coefficients continuously and resolving relative changes in seawater optical properties.

  6. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection of vanadium in water and food samples after solid phase extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Tuzen, Mustafa; Gul Kazi, Tasneem; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-11-15

    Vanadium(V) ions as 8-hydroxyquinoline chelates were loaded on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in a mini chromatographic column. Vanadium was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Various analytical parameters including pH of the working solutions, amounts of 8-hydroxyquinoline, eluent type, sample volume, and flow rates were investigated. The effects of matrix ions and some transition metals were also studied. The column can be reused 250 times without any loss in its sorption properties. The preconcentration factor was found as 100. Detection limit (3 s) and limit of quantification (10 s) for the vanadium in the optimal conditions were observed to be 0.012 µg L(-1) and 0.040 μg L(-1), respectively. The capacity of adsorption was 9.6 mg g(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 5%. The validation of the method was confirmed by using NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves, NIST SRM 1570a Spinach leaves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium in tap water and bottled drinking water samples. The procedure was also successfully applied to microwave digested food samples including black tea, coffee, tomato, cabbage, zucchini, apple and chicken samples. PMID:24148394

  7. Loss of water transport capacity due to xylem cavitation in roots of two CAM succulents.

    PubMed

    Linton, M J; Nobel, P S

    1999-11-01

    Loss of axial hydraulic conductance as a result of xylem cavitation was examined for roots of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) succulents Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica. Vulnerability to cavitation was not correlated with either root size or vessel diameter. Agave deserti had a mean cavitation pressure of -0.93 0.08 MPa by both an air-injection and a centrifugal method compared to -0.70 0.02 MPa by the centrifugal method for O. ficus-indica, reflecting the greater tolerance of the former species to low water potentials in its native habitat. Substantial xylem cavitation would occur at a soil water potential of -0.25 MPa, resulting in a predicted 22% loss of conductance for A. deserti and 32% for O. ficus-indica. For an extended drought of 3 mo, further cavitation could cause a 69% loss of conductance for A. deserti and 62% for O. ficus-indica. A model of axial hydraulic flow based upon the cavitation response of these species predicted that water uptake rates are far below the maximum possible, owing to the high root water potentials of these desert succulents. Despite various shoot adaptations to aridity, roots of A. deserti and O. ficus-indica are highly vulnerable to cavitation, which partially limits water uptake in a wet soil but helps reduce water loss to a drying soil. PMID:10562245

  8. Retention capacity of natural sands for the treatment of waters containing arsenic trace levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hécho, I.; Chappaz, A.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Behra, P.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study the As retention capacity of two natural sand, a quartz sand and a volcanic red sand. Sorption experiments were performed in batch reactors at a constant ionic strength (0.010 M Na03). pH was controlled by acid or base microadditions. As, Fe, Al and Si were analysed in the aqueous phase to control their fate. Kinetic experiments of arsenic sorption showed that a fast step followed by a slow one could be observed depending on the sand. In the most rapid step, the formation of monodentate complexes could be the main phenomenon while in the slowest one bidendate and binuclear complexes could predominate. During As (V) sorption, the analyses of Al, Fe and Si showed that the dissolution of the different minerals present in the sands as Al, Si and Fe (hydr) oxides was not affected by As (V) sorption. From the point of view of the surface reactivity, the quartz sand bas more available sites for arsenic sorption than the volcanic sand However, the red soil shows a better retelltion capacity as expressed in amount of As per solid mass unit : 666 nmol g^{-1} and 9.4 nmol g^{-1} for the red soil and the quartz sand, respectively, for a contact time of 288 h.

  9. [Assessment of ecosystem energy flow and carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement in the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters].

    PubMed

    Lin Qun; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhong-yi; Wu, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Stock enhancement is increasingly proved to be an important measure of the fishery resources conservation, and the assessment of carrying capacity is the decisive factor of the effects of stock enhancement. Meanwhile, the variations in the energy flow patterns of releasing species and ecosystem were the basis for assessing carrying capacity of stock enhancement. So, in the present study, based on the survey data collected from the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters during 2012-2013, three Ecopath mass-balance models were established in June, August and October, and the variations in ecosystem energy flow in these months were analyzed, as well as the assessment of carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement. The energy flow mainly concentrated on trophic level I-III in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, and was relatively less on trophic level IV or above. The system flow proportion on the trophic level I was the highest in June, and was the lowest in August. The highest system flow proportion on the trophic level II was found in August, and the lowest in June. The relative and absolute energy flow of swimming crab mainly concentrated on the trophic level III, and the mean trophic level of swimming crab among June, August and October were 3.28. Surplus production was relatively higher in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, the highest value was found in June, and the lowest value in August. The ratios of total primary production/total respiration (TPP/TR) were 5.49, 2.47 and 3.01 in June, August and October, respectively, and the ratios of total primary production/total biomass (TPP/B) were 47.61, 33.30 and 29.78, respectively. Combined with the low Finn' s cycling index (FCI: 0.03-0.06), these changes indicated that the Yellow River estuary ecosystem was at an early development stage with higher vulnerability. The energy conversion efficiency of system was from 7.3% to 11.5%, the mean trophic levels of the catch were 3.23, 2.97 and 2.82 in June, August and October, respectively. The highest gross efficiency of the fishery was found in August, and the lowest in June. Finally, based on the Ecopath model in August survey, the preliminarily assessed carrying capacity of swimming crab was 1.5115 t · km(-2) in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters. PMID:26915212

  10. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  11. Assessment of capacity sensors for monitoring soil water content in ecological orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrícia Prazeres Marques, Karina; Horcajo, Daniel; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2014-05-01

    Water is an important element for soil tillage and crop development. Its proper management is essential for the development of plants, by preventing excess or shortage in water application. Soil water content is affected by the soil-water-plant system and its monitoring is a required within a sustainable agriculture framework respectful with the natural environment. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of capacitive sensors in monitoring soil moisture from organic orchards. An experimental text was carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Agricultural Engineering School in the Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain). Soil samples were collected within the 0-20 cm depth layers from the university organic orchard. The samples were air dried and subsequently sieved in a 2 mm mesh sieve, removing roots and coarse fractions and keeping the fine soil. The amount of fine soil was calculated from the soil density and the soil samples were compacted to obtain the relative volume that corresponded to their density. The measurements were carried out in dry and in saturated soil and, also in samples where soil was stirring with: 150 cm³, 300 cm³ and 450 cm³ of water. A 1890 ml container was used to hold the fine soil and the soil moisture sensor ECH2O, type 10 HS (Decagon Devices, Inc.) was placed horizontally at 5 cm depth. Soil water readings were recorded on a datalogger Em5b from the same manufacturer. The results showed that the capacitive sensor has a linear response to soil moisture content. Its value was overestimated in comparison to the volumetric values and the largest errors (about 8%) were observed in the soils with high moisture contents. Overall, these results point out that the ECH2O sensor, model 10 HS, could determine with sufficient accuracy the volumetric soil water content from organic orchards although it could be further improved by "in situ" calibration.

  12. Improvement of the COP of the LiBr-Water Double-Effect Absorption Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Atsushi

    Prevention of the global warming has called for a great necessity for energy saving. This applies to the improvement of the COP of absorption chiller-heaters. We started the development of the high efficiency gas-fired double-effect absorption chiller-heater using LiBr-H2O to achieve target performance in short or middle term. To maintain marketability, the volume of the high efficiency machine has been set below the equal to the conventional machine. The absorption cycle technology for improving the COP and the element technology for downsizing the machine is necessary in this development. In this study, the former is investigated. In this report, first of all the target performance has been set at cooling COP of 1.35(on HHV), which is 0.35 higher than the COP of 1.0 for conventional machines in the market. This COP of 1.35 is practically close to the maximum limit achievable by double-effect absorption chiller-heater. Next, the design condition of each element to achieve the target performance and the effect of each mean to improve the COP are investigated. Moreover, as a result of comparing the various flows(series, parallel, reverse)to which the each mean is applied, it has been found the optimum cycle is the parallel flow.

  13. Spring carbonate chemistry dynamics of surface waters in the northern East China Sea: Water mixing, biological uptake of CO2, and chemical buffering capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei-Dong; Chen, Jian-Fang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Jin-Wen; He, Xian-Qiang; Bai, Yan

    2014-09-01

    We investigated sea surface total alkalinity (TAlk), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved oxygen (DO), and satellite-derived chlorophyll-a in the connection between the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (ECS) during April to early May 2007. In spring, Changjiang dilution water (CDW), ECS offshore water, and together with Yellow Sea water (YSW) occupied the northern ECS. Using 16 day composite satellite-derived chlorophyll-a images, several algal blooms were identified in the CDW and ECS offshore water. Correspondingly, biological DIC drawdown of 73 ± 20 μmol kg-1, oversaturated DO of 10-110 μmol O2 kg-1, and low fugacity of CO2 of 181-304 μatm were revealed in these two waters. YSW also showed CO2 uptake in spring, due to the very low temperature. However, its intrusion virtually counteracted CO2 uptake in the northern ECS. In the CDW and the ECS offshore water, Revelle factor was 9.3-11.7 and 8.9-10.6, respectively, while relatively high Revelle factor values of 11.4-13.0 were revealed in YSW. In the ECS offshore water, the observed relationship between DIC drawdown and oversaturated DO departed from the Redfield ratio, indicating an effect of chemical buffering capacity on the carbonate system during air-sea reequilibration. Given the fact that the chemical buffering capacity slows down the air-sea reequilibration of CO2, the early spring DIC drawdown may have durative effects on the sea surface carbonate system until early summer. Although our study is subject to limited temporal and spatial coverage of sampling, these insights are fundamental to understanding sea surface carbonate chemistry dynamics in this important ocean margin.

  14. Very high finesse optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for low concentration water vapor isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J; Romanini, D; Kerstel, E

    2014-04-01

    So far, cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) has been based on optical cavities with a high finesse F that, however, has been limited by mirror reflectivity and by cavity transmission considerations to a few times 10,000. Here, we demonstrate a compact near-infrared optical-feedback CEAS instrument for water vapor isotope ratio measurements, with F>140,000. We show that this very high finesse can be effectively exploited to improve the detection sensitivity to the full extent predicted by the increased effective path length to reach a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 5.7×10(-11)  cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for a full spectrum registration (including possible effects of interference fringes and fit model inadequacies). PMID:24686607

  15. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a single grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high-power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, high-reflectivity cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350, and 80 parts per trillion (pptv) in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0, and 5.0 %, limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  16. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light emitting diodes (LEDs) and a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, state-of-the-art cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350 and 80 pptv in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0 and 5.0 % limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  17. Profiling of carotenoids and antioxidant capacity of microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruq; Fanning, Kent; Netzel, Michael; Turner, Warwick; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-12-15

    Carotenoids are associated with various health benefits, such as prevention of age-related macular degeneration, cataract, certain cancers, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy and cardiovascular problems. As microalgae contain considerable amounts of carotenoids, there is a need to find species with high carotenoid content. Out of hundreds of Australian isolates, 12 microalgal species were screened for carotenoid profiles, carotenoid productivity, and in vitro antioxidant capacity (total phenolic content (TPC) and ORAC). The top four carotenoid producers at 4.68-6.88 mg/g dry weight (DW) were Dunaliella salina, Tetraselmis suecica, Isochrysis galbana, and Pavlova salina. TPC was low, with D. salina possessing the highest TPC (1.54 mg Gallic Acid Equivalents/g DW) and ORAC (577 μmol Trolox Equivalents/g DW). Results indicate that T. suecica, D. salina, P. salina and I. galbana could be further developed for commercial carotenoid production. PMID:25038679

  18. Simultaneous preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt in water by coprecipitation-flotation for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Yagi, M.

    1984-09-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous flotation separation and determination of microgram-levels of copper (II), nickel (II) and cobalt (II) in water. Copper, nickel and cobalt in a 1000-ml sample of water are coprecipitated with hydrated zirconium oxide at pH 9.1 +/- 0.1. The precipitate is floated with the aid of a surfactant solution and small air bubbles; the precipitate is readily separated from the mother liquor and dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The method is simple and rapid, and applicable to the simultaneous separation of copper, nickel and cobalt at microgram levels from a large volume of water. 15 references, 3 tables.

  19. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millán, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of differential absorption radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to large eddy simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m full width at half maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the column water vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 %(21.9 %) of stratocumulus(cumulus) atmospheric boundary layer range bins would be sampled. Simulated surface reflectivities are always greater than -5 dBZ, which implies the DAR technique could provide near spatially continuous observation of the CWV in subtropical boundary layers at a spatial resolution better than 1 km.

  20. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millan, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    The feasibility of Differential Absorption Radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the Column Water Vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 % (21.9 %) of stratocumulus (cumulus) atmospheric boundary layer range bins would be sampled. Simulated surface reflectivities are always greater than -5 dBZ, which implies the DAR technique could provide near spatially continuous observation of the CWV in subtropical boundary layers at a spatial resolution better than 1 km.

  1. The capacity to maintain ion and water homeostasis underlies interspecific variation in Drosophila cold tolerance

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Andersen, Jonas L.; Davies, Shireen A.; Overgaard, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Many insects, including Drosophila, succumb to the physiological effects of chilling at temperatures well above those causing freezing. Low temperature causes a loss of extracellular ion and water homeostasis in such insects, and chill injuries accumulate. Using an integrative and comparative approach, we examined the role of ion and water balance in insect chilling susceptibility/ tolerance. The Malpighian tubules (MT), of chill susceptible Drosophila species lost [Na+] and [K+] selectivity at low temperatures, which contributed to a loss of Na+ and water balance and a deleterious increase in extracellular [K+]. By contrast, the tubules of chill tolerant Drosophila species maintained their MT ion selectivity, maintained stable extracellular ion concentrations, and thereby avoided injury. The most tolerant species were able to modulate ion balance while in a cold-induced coma and this ongoing physiological acclimation process allowed some individuals of the tolerant species to recover from chill coma during low temperature exposure. Accordingly, differences in the ability to maintain homeostatic control of water and ion balance at low temperature may explain large parts of the wide intra- and interspecific variation in insect chilling tolerance. PMID:26678786

  2. A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON TO SOIL WATER HOLDING CAPACITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of organic matter on the water holding characteristics of soil was described with a continuous energy function. This energy function used only organic carbon, silt and clay content. The General Energy Model for Limited Systems (GEMLS) was applied to data from the US national soil invento...

  3. A Simple Approach for Demonstrating Soil Water Retention and Field Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A.; Heitman, J. L.; Bowman, D.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to demonstrate the soil water retention relationship and related concepts because the specialized equipment required for performing these measurements is unavailable in most classrooms. This article outlines a low-cost, easily visualized method by which these concepts can be demonstrated in most any classroom. Columns (62.5 cm…

  4. Geophysical imaging of watershed subsurface patterns and prediction of soil texture and water holding capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extent to which soil resource availability, nutrients or moisture, contro1 the structure, function and diversity of plant communities has aroused considerableinterest in the past decade, and remains topical in light of global change. Numerous plant communities are controlled either by water or s...

  5. A Simple Approach for Demonstrating Soil Water Retention and Field Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A.; Heitman, J. L.; Bowman, D.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to demonstrate the soil water retention relationship and related concepts because the specialized equipment required for performing these measurements is unavailable in most classrooms. This article outlines a low-cost, easily visualized method by which these concepts can be demonstrated in most any classroom. Columns (62.5 cm

  6. Water absorption behavior and residual strength assessment of glass/epoxy and glass-carbon/epoxy hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S. C.; Singh, B. P.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2016-02-01

    Present investigation is aimed to study the water absorption behaviour and evaluation of residual strength of glass fibre/epoxy (GE) and alternate plies of glass- carbon/epoxy (GCE) hybrid composite. Both the composite systems were exposed to water at 70°C. Specimens were weighed after certain time periods to study the water uptake kinetic. Flexural tests were conducted after 4, 100 and 450 hours of ageing to evaluate the effect of hot water ageing on the mechanical properties of these potential materials. The water uptake kinetic was found to follow Fickian diffusion kinetic for GE as well as GCE hybrid composite but the rate of diffusion was higher for GE composite over GCE composite. The water content was also higher in GE composite over GCE composite after 450 hours of ageing. Significant decrement in flexural strength was observed with the increase in ageing time. Presence of water in the composite also imparted significant embrittlement to the matrix as reflected in the decrease in strain at peak for both the composite systems.

  7. Crop systems and plant roots can modify the soil water holding capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussan, Claude; Cousin, Isabelle; Berard, Annette; Chabbi, Abad; Legendre, Laurent; Czarnes, Sonia; Toussaint, Bruce; Ruy, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    At the interface between atmosphere and deep sub-soil, the root zone plays a major role in regulating the flow of water between major compartments: groundwater / surface / atmosphere (drainage, runoff, evapotranspiration). This role of soil as regulator/control of water fluxes, but also as a supporting medium to plant growth, is strongly dependent on the hydric properties of the soil. In turn, the plant roots growing in the soil can change its structure; both in the plow layer and in the deeper horizons and, therefore, could change the soil properties, particularly hydric properties. Such root-related alteration of soil properties can be linked to direct effect of roots such as soil perforation during growth, aggregation of soil particles or indirect effects such as the release of exudates by roots that could modify the properties of water or of soil particles. On an another hand, the rhizosphere, the zone around roots influenced by the activity of root and associated microorganisms, could have a high influence on hydric properties, particularly the water retention. To test if crops and plant roots rhizosphere may have a significant effect on water retention, we conducted various experiment from laboratory to field scales. In the lab, we tested different soil and species for rhizospheric effect on soil water retention. Variation in available water content (AWC) between bulk and rhizospheric soil varied from non-significant to a significant increase (to about 16% increase) depending on plant species and soil type. In the field, the alteration of water retention by root systems was tested in different pedological settings for a Maize crop inoculated or not with the bacteria Azospirillum spp., known to alter root structure, growth and morphology. Again, a range of variation in AWC was evidenced, with significant increase (~30%) in some soil types, but more linked to innoculated/non-innoculated plants rather than to a difference between rhizospheric and bulk soil. Finally, in field condition, on a larger time scale, we investigated the effect of crop alternations on the Lusignan ACBB SOERE site. That site presents on the same soil type different crop alternation treatments: an old, continuous grassland, a 8-year continuous cereal rotation and an alternation of cereal/grassland (3-years cereals and 3 to 6 years grassland). Measurements of AWC in these different crop systems setting, 8 years after implementation of the SOERE, show that AWC was different in the cereal/grassland alternation compared to the continuous cereal or grassland cropping systems (~15-20% increase). If such alteration of AWC may seem modest, modeling (in the case of ACBB SOERE) shows that this increase in AWC would increase the cereal yield but also decrease the water drainage out of the root zone, and the possible associated loss of nitrate and pesticides. As a conclusion, in line with some other literature data, roots can influence soil hydric properties and this opens a way to use plants as "soil engineers" to modulate the properties of the root zone, and thus the components of water balance, to mitigate effects of drought on crops… However, how and how much plants will modify the hydric properties, a question which mixes physics, biology, microbiology, crop system settings, is still in infancy and needs further research.

  8. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Divergent Phenotypes for Water Holding Capacity across the Post Mortem Ageing Period in Porcine Muscle Exudate.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Alessio; Hamill, Ruth M; Mullen, Anne Maria; Slavov, Nikolai; Elia, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and mass spectrometry were applied to investigate the changes in metabolic proteins that occur over a seven day (day 1, 3 and 7) post mortem ageing period in porcine centrifugal exudate from divergent meat quality phenotypes. The objectives of the research were to enhance our understanding of the phenotype (water holding capacity) and search for biomarkers of this economically significant pork quality attribute. Major changes in protein abundance across nine phenotype-by-time conditions were observed. Proteomic patterns were dominated by post mortem ageing timepoint. Using a machine learning algorithm (l1-regularized logistic regression), a model was derived with the ability to discriminate between high drip and low drip phenotypes using a subset of 25 proteins with an accuracy of 63%. Models discriminating between divergent phenotypes with accuracy of 72% and 73% were also derived comparing respectively, high drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus low drip and comparing low drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus high drip. In all comparisons, the general classes of discriminatory proteins identified include metabolic enzymes, stress response, transport and structural proteins. In this research we have enhanced our understanding of the protein related processes underpinning this phenotype and provided strong data to work toward development of protein biomarkers for water holding capacity. PMID:26950297

  9. Reversible, Selective Trapping of Perchlorate from Water in Record Capacity by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Ian R; Silva, Rachel C; Oliver, Scott R J

    2016-02-16

    We report the capture of ppm-level aqueous perchlorate in record capacity and kinetics via the complete anion exchange of a cationic metal-organic framework. Ambient conditions were used for both the synthesis of silver 4,4'-bipyridine nitrate (SBN) and the exchange, forming silver 4,4'-bipyridine perchlorate (SBP). The exchange was complete within 90 min, and the capacity was 354 mg/g, representing 99% removal. These values are greater than current anion exchangers such as the resins Amberlite IRA-400 (249 mg/g), Purolite A530E (104 mg/g), and layered double hydroxides (28 mg/g). Moreover, unlike resins and layered double hydroxides, SBN is fully reusable and displays 96% regeneration to SBN in nitrate solution, with new crystal formation allowing the indefinite cycling for perchlorate. We show seven cycles as proof of concept. Perchlorate contamination of water represents a serious health threat because it is a thyroid endocrine disruptor. This noncomplexing anionic pollutant is significantly mobile and environmentally persistent. Removal of other anionic pollutants from water such as chromate, pertechnetate, or arsenate may be possible by this methodology. PMID:26765213

  10. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Divergent Phenotypes for Water Holding Capacity across the Post Mortem Ageing Period in Porcine Muscle Exudate

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Alessio; Hamill, Ruth M.; Mullen, Anne Maria; Slavov, Nikolai; Elia, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and mass spectrometry were applied to investigate the changes in metabolic proteins that occur over a seven day (day 1, 3 and 7) post mortem ageing period in porcine centrifugal exudate from divergent meat quality phenotypes. The objectives of the research were to enhance our understanding of the phenotype (water holding capacity) and search for biomarkers of this economically significant pork quality attribute. Major changes in protein abundance across nine phenotype-by-time conditions were observed. Proteomic patterns were dominated by post mortem ageing timepoint. Using a machine learning algorithm (l1-regularized logistic regression), a model was derived with the ability to discriminate between high drip and low drip phenotypes using a subset of 25 proteins with an accuracy of 63%. Models discriminating between divergent phenotypes with accuracy of 72% and 73% were also derived comparing respectively, high drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus low drip and comparing low drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus high drip. In all comparisons, the general classes of discriminatory proteins identified include metabolic enzymes, stress response, transport and structural proteins. In this research we have enhanced our understanding of the protein related processes underpinning this phenotype and provided strong data to work toward development of protein biomarkers for water holding capacity. PMID:26950297

  11. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  12. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  13. Water vapour absorption in the penicillate millipede Polyxenus lagurus (Diplopoda: Penicillata: Polyxenida): microcalorimetric analysis of uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan C; Westh, Peter

    2006-07-01

    The aberrant millipedes of the order Polyxenida are minute animals that inhabit xeric microclimates of bark and rock faces. The lichens and algae that provide their main food substrates tolerate extensive dehydration, effectively eliminating a liquid water source during periods of drought. In this study, we used microcalorimetry to test whether Polyxenus lagurus (L.) exploits active water vapour absorption (WVA) for water replenishment. Individual animals were pre-desiccated to 10-20% mass-loss and heat fluxes then monitored using a TAM 2277 microcalorimeter. The calorimetric cell was exposed to an air stream increasing progressively in humidity from 84% to 96%. WVA was distinguishable as large exothermic fluxes seen in > or = 86% RH. Owing to very small and opposing heat fluxes from metabolism and passive water loss, the measured flux provided a good measure of water uptake. WVA showed an uptake threshold of 85% RH and linear sorption kinetics until >94% RH, when uptake became asymptotic. Uptake was rapid, and would allow recovery from 20% dehydration (by mass) in little over 5 h. The uptake flux scales proportional, variant mass (0.61), suggesting an area-limited mechanism. Polyxenus possesses a cryptonephric system, analogous to that of tenebrionid beetle larvae. Measurements of water absorption and desorption from faecal pellets voided in different humidities gave an estimated rectal humidity of 85.5%. The close congruence between this value and the WVA threshold provides evidence for a cryptonephric uptake mechanism derived independently from that of tenebrionids. Polyxenus represents the first documented example of WVA in the myriapod classes. PMID:16788032

  14. Emission, absorption and group delay of microwaves in the atmosphere in relation to water vapour content over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. K.; Gupta, A. K. D.; Karmakar, P. K.; Barman, S. D.; Bhattacharya, A. B.; Purkait, N.; Gupta, M. K. D.; Sehra, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of satellite communication for global coverage has apparently indicated a renewed interest in the studies of radio wave propagation through the atmosphere, in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. The extensive measurements of atmosphere constituents, dynamics and radio meterological parameters during the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) have opened up further the possibilities of studying tropospheric radio wave propagation parameters, relevant to Earth/space link design. The three basic parameters of significance to radio propagation are thermal emission, absorption and group delay of the atmosphere, all of which are controlled largely by the water vapor content in the atmosphere, particular at microwave bands. As good emitters are also good absorbers, the atmospheric emission as well as the absorption attains a maximum at the frequency of 22.235 GHz, which is the peak of the water vapor line. The group delay is practically independent of frequency in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. However, all three parameters exhibit a similar seasonal dependence originating presumably from the seasonal dependence of the water vapor content. Some of the interesting results obtained from analyses of radiosonde data over the Indian subcontinent collected by the India Meteorological Department is presented.

  15. Estimation of plant water content by spectral absorption features centered at 1,450 nm and 1,940 nm regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Xu, Ruisong; Yang, Shilun

    2009-10-01

    Vegetation water content could possibly provide widespread utility in agriculture, forestry and hydrology. In this article, three species leaves were measured radiometrically in order to determine a relationship between leaf water status and the spectral feature centered at 1,450 and 1,940 nm where there are strong water absorptions. The first step of our research is to measure leaf spectra with a FieldSpec-FR. After the spectral analysis using the continuum removal technique, the spectral absorption feature parameters: absorption band depth (D (1450), D (1940)), the normalized band depth of absorption in 1,450 and 1,940 nm (BNA(1450), BNA(1940)), the ratio of the two reflectance of continuum line (R (1450i )/R (1940i )), the ratio of the two band depth (D (1450)/D (1940)) and the ratio of the two absorption areas (A (1450)/A (1940)) in the two wavebands were extracted from each leaf spectrum. The fuel moisture content (FMC), specific leaf weight (SLW), equivalent water thickness (EWT) were measured for each leaf sample. A correlation analysis was conducted between the spectral absorption feature parameters and corresponding FMC, SLW and EWT. In addition, some existing indices for assessing water status such as WI (water index), WI/NDVI (water index/normalized difference vegetation index), MSI (moisture stress index), NDWI (normalized difference water index)were calculated and the correlation between them and water status were analyzed too. The results by comparing the correlations indicated that the spectral absorption feature indices we proposed were better. The indexes BNA(1940), D (1450)/D (1940), and A (1450)/A (1940) were well correlated with FMC, and the correlation between the indexes D (1450,) D (1940), R (1450i )/R (1940i ) and EWT were strong. The index A (1450)/A (1940) was tested to be a good indictor for evaluating plant water content, because there was strongest positive correlation between it and FMC than other indices. PMID:18853268

  16. Stacked waveguide reactors with gradient embedded scatterers for high-capacity water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Syed Saad; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Erickson, David

    2015-11-30

    We present a compact water-cleaning reactor with stacked layers of waveguides containing gradient patterns of optical scatterers that enable uniform light distribution and augmented water-cleaning rates. Previous photocatalytic reactors using immersion, external, or distributive lamps suffer from poor light distribution that impedes scalability. Here, we use an external UV-source to direct photons into stacked waveguide reactors where we scatter the photons uniformly over the length of the waveguide to thin films of TiO2-catalysts. We also show 4.5 times improvement in activity over uniform scatterer designs, demonstrate a degradation of 67% of the organic dye, and characterize the degradation rate constant. PMID:26698812

  17. Ab initio study of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of hexagonal ice and liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Car, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    We report first-principles calculations of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of hexagonal ice and liquid water. Our work is motivated by the importance of accurately modeling NEXAFS spectra, which provide sensitive information on local molecular structures. In particular, we find a systematic improvement in the agreement of the calculated spectra with the experiment, by including excitonic effects, final state and self-interaction corrections. We correlate the calculated corrections to the degree of localization of the excited states.

  18. A numerical and experimental analysis of the process of water vapour absorption by a static lithium bromide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, R.; Knikker, R.; Boudard, E.; Stutz, B.; Bonjour, J.

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a numerical and experimental analysis of the process of water vapour absorption by a static lithium bromide solution. In the experiment, the temperature evolution of the absorbent solution is measured at different heights. The numerical model solves the set of governing equations for the simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside the absorbent by means of the finite-volume method. An iterative method is used to take into account the strong coupling of heat and mass transfer at the interface and variations of thermophysical properties. A moving grid technique is employed to represent the increase of the solution volume. Model results are compared with our measurements and data reported in the literature. The influence of using constant properties is analysed by comparison with the variable properties and experimental results. It is found that this assumption provides acceptable results in the investigated pool absorption cases despite a strong underestimation of the increase of the solution volume in the course of the absorption process.

  19. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine particle light absorption based on water and methanol extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Bergin, M.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Kotra, N.; Edgerton, E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    Light absorbing organic carbon, often termed brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon are poorly understood. With this in mind field measurements were made at both urban (Atlanta), and rural (Yorkville) sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a central site and a road side site adjacent to a main highway near the city center. Fine particle brown carbon optical absorption is estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size resolved measurements of chromophores in filter extracts. Size-resolved atmospheric aerosol samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and solution light absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Fine particle absorption was also measured with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) and seven-wavelength Aethalometer. Scattering-corrected aethalometer and MAAP absorption were in good agreement at 670 nm and Mie-estimated absorption based on size-resolved EC data were within 30% of these optical instruments. When applied to solution measurements, at all sites, Mie-predicted brown carbon absorption at 350 nm contributed a significant fraction (20 to 40%) relative to total light absorption, with highest contributions at the rural site where organic to elemental carbon ratios were highest. Brown carbon absorption, however, was highest by the roadside site due to vehicle emissions. The multi-wavelength aethalometer did not detect brown carbon, having an absorption Ångstrom exponent near one. Although the results are within the estimated Aethalometer uncertainties, the direct measurement of brown carbon in solution definitively shows that it is present and this Mie analysis suggests it is optically important in the near UV range in both a rural and urban environment during summer when biomass burning emissions are low.

  20. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Water absorption dependent photoconductivity of a freestanding polymer bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Choi, Jaewu

    2010-06-01

    The photo-response of a freestanding constricted polymeric solid-state bridge of water soluble sodium poly[2-(3-thienyl)-ethoxy-4-butylsulfonate] (SPTEBS) was studied as a function of water vapor pressure. The dark current dramatically increases with water vapor pressure higher than 12 Torr. Surprisingly, under light illumination, the short-circuit current of the polymeric solid-state bridge decreases with increasing water vapor pressure so that, above 12 Torr of water vapor pressure, the short-circuit current under the light illumination is even lower than the dark current. This negative photo-response of the polymeric solid-state bridge is attributed to the self-doping by hydration of the polymer and the de-doping, possibly the result of photo-induced desorption of adsorbed water molecules.

  1. A new direct absorption measurement for high precision and accurate measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly accurate and precise water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are critical to understanding the climate feedbacks of water vapor and clouds in that region. However, the continued disagreement among water vapor measurements (~1 - 2 ppmv) are too large to constrain the role of different hydration and dehydration mechanisms operating in the UT/LS, with model validation dependent upon which dataset is chosen. In response to these issues, we present a new instrument for measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS that was flown during the April 2011 MACPEX mission out of Houston, TX. The dual axis instrument combines the heritage and validated accuracy of the Harvard Lyman-alpha instrument with a newly designed direct IR absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha detection axis has flown aboard NASA's WB-57 and ER2 aircraft since 1994, and provides a requisite link between the new HHH instrument and the long history of Harvard water vapor measurements. The instrument utilizes the highly sensitive Lyman-alpha photo-fragment fluorescence detection method; its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. The Harvard Herriott Hygrometer employs a fiber coupled near-IR laser with state-of-the-art electronics to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a spherical Herriott cell of 10 cm length. The instrument demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec, 1-sigma) at mixing ratios as low as 5 ppmv with accuracies of 10% based on careful laboratory calibrations and in-flight performance. We present a description of the measurement technique along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. The simultaneous utilization of radically different measurement techniques in a single duct in the new Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument allows for the constraint of systematic errors inherent in each technique both in the laboratory and in flight. The HWV data set, in combination with the intercomparison of numerous water vapor instruments during MACPEX, constitutes a significant step toward resolving the controversy surrounding water vapor measurements in the tropopause region.

  2. WATER ABSORPTION IN GALACTIC TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: CONDITIONS AND HISTORY OF THE GAS DERIVED FROM HERSCHEL /HIFI PRISMAS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B.; Neufeld, D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H{sub 2}O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)-as well as the first few excited transitions of H{sub 2}O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)-toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}{sup 18}O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H{sub 2}O) =5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, which makes water a good traced of H{sub 2} in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H{sub 2}O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T {sub ex} {approx_equal} 5 K and that the density n(H{sub 2}) in the translucent clouds is below 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. We derive the water ortho-to-para ratio for each absorption feature along the line of sight and find that most of the clouds show ratios consistent with the value of 3 expected in thermodynamic equilibrium in the high-temperature limit. However, two clouds with large column densities exhibit a ratio that is significantly below 3. This may argue that the history of water molecules includes a cold phase, either when the molecules were formed on cold grains in the well-shielded, low-temperature regions of the clouds, or when they later become at least partially thermalized with the cold gas ({approx}25 K) in those regions; evidently, they have not yet fully thermalized with the warmer ({approx}50 K) translucent portions of the clouds.

  3. Why a mosquito leg possesses superior load-bearing capacity on water: Experimentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiang-Qing; Liu, Jian-Lin; Wu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Mosquitoes possess the striking ability to walk on water because each of their legs has a huge water supporting force (WSF) that is 23 times their body weight. Aiming at a full understanding of the origins of this extremely large force, in this study, we concentrate on two aspects of it: the intrinsic properties of the leg surface and the active control of the initial stepping angle of the whole leg. Using a measurement system that we developed ourselves, the WSFs for the original leg samples are compared with those whose surface wax and microstructures have been removed and with those of a different stiffness. The results show that leg flexibility plays a dominant role over surface wax and microstructures on the leg surface in creating the supporting force. Moreover, we discuss the dependence relationship between the maximum WSF and the initial stepping angle, which indicates that the mosquito can regulate this angle to increase or decrease the WSF during landing or takeoff. These findings are helpful for uncovering the locomotion mechanism of aquatic insects and for providing inspiration for the design of microfluids, miniature boats, biomimetic robots, and microsensors.

  4. Scale coloration change following water absorption in the beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassart, Marie; Simonis, Priscilla; Bay, Annick; Deparis, Olivier; Vigneron, Jean Pol

    2009-09-01

    The blue scales on the cuticle of the male beetle Hoplia coerulea can absorb water, with the consequence that these scales, which have been shown to be responsible for the beetle’s bright blue coloration, reversibly turn to emerald green with increasing water contents. Optical measurements are shown, by analytic photonic-crystal models, to be compatible with the full filling of the scales structures with water. The natural mechanism shows the way to produce a very efficient hygrochromic material: a medium which significantly changes color when its water contents are modified.

  5. Ultratrace determination of arsenic in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after pre-concentration with Mg-Al-Fe ternary layered double hydroxide nano-sorbent.

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammad-Zadeh, Hossein; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Amini, Roghayeh

    2013-11-15

    A selective solid phase extraction method, based on nano-structured Mg-Al-Fe(NO3(-)) ternary layered double hydroxide as a sorbent, is developed for the pre-concentration of ultra-trace levels of arsenic (As) prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. It is found that both As(III) and As(V) could be quantitatively retained on the sorbent within a wide pH range of 4-12. Accordingly, the presented method is applied to determination of total inorganic As in aqueous solutions. Maximum analytical signal of As is achieved when the pyrolysis and atomization temperatures are close to 900 C and 2300 C, respectively. Several variables affecting the extraction efficiency including pH, sample flow rate, amount of nano-sorbent, elution conditions and sample volume are optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (3Sb/m) and the relative standard deviation are 4.6 pg mL(-1) and 3.9%, respectively. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 15.0-650 pg mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9979, sorption capacity and pre-concentration factor are 8.68 mg g(-1) and 300, respectively. The developed method is validated by the analysis of a standard reference material (SRM 1643e) and is successfully applied to the determination of ultra-trace amounts of As in different water samples. PMID:24148451

  6. X-ray absorption spectrum for guanosine- 5'-monophosphate in water solution in the vicinity of the nitrogen K-edge observed in free liquid jet in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, Masatoshi; Yokoya, Akinari; Fujii, Kentaro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2008-10-01

    A new spectroscopy for direct effect of radiation damage to nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA is underway using a liquid beam sample in vacuum combined with soft-X-ray synchrotron radiation. We show the X-ray absorption spectrum (XANES) of liquid phase water at X-ray photon energy in the vicinity of oxygen K-shell absorption edge obtained from total photoelectron yields ejected from a pure water beam. We confirm a "liquid sample in vacuum" for the present experiment by the measurements of the temperature dependence of the XANES spectrum for a liquid beam of pure water. Shown is the first measurement of the XANES spectrum for guanosine- 5'-monophosphate (GMP), which is one of the fundamental nucleotide unit for RNA, in water solution at X-ray photon energy in the vicinity of nitrogen K-shell absorption edge involved in the 'water-window' region, which corresponds to a selective excitation of guanine site.

  7. A Two-Line Absorption Instrument for Scramjet Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Measurement in HYPULSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    A three beam water vapor sensor system has been modified to provide for near simultaneous temperature measurement. The system employs a tunable diode laser to scan spectral line of water vapor. The application to measurements in a scramjet combustor environment of a shock tunnel facility is discussed. This report presents and discusses die initial calibration of the measurement system.

  8. Wettability, polarity, and water absorption of holm oak leaves: effect of leaf side and age.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Victoria; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Guzmán, Paula; Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Gil, Luis; Karabourniotis, George; Khayet, Mohamed; Fasseas, Costas; Heredia-Guerrero, José Alejandro; Heredia, Antonio; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2014-09-01

    Plant trichomes play important protective functions and may have a major influence on leaf surface wettability. With the aim of gaining insight into trichome structure, composition, and function in relation to water-plant surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of holm oak (Quercus ilex) as a model. By measuring the leaf water potential 24 h after the deposition of water drops onto abaxial and adaxial surfaces, evidence for water penetration through the upper leaf side was gained in young and mature leaves. The structure and chemical composition of the abaxial (always present) and adaxial (occurring only in young leaves) trichomes were analyzed by various microscopic and analytical procedures. The adaxial surfaces were wettable and had a high degree of water drop adhesion in contrast to the highly unwettable and water-repellent abaxial holm oak leaf sides. The surface free energy and solubility parameter decreased with leaf age, with higher values determined for the adaxial sides. All holm oak leaf trichomes were covered with a cuticle. The abaxial trichomes were composed of 8% soluble waxes, 49% cutin, and 43% polysaccharides. For the adaxial side, it is concluded that trichomes and the scars after trichome shedding contribute to water uptake, while the abaxial leaf side is highly hydrophobic due to its high degree of pubescence and different trichome structure, composition, and density. Results are interpreted in terms of water-plant surface interactions, plant surface physical chemistry, and plant ecophysiology. PMID:24913938

  9. Metal-and hydrogen-bonding competition during water absorption on Pd(111) and Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarkhanov, Mouslim; Ogletree, D. Frank; Rose, Franck; Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Fomin, Evgeny; Rose, Mark; Cerda, Jorge I.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-09-03

    The initial stages of water adsorption on the Pd(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces have been investigated experimentally by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy in the temperature range between 40 K and 130 K, and theoretically with Density Functional Theory (DFT) total energy calculations and STM image simulations. Below 125 K water dissociation does not occur at any appreciable rate and only molecular films are formed. Film growth starts by the formation of flat hexamer clusters where the molecules bind to the metal substrate through the O-lone pair while making H-bonds with neighboring molecules. As coverage increases, larger networks of linked hexagons are formed with a honeycomb structure, which requires a fraction of the water molecules to have their molecular plane perpendicular to the metal surface with reduced water-metal interaction. Energy minimization favors the growth of networks with limited width. As additional water molecules adsorb on the surface they attach to the periphery of existing islands, where they interact only weakly with the metal substrate. These molecules hop along the periphery of the clusters at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures they bind to the metal to continue the honeycomb growth. The water-Ru interaction is significantly stronger than the water-Pd interaction, which is consistent with the greater degree of hydrogen-bonded network formation and reduced water-metal bonding observed on Pd relative to Ru.

  10. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 ?g/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  11. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  12. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  13. Development of Absorption Heat Pump Driven by Low Temperature Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshida, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Naoto; Asai, Hiroshi; Hasatani, Masanobu; Watanabe, Fujio; Fujisawa, Ryou

    We developed an Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) system, which applies silica-gel as adsorbent and H2O as refrigerant, and is possibly intended to use low temperature hot water (333K) as a driving force. The growing importance to save energy, leads us to develop energy saving systems such as Co-generation systems, including fuel cell system. It is important to use low temperature hot water in order to achieve high efficiency in total. It is, however, noticed that the lower water temperature is, the more difficult its' heat recovery becomes. We reported experimental results of the AHP system, and estimated the possibility to apply low temperature hot water from fuel cell system to the AHP system. We showed quantitatively that the AHP system is able to be driven by low temperature hot water(333K).

  14. Improved intestinal absorption of a poorly water-soluble oral drug using mannitol microparticles containing a nanosolid drug dispersion.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Yukiko; Kubota, Aya; Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Ozeki, Tetsuya; Okada, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    A nozzle for a spray dryer that can prepare microparticles of water-soluble carriers containing various nanoparticles in a single step was previously developed in our laboratory. To enhance the solubility and intestinal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs, we used probucol (PBL) as a poorly water-soluble drug, mannitol (MAN) as a water-soluble carrier for the microparticles, and EUDRAGIT (EUD) as a polymer vehicle for the solid dispersion. PBL-EUD-acetone-methanol and aqueous MAN solutions were simultaneously supplied through different liquid passages of the spray nozzle and dried together. PBL-EUD solid dispersion was nanoprecipitated in the MAN solution using an antisolvent mechanism and rapidly dried by surrounding it with MAN. PBL in the dispersion vehicle was amorphous and had higher physical stability according to powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The bioavailability of PBL in PBL-EUD S-100-MAN microparticles after oral administration in rats was markedly higher (14- and 6.2-fold, respectively) than that of the original PBL powder and PBL-MAN microparticles. These results demonstrate that the composite microparticles containing a nanosized solid dispersion of a poorly water-soluble drug prepared using the spray nozzle developed by us should be useful to increase the solubility and bioavailability of drugs after oral administration. PMID:22864998

  15. Water Absorption of Jute/Polylactic Acid Composite Intended for an Interior Application and Comparison with Wood-Based Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, C.; Bandyopadhyay, N. R.; Ray, D.

    2014-04-01

    Jute/polylactic acid (PLA) composite is of special interest because it is entirely from renewable resources with high mechanical properties. Thus, it could be a more eco-friendly alternative to the conventional wood-based panels made of formaldehyde resin which is asserted to be carcinogenic. Yet the water affinity of the natural fibres and susceptibility of polylactic acid towards hydrolysis raise a question about the water resistance of such composites in service condition. In this work, the water absorption behaviour of jute/PLA composites, jute/maleated polypropylene was investigated with regard to interior applications following the standard test method in accordance to ISO 16983:2003 `Wood-based panels—determination of swelling in thickness after immersion in water' and compared to standard of wood-based panels. Untreated and treated jute/PLA composites exhibited a superior water resistance property compared to particleboard, MDF and hardboard and they are by far, below the minimum requirement of the ISO standard 16983.

  16. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  17. Structure and water storage capacity of a small karst aquifer based on stream discharge in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tonggang; Chen, Hongsong; Wang, Kelin

    2016-03-01

    Karst spring/stream discharge reflects the global configuration of the aquifer. However, quantitative description of the aquifer structure such as effective porosity (neff) and water storage capacity by the discharge analysis is difficult because of the complex conduit/fracture system. This study attempted to quantify the characteristics of karst aquifer based on discharge recession and time series analysis methods. Three recession models, including modified Maillet, Mangin and Boussinesq models, were evaluated to choose the most suitable one for analyzing the aquifer structure, and auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions were applied to study the aquifer response in both year and rainfall event time scales. The results showed that the modified Maillet model was more suitable in the study catchment with Mangin model overestimating and Boussinesq model underestimating the discharge. The neff was 3.73% for the total aquifer, and it was 0.07%, 0.33% and 3.33% for the conduit, fracture and matrix, respectively. Based on a case study of a rainfall event with precipitation of 68 mm, the water volumes drained by the three media were 25.43%, 33.40% and 41.17%, respectively. This indicates that, although conduit network is not very developed with lower neff, it is still an important water transmissive element (draining more than a quarter of water after the rainfall event). The memory time of the aquifer was 4 days for the year scale and 8 h for the rainfall event (68 mm) scale. This demonstrates that the aquifer has a well developed drainage system with a quick response to the rainfall. The above results provide further insights for hydrological processes modeling and water resources management for the small catchment in karst regions.

  18. Building Capacity to Integrate NASA Earth Science into Water Resources Management Applications in the Context of a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prados, A. I.; Mehta, A. V.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences program provides technical capacity building activities to enable decision-makers to integrate NASA Earth Science into environmental management activities. This includes workshops tailored to end-user needs by working directly with agencies to 1) identify environmental management activities that could benefit from NASA Earth Science and 2) conducting workshops that teach the NASA products and decision-support tools best suited to the identified application area. Building on a successful 3-year effort on air pollution monitoring for environmental applications, the project has expanded into water resources. Climate Change has dramatically increased demand for observational and predictive data in support of decision making activities related to water supply and demand. However, a gap remains between NASA products and applied research and the entities who stand to benefit from their utilization. To fill this gap, the project has developed short courses on 1) impacts of climate change on water resources 2) hands-on exercises on access and interpretation of NASA imagery relevan