Sample records for water by salt content

  1. Trace water content of salt in Louisiana salt domes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. P. Knauth; M. B. Kumar

    1981-01-01

    The trace water content of salt in six Louisiana salt domes has been determined and has been found to be the lowest of any terrestrial rock type. The average water content of normal domal salt is on the order of 0.003 percent by weight, but anomalous zones within salt stocks can have more than ten times this amount. From the

  2. Temperature resistance of Salmonella in low-water activity whey protein powder as influenced by salt content.

    PubMed

    Santillana Farakos, S M; Hicks, J W; Frank, J F

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella can survive in low-water activity (a(w)) foods for long periods of time. Water activity and the presence of solutes may affect its survival during heating. Low-a(w) products that contain sodium levels above 0.1 % (wt/wt) and that have been involved in major Salmonella outbreaks include peanut products and salty snacks. Reduced a(w) protects against thermal inactivation. There is conflicting information regarding the role of salt. The aim of this study was to determine whether NaCl influences the survival of Salmonella in low-a(w) whey protein powder independent of a(w) at 70 and 80 °C. Whey protein powders of differing NaCl concentrations (0, 8, and 17 % [wt/wt]) were equilibrated to target a(w) levels 0.23, 0.33, and 0.58. Powders were inoculated with Salmonella, vacuum sealed, and stored at 70 and 80 °C for 48 h. Cells were recovered on nonselective differential media. Survival data were fit with the Weibull model, and first decimal reduction times (?) (measured in minutes) and shape factor values (?) were estimated. The influence of temperature, a(w), and salinity on Weibull model parameters (? and ?) was analyzed using multiple linear regression. Results showed that a(w) significantly influenced the survival of Salmonella at both temperatures, increasing resistance at decreasing a(w). Sodium chloride did not provide additional protection or inactivation of Salmonella at any temperature beyond that attributed to a(w). The Weibull model described the survival kinetics of Salmonella well, with R2 adj and root mean square error values ranging from 0.59 to 0.97 and 0.27 to 1.07, respectively. Temperature and a(w) influenced ? values (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were found between 70 and 80 °C among the different salt concentrations (P > 0.05). ? values were not significantly influenced by temperature, a(w), or % NaCl (P > 0.05). This study indicates that information on salt content in food may not help improve predictions on the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in low-a(w) protein systems within the a(w) levels and temperatures studied. PMID:24680075

  3. Non-freezing water content of mono- and divalent cation salts of polyelectrolyte-water systems studied by DSC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuko Hatakeyama; Hyoe Hatakeyama; Kunio Nakamura

    1995-01-01

    The number of bound water molecules restricted by mono-, di-, and trivalent cations in polyelectrolytes, such as polystyrene sulphonate, carboxymethylcellulose and alginic acid, was calculated using DSC. The number of bound water molecules decreases with increasing ionic radius in the series of mono- and divalent cations when polyelectrolytes form the liquid crystalline state. However, when polyelectrolytes form rigid junction zones

  4. The effects of pre-salting methods on salt and water distribution of heavily salted cod, as analyzed by (1)H and (23)Na MRI, (23)Na NMR, low-field NMR and physicochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gudjónsdóttir, María; Traoré, Amidou; Jónsson, Ásbjörn; Karlsdóttir, Magnea Gudrún; Arason, Sigurjón

    2015-12-01

    The effect of different pre-salting methods (brine injection with salt with/without polyphosphates, brining and pickling) on the water and salt distribution in dry salted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fillets was studied with proton and sodium NMR and MRI methods, supported by physicochemical analysis of salt and water content as well as water holding capacity. The study indicated that double head brine injection with salt and phosphates lead to the least heterogeneous water distribution, while pickle salting had the least heterogeneous salt distribution. Fillets from all treatments contained spots with unsaturated brine, increasing the risk of microbial denaturation of the fillets during storage. Since a homogeneous water and salt distribution was not achieved with the studied pre-salting methods, further optimizations of the salting process, including the pre-salting and dry salting steps, must be made in the future. PMID:26041245

  5. Salt Content and Water Budget of The Suez Canal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SELIM A. MORCOS; GIRGIS F. SOLIMAN

    2001-01-01

    The water body in the Suez Canal is a combination of waters from differ- ent sources. Hence, its exact hydrographic structure is very difficult to define. Three main water masses are identified along the Canal on account of their salinity values: Levantine water mass I, the Suez Bay water mass II, and the Bitter Lake water mass IV, in addition

  6. Fluctuations of Ground-Water Levels Caused by Dispersion of Salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Kohout

    1961-01-01

    Certain wells tapping the zone of diffusion between fresh and salt water in the Miami, Florida, area showed anomalous residual waer-level drawdowns after being pumped. Graphs comparing fluctuations of water levels and chloride contents show that the anomalies are caused by dispersion-motivated changes in the density of the water in the casing. Dispersion produces fluctuations of water level under natural

  7. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, International Center for Applied Mechanics and School of Aerospace, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Suo, Zhigang, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kavli Institute of Bionano Science and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  8. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    E-print Network

    Suo, Zhigang

    Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt 2014; published online 14 October 2014) Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced

  9. Soil water content by Karl Fischer titration

    SciTech Connect

    Prunty, L.; Zellis, M.K.; Bell, J.S. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States). Dept. of Soil Science

    1997-12-31

    Specific analytical determination of water content is often desirable in contaminated soils. Karl Fischer (KF) titration is useful for this purpose, since it consumes only H{sub 2}O, even in the presence of other volatile substances. Although widely used for water content determination in industrial and food products, KF has been virtually ignored in soil and environmental science. Oven drying (OD), conversely, is considered the standard method of soil water determination, but is an indiscriminate determiner of all volatiles. The authors examined KF titration for soil water content determination. Two soil types were mixed with varying amounts of water and octane or toluene. The prepared samples containing water only, water and octane, and water and toluene were analyzed for volatile/moisture content using OD/KF analysis. Soil moisture values determined by the calibrated KF method (w{sub c}) compared favorably to those determined by OD (w{sub 0}) in terms of regression slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, and Student`s t. Regression slopes ranged from 0.980 to 1.009 while intercepts ranged from {minus}0.6 to 7.8 g kg{sup {minus}1}. Plots of the data show essentially a 1:1 correspondence of w{sub c} to w{sub o}.

  10. Artificial neural network and time series models for predicting soil salt and water content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping Zou; Jingsong Yang; Jianrong Fu; Guangming Liu; Dongshun Li

    2010-01-01

    Volumetric water content of a silt loam soil (fluvo-aquic soil) in North China Plain was measured in situ by L-520 neutron probe (made in China) at three depths in the crop rootzone during a lysimeter experiment from 2001 to 2006. The electrical conductivity of the soil water (ECsw) was measured by salinity sensors buried in the soil during the same

  11. Optimizing the salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents: Effects of lyophilization time and water content

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, M.T.; Reimer, J.A.; Clark, D.S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Dordick, J.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-04-20

    The addition of simple inorganic salts to aqueous enzyme solutions prior to lyophilization results in a dramatic activation of the dried powder in organic media relative to enzyme with no added salt. Activation of both the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg and lipase from Mucor javanicus resulting from lyophilization in the presence of KCl was highly sensitive to the lyophilization time and water content of the sample. Specifically, for a preparation containing 98% (w/w) KCl, 1% (w/w) phosphate buffer, and 1% (w/w) enzyme, varying the lyophilization time showed a direct correlation between water content and activity up to an optimum, beyond which the activity decreased with increasing lyophilization time. The catalytic efficiency in hexane varied as much as 13-fold for subtilisin Carlsberg and 11-fold for lipase depending on the lyophilization time. This dependence was apparently a consequence of including the salt, as a similar result was not observed for the enzyme freeze-dried without KCl. In the case of subtilisin Carlsberg, the salt-induced optimum value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for transesterification in hexane was over 20,000-fold higher than that for salt-free enzyme, a substantial improvement over the previously reported enhancement of 3750-fold. As was found previously for pure enzyme, the salt-activated enzyme exhibited greatest activity when lyophilized from a solution of pH equal to the pH for optimal activity in water. The active-site content of the lyophilized enzyme samples also depended upon lyophilization time and inclusion of salt, with opposite trends in this dependence observed for the solvents hexane and tetrahydrofuran. Finally, substrate selectivity experiments suggested that mechanism(s) other than selective partitioning of substrate into the enzyme-salt matrix are responsible for salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents.

  12. Removal of Sea Salt Hydrate Water from Seawater-Derived Samples by Dehydration

    E-print Network

    Russell, Lynn

    Removal of Sea Salt Hydrate Water from Seawater-Derived Samples by Dehydration Amanda A. Frossard of natural seawater contain both sea salts and organic components. Depending on the temperature, pressure, and speed of drying, the salt components can form hydrates that bind water, slowing evaporation of the water

  13. Laboratory testing of salt samples for water content/loss of weight on heating, thermal fracture, insoluble residue, and clay and bulk mineralogy: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, L.B.; Schwendiman, L.

    1987-07-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory testing on salt samples from the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Laboratory specimens were tested to determine water content by loss of weight on heating, temperature of thermal fracture, the amount of insoluble residue, and clay and bulk mineralogy. 7 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Water uptake by salts during the electrolyte processing for thermal batteries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Masset; Jean-Yves Poinso; Jean-Claude Poignet

    2004-01-01

    Water uptake of single salts and electrolytes were measured in industrial conditions (dry-room). The water uptake rate ? (gh?1cm?2) was expressed with respect to the apparent area of contact of the salt with atmosphere of the dry room. The water uptake by potassium-based salts was very low. LiF and LiCl salts were found to behave similarly. For LiBr- and LiI-based

  15. Water uptake by salts during the electrolyte processing for thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masset, Patrick; Poinso, Jean-Yves; Poignet, Jean-Claude

    Water uptake of single salts and electrolytes were measured in industrial conditions (dry-room). The water uptake rate ? (g h -1 cm -2) was expressed with respect to the apparent area of contact of the salt with atmosphere of the dry room. The water uptake by potassium-based salts was very low. LiF and LiCl salts were found to behave similarly. For LiBr- and LiI-based salts and mixtures, we pointed out a linear relationship between the water uptake and the elapsed time. Water uptake by magnesium oxide reached a limit after 200 h. This work provides a set of data concerning the rate of water uptake by single salts, salt mixtures and magnesia used in thermal battery electrolytes.

  16. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  17. Quantifying Ground-Water Savings Achieved by Salt-Cedar Control Measures: A Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. J.; Kluitenberg, G. J.; Whittemore, D. O.; Healey, J. M.; Zhan, X.

    2005-05-01

    Consumption of ground water by phreatophytes in riparian corridors is thought to be one factor responsible for stream-flow reductions in western Kansas and elsewhere. Extensive phreatophyte-control measures, primarily focusing on invasive species such as salt cedar and Russian olive, are being considered in response to concerns about the impact of phreatophytes on surface-and ground-water resources. At present, there is no generally accepted means of quantifying the ground-water savings that might be gained through these control measures. Micrometeorological methods are often not appropriate for this application because their fetch requirements are too large for narrow riparian corridors. Recently, an approach based on diurnal fluctuations in the water table has been shown to have potential for quantifying ground-water consumption by phreatophytes. A demonstration project is underway to examine the utility of this method for assessing ground-water savings achieved through phreatophyte-control measures. This project is being carried out at a research site in a region of salt-cedar infestation along the Cimarron River in southwestern Kansas. The site has been subdivided into four areas of approximately four hectares each in which different salt-cedar control measures will be applied. Control measures will not be used in one area so that data unaffected by those measures can be obtained throughout the project. Wells equipped with submersible pressure sensors have been installed to monitor water-table responses in the vicinity of the most common phreatophyte communities at the site. A neutron access tube has been emplaced adjacent to each well so that water content in the vadose zone can also be monitored. Changes in water-content profiles will be used to estimate specific yield, a critical parameter in the proposed methodology. A weather station has also been installed on site to monitor meteorological conditions and provide reference ET estimates. Water-level data collected prior to any control activities clearly indicate that the magnitude of the water-table fluctuations is highly dependent on the apparent vitality of the phreatophyte community in the vicinity of each well. After the control measures have been applied, water-level data from the treated areas will be compared to data from the untreated area. That comparison should enable quantification of reductions in ground-water consumption produced by those measures.

  18. Limitations of amorphous content quantification by isothermal calorimetry using saturated salt solutions to control relative humidity: alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Khalef, Nawel; Pinal, Rodolfo; Bakri, Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Despite the high sensitivity of isothermal calorimetry (IC), reported measurements of amorphous content by this technique show significant variability even for the same compound. An investigation into the reasons behind such variability is presented using amorphous lactose and salbutamol sulfate as model compounds. An analysis was carried out on the heat evolved as a result of the exchange of water vapor between the solid sample during crystallization and the saline solution reservoir. The use of saturated salt solutions as means of control of the vapor pressure of water within sealed ampoules bears inherent limitations that lead in turn to the variability associated with the IC technique. We present an alternative IC method, based on an open cell configuration that effectively addresses the limitations encountered with the sealed ampoule system. The proposed approach yields an integral whose value is proportional to the amorphous content in the sample, thus enabling reliable and consistent quantifications. PMID:19774655

  19. Pearson’s correlations between moisture content, drip loss, expressible fluid and salt-induced water gain of broiler pectoralis major muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture content, drip loss, expressible fluid, and % salt-induced water gain are widely used to estimate water states and water-holding capacity of raw meat. However, the relationships between these four measurements of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle describe are not well described. The objec...

  20. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  1. Impact of Salt Purity on Interfacial Water Organization Revealed by Conventional and Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency

    E-print Network

    Impact of Salt Purity on Interfacial Water Organization Revealed by Conventional and Heterodyne of the chosen salts and their solutions. This is true not only for the ACS grade salts but also vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected VSFG (HD-VSFG) spectroscopy that salt

  2. Removal of sea salt hydrate water from seawater-derived samples by dehydration.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Amanda A; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-12-18

    Aerosol particles produced from bubble bursting of natural seawater contain both sea salts and organic components. Depending on the temperature, pressure, and speed of drying, the salt components can form hydrates that bind water, slowing evaporation of the water, particularly if large particles or thick layers of salts undergo drying that is nonuniform and incomplete. The water bound in these salt hydrates interferes with measuring organic hydroxyl and amine functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy because it absorbs at the same infrared wavelengths. Here, a method for separating the hydrate water in sea salt hydrates using freezing and then heating in warm, dry air (70 °C) is evaluated and compared to other methods, including spectral subtraction. Laboratory-generated sea salt analogs show an efficient removal of 89% of the hydrate water absorption peak height by 24 h of heating at atmospheric pressure. The heating method was also applied to bubbled submicrometer (Sea Sweep), generated bulk (Bubbler), and atomized seawater samples, with efficient removal of 5, 22, and 39 ?g of hydrate water from samples of initial masses of 11, 30, 58 ?g, respectively. The strong spectral similarity between the difference of the initial and dehydrated spectra and the laboratory-generated sea salt hydrate spectrum provided verification of the removal of hydrate water. In contrast, samples of submicrometer atmospheric particles from marine air masses did not have detectable signatures of sea salt hydrate absorbance, likely because their smaller particles and lower filter loadings provided higher surface area to volume ratios and allowed faster and more complete drying. PMID:23181806

  3. Desalination of salt water by solar energy means

    Microsoft Academic Search

    La Rocca

    1979-01-01

    Desalination apparatus using solar energy comprises a main insulated container with a subsidiary preheating container next to it; the main container is covered with a transparent cover serving as a selective filter to provide the greenhouse effect and also as a condensation surface for water vapor, and this transparent cover incorporates a hollow space, for example by making the cover

  4. [Simulation of effect of irrigation with reclaimed water on soil water-salt movement by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    PubMed

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    As the conflict between water supply and demand, wastewater reuse has become an important measure, which can relieve the water shortage in Beijing. In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing, a city of water shortage, under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this research. The accumulation trends of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, it investigated the effects of different irrigation practices on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation. Results indicated that annual averages of soil salinity (EC(e)) increased 29.5%, 97.2%, 197.8% respectively, with the higher irrigation, normal irrigation, and low irrigation under equilibrium conditions. Irrigation frequency had little effect on soil salt-water movement, and soil salt accumulation was in a downward trend with low frequency of irrigation. Under equilibrium conditions, annual averages of EC(e) increased 23.7%, 97.2%, 208.5% respectively, with irrigation water salinity (EC(w)) 0.6, 1.2, 2.4 dS x m(-1). Soil salinity increased slightly with EC(w) = 0.6 dS x m(-1), while soil salinization did not appear. Totally, the growth of Blue grass was not influenced by soil salinity under equilibrium conditions with the regular irrigation in Beijing, but mild soil salinization appeared. PMID:23379129

  5. Voltammetric study of cadmium complexation by natural organic ligands in simulated salt lake water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. BYAMUGISHA; J. TIWANGYE NYANGABABO; KNUT H. SCHRØDER

    2005-01-01

    The binding of cadmium by amino acids has been studied using anodic stripping voltammetry. This was carried out in simulated salt lake water, at ionic strength of 7.92 M. The ionic strength was established by using sodium perchlorate as a supporting electrolyte. The stability constants of the complexes were evaluated from the shifts of peak potentials of the voltammograms as a

  6. Expression of COX2 in gastric mucosa of atrophic gastritis caused by hot high-salt water in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mei Tao; Li Zhang; Ling-Xia Zhang; Mei Jiang; Guang-Zhou Cao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To measure the expression of COX-2 in gastric mucosa of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) caused by hot high-salt water in rats and to study the pathogenesis of atrophic gastritis caused by hot high-salt diet. METHODS: The atrophic gastritis rat model was made by hot high-salt water ig perfusion. The expression of COX-2 in gastric mucosa in 4, 8, 12,

  7. Modeling the effects of landuse change on water and salt delivery from a catchment affected by dryland salinity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jai Vaze; Paul Barnett; Geoffrey Beale; Warrick Dawes; Ray Evans; Narendra Kumar Tuteja; Brian Murphy; Guy Geeves; Michelle Miller

    Abstract Acomprehensive,framework ,for the assessment of water ,and salt balance for large catchments affected by dryland salinity is applied to the Boorowa River catchment (1550 km,), located in south-eastern Australia. The effects of landuse, climate, topography, soils and geology on water and salt balance are examined. Landuse change scenarios based on increased pasture perenniality and tree cover, aimed at high

  8. Active Sodium and Chloride Transport by Anal Papillae of a Salt Water Mosquito Larva (Aedes campestris)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Phillips; J. Meredith

    1969-01-01

    ALTHOUGH anal papillae of freshwater mosquito larvae have been extensively investigated and shown to absorb actively sodium, potassium and chloride ions from the external medium1-7, this organ has been assumed to have no function and an impermeable structure in salt water species8,9. Considering insects in general, ``in dilute external solutions the salt water larvae become hyperosmotic to the medium. Salt

  9. Modeling daily stem water content by artificial neural network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hailan Wang; Ye Tian; Yandong Zhao

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to model the daily stem water content with neural network. The output voltage of stem water content sensor changed as time series. In order to ensure the accuracy of the model, coefficients sc and eg must be adjusted with the RBF NN input vector changed. The dimensions of input vectors were grouped from 2,

  10. Predicting the effects of landuse change on water and salt balance—a case study of a catchment affected by dryland salinity in NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Narendra Kumar; Beale, Geoffrey; Dawes, Warrick; Vaze, Jai; Murphy, Brian; Barnett, Paul; Rancic, Aleksandra; Evans, Ray; Geeves, Guy; Rassam, Daud W.; Miller, Michelle

    2003-12-01

    An integrated and comprehensive framework for the assessment of water and salt balance for large catchments is presented. The framework is applied to the Mandagery Creek catchment (1688 km 2), located in the south-eastern part of Australia. The catchment is affected by dryland salinity and the effects of landuse, climate, topography, soils and geology on water and salt balance are examined. Landuse change scenarios designed to: (a) increase the perennial content of the pastures and crop rotations and (b) increase the current remnant native woody vegetation with additional tree cover are investigated to determine the level of intervention required to develop ameliorative strategies. Likely downstream impacts of the reduction in water flow and salt export are also estimated.

  11. Fructose2,6-bisphosphate contents were increased in response to salt, water and osmotic stress in leaves of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza by differential changes in the activity of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase\\/fructose-2,6-bisphosphate 2-phosphatase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshiaki Banzai; Nobutaka Hanagata; Zvy Dubinsky; Isao Karube

    2003-01-01

    The steady-state level of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase\\/fructose-2,6-bisphosphate 2-phosphatase (F6P2K\\/F26BPase) transcript has been found to be raised in the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza treated with 500 mM NaCl for 6 h. In the present study, we assayed both F6P2K\\/F26BPase activity and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F26BP) contents in leaves of salt- and water-stressed B. gymnorrhiza. In the plants treated with 500 mM NaCl, no increase in transcript level was observed after

  12. The characterisation of the coated layer at the interface carbon steel-natural salt water by impedance spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Bousselmi; C. Fiaud; B. Tribollet; E. Triki

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion products layer formed in natural salt waters has been characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The possibility of using synthetic waters instead of natural waters to simulate the corrosion processes has been considered. Following the EHD impedance results, it could be assumed that the mass transport of oxygen occurs in the electrolyte and through a porous layer. The AC diagrams

  13. Salt Water Revival

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    1981-01-01

    In this outdoor activity, learners visit the intertidal zone of a rocky coastal site well populated with marine organisms. During a low tide, when many organisms are not covered by water, learners create "waves" and a false "high tide" to trigger animals into action such as opening up their shells or pushing out feathery food-catching extensions.

  14. Water Uptake by Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation of Stable Aqueous Solutions Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, Danielle L.

    Liquid water processes that may occur on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars have important implications for the present-day water cycle, habitability, and planetary protection policies. The presence of salts on Mars plays a role in surface-atmosphere interactions as salts enhance the soil's ability to retain water. This thesis explores the phase transitions of water upon interaction with Mars relevant salt analogs. Water uptake and loss properties of a single and complex Mars analog are examined using a Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell. The effect of the hygroscopic salts on bacterial spores was evaluated with a focus on potential terrestrial contamination on outbound spacecraft and its influence on planetary protection concerns. Calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) is a highly deliquescent salt that may exist on the surface of present-day Mars. Here, we quantify the deliquescent relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescent relative humidity (ERH) of Ca(ClO4)2 as a function of temperature (223 K to 273 K) to elucidate its behavior on the surface of Mars. Mars relevant temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions were simulated and deliquescence (solid to aqueous) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid) phase transitions of Ca(ClO4)2 were characterized. Experimental DRH values were compared to a thermodynamic model for three hydration states of Ca(ClO 4)2. Calcium perchlorate was found to supersaturate, with lower ERH values than DRH values. Additionally, we conducted a 17-hour experiment to simulate a subsurface relative humidity and temperature diurnal cycle. This demonstrated that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions can persist without efflorescing for the majority of a martian sol, up to 17 hours under Mars temperature heating rates and RH conditions. Applying these experimental results to martian surface and subsurface heat and mass transfer models, we find that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions could persist for most of the martian sol under present-day conditions. To investigate complex brine mixtures, a salt analog, deemed 'Instant Mars,' was developed to closely match the individual cation and anion concentrations as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory instrument at the Phoenix landing site. 'Instant Mars' was developed to fully encompass and closely replicate correct concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, and sulfate ions. Here we use two separate techniques, Raman microscopy and particle levitation, to study the water uptake and loss properties of individual Instant Mars analog particles. Raman microscope experiments reveal that Instant Mars particles can form stable, aqueous solutions at 56 +/- 5% RH at 243 K and persist as a metastable, aqueous solution down to 13 +/- 5% RH. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate that a salt analog that closely replicates in-situ measurements from the Phoenix landing site can take up water vapor from the surrounding environment and transition into a stable, aqueous solution. Furthermore, this aqueous Instant Mars solution can persist as a metastable, supersaturated solution in RH conditions much lower than the deliquescent RH. Finally, laboratory experiments presented here examine the interaction of B. subtilis spores (B-168) with liquid water in Mars relevant temperatures and RH conditions. In addition, Ca(ClO4)2 was mixed with the B. subtilis spores and exposed to the same diurnal cycle conditions to quantify the effects of Ca(ClO4)2 on the spores. A combination of Raman microscopy and an environmental cell allows us to visually and spectrally analyze the changes of the individual B. subtilis spores and Ca(ClO4)2 mixtures as they experience present-day martian diurnal cycle conditions. Results suggest that B-168 spores can survive the arid conditions and martian temperatures, even when exposed to Ca(ClO 4)2 in the crystalline or aqueous phase. The extreme hygroscopic nature of Ca(ClO4)2 allows for direct interaction of B. subtilis spores with liquid water. The results impact the understanding of planetary protectio

  15. Salt content in canteen and fast food meals in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Hansen, Kirsten; Knuthsen, Pia; Saxholt, Erling; Fagt, Sisse

    2010-01-01

    Background A high salt (=NaCl) intake is associated with high blood pressure, and knowledge of salt content in food and meals is important, if the salt intake has to be decreased in the general population. Objective To determine the salt content in worksite canteen meals and fast food. Design For the first part of this study, 180 canteen meals were collected from a total of 15 worksites with in-house catering facilities. Duplicate portions of a lunch meal were collected from 12 randomly selected employees at each canteen on two non-consecutive days. For the second part of the study, a total of 250 fast food samples were collected from 52 retail places representing both city (Aarhus) and provincial towns. The canteen meals and fast food samples were analyzed for chloride by potentiometric titration with silver nitrate solution, and the salt content was estimated. Results The salt content in lunch meals in worksite canteens were 3.8±1.8 g per meal and 14.7±5.1 g per 10 MJ for men (n=109), and 2.8±1.2 g per meal and 14.4±6.2 g per 10 MJ for women (n=71). Salt content in fast food ranged from 11.8±2.5 g per 10 MJ (burgers) to 16.3±4.4 g per 10 MJ (sausages) with a mean content of 13.8±3.8 g per 10 MJ. Conclusion Salt content in both fast food and in worksite canteen meals is high and should be decreased. PMID:20305749

  16. Influence of Start-Up Time on the Purging of Salt Water From a Cavity by an Overflow of Fresh Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Gillam; M. P. Kirkpatrick; S. W. Armfield

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation of a flow in which salt water is purged from a square cavity by an overflow of fresh water. Ramp inlet velocity boundary conditions are used in order to describe the influence of the start up time on the amount of saline water purged from the cavity in the initial splash.

  17. Biased Monitoring of Fresh Water-Salt Water Mixing Zone in Coastal Aquifers

    E-print Network

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    aquifers, significant vertical hydraulic gradients are formed where fresh water and underlying salt waterBiased Monitoring of Fresh Water-Salt Water Mixing Zone in Coastal Aquifers by Eyal Shalev1, Ariel water-salt water mixing zone in the coastal aquifer of Israel are installed with 10 to 50 m long screens

  18. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution by combining water soluble graphene with cobalt salts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Chen, Bin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is tremendous effort put in the pursuit for cheap and efficient catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution systems. Herein, we report an active catalyst that uses the earth-abundant element cobalt and water-dispersible sulfonated graphene. The photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity of the catalyst was tested by using triethanolamine (TEOA) as electron donor and eosin Y (EY) as the photosensitizer under LED irradiation at 525 nm. Hydrogen was produced constantly even after 20 h, and the turnover number (TON) reached 148 (H2/Co) in 4 h with respect to the initial concentration of the added cobalt salts was shown to be 5.6 times larger than that without graphene. PMID:25161850

  19. Hydrogen production from salt water by Marine blue green algae and solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, A.; Rosner, D.; Kumazawa, S.; Barciela, S.; Phlips, E.

    1985-01-01

    Two marine bluegreen algae, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 and Synechococcus sp Miami 041511 have been selected as the result of over 10 years continuous and intensive effort of isolation, growth examination, and the screening of hydrogen photoproduction capability in this laboratory. Both strains photoproduced hydrogen for several days at high rates and a quantity of hydrogen was accumulated in a closed vessel. Overall hydrogen donor substance of the hydrogen photoproduction was found to be salt water. Using strain Miami BG 7, a two step method of hydrogen photoproduction from salt water was successfully developed and this was recycled several times over a one month period using both free cells and immobilized cells in both indoor and outdoor under natural sunlight. According to these experiments, a prototype floating hydrogen production system was designed for further development of the biosolar hydrogen production system.

  20. Electrolysis of Salt Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is a hands-on lab activity about the chemical composition and conductivity of water. Working in groups, learners will: conduct an experiment involving the process of electrolysis, prepare an experiment to better understand the process of ion exchange, discuss and research the "softness" and "hardness" of water, and use the periodic table to identify elements and learn their characteristics. Background information, a glossary and more is included. Materials needed for each student group include a 9-volt battery, two electrodes (e.g. copper strips, or two #2 pencils sharpened at both ends), electrical wire and glass beakers or ceramic saucers. This activity is part of the Aquarius Hands-on Laboratory Activities.

  1. A SCREENING ASSESSMENT OF THE RELATIVE VULNERABILITY OF COASTAL WATER SUPPLIES TO SALT WATER INTRUSION CAUSED BY SEA LEVEL RISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea levels have risen from four to eight inches in the 20th century, and model projections suggest an additional rise of 8 to 15 inches is possible during the 21st century. Rising sea levels can increase the upstream extent of salt water influence in coastal aquifers. In coasta...

  2. Expressions of HSP and p53 protein in gastric mucosa of atrophic gastritis induced by high-salt hot water in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-He Jia; Li Zhang; Ling-Xia Zhang; Jun-Rong Xu; Mei Jiang; Ning-Xia Zhang; Guang-Zhou Cao

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To study the relationship between hot high-salt diet and chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and gastric cancer, and detect the expression of HSP60, HSP 70 and HSP 90 ? and p53 protein in the rat gastric mucosa of atrophic gastritis induced by high-salt hot water. METHODS:Rat CAG models were firstly established by intragastrical feeding with 15 % 55 ? salt water

  3. Coagulation by hydrolysing metal salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinming Duan; John Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Aluminium and iron salts are widely used as coagulants in water and wastewater treatment and in some other applications. They are effective in removing a broad range of impurities from water, including colloidal particles and dissolved organic substances. Their mode of action is generally explained in terms of two distinct mechanisms: charge neutralisation of negatively charged colloids by cationic hydrolysis

  4. Continuous salt precipitation and separation from supercritical water. Part 2. Type 2 salts and mixtures of two salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Schubert; Johann W. Regler; Frédéric Vogel

    2010-01-01

    Using a continuously operated laboratory plant for the catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass featuring a supercritical water salt separator we investigated the separation performance of three different binary type 2 salt–water mixtures and three ternary salt–water mixtures that consisted either of two type 1 salts or two type 2 salts dissolved in water. It turned out that a concentrated salt

  5. Ending the 100 Years Salt Water Industrial Exploitation in Mineral Salt Site in Tuzla

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nedjo Djuric

    Resume The rocks of the salt sites are widespread in north-east part of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Tuzla basin area the. Dissolution of mentioned takes place with the presence of water what is shown at the terrain surface by appearance of salt wells of various mineralizations. In regard with the fact that salt was of interest for human civilization through

  6. Water Uptake By Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation Of Stable Aqueous Solutions On Mars Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.; Jorgensen, S. K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To understand the formation of briny aqueous solutions on Mars, a salt analog was developed to closely match the individual cation and anion concentrations as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory aboard the Phoenix Lander. ';Instant Mars' is a salt analog developed to fully encompass the correct concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, and sulfate ions. Using environmental Raman microscopy, we have studied the water uptake by the Instant Mars analog as a function of temperature and relative humidity. Water uptake was monitored using Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy. A MicroJet droplet generator was used to generate 30 ?m diameter particles that were deposited onto a quartz disc. The particles undergo visual transformations as the relative humidity (RH) is increased and the presence of water uptake is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. At -30° C, water uptake begins at ~ 35% RH as humidity is increased. The water uptake is marked by the growth of a sulfate peak at 990 cm-1, an indicator that sulfate has undergone a phase transition into an aqueous state. As the RH continues to increase, the peak in the O-H region (~3500 cm-1) broadens as more liquid water accumulates in the particles. The Instant Mars particles achieve complete deliquescence at 68% RH, indicated both visually and with Raman spectroscopy. The gradual water uptake observed suggests that deliquescence of the Instant Mars particles is not an immediate process, but that it occurs in steps marked by the deliquescence of the individual salts. Perhaps of even more significance is the tendency for the Instant Mars particles to remain aqueous at low humidity as RH is decreased. Raman spectra indicate that liquid water is present as low as 2% RH at -30° C. Ongoing work will examine the phase of Instant Mars particles under simulated Martian surface and subsurface conditions to gain insight into the possibility for aqueous solutions on Mars today via water uptake.

  7. Analysis of aqueous solutions by near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS) III. Binary mixtures of inorganic salts in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker J. Frost; Karl Molt

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that binary mixtures of inorganic salts in aqueous solutions can be analyzed quantitatively by near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS). Each component influences the structure of water by miscellaneous cation\\/anion-OH interactions causing specific effects in the NIR spectra which can be evaluated in a quantitative way. The calibrations described were performed using principle component regression (PCR) and optimised with respect

  8. Determination of Preferential Interaction Parameters by Multicomponent Diffusion. Applications to Poly(ethylene glycol)-Salt-Water Ternary Mixtures

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    to Poly(ethylene glycol)-Salt-Water Ternary Mixtures Cong Tan, John G. Albright, and Onofrio Annunziata for lysozyme-salt-water systems using precision Rayleigh inter- ferometry.6,10-13,16 Here, we report; In Final Form: February 13, 2008 Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a hydrophilic nonionic polymer used in many

  9. Hot water, fresh beer, and salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1990-11-01

    In the ``hot chocolate effect'' the best musical scales (those with the finest tone quality, largest range, and best tempo) are obtained by adding salt to a glass of hot water supersaturated with air. Good scales can also be obtained by adding salt to a glass of freshly opened beer (supersaturated with CO2) provided you first (a) get rid of much of the excess CO2 so as to produce smaller, hence slower, rising bubbles, and (b) get rid of the head of foam, which damps the standing wave and ruins the tone quality. Finally the old question, ``Do ionizing particles produce bubbles in fresh beer?'' is answered experimentally.

  10. Altered toxicities of fatty acid salts in green paramecia cultured in different waters.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Takashi; Uezu, Kazuya; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Kawano, Tomonori

    2006-01-01

    Detergents including fatty acid salts act as surface-active agents and thus possibly damage the plasma membrane structures of aquatic organisms. Therefore, when excess, the house-used and industrial outflows of such detergents into aquatic environments may have considerable impacts on the ecosystem. In this study, we propose the use of green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) for assessing the acute toxicity of eight fatty acid salts (Na and K salts of oleate, palmitate, laurate and myristate) under various water conditions. The Paramecium in the stationary phase were used for a toxicity assay carried out on 12-well microplates and the median lethal concentration (LC50) was determined for each fatty acid salt. In the low mineral culture medium prepared with ultra-pure water, the LC50 for each fatty acid ranged from 5.8 to 144 ppm (w/v). The toxic levels of fatty acid salts differed in the following order: laurate, myristate > or = oleate, palmitate. The toxic levels of oleate and palmitate salts were ca. 10-fold lower than those of laurate and myristate salts. When river water and local tap water instead of ultra-pure water were used for culturing, the toxic levels of all fatty acid salts were drastically lowered compared to the low mineral condition by 30- to 100-fold (198-660 ppm, w/v). Similar detoxification effect was observed when Ca or Mg was added to the low mineral culture media, indicating that the toxicity of fatty acid salts can be notably lowered as the mineral content increases. As we demonstrated that toxicities of fatty acid salts can be lowered in river water and tap water compared to the low mineral condition, some chemical substances behave differently in the different water conditions. Therefore, the use of natural waters reflecting the real environmental conditions in further collection of data on the ecotoxicity impacts of variety of chemicals is highly encouraged. PMID:16989314

  11. SALT WATER INTRUSION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salt water intrusion, from one or more sources outlined in this report, has resulted in degradation of subsurface fresh water aquifers in 43 States. Numerous case histories delineating current problems exist, providing adequate documentation of the seriousness of salt water intru...

  12. Modelling the effects of land-use change on water and salt delivery from a catchment affected by dryland salinity in south-east Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaze, Jai; Barnett, Paul; Beale, Geoffrey; Dawes, Warrick; Evans, Ray; Tuteja, Narendra Kumar; Murphy, Brian; Geeves, Guy; Miller, Michelle

    2004-06-01

    A comprehensive framework for the assessment of water and salt balance for large catchments affected by dryland salinity is applied to the Boorowa River catchment (1550 km2), located in south-eastern Australia. The framework comprised two models, each focusing on a different aspect and operating on a different scale. A quasi-physical semi-distributed model CATSALT was used to estimate runoff and salt fluxes from different source areas within the catchment. The effects of land use, climate, topography, soils and geology are included. A groundwater model FLOWTUBE was used to estimate the long-term effects of land-use change on groundwater discharge. Unlike conventional salinity studies that focus on groundwater alone, this study makes use of a new approach to explore surface and groundwater interactions with salt stores and the stream.Land-use change scenarios based on increased perennial pasture and tree-cover content of the vegetation, aimed at high leakage and saline discharge areas, are investigated. Likely downstream impacts of the reduction in flow and salt export are estimated.The water balance model was able to simulate both the daily observed stream flow and salt load at the catchment outlet for high and low flow conditions satisfactorily. Mean leakage rate of about 23.2 mm year-1 under current land use for the Boorowa catchment was estimated. The corresponding mean runoff and salt export from the catchment were 89 382 ML year-1 and 38 938 t year-1, respectively. Investigation of various land-use change scenarios indicates that changing annual pastures and cropping areas to perennial pastures is not likely to result in substantial improvement of water quality in the Boorowa River. A land-use change of about 20% tree-cover, specifically targeting high recharge and the saline discharge areas, would be needed to decrease stream salinity by 150 ?S cm-1 from its current level. Stream salinity reductions of about 20 ?S cm-1 in the main Lachlan River downstream of the confluence of the Boorowa River is predicted. The FLOWTUBE modelling within the Boorowa River catchment indicated that discharge areas under increased recharge conditions could re-equilibrate in around 20 years for the catchment, and around 15 years for individual hillslopes.

  13. Effect of salinity on water relations of wild barley plants differing in salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Vysotskaya, Lidia; Hedley, Peter E.; Sharipova, Guzel; Veselov, Dmitry; Kudoyarova, Guzel; Morris, Jennifer; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Certain lines of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) are more tolerant of salinity than others. The physiological basis of this difference is examined in a comparative study of a saline-tolerant and saline-intolerant line that emphasizes plant water relations. Methodology Effects of salt-treatment (75 mM maximum) extending from a few hours to 3 weeks were quantified in 8-day-old seedlings of a saline-sensitive wild barley line (‘T-1’) and a less saline-sensitive line (‘20-45’). Plants were grown in nutrient culture. Levels of mRNA of the HtPIP2;4 aquaporin (AQP) gene were determined together with a range of physiological responses including root hydraulic conductivity, osmotic potential of root xylem sap, transpiration, leaf relative water content, root water content, leaf water potential, leaf sap osmolality, leaf length, leaf area and chlorophyll content. Principal results Salt treatment inhibited transpiration and hydraulic conductivity more in salt-tolerant ‘20-45’ plants than in salt-sensitive ‘T-1’. In ‘20-45’, the effect was paralleled by a fast (within a few hours) and persistent (3 days) down-regulation of aquaporin. In salt-sensitive ‘T-1’ plants, aquaporin down-regulation was delayed for up to 24 h. Greater tolerance in ‘20-45’ plants was characterized by less inhibition of leaf area, root fresh weight, leaf water content and chlorophyll concentration. Leaf water potentials were similar in both lines. Conclusions (i) Decline in hydraulic conductivity in salt-treated barley plants is important for stomatal closure, (ii) lowered transpiration rate is beneficial for salt tolerance, at least at the seedling stage and (iii) changes in AQP expression are implicated in the control of whole plant hydraulic conductivity and the regulation of shoot water relations. PMID:22476064

  14. [Simulation of effects of soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement with reclaimed water irrigation by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    PubMed

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this study. The accumulation trends and profile distribution of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, the effects of different soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation were investigated. Results indicated that soil salinity in the profiles reached uniform equilibrium conditions by repeated simulation, with different initial soil salinity. Under the conditions of loam and clay loam soil, salinity in the profiles increased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions, while under the condition of sandy loam soil, salinity in the profiles decreased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions. The saturated soil salinity (EC(e)) under equilibrium conditions followed an order of sandy loam < loam < clay loam. Salt accumulations in Japan euonymus and Chinese pine were less than that in Blue grass. The temporal and spatial distributions of soil salinity were also different in these three types of plants. In addition, the growth of the plants was not influenced by soil salinity (except clay loam), but mild soil salinization occurred under all conditions (except sandy loam). PMID:23379130

  15. Effectiveness of highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt, Route 25, southeastern Massachusetts; description of study area, data collection programs, and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, P.E.; Armstrong, D.S.; Granato, G.E.; Stone, V.J.; Smith, K.P.; Provencher, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Four test sites along a 7-mile section of Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts, each representing a specific highway-drainage system, were instrumented to determine the effectiveness of the drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt. One of the systems discharges highway runoff onsite through local drainpipes. The other systems use trunkline drainpipes through which runoff from highway surfaces, shoulders, and median strips is diverted and discharged into either a local stream or a coastal waterway. Route 25 was completed and opened to traffic in the summer of 1987. Road salt was first applied to the highway in the winter of 1987-88. The study area is on a thick outwash plain composed primarily of sand and gravel. Water-table depths range from 15 to 60 feet below land surface at the four test sites. Ground-water flow is in a general southerly direction, approximately perpendicular to the highway. Streamflow in the study area is controlled primarily by ground-water discharge. Background concentrations of dissolved chloride, sodium, and calcium-the primary constituents of road salt-are similar in ground water and surface water and range from 5 to 20, 5 to 10, and 1 to 5 milligrams per liter, respectively. Data-collection programs were developed for monitoring the application of road salt to the highway, the quantity of road-salt water entering the ground water, diverted through the highway-drainage systems, and entering a local stream. The Massachusetts Highway Department monitored road salt applied to the highway and reported these data to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Geological Survey designed and operated the ground-water, highway- drainage, and surface-water data-collection programs. A road-salt budget will be calculated for each test site so that the effectiveness of the different highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt can be determined.

  16. The production of gas-phase molecular iodine by the photoenhanced reaction between chlorophyll and iodide at salt water surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. I. Reeser; C. George; D. J. Donaldson

    2009-01-01

    Sources of iodine species into the atmosphere are of interest because iodine atoms play an important role in the oxidative capacity of the troposphere and the formation of particles. Previous results from our group show that photoreactions between chlorophyll and halide salts at salt water surfaces may be an important source of reactive halogens into the troposphere. The mechanism for

  17. Water Imbibition into Rock as Affected by Sample Shape, Pore, Conductivity, and Antecedent Water Content

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Ewing

    2005-08-29

    Infiltration is often presumed to follow Philip's equation, I = st{sup 1/2}, where I is cumulative infiltration, s is sorptivity, and t is time. This form of the equation is appropriate for short times, and/or for negligible gravitational effects. For a uniform soil, this equation describes a plot of log(mass imbibed) versus log(time), with a slope (imbibition exponent) of 1/2. The equation has also been applied to low-porosity rocks, where the extremely small pores render gravitational forces negligible. Experiments recently performed on a wide variety of rocks produced imbibition exponents from 0.2 to 0.5. Many rock types showed initial imbibition proceeding as I {approx} t{sup 1/4}, then later switched to ''normal'' (t{sup 1/2}) behavior. The distance to the wetting front that corresponds to this cross-over behavior was found to be related to the sample shape: tall thin samples are more likely to exhibit the exponent 1/4, and to cross over to 1/2-type behavior later, while short, squat samples are less likely to display the 1/4-type behavior at all. Additionally, the exponents are sensitive to antecedent water content, with initially wetter samples having smaller values. In this study, we present the experimental data, and provide a consistent and physically-based explanation using percolation theory. The analogy between imbibition and diffusion is used to model imbibition into samples with low pore connectivity, with the exponents and their crossover behavior emerging from a random walk process. All laboratory phenomena--different exponents, crossover behavior, and effects of sample shape and antecedent water content--are reproduced by the model, with similar patterns across experiment and simulation. We conclude both that diffusion is a useful and powerful conceptual model for understanding imbibition, and also that imbibition experiments, being simpler than diffusion measurements, can be used to examine diffusive behavior in rock.

  18. Magnesium sulphate salts and the history of water on Mars.

    PubMed

    Vaniman, David T; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve J; Fialips, Claire I; Carey, J William; Feldman, William C

    2004-10-01

    Recent reports of approximately 30 wt% of sulphate within saline sediments on Mars--probably occurring in hydrated form--suggest a role for sulphates in accounting for equatorial H2O observed in a global survey by the Odyssey spacecraft. Among salt hydrates likely to be present, those of the MgSO4*nH2O series have many hydration states. Here we report the exposure of several of these phases to varied temperature, pressure and humidity to constrain their possible H2O contents under martian surface conditions. We found that crystalline structure and H2O content are dependent on temperature-pressure history, that an amorphous hydrated phase with slow dehydration kinetics forms at <1% relative humidity, and that equilibrium calculations may not reflect the true H2O-bearing potential of martian soils. Mg sulphate salts can retain sufficient H2O to explain a portion of the Odyssey observations. Because phases in the MgSO4*nH2O system are sensitive to temperature and humidity, they can reveal much about the history of water on Mars. However, their ease of transformation implies that salt hydrates collected on Mars will not be returned to Earth unmodified, and that accurate in situ analysis is imperative. PMID:15470421

  19. Hot water, fresh beer, and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (USA) Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    In the hot chocolate effect'' the best musical scales (those with the finest tone quality, largest range, and best tempo) are obtained by adding salt to a glass of hot water supersaturated with air. Good scales can also be obtained by adding salt to a glass of freshly opened beer (supersaturated with CO{sub 2}) provided you first (a) get rid of much of the excess CO{sub 2} so as to produce smaller, hence slower, rising bubbles, and (b) get rid of the head of foam, which damps the standing wave and ruins the tone quality. Finally the old question, Do ionizing particles produce bubbles in fresh beer '' is answered experimentally.

  20. Ion specificity at a low salt concentration in water-methanol mixtures exemplified by a growth of polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunchao; Wang, Tao; Liu, Lvdan; Liu, Guangming; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2013-03-19

    By use of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), we have investigated the specific ion effect on the growth of poly(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) multilayer at a salt concentration as low as 2.0 mM in water-methanol mixtures. QCM-D results demonstrate that specific ion effect can be observed in methanol and water-methanol mixtures though it is negligible in water. Moreover, the specific ion effect is amplified as the molar fraction of methanol (xM) increases from 0% to 75% but is weakened again with the further increase of xM from 75% to 100%. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements reveal that the counterion-polyelectrolyte segment interactions may not account for the observed ion specificity. By extending the Collins' concept of matching water affinities to methanol and water-methanol mixtures, we suggest that the ion-solvent interactions and the resulted counterion-charged group interactions are responsible for the occurrence of the specific ion effect. The conductivity measurements indicate that water and methanol molecules may form complexes, and the change of relative proportion of complexes with the xM causes the amplification or weakening of the specific ion effect. PMID:23425248

  1. Monitoring of root zone water content in the lab by 2D geoelectrical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, U.; Al Hagrey, S. A.; Rabbel, W.

    2009-12-01

    Studying the simulation of plant behaviour under water stress conditions becomes more and more important as a consequence of the increasing water shortage in many countries. Therefore monitoring of soil moisture is essential to validate results of hydrological models and for balancing of water flow processes. One of the fundamental processes in this context is the root water uptake. Based on field studies we recognized the importance to observe the water content at different time steps. We present a method for monitoring soil water redistributions due to water uptake by roots. Our aim was to image and monitor diurnal soil water redistribution in a small scale indoor experiment (cm-dm range) using techniques of geoelectrical resistivity tomography of high resolution, and to correlate results of the applied geoelectrical time-lapse imaging techniques with single point TDR-method. The measured time-lapses were inverted in 2D resistivity models, which were transferred in moisture distributions within the root-zone and surrounding soils using a geophysical pedotransfer (pedophysical) function. The distribution of water content was observed over several weeks. We imaged significant heterogeneity of soil moisture in space and time, even whereas no irrigation was applied. We monitored highest moisture variability during the morning hours, whereas nearly no changes accrued during the night. In our presentation we will focus also on the development of a model for root zone media which has been established based on the Archie’s equation. Until now, the Archie equation has been applied successfully for granular media with full or partial water saturation (mixture of three phases: grain, water and air). However if roots are involved we have to consider a media of four phases (mixture of sand grain, water, air and root) The model of the electric resistivity versus water content for root zones has been validated by experimental laboratory data for fine sand with plant roots as well as by data for the same material without roots.

  2. Enhanced bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug fenofibrate by using liposomes containing a bile salt.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaping; Lu, Yi; Chen, Jianming; Lai, Jie; Sun, Jing; Hu, Fuqiang; Wu, Wei

    2009-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug fenofibrate when liposomes containing a bile salt were used as oral drug delivery systems. Liposomes composed of soybean phosphotidylcholine (SPC) and sodium deoxycholate (SDC) were prepared by a dry-film dispersing method coupled with sonication and homogenization. Several properties of the liposomes, including particle size, entrapment efficiency and membrane fluidity, were extensively characterized. In vitro release experiments indicated that no more than 20% of total fenofibrate was released from SPC/cholesterol (CL) and SPC/SDC liposomes at 2 h, in contrast with near complete release for micronized fenofibrate capsules. Strikingly, in vivo measurements of pharmacokinetics and bioavailability demonstrated higher rates of fenofibrate absorption from both SPC/SDC and SPC/CL liposomes than micronized fenofibrate. The bioavailability of SPC/SDC and SPC/CL liposomes was 5.13- and 3.28-fold higher, respectively, than that of the micronized fenofibrate. The disparity between oral bioavailability and in vitro release for liposomes strongly suggests alternative absorption mechanisms rather than enhanced release. Importantly, SPC/SDC liposomes exhibited a 1.57-fold increase in bioavailability relative to SPC/CL liposomes, indicating that liposomes containing bile salts may be used to enhance oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:19394416

  3. Dynamic modelling of passive margin salt tectonics: effects of water loading, sediment properties and

    E-print Network

    Beaumont, Christopher

    Dynamic modelling of passive margin salt tectonics: effects of water loading, sediment properties by Couette £ow in the underlying salt.The e¡ects of water: (i) increase solid and £uid pressures that are formed above salt. Sediment progradation above a viscous salt layer results in formation of landward

  4. Unfrozen water contents of undisturbed and remolded Alaskan silt as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Tice; P. B. Black; R. L. Berg

    1988-01-01

    Unfrozen water content as a function of temperature was measured in the laboratory using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for 16 undisturbed frozen cores acquired from the Northwest Alaska Pipeline Company Chilled Gas Test Facility. The cores were then remolded and brought to their original densities and water contents, and unfrozen water content as a function of temperature was again measured

  5. Salt water intrusion analysis and trend forecast in the coastal plain of the Laizhou Bay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    An Yonghui; Zhang Fucun; He Jin; Shi Fenghua; Han Shuangbao; Li Xufeng

    2010-01-01

    Taking Guangrao county of Shandong Province as an example, authors expatiate geological background for salt and fresh water formation, and formation and evolvement for transition-zone of salt and fresh water, analyze the history and actuality of salt water intrusion arisen by extensive groundwater exploitation, forecast intrusion trend for salty water using indeterminacy model method, and point out measures and proposition

  6. Changes in Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup Tilt and Water Order Induced by Monovalent Salts: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan N. Sachs; Hirsh Nanda; Horia I. Petrache; Thomas B. Woolfz

    2004-01-01

    The association between monovalent salts and neutral lipid bilayers is known to influence global bilayer structural properties such as headgroup conformational fluctuations and the dipole potential. The local influence of the ions, however, has been unknown due to limited structural resolution of experimental methods. Molecular dynamics simulations are used here to elucidate local structural rearrangements upon association of a series

  7. Temporal stability of soil water contents as affected by weather patterns: a simulation study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) is a natural phenomenon that recently attracts attention and finds multiple applications. Large variations in the interannual and interseasonal TS SWC have been encountered among locations studied by various authors. The objective of this work was ...

  8. Tamarix hispida zinc finger protein ThZFP1 participates in salt and osmotic stress tolerance by increasing proline content and SOD and POD activities.

    PubMed

    Zang, Dandan; Wang, Chao; Ji, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yucheng

    2015-06-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are a large family that play important roles in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, RNA binding, morphogenesis, transcriptional regulation, abiotic or biotic stress response. However, the functions of ZFPs involved in abiotic stress are largely not known. In the present study, we cloned and functionally characterized a ZFP gene, ThZFP1, from Tamarix hispida. The expression of ThZFP1 is highly induced by NaCl, mannitol or ABA treatment. To study the function of ThZFP1 involved in abiotic stress response, transgenic T. hispida plants with overexpression or knockdown of ThZFP1 were generated using a transient transformation system. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of ThZFP1 suggested that ThZFP1 can induce the expression of a series of genes, including delta-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), leading to accumulation of proline and enhanced activities of SOD and POD. These physiological changes enhanced proline content and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capability when exposed to salt or osmotic stress. All the results obtained from T. hispida plants were further confirmed by analyses of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ThZFP1. These data together suggested that ThZFP1 positively regulates proline accumulation and activities of SOD and POD under salt and osmotic stress conditions. PMID:25900571

  9. Effect of Pre-Dried History and Initial Water Content on Soil Slaking and Desalinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, Abul Hasnat Md.; Akae, Takeo

    An efficient and low cost method is required to improve the saline soils. Soil slaking has long been studied from the stand point of stability of aggregates. However, it has not been studied from that of salt removal. The objective of this study is to examine the contribution of slaking to desalinization of soil accompanied by land drying practice. A slaking test was carried out for evaluating the efficiency of slaking and their impacts on salt removal of salinized soil under various water contents. We prepared natural/virgin and air-dried soils to give different intensity of pre-drying. Those soils were resaturated (for air-dry soil) and well-mixed, then dried to different moisture contents (60, 50, 40, 30, 20 and 10% by weight). After 24 hours immersion in water, the soils never slaked at 60 and 50% moisture contents in natural soil whereas 88-89% of the specimens were slaked in air-dry soil under the same moisture contents. The slaking rate was highest under 30% moisture contents in natural soil. In air-dry soil 30 and 20% showed the higher slaking rate in compared to other water contents. The proportion of salt released into equilibrated water after 24 hours immersion was also high at the same water contents. Since the natural soil did not slake until 40%, drying below 30% moisture content will be effective for the removal of salt from these soils.

  10. Laboratory experiments of salt water intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestani, Elena; Camporese, Matteo; Salandin, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The problem of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers is dealt with by the proper setup of a sand-box device to develop laboratory experiments in a controlled environment. Saline intrusion is a problem of fundamental importance and affects the quality of both surface water and groundwater in coastal areas. In both cases the phenomenon may be linked to anthropogenic (construction of reservoirs, withdrawals, etc.) and/or natural (sea-level excursions, variability of river flows, etc.) changes. In recent years, the escalation of this problem has led to the development of specific projects and studies to identify possible countermeasures, typically consisting of underground barriers. Physical models are fundamental to study the saltwater intrusion problem, since they provide benchmarks for numerical model calibrations and for the evaluation of the effectiveness of solutions to contain the salt wedge. In order to study and describe the evolution of the salt wedge, the effectiveness of underground barriers, and the distance from the coast of a withdrawal that guarantees a continuous supply of fresh water, a physical model has been realized at the University of Padova to represent the terminal part of a coastal aquifer. It consists of a laboratory flume 500 cm long, 30 cm wide and 60 cm high, filled for an height of 45 cm with glass beads with a d50 of 0.6 mm and a uniformity coefficient d60/d10~= 1.5. The material is homogeneous and characterized by a porosity of about 0.37 and by an hydraulic conductivity of about 1.8×10-3 m/s. Upstream from the sand-box, a tank, continuously supplied by a pump, provides fresh water to recharge the aquifer, while the downstream tank, filled with salt water, simulates the sea. The volume of the downstream tank (~= 2 m3) is about five times the upstream one, so that density variations due to the incoming fresh water flow are negligible. The water level in the two tanks is continuously monitored by means of two level probes and is controlled by a couple of spillways placed in both the upstream and downstream tanks, ensuring a constant gradient during the tests. The flow rate spilled from the downstream tank is continuously measured so that it is possible to control the fulfillment of the stationary condition in the system. While we use food dye to mark saltwater to give an easy visual evidence of the salt wedge, the spatio-temporal evolution of the concentration is monitored during the experiment by using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). An electrode system specifically realized to be effective in the flume is used during the experiments to achieve electrical resistance measurements, later converted in concentrations through the calibration of a petrophysical law. The presentation describes the laboratory setup and the data achieved from the developed experiments compared with numerical simulations obtained by the SUTRA software.

  11. Thermophysical properties of Brazilian orange juice as affected by temperature and water content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Telis-Romero; V. R. N. Telis; A. L. Gabas; F. Yamashita

    1998-01-01

    The specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and density of Brazilian orange juice were determined between 0.34 and 0.73 (w\\/w) water content and with temperatures from 0.5 to 62 °C. The experimental data were fitted as functions of temperature and water content and all properties showed a linear dependency with these variables. In the tested range, the water content exhibited

  12. Production of biodiesel by immobilized Candida sp. lipase at high water content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianwei Tan; Kaili Nie; Fang Wang

    2006-01-01

    A new process for enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel at high water content (10–20%) with 96% conversion by lipase from Candida sp. 99–125 was studied. The lipase, a no-position-specific lipase, was immobilized by a cheap cotton membrane and the membrane-immobilized\\u000a lipase could be used at least six times with high conversion. The immobilized lipase could be used for different oil conversion

  13. Phenolic Content and DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity of Yam-containing Surimi Gels Influenced by Salt and Heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JING-CHUNG CHEN; JAN-YING YEH; PEI-CHUN CHEN

    The factors contributing to the loss of phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity of Taiwanese yam, Dioscorea alata Tainung No. 1 (TNG1), in the 20% TNG1-containing pollock surimi gel were investigated. Heating at 90°C for 30 min decreased both the total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity in 50% ethanolic extract from TNG1, but no significant effect was

  14. Water in the Oceanic Lithosphere: Salt Lake Crater Xenoliths, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizimis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Water can be present in nominally anhydrous minerals of peridotites in the form of hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen. Such water in the oceanic upper mantle could have a significant effect on its physical and chemical properties. However, the water content of the MORB source has been inferred indirectly from the compositions of basalts. Direct determinations on abyssal peridotites are scarce because they have been heavily hydrothermally altered. Here we present the first water analyses of minerals from spinel peridotite xenoliths of Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are exceptionally fresh. These peridotites are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. A few have unradiogenic Os and radiogenic Hf isotopes and may be fragments of an ancient (2 Ga) depleted and recycled lithosphere. Water contents in olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), and clinopyroxene (Cpx) were determined by FTIR spectrometry. Preliminary H_{2}O contents show ranges of 8-10 ppm for Ol, 151-277 ppm for Opx, and 337-603 ppm for Cpx. Reconstructed bulk rock H_{2}O contents range from 88-131 ppm overlapping estimates for the MORB source. Water contents between Ol minerals of the same xenolith are heterogeneous and individual OH infrared bands vary within a mineral with lower 3230 cm^{-1} and higher 3650-3400 cm^{-1} band heights from core to edge. This observation suggests disturbance of the hydrogen in Ol likely occurring during xenolith entrainment to the surface. Pyroxene water contents are higher than most water contents in pyroxenes from continental peridotite xenoliths and higher than those of abyssal peridotites. Cpx water contents decrease with increasing degree of depletion (e.g. increasing Fo in Ol and Cr# in spinel) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water. However Cpx water contents also show a positive correlation with LREE/HREE ratios and LREE concentrations consistent with refertilization. Opx water contents increase with increasing degree of depletion and decrease with LREE/HREE ratios which is inconsistent with the incompatible behavior of H. Calculated water contents of melts in equilibrium with Cpx or Opx range from 1.4 to 3.8 wt % which is higher than that of all Hawaiian lavas. Calculated melts in equilibrium with Cpx and Opx have variable but mostly high H_{2}O/Ce ratios (194 to 1146) consistent with those of rejuvenated stage lavas from Niihau and the South Arch volcanic field, but unlike the drier shield building stage tholeiites. Whether the high water contents recorded in Salt Lake Crater xenoliths were acquired before and/or during interaction of the oceanic lithosphere with the Hawaiian plume will be discussed.

  15. Precipitation of salt in saline water drop on superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Bongsu; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    In the membrane distillation process, water vapor of heated, pressurized saline water is transported across the membrane to be collected as pure water. While the water-repellency of the membrane surface has been considered an important parameter affecting the distillation efficiency, the resistance of the membrane to the contamination due to salt has gathered little scientific interest thus far. Here we experimentally investigate the precipitation of salt in sessile saline water drops, to find drastic differences in salt crystallization behavior depending on the water-repellency of solid surface. On a moderately hydrophobic surface with a static contact angle with water being about 150 degrees, salt crystals are aligned and stacked along the initial contact line, forming an interesting structure resembling an igloo. On a superhydrophobic surface with about 164 degrees of static contact angle with water, salt crystallizes only at the center of the drop-solid contact area, forming a pebble-shaped structure. We explain this difference by comparing the evaporation modes (constant contact radius versus constant contact angle) of the sessile drops on those surfaces. We also visualize the liquid flow within drops undergoing evaporation and precipitation at the same time using PIV.

  16. Certification of the reference material of water content in water saturated 1-octanol by Karl Fischer coulometry, Karl Fischer volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Sun, Guohua; Li, Hongmei

    2012-10-15

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) of water content are widely used in the calibration and validation of Karl Fischer coulometry and volumetry. In this study, the water content of the water saturated 1-octanol (WSO) CRM was certified by Karl Fischer coulometry, volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (Q NMR). The water content recovery by coulometry was 99.76% with a diaphragm-less electrode and Coulomat AG anolyte. The relative bias between the coulometry and volumetry results was 0.06%. In Q NMR, the water content of WSO is traceable to the International System (SI) of units through the purity of internal standard. The relative bias of water content in WSO between Q NMR and volumetry was 0.50%. The consistency of results for these three independent methods improves the accuracy of the certification of the RM. The certified water content of the WSO CRM was 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%. PMID:23442697

  17. Resolving precipitation induced water content profiles by inversion of dispersive GPR data: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, Adam R.; Moysey, Stephen M. J.; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements have significant potential for monitoring dynamic hydrologic processes at multiple scales in time and space. At early times during infiltration into a soil, the zone above the wetting front may act as a low-velocity waveguide that traps GPR waves, thereby causing dispersion and making interpretation of the data using standard methods difficult. In this work, we show that the dispersion is dependent upon the distribution of water within the waveguide, which is controlled by soil hydrologic properties. Simulations of infiltration were performed by varying the n-parameter of the Mualem-van Genuchten equation using HYDRUS-1D; the associated GPR data were simulated to evaluate the influence of dispersion. We observed a notable decrease in wave dispersion as the sharpness of the wetting front profile decreased. Given the sensitivity of the dispersion effect to the wetting front profile, we also evaluated whether the water content distribution can be determined through inversion of the dispersive GPR data. We found that a global grid search combined with the simplex algorithm was able to estimate the average water content when the wetted zone is divided into 2 layers. This approach was incapable, however, of representing the gradational nature of the water content distribution behind the wetting front. In contrast, the shuffled complex evolution algorithm was able to constrain a piece-wise linear function to closely match the shallow gradational water content profile. In both the layered and piece-wise linear case, the sensitivity of the dispersive data dropped sharply below the wetting front, which in this case was around 20 cm, i.e., twice the average wavelength, for a 900 MHz GPR survey. This study demonstrates that dispersive GPR data has significant potential for capturing the early-time dynamics of infiltration that cannot be obtained with standard GPR analysis approaches.

  18. Supporting Information to "Impact of Salt Purity on Interfacial Water Organization Revealed by Conventional and

    E-print Network

    grade stock RamanIntensity(10 4 arb.unit) Raman Shift (cm -1 ) a R 2 = 0.999 Concentration(M) Raman.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 water pretreated ACS grade 2 M LiNO3 untreated ACS grade 2 M LiNO3 VSFGIntensity(arb.unit.006 water pretreated UP grade Na2 CO3 1 M pretreated ACS grade Na2 CO3 1 M | (2) | 2 (arb.unit) a water

  19. Salt tolerance and water use by Dalbergia sissoo during the establishment stage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. P. Singh; P. S. Minhas; O. S. Tomar; R. K. Gupta

    1996-01-01

    For rehabilitation of soils rendered barren owing to salinity problems, adaptation to site conditions, water use, and multiple uses form the important criteria of tree selection. Therefore, 6?month?old saplings of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. were transplanted in lysimeters (0.45 m diameter and 1.0 m deep) during July 1992 to measure their water use and salinity tolerance during the initial growth stages.

  20. Simultaneous determination of oil and water contents in different oilseeds by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy Rubel

    1994-01-01

    Routine analysis of oil and water contents in different oilseeds with the Bruker Minispec pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance\\u000a (NMR) analyzer (Bruker Analytische Mestechnik, Rheinstetten, Germany) is rapid (16 s measurements), precise, accurate and\\u000a nondestructive. In 1991, subcommittee SC2 (oil seeds) of the Technical Committee Number 34 [organized by the International\\u000a Standards Organization (ISO), Geneva, Switzerland] organized an international collaborative study

  1. MULTI-SENSOR CAPACITANCE PROBE SCALED FREQUENCY TEMPERATURE RESPONSE BY SOIL TYPE AND VOLUMETRIC WATER CONTENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available multi-sensor capacitance probes were used to elucidate scaled frequency temperature response from sand, sandy loam, clay loam (2:1 clay), and clay soil textures across volumetric water content and temperature regimes. Volumetric water content classes included air dry, air dry...

  2. [Effect of shifting sand burial on evaporation reduction and salt restraint under saline water irrigation in extremely arid region].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Xin-Wen; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Li, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Yong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    The Taklimakan Desert Highway Shelterbelt is drip-irrigated with high saline groundwater (2.58-29.70 g x L(-1)), and shifting sand burial and water-salt stress are most common and serious problems in this region. So it is of great importance to study the effect of shifting sand burial on soil moisture evaporation, salt accumulation and their distribution for water saving, salinity restraint, and suitable utilization of local land and water resources. In this study, Micro-Lysimeters (MLS) were used to investigate dynamics of soil moisture and salt under different thicknesses of sand burial (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm), and field control experiments of drip-irrigation were also carried out to investigate soil moisture and salt distribution under different thicknesses of shifting sand burial (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 cm). The soil daily and cumulative evaporation decreased with the increase of sand burial thickness in MLS, cumulative evaporation decreased by 2.5%-13.7% compared with control. And evaporative inhibiting efficiency increased with sand burial thickness, evaporative inhibiting efficiency of 1-5 cm sand burial was 16.7%-79.0%. Final soil moisture content beneath the interface of sand burial increased with sand burial thickness, and it increased by 2.5%-13.7% than control. The topsoil EC of shifting sand in MLS decreased by 1.19-6.00 mS x cm(-1) with the increasing sand burial thickness, whereas soil salt content beneath the interface in MLS increased and amplitude of the topsoil salt content was higher than that of the subsoil. Under drip-irrigation with saline groundwater, average soil moisture beneath the interface of shifting sand burial increased by 0.4% -2.0% compare with control, and the highest value of EC was 7.77 mS x cm(-1) when the sand burial thickness was 10 cm. The trend of salt accumulation content at shifting sand surface increased firstly, and then decreased with the increasing sand burial thickness. Soil salt contents beneath the interface of shifting sand burial were much lower than that of shifting sand surface. 35 cm was the critical sand burial thickness for water-saving and salt restraint. In summary, sand burial had obvious inhibition effects on soil evaporation and salt accumulation, so maybe it could be used to save water and reduce salt accumulation in arid shifting desert areas. PMID:25129944

  3. Comparison of intracellular water content measurements by dark-field imaging and EELS in medium voltage TEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Terryn; J. Michel; L. Kilian; P. Bonhomme; G. Balossier

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the water content at the subcellular level is important to evaluate the intracellular concentration of either diffusible or non-diffusible elements in the physiological state measured by the electron microprobe methods. Water content variations in subcellular compartments are directly related to secretion phenomena and to transmembrane exchange processes, which could be attributed to pathophysiological states. In this paper we

  4. Vitamin (B1, B2, B3 and B6) content and oxidative stability of Gastrocnemius muscle from dry-cured hams elaborated with different nitrifying salt contents and by two ageing times.

    PubMed

    Gratacós-Cubarsí, M; Sárraga, C; Castellari, M; Guàrdia, M D; Regueiro, J A García; Arnau, J

    2013-11-01

    The effect of the amount of added nitrate and nitrate plus nitrite to dry-cured hams on the vitamin (B1, B2, B3, B6) content, the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activities and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was assessed in Gastrocnemius muscle at the end of two ripening processes. Five different curing mixtures (Hi-N: 600 KNO3; Lo-N: 150 KNO3; Hi-Mix: 600 KNO3+600 NaNO2; Lo-Mix: 150 KNO3+150 NaNO2; Hi-Mix/Asc: 600 KNO3+600 NaNO2+500 sodium ascorbate, expressed as mg of salts added on surface per kg of fresh ham) were evaluated in dry-cured hams aged for 11.5months (standard process, SP) and 22months (long process, LP). Minor differences in target parameters between the hams due to the process were found. The amount of nitrate when it was added alone or as a mixture of nitrate and nitrite, as well as the ascorbate addition to dry-cured hams did not affect vitamin B1, B2 and B3 contents. The level of vitamin B6 was affected by both the amount and the mixture of salts; the addition of nitrite reduced around 40% the content of vitamin B6, but it was not affected by nitrate or ascorbate. The activity of SOD and CAT decreased with the amount of nitrate and nitrite, while GSHPx and TBARS resulted unaffected. PMID:23811105

  5. Free water content and monitoring of healing processes of skin burns studied by microwave dielectric spectroscopy in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshihito Hayashi; Nobuhiro Miura; Naoki Shinyashiki; Shin Yagihara

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the dielectric properties of human skin in vivo at frequencies up to 10 GHz using a time-domain reflectometry method with open-ended coaxial probes. Since gamma-dispersion results from the reorientation of free water molecules, the free water content of skin is quantitatively determined by dielectric measurements. The free water content of finger skin increased by about 10% after

  6. WATER, SALT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of synchrotron based research for understanding the fate of contaminants in water, soil, and atmosphere is proving to be beneficial for scientists and regulators. Drawing the connection of a contaminated site to knowledge of metal speciation provides direct eviden...

  7. 46 CFR 45.37 - Salt water load lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Salt water load lines. 45.37 Section 45...LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.37 Salt water load lines. Each vessel that operates in the salt water of the St. Lawrence River...

  8. 46 CFR 45.37 - Salt water load lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Salt water load lines. 45.37 Section 45...LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.37 Salt water load lines. Each vessel that operates in the salt water of the St. Lawrence River...

  9. 46 CFR 45.37 - Salt water load lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Salt water load lines. 45.37 Section 45...LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.37 Salt water load lines. Each vessel that operates in the salt water of the St. Lawrence River...

  10. 46 CFR 45.37 - Salt water load lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Salt water load lines. 45.37 Section 45...LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.37 Salt water load lines. Each vessel that operates in the salt water of the St. Lawrence River...

  11. 46 CFR 45.37 - Salt water load lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Salt water load lines. 45.37 Section 45...LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.37 Salt water load lines. Each vessel that operates in the salt water of the St. Lawrence River...

  12. Estimating canopy water content from spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  13. Evaluating climate change effects on water and salt resources in Salt Lake, Turkey using multitemporal SPOT imagery.

    PubMed

    Ekercin, Semih; Ormeci, Cankut

    2010-04-01

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the dimension of climate change effects in Salt Lake and its vicinity in Turkey using satellite remote sensing data. The first stage of the study includes evaluation of the multitemporal climatic data on the Salt Lake Basin Area, Turkey for a period of 35 years (1970-2005). The changes in mean temperature and precipitation are evaluated for the study area by comparing two periods, 1970-1992 and 1993-2005. In the second stage, the effects of climate changes in the Salt Lake are investigated by evaluating water and salt reserve changes through seasonal and multitemporal SPOT imagery collected in 1987 and 2005. The climatic data and remotely sensed and treated satellite images show that water and salt reserve in Salt Lake has decreased between 1987 and 2005 due to drought and uncontrolled water usage. It is suggested that the use of water supplies, especially underground waters, around the Salt Lake should be controlled and the lake should regularly be monitored by current remote sensing data for an effective management of water and salt resources in the region. PMID:19267206

  14. Demulsification of bitumen emulsions using water soluble salts of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, D.R.; Cuscurida, M.; Speranza, G.P.

    1983-08-02

    A process for recovering bitumen from oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions is disclosed wherein water-soluble demulsifiers are used. These demulsifiers are water-soluble salts of polymers prepared by the reaction between certain polyoxyalkylene diamines with diepoxides. To resolve the bituminous petroleum emulsions, the process is carried out between 25/sup 0/ and 160/sup 0/C. wherein the demulsifier of the invention is contacted with the bituminous emulsion.

  15. Separation and Fixation of Toxic Components in Salt Brines Using a Water-Based Process

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, C.; Quach, A.; Birnie III, D.; Ela, W.; Saez, A.E.; Zelinski, B.; Smith, H.; Smith, G.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to implement new water quality standards, increase water reuse and reclamation, and minimize the cost of waste storage motivate the development of new processes for stabilizing wastewater residuals that minimize waste volume, water content and the long-term environmental risk from related by-products. This work explores the use of an aqueous-based emulsion process to create an epoxy/rubber matrix for separating and encapsulating waste components from salt laden, arsenic contaminated, amorphous iron hydrate sludges. Such sludges are generated from conventional water purification precipitation/adsorption processes, used to convert aqueous brine streams to semi-solid waste streams, such as ion exchange/membrane separation, and from other precipitative heavy metal removal operations. In this study, epoxy and polystyrene butadiene (PSB) rubber emulsions are mixed together and then combined with a surrogate sludge. The surrogate sludge consists of amorphous iron hydrate with 1 part arsenic fixed to the surface of the hydrate per 10 parts iron mixed with sodium nitrate and chloride salts and water. The resulting emulsion is cured and dried at 80 °C to remove water. Microstructure characterization by electron microscopy confirms that the epoxy/PSB matrix surrounds and encapsulates the arsenic laden amorphous iron hydrate phase while allowing the salt to migrate to internal and external surfaces of the sample. Salt extraction studies indicate that the porous nature of the resulting matrix promotes the separation and removal of as much as 90% of the original salt content in only one hour. Long term leaching studies based on the use of the infinite slab diffusion model reveal no evidence of iron migration or, by inference, arsenic migration, and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficients of the unextracted salt yield leachability indices within regulations for non-hazardous landfill disposal. Because salt is the most mobile species, it is inferred that arsenic leaches from the host material at an even slower rate, making the waste forms amenable to unregulated land disposal options. These results indicate that the environmentally-benign, water-based emulsion processing of epoxy/PSB polymeric hosts show great promise as a separation and fixation technology for treating brine streams from wastewater treatment facilities.

  16. IR spectroscopy of aqueous alkali halide solutions: Pure salt-solvated water spectra and hydration numbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Joseph Max; Camille Chapados

    2001-01-01

    Extrapolation techniques were used to obtain pure salt-solvated water spectra from the attenuated total reflection infrared spectra (ATR-IR) of aqueous solutions of the nine alkali halide salts LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, KBr, NaI, KI, and CsI and the alkaline-earth chloride salt MgCl2. These salts ionize completely in water. The ions by themselves do not absorb in the IR, but

  17. Indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents by salting-out effect for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Daneshfar, Ali; Khezeli, Tahere

    2014-12-01

    A simple and low-cost method that indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents (ISDME) by salting-out effect before high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different samples. The ISDME is a combination of salting-out extraction of water-miscible organic solvent and directly suspended droplet microextraction (DSDME). Ninety-five microliters water-miscible organic solvent (1-propanol) was added to a 500-µL sample. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. To produce a steady vortex at the top of the solution, the sample was agitated at 700 rpm using a magnetic stirrer. By the addition of ammonium sulfate (saturated solution) to the homogeneous solution, 1-propanol was separated and collected at the bottom of the steady vortex. Finally, 20?µL 1-propanol was injected into HPLC-UV. The effects of important parameters such as water-miscible organic solvent (type and volume), type of salt, and extraction time were evaluated. Under optimum conditions, the method has a good linear calibration range (0.1 µg/L-300 µg/L), coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.998), low limits of detection (between 0.02 µg/L and 0.27 µg/L), and acceptable recovery (>85.0%). PMID:25242239

  18. Model selection for salt water intrusion in delta areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Xu; P. J. Van Overloop; N. C. Van de Giessen

    2011-01-01

    Due to land subsidence and sea level rise, salt intrusion in delta areas increases. This is a potential thread for agriculture in these areas. To investigate this thread and measures that can counteract on it, numerical models are developed to mimic the behavior of the water system under different strategies and scenarios. This behavior is characterized by a complex interaction

  19. Study of Salt Wash Water Toxicity on Wastewater Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mostafa F. Hashad; Surabhi Sharma; Loring F. Nies; James E. Alleman

    2006-01-01

    This research effort focused on evaluating the toxicity of the saline waste water generated from washing of Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) deicing trucks and to study the feasibility of discharging it into wastewater treatment plants. Performance of activated sludge treating wastewater under varying levels of salt concentration was studied by measuring the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), activated sludge oxygen

  20. Impact of metamorphic reactions limited by water content on MCC formation and exhumation along detachment faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezri, Leila; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Wolf, Sylvie; Burov, Evgenii

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic phase changes impact both the buoyancy (volume forces) and the rheology (surface forces) of rocks. As such, they play an important dynamic control on the tectonic processes. It is generally assumed that phase changes are mostly controlled by pressure and temperature conditions. Yet, this supposes some assumptions on the amount of water available in the system. In geodynamic community, it is systematically assumed that water is always available in sufficient quantities to minimize Gibbs energy for given P,T conditions and a constant chemical composition. So that, as a matter of fact, the influence of water on the system is completely neglected. Yet, many petrological studies point out that water, as a limiting reactant, is responsible for the lack of retrograde metamorphic reactions observed in the rocks exhumed in typical MCC contexts. In order to study the impact of fluid content on the structure of metamorphic core complexes, we have implemented fluid transport and water limited thermodynamic for phase transition, in a thermomechanical code. We describe a parametrisation of Darcy flow that is able to capture source/sink and transport aspects of fluids at the scale of the whole crust with a minimum of complexity. Using this model, phase transitions are controlled by pressure temperature and the local amount of free fluid that comes from both external meteoric and local dehydration sources. The numerical experiments imply a strong positive feedback between the asymmetry of the tectonic structures and the depth of penetration of meteoric fluid. Bending stress pattern in asymmetric detachment zone indeed drives the penetration of meteoric fluids to greater depth, where they can in turn lubricate the deep ductile part of the detachment. However, thermal weakening and/or slow re-equilibration of the protolith rocks at depth with time tends to decrease the asymmetry of structure, changing the orientation of the bending stress and to shut down the activity of asymmetric detachments in favor of spreading structures which forms double-domes.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Soil Water Content in the Unsaturated Zone Using Constraints Provided by Geophysical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Z.; Rubin, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2002-12-01

    Soil moisture distribution and variation in the vadose zone is important for agricultural, engineering and contaminant studies. Conventional sampling techniques for estimating soil water moisture content are costly, time consuming, invasive, and typically recover information at a single point in space and time only. Geophysical techniques have the potential to provide dense and accurate information about subsurface soil moisture. However, these data still provide information about water content at the time of measurement only, and geophysical data acquisition is sometimes hindered by cultural or site conditions. For example, although both surface and crosshole GPR techniques have been successfully applied for providing soil moisture information over space and time, the penetration distance of the GPR signal is limited in soils having high electrical conductivity, sometimes inhibiting moisture profiling through the entire vadose zone. In this study, we investigate the potential of coupling geophysical measurements with numerical modeling to provide information about soil moisture variations in space and over time. Such an approach was undertaken to permit estimation of soil moisture throughout the root zone even under difficult GPR data acquisition conditions, and also to yield insight into the dynamics of soil water distribution, including both state variables and fluxes. In this study, surface and crosshole geophysical measurements provide initial and boundary soil moisture conditions to a numerical simulator (TOUGH2-EOS9) based on Richard­_s Equation. Simulations were run using information available from various geophysical techniques collected at a naturally heterogeneous agricultural field site, including surface GPR, crosshole GPR, neutron probe, and TDR measurements. Information about soil heterogeneity was obtained using borehole soil textural information, and meteorological water flux boundary conditions were obtained using rain gauges, sap flow meters and also from a nearby CIMIS weather station. Hydraulic conductivity, one of the most difficult field variables to measure, can be satisfactorily estimated using a stochastic inverse modeling approach. Comparison of soil moisture measurements (collected throughout a year at a field site near Napa, CA) with the various simulations suggested that the approach was able to capture the natural evolution of the vadose zone soil moisture profile at several locations throughout the heterogeneous site. These results illustrate that improvement in the understanding of water cycling and its interaction with ecosystems can be obtained by coupling hydrological theory and measurements available from geophysical and meteorological techniques.

  2. Mobilization of osmotically inactive Na+ by growth and by dietary salt restriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Schafflhuber, Markus; Volpi, Nicola; Dahlmann, Anke; Hilgers, Karl F; Maccari, Francesca; Dietsch, Peter; Wagner, Hubertus; Luft, Friedrich C; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Titze, Jens

    2007-05-01

    The idea that an osmotically inactive Na(+) storage pool exists that can be varied to accommodate states of Na(+) retention and/or Na(+) loss is controversial. We speculated that considerable amounts of osmotically inactive Na(+) are lost with growth and that additional dietary salt excess or salt deficit alters the polyanionic character of extracellular glycosaminoglycans in osmotically inactive Na(+) reservoirs. Six-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed low-salt (0.1%; LS) or high-salt (8%; HS) diets for 1 or 4 wk. At their death, we separated the tissues and determined their Na(+), K(+), and water content. Three weeks of growth reduced the total body Na(+) content relative to dry weight (rTBNa(+)) by 23%. This "growth-programmed" Na(+) loss originated from the bone and the completely skinned and bone-removed carcasses. The Na(+) loss was osmotically inactive (45-50%) or osmotically active (50-55%). In rats aged 10 wk, compared with HS, 4 wk of LS reduced rTBNa(+) by 9%. This dietary-induced Na(+) loss was osmotically inactive ( approximately 50%) and originated largely from the skin, while approximately 50% was osmotically active. LS for 1 wk did not reduce skin Na(+) content. The mobilization of osmotically inactive skin Na(+) with long-term salt deprivation was associated with decreased negatively charged skin glycosaminoglycan content and thereby a decreased water-free Na(+) binding capacity in the extracellular matrix. Our data not only serve to explain discrepant results in salt balance studies but also show that glycosaminoglycans may provide an actively regulated interstitial cation exchange mechanism that participates in volume and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:17244896

  3. Organic tank safety project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water contents of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-BY-108

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P{sub H2O} is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site`s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, Webb et al. determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that satisfies the waste classification criteria based on water content alone or a combination of water content and either total organic carbon (TOC) content or waste energetics. To provide information on the behavior of saltcake wastes, two waste samples taken from Tank 241-BY-108 (BY-108) were selected for study, even though BY-108 is not on the Organic Tanks Watch List because of their ready availability and their similarity to some of the organic-bearing saltcakes.

  4. Effects of sugar, salt and water on soybean oil quality during deep-frying

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan-Hwa Chu; Shiuan Luo

    1994-01-01

    The effects of flour dough components (water, sugar and salt) on soybean oil deterioration during deep-fat frying have been\\u000a investigated. Flour dough sheets made from flour and water were used as the carrier of salt and sugar. Several analyses, including\\u000a acid value, carbonyl value,p-anisidine value, color, dielectric constant, Fritest, total polar compounds and polymer content, were used to evaluate deterioration

  5. Effects of salt stress on the growth, physiological responses, and glycoside contents of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianwei; Chen, Aimeng; Li, Dandan; Yi, Bin; Wu, Wei

    2013-06-19

    This study examined the effects of three different NaCl concentrations (60, 90, and 120 mM) on the growth, physiological responses, and steviol glycoside composition of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni for 4 weeks. The results showed that the total dry weight decreased by 40% at 120 mM NaCl but remained the same at 60 and 90 mM NaCl. As salt concentration increased, chlorophyll contents decreased markedly by 10-70%, whereas the increments of the antioxidant enzyme activities were 1.0-1.6, 1.2-1.3, and 2.0-4.0 times, respectively, for superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase. The proline contents in salt-treated plants were 17-42 times higher than that in control. Moreover, leaf possessed significantly higher K? content and K?/Na? ratio than stem and root for all salt treatments. In addition, 90-120 mM NaCl treatment notably decreased the content of rebaudioside A (RA) and stevioside (ST) by 16.2-38.2%, whereas the increment of the ratio of RA/ST of salt-treated plants was 1.1-1.4 times. These results indicate that S. rebaudiana is moderately tolerant to salt stress. Hypohaline soil can be utilized in the plantation of S. rebaudiana and may be profitable for optimizing the steviol glycoside composition. PMID:23711229

  6. Effect of salts on water viscosity in narrow membrane pores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Richard Bowen; Haitham N. S Yousef

    2003-01-01

    The effect of various salts on the viscosity, and by implication structure, of water in polymeric membrane pores of radius ?1.69 nm and low charge density has been studied. Permeation of pure water and various electrolyte solutions was analyzed using the Hagen–Poiseuille equation expressed in a ratio form to exclude membrane-specific quantities such as pore radius and length. The analysis produced

  7. Cardiac content of brain natriuretic peptide in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Naoto; Aburaya, Masahito; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kida, Osamu; Eto, Tanenao; Kangawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenjiro (Miyazaki Medical College (Japan)); Minamino, Naoto; Matsuo, Hisayuki (National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    The cardiac content of immunoreactive rat brain natriuretic peptide (ir-rBNP) in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The atrial content of ir-rBNP was significantly lower in the DOCA-salt group than in the control group. However, the ventricular content of ir-rBNP was markedly increased in the DOCA-salt group as compared to the other groups. Ir-rBNP level in the atria was negatively correlated with blood pressure, while that in the ventricle was positively correlated with blood pressure. A significant correlation was observed between tissue levels of ir-rBNP and ir-rat atrial natriuretic peptide (rANP) both in atrium and ventricle. These results raise the possibility that rBNP as well as rANP functions as a cardiac hormone, the production of which probably changes in response to increased of body fluid and blood pressure.

  8. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  9. The salt content of products from popular fast-food chains in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Blonval, Katrina; Blanco-Metzler, Adriana; Montero-Campos, Marielos; Dunford, Elizabeth K

    2014-12-01

    Salt is a major determinant of population blood pressure levels. Salt intake in Costa Rica is above levels required for good health. With an increasing number of Costa Ricans visiting fast food restaurants, it is likely that fast-food is contributing to daily salt intake. Salt content data from seven popular fast food chains in Costa Rica were collected in January 2013. Products were classified into 10 categories. Mean salt content was compared between chains and categories. Statistical analysis was performed using Welch ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer HSD tests. Significant differences were found between companies; Subway products had lowest mean salt content (0.97?g/100?g; p?salt content were observed between categories. Salads had a mean salt content of 0.45?g/100?g while sauces had 2.16?g/100?g (p?salt content was also seen within food categories. Salt content in sandwiches ranged from 0.5 to 2.1?g/100?g. The high levels and wide variation in salt content of fast food products in Costa Rica suggest that salt reduction is likely to be technically feasible in many cases. With an increasing number of consumers purchasing fast foods, even small improvements in salt levels could produce important health gains. PMID:25171851

  10. Dynamics of Confined Water Molecules in Aqueous Salt Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pandelov, S.; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2011-04-01

    The unusual properties of water are largely dictated by the dynamics of the H bond network. A single water molecule has more H bonding sites than atoms, hence new experimental and theoretical investigations about this peculiar liquid have not ceased to appear. Confinement of water to nanodroplets or small molecular clusters drastically changes many of the liquid’s properties. Such confined water plays a major role in the solvation of macro molecules such as proteins and can even be essential to their properties. Despite the vast results available on bulk and confined water, discussions about the correlation between spectral and structural properties continue to this day. The fast relaxation of the OH stretching vibration in bulk water, and the variance of sample geometries in the experiments on confined water obfuscate definite interpretation of the spectroscopic results in terms of structural parameters. We present first time-resolved investigations on a new model system that is ideally suited to overcome many of the problems faced in spectroscopical investigation of the H bond network of water. Aqueous hydrates of inorganic salts provide water molecules in a crystal grid, that enables unambiguous correlations of spectroscopic and structural features. Furthermore, the confined water clusters are well isolated from each other in the crystal matrix, so different degrees of confinement can be achieved by selection of the appropriate salt.

  11. Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

  12. Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

    2005-11-04

    The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

  13. A universal salt model based on underground precipitation of solid salts due to supercritical water `out-salting'

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Rueslåtten; M. T. Hovland

    2010-01-01

    One of the common characteristics of planets Earth and Mars is that both host water (H2O) and large accumulations of salt. Whereas Earth's surface-environment can be regarded as `water-friendly' and `salt hostile', the reverse can be said for the surface of Mars. This is because liquid water is stable on Earth, and the atmosphere transports humidity around the globe, whereas

  14. Results of water quality sampling near Richton, Cypress Creek and Lampton Salt Domes, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandl, L.A.; Spiers, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    In the Mississippi salt basin in southern Mississippi, chemical quality studies of surface water and ground water have been made to determine present water-quality conditions near three salt domes being studied by the Department of Energy as potential repositories for radioactive wastes. Chloride concentrations in excess of 60 milligrams per liter in surface water and ground water in Perry County indicate that contamination could be occurring from industrial wastes, oil test wells, or dissolution of Richton or Cypress Creek domes. (USGS)

  15. Airborne endotoxin associated with particles of different sizes and affected by water content in handled straw.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A M; Nielsen, S H

    2010-07-01

    High exposures to endotoxin are observed in environments where organic materials are handled and lower exposures are found in e.g. indoor air. Inhaled endotoxin contributes significantly to the induction of airway inflammation and dysfunction. The size of an inhaled particle influences the deposition in the airways and the following health symptoms. The objective is to characterise the distribution of endotoxin on airborne particles of different sizes in straw storage halls with high exposure and in other environments with lower exposure levels to endotoxin. Furthermore we have studied the influence of water content of handled straw on the size distribution of endotoxin containing particles. Total, inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin and particles have each been quantified in aerosols from boiler rooms and straw storage halls at 24 power plants, including 21 biofuel plants. Inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin have been quantified in aerosols from offices and outdoor air. The endotoxin concentration was higher in airborne thoracic dust than in airborne 'total dust'. The median respirable fraction in the straw storage halls, boiler rooms at biofuel plants, boiler rooms at conventional plants, offices and outdoors was respectively 42%, 9%, 19%, 24% and 34%. Thoracic endotoxin per number of thoracic particles was higher than respirable endotoxin per number of respirable particles at the biofuel plants. In straw storage halls the fraction of endotoxin of respirable size was highest on the days with lowest water content in the received straw. Furthermore the exposures to all endotoxin fractions were highest on days with the lowest water content in the received straw. In conclusion the highest exposures and concentrations of endotoxin occur or tend to occur from thoracic dust. A high variation in endotoxin concentrations and in fractions of respirable or thoracic size is found in the different working areas. This is important in the risk assessment and makes attempts to influence the endotoxin exposure a possibility. Water content in straw affected the concentration, exposure level and size distribution of airborne endotoxin. PMID:20362504

  16. Characterization of water content dynamics and tracer breakthrough by 3-D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) under transient unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of preferential flow and transport is still a major challenge but may be improved employing noninvasive, tomographic methods. In this study, 3-D time lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during infiltration on an undisturbed, unsaturated soil core in a laboratory lysimeter. A tracer breakthrough was conducted during transient conditions by applying a series of short-term infiltrations, simulating natural precipitation events. The electrical response was quantitatively validated using data from a multicompartment suction sampler. Water content probes were also installed for ground-truthing of ERT responses. Water content variations associated with an infiltration front dominated the electrical response observed during individual short-term infiltration events, permitting analysis of water content dynamics from ERT data. We found that, instead of the application of an uncertain petrophysical function, shape measures of the electrical conductivity response might be used for constraining hydrological models. Considering tracer breakthroughs, the ERT observed voxel responses from time lapse tomograms at constant water contents in between infiltration events were used to quantitatively characterize the breakthrough curve. Shape parameters of the breakthrough derived from ERT, such as average velocity, were highly correlated with the shape parameters derived from local tracer breakthrough curves observed in the compartments of the suction plate. The study demonstrates that ERT can provide reliable quantitative information on both, tracer breakthroughs and water content variations under the challenging conditions of variable background electrical conductivity of the pore solution and non steady-state infiltration.

  17. Salt Appetite Is Reduced by a Single Experience of Drinking Hypertonic Saline in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael P.; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F. R.; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  18. Isotopic compositions and sources of nitrate in ground water from western Salt River Valley, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellenbeck, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Isotopic and chemical compositions of ground water from western Salt River Valley near Phoenix, Arizona, were used to develop identification tech- niques for sources of nitrate in ground water. Four possible sources of nitrate were studied: dairies and feedlots, sewage-treatment plants, agricultural activities, and natural source. End members that represent these sources were analyzed for a variety of chemical and isotopic constituents; contents of the end-member and the ground water were compared to identify nitrate from these sources. Nitrate from dairies and feedlots was identified by delta 15N values higher than +9.0 per mil. Nitrate from sewage treatment plants was identified by some chemical constituents and values of delta 15N, delta 34S, delta 7Li, and delta 11B that were lighter than the values determined for ground water not affected by sewage-treatment plants. Nitrate from agricultural activities was identified by delta 15N, 3H, and delta 34S compositions. Natural nitrate derived from decomposing plants and accumulated by biological fixation was identified by delta 15N values that range between +2 and +8 per mil. In addition to identifying nitrate sources, some chemical and isotopic charabteristics of ground water were determined on the basis of data collected during this study. Concentrations of major ions, lithium, and boron and delta 7Li, delta 11B, 3H, delta D, and delta 18O data identify ground water in different geographic regions in the study area. These differences probably are related to different sources of ground water, geochemical processes, or geologic deposits. The Luke salt body and a geothermal anomaly alter the chemical and isotopic content of some ground water.

  19. Potentials and problems of sustainable irrigation with water high in salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gal, Alon

    2015-04-01

    Water scarcity and need to expand agricultural productivity have led to ever growing utilization of poor quality water for irrigation of crops. Almost in all cases, marginal or alternative water sources for irrigation contain relatively high concentrations of dissolved salts. When salts are present, irrigation water management, especially in the dry regions where water requirements are highest, must consider leaching in addition to crop evapotranspiration requirements. Leaching requirements for agronomic success are calculable and functions of climate, soil, and very critically, of crop sensitivity and the actual salinity of the irrigation water. The more sensitive the crop and more saline the water, the higher the agronomic cost and the greater the quantitative need for leaching. Israel is a forerunner in large-scale utilization of poor quality water for irrigation and can be used as a case study looking at long term repercussions of policy alternatively encouraging irrigation with recycled water or brackish groundwater. In cases studied in desert conditions of Israel, as much of half of the water applied to crops including bell peppers in greenhouses and date palms is actually used to leach salts from the root zone. The excess water used to leach salts and maintain agronomic and economic success when irrigating with water containing salts can become an environmental hazard, especially in dry areas where natural drainage is non-existent. The leachate often contains not only salts but also agrochemicals including nutrients, and natural contaminants can be picked up and transported as well. This leachate passes beyond the root zone and eventually reaches ground or surface water resources. This, together with evidence of ongoing increases in sodium content of fresh produce and increased SAR levels of soils, suggest that the current policy and practice in Israel of utilization of high amounts of low quality irrigation water is inherently non- sustainable. Current trends and technologies allowing economically feasible desalination at large scales present a sustainable alternative where salts are removed from water prior to irrigation.

  20. Water Content of Earth's Continental Mantle Is Controlled by the Circulation of Fluids or Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A key mission of the ARES Directorate at JSC is to constrain models of the formation and geological history of terrestrial planets. Water is a crucial parameter to be measured with the aim to determine its amount and distribution in the interior of Earth, Mars, and the Moon. Most of that "water" is not liquid water per se, but rather hydrogen dissolved as a trace element in the minerals of the rocks at depth. Even so, the middle layer of differentiated planets, the mantle, occupies such a large volume and mass of each planet that when it is added at the planetary scale, oceans worth of water could be stored in its interior. The mantle is where magmas originate. Moreover, on Earth, the mantle is where the boundary between tectonic plates and the underlying asthenosphere is located. Even if mantle rocks in Earth typically contain less than 200 ppm H2O, such small quantities have tremendous influence on how easily they melt (i.e., the more water there is, the more magma is produced) and deform (the more water there is, the less viscous they are). These two properties alone emphasize that to understand the distribution of volcanism and the mechanism of plate tectonics, the water content of the mantle must be determined - Earth being a template to which all other terrestrial planets can be compared.

  1. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-print Network

    Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

  2. Salt-water up-coning during extraction of fresh water from a tropical island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence K. Forbes; Graeme C. Hocking; Simon Wotherspoon

    2004-01-01

    Rainwater can collect in a lens-shaped region within the rock of a tropical island, and may be separated from the underlying salt water by a sharp interface. This paper presents a nonlinear theory for determining the shape of this interface. The island is assumed to be saturated with rain, and provision is made for the outflow of rain-water through the

  3. Effects of carbon dioxide, water supply, and seasonality on terpene content and emission by Rosmarinus officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Penuelas, J.; Llusia, J. [Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona (Spain)] [Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. plants were grown under carbon dioxide concentrations of 350 and 700 {mu}mol (atmospheric CO{sub 2} and elevated CO{sub 2}) and under two levels of irrigation (high water and low water) from October 1, 1994 to May 31, 1996. Elevated CO{sub 2} led on increasingly larger monthly growth rates than the atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments. The increase was 9.5% in spring 1995, 23% in summer 1995, and 53% in spring 1996 in the high-water treatments, whereas in low-water treatments the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} was constrained until the second year spring, when there was a 47% increase. The terpene concentrations was slightly larger in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatments than in atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments and reached a maximum 37% difference in spring 1996. There was no significant effect of water treatment, likely as a result of a mild low water treatment for a Mediterranean plant. Terpene concentrations increased throughout the period of study, indicating possible age effects. The most abundant terpenes were {alpha}-pinene, cineole, camphor, borneol, and verbenone, which represented about 75% of the total. No significant differences were found in the terpene composition of the plants in the different treatments or seasons. The emission of volatile terpenes was much larger in spring (about 75 {mu}g/dry wt/hr) than in autumn (about 10 {mu}g/dry wt/hr), partly because of higher temperature and partly because of seasonal effect, but no significant differences was found because of CO{sub 2} or water treatment. The main terpene emitted was {alpha}-pinene, which represented about 50% of the total. There was no clear correlation between content and emission, either quantitatively or qualitatively. More volatile terpenes were proportionally more important in the total emission than in total content and in autumn than in spring.

  4. Hormonal control of salt and water balance in vertebrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen D. McCormick; Don Bradshaw

    2006-01-01

    The endocrine system mediates many of the physiological responses to the homeostatic and acclimation demands of salt and water transport. Many of the hormones involved in the control of salt and water transport are common to all vertebrates, although their precise function and target tissues have changed during evolution. Arginine vasopressin (vasotocin), angiotensin II, natriuretic peptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide, urotensin

  5. Identification and Control of Pollution from Salt Water Intrusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document contains informational guidelines for identifying and evaluating the nature and extent of pollution from salt water intrusion. The intent of these guidelines is to provide a basic framework for assessing salt water intrusion problems and their relationship to the total hydrologic system, and to provide assistance in developing…

  6. Molecular dynamics study of salt-solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Sakka, Tetsuo; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2014-04-01

    The NaCl salt-solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt-solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt-solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng, E-mail: y-liang@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi, E-mail: y-liang@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Environment and Resource System Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)] [Environment and Resource System Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Sakka, Tetsuo [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)] [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of salt-solution interface: solubility and surface charge of salt in water.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Sakka, Tetsuo; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt-solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt-solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt-solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:24735311

  9. Double diffusion during ice thawing in salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. I. Bukreev

    2007-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments showing that a jet flow penetrating to a large depth is formed under a piece of ice\\u000a of restricted dimensions (“iceberg”) during its thawing in warm salt water are presented. This phenomenon is caused by the\\u000a fact that the coefficient of molecular diffusion of heat is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the coefficient

  10. Simulation of salt water-fresh water interface motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer Polo, J.; Ramos, F.J.

    1983-02-01

    A mathematic model is presented which describes the salt water-fresh water motion with a sharp interface, assuming the validity of the Dupuit approximation. This model is used as a base to derive a numeric-model (finite difference method) which is unconditionally convergent and stable. A method for solving the equations is selected together with a convergence accelerating procedure. The treatment of the boundary conditions in the interface is discussed, and a general and automatic solution for that problem is presented. Several tests with analytic solutions have been performed with good results. 13 references.

  11. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  12. Evaluation of the direct and diffusion methods for the determination of fluoride content in table salt

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mier, E. Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E.; Buckley, Christine M.; Margineda, Jorge; Zero, Domenick T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess methods currently used for analyzing fluoridated salt in order to identify the most useful method for this type of analysis. Basic research design Seventy-five fluoridated salt samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for fluoride content, with and without pretreatment, using direct and diffusion methods. Element analysis was also conducted in selected samples. Fluoride was added to ultra pure NaCl and non-fluoridated commercial salt samples and Ca and Mg were added to fluoride samples in order to assess fluoride recoveries using modifications to the methods. Results Larger amounts of fluoride were found and recovered using diffusion than direct methods (96%–100% for diffusion vs. 67%–90% for direct). Statistically significant differences were obtained between direct and diffusion methods using different ion strength adjusters. Pretreatment methods reduced the amount of recovered fluoride. Determination of fluoride content was influenced both by the presence of NaCl and other ions in the salt. Conclusion Direct and diffusion techniques for analysis of fluoridated salt are suitable methods for fluoride analysis. The choice of method should depend on the purpose of the analysis. PMID:20088217

  13. Determination of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb in natural waters, alkali and alkaline earth salts by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by column solid phase extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irina Karadjova

    1999-01-01

    Methods are described for the determination of trace and ultra trace amounts of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb in natural waters, alkali and alkaline earth salts. Separation and preconcentration of trace metals is achieved by a column solid phase extraction procedure using silica gel modified with derivatives of dithiocarbamates — Na-DDTC (sodium diethyldithio-carbamate and HMDTC (ammonium

  14. Water structure and its influence on the flotation of carbonate and bicarbonate salts.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, O; Celik, M S; Nickolov, Z S; Miller, J D

    2007-10-15

    Interfacial water structure is a most important parameter that influences the collector adsorption by salt minerals such as borax, potash and trona. According to previous studies, salts can be classified as water structure makers and water structure breakers. Water structure making and breaking properties of salt minerals in their saturated brine solutions are essential to explain their flotation behavior. In this work, water structure making-breaking studies in solutions of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (Na(2)CO(3), K(2)CO(3), NaHCO(3) and NH(4)HCO(3)) in 4 wt% D(2)O in H(2)O mixtures have been performed by FTIR analysis of the OD stretching band. This method reveals a microscopic picture of the water structure making/breaking character of the salts in terms of the hydrogen bonding between the water molecules in solution. The results from the vibrational spectroscopic studies demonstrate that carbonate salts (Na(2)CO(3) and K(2)CO(3)) act as strong structure makers, whereas bicarbonate salts (NaHCO(3) and NH(4)HCO(3)) act as weak structure makers. In addition, the changes in the OD band parameters of carbonate and bicarbonate salt solutions are in agreement with the viscosity characteristics of their solutions. PMID:17618642

  15. Detection of Plant Water Content with Needle-Type In-Situ Water Content Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Hitoshi; Miki, Norihisa

    A needle-type water content sensor with a polyethersulfone (PES) polymer membrane was developed for the low-invasive, direct in-situ measurement of plant water content (PWC) in prior work. In this paper we demonstrate a measurement of plant water stress that represents the demand for water of the plant and greatly affects its sweetness. We inserted the sensor into a stalk of strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) and soil. The variation in both the plant and the soil water content were successfully detected, which revealed the delay between variation in the plant water stress and soil water content after irrigation. Such delay could only be detected by the proposed sensor that could directly measure the variation of PWC in situ and continuously. The experiments also showed the variation in the signals as a function of detection sites and suggested that the detection sites of plant water stress need to be considered when the sensor is applied to irrigation culture.

  16. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  17. Elucidating the mechanism by which Gypsum fibrosum, a traditional Chinese medicine, maintains cutaneous water content.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Ogiue, Naoki; Toyoda, Eri; Nakamura, Marina; Kon, Risako; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Aburada, Takashi; Ishii, Makoto; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Machida, Yoshiaki; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) plays an important role in maintaining the normal water content of the skin. Previously, we revealed that the expression of cutaneous AQP3 increased following oral administration of Gypsum fibrosum (main component: CaSO?) to mice. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which Gypsum fibrosum increases the expression of cutaneous AQP3 in a keratinocyte cell line. Gypsum fibrosum or CaSO? was added to keratinocytes, and the expression level of AQP3, the Ca concentration, the activity of protein kinase C (PKC), and the degrees of phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) were measured. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AQP3 increased significantly 6 h-post addition of Gypsum fibrosum. In keratinocytes treated with Gypsum fibrosum, increases in the concentration of intracellular Ca, PKC activity, and the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB were observed. Pre-treatment with GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, suppressed the mRNA expression levels of AQP3. Similarly to treatment with Gypsum fibrosum, the addition of CaSO? led to the same observations in keratinocytes. It is hypothesized that Gypsum fibrosum causes an increase in the intracellular Ca concentration, PKC activity, and the phosphorylation levels of ERK and CREB, resulting in increased AQP3 expression in keratinocytes. In addition, it is possible that the effect of Gypsum fibrosum is attributable to CaSO?, based on the results demonstrating that the mechanisms of action of Gypsum fibrosum and CaSO? were nearly identical. PMID:23912684

  18. Handling of produced salt water for injection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bilhartz

    1965-01-01

    The discussion demonstrates by illustration the application of a standardized data package in defining water injection system performance. A water injection system is divided into complexity points and basic data collected at each point so that performance can be determined by chemical material balance calculations. To withstand the technical demands of this plan, precise sampling and testing techniques must be

  19. Determination of sulfonamides in swine muscle after salting-out assisted liquid extraction with acetonitrile coupled with back-extraction by a water\\/acetonitrile\\/dichloromethane ternary component system prior to high-performance liquid chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Hsien Tsai; Tzou-Chi Huang; Ho-Hsien Chen; Yuh-Wern Wu; Joh-Jong Huang; Hung-Yi Chuang

    2010-01-01

    A salting-out assisted liquid extraction coupled with back-extraction by a water\\/acetonitrile\\/dichloromethane ternary component system combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC–DAD) was developed for the extraction and determination of sulfonamides in solid tissue samples. After the homogenization of the swine muscle with acetonitrile and salt-promoted partitioning, an aliquot of 1mL of the acetonitrile extract containing a small amount

  20. Sodium content of potable water: dietary significance.

    PubMed

    Korch, G C

    1986-01-01

    Americans are consuming more sodium than required for physiologic functions. While the dietary sources of sodium generally are recognized and understood, the contribution of drinking water as a source of sodium may be overlooked. Because water may account for up to 10% of an individual's daily sodium consumption, dietitians should know the sodium content of the public water supply. Patients on severe sodium-restricted diets may not be able to consume the public water available in their area because 42% of the nation's water supplies provide sodium in excess of the optimal level. While the use of bottled waters may be the client's first choice, it may not be an acceptable alternative. Dietitians need to know the types and sodium contents of bottled water available in their area. A glossary of water descriptors and a table that lists the sodium content of bottled waters by brand name are provided. Another table lists sodium content by soft-drink types. Dietitians are reminded to consider the effect of the increased fluid requirements of individuals exercising in hot or humid conditions. PMID:3941232

  1. Extraction and mechanism investigation of trace roxithromycin in real water samples by use of ionic liquid-salt aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Han, Juan; Wang, Yun; Yan, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Ming

    2009-10-27

    The ionic liquid, as a green solvent, has several advantages over the organic solvents in traditional liquid-liquid extraction. Aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) consisting of a hydrophilic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoraborate, [Bmim]BF(4)) and Na(2)CO(3), which is a novel, simple, non-toxic and effective sample pretreatment technique coupled with molecular fluorescence spectrophotometry, was developed for the simultaneous separation, enrichment and rapid analysis of roxithromycin. The extraction yield of roxithromycin in [Bmim]BF(4)-Na(2)CO(3) aqueous two-phase system is influenced by the types of salts, concentrations of Na(2)CO(3) and [Bmim]BF(4), as well as the extracting temperature. Under the optimum conditions, the average extraction efficiency is up to 90.7%. The mechanism of ionic liquid-salt ATPS formation was discussed by hydration theory, and the extraction mechanism of the [Bmim]BF(4)-salt ATPS was investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that no chemical (bonding) interactions are observed between ionic liquid and roxithromycin, while the nature properties of the roxithromycin are not altered. This method was practical when applied to the analysis of roxithromycin in real water samples with the detection limit of 0.03 microg mL(-1), relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.9% (n=13), and linear ranges of 1.00-20.00 microg mL(-1). The proposed extraction technique will be promising in the separation of other small biomolecules. PMID:19808111

  2. The effect of fatty acid concentration and water content on the production of biodiesel by lipase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sulaiman Al-Zuhair; Kishnu Vaarma Jayaraman; Smita Krishnan; Wai-Hoong Chan

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of the production of biodiesel by esterification of butyric acid with methanol, catalysed by lipase from Mucor miehei, was studied in two types of systems, namely, n-hexane microaqueous and biphasic (n-hexane\\/water) containing different amounts of water. The experimental results were fit to a Ping-Pong mechanism and the constants found in the rate expression were determined. The results have

  3. Hydrostatic creep consolidation of crushed salt with added water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Holcomb; M. Shields

    1987-01-01

    Adding small amounts of water to the as-mined salt results in a consolidation rate such that times required for the salt to form an effective barrier to fluid flow are of the order of 1 year, at stresses in the 1 MPa range. Two different extrapolations were used, one biased towards a high estimate and the other towards a low

  4. The chemistry of salt-affected soils and waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the chemistry of salt affected soils and waters is necessary for management of irrigation in arid and semi-arid regions. In this chapter we review the origin of salts in the landscape, the major chemical reactions necessary for prediction of the soil solution composition, and the use of...

  5. Bulk, surface properties and water uptake mechanisms of salt/acid amorphous composite systems.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Stefano; Tewes, Frederic; Tajber, Lidia; Caron, Vincent; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2013-11-01

    Developing amorphous pharmaceuticals can be desirable due to advantageous biopharmaceutical properties. Low glass transition temperature (Tg) amorphous drugs can be protected from crystallisation by mixing with high Tg excipients, such as polymers, or with salt forms. However, both polymers and salts can enhance the water uptake. The aim of this study was to formulate physico-chemically stable amorphous materials, by co-processing different proportions of sulfathiazole and its sodium salt to produce an optimum ratio, characterised by the best physical stability and lowest hygroscopicity. Both sulfathiazole and salt amorphised upon spray drying. At room temperature, sulfathiazole crystallised within 1h at <5% relative humidity while the salt deliquesced when exposed to ambient humidity conditions. In the case of composite systems, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal and surface analysis suggested interactions with an acid:salt stoichiometry of 1:2. Increasing proportions of salt raised the Tg, enhancing the storage stability, however this was opposed by an enhanced hygroscopicity. The water uptake mechanism within the different amorphous systems, analysed by fitting the water sorption isotherms with the Young and Nelson equation, was dependent on the ratio employed, with the salt and the acid facilitating absorption and adsorption, respectively. Tuning the properties of amorphous salt/acid composites by optimising the ratio appears potentially promising to improve the physical stability of amorphous formulations. PMID:23948137

  6. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  7. 4. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SKINNER SALT ROASTERS, SAMPLING BUILDING, WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SKINNER SALT ROASTERS, SAMPLING BUILDING, WATER TOWER, AND OFFICE BUILDING. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  8. Inhibiting salt water intrusion into fresh water aquifers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Dreher; R. D. Sydansk

    1972-01-01

    Intrusion of saline waters into fresh water aquifers is inhibited by injecting into the aquifer in advance of the major portion of the saline water, a micellar dispersion comprised of a surfactant containing a cation which can be replaced in situ by a major cation within the saline water. For example, a micellar dispersion (containing a sodium petroleum sulfonate) is

  9. Mineral Content and Biochemical Variables of Aloe vera L. under Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Córdoba-Matson, Miguel Víctor; Villegas-Espinoza, Jorge Arnoldo; Hernández-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Troyo-Diéguez, Enrique; García-Hernández, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proven economic importance of Aloe vera, studies of saline stress and its effects on the biochemistry and mineral content in tissues of this plant are scarce. The objective of this study was to grow Aloe under NaCl stress of 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM and compare: (1) proline, total protein, and enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-case) in chlorenchyma and parenchyma tissues, and (2) ion content (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, Fe, P. N, Zn, B, Mn, and Cu) in roots, stems, leaves and sprouts. Proline and PEP-case increased as salinity increased in both parenchyma and chlorenchyma, while total protein increased in parenchyma and decreased in chlorenchyma, although at similar salt concentrations total protein was always higher in chlorenchyma. As salinity increased Na and Cl ions increased in roots, stems, leaves, while K decreased only significantly in sprouts. Salinity increases typically caused mineral content in tissue to decrease, or not change significantly. In roots, as salinity increased Mg decreased, while all other minerals failed to show a specific trend. In stems, the mineral concentrations that changed were Fe and P which increased with salinity while Cu decreased. In leaves, Mg, Mn, N, and B decreased with salinity, while Cu increased. In sprouts, the minerals that decreased with increasing salinity were Mg, Mn, and Cu. Zinc did not exhibit a trend in any of the tissues. The increase in protein, proline and PEP-case activity, as well as the absorption and accumulation of cations under moderate NaCl stress caused osmotic adjustment which kept the plant healthy. These results suggest that Aloe may be a viable crop for soil irrigated with hard water or affected by salinity at least at concentrations used in the present study. PMID:24736276

  10. Comments on “Electrical conductivity of wadsleyite as a function of temperature and water content” by Manthilake et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro; Dai, Lidong

    2009-05-01

    In a recent paper, Manthilake et al. [Manthilake, M.A.G.M., et al. Electrical conductivity of wadsleyite as a function of temperature and water content. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press] presented the results of experimental study on the electrical conductivity of wadsleyite and concluded that the influence of water is small at transition zone temperatures and that a high concentration of water (hydrogen) cannot explain the observed conductivity in the transition zone as oppose to the conclusion originally obtained by Huang et al. [Huang, X., Xu, Y., Karato, S., 2005. Water content of the mantle transition zone from the electrical conductivity of wadsleyite and ringwoodite. Nature 434, 746-749) from a similar experimental study. In this note, we discuss the causes of discrepancies between the results by two groups and show that almost all the differences are due to the experimental artifacts in the studies by Manthilake et al. and Yoshino et al. [Manthilake, M.A.G.M., et al. Electrical conductivity of wadsleyite as a function of temperature and water content. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press; Yoshino, T., Manthilake, G., Matsuzaki, T., Katsura, T., 2008a. Dry mantle transition zone inferred from the conductivity of wadsleyite and ringwoodite. Nature 451, 326-329] namely (i) the use of inappropriate method of determining electrical conductivity and (ii) the use of the data from a sample of wadsleyite with a substantial amount of water as a "dry" conductivity. A comparison of electrical conductivity of truly "dry" wadsleyite and olivine shows that the conductivity is similar at the same pressure and temperature. We also show that the use of one frequency method results in systematic errors in the conductivity measurements that explains the discrepancies in the results by two sets of studies. When an appropriate method for determining electrical conductivity (i.e., the impedance spectroscopy) is used and when the results of truly dry sample are used for the background dry conductivity, we find that the influence of water (hydrogen) is large enough to explain a majority of variation of electrical conductivity by the regional variation in water content.

  11. Complex permittivity and microwave heating of pure water, tap water and salt solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. KUMAR

    1979-01-01

    The complex permittivity and temperature rise versus time have been measured for pure water, Maltese tap water and pure water—commercial salt solution at 2.45GHz. The experimental results are related to empirical or theoretical calculations. The complex permittivity of commercial salt concentration in pure water has also been reported.

  12. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded well under different field conditions. Moreover, GANS approach responded well to precipitation events in both experimental sites through summer and autumn, and soil water content estimations were affected by water stored in snow.

  13. Water, salt, and energy balances of the Dead Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Lensky; Y. Dvorkin; V. Lyakhovsky; I. Gertman; I. Gavrieli

    2005-01-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline terminal lake experiencing a water level drop of about 1 m\\/yr over the last decade. The existing estimations for the water balance of the lake are widely variable, reflecting the unknown subsurface water inflow, the rate of evaporation, and the rate of salt accumulation at the lake bottom. To estimate these we calculate the

  14. Effect of nitrogen, salt, and iron content in the growth medium and light intensity on lipid production by microalgae isolated from freshwater sources in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yeesang, Chittra; Cheirsilp, Benjamas

    2011-02-01

    Four green microalgae (TRG, KB, SK, and PSU) identified as Botryococcus spp. by morphological criteria were isolated from lakes and freshwater ponds in southern Thailand. In nitrogen-rich medium the strains achieved a lipid content of 25.8%, 17.8%, 15.8% and 5.7%, respectively. A combination of nitrogen deficiency, moderately high light intensity (82.5 ?E m(-2) s(-1)) and high level of iron (0.74 mM) improved lipid accumulation in TRG, KB, SK, and PSU strains up to 35.9%, 30.2%, 28.4% and 14.7%, respectively. The lipid contents and plant oil-like fatty acid composition of the microalgae suggested their potential as biodiesel feedstock. PMID:20980142

  15. Nitrogen in Desert Grasses as Affected by Biosolids, their Time of Application, and Soil Water Content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICARDO MATA-GONZÁLEZ; RONALD E. SOSEBEE; CHANGGUI WAN

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the interactive effect of biosolids, time of application, and soil water on plant N concentration and uptake by Bouteloua gracilis (blue grama) and Hilaria mutica (tobosagrass) grown in pots. Biosolids were surface-applied to the soil of the pots either in the spring or the summer at rates of 0, 7, 18, 34, and 90 dry Mg ha.

  16. On chlorine salts: Their detection, stability and implications for water on Mars and Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jennifer

    Chlorine salts (e.g. chlorides, chlorates and perchlorates) are an important factor in the stability of water on the surfaces of planetary bodies. Here we have shown that perchlorate and chlorate salts will lower the freezing point of water, allowing it to be liquid down to ~204 K. These salts will also slow down the evaporation rate, extending the lifetime of the liquid water solution. Chlorine salts have been detected on Mars, which has significant implications for the stability of water and hence its habitability. To study their effects on the stability of water on planetary surfaces, we need to first locate where these chlorine salts exist; this is typically done by remote sensing. To date, only anhydrous chlorides have been remotely detected, mostly due to the lack of hydrated chlorine salts in the spectral libraries used to identify features. To address this deficit, we measured reflectance spectra for numerous chlorine salts. Hydration bands were most common in near-infrared spectra, with band depth and width increasing with increasing hydration state. In the mid-infrared, oxychlorine salts exhibit spectral features due to Cl-O vibrations. We also investigated the spectral features of these salts at low temperature (80 K) to compare with remote sensing data of the outer satellites, specifically Europa. At low temperature, water bands become narrower and shallower than their room temperature counterparts. We show that chlorine salts do possess distinct spectral features that should allow for their detection by remote sensing, though care must be taken to acquire laboratory spectra of all hydrated phases at the relevant conditions (e.g. temperature, pressure) for the planetary body being studied.

  17. On Chlorine Salts: Their Detection, Stability and implications for Water on Mars and Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    Chlorine salts (e.g. chlorides, chlorates and perchlorates) are an important factor in the stability of water on the surfaces of planetary bodies. Here we have shown that perchlorate and chlorate salts will lower the freezing point of water, allowing it to be liquid down to ~204 K. These salts will also slow down the evaporation rate, extending the lifetime of the liquid water solution. Chlorine salts have been detected on Mars, which has significant implications for the stability of water and hence its habitability. To study their effects on the stability of water on planetary surfaces, we need to first locate where these chlorine salts exist; this is typically done by remote sensing. To date, only anhydrous chlorides have been remotely detected, mostly due to the lack of hydrated chlorine salts in the spectral libraries used to identify features. To address this deficit, we measured reflectance spectra for numerous chlorine salts. Hydration bands were most common in near-infrared spectra, with band depth and width increasing with increasing hydration state. In the mid-infrared, oxychlorine salts exhibit spectral features due to Cl-O vibrations. We also investigated the spectral features of these salts at low temperature (80 K) to compare with remote sensing data of the outer satellites, specifically Europa. At low temperature, water bands become narrower and shallower than their room temperature counterparts. We show that chlorine salts do possess distinct spectral features that should allow for their detection by remote sensing, though care must be taken to acquire laboratory spectra of all hydrated phases at the relevant conditions (e.g. temperature, pressure) for the planetary body being studied.

  18. Boron carbon nitride nanostructures from salt melts: tunable water-soluble phosphors.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Portehault, David; Dimova, Rumiana; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-05-11

    A simple, high yield, chemical process is developed to fabricate layered h-BN nanosheets and BCNO nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 5 nm at 700 °C. The use of the eutectic LiCl/KCl salt melt medium enhances the kinetics of the reaction between sodium borohydride and urea or guanidine as well as the dispersion of the nanoparticles in water. The carbon content can be tuned from 0 to 50 mol % by adjusting the reactant ratio, thus providing precise control of the light emission of the particles in the range 440-528 nm while reaching a quantum yield of 26%. Because of their green synthesis, low toxicity, small size, and stability against aggregation in water, the as-obtained photoluminescent BCNO nanoparticles show promise for diagnostics and optoelectronics. PMID:21506566

  19. Aqueous two-phase systems of copolymer L64 + organic salt + water: Enthalpic L64–salt interaction and Othmer–Tobias, NRTL and UNIFAC thermodynamic modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivianne Molica de Andrade; Guilherme Dias Rodrigues; Raquel Moreira Maduro de Carvalho; Luis Henrique Mendes da Silva; Maria C. Hespanhol da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Phase diagrams of two-phase systems (ATPS) composed by the triblock copolymer L64+organic salt (sodium tartrate, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or ammonium citrate)+water, at different temperatures (278, 288, and 298K) are presented in this work. Contrary to behavior of ATPS formed by inorganic salts, the study of the temperature influence in the liquid–liquid equilibrium behavior of L64–organic salts ATPS showed an

  20. Anomalous water diffusion in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Hassanali, Ali A; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of water exhibits anomalous behavior in the presence of different electrolytes. Recent experiments [Kim JS, Wu Z, Morrow AR, Yethiraj A, Yethiraj A (2012) J Phys Chem B 116(39):12007-12013] have found that the self-diffusion of water (Dw) can either be enhanced or suppressed around CsI and NaCl, respectively, relative to that of neat water. Here we show that unlike classical empirical potentials, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations successfully reproduce the qualitative trends observed experimentally. These types of phenomena have often been rationalized in terms of the "structure-making" or "structure-breaking" effects of different ions on the solvent, although the microscopic origins of these features have remained elusive. Rather than disrupting the network in a significant manner, the electrolytes studied here cause rather subtle changes in both structural and dynamical properties of water. In particular, we show that water in the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations is characterized by dynamic heterogeneity, which turns out to be critical in reproducing the experimental trends. PMID:24522111

  1. Method of and means for maintaining a halocline in an open body of salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Assaf

    1985-01-01

    A halocline is maintained in open body of salt water at a depth to which a significant amount of solar radiation penetrates by inducing an upward vertical flow in the body of water sufficient to counter wind-mixing and molecular diffusion thereby establishing an ascending or rising solar lake. The upward flow is induced by injecting into the body of water

  2. Method of and means for maintaining a halocline in an open body of salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Assaf

    1984-01-01

    A halocline is maintained in open body of salt water at a depth to which a significant amount of solar radiation penetrates by inducing an upward vertical flow in the body of water sufficient to counter wind-mixing and molecular diffusion thereby establishing an ascending or rising solar lake. The upward flow is induced by injecting into the body of water

  3. Indirect prediction of total body water content in healthy adult Beagles by single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaguiyan-Colliard, Laurence; Daumas, Caroline; Bousbiat, Sana; Jaffrin, Michel; Cardot, Philippe; Grandjean, Dominique; Priymenko, Nathalie; Nguyen, Patrick; Roux, Françoise

    2015-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop equations for prediction of total body water (TBW) content in unsedated dogs by combining impedance (resistance and reactance) and morphological variables and to compare the results of those equations with TBW content determined by deuterium dilution (TBWd). ANIMALS 26 healthy adult Beagles. PROCEDURES TBW content was determined directly by deuterium dilution and indirectly with equations developed from measurements obtained by use of a portable bioelectric impedance device and morphological variables including body length, height, weight, and thoracic and abdominal circumferences. RESULTS Impedance and morphological data from 16 of the 26 dogs were used to determine coefficients for the following 2 equations: TBW1 = -0.019 (BL(2)/R) + -0.199 (RC + AC) + 0.996W + 0.081H + 12.31; and TBW2 = 0.048 (BL(2)/R) + -0.144 (RC + AC) + 0.777W + 0.066H + 0.031X + 7.47, where AC is abdominal circumference, H is height, BL is body length, R is resistance, RC is rib cage circumference, W is body weight, and × is reactance. Results for TBW1 (R(2)1 = 0.843) and TBW2 (R(2)2 = 0.816) were highly correlated with the TBWd. When the equations were validated with data from the remaining 10 dogs, the respective mean differences between TBWd and TBW1 and TBW2 were 0.17 and 0.11 L, which equated to a nonsignificant underestimation of TBW content by 2.4% and 1.6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that impedance and morphological data can be used to accurately estimate TBW content in adult Beagles. This method of estimating TBW content is less expensive and easier to perform than is measurement of TBWd, making it appealing for daily use in veterinary practice. PMID:26000602

  4. Hypothalamic activity during altered salt and water balance in the snake Bothrops jararaca

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Zambotti-Villela; Camila Eduardo Marinho; Rafaela Fadoni Alponti; Paulo Flavio Silveira

    2008-01-01

    The effects of water and salt overload on the activities of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and the adjacent periventricular\\u000a zone of the hypothalamus of the snake Bothrops jararaca were investigated by measurements of Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-ir). Both water and salt overload resulted in changes\\u000a in body mass, plasma osmolality, and plasma concentrations of sodium, potassium, and chloride. Hyper-osmolality increased

  5. DESCRIPTION OF THE FRESH AND SALT WATER SUPPLY AND PUMPING PLANTS USED FOR THE AQUARIUM.

    E-print Network

    DESCRIPTION OF THE FRESH AND SALT WATER SUPPLY AND PUMPING PLANTS USED FOR THE AQUARIUM. BY I. S. K was supplied from one of the water mains under the aquarium building at an average pressure of about 60 pounds per square inch, and before passing into the supply pipes erected over the aquarium this water

  6. Calibration of a water content reflectometer and soil water dynamics for an agroforestry practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ranjith P. UdawattaStephen; Stephen H. Anderson; Peter P. Motavalli; Harold E. Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Water content reflectometers allow temporal and continuous assessment of spatial differences in soil water dynamics. We hypothesized\\u000a that volumetric soil water content estimated by the water content reflectometers (CS616 Campbell Sci. Inc., Logan, UT) is\\u000a influenced by clay content and temperature and therefore site- and or soil-specific equations are required for accurate estimations\\u000a of soil water. Objectives of the study

  7. Inland salt waters of southern Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Seaman; P. J. Ashton; W. D. Williams

    1991-01-01

    Inland salt lakes are widely distributed in southern Africa: they are particularly common in South Africa, but many occur\\u000a in Namibia and Botswana. All are shallow, and most are ephemeral with salinities that are not very high (mostly ?1). Fringing zones of halophytes or submerged macrophytes are neither well-developed nor taxonomically diverse. The Cyanobacteria,\\u000a especially Nodularia spumigena, often dominate the

  8. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was likely very significant in the evolution of the lunar mantle. Conclusions: Lunar granites crystallized between 4.3-3.8 Ga from relatively wet melts that degassed upon crystallization. The formation of these granites likely removed significant amounts of water from some mantle source regions, e.g. later mare basalts predicting derivation from a mantle with <10 ppm water. However, this would have been a heterogeneous pro-cess based on K distribution. Thus some, if not most of the mantle may not have been devolatilized by this process; as seen by water in volcanic glasses and melt inclusions.

  9. Investigation of indigenous water, salt and soil for solar ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of salt-gradient solar ponds in nature is a strong indication that the successful exploitation of this phenomenon must account adequately for the influences of the local setting. Sun, weather and other general factors are treated elsewhere. This paper deals with water, salt, and soil. A general methodology for evaluating and, where feasible, adjusting the effects of these elements is under development. Eight essential solar pond characteristics have been identified, along with a variety of their dependencies upon properties of water, salt and soil. The comprehensive methodology, when fully developed, will include laboratory investigation in such diverse areas as brine physical chemistry, light transmission, water treatment, brine-soil interactions, sealants, and others. With the Salton Sea solar pond investigation as an example, some methods under development will be described.

  10. Interfacial water: A first principles molecular dynamics study of a nanoscale water film on salt

    E-print Network

    Alavi, Ali

    Interfacial water: A first principles molecular dynamics study of a nanoscale water film on salt Li Density functional theory DFT molecular dynamics simulations of a thin 15 Å water film on NaCl 001 have interfacial water system. The interaction of the water film with the surface orders the water molecules

  11. Road salt turning Twin Cities lakes into dead seas By JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY, Star Tribune

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Road salt turning Twin Cities lakes into dead seas By JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY, Star Tribune March 23 in lakes and streams around the Twin Cities -- road salt. The fish, bugs and other wildlife that live, a primary ingredient in salt, and what it will take to keep urban waters healthy. But the far more difficult

  12. The association of octadecyl-end-capped poly-(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonates) in water and salt solutions: A study by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, M.; Morishima, Y.; Raju, B. B.; Winnik, F. M.

    Steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been used to study the aggregation in aqueous solutions of poly-(2-acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonic acids, sodium salt mono-endcapped with either N,N-di-n-octadecyl or N-4-[(1-pyrenyl)butyl]-N-n-octadecyl which were prepared by free radical polymerization of 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) initiated with the azo compounds, 4,4'-azobis{cyano-N,N-di-n-octadecyl}pentanamide and 4,4'-azobis{cyano-N,N-[4-(1-pyrenyl)butyl]-n-octadecyl}pentanamide, respectively. Both techniques indicate the occurrence of multimolecular aggregates in solutions of the polymers in water and in 0.2 M NaCl. The concentration range for aggregation is about 1-14 mmol AMPS l^{-1} (0.5-2.7 g l^{-1}) in 0.2 M NaCl and the enthalpy of micellization, estimated from ITC data, is 100 J [mol AMPS]^{-1}. The accessibility of the chromophores to neutral molecules and to cationic species was assessed by quenching of fluorescence with nitromethane and thallium nitrate, respectively. The association of the mono-endcapped polymers is compared to that of PAMPS derivatives carrying hydrophobic groups randomly attached along the chain.

  13. A derivatization approach using pyrylium salts for the sensitive and simple determination of sulfide in spring water by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rembisz, ?aneta; Bzdurska, Dorota; Obiedzi?ska, Justyna; Martínez-Má?ez, Ramón; Zakrzewski, Robert

    2015-08-14

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method based on pre-column derivatization with the pyrylium salts (4-[p-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenyl]-2,6-diphenylpyrylium perchlorate (LN1) and 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate (L1)) has been developed for the determination of sulfide. After the reaction of sulfide ions with LN1 or L1 aiming at the formation of the corresponding thiopyrylium derivatives LN3 or L3, they were separated on a C18 column using phosphate buffer and acetonitrile as eluent, and afterwards detected with a UV/vis detector. By using the described method, sulfide ions can be determined in the range of 5.12-486.4?g(.)L(-1) or 1.024-20.48?g(.)L(-1) by means of L1 or LN1, respectively. In our experiments, the relative standard deviation was not higher than 2% and the recovery coefficient was in the range of 88-102%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of sulfide in spring water samples from Busko Zdrój and Uniejów health resorts located in Poland. PMID:26163932

  14. Water deficit and salt stress diagnosis through LED induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis in Jatropha curcas L. oil plants for biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Oliveira, Ronaldo A.; Cunha, Patrícia C.; Costa, Ernande B.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2011-02-01

    Light-emitting-diode induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis is employed to investigate the effect of water and salt stress upon the growth process of physicnut(jatropha curcas) grain oil plants for biofuel. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were observed and examined as a function of the stress intensity(salt concentration and water deficit) for a period of time of 30 days. The chlorophyll fluorescence(ChlF) ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive and nonintrusive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was exploited to monitor the level of stress experienced by the jatropha plants. The ChlF technique data indicated that salinity plays a minor role in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves tissues for NaCl concentrations in the 25 to 200 mM range, and results agreed quite well with those obtained using conventional destructive spectrophotometric methods. Nevertheless, for higher NaCl concentrations a noticeable decrease in the Chl content was observed. The Chl fluorescence ratio analysis also permitted detection of damage caused by water deficit in the early stages of the plants growing process. A significant variation of the Fr/FFr ratio was observed sample in the first 10 days of the experiment when one compared control and nonwatered samples. The results suggest that the technique may potentially be applied as an early-warning indicator of stress caused by water deficit.

  15. Genetics of water content in sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water contributes the greatest portion of harvested sugarbeet weight. Due to the convenience of measuring sucrose in solution, such as that extracted in beet juice, little information on the inheritance of water content in beets is available. Water content has a direct influence on the percent of ...

  16. First data on the uranium content in water of the Yenisei River basin in the area affected by the operation of Rosatom plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ya. Bolsunovskii; A. M. Zhizhaev; A. I. Saprykin; A. G. Degermendzhi; A. I. Rubailo

    2011-01-01

    This study is devoted to investigating the content of uranium isotopes in water of the Yenisei River and its tributaries within the territories affected by the operation of Rosatom plants (mining chemical combine, and electrochemical plant). Long-term monitoring of the 238U content by mass spectrometry carried out in two institutes of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

  17. Assessment of drinking water radioactivity content by liquid scintillation counting: set up of high sensitivity and emergency procedures.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, R; Azzellino, A; Bellinzona, S; Forte, M; Gallini, R; Sgorbati, G

    2004-05-01

    In our institute, different procedures have been developed to measure the radioactivity content of drinking water both in normal and in emergency situations, such as those arising from accidental and terrorist events. A single radiometric technique, namely low level liquid scintillation counting (LSC), has been used. In emergency situations a gross activity screening is carried out without any sample treatment by a single and quick liquid scintillation counting. Alpha and beta activities can be measured in more than one hundred samples per day with sensitivities of a few Bq/L. Higher sensitivity gross alpha and beta, uranium and radium measurements can be performed on water samples after specific sample treatments. The sequential method proposed is designed in such a way that the same water sample can be used in all the stages, with slight modifications. This sequential procedure was applied in a survey of the Lombardia district. At first tap waters of the 13 largest towns were examined, then a more detailed monitoring was carried out in the surroundings of Milano and Lodi towns. The high sensitivity method for the determination of uranium isotopes was used to check the presence of depleted uranium in Lake Garda. Reduced equipment requirements and relative readiness of radiochemical procedures make LSC an attractive technique which can also be applied by laboratories lacking specific radiochemistry facilities and experience. PMID:15042271

  18. Salt water infiltration in two artificial sea inlets in the Belgian dune area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, A.; Lebbe, L.; Gysens, Stefaan; Delecluyse, Kevin; DeWolf, Peter

    2008-10-01

    SummaryIn the dune area of the Westhoek Nature Reserve, situated in the western Belgian coastal plain, two artificial tidal inlets were made aiming to enhance biodiversity. The infiltration of salt water in these tidal inlets was carefully monitored because a fresh water lens is present in the phreatic dune aquifer. This forms an important source of fresh water which is for instance exploited by a water company. The infiltration was monitored over a period of two years by means of electromagnetic borehole measurements (EM39) and by measurements of fresh water heads and temperature using a large number of observation wells. EM39 observations point to aquifer heterogeneity as a determining factor in the movement of the salt infiltration water. It is shown that part of the infiltration water moves further in the dunes instead of towards the sea. On the long term run, possibility exists that salt water enters the extraction's capture zone. This issue needs further monitoring and study. Fresh water head and temperature data illustrate that the main period of infiltration is confined to spring tide when large amounts of salt water enter the tidal inlets.

  19. High Salt Diets, Bone Strength and Mineral Content of Mature Femur After Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that high salt diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) loss, but it is not known whether this effect weakens bone during space flight. The Bone Hormone Lab has studied the effect of high salt diets on Ca balance and whole body Ca in a space flight model (2,8). Neither the strength nor mineral content of the femurs from these studies has been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of high salt diets (HiNa) and skeletal unloading on femoral bone strength and bone mineral content (BMC) in mature rats.

  20. Interaction of ionic liquid with water with variation of water content in 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6])\\/TX-100\\/water ternary microemulsions monitored by solvent and rotational relaxation of coumarin 153 and coumarin 490

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debabrata Seth; Anjan Chakraborty; Palash Setua; Nilmoni Sarkar

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of water with room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [bmim][PF6] has been studied in [bmim][PF6]\\/TX-100\\/water ternary microemulsions by solvent and rotational relaxation of coumarin 153 (C-153) and coumarin 490 (C-490). The rotational relaxation and average solvation time of C-153 and C-490 gradually decrease with increase in water content of the microemulsions. The gradual increase in the size of the

  1. Geophysical surveys for monitoring coastal salt water intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loperte, A.; Satriani, A.; Simoniello, T.; Imbrenda, V.; Lapenna, V.

    2009-04-01

    Geophysical surveys have been exploited in a coastal forest reserve, at the mouth of the river Bradano in South Italy (Basilicata, southern Italy, N 40°22', E 16°51'), to investigate the subsurface saltwater contamination. Forest Reserve of Metapontum is a wood of artificial formation planted to protect fruit and vegetable cultivations from salt sea-wind; in particular it is constituted by a back dune pine forest mainly composed of Aleppo Pine trees (Pinus halepensis) and domestic pine trees (Pinus pinea). Two separate geophysical field campaigns, one executed in 2006 and a second executed in 2008, were performed in the forest reserve; in particular, electrical resistivity tomographies, resistivity and ground penetrating radar maps were elaborated and analyzed. In addition, chemical and physical analyses on soil and waters samples were performed in order to confirm and integrate geophysical data. The analyses carried out allowed an accurate characterization of salt intrusion phenomenon: the spatial extension and depth of the saline wedge were estimated. Primary and secondary salinity of the Metapontum forest reserve soil occurred because of high water-table and the evapo-transpiration rate which was much higher than the rainfall rate; these, of course, are linked to natural factors such as climate, natural drainage patterns, topographic features, geological structure and distance to the sea. Naturally, since poor land management, like the construction of river dams, indiscriminate extraction of inert from riverbeds that subtract supplies sedimentary, the alteration of the natural water balance, plays an important role in this process. The obtained results highlighted that integrated geophysical surveys gave a precious contribute for better evaluating marine intrusion wedge in coastal aquifers and providing a rapid, non-invasive and low cost tool for coastal monitoring.

  2. Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Vedder, J. F.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Soil water contents from both smooth and rough bare soil were estimated from remotely sensed surface soil and air temperatures. An inverse relationship between two thermal parameters and gravimetric soil water content was found for Avondale loam when its water content was between air-dry and field capacity. These parameters, daily maximum minus minimum surface soil temperature and daily maximum soil minus air temperature, appear to describe the relationship reasonably well. These two parameters also describe relative soil water evaporation (actual/potential). Surface soil temperatures showed good agreement among three measurement techniques: in situ thermocouples, a ground-based infrared radiation thermometer, and the thermal infrared band of an airborne multispectral scanner.

  3. Structure and phase equilibria of mixtures of the complex salt hexadecyltrimethylammonium polymethacrylate, water and different oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliana Silva Bernardes; Watson Loh

    2008-01-01

    This work reports on phase diagrams for mixtures of a complex salt formed by a cationic surfactant and an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte, hexadecyltrimethylammonium polymethacrylate, in binary mixtures with water and in ternary mixtures containing water and organic solvents of different polarity (‘oils’): decanol, octanol, p-xylene and cyclohexane. The liquid crystalline structures formed were identified by small angle X-ray scattering measurements,

  4. The Transport of Salt and Water across Isolated Rat Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, T. W.

    1967-01-01

    The flows of sodium, potassium, and chloride under electrical and chemical gradients and of salt and water in the presence of osmotic pressure gradients are described by phenomenological equations based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The aim was to give the simplest possible description, that is to postulate the least number of active transport processes and the least number of separate pathways across the intestine. On this basis, the results were consistent with the following picture of the intestine: Two channels exist across this tissue, one allowing only passive transport of ions and the other only active. In the passive channel, the predominant resistance to ion flow is friction with the water in the channel. The electroosmotic flow indicates that the passive channel is lined with negative fixed charged groups having a surface charge density of 3000 esu cm-2. The values of the ion-water frictional coefficients, and the relationship between ionic concentrations and flows indicate that the passive channel is extracellular. The active channel behaves as two membranes in series, the first membrane being semipermeable but allowing active transport of sodium, and the second membrane being similar to the passive channel. Friction with the ions in the second "membrane" is the predominant resistance to water flow. PMID:11526854

  5. Water use of grazed salt bush plantations with saline watertable

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Slavich; K. S. Smith; S. D. Tyerman; G. R. Walker

    1999-01-01

    Old man saltbush (Atriplex nummularia) has been widely planted on salt affected land in south-east Australia to provide a vegetative cover which can be used as a fodder reserve. Such plantations are also perceived as having the capacity to use saline groundwater and hence affect the extent of shallow watertables. This paper examines the water use characteristics of saltbush plantations

  6. Phase diagram of 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE):water system at subzero temperatures and at low water contents.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, E Y; Steponkus, P L

    1999-07-15

    The phase behavior of partially hydrated 1, 2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction methods together with water sorption isotherms. DOPE liposomes were dehydrated in the H(II) phase at 29 degrees C and in the L(alpha) phase at 0 degrees C by vapor phase equilibration over saturated salt solutions. Other samples were prepared by hydration of dried DOPE by vapor phase equilibration at 29 degrees C and 0 degrees C. Five lipid phases (lamellar liquid crystalline, L(alpha); lamellar gel, L(beta); inverted hexagonal, H(II); inverted ribbon, P(delta); and lamellar crystalline, L(c)) and the ice phase were observed depending on the water content and temperature. The ice phase did not form in DOPE suspensions containing <9 wt% water. The L(c) phase was observed in samples with a water content of 2-6 wt% that were annealed at 0 degrees C for 2 or more days. The L(c) phase melted at 5-20 degrees C producing the H(II) phase. The P(delta) phase was observed at water contents of <0.5 wt%. The phase diagram, which includes five lipid phases and two water phases (ice and liquid water), has been constructed. The freeze-induced dehydration of DOPE has been described with the aid of the phase diagram. PMID:10407074

  7. Water Content of the Oceanic Lithosphere at Hawaii from FTIR Analysis of Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizmis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Although water in the mantle is mostly present as trace H dissolved in minerals, it has a large influence on its melting and rheological properties. The water content of the mantle lithosphere beneath continents is better constrained by abundant mantle xenolith data than beneath oceans where it is mainly inferred from MORB glass analysis. Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, we determined the water content of olivine (Ol), clinopyroxene (Cpx) and orthopyroxene (Opx) in spinel peridotite xenoliths from Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. Only Ol exhibits H diffusion profiles, evidence of limited H loss during xenolith transport to the surface. Water concentrations (Ol: 9-28 ppm H2O, Cpx: 246-566 ppm H2O, Opx: 116-224 ppm H2O) are within the range of those from continental settings but higher than those from Gakkel ridge abyssal peridotites. The Opx H2O contents are similar to those of abyssal peridotites from Atlantic ridge Leg 153 (170-230 ppm) but higher than those from Leg 209 (10- 14 ppm). The calculated bulk peridotite water contents (94 to 144 ppm H2O) are in agreement with MORB mantle source water estimates and lower than estimates for the source of Hawaiian rejuvenated volcanism (approx 540 ppm H2O) . The water content of Cpx and most Opx correlates negatively with spinel Cr#, and positively with pyroxene Al and HREE contents. This is qualitatively consistent with the partitioning of H into the melt during partial melting, but the water contents are too high for the degree of melting these peridotites experienced. Melts in equilibrium with xenolith minerals have H2O/Ce ratios similar to those of OIB

  8. ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content Course #: 474 Title: Water and Landscape Engineering Applications

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    and engineering processes and systems used to manage soil- water for optimal purposes. Primary (a) 7 problem exam problem above 80%: All students achieved a grade above XX% on a case study relevant to the stated management problem, and then work in project teams to design a drainage and/or irrigation system to meet

  9. The reaction kinetics of lithium salt with water vapor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Balooch; L. N. Dinh; D. F. Calef

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of lithium salt (LiH and\\/or LiD) with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10?5–2657 Pa has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with LiH cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiH surface temperature, suggesting a negligible activation energy for

  10. Isotope geochemistry of water in Gulf Coast Salt Domes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Paul Knauth; M. B. Kumar; J. D. Martinez

    1980-01-01

    Water found as active leaks and isolated pools in the Weeks Island, Jefferson Island, and Belle Isle salt mines of south Louisiana has delta¹⁸O values ranging from -4 to +11.5%â and deltaD values from -2.3 to -53%â. One sample from Weeks Island and one from Jefferson Island are isotopically similar to local surface waters and are clearly of meteoric origin.

  11. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  12. EFFECTS OF SALT AND WATER STRESS ON THE GERMINATION OF CHENOPODIUM GLAUCUM L., SEED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DEYU DUAN; XIAOJING LIU; M. AJMAL KHAN; BILQUEES GUL

    Effect of salts (Na2SO4, Na2CO3, MgSO4, NaCl, MgCl2), soil extract and polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) on the germination of Chenopodium glaucum L., seed was studied. Maximum germination was obtained in distilled water. Germination decreased with increase in salinity. The inhibition of germination by salt solutions was in the order of MgCl2 > Na2SO4 > Na2CO3 > NaCl > Soil extract >

  13. NITRATE RELEASE BY SALT MARSH PLANTS: AN OVERLOOKED NUTRIENT FLUX MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salt marshes provide water purification as an important ecosystem service in part by storing, transforming and releasing nutrients. This service can be quantified by measuring nutrient fluxes between marshes and surface waters. Many processes drive these fluxes, including photosy...

  14. Effect of salt on the formation of alcohol-dehydrogenease monolayer: a study by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Kamilya, Tapanendu; Pal, Prabir; Mahato, Mrityunjoy; Talapatra, G B

    2009-04-16

    We report here the effect of salt (KCl) on the interfacial surface activity of yeast alcohol dehydogenease (ADH) at air/water interface using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Effect of salt content in the water subphase on ADH structure has been studied. The change of area/molecule, compressibility, rigidity, and unfolding of ADH are insignificant up to 10 mM KCl concentration. The significant changes are observed above 0.1 M KCl concentrations. Observations are explained in the context of DLVO theory. FTIR study of amide band together with AFM imaging of ADH monolayer indicate that KCl perturbs the ADH monolayer by the increment of beta-structure resulting into larger unfolding and intermolecular aggregates at high salt concentration. PMID:19320452

  15. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in the previous experiment. Also there were 2 columns as a verification variant contained pure soil. Each column was washed off with different amount of distilled water. The total volume of the pure solution was equal to the mean amount of the annual precipitation in the region of the field experiment. The main physical and chemical properties were measured in soils samples as well in the first experiment. In addition to it the complex assessment of soil's water were made. The experiments revealed the fast rate of salinization-desalinization processes in spod-podzolic soils of the coniferous areas in Kaliningrad region. The maximum values of conductivity were observed at the end of 1 week period and made up more than 2000 mSm/cm in top soils horizons. Furthermore the desalinization of the soils took place in both field and laboratory experiments a year after the spill. The reported study was partially supported by RFBR, research project No 12-05-31088 mol_a.

  16. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation. PMID:22649945

  17. PRODUCTION IN COASTAL SALT MARSHES OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Production ecology in southern California coastal salt marshes was investigated by harvesting macrophytes and monitoring environmental factors (substrate salinity, pH, nitrogen, redox, water content, temperature, and tide level) at four locations--Sweetwater River Estuary, Los Pe...

  18. ASIAN SALTED NOODLE QUALITY: IMPACT OF AMYLOSE CONTENT ADJUSTMENTS USING WAXY WHEAT FLOUR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen (14) flour blends of two natural wild type wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flours, `Nuplains¿ and `Centura¿, blended with one waxy flour sample were characterized and processed to Asian salted noodles. The flour amylose content ranged from <1% to 29%. Damaged starch contents were 10.4%, 7.0%, ...

  19. Field Devices for Monitoring Soil Water Content

    E-print Network

    a soil sample, usually referred to as the gravimetric method. This method expresses gravimetric water Water Content Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Field Methods for Soil Moisture Measurement 2 present in a sample to the mass of the soil sample after it has been oven-dried at 100-110 C to a constant

  20. Analysis of trace water contamination in propylene carbonate electrolytes. [With KPF6 salt

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.C.; Tobias, C.W.

    1985-12-01

    The measurement and removal of trace water contamination in organic electrolytes are of great importance in nonaqueous electrochemistry. This work was aimed at evaluating an electrochemical method for determining ppM levels of water in propylene carbonate electrolytes. Solutions of 0.5M KPF6 in PC were prepared using solvent which had been vacuum distilled and dried with Na/K alloy or molecular sieves. Solution preparation and limiting current measurements were performed in a helium atmosphere from which water and oxygen were excluded. The rate of mass transfer controlled reduction of water was measured on a rotating disk electrode, at a potential of +0.4V vs. k/K . From the limiting currents obtained at various rotation speeds, a diffusion coefficient of 0.85 x 10 V cmS/s was calculated. A gradual decrease in water concentration with time was detected under open-circuit conditions. The water content of solutions dried following the addition of KPF6 using Na/K alloy or molecular sieves was in the range of 1 to 2 ppM. The water content of a solution in which the salt was added to the solvent without careful drying was above 15 ppM, indicating that the salt may be a significant source of moisture.

  1. Actual evapotranspiration assessment by means of a coupled energy/hydrologic balance model: Validation over an olive grove by means of scintillometry and measurements of soil water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammalleri, C.; Agnese, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Minacapilli, M.; Provenzano, G.; Rallo, G.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryA coupled energy/hydrologic model was applied to simulate the exchange of energy and water in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (SPA). The model, which uses a "two-source" approach to estimate the energy fluxes, and the "force-restore" approach to represent the water balance, was validated by means of evapotranspiration measurements collected via scintillometry and soil moisture measurements collected via time domain reflectometry (TDR) in a Sicilian olive grove. The comparison between measured and estimated fluxes values at an hourly scale showed good agreement. Additional comparisons on a daily timescale confirmed the model's applicability for quantifying crop water requirements. Also in terms of daily evapotranspiration and soil water content values, the obtained results confirmed the model's applicability for those practical applications aiming to quantify the crop water requirement. Moreover, further studies should be conducted to test the feasibility of using this model for long term simulations over a broad range of conditions.

  2. Renal arteriolar injury by salt intake contributes to salt memory for the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Hideyo; Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Hayashi, Kaori; Nakamura, Mari; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Oya, Mototsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    The role of salt intake in the development of hypertension is prominent, but its mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Our aim was to examine the effect of transient salt intake during the prehypertensive period in hypertensive model animals. Dahl salt-sensitive rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with low-salt (0.12% NaCl), normal-salt (0.8% NaCl), high-salt (7% NaCl), or high-sodium/normal-chloride diet and returned to normal-salt diet for 3 months. Rats in the high-salt group saw elevations in blood pressure (BP) not only during the treatment period but also for the 3 months after returning to normal-salt diet. We named this phenomenon salt memory. Renal arteriolar injury was found in the high-salt group at the end of experiment. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with high-salt diet with angiotensin receptor blocker, vasodilator, calcium channel blocker, and calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker and returned to normal-salt diet. Although BP was suppressed to control levels by vasodilator or calcium channel blocker, elevated renal angiotensin II and renal arteriolar injury were observed, and salt memory did not disappear because of sustained renal arteriolar injury. Calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker suppressed renal arteriolar injury, resulting in the disappearance of salt memory. Cross-transplantation of kidneys from Dahl salt-sensitive rats on high salt to control rats caused increase of BP, whereas control kidneys caused reduction in BP of hypertensive rats, inducing the central role of the kidney. These results suggest that renal arteriolar injury through BP and renal angiotensin II elevation plays important roles in the development of salt memory for hypertension. PMID:24980670

  3. ALUMINUM BIOAVAILABILITY FROM DRINKING WATER IS VERY LOW AND IS NOT APPRECIABLY INFLUENCED BY STOMACH CONTENTS OR WATER HARDNESS. (R825357)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives were to estimate aluminum (Al) oral bioavailability under conditions that model its consumption in drinking water, and to test the hypotheses that stomach contents and co-administration of the major components of hard water affect Al absorption. Rats received intra...

  4. Water swellable clay composition and method to maintain stability in salt contaminated water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of drilling comprising contacting an earthen formation with a rotary drilling bit to form a salt contaminated drill hole and circulating a drilling fluid in the drill hole to cool and lubricate the drill bit during rotation and to lift drill cuttings of the drill hole. The drilling fluid becomes contaminated with salt contaminated water. The

  5. 46 CFR 46.10-45 - Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water. 46.10-45 Section 46.10-45...Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water. (a) Passenger vessels required...Great Lakes voyages, shall not submerge in salt water the subdivision load line...

  6. Laboratory Studies of the Liquid Water Content and the Degradation Rates of Organic Biomarkers in the Shallow Martian Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Pavlov, A. K.; Johnson, C. S.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2010-04-01

    We determined the fraction of the liquid water and the rates of organic degradation in a simulated martian shallow subsurface layer as a function of ice table depth, atmospheric pressure, surface temperature, salt and oxidants' content.

  7. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  8. Effects of free fatty acids, water content and co-solvent on biodiesel production by supercritical methanol reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kok Tat Tan; Keat Teong Lee; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, non-catalytic supercritical methanol (SCM) reaction was utilized to produce biodiesel from palm oil. The effects of free fatty acids and water content on the yield of biodiesel were investigated and subsequently compared with conventional catalytic reaction. In addition, the feasibility of utilizing co-solvent to reduce the operating conditions needed in SCM was carried out as well.

  9. Workers intake too much salt from dishes of eating out and food service cafeterias; direct chemical analysis of sodium content

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Seung-Lim; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young; Ryou, Hyun-Joo

    2009-01-01

    The average sodium intake of Koreans was reported to be 5,279.9 mg/day, which is one of the highest intake levels worldwide. The average Koreans intake 19.6% of sodium from kimchi, showing kimchi as the main contributor of sodium in this country (Ministry of Health and Welfare, 2005). The sodium content of dishes that are frequently chosen by workers, and which were served by foodservice cafeterias were chemically analyzed. The average sodium content of one meal provided by 10 foodservice cafeterias was 2,777.7 mg. Twenty-one, one-dish-meals, frequently chosen by workers for a lunch menu, were collected at 4 different restaurants for each menu by one male, aged in the twenties and analyzed chemically also. Workers who eat lunch at a workplace cafeteria everyday could intake about 8 g of salt at a one-time meal and those who eat out for a one-dish-meal would intake 3-8 g of salt without counting sodium content from the side dishes. From these study results, one could estimate that over 10 g of salt could be possible for a single meal for workers who eat out everyday. A nationwide nutrition campaign and education for low salt diets for restaurant owners and foodservice providers should be seriously considered. PMID:20098587

  10. Factors affecting properties of pork sausage patties made with reduced salt contents 

    E-print Network

    Matlock, Robert Gerard

    1983-01-01

    18 4 Mean values for NaCI content of fresh-frozen sausage patties according to salt level and phosphate group 19 5 Mean values for saltiness scores of fresh-frozen sausage patties according to salt level, phosphate group, storage period... storage treatments 0 for per1ods of 0, 2, 4 or 8 weeks at -9. 4 C. 10 Table I - Experimental design Fresh-frozen Precooked Ingredi ent combination a ~No ho h t 1. 5% NaCl 1. 0%%d NaCl 0. 5X, NaC1 0. 07. WaCS Salt plus sodium tri polyphosphate...

  11. Porous starch/cellulose nanofibers composite prepared by salt leaching technique for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan; Mehrasa, Mohammad; Rafienia, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Shahin; Behzad, Tayebeh; Gavanji, Shahin

    2014-08-01

    Starch/cellulose nanofibers composites with proper porosity pore size, mechanical strength, and biodegradability for cartilage tissue engineering have been reported in this study. The porous thermoplastic starch-based composites were prepared by combining film casting, salt leaching, and freeze drying methods. The diameter of 70% nanofibers was in the range of 40-90 nm. All samples had interconnected porous morphology; however an increase in pore interconnectivity was observed when the sodium chloride ratio was increased in the salt leaching. Scaffolds with the total porogen content of 70 wt% exhibited adequate mechanical properties for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The water uptake ratio of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced by adding 10% cellulose nanofibers. The scaffolds were partially destroyed due to low in vitro degradation rate after more than 20 weeks. Cultivation of isolated rabbit chondrocytes on the fabricated scaffold proved that the incorporation of nanofibers in starch structure improves cell attachment and proliferation. PMID:24751269

  12. Cratonic root survival by low olivine water contents at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary: evidence from FTIR analyses of Kaapvaal peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Woodland, A. B.; Lazarov, M.

    2009-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine and pyroxene can accommodate hydrogen in structural defects, amounts of which are calculated as ppm H2O or water. Water contents were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) in olivine, orthopyroxene (Opx), clinopyroxene (Cpx), and garnet from peridotite xenoliths from kimberlites intruding the Kaapvaal craton in southern Africa (Finsch Mine, Kimberley, Jagersfontein, and Lesotho). For samples equilibrated at pressures of 2.5 to 5 GPa, corresponding to craton lithospheric mantle, water contents in olivine do not correlate with P or T, while Opx and Cpx water contents broadly increase from <120 to 220 ppm and from <250 to 400 ppm respectively. From 5 to 7 GPa, in the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, water contents of olivine decrease systematically from 80 to < 10 ppm with increasing P and T, while preliminary pyroxene water contents appear to plateau at 220 ppm in Opx and 400 ppm in Cpx. The decrease of olivine water contents with depth could be caused by increased amounts of methane compared to water in mantle fluids and the miscibility of melt and fluid at these depths. This would be consistent with the low oxygen fugacities recorded by these deeper samples. Olivine is the main mineral of the upper mantle, and the presence of structural water decreases its viscosity. The measured water contents at > 6.5 GPa are low enough to speculate that a dry olivine layer may exist beneath cratons. This layer would consequently be stronger than the surrounding asthenosphere, and could not easily be deformed and delaminated by mantle convection currents. Taking into account P estimates of the density cross-over (at which melts become denser than surrounding mantle), and calculations of the P, T conditions at which the viscosities of water-free olivine and asthenospheric mantle merge, this dry olivine layer is assessed to extend down to 9.3 GPa. Low water contents in olivine from 6.5 to 9.3 GPa could be responsible for cratonic stability over billions of years.

  13. Compositions for depolluting fresh water and salt water bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, R.; Degen, L.; Robertiello, A.

    1983-11-08

    Compositions are disclosed, which are adapted to depollute fresh and sea water bodies from crude oil and petroleum product pollution by microbial action. The growth of micro-organisms capable of metabolizing hydrocarbons is exalted by certain combination of nutrients, such as lecithin as a phosphorus source, hydantoins, amides allophanates, polyamines, acyl-ureas and esters of the hydantoic and allantoic acids as the nitrogen sources. Ureido-derivatives of amides are also contemplated as additional nutrients.

  14. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics

    E-print Network

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics in naturally salt an imprint on salt accumulation and distribution patterns. We explored how the conversion of native grasslands to oak plantations affected the abundance and distribution of salts on soils and groundwater

  15. [Estimation of leaf area index by normalized composite vegetation index fusing the spectral feature of canopy water content].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shi; Liu, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Mei-Ling; Cao, Shan; Yao, Shuai

    2011-02-01

    The accurate inversion of leaf area index (LADI) in canopy is very important for guiding crop management and assessing crop yield. Sixty samples belonging to corn in four different areas of Jilin City were scanned by ASD field pro3 and LAI-2000 for optical data and LAI. A new vegetation index, the normalized composite Vegetation index (NCVI), containing the factor of canopy water content, is proposed in the present paper for a better quantitative estimation of LAI than with the remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), especially in the arid and semi-arid areas. A model was built for inversion of LAI with NCVI, and experience validation. The results showed that there was a good linear correlation between the simulation LAI inversed from NCVI model and the real LAI values. The model breaking the limitations of the traditional empirical models for LAI inversion has a good result for estimating LAI of the dense canopy whose LAI value was greater than 3. In addition, NCVI model was very sensitive to the water environment of soil, and the inversion result in the arid and semi-arid areas was superior to the general area. PMID:21510408

  16. Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Enrichment and Association of Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Young, L. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Elevated counts of bacteria were found during outgoing tides in surface microlayers (?300 ?m) of Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Palo Alto salt marsh, Palo Alto, California. At both sampling sites, the degrees by which bacteria were concentrated into the surface microlayer were linearly dependent upon surface concentration of particulate material. A significant percentage of bacteria in the microlayer were found to be attached to particulate material, while bacterial populations in the subsurface water were largely planktonic. Proportions of the bacterial populations which could be grown on seawater nutrient agar were also greater in the microlayer than in the subsurface waters and were positively correlated with the fraction of bacteria attached to particulate matter. Data from these studies suggest that particulates in the microlayer waters of the salt marsh influenced the observed increase in both the readily grown and the total numbers of bacteria. PMID:16345554

  18. Effect of initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on susceptibility to hot-salt stress-corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    The Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was tested in four conditions: mill annealed (70 ppM H), duplex annealed (70 ppM H), vacuum annealed to an intermediate (36 ppM) and a low (9 ppM H) hydrogen level. Material annealed at 650 C (duplex condition) exhibited resistance to hot-salt stress corrosion superior to that exhibited by material in the mill-annealed condition. Reduction of the alloy hydrogen content from 70 to as low as 9 ppM did not influence resistance to hot-salt stress corrosion embrittlement or cracking.

  19. An in-situ electropolymerization based sensor for measuring salt content in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, Rashed M; Akmal, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Determining salt content is a vital procedure in the petroleum industry during the process of crude oil transportation, refining and production. Monitoring the salinity value using a fast and direct technique can substantially lower the cost of crude oil in its processing and its production stages. In the present work, a novel analytical method was developed to detect the amount of salt present in crude oil in a quick and reliable manner. The measurement is based on the rate of in-situ electropolymerization of a monomer such as aniline in association with the salt content in the crude oil. The salt dispersed in the hydrocarbon matrix is used as an electrolyte in the electrolytic system to induce an electropolymerization reaction upon the induction of voltages, in which the salt content is measured corresponding to the polymeric film formation on the working electrode surface. Acetonitrile and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) were used in the electrochemical cell as solvents, and cyclic voltammetry tests were performed for Arabian crude oil solutions in the presence of aniline. The method has shown an excellent detection response for very low concentrations of salt. Four Arabian crude oils with salt concentrations of 34.2, 28.5, 14.3 and 5.71 mg L(-1) have produced current intensity of 180.1, 172.6, 148.1 and 134.2 µA at an applied current potential of 1.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. A Calibration curve was obtained in the range of 5-35 mg L(-1), giving limits of detection and quantitation at 1.98 and 5.95 mg L(-1), respectively. The in-situ electropolymerization based sensor has significant advantages over the existing techniques of salt monitoring in crude oil such as fast response, temperature independency, electrode stability, and minimum sample preparation. PMID:25476303

  20. First data on the uranium content in water of the Yenisei River basin in the area affected by the operation of Rosatom plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ya. Bolsunovskii; A. M. Zhizhaev; A. I. Saprykin; A. G. Degermendzhi; A. I. Rubailo

    2011-01-01

    This study is devoted to investigating the content of uranium isotopes in water of the Yenisei River and its tributaries within\\u000a the territories affected by the operation of Rosatom plants (mining chemical combine, and electrochemical plant). Long-term\\u000a monitoring of the 238U content by mass spectrometry carried out in two institutes of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

  1. Transport Properties of Sodium Silicate Glasses with High Water Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinelli, Joyce E.

    Sodium disilicate and sodium tetrasilicate glasses with water contents ranging up to approximately eleven weight percent water were prepared by a hydrothermal method. They contain water as hydroxyls bonded to the silica network and molecular water located within the glass structure in non-network sites. Conduction and diffusion measurements were performed on these glasses to see the effects of the sample compositions on such properties as ionic conductivity, dielectric relaxation and sodium diffusion. Water hydration measurements were performed on sodium trisilicate glasses as well. It was found that ionic conductivity is due mainly to the motion of sodium ions. The conductivity, static dielectric constant, and sodium diffusion coefficient go through a minimum with increasing water content. This is attributed to the predominance of each of the two "types" of water in a part of the range of water contents studied. For any given water content, the conductivity and diffusion coefficient increase with increasing sodium oxide content. From the water hydration measurements, the diffusion coefficient of molecular water in the glass was estimated and was found to increase with increasing water content in the glasses studied. The hydration was found to be controlled by either of two mechanisms, the usual Fickian diffusion of molecular water due to the chemical potential gradient or Case II diffusion due to the stress gradient. Most compositions studied were predominantly controlled by one of these types, although there are expected to be compositions in which both types contribute significantly. It is believed that the hydroxyl content prevents ionic motion in these glasses. On the other hand, it is believed that the molecular water content contributes to the motion by a general loosening of the network, increasng conductivity and diffusion.

  2. Advances in understanding damage by salt crystallization.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Scherer, George W

    2010-06-15

    The single most important cause of the deterioration of monuments in the Mediterranean basin, and elsewhere around the world, is the crystallization of salt within the pores of the stone. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in elucidating the fundamental mechanisms responsible for salt damage. As a result, new methods of treatment are being proposed that offer the possibility of attacking the cause of the problem, rather than simply treating the symptoms. In this Account, we review the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization, then examine how a range of technological innovations have been applied experimentally to further the current understanding of in-pore crystallization. We close with a discussion of how computer modeling now provides particularly valuable insight, including quantitative estimates of both the interaction forces between the mineral and the crystal and the stresses induced in the material. Analyzing the kinetics and thermodynamics of crystal growth within the pores of a stone requires sensitive tools used in combination. For example, calorimetry quantifies the amount of salt that precipitates in the pores of a stone during cooling, and dilatometric measurements on a companion sample reveal the stress exerted by the salt. Synchrotron X-rays can penetrate the stone and identify the metastable phases that often appear in the first stages of crystallization. Atomic force microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy permit study of the nanometric liquid film that typically lies between salt and stone; this film controls the magnitude of the pressure exerted and the kinetics of relaxation of the stress. These experimental advances provide validation for increasingly advanced simulations, using continuum models of reactive transport on a macroscopic scale and molecular dynamics on the atomic scale. Because of the fundamental understanding of the damage mechanisms that is beginning to emerge, it is possible to devise methods for protecting monuments and sculptures. For example, chemical modification of the stone can alter the repulsive forces that stabilize the liquid film between the salt and mineral surfaces, thereby reducing the stress that the salt can generate. Alternatively, molecules can be introduced into the pores of the stone that inhibit the nucleation or growth of salt crystals. Many challenges remain, however, particularly in understanding the complex interactions between salts, the role of metastable phases, the mechanism of crack initiation and growth, and the role of biofilms. PMID:20214404

  3. Calibration equations for two capacitance water content probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskevas, C.; Georgiou, P.; Ilias, A.; Panoras, A.; Babajimopoulos, C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the calibration equations of two capacitance probes for monitoring the soil water content in a lysimeter field. Capacitance probes provide readings at desired depths and time intervals. The calibration equations are derived by regression analysis between measurements of scaled frequency and volumetric soil water content. The calibration equations are compared with the manufacturer default equations to estimate the irrigation water depth. The accuracy of capacitance probes in monitoring soil water content increased by using the site-specific calibration equations rather than the manufacturer default equation.

  4. Quantum Calculations on Salt Bridges with Water: Potentials, Structure, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Sing; Green, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with a guanidinium basic group, the other lysine, which is a primary amine. Only arginine is modeled here, by ethyl guanidinium, while propionic acid is used as a model for either carboxylic acid. The salt bridges are accompanied by 0-12 water molecules; for each of the 13 systems, the energy-bond distance relation, natural bond orbitals (NBO), frequency calculations allowing thermodynamic corrections to room temperature, and dielectric constant dependence, were all calculated. The water molecules were found to arrange themselves in hydrogen bonded rings anchored to the oxygens of the salt bridge components. This was not surprising in itself, but it was found that the rings lead to a periodicity in the energy, and to a 'water addition' rule. The latter shows that the initial rings, with four oxygen atoms, become five member rings when an additional water molecule becomes available, with the additional water filling in at the bond with the lowest Wiberg index, as calculated using NBO. The dielectric constant dependence is the expected hyperbola, and the fit of the energy to the inverse dielectric constant is determined. There is an energy periodicity related to ring formation upon addition of water molecules. When 10 water molecules have been added, all spaces near the salt bridge are filled, completing the first hydration shell, and a second shell starts to form. The potentials associated with salt bridges depend on their hydration, and potentials assigned without regard to local hydration are likely to cause errors as large as or larger than kBT, thus suggesting a serious problem if these potentials are used in Molecular Dynamics simulations.

  5. Research on plasma and bubble behavior of pulsed corona discharge in salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yao-Hong Sun; Ping Yan

    2004-01-01

    Summary form only given. This paper describes a pulse corona discharge in salt water with large gap between electrodes. The process of discharge and bubble behavior is investigated by means of high-speed photography. The results show that the plasma produced by discharge only exists around the tip of the electrodes, the bubble shape being approximately spherical, no throughout arc channel

  6. Water and chlorine content in the Martian soil along the first 1900 m of the Curiosity rover traverse as estimated by the DAN instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R. D.; Lisov, D. I.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Jun, I.; Milliken, R. E.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J. E.; Tate, C. G.

    2014-07-01

    The presence of hydrated phases in the soil and near-surface bedrock of Gale Crater is thought to be direct evidence for water-rock interaction in the crater in the ancient past. Layered sediments over the Gale Crater floor are thought to have formed in past epochs due to sediment transport, accumulation, and cementation through interaction with fluids, and the observed strata of water-bearing minerals record the history of these episodes. The first data analysis of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) investigation on board the Curiosity rover is presented for 154 individual points of active mode measurements along 1900 m of the traverse over the first 361 Martian solar days in Gale crater. It is found that a model of constant water content within subsurface should be rejected for practically all tested points, whereas a two-layer model with different water contents in each layer is supported by the data. A so-called direct two-layer model (water content increasing with depth) yields acceptable fits for odometry ranges between 0 and 455 m and beyond 638 m. The mean water (H2O) abundances of the top and bottom layers vary from 1.5 to 1.7 wt % and from 2.2 to 3.3 wt %, respectively, while at some tested spots the water content is estimated to be as high as ~5 wt %. The data for odometry range 455-638 m support an inverse two-layer model (water content decreasing with depth), with an estimated mean water abundance of 2.1 ± 0.1 wt % and 1.4 ± 0.04 wt % in the top and bottom layers, respectively.

  7. Hydrology of the Bonneville Salt Flats, northwestern Utah, and simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the shallow-brine aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the hydrologic system of the Bonneville Salt Flats with emphasis on the mechanisms of solute transport. Variable-density, three-dimensional computer simulations of the near-surface part of the ground-water system were done to quantify both the transport of salt dissolved in subsurface brine that leaves the salt-crust area and the salt dissolved and precipitated on the land surface. The study was designed to define the hydrology of the brine ground-water system and the natural and anthropogenic processes causing salt loss, and where feasible, to quantify these processes. Specific areas of study include the transport of salt in solution by ground-water flow and the transport of salt in solution by wind-driven ponds and the subsequent salt precipitation on the surface of the playa upon evaporation or seepage into the subsurface. In addition, hydraulic and chemical changes in the hydrologic system since previous studies were documented.

  8. Salt Content and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Rain as Indices of Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. R.; Gedzelman, S. D.; Padilla, H.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical cyclones making landfall in the United States exhibit large variations in both their concentrations of salt and oxygen isotope ratios. For most storms chloride concentrations (3.5 to 11 ppm) fell in the same range as those of average coastal rainfall. For two storms, Georges 98 and Katrina 05, the chloride concentrations were 25 and 50 ppm respectively. Mean oxygen isotope values ranged from -5.3 to -11.2 per mil for all storms with George 98 and Katrina 05, having oxygen isotope values of -7.4 and -4.6 per mil. The concentration of chloride in the storms is the direct result of the addition of sea spray or salt particles from sea spray into the storm with subsequent removal by rainout. Oxygen isotope values of tropical cyclones have been shown to decrease from the outer edges of the storm toward the center as the result of exposure of inflowing water vapor to rain with low isotope values. A subsequent rise in the innermost regions of the storm suggests that increased sea spray plays a roll. The oxygen isotope value of seawater is 0 per mil. Simple mass balance considerations using Katrina 05 as an example show that the high mean oxygen isotope value of the rain from Katrina where collections were made in the interior most region of the storm cannot be explained by the simple addition of sea spray to the rain. Rather the oxygen isotopic composition of the water vapor in the innermost portions of intense tropical cyclones must be relatively high because of the high degree of evaporation of sea spray droplets and the high rate of isotopic exchange due to the increased surface area of liquid water. This water vapor having a high oxygen isotope value must be a major source of water for the inner portions of intense tropical cyclones. The thermodynamics of this process is a key to understanding the intensification of intense tropical cyclones. The combined study of salt concentrations, of stable isotope ratios and the use of trajectory analysis in tropical cyclones promises to be a powerful tool in unraveling the secrets of rapid storm intensification.

  9. A New Way to Measure Cirrus Ice Water Content by Using Ice Raman Scatter with Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay; Veselovskii, Igor

    2004-01-01

    High and cold cirrus clouds mainly contain irregular ice crystals, such as, columns, hexagonal plates, bullet rosettes, and dendrites, and have different impacts on the climate system than low-level clouds, such as stratus, stratocumulus, and cumulus. The radiative effects of cirrus clouds on the current and future climate depend strongly on cirrus cloud microphysical properties including ice water content (IWC) and ice crystal sizes, which are mostly an unknown aspect of cinus clouds. Because of the natural complexity of cirrus clouds and their high locations, it is a challenging task to get them accurately by both remote sensing and in situ sampling. This study presents a new method to remotely sense cirrus microphysical properties by using ice Raman scatter with a Raman lidar. The intensity of Raman scattering is fundamentally proportional to the number of molecules involved. Therefore, ice Raman scattering signal provides a more direct way to measure IWC than other remote sensing methods. Case studies show that this method has the potential to provide essential information of cirrus microphysical properties to study cloud physical processes in cirrus clouds.

  10. Characterization of protein hydrolysis and odor-active compounds of fish sauce inoculated with Virgibacillus sp. SK37 under reduced salt content.

    PubMed

    Lapsongphon, Nawaporn; Cadwallader, Keith R; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2013-07-10

    The effect of Virgibacillus sp. SK37, together with reduced salt content, on fish sauce quality, particularly free amino acids and odor-active compounds, was investigated. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 was inoculated with an approximate viable count of 5 log CFU/mL in samples with varied amounts of solar salt, for example, 10, 15, and 20% of total weight. Eighteen selected odorants were quantitated by stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA), and their odor activity values (OAVs) were calculated. Samples prepared using 10% salt underwent spoilage after 7 days of fermentation. The viable count of Virgibacillus sp. SK37 was found over 3 months in the samples containing 15 and 20% salt. However, acceleration of protein hydrolysis was not pronounced in inoculated samples at both 15 and 20% salt. Virgibacillus sp. SK37, together with salt contents reduced to 15-20%, appeared to increase the content of 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, acetic acid, and 2-methylpropanoic acid. However, only aldehydes were found to have an effect on the overall aroma of fish sauce based on high OAVs, suggesting that the inoculation of samples with Virgibacillus sp. SK37 under reduced salt contents of 15-20% likely contributed to stronger malty or dark chocolate notes. PMID:23768048

  11. Salicylic Acid Alleviates the Adverse Effects of Salt Stress in Torreya grandis cv. Merrillii Seedlings by Activating Photosynthesis and Enhancing Antioxidant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xuhua; Tang, Hui; Shen, Chaohua; Wu, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Salt stress is a major factor limiting plant growth and productivity. Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to ameliorate the adverse effects of environmental stress on plants. To investigate the protective role of SA in ameliorating salt stress on Torreya grandis (T. grandis) trees, a pot experiment was conducted to analyze the biomass, relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis (Pn), gas exchange parameters, relative leakage conductivity (REC), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) of T. grandis under 0.2% and 0.4% NaCl conditions with and without SA. Methodology/Principal Findings The exposure of T. grandis seedlings to salt conditions resulted in reduced growth rates, which were associated with decreases in RWC and Pn and increases in REC and MDA content. The foliar application of SA effectively increased the chlorophyll (chl (a+b)) content, RWC, net CO2 assimilation rates (Pn), and proline content, enhanced the activities of SOD, CAT and POD, and minimized the increases in the REC and MDA content. These changes increased the capacity of T. grandis in acclimating to salt stress and thus increased the shoot and root dry matter. However, when the plants were under 0% and 0.2% NaCl stress, the dry mass of the shoots and roots did not differ significantly between SA-treated plants and control plants. Conclusions SA induced the salt tolerance and increased the biomass of T. grandis cv. by enhancing the chlorophyll content and activity of antioxidative enzymes, activating the photosynthetic process, and alleviating membrane injury. A better understanding about the effect of salt stress in T. grandis is vital, in order gain knowledge over expanding the plantations to various regions and also for the recovery of T. grandis species in the future. PMID:25302987

  12. Evaluation of trace metal content by ICP-MS using closed vessel microwave digestion in fresh water fish.

    PubMed

    Jarapala, Sreenivasa Rao; Kandlakunta, Bhaskarachary; Thingnganing, Longvah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate trace metal levels of different varieties of fresh water fish using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrophotometer after microwave digestion (MD-ICPMS). Fish samples were collected from the outlets of twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad. The trace metal content in different varieties of analyzed fish were ranged from 0.24 to 1.68?mg/kg for Chromium in Cyprinus carpio and Masto symbollon, 0.20 to 7.52?mg/kg for Manganese in Labeo rohita and Masto symbollon, 0.006 to 0.07?mg/kg for Cobalt in Rastrelliger kanagurta and Pampus argenteus, 0.31 to 2.24?mg/kg for Copper in Labeo rohita and Penaeus monodon, 3.25 to 14.56?mg/kg for Zinc in Cyprinus carpio and Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and 0.01 to 2.05?mg/kg for Selenium in Rastrelliger kanagurta and Pampus argenteus, respectively. Proximate composition data for the different fishes were also tabulated. Since the available data for different trace elements for fish is scanty, here an effort is made to present a precise data for the same as estimated on ICP-MS. Results were in accordance with recommended daily intake allowance by WHO/FAO. PMID:24744789

  13. Conversion of an Aziridine to an Oxazolidinone Using a Salt and Carbon Dioxide in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Justin R.; Lieberman, Deborah L.; Hancock, Matthew T.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2005-01-01

    A convenient, inexpensive, environment friendly, and regioselective conversion of an aziridine to an oxazolidinone is developed by using iodide salt and CO[2] in water. A description is provided, on the way in which this series of experiments will show students how to change experimental conditions to obtain mainly one desired regiosomer of a…

  14. Efficient chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation using nickel complexes and salts as precatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui; Chen, Lingjing; Ng, Siu-Mui; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation catalyzed by a number of Ni complexes and salts have been investigated at pH 7-9 in borate buffer. For chemical oxidation, [Ru(bpy)3](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) was used as the oxidant, with turnover numbers (TONs) >65 and a maximum turnover frequency (TOFmax) >0.9 s(-1). Notably, simple Ni salts such as Ni(NO3 )2 are more active than Ni complexes that bear multidentate N-donor ligands. The Ni complexes and salts are also active catalysts for visible-light-driven water oxidation that uses [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as the photosensitizer and S2 O8 (2-) as the sacrificial oxidant; a TON>1200 was obtained at pH 8.5 by using Ni(NO3)2 as the catalyst. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed the formation of nanoparticles in chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation by the Ni catalysts. These nanoparticles aggregated during water oxidation to form submicron particles that were isolated and shown to be partially reduced ?-NiOOH by various techniques, which include SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. These results suggest that the Ni complexes and salts act as precatalysts that decompose under oxidative conditions to form an active nickel oxide catalyst. The nature of this active oxide catalyst is discussed. PMID:24155063

  15. Wavy Wake Formation in the Absence of Submerged Bodies in Electrolyzed Salt Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyuki Honji

    1991-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that in electrolyzed salt water, a wavy wake forms in the absence of submerged bodies downstream of a localized region influenced by the magnetic field of permanent magnets moving at a constant velocity. The lower and upper critical numbers of a dimensionless current density (Q) for the formation region of the wavy wakes decrease with

  16. Quaternary ammonium salts as antimicrobial additives to water-dispersible paints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Makarewicz; A. V. Shiichuk; I. D. Syrotyns’ka

    2011-01-01

    The properties of quaternary ammonium salts in water and in a dispersion of a film-forming agent were studied by viscometry,\\u000a conductometry, and pH-metry. The colloidal particle sizes, critical micelle concentrations, and coagulation thresholds were\\u000a determined.

  17. MFR PAPER 1255 Use of Salt (NaCI) Water to Reduce Mortality of Chinook Salmon

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1255 Use of Salt (NaCI) Water to Reduce Mortality of Chinook Salmon Smolts, Oncorhynchus salmon and trout by capturing them at an upriver dam, transporting them around a series of dams gairdneri. However, the mortality of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, immediately following

  18. Ammonium salts of polymaleic acids and use as corrosion inhibitors in water-in-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenlaender, K.; Barthold, K.; Stork, K.

    1984-03-13

    The subject invention relates to salts of polymaleic acids having a molecular weight between 200 and 1500 and to their use in preventing the corrosion of metal caused by hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in water-in-oil emulsions such as crude oil.

  19. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases; improve irrigation scheduling by reducing over-watering and under-watering. These estimates will also allow researchers to identify wildfire behavior/risk: drives ignition probability and burning efficiency; to be used as an indicator of soil moisture and Leaf Area Index.

  20. Single Location Doublet Well to Reduce Salt-Water Encroachment: Phase I-Numerical Simulation 

    E-print Network

    Reddell, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    C. E. Jacob received patents in 1965 for a single location well doublet that would produce fresh water overlying salt-water without upconing of the heavier salt-water and pollution of the fresh water zone. No known evaluation of the concept...

  1. Thermal energy storage by encapsulated Glauber's salt in a liquid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Sozen, Z.Z.; Grace, J.R.; Pinder, K.L.

    1983-12-01

    Glauber's salt is a promising phase change thermal energy storage compound because of its low price, suitable phase change temperature (32.4/sup 0/C), high latent heat (3.665 x 10/sup 5/kJ/m/sup 3/) and the availability of a suitable nucleating agent (Borax). However, segregation due to incongruent melting is a serious problem associated with Glauber's salt. Mechanical mixing in devices like rotating drums has been shown in the past to prevent segregation, but these devices often have a very low heat transfer area per unit storage area. Encapsulation of Glauber's salt in small particles increases the heat transfer area per unit storage volume enormously and helps alleviate the segregation problem. Mechanical mixing of the capsules and their contents is also much easier and more efficient than mixing the entire storage volume. In this study, a mixture consisting of 96% Glauber's salt and 4% Borax was encapsulated in 25 mm diameter hollow polypropylene spheres with 5% air space in each sphere to increse the mixing efficiency. Agitation and heat transfer were provided by fluidizing the spherical capsules with water in a pilot-plant-scale (340 mm diameter, 1.37 m free height) column. The instrumentation of the system was capable of supplying data for accurate and detailed energy balances. A closed water recirculation system allowed the superficial velocity to be varied without changing the heat input or output from the system. The capsules were tested for impermeability in water and in air for a period of one year and proved to be completely impermeable.

  2. Effect of Foliar Salicylic Acid Applications on Growth, Chlorophyll, and Mineral Content of Cucumber Grown Under Salt Stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ertan Yildirim; Metin Turan; Ismail Guvenc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of foliar salicylic acid (SA) applications on growth, chlorophyll, and mineral content of cucumber grown under salt stress. The study was conducted in pot experiments under greenhouse conditions. Cucumber seedlings were treated with foliar SA applications at different concentrations (0.0, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mM). Salinity treatments were established by

  3. UPCONING OF A SALT-WATER/FRESH-WATER INTERFACE BELOW A PUMPING WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical solutions for the upconing of an abrupt salt-water/fresh-water interface beneath a pumping well and for the concentration profile across a moving interface are developed for two types of upconing problems. The first considers the position of the interface and the salin...

  4. The Effect of Salt Stoichiometry on Protein-Salt Interactions Determined by Ternary Diffusion in Aqueous Solutions

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    The Effect of Salt Stoichiometry on Protein-Salt Interactions Determined by Ternary Diffusion of salt stoichiometry on the transport properties of lysozyme-salt aqueous mixtures. We find that the two cross-diffusion coefficients are very sensitive to salt stoichiometry. One of the cross

  5. Mineralogical and Anthropogenic Controls of Stream Water Chemistry in Salted Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Alexander, J.; Gove, B.; Chakowski, N.; Husch, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of major cation and anion concentrations in stream water and soil solutions from two salted (regular applications of winter road deicing salt) watersheds located in the northeastern United States indicate that both mineralogical and anthropogenic factors are important in controlling water chemistry. The relatively stable concentrations of calcium and magnesium, as well as their possible weathering paths identified by mass-balance models, indicate that the weathering of feldspars and the dissolution of carbonates are the primary sources for these two cations in the small, salted Centennial Lake Watershed (CLW, 1.95 km 2). However, the relatively stable and lower concentrations of sodium and chloride in soil solutions, and their fluctuating and higher concentrations in stream water from the CLW, indicate that road deicing salt is the primary source for these ions in stream water. Furthermore, positive correlations between calcium and sulfur concentrations and magnesium and sulfur concentrations in soil solutions, as well as positive correlations between sulfur and iron concentrations in soil compositions, indicate that both the dissolution of gypsum and the oxidation of pyrite into hematite are the primary sources of sulfate in the CLW. Analyses of water chemistry from the related and much larger Delaware River Watershed (DRW, 17560 km 2) show that sodium and chloride concentrations have increased steadily due to the regular application of winter deicing salt over the 68 years for which data are available. The more rapid increase of stream water chloride concentrations, relative to the increase in sodium, also results in the steady decline of Na+/Cl-molar ratios in the DRW over that time. In addition, the reduction of sulfate and increase of bicarbonate concentration since 1980 in DRW stream water may be attributed to the decline of sulfate levels in atmospheric deposition resulting from enhanced national and state environmental regulations and a shift in local economic activity away from heavy industry. There also are more periods of low silica stream water concentrations in the DRW than in the past, perhaps as a result of recent increases in summer water temperatures due to global climate change. The combined results of this study illustrate the many changing anthropogenic factors that can control stream water chemistry in salted watersheds and that these factors need to be taken into account when considering future water quality regulations and policy.

  6. Estimation of water turnover rates of captive West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) held in fresh and salt water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Worthy, G. A.; Byers, F. M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) to move between fresh and salt water raises the question of whether manatees drink salt water. Water turnover rates were estimated in captive West Indian manatees using the deuterium oxide dilution technique. Rates were quantified in animals using four experimental treatments: (1) held in fresh water and fed lettuce (N=4), (2) held in salt water and fed lettuce (N=2), (3) acutely exposed to salt water and fed lettuce (N=4), and (4) chronically exposed to salt water with limited access to fresh water and fed sea grass (N=5). Animals held in fresh water had the highest turnover rates (145+/-12 ml kg-1 day-1) (mean +/- s.e.m.). Animals acutely exposed to salt water decreased their turnover rate significantly when moved into salt water (from 124+/-15 to 65+/-15 ml kg-1 day-1) and subsequently increased their turnover rate upon re-entry to fresh water (146+/-19 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water had significantly lower turnover rates (21+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1) compared with animals held in salt water and fed lettuce (45+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water and fed sea grass had very low turnover rates compared with manatees held in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drank large volumes of water, which may make them susceptible to hyponatremia if access to a source of Na+ is not provided.

  7. Inhibition of Peptide Acylation in PLGA Microspheres with Water-soluble Divalent Cationic Salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying Zhang; Andreas M. Sophocleous; Steven P. Schwendeman

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  To test the potential of water-soluble divalent cationic salts to inhibit acylation of octreotide encapsulated in poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic\\u000a acid)-star (PLGA) microspheres.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The divalent cationic salts, calcium chloride and manganese chloride, previously shown to disrupt peptide sorption, were introduced\\u000a in PLGA microspheres prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Peptide stability was monitored by reversed-phase\\u000a high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and identified

  8. Water content and structure in malignant and benign skin tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniadecka, M.; Nielsen, O. F.; Wulf, H. C.

    2003-12-01

    Analysis of the low frequency region of Raman spectra enables determination of water structure. It has been previously demonstrated by various techniques that water content and possibly also the water structure is altered in some malignant tumours. To further elucidate possible change in water structure in tumours we performed NIR FT Raman spectroscopy on biopsies from selected benign and malignant skin tumours (benign: seborrheic keratosis, pigmented nevi; malignant: malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma). We did not observe any differences in water content between malignant and benign skin tumours with an exception of seborrheic keratosis, in which the water content was decreased. Increase in the tetrahedral (free) water was found in malignant skin tumours and sun-damaged skin relative to normal young skin and benign skin tumours. This finding may add to the understanding of molecular alterations in cancer.

  9. Verification of Ground Penetrating Radar for Soil Water Content Measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, O.; Zeiliguer, A.

    2009-04-01

    Spatially distributed water at the land surface is a vital natural resource for human being and ecosystems. Soil water content at vadose zone at regional scale controls exchange of moisture and energy between Earth surface and atmosphere, at the catchment scale - the separation of precipitation into infiltration, runoff and evapotranspiration, at the field scale - plant growing, at the small plot scale - pathway of water flow through soil profile. Hydrologist, agronomists, soil scientists and others looking for technology providing soil water content measurements across a range of spatial range. Ground penetrating radar is not destructive method of measurement for diverse application was tested in the field for mapping a spatial distribution of soil water content during infiltration event at chestnut soil of Saratov Region, Russia. A Common-MidPoint method was used to calibrate GPR OKO with a 400 MHz antenna. At experimental plot of 50x50 m a range of 36 boreholes equipped by vertical access tubes (10 distance between) for TDR PR2 with 4 predefined depths of soil moisture measurements was prepared. TDR PR2 equipment used for measurements was calibrated on special experimental setup with soil from plot. Data sets of parallel measurements of soil water content by TDR at 4 depths of borehole locations and GPR at trace lines along ranges of boreholes were used to produce soil water content maps with geo-statistical methods. Keywords: GPR, TDR, soil water content

  10. Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content

    E-print Network

    Waller, Laura

    We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered ...

  11. Boron behavior during desalination of sea and underground water by electrodialysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludmila Melnik; Olga Vysotskaja; Boris Kornilovich

    1999-01-01

    The degree of boron removal and its residual content in desalinated water vs. the feed boron concentration and the total salt content of a solution by means of electrodialysis have been studied. A comparative analysis of treatment of waters containing boron by the electrodialysis using the heterogeneous [MK-40 and MA-40 (Russia)], homogeneous [MK-100 and MA-100 (Ukraine)], and IONICS [CR67-HMR and

  12. LOCALIZATION AND SECRETION OF SALT BY THE SALT GLANDS OF Tamarix aphylla.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W W; Berry, W L; Liu, L L

    1969-06-01

    Analysis of salt secreted by the salt glands of Tamarix aphylla shows that the composition of the secreted salt is dependent on the salt composition of the root environment. Rubidium ion, if added to culture solutions in which the plants were growing, is also taken up by the plants and subsequently secreted by the glands. Electron micrographs of glands from the ribidium-secreting plants show accumulations of electron-dense material in the microvacuoles of the secretory cells. It is concluded that rubidium is accumulated in the microvacuoles and subsequently secreted by their fusion with the plasmalemma. PMID:16591764

  13. LOCALIZATION AND SECRETION OF SALT BY THE SALT GLANDS OF Tamarix aphylla*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, W. W.; Berry, W. L.; Liu, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Analysis of salt secreted by the salt glands of Tamarix aphylla shows that the composition of the secreted salt is dependent on the salt composition of the root environment. Rubidium ion, if added to culture solutions in which the plants were growing, is also taken up by the plants and subsequently secreted by the glands. Electron micrographs of glands from the ribidium-secreting plants show accumulations of electron-dense material in the microvacuoles of the secretory cells. It is concluded that rubidium is accumulated in the microvacuoles and subsequently secreted by their fusion with the plasmalemma. Images PMID:16591764

  14. Polyelectrolyte Uptake by PEMs at High Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David; Su, Zhaohui; Peng, Bo; Zan, Xingjie

    2012-02-01

    Upon a jump in salt concentration, a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) constructed by the layer-by-layer process will swell, and in consequence, uptake from solution a large additional mass of the capping polyelectrolyte. Here, swelling and uptake are monitored in time by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) method as a function of elevated salt concentration (0.75M<[NaCl]<2.5 M) during the uptake of poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS, MW˜70,000 g/mol) by poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/PSS PEMs made at [NaCl]=0.5M. For [NaCl] less than ˜1 M, PSS adds only at/near the PEM surface, while for higher [NaCl], PSS fully permeates the PEM, contributing a PSS mass approaching, even exceeding, that already present; higher salt concentration leads to faster and greater PSS uptake. Above [NaCl]=1.0 M, uptake is diffusive, characterized by surprisingly large and sharply [NaCl]-dependent diffusion coefficients (˜10-14 - 10-12 cm^2/s). This uptake process opens a general opportunity for facile bulk and surface modifications of PEMs.

  15. First data on the uranium content in water of the Yenisei River basin in the area affected by the operation of Rosatom plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsunovskii, A. Ya.; Zhizhaev, A. M.; Saprykin, A. I.; Degermendzhi, A. G.; Rubailo, A. I.

    2011-07-01

    This study is devoted to investigating the content of uranium isotopes in water of the Yenisei River and its tributaries within the territories affected by the operation of Rosatom plants (mining chemical combine, and electrochemical plant). Long-term monitoring of the 238U content by mass spectrometry carried out in two institutes of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences first revealed the multiple excess of 238U over the background content in different areas of the Yenisei River basin, such as the region of the Yenisei River near the effluents of the mining and chemical combine (MCC), and the territories of the Bol'shaya Tel' and Kan rivers. In these regions, the 238U content in water reaches 2.1-4.0 ?g/l, which exceeds its content upstream from the MCC (0.3-0.6 ?g/l) by almost an order of magnitude. The studies of the isotopic composition of uranium in water samples, which were carried out at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, showed the presence of a technogenic isotope of uranium 236U in the samples from the Bolshaya Tel' River and revealed the deviation of the isotope ratio 238U/235U (167 ± 3 and 177 ± 3) from the equilibrium natural ratio (238U/235U = 138). These facts attest to the technogenic origin of part of the uranium in water of the Bol'shaya Tel' River connected with the activity of MCC. The excess uranium content in the Kan River requires additional studies to ascertain the fraction of uranium of technogenic origin connected with the activity of the electrochemical plant (ECP) (Fig. 1, Table 4).

  16. Effect of a counterion on the glass transition temperature (T(g)') during lyophilization of ganciclovir salt forms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokesh; Baheti, Ankit; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-02-01

    This manuscript deals with the effect of a counterion on the glass transition temperature for lyophilization of ganciclovir salts. Salt forms of ganciclovir, namely, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium salts, were prepared by an in situ technique and analyzed by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) for the determination of the critical process parameter for lyophilization. Nonionized ganciclovir and its salt forms showed a glass transition (T(g)') in the reversing MDSC signal, confirming their amorphous nature. T(g)' of the nonionized ganciclovir and ganciclovir sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium salts followed the order: sodium salt (-34.94°C) > nonionized ganciclovir (-40.15°C) > potassium salt (-46.23°C) > rubidium salt (-49.95°C) > cesium salt (-53.62°C). The analysis of the freezable water content for ganciclovir and its salts showed the trend: pure water > nonionized ganciclovir > potassium salt ? sodium salt > rubidium salt > cesium salt. This showed that a majority of water in the salts is present as an unfrozen fraction, thus leading to a lowering of T(g)' because of the plasticizing effect of unfrozen water. Density functional theory (DFT) further suggested a positive contribution of the strength of intra- and intermolecular force of interactions to the T(g)' value, with a higher intramolecular and intermolecular force of interaction leading to a higher T(g)'. PMID:21133416

  17. Water swellable clay composition and method to maintain stability in salt contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, W.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described of drilling comprising contacting an earthen formation with a rotary drilling bit to form a salt contaminated drill hole and circulating a drilling fluid in the drill hole to cool and lubricate the drill bit during rotation and to lift drill cuttings of the drill hole. The drilling fluid becomes contaminated with salt contaminated water. The improvement described here comprises adding a water swellable montmorillonite clay composition to the drilling fluid. The composition comprises a water swellable montmorillonite clay, xanthan gum in an amount of 0.1% to 20% based on the weight of water swellable montmorillonite clay, and at least one other, water soluble gum selected from the group consisting of guar gum, dextran gum, locust bean gum, and mixtures thereof in an amount of 4.0% to 10% based on the weight of water swellable clay.

  18. The Initial Water Content Dependent Swelling Behavior of Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samet Öngen, Ali; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    The variation in water content is known as a main controlling parameter for many physical and mechanical behaviors of clayey soils, particularly soils found in arid and semi-arid regions. Expansive soils found in such regions are naturally subjected to many volume increase and decrease cycles within unsaturated zone during rainy and dry periods, and thus these soils constitute severe hazard to low-rise light buildings and infrastructures constructed in shallow unsaturated depths. Although the relationships between swelling parameters (swelling pressure and swelling percent) and soils' physical - index properties have been investigated in details in previous researches, the continuous effect of water content on swelling mechanisms of soils is not yet sufficiently studied. The water content of unsaturated zone naturally fluctuates with changes in both seasonal climatic conditions and increasing in depths, and therefore, swelling parameters of a soil within unsaturated soils should not be represented with only one single value. For achieving accurate understanding of swelling behavior at field condition, soils should be subjected to swelling tests by considering different initial water content conditions. Considering requirement for further understanding in water content dependent swelling behavior of soils, a research program was aimed to investigate the effect of initial water content on swelling behavior of soil materials. For this purpose, soils having wide range of physical properties such as grain size distributions, mineralogical composition and consistency limits were collected from different locations in Turkey. To minimize the effect of dry unit weight on swelling behavior of soils, samples prepared at same dry unit weight (14.6 kN/m3) with various initial water contents ranging from 0% to approximately 37% were subjected to swelling tests by using convenient odometer device. Beside these tests, grain size distribution, Atterberg limits and mineralogical composition of samples were also determined. The swelling pressure of selected samples reached up to 250 kPa at zero water content. In addition, swelling parameters of collected clayey soils considerably decrease with increasing initial water content to somewhere between 30% and 37%. For finding the most important physical, index and mineralogical properties to constitute predictive models for swelling parameters of soils and understand the effect of initial water content, simple and multiple regression analyses were performed among appropriate variables. As a result of all analyses, statistically significant linear relationships were obtained between swelling parameters and initial water content values. Furthermore, it can be concluded that initial water content is a crucial controlling parameter for understanding swelling behavior of soils.

  19. Aqueous slurry blasting composition containing an aliphatic amine salt and a water soluble inorganic perchlorate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. Jr

    1971-01-01

    Inorganic oxidizer salt blasting compositions of the aqueous slurry type are provided which contain a combination of an aliphatic amine salt and a water- soluble inorganic perchlorate as a sensitizer component. Preferably, each of the amine salt and perchlorate is present in the sensitizer combination in a proportion at least stoichiometrically equivalent to that required for reaction with the other

  20. A Grandfather Studies the Power of the Wind; Turning Salt Water into Drinking Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The ATETV project delivers web-based videos to connect students to careers in advanced technology. This episode of ATETV follows a non-traditional adult student as he returns to school to study wind energy technology, and examines water treatment technology for desalination. The video can be viewed whole or in two segments: "A Grandfather Studies the Power of the Wind" and "Turning Salt Water into Drinking Water." The running time for the full episode is 9:59.

  1. 2012 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Session Performance of Composite Materials Subjected to Salt Water Environments

    E-print Network

    2012 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Session Performance of Composite Materials Subjected to Salt Water for Marine Hydro Kinetic (MHK) applications exposed to salt water environments. First, a testing protocol] and [90]) mechanical test samples were submerged in synthetic sea water at 40°C and 50°C, with the weight

  2. A new and novel process for separation of salts, scale salts and norm contaminant salts from saline waters and saline solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. H. Bader

    1994-01-01

    A new and novel process for saline waters and saline solutions conversion has been provided that requires only a fair amount of a miscible organic solvent and heat transfer. Such requirements are ordinary in the nature of precipitation and vaporization. The proposed process consists of adding a miscible (strongly associated) organic solvent to saline water so that salt precipitates of

  3. Recovering distilled water and pure salt products from industrial wastewater: Three case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schooley, K.E.; Ludlum, R.S. [Ionics RCC, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Industry is slowly moving beyond the concept of zero liquid discharge toward the ideal of zero waste discharge. While zero liquid discharge means no liquids are discharged off site, the tons of dry solids removed from treated wastewater are often hauled to landfills off site if they cannot be stored at the plant. In recent years, some plants have opted to recover valuable salts and chemicals from wastewater to reduce the cost of hauling away useless mixed salts. Some plants even recover some of the cost of wastewater treatment by selling recovered salt. This paper will discuss three industrial sites where all wastewater is treated and recycled and most salts removed from the wastewater are turned into saleable products. The case studies will be a coal mine in Poland, where distilled water and sodium chloride are recovered from mine drainage; a uranium mine in the Czech Republic, where distilled water and ammonium alum are recovered from acid waste; and a power plant in New York, where distilled water and calcium chloride are recovered from scrubber blowdown.

  4. Electrodialysis-based separation process for salt recovery and recycling from waste water

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, S.P.

    1997-07-08

    A method for recovering salt from a process stream containing organic contaminants is provided, comprising directing the waste stream to a desalting electrodialysis unit so as to create a concentrated and purified salt permeate and an organic contaminants-containing stream, and contacting said concentrated salt permeate to a water-splitting electrodialysis unit so as to convert the salt to its corresponding base and acid. 6 figs.

  5. Electrodialysis-based separation process for salt recovery and recycling from waste water

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Shih-Perng (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for recovering salt from a process stream containing organic contaminants is provided, comprising directing the waste stream to a desalting electrodialysis unit so as to create a concentrated and purified salt permeate and an organic contaminants containing stream, and contacting said concentrated salt permeate to a water-splitting electrodialysis unit so as to convert the salt to its corresponding base and acid.

  6. Impact of removing iodised salt on children's goitre status in areas with excessive iodine in drinking-water.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shengmin; Xu, Dong; Wang, Yuchun; Jun, Zhao; Jia, Lihui; Du, Yonggui

    2014-11-01

    The impact of removing iodised salt on children's goitre status in a high-iodine area (HIA) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the changes in the prevalence of goitre in children after removing iodised salt from their diet. For this purpose, three towns with the median water iodine content of 150-300 ?g/l were selected randomly in Hengshui City, Hebei Province, China. A total of 452 and 459 children were randomly selected from the three towns in order to measure thyroid volume by ultrasound before and after removing iodised salt, respectively. Their goitre status was judged using the criteria of age-specific thyroid volume recommended by the WHO. After removing iodised salt, the overall median urinary iodine content (MUIC) of children decreased from 518 (interquartile range (IQR) 347-735) to 416 (IQR 274-609) ?g/l. The MUIC of children across sex and age group decreased significantly except for the age group of 9 years. The overall prevalence of goitre in the three towns significantly decreased from 24·56 % (n 111/452) to 5·88 % (n 27/459) (P< 0·001). Goitre prevalence in children aged 8-10 years decreased from 33·70 % (n 31/92), 23·32 % (n 45/193) and 20·96 % (n 35/167) to 6·10 % (n 10/164), 5·52 % (n 9/163) and 6·06 % (n 8/132), respectively. Goitre prevalence in boys and girls decreased from 27·05 % (n 66/244) and 21·63 % (n 45/208) to 6·66 % (n 15/226) and 5·15 % (n 12/233), respectively. The decreases in the prevalence of goitre in children across sex and age group were all statistically significant. The present study revealed that goitre prevalence in children decreased significantly after removing iodised salt from their diet for about 1·5 years in the HIA in Hebei Province. PMID:25366513

  7. Salt marsh ecohydrological zonation due to heterogeneous vegetation - groundwater - surface water interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Gorelick, S.; McLaren, R.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Among the most fundamental characteristics of intertidal salt marshes are distinctive vegetation zonation and tidally-forced hydrology. Vegetation zones often correlate with tidal hydrology and plant water use is significant in the wetland balance; however, specific links between vegetation zonation, plant water use, and spatiotemporally variable intertidal hydrology have eluded thorough characterization. This investigation developed the first comprehensive salt marsh ecohydrology models integrating the transient, 3D, coupled surface water and groundwater flow and plant water use of an intensively studied salt marsh field site. The physics-based modeling demonstrated that superimposing heterogeneous sediment hydraulic properties, evapotranspiration rates, and rooting depths, together with tidal dynamics, induced surprising spatial variations in root zone hydraulics: variations pronounced enough to constitute wholly different root zone habitats with different pressure heads, saturations, and vertical groundwater velocities. These diverse habitats were apparent only when both hydraulic and vegetative influences were accounted for, leading to their definition as discrete "ecohydrological zones." We distinguished five different ecohydrological zones (EHZs) by distinct combinations of sediment hydraulic properties and evapotranspiration rates and two EHZs by topography. The hydraulic variations among EHZs were masked shortly after a flooding tide, but again became prominent during prolonged marsh exposure. Boundaries between EHZs exhibited large gradients in head, saturation, and vertical flow magnitude and direction due to a combination of vegetation and sediment effects. We suggest that ecohydrological zones, combining spatially-variable topographic, sediment, and vegetation influences, are the fundamental spatial habitat units comprising the salt marsh ecosystem. This perspective contrasts with historical emphasis on vegetation zones as the foremost unit of habitat variation within salt marshes.

  8. Models for coupling of salt and water transport; Proximal tubular reabsorption in Necturus kidney

    PubMed Central

    Sackin, H; Boulpaep, EL

    1975-01-01

    Models for coupling of salt and water transport are developed with two important assumptions appropriate for leaky epithelia. (a) The tight junction is permeable to both sale and water. (b) Active Na transport into the lateral speces is assumed to occur uniformly along the length of the channel. The proposed models deal specifically with the intraepithelial mechanism of proximal tubular resbsorption in the Necturus kidney although they have implications for epithelial transport in the gallbladder and small intestine as well. The first model (continuous version) is similar to the standing gradient model devised by Diamond and Bossert but used different boundary conditions. In contrast to Diamond and Bossert's model, the predicted concentration profiles are relatively flat with no sizable gradients along the interspace. The second model (compartment version) expands Curran's model of epithelial salt and water transport by including additional compartments and considering both electrical and chemical driving forces for individual Na and Cl ions as well as hydraulic and osmotic driving forces for water. In both models, ion and water fluxes are investigated as a function of the transport parameters. The behavior of the models is consistent with previously suggested mechanisms for the control of net transport, particularly during saline diuresis. Under all conditions the predicted ratio of net solute to solvent flux, or emergent concentration, deviates from exact isotonicity (except when the basement membrane has an appreciable salt reflection coefficient). However, the degree of hypertonicity may be small enough to be experimentally indistinguishable from isotonic transport. PMID:1104761

  9. Effects of subfornical organ extracts on salt-water balance in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summy-Long, J. Y.; Crawford, I. L.; Severs, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular structure located at the junction of the lamina terminalis and the tela choroidea of the third cerebral ventricle. SFO is histologically regarded as a neurosecretory structure, although the physiological effects or biochemical nature of such secretions are not yet ascertained. Results are presented for an experimental study designed to determine whether SFO extracts alter parameters associated with salt-water balance in the rat. The data obtained support the conclusion that SFO contains some water-soluble substance(s), easily released by incubation, dialyzable and heat stable, which influences the salt-water balance after injection into ventricular cerebrospinal fluid. Whether other brain tissues or plasma contains the same or similar material is not yet convincingly established. The observation that one or more active constituents are easily released from SFO upon incubation in potassium-enriched medium may be of value.

  10. Concentration and precipitation of NaCl and KCl from salt cake leach solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasarao, K; Patsiogiannis, F.; Hryn, J.N.

    1997-02-09

    Electrodialysis was investigated for cost-effective recovery of salt from salt cake leach solutions. (Salt cake is a waste stream generated by the aluminum industry during treatment of aluminum drosses and scrap.) We used a pilot-scale electrodialysis stack of 5 membrane pairs, each with an effective area of 0.02 m{sup 2}. The diluate stream contained synthetic NaCl, KCl,mixtures of NaCl and KCl, and actual salt cake leach solutions (mainly NaCl and KCl, with small amounts of MgCl{sub 2}). We concentrated and precipitated NaCl and KCl salts from the concentrate steam when the initial diluate stream concentration was 21.5 to 28.8 wt% NaCl and KCl. We found that water transferring through the membranes was a significant factor in overall efficiency of salt recovery by electrodialysis.

  11. Water content reflectometer calibration, field versus laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For soils with large amounts of high-charge clays, site-specific calibrations for the newer permittivity probes that operate at lower frequencies, often have higher permittivity values than factory calibrations. The purpose of this study was to determine site-specific calibration of water content re...

  12. Design of Phosphonium-Type Zwitterion as an Additive to Improve Saturated Water Content of Phase-Separated Ionic Liquid from Aqueous Phase toward Reversible Extraction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoritsugu; Kohno, Yuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We designed phosphonium-type zwitterion (ZI) to control the saturated water content of separated ionic liquid (IL) phase in the hydrophobic IL/water biphasic systems. The saturated water content of separated IL phase, 1-butyl-3-methyimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, was considerably improved from 0.4 wt% to 62.8 wt% by adding N,N,N-tripentyl-4-sulfonyl-1-butanephosphonium-type ZI (P555C4S). In addition, the maximum water content decreased from 62.8 wt% to 34.1 wt% by increasing KH2PO4/K2HPO4 salt content in upper aqueous phosphate buffer phase. Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt.c) was dissolved selectively in IL phase by improving the water content of IL phase, and spectroscopic analysis revealed that the dissolved cyt.c retained its higher ordered structure. Furthermore, cyt. c dissolved in IL phase was re-extracted again from IL phase to aqueous phase by increasing the concentration of inorganic salts of the buffer solution. PMID:24013379

  13. Progress report on studies of salt-water encroachment on Long Island, New York, 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusczynski, N.J.; Upson, J.E.

    1954-01-01

    Nearly all the water used on Long Island, N. Y., is derived by wells from the thick and extensive water-bearing formations that underlie and compose the entire island. The unconsolidated deposits, consisting of sand, gravel, and clay, range in thickness from a few feet in northern Queens County to more than 2,000 feet in southern Suffolk County. Four main and relatively distinct aquifers, all interconnected hydraulically to a greater or lesser degree, have been recognized and delineated at least in a general way. They are, from younger to older, the upper Pleistocene deposits, in which the ground water is mainly unconfined, and three formations in which the water is generally confined - the Jameco gravel, of Pleistocene age, and the Magothy (?) formation and the Lloyd sand member of the Rartian formation, both of Lake Cretaceous age. Except for some artificial recharge, these aquifers are replenished entirely by infiltration of precipitation. Under natural conditions, the fresh water moves into and through the formations, discharging into the sea. With the growth of population on Long Island and the continuously increasing use of water over the years, not only has the infiltration of precipitation been seriously impeded at places, but the withdrawals from the ground-water reservoir have increased markedly. These factors have upset the natural balance between the fresh surface and ground water of the island and the surrounding sea water, and with increased use of water will do so more and more, thus leading to salt-water encroachment. In a sense, the whole problem of utilization of ground water on Long Island is one of determining how much ground water can be withdrawn without serious salt-water encroachment.

  14. Different stability regimes of oil-in-water emulsions in the presence of bile salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Jódar-Reyes; A. Torcello-Gómez; M. Wulff-Pérez; M. J. Gálvez-Ruiz; A. Martín-Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we study the stability of emulsified olive oil-in-water emulsions at different bile salt (BS) concentrations. The effect of the interfacial properties of the emulsion is analyzed by using different emulsifiers (Epikuron 145V and Pluronic F68). Emulsion characteristics (electrophoretic mobility, average droplet size) are measured under the different conditions, and the stability of these systems is characterized by

  15. Nanostructure and salt effect of zwitterionic carboxybetaine brush at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hideki; Yamakawa, Yuta; Ghosh, Arjun; Saruwatari, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    Zwitterionic amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(ethylhexyl acrylate)-b-poly(carboxybetaine) (PEHA-b-PGLBT), was synthesized by the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) method with precise control of block length and polydispersity. The polymers thus obtained were spread onto the water surface to form a polymer monolayer. The fundamental property and nanostructure of the block copolymer monolayer were systematically studied by the surface pressure-molecular area (?-A) isotherm, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and X-ray reflectivity (XR) techniques. The ? values of the monolayer increased by compression in relatively larger A regions. After showing a large plateau region by compression, the ? value sharply increased at very small A regions, suggesting the formation of poly(GLBT) brush formation just beneath the water surface. The domain structure of ?m size was observed by BAM in the plateau region. XR profiles for the monolayer at higher surface pressure regions clearly showed the PGLBT brush formation in addition to PGLBT carpet layer formation under the hydrophobic PEHA layer on the water surface, as was observed for both anionic and cationic brush layer in the water surface monolayer studied previously. The critical brush density, where the PGLBT brush is formed, was estimated to be about 0.30 chains/nm(2) for the (EHA)45-b-(GLBT)60 monolayer, which is relatively large compared to other ionic brushes. This observation is consistent with the fact that the origin of brush formation is mainly steric hindrance between brush chains. The brush thickness increased by compression and also by salt addition, unlike the normal ionic brush (anionic and cationic), whose thickness tended to decrease, i.e., shrink, by salt addition. This might be a character unique to the zwitterionic brush, and its origin is thought to be transition to an ionic nature from the almost nonionic inner salt caused by salt addition since both the cation and anion of the GLBT chain obtained counterions by the addition of salt. This stretching nature of the PGLBT brush depends on the ion species of the salt added, and it followed the Hofmeister series, i.e., more stretching in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). However, it was rather insensitive to the anion species (Cl(-), Br(-), SCN(-)), which suggests that the carboxylic anion has a more dominant effect than the quaternized cation in GLBT although the former is a weak acid and the latter is believed to be a strong base. PMID:25867972

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effects of salts on the aggregation properties of benzene in water.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P. E.

    2003-07-16

    The specific aims of the project were: to provide an atomic level description of the interactions between benzene, water and ions in solutions. To determine the degree of association between two benzene molecules in aqueous and salt solutions. To investigate the structure and dynamics of the interface between benzene and water or salt solution.

  17. A comparison of the ecology of planktonic bacteria in fresh and salt water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Hobbie

    1988-01-01

    The planktonic bacteria inhabiting fresh and salt waters are not physiologically identical; most marine bacteria, for example, require sodium and some marine forms can thrive at 1,000 atm of pressure in the deep sea. Despite this difference, the conclusion of this review is that the ecology of planktonic bacteria is virtually identical in fresh and salt waters. The differences are

  18. Responses of common and successional heathland species to manipulated salt spray and water availability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MEGAN E. GRIFFITHS; COLIN M. ORIANS

    2003-01-01

    Coastal sandplain heathlands are a rare plant community in the northeastern United States. Salt spray and water availability are likely important factors determining heathland distribution. Field surveys and manipulative experiments were performed to examine heathland species' responses to salt spray and water availability. We surveyed field distributions of four typical heathland species: Solidago puberula, Solidago rugosa, Gaylussacia baccata, and Myrica

  19. Attenuation of salt-induced hypertension by aqueous calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa.

    PubMed

    Mojiminiyi, F B O; Audu, Z; Etuk, E U; Ajagbonna, O P

    2012-01-01

    The aqueous calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) has a folk reputation as an antihypertensive agent. On account of its antioxidant properties and probably high K+ concentration, we hypothesized that HS may attenuate the development of salt-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8 each) were treated for 12 weeks as follows: control (normal diet + water), salt-loaded (8% salt diet + water), HS (normal diet + 6 mg/ml HS), salt+HS (8% salt diet + 6 mg/ml HS) and furosemide (normal diet+ 0.25mg/Kg furosemide). Their blood pressure and heart rates were measured and responses to noradrenalin and acetylcholine (0.01 mg/kg respectively) were estimated. The cationic concentration of 6 mg/ml HS was determined. The Na+ and K+ concentrations of 6 mg/ml HS were 3.6 and 840 mmol/l respectively. The mean arterial pressure (MAP±SEM; mmHg) of salt loaded rats (184.6±29.8) was significantly higher than control (113.2±3.0; P<0.05), HS (90.0±7.4; P<0.001) salt+HS (119.4±8.9; P<0.05) and furosemide (94.9±11.5; P<0.01). The MAP of salt+HS and control rats did not differ significantly and the effect of HS was comparable to furosemide. The pressor response to noradrenalin or vasodilator response to acetylcholine remained similar in all groups. These results suggest that HS attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension and this attenuation may be associated with its high K+ content or high potassium: sodium ratio and not with altered pressor/depressor response to noradrenalin or acetylcholine. Also the effects of HS and furosemide on blood pressure are comparable. PMID:23652235

  20. Design and Implementation of a Low-Cost Non-Destructive System for Measurements of Water and Salt Levels in Food Products Using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masot, Rafael; Alcañiz, Miguel; Fuentes, Ana; Campos, Franciny; Barat, José M.; Gil, Luis; Labrador, Roberto H.; Soto, Juan; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2009-05-01

    The IQMA and the DTA have developed a low-cost system to determinate the contents of water and salt in food products as cured ham or pork loin using non-destructive methods. The system includes an electronic equipment that allows the implementation of impedance spectroscopy and an electrode. The electrode is a concentric needle which allows carrying out tests in a non-destructive way. Preliminary results indicate that there is a correlation between the water and salt contents and the module and phase of the impedance of the food sample in the range of 1 Hz to 1 MHz.

  1. Postmortem aging can significantly enhance water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle measured by the salt-induced swelling/centrifuge method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) is one of the most important functional properties of fresh meat and can be significantly affected by postmortem muscle changes. Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of postmortem aging on WHC of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle indicated with % s...

  2. Salt-Tolerant Superoleophobicity on Alginate Gel Surfaces Inspired by Seaweed (Saccharina japonica).

    PubMed

    Cai, Yue; Lu, Qihang; Guo, Xinglin; Wang, Shutao; Qiao, Jinliang; Jiang, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Seaweed (Saccharina japonica) is found to have excellent superoleophobicity in salt solutions, which results from its high content of polysaccharides. Inspired by this, coatings with salt-tolerant underwater superoleophobicity and ultralow oil adhesion are successfully fabricated using calcium alginate. During immersion in artificial seawater for 30 days, the coatings effectively repel various types of oil, including crude oil and viscous silicon oil, demonstrating their great potential as a marine oil-repellent coating. PMID:26094862

  3. Mechanisms of water-salt metabolism disturbances in dogs subjected to six month hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolkov, V. I.; Kovalenko, Y. A.; Krotov, V. P.; Ilyushko, N. A.; Kondratyeva, V. A.; Kondratyev, Y. I.

    1980-01-01

    Water-salt metabolism in dogs during prolonged restricted motor activity (hypokinesia) was investigated. It was found that hydration occurred and fluid was redistributed between the extra- and intra-cellular sectors. Also, electrolyte excretion rose, and magnetism and calcium metabolism changed significantly. It is concluded that the forces caused by muscle strain proper (which was decreased under conditions of hypokinesia) influence the state of bone metabolism.

  4. Correcting the errors from variable sea salt retention and water of hydration in loss on ignition analysis: Implications for studies of estuarine and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavn, Robert H.; Rick, Hans J.; Falster, Alexander V.

    2009-03-01

    The standard technique of determining the concentrations of total suspended solids (TSSs), particulate inorganic matter (PIM), and particulate organic matter (POM) by filtration with glass fiber filters is subject to an error or bias from sea salt plus water of hydration retention, when applied to saline waters. The sea salt plus water of hydration retention by the filters occurs even after washing the filter with 300 ml of deionized water, a greater volume than any wash recommended in the literature. We determined that the mass retention on a glass fiber filter, at a given salinity, is essentially constant, no matter the volume of seawater passed through the filter. We also determined that the sea salt plus water of hydration retention on glass fiber filters is directly proportional to the salinity of the seawater filtered. Sea salt plus water of hydration retention causes an overestimate of TSS; sea salt retention causes an overestimate of PIM; volatilization of water of hydration causes an overestimate of POM. Thus a correction curve is required for sea salt and water of hydration errors in the determination of TSS and PIM. Corrected POM comes from the difference between the two. Also, filter blanks (procedural control filters), run with deionized (DI) water rather than the seawater sample, are required to correct for possible filter mass loss during the analysis. We demonstrate correction curves for sea salt plus water of hydration retention for Whatman GF/F filters, 47 mm diameter, utilizing the methods of the APHA Manual, Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. Application of other glass fiber filter types or an analytical technique differing significantly from that employed here requires a different correction curve for retention of sea salt and water of hydration. These methods can be used to reanalyze older data on PIM, POM, and TSS. We apply these corrections to PIM and POM data from the northern Gulf of Mexico and examine the interactions of these filter corrections with corrections for structural water volatilization from suspended clay minerals in the determinations of PIM and POM. We analyze published data on PIM and POM determinations and their application to remote sensing. We conclude that sea salt and water of hydration retention on filters has an adverse effect on remote-sensing algorithms inverting radiance reflectance to estimate concentrations of suspended matter.

  5. Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

  6. Determination of water content in powdered milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Reh; Shrinivasa N. Bhat; Stephane Berrut

    2004-01-01

    The determination of the water content in foodstuff is one of the most frequently performed analyses in the food industry (Isengard, 2001). In dried milk IDF method 26A in which the sample is dried at 102.0±2.0 °C in a standard air drying oven has been used for many years as reference method. The method exhibits excellent repeatability but reproducibility is

  7. Transition temperatures and contact angles in the sequential-wetting scenario of n-alkanes on (salt) water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker C. Weiss; Joseph O. Indekeu

    2003-01-01

    Alkanes of medium chain length show an unusual wetting behavior on (salt) water, exhibiting a sequence of two changes in the wetting state. When deposited on the water surface at low temperatures, the liquid alkane forms discrete droplets that are interconnected only by a molecularly thin film. On increase of the temperature, there occurs a sudden jump of the film

  8. Transition temperatures and contact angles in the sequential-wetting scenario of n-alkanes on (salt) water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker C. Weiss; Joseph O. Indekeu

    2004-01-01

    Alkanes of medium chain length show an unusual wetting behavior on (salt) water, exhibiting a sequence of two changes in the wetting state. When deposited on the water surface at low temperatures, the liquid alkane forms discrete droplets that are interconnected only by a molecularly thin film. On increase of the temperature, there occurs a sudden jump of the film

  9. Epigenetic salt accumulation and water movement in the active layer of central Yakutia in eastern Siberia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Larry Lopez; A. Brouchkov; H. Nakayama; F. Takakai; A. N. Fedorov; M. Fukuda

    2007-01-01

    Observations of soil moisture and salt content were conducted from May to August at Neleger station in eastern Siberia. Seasonal changes of salt and soil moisture distribution in the active layer of larch forest (undisturbed) and a thermokarst depression known as an alas (disturbed) were studied. Electric conductivity ECe of the intact forest revealed higher concentrations that increased with depth

  10. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects intramuscular water diffusion and microcirculation, and apparent diffusion coefficient 2, which is approximately equal to the true diffusion coefficient that excludes as much of the effect of intramuscular microcirculation as possible) and the T2 values (intramuscular water content level) of the ankle dorsiflexors, respectively, before and after ankle dorsiflexion exercise and after post-exercise treatment. The T2 values increased significantly after exercise and returned to pre-exercise values after each treatment; no significant differences were observed among the four post-exercise treatments. Both apparent diffusion coefficients also increased significantly after exercise and decreased significantly after the three cooling treatments; no significant difference was detected among the three cooling treatments. Local cooling suppresses both water diffusion and microcirculation within exercised muscles. Moreover, although the treatment time was longer, adequate cooling effects could be achieved using the gel-pack applications at relatively mild cooling temperatures. PMID:20845216

  11. Water in urban planning, Salt Creek Basin, Illinois water management as related to alternative land-use practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spieker, Andrew Maute

    1970-01-01

    Water management can be an integral part of urban comprehensive planning in a large metropolitan area. Water both imposes constraints on land use and offers opportunities for coordinated land and water management. Salt Creek basin in Cook and Du Page Counties of the Chicago metropolitan area is typical of rapidly developing suburban areas and has been selected to illustrate some of these constraints and opportunities and to suggest the effects of alternative solutions. The present study concentrates on the related problems of ground-water recharge, water quality, management of flood plains, and flood-control measures. Salt Creek basin has a drainage area of 150 square miles. It is in flat to. gently rolling terrain, underlain by glacial drift as much as 200 feet thick which covers a dolomite aquifer. In 1964, the population of the basin was about 400,000, and 40 percent of the land was in urban development. The population is expected to number 550,000 to 650,000 by 1990, and most of the land will be taken by urban development. Salt Creek is a sluggish stream, typical of small drainage channels in the headwaters area of northeastern Illinois. Low flows of 15 to 25 cubic feet per second in the lower part of the basin consist largely of sewage effluent. Nearly all the public water supplies in the basin depend on ground water. Of the total pumpage of 27.5 million gallons per day, 17.5 million gallons per day is pumped from the deep (Cambrian-Ordovician) aquifers and 10 million gallons per day is pumped from the shallow (Silurian dolomite and glacial drift) aquifers. The potential yield of the shallow aquifers, particularly glacial drift in the northern part of the basin, far exceeds present use. The largest concentration of pumpage from the shallow ,aquifers is in the Hinsdale-La Grange area. Salt Creek serves as an important source of recharge to these supplies, particularly just east of Hinsdale. The entire reach of Salt Creek south and east of Elmhurst can be regarded as an area of potential recharge to the shallow aquifers. Preservation of the effectiveness of these potential recharge areas should be considered in land-use planning. Salt Creek is polluted in times of both low and high flow. Most communities in the basin in Du Page County discharge their treated sewage into the creek, whereas those in Cook County transfer their sewage to plants of the Metropolitan Sanitary District outside the basin. During periods of high runoff, combined storm runoff and overflow from sanitary sewers enter the creek. Such polluted water detracts from the stream's esthetic and recreational potential and poses a threat to ground-water supplies owing to induced recharge of polluted water to shallow aquifers. Alternative approaches .to the pollution problem include improvement of the degree of sewage treatment, detention and treatment of storm runoff, dilution of sewage through flow augmentation, or transfer of sewage from the basin to a central treatment plant. To result in an enhanced environment, the streambed would have to be cleansed of accumulated sludge deposits. The overbank flooding in Salt Creek basin every 2 to 3 years presents problems because of encroachments and developments on the flood plains. Flood plains in an urban area can be managed by identifying them, by recognizing that either their natural storage capacity or equivalent artificial capacity is needed to accommodate floods, and by planning land use accordingly. Examples of effective floodplain management include (1) preservation of greenbelts or regional parks along stream courses, (2) use of flood plains for recreation, parking lots. or other low-intensity uses, (3) use of flood-proofed commercial buildings, and (4) provision for compensatory storage to replace natural storage capacity. Results of poor flood-plain management include uncontrolled residential development and encroachment by fill into natural storage areas where no compensatory storage has been

  12. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil. PMID:24555360

  13. Characteristic monitoring of groundwater-salt transportation and input-output in inland arid irrigation area.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cundong; Zhang, Hongyang; Han, Liwei; Zhai, Luxin

    2014-11-01

    The rules of microscopic water-salt transportation can be revealed and the impact on the macroscopic water and soil resources can be further predicted by selecting a typical study area and carrying out continuous monitoring. In this paper, Jingtaichuan Electrical Lifting Irrigation District in Gansu Province (hereinafter called as JingDian irrigation district (JID)) located at the inland desert region of northwest China was selected as study area. Based on the groundwater-salt transportation data of representative groundwater monitoring wells in different hydrogeological units, the groundwater-salt evolution and transportation tendency in both closed and unclosed hydrogeological units were analyzed and the quantity relative ratio relationship of regional water-salt input-excretion was calculated. The results showed that the salt brought in by artificial irrigation accounts for the highest proportion of about 63.99% and the salt carried off by the discharge of irrigation water accounts for 66.42%, namely, the water-salt evolution and transportation were mainly controlled by artificial irrigation. As the general features of regional water-salt transportation, groundwater salinity and soil salt content variation were mainly decided by the transportation of soil soluble salt which showed an obvious symbiosis gathering regularity, but the differentiation with insoluble salt components was significant in the transportation process. Besides, groundwater salinity of the unclosed hydrogeological unit presented a periodically fluctuating trend, while the groundwater salinity and soil salt content in water and salt accumulation zone of the closed hydrogeological unit showed an increasing tendency, which formed the main occurrence area of soil secondary salinization. PMID:25522523

  14. Surface-water and climatological data, Salt Lake County, Utah, water year 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyper, G.E.; Christensen, R.C.; Stephens, D.W.; McCormack, H.F.; Conroy, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents streamflow, water-quality, precipitation, and storm-runoff data collected in Salt Lake County, Utah, during the 1980 water year and certain water-quality data for the 1979 water year which were included for comparative purposes. Surface-water data consist of daily mean values of flow at 33 sites on natural streams, canals, and conduits. Water-quality data consist of chemical, biologic, and sediment analyses at 30 sites. Precipitation data consist of daily and monthly total at nine sites. Storm-runoff data consist of 5 and 15-minute interval discharge data for storms of July 1-2, August 19, and August 25, 1980, for most surface-water sites. (USGS)

  15. Calcium and bromide contents of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.J.; Graf, D.L.; Jones, B.F.

    1966-01-01

    The linear relation observed in a log Ca++ versus log Br - plot for subsurface Cl- waters is attributed to ultrafiltration by shale of sea water and fresh water that have passed through sedimentary rocks since their formation. Reactions between these solutions and sedimentary minerals, particularly dolomitization, must have contributed additional Ca+ + to solution.

  16. Thermal Inactivation of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus in a Peptone-Salt Medium Mimicking the Water-Soluble Phase of Hydrolyzed Fish By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Ingebjørg; Myrmel, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) (serotype Sp) was exposed to temperatures between 60 and 90°C in a medium mimicking the water-soluble phase of hydrolyzed fish by-products. D values ranged from 290 to 0.5 min, and the z value was approximately 9.8°C. Addition of formic acid to create a pH 4 medium did not enhance heat inactivation. Predicted inactivation effects at different temperature-time combinations are provided. PMID:22247167

  17. Parameter sensitivity to climate and landscape variability of a simple, lumped salt and water balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, M. A.; Smettem, K. R. J.

    2005-08-01

    A salt and water balance model is developed to represent salinity generation following land use changes in Western Australia. The model consists of five interconnecting stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface unsaturated Stores, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store and (iii) a saturated Groundwater Store. The salinity generation process in Western Australia is highly dependent on annual rainfall, potential energy for evaporation, salt fall and land use history of a catchment. We selected six experimental catchments with different land use histories across a climatic gradient to test the model and assess parameter sensitivity. The model was successful in representing the streamflow and salinity generation processes of all catchments. In the process of application, we classified the model parameters into three sets: (i) "known", (ii) "fixed" and (iii) "variable". The "known" parameter set is calculated a priori from catchment attributes. The "fixed" set comprises regionalised parameters that remain unchanged across all catchments once calibrated in one catchment. The "variable" set of seven physically meaningful parameters were calibrated at one catchment, estimated a priori for other catchments and then subsequently adjusted for best fit. The "variable" set represents: (i) the depth (d), spatial distribution (b, c), relationship of the lateral hydraulic conductivity with moisture content (ia) and vertical conductivity (Kuv) of the top soil, (ii) lateral conductivity (Kll) of the groundwater system, and (iii) salt release (Cu) from top soil. Sensitivity analyses of key model parameters show that the relationship of the top soil lateral hydraulic conductivity with soil moisture content (ia) is the most sensitive parameter. Other sensitive parameters include the depth of the top soil and its spatial distribution (d, b, c).

  18. Calibrating a salt water intrusion model with time-domain electromagnetic data.

    PubMed

    Herckenrath, Daan; Odlum, Nick; Nenna, Vanessa; Knight, Rosemary; Auken, Esben; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Salt water intrusion models are commonly used to support groundwater resource management in coastal aquifers. Concentration data used for model calibration are often sparse and limited in spatial extent. With airborne and ground-based electromagnetic surveys, electrical resistivity models can be obtained to provide high-resolution three-dimensional models of subsurface resistivity variations that can be related to geology and salt concentrations on a regional scale. Several previous studies have calibrated salt water intrusion models with geophysical data, but are typically limited to the use of the inverted electrical resistivity models without considering the measured geophysical data directly. This induces a number of errors related to inconsistent scales between the geophysical and hydrologic models and the applied regularization constraints in the geophysical inversion. To overcome these errors, we perform a coupled hydrogeophysical inversion (CHI) in which we use a salt water intrusion model to interpret the geophysical data and guide the geophysical inversion. We refer to this methodology as a Coupled Hydrogeophysical Inversion-State (CHI-S), in which simulated salt concentrations are transformed to an electrical resistivity model, after which a geophysical forward response is calculated and compared with the measured geophysical data. This approach was applied for a field site in Santa Cruz County, California, where a time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) dataset was collected. For this location, a simple two-dimensional cross-sectional salt water intrusion model was developed, for which we estimated five uniform aquifer properties, incorporating the porosity that was also part of the employed petrophysical relationship. In addition, one geophysical parameter was estimated. The six parameters could be resolved well by fitting more than 300 apparent resistivities that were comprised by the TDEM dataset. Except for three sounding locations, all the TDEM data could be fitted close to a root-mean-square error of 1. Possible explanations for the poor fit of these soundings are the assumption of spatial uniformity, fixed boundary conditions and the neglecting of 3D effects in the groundwater model and the TDEM forward responses. PMID:22891736

  19. Cytological Reactions Induced by Inorganic Salt Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Levan

    1945-01-01

    AN investigation has been carried on for some time in this Laboratory into the immediate cytological effect of salt solutions on root meristems of Allium Cepa. Salts, mostly nitrates, of some forty metals were tested. A dilution series of 10-16 concentrations were studied for each substance, covering the whole range from total lethality down to such weak con- centrations that

  20. [Estimating canopy water content in wheat based on new vegetation water index].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Yang, Gui-jun; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Li, Zhen-hai; Feng, Hai-kuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-12-01

    Moisture content is an important indicator for crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring crop water content is of great significance for evaluate crop water deficit balance and guide agriculture irrigation. In order to improve the saturated problems of different forms of typical NDWI (Normalized Different Water Index), we tried to introduce EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index) to build new vegetation water indices (NDWI#) to estimate crop water content. Firstly, PROSAIL model was used to study the saturation sensitivity of NDWI, and NDWI# to canopy water content and LAI (Leaf Area Index). Then, the estimated model and verified model were estimated using the spectral data and moisture data in the field. The result showed that the new indices have significant relationships with canopy water content. In particular, by implementing modified standardized for NDWI1450, NDWI1940, NDWI2500. The result indicated that newly developed indices with visible-infrared and shortwave infrared spectral feature may have greater advantage for estimation winter canopy water content. PMID:25881445

  1. The reaction kinetics of lithium salt with water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balooch, M.; Dinh, L. N.; Calef, D. F.

    2002-06-01

    The interaction of lithium salt (LiH and/or LiD) with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10 -5-2657 Pa has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with LiH cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiH surface temperature, suggesting a negligible activation energy for the reaction in agreement with quantum chemical calculations. The value gradually reduced, however, to 0.007 as the surface concentration of oxygen containing product approached full coverage. As the film grew beyond a monolayer, the phase lag of hydrogen product increased from 0 °C to 20 °C and the reaction probability reduced further until it approached our detection limit (˜10 -4). This phase lag was attributed to a diffusion-limited process in this regime. For micrometer thick hydroxide films grown in high moisture concentration environment on LiD and LiH, the reaction probability reduced to ˜4×10 -7 and was independent of exposure time. In this regime of thick hydroxide films (LiOH and/or LiOD), microcracks generated in the films to release stress provided easier pathways for moisture to reach the interface. A modified microscope, capable of both atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation, was also employed to investigate the surface morphology of hydroxide monohydrate (LiOH · H 2O and/or LiOD · H 2O) grown on hydroxide at high water vapor partial pressures and the kinetics of this growth.

  2. The deuterium content of water in some volcanic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, R.L.

    1958-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen composition (relative to Lake Michigan water = 0.0) of water extractsd from coexisting perlite and obsidian from eleven different localities was determined. The water content of the obsidians is generally from 0.09 to 0.29 per cent by weight, though two samples from near Olancha, California, contain about 0.92 per cent. The relative deuterium concentration is from -4.6 to -12.3 per cent. The coexisting perlite contains from 2.0 to 3.8 per cent of water with a relative deuterium concentration of -3.1 to -16.6 per cent. The deuterium concentration in the perlites is not related to that in the enclosed obsidian. The deuterium concentration in the perlite water is related to the deuterium concentration of the modern meteoric water and the perlite water contains approximately 4 per cent less deuterium than does the groundwater of the area in which the perlites occur. The above relations hold true for perlites from northern New Mexico, east slope of the Sierra Nevada. California Coast Range, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and New Zealand. As the water in the obsidian is unrelated to meteoric water, but the enclosing perlite water is related, we believe that this is evidence for the secondary hydration of obsidian to form high water content perlitic glass. ?? 1958.

  3. Effect of hydrotropic salts on phase relationships involving hydrocarbons, water, and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.C.; Kraus, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrotropic salts, which can increase the solubility of organic materials in aqueous solutions, are useful to tertiary oil recovery. We have examined effects on solubility of hydrocarbons in water (with and without alcohols) through addition of inorganic hydrotropic salts, such as perchlorates, thiocyanates, and iodides - high in the usual Hofmeister series - and of organic salts such as short chain alkyl benzene sulfonates and other salts based on substituted benzene derivatives. Although the inorganic salts are relatively ineffective in increasing solubility of hydrocarbons in water, many of the organic salts are excellent hydrotropic agents for hydrocarbons. We have examined the phase relationships for several series of aromatic salts such as sulfonates, carboxylates and hydroxycarboxylates, as a function of alkyl-carbon substitution in three-component (hydrocarbon, salt, water) and in four-component (hydrocarbon, salt, alcohol, water) systems. We have also examined miscibility relationships for a given hydrotropic salt as the chain length of alkanes and alkyl benzenes is systematically varied. While miscibilities decrease with increase in chain length of the hydrocarbon, the hydrotropic properties in these systems increase rapidly with the number of alkyl carbons on the benzene ring of the salts and they are relatively insensitive to the type of charged group (sulfonate vs carboxylate) attached to the benzene ring. However, there were significant increases in hydrotropy as one goes from equally substituted sulfonates or carboxylates to salicylates. A number of salts have been identified which have much greater hydrotropic properties for hydrocarbons than such well-known hydrotropic materials as toluene and xylene sulfonates.

  4. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Windsat and Modis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retrieval of soil moisture content from microwave sensors also returns an estimate of vegetation water content. Remotely sensed indices from optical sensors can be used to estimate canopy water content. For corn and soybean in central Iowa, there are allometric relationships between canopy water c...

  5. Critical water contents of hydrophobic soils in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Holzinger, Ursula; Singh, Ranvir; Klik, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency is an important problem for pasture farming in New Zealand which causes low infiltration rates and increased surface runoff. However, the real extent of this issue is not yet evaluated. Water repellency is thought to appear on dry soils, when the water content falls below a critical limit. The main objectives of this study was 1) to investigate the effects of different amounts of infiltration water on hydrophobicity of three selected soils under grassland in the North island of New Zealand, and 2) to determine the critical water content for ten sites with five different soil types. In April 2011 undisturbed and disturbed soil samples from a brown, gley and organic soil have been taken from sites around Mount Taranaki. Soil water repellency was determined using the Water Droplet Penetration Time Test (WDPT) and the Molarity of Ethanol Droplet Test (MED). During the lab experiment four amounts of water were applied to the 270 cm³ samples: 400, 800, 1600 and 2400 mL . One test was performed with cold and one with hot (80 °C) water. Each test was replicated four times. In the leachate the amount of dissolved organic carbon was analyzed. The experiments showed that only for the brown soil water repellency decreased significantly with increasing amount of infiltration water whereas for gley soils no correlation was found. Gley soil had initially a lower degree of hydrophobicity compared to the other soils. Possibly due to the higher bulk density of these soils, the carbon compounds directly surrounding the soil particles wre rearranged rather than leached. No clear pattern could be obtained for organic soils. This may be explained by the high initial carbon content of more than 20%. It may take a much greater amount of infiltration to affect hydrophobicity. The critical contact angle of investigated soils above which water repellency is moderately persistent, was 93.8°. In May 2012 ten more sites were sampled and five soil types were investigated with respect to the critical water content. Soil hydrophobicity was again tested during 4 wetting and drying cycles on 3 replicates each of disturbed and undisturbed soil samples. The tests confirmed that water repellency does not exist at high water contents. It generally starts to appear at a certain limit, increases rapidly up to a peak value and finally decreases slowly when the water content approaches 0. Critical water contents were very high in the first wetting cycle and stabilized at a rather constant level during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th wetting cycle. This phenomenon may be due to inhomogeneous water distributions within the field moist soil samples in the 1st wetting cycle and it was thus chosen to take the critical moisture content from the 2nd wetting cycle for further purposes. We found relatively broad transition zones where soils were found to be both hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Critical water contents or rather transition zones were found to differ significantly between the various soil orders and showed values between 0.34 (m³/m³) for recent soil and 0.44(m³/m³) for organic soil.

  6. Ecosystem-groundwater interactions under changing land uses: Linking water, salts, and carbon across central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.; Santoni, C. S.; Jackson, R. B.

    2007-05-01

    Although most ecosystems display a one-way connection with groundwater based on the regulation of deep water drainage (recharge), this link can become reciprocal when the saturated zone is shallow and plants take up groundwater (discharge). In what context is the reciprocal link most likely? How is it affected by land use changes? Has it consequences on salt and carbon cycling? We examine these questions across a precipitation gradient in the Pampas and Espinal of Argentina focusing on three vegetation change situations (mean annual rainfall): afforestation of humid (900-1300 mm) and subhumid grassland (700-900 mm/yr of rainfall), annual cultivation of subhumid grasslands (700-800 mm/yr), and annual cultivation of semiarid forests (500-700 mm). Humid and subhumid grasslands have shallow (< 5 m deep) groundwater tables that are poorly consumed by grasses but highly used by planted trees, as evidenced by satellite canopy temperatures, soil moisture and water table level records, and sapflow measurements. Groundwater contributions enhance carbon uptake in plantations compared to grasslands as suggested by aboveground biomass measurements and satellite vegetation indexes from sites with and without access to groundwater. Where rainfall is <1100 mm, grassland afforestation switches water fluxes to groundwater from positive (net recharge) to negative (net discharge) causing a salt accumulation process in soils and groundwater that is ultimately limited by the tolerance to salinity of tree species. Cultivation with corn and soybean can lead to groundwater consumption in the driest belt of subhumid grassland. Up to five-fold yield increases in lowlands vs. uplands during the driest years indicate a dramatic impact of groundwater use on carbon uptake and groundwater salinization suggests a recharge-to- discharge switch. In dry forests groundwater is not accessible (> 15 m deep) and recharge under natural conditions is null. The establishment of crops, however, triggers the onset of recharge, as evidenced by vadose zones getting wetter and leached of atmospheric chloride. Cropping may cause water table raises leading to a two-way coupling of ecosystems and groundwater in the future, as it has been documented for similar settings in Australia and the Sahel. In the Pampas land use change interacts with groundwater consumption leading to higher carbon uptake (humid and subhumid grasslands) and salt accumulation (subhumid grasslands). In the Espinal (semiarid forest) land use change currently involves a one-way effect on groundwater recharge that may switch to a reciprocal connection if regional water table raises occur. Neglecting the role of groundwater in flat sedimentary plains can obscure our understanding of carbon and salt cycling and curtail our attempts to sustain soil and water resources under changing land uses.

  7. Geomicrobiology and hopanoid content of sulfidic subsurface vent biofilms, Little Salt Spring, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, E.; Schaperdoth, I.; Albrecht, H.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Sulfide-rich, oxygen-poor environments are widespread in the subsurface and were prevalent at the earth's surface during critical intervals in the geologic past. Modern microbial communities in sulfidic niches have the potential to shed light on the biogeochemistry and biosignatures of anoxia and euxinia in earth history. Caves and sinkholes provide rare windows into microbially-dominated, sulfidic subsurface environments that are otherwise difficult and expensive to access. Little Salt Spring (Sarasota County, Florida) is a cover-collapse sinkhole lake with oxic surface water and anoxic, sulfidic bottom water (Alvarez Zarikian 2005). The site is famous for excellent preservation of human and animal archaeological remains (Clausen 1979), and its microbiology has never been investigated. Abundant white biofilms develop seasonally at a warm vent that feeds into the anoxic bottom water at 73 m depth below the water surface. The biofilms are of interest both as potential sources of biomarker compounds and because of their likely role in sulfuric acid production and limestone dissolution (speleogenesis). Biofilm samples were collected by expert science divers and investigated using microscopy, nucleic acid, and lipid analytical methods. Microscopy of the live biofilm revealed clusters of microbial filaments with holdfasts and dendritic, sulfur-rich colonial structures similar to those described in the 1960s for Thiobacterium, a sulfur-oxidizing genus with undetermined phylogeny. A 16S rDNA library constructed from the biofilm was split into three main phylotypes, with multiple clones representing (1) a Betaproteobacterial clade with no cultivated representatives, (2) filamentous Epsilonproteobacteria, and (3) a major bacterial lineage without named isolates (OP11/OD2). A full cycle rRNA approach is currently underway to link 16S rDNA phylotypes with specific populations in the biofilm. We confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that abundant filamentous cells with holdfasts are Epsilonproteobacteria. Additional FISH experiments will target the Betaproteobacterial and OP11/OD2 phylotypes retrieved by cloning. Based on HPLC-MS analyses, the biofilm contains at least 5 membrane hopanoid structures distinct from the suite of hopanoids present in sinking organic particles from the photic zone of the sinkhole. Future efforts will be aimed at linking hopanoid structures to specific sulfur-oxidizing populations and to geochemical parameters such as sulfide and oxygen concentrations. References Alvarez Zarikian,C. A., P. K. Swart, J. A. Gifford, P. L. Blackwelder, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 225, 134 (2005). Clausen, C. J., A. D. Cohen, C. Emiliani, J. A. Holman, J. J. Stipp, Science 203, 609 (1979).

  8. [Comparative study on hyperspectral inversion accuracy of soil salt content and electrical conductivity].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; Wang, Jia-Qiang; Xiang, Hong-Ying; Teng, Hong-Fen; Liu, Wei-Yang; Chi, Chun-Ming; Niu, Jian-Long; Guo, Yan; Shi, Zhou

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present article is to ascertain the mechanism of hyperspectral remote sensing monitoring for soil salinization, which is of great importance for improving the accuracy of hyperspectral remote sensing monitoring. Paddy soils in Wensu, Hetian and Baicheng counties of the southern Xinjiang were selected. Hyperspectral data of soils were obtained. Soil salt content (S(t)) an electrical conductivity of 1:5 soil-to-water extracts (EC(1:5)) were determined. Relationships between S(t) and EC(1:5) were studied. Correlations between hyperspectral indices and S(t), and EC(1:5) were analyzed. The inversion accuracy of S(t) using hyperspectral technique was compared with that of EC(1:5). Results showed that: significant (p<0.01) relationships were found between S(t) and EC(1:5) for soils in Wensu and Hetian counties, and correlation coefficients were 0.86 and 0.45, respectively; there was no significant relationship between S(t) and EC(1:5) for soils in Baicheng county. Therefore, the correlations between S(t) and EC(1:5) varied with studied sites. S(t) and EC(1:5) were significantly related with spectral reflectance, first derivative reflectance and continuum-removed reflectance, respectively; but correlation coefficients between S(t) and spectral indices were higher than those between EC(1:5) and spectral indices, which was obvious in some sensitive bands for soil salinization such as 660, 35, 1229, 1414, 1721, 1738, 1772, 2309 nm, and so on. Prediction equations of St and EC(1:5) were established using multivariate linear regression, principal component regression and partial least-squares regression methods, respectively. Coefficients of determination, determination coefficients of prediction, and relative analytical errors of these equations were analyzed. Coefficients of determination and relative analytical errors of equations between S(t) and spectral indices were higher than those of equations between EC(1:5) and spectral indices. Therefore, the responses of high spectral information to St were more sensitive than those of high spectral information to EC(1:5). Accuracy of St predicted from high spectral data was higher than that of EC(1:5) estimated from high spectral data. The results of this study can provide a theoretical basis to improve hyperspectral remote sensing monitoring accuracy of soil salinization. PMID:24822430

  9. Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

  10. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Numerical approximations and analysis, Electromagnetic methods, Body waves, Wave propagation, Seismoelectric- moelectric signals as the water content changed. We measured seismoelectric signals induced by seismic wave propagation, by repeating the observations on the same two profiles during several months. The electrical

  11. Collagen: mobile water content of frozen fibers.

    PubMed

    Dehl, R E

    1970-11-13

    From the change in the nuclear magnetic resonance splitting of heavy water in oriented wet collagen fibers at low temperatures, it is estimated that about 0.6 gram of heavy water per gram of collagen does not freeze. This estimate has been confirmed by a measurement of the heat evolved on melting "frozen" wet collagen. The water that does not freeze retains liquid-like mobility even at temperatures as low as -50 degrees C. PMID:5479630

  12. Ocean climate change fingerprints attenuated by salt fingering?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory C. Johnson; Kelly A. Kearney

    2009-01-01

    Intensified double diffusive mixing may attenuate changes in ocean temperature and salinity patterns from global-warming induced increases in the Earth's hydrological cycle. Increasingly fresher Antarctic Intermediate Water and saltier subtropical waters would tend to increase destabilizing vertical salinity stratification compared to the stabilizing temperature stratification. Destabilization would increase salinity (and temperature) fluxes through double-diffusive salt fingering. These fluxes could in

  13. Nasal Salt Excretion and the Possible Function of the Cloaca in Water Conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Knut Schmidt-Nielson; Arieh Borut; Ping Lee; Eugene Crawford Jr.

    1963-01-01

    Secretion of concentrated salt solutions from the nasal region was observed in several terrestrial birds and reptiles. In the secreted fluid potassium usually exceeded sodium concentrations, with chloride and bicarbonate as the major anions. It is suggested that the extrarenal excretion of salts is related to the reabsorption of water in the cloaca, that it is necessary for the production

  14. Chloride dynamics in a restored urban stream and the influence of road salts on water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services from these widely used de-icers. Preliminary analysis identified a probable connection between road salt application and a stream wat...

  15. Corrosion of Mullite by Molten Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.; Yoshio, Tetsuo

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of molten salts of different Na2O activities and mullite is examined with furnace and burner tests. The more-acidic molten salts form small amounts of Al2O3; the more-basic molten salts form various Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 compounds. The results are interpreted using the Na2O-Al203-SiO2 ternary phase diagram, and some possible diffusion paths are discussed. The generally higher melting points of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 compounds lead to better behavior of mullite in molten salts, as compared to SiO2-protected ceramics such as SiC. Mullite-coated SiC is discussed, and the corrosion behavior is evaluated.

  16. Tamarisk Water Flux Patterns Before, During and After Episodic Defoliation by the Salt Cedar Leaf Beetle on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultine, K. R.; Nagler, P. L.; Dennison, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Tamarisk (Tamarix) species are among the most successful plant invaders in the western United States, and has had significant impacts on watershed hydrology and water resources. Accordingly, local, state and federal agencies have undertaken considerable efforts to eradicate tamarisk and restore riparian habitats to pre-invasion status. A biological control - the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) - was released in the summer of 2004 at several locations in eastern Utah, USA to control the spread and impact of tamarisk within the Colorado River watershed. Beginning in April of 2008, sap flux techniques were used to monitor changes in transpiration fluxes in response to canopy defoliation by the beetle. Specifically we installed modified (10 mm length) heat dissipation probes into the main stem of 20 mature tamarisk trees within a single stand on the Colorado Plateau. In July, the saltcedar leaf beetle reduced the total leaf area to near 0% of pre-beetle invasion status. Consequently, sap flux declined by up to 80% compared to pre-beetle invasion fluxes. By mid-August, refoliation of the canopy occurred, and sap flux rates returned to pre- defoliation status. Sap flux rates prior to defoliation were modeled against atmospheric vapor pressure deficit in order to predict the amount of water salvage from defoliation. Sap flux from June 1 through September 1 was on average 36% lower than predicted values. Combined with scaling techniques, the heat dissipation approach shows a high potential for monitoring changes in watershed hydrology in response to tamarisk defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle. Nevertheless, tamarisk sap flux studies with heat dissipation probes presents several challenges, including, narrow sapwood depth, low flux rates in response to defoliation, and large thermal gradients that are inevitable in warm climates (particularly after defoliation removes canopy shading). We will present results from ongoing research to address these potential pitfalls.

  17. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  18. Numerical modeling of water flow and salt transport in bare saline soil subjected to evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2015-05-01

    A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to evaporation, which was simulated using the bulk aerodynamic formulation. As evaporation was assumed to depend on the pore moisture, the evaporation flux evolved gradually causing a gradual increase in the pore salinity. This is in contrast to prior studies where the high salinity was imposed instantaneously on the ground surface. Key factors likely affecting subsurface hydrodynamics were investigated, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, relative humidity in the air, and surrounding groundwater replenishment. The simulations showed two temporal regimes where the first consists of rapid evaporation for a duration of hours followed by slow evaporation, until evaporation ceases. In the absence of surrounding groundwater replenishment, evaporation-induced density gradient generated an upward water flow initially, and then the flow decreased at which time a high density salt "finger" formed and propagated downwards. Capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. The results also suggested that the presence of subsurface water replenishment to the evaporation zone tended to produce a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface.

  19. [Solubility and phase transitions in the water-protein-salt system].

    PubMed

    Rozhkov, S P

    2006-01-01

    The previously derived formulas for the curves corresponding to sol-gel, liquid-liquid, and liquid-solid phase transitions, which correlate the critical molar composition of the water-protein-salt system with individual characteristic features of its component (protein charge z, the number of ions adsorbed v, the function of electrolyte activity A) are presented as curves in ordinary coordinates of protein solubility logS against salt concentration m3. Tendencies in changes in phase transition lines versus the v, z, and v/z ratio have been determined. Correlations of the salting-out curve and the salting-out coefficient with phase transitions are discussed. PMID:17131819

  20. Collagen: Mobile Water Content of Frozen Fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Dehl

    1970-01-01

    From the change in the nuclear magnetic resonance splitting of heavy water in oriented wet collagen fibers at low temperatures, it is estimated that about 0.6 gram of heavy water per gram of collagen does not freeze. This estimate has been confirmed by a measurement of the heat evolved on melting \\

  1. Simulation of salt and water movement and estimation of water productivity of rice crop irrigated with saline water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Phogat; A. K. Yadav; R. S. Malik; Sanjay Kumar; Jim Cox

    2010-01-01

    The HYDRUS-ID model was experimentally tested for water balance and salt build up in soil under rice crop irrigated with different\\u000a salinity water (ECiw) of 0.4, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 dS m?1 in micro-lysimeters filled with sandy loam soil. Differences of means between measured (M) and HYDRUS-1D predicted (P) values of bottom flux (Q\\u000a o) and leachate EC as tested

  2. Effects of stomatal density and leaf water content on the ¹?O enrichment of leaf water.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Leticia; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Sternberg, Leonel

    2015-04-01

    Leaf water isotopic composition is imprinted in several biomarkers of interest and it is imperative that we understand the isotopic enrichment of leaf water. Here, we test the effect of stomatal density and leaf water content on the oxygen isotopic composition of leaf water in transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different stomatal densities, and several other species showing a range of stomatal density. We grew Arabidopsis plants hydroponically and collected other species in the field. Stomatal density and leaf water content were determined for each plant. We measured transpiration and extracted leaf water for isotopic determination. Using these measurements and the current leaf water isotope model, we calculated several of the parameters related to leaf water isotopic enrichment. High stomatal density promoted leaf water isotope enrichment. No conclusion, however, can be drawn regarding the effect of leaf water content on leaf water isotope enrichment. Factors such as transpiration might mask the effect of stomatal density on leaf water isotopic enrichment. We propose a method by which stomatal density can be incorporated in the current Peclet model of leaf water isotope enrichment. These findings have important applications in the use of plant-based metabolic proxies in paleoclimate studies. PMID:25408145

  3. Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate of free-living stages of irrigation by flooding the pastures on the ability of the eggs of sheep Tri- chostrongyles to develop irrigation or submerged, at different times and durations. The rates of development of Teladorsagia

  4. Response to "comments on field calibration of water content refectometers"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication is a response to comments on a recent paper, “Field calibration of water content reflectometers”, by Chandler, Seyfried and McNamara, Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2004) we published. In that paper we presented a method for field calibration of a relatively inexpensive so...

  5. 46 CFR 46.10-45 - Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    (a) Passenger vessels required to be marked with subdivision load lines, engaged on foreign and coastwise voyages other than the Great Lakes voyages, shall not submerge in salt water the subdivision load line applicable to the...

  6. 46 CFR 46.10-45 - Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water. 46.10-45 Section 46...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SUBDIVISION LOAD LINES FOR PASSENGER VESSELS Administration §...

  7. 46 CFR 46.10-45 - Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water. 46.10-45 Section 46...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SUBDIVISION LOAD LINES FOR PASSENGER VESSELS Administration §...

  8. 46 CFR 46.10-45 - Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Nonsubmergence subdivision load lines in salt water. 46.10-45 Section 46...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SUBDIVISION LOAD LINES FOR PASSENGER VESSELS Administration §...

  9. Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using

    E-print Network

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    which are commonly used for industrial purposes; mineral contaminants such as heavy metals, phosphorus of water constituents by training the MLP with ground spectra of nitrogen salts, which are commonly used range of applications2-3 . Chemical and Biological Standoff Detection II, edited by James O. Jensen

  10. Environmental evolution in the salt-water intrusion area south of Laizhou Bay since late Pleistocene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zulu Zhang; Enfeng Liu; Yan Zhang; Liangjie Xin

    2008-01-01

    The south coastal plain of Laizhou Bay is one of the typical salt-water intrusion areas in China, the occurrence and development\\u000a of which was closely related with the palaeoenvironment evolution. Systematic analyses of pollen, foraminifera and grain size\\u000a com-position based on 14C and luminescence dating from two sediment cores were performed for the purpose of understanding the salt-water intrusion\\u000a in

  11. Irrigation water with an increased magnesium content and its role in the degradation of chernozems in Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minashina, N. G.

    2011-05-01

    The reasons for the deterioration of the irrigation water quality and the alkaline degradation of chernozems in the Danube-Dnestr and Azov irrigation systems on the East-European Plain were studied. The water of the accumulation reservoirs in these systems is alkaline (pH up to 8.6), contains 1.5-2.5 g/l total dissolved salts, and is characterized by an increased content of magnesium (35% of the total cations). The irrigation of chernozems with such water results in the alkalinization of the soils and a decrease in the content of exchangeable calcium from 85-90 to 55-65% of the total exchangeable cations. The content of exchangeable magnesium increases to 30-40% and that of sodium to 3-5% of the total exchangeable cations. Problems of soil reclamation that have arisen during the functioning of irrigation systems without solving the main task (the improvement of the irrigation water's quality) have been considered. Recommendations are given for the conservation of chernozems and the preservation of the quality of the irrigation water from the Kuban and Don rivers during its transportation to the irrigated fields.

  12. Involvement of ethylene in reversal of salt-inhibited photosynthesis by sulfur in mustard.

    PubMed

    Nazar, Rahat; Khan, Md Iqbal R; Iqbal, Noushina; Masood, Asim; Khan, Nafees A

    2014-10-01

    Sulfur (S) assimilation results in the synthesis of cysteine (Cys), a common metabolite for the formation of both reduced glutathione (GSH) and ethylene. Thus, ethylene may have regulatory interaction with GSH in the alleviation of salt stress. The involvement of ethylene in the alleviation of salt stress by S application was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea cv. Pusa Jai Kisan). First, the effects of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0?mM SO4 (2) (-) were studied on photosynthetic and growth parameters to ascertain the S requirement as sufficient-S and excess-S for the plant. In further experiments, the effects of sufficient-S (1?mM SO4 (2) (-) ) and excess-S (2?mM SO4 (2) (-) ) were studied on the alleviation of salt stress-induced by 100?mM NaCl, and ethylene involvement in the alleviation of salt stress by S. Under non-saline condition, excess-S increased ethylene with less content of Cys and GSH and adversely affected photosynthesis and growth. In contrast, excess-S maximally alleviated salt stress due to high demand for S and optimal ethylene formation, which maximally increased GSH and promoted photosynthesis and growth. The involvement of ethylene in S-mediated alleviation of salt stress was further substantiated by the reversal of the effects of excess-S on photosynthesis by aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor. The studies suggest that plants respond differentially to the S availability under non-saline and salt stress and excess-S was more potential in the alleviation of salt stress. Further, ethylene regulates plants' response and excess S-induced alleviation of salt stress and promotion of photosynthesis. PMID:24547902

  13. [Determination of iodine in the table salt consumed by our population].

    PubMed

    Contreras, C; Corona, L; Suarez Demorizi, J; Labour, I; Morla, E

    1994-01-01

    The World Health Organization has recommended since 1920 that salt for cooking be iodized to ensure adequate iodine intake by the population. The frequent appearance of goiter especially in adolescents in some endemic areas of the Dominican Republic prompted a study of iodine content of salt. Concentrations of iodine were assessed in 12 samples of salt. Three samples were from salt mines and the rest were obtained as "iodized salt" in markets. Iodine was added to six other samples as a control for the laboratory procedure. 50 mothers attending a public children's clinic and 25 attending a private medical practice were interviewed concerning the type of salt they used for cooking. Iodine was not found in the 12 samples but was found in the six controls. 56% of the women stated they used non-refined salt in meal preparation. 16% of the mothers in the public clinic and 44% in the private clinic were aware of the association between iodine and goiter. PMID:12290027

  14. Hard magnetic FePt nanoparticles by salt-matrix annealing Daren Li, Narayan Poudyal, Vikas Nandwana, Zhiqiang Jin, Kevin Elkins, and

    E-print Network

    Liu, J. Ping

    the fcc to fct phase transition. After the annealing, the salt was washed out by water and monodisperse and the annealing time was varied from 2 to 8 h at 700 °C in forming gas. The effect of salt-to-particle ratioHard magnetic FePt nanoparticles by salt-matrix annealing Daren Li, Narayan Poudyal, Vikas Nandwana

  15. [Determination of tracer gas contents in sediment pore water of gas hydrate area by two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Yang, Qunhui; Ji, Fuwu; Zhou, Huaiyang; Xue, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional gas chromatographic instrument was established by the capillary flow technology (Deans Switch) and two columns (PoraPLOT Q and Molsieve 5A) and three detectors (pulsed discharge helium ionization detector, flame photometric detector and thermal conductivity detector). The instrument can be used to measure tracer gases simultaneously including hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The detection limits of the hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were 0.51, 0.17, 82 and 0.08 micromol/mol, and the calibration curves presented good linear relationships in the range of 2-1030, 0.6-501, 120-10500 and 0.2- 49.1 micromol/mol, respectively. The relative standard deviations were less than 10% for the measurements of ten standard gases. By this method, the tracer gases in the sediment pore water of gas hydrate area in South China Sea had been detected. This method is simple, sensitive, and suitable for on-board detection. Compared with the usual methods for measuring tracer gases, the amount of a sample necessary is reduced greatly. It is useful for the survey of gas hydrate and hydrothermal resources below sea floor and for the research of dissolved gases in the ocean. PMID:21574403

  16. A multi-residue method for the determination of 90 pesticides in matrices with a high water content by LC-MS/MS without clean-up.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Fernando Diniz; da Silva Oliveira, Fabiano Aurélio; de Souza, Wesley Robert; Pontelo, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Mauro Lúcio Gonçalves; Silva, Gilsara

    2012-01-01

    A method using QuEChERS extraction and LC-MS/MS in electrospray positive ionisation mode was developed and validated for the analysis of 90 pesticides in a high water content matrix (tomato) in a single chromatographic run. To assess the intra-laboratory reproducibility of the method, validation was conducted on four different days by two different analysts. The validation data was treated using a spreadsheet developed in-house, which sets the most appropriate model for linear fit by determining whether the residuals of the calibration curves are homocedastic or heterocedastic. A statistical test for the significance of regression was also carried out. Calibration was always matrix-matched and the curves were obtained over the range 0.0075-0.10 or 0.020-0.125 mg kg(-1). Identification of analytes was based on retention times and MRM ratios. Recoveries were assessed at four different levels for each analyte and were between 73 and 106%, with relative standard deviations under reproducibility conditions of <20%. The measurement uncertainties of the method for each pesticide analysed were below 50%. Previous validation of the same method, applied to papaya samples and satisfactory results obtained in various proficiency tests with different high water content matrices, demonstrated the applicability of the method to these classes of commodities, without clean-up. The validated method will be applied routinely in the pesticide residues monitoring programme that constitutes the National Residue and Contaminant Control Plan of Brazil. PMID:22059454

  17. Stabilization of Water?in?Oil Emulsions by Naphthenic Acids and Their Salts: Model Compounds, Role of pH, and Soap:Acid Ratio

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter K. Kilpatrick

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, crudes of high acidity are observed in production of petroleum reserves. Naphthenic acids, which are generally cyclic and branched aliphatic carboxylic acids, are interfacially active and adsorb at water–oil interfaces to form monolayers, liquid crystalline films, and other colloidal structures. A serious challenge in petroleum production is the resulting stabilization of water?in?oil emulsions, which can cause problems in topside

  18. Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Misun [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-lin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  19. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  20. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  1. Health Gain by Salt Reduction in Europe: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Marieke A. H.; van Raaij, Joop M. A.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Breda, Joao; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive salt intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt intake exceeds the World Health Organization population nutrition goal of 5 grams per day in the European region. We assessed the health impact of salt reduction in nine European countries (Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Through literature research we obtained current salt intake and systolic blood pressure levels of the nine countries. The population health modeling tool DYNAMO-HIA including country-specific disease data was used to predict the changes in prevalence of ischemic heart disease and stroke for each country estimating the effect of salt reduction through its effect on blood pressure levels. A 30% salt reduction would reduce the prevalence of stroke by 6.4% in Finland to 13.5% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would be decreased by 4.1% in Finland to 8.9% in Poland. When salt intake is reduced to the WHO population nutrient goal, it would reduce the prevalence of stroke from 10.1% in Finland to 23.1% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would decrease by 6.6% in Finland to 15.5% in Poland. The number of postponed deaths would be 102,100 (0.9%) in France, and 191,300 (2.3%) in Poland. A reduction of salt intake to 5 grams per day is expected to substantially reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality in several European countries. PMID:25826317

  2. Manufacturing Nanosized Fenofibrate by Salt Assisted Milling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vadym N. Mochalin; Adarsh Sagar; Shruti Gour; Yury Gogotsi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study is to develop a new process for manufacturing a nano-sized form of the popular cholesterol-reducing\\u000a drug fenofibrate which can be implemented on industrial scale with minimal changes of currently used production schemes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Salt-assisted milling was used to reduce particle size of commercial fenofibrate from micron-sized particles to nanometer\\u000a domains.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  The optimal parameters for the salt

  3. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  4. Water Uptake of Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation of Stable Aqueous Solutions on Mars Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    To understand the formation of briny aqueous solutions on Mars, a salt analog was developed to closely match the cation and anion concentrations as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory aboard the Phoenix Lander. The salt analog contained magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, sulfate, and carbonate ions. The salt analog was developed to fully encompass the correct anion and cation concentration and is referred to as 'Instant Mars.' Using Raman microscopy, we have studied phase transitions of the analogs in an environmental cell. Phase transitions were monitored using Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy while samples were in a controlled water vapor and temperature environment. Salt analog solutions were nebulized to generate 20 ?m particles (on average) that were deposited onto a quartz wafer. The particles undergo visual transformations as the relative humidity (RH) is increased and the presence of aqueous phase salts is confirmed by Raman spectra. Perhaps even more interesting is a liquid water phase particle can persist at lower RH values than the humidity at which the aqueous phase first appeared. This hysteresis effect is due to kinetic inhibition of salt nucleation and can result in metastable, supersaturated salt solutions existing at RH values as low as 10%. With measured humidity values at the Phoenix Lander site varying from 0-100% in a diurnal cycle, it seems likely that aqueous, briny solutions can form in Martian environmental conditions. Microscope images illustrating water uptake at 243K of an 'Instant Mars' particle. As the RH increases, a visual change (size and darkness) is apparent.

  5. The influence of road salts on water quality in a restored urban stream (Columbus, OH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services. To assess the effects of the restoration on water quality, surface and ground water have been monitored at Minebank Run, MD since 20...

  6. Salts and nutrients present in regenerated waters induce changes in water relations, antioxidative metabolism, ion accumulation and restricted ion uptake in Myrtus communis L. plants.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Motos, José R; Alvarez, Sara; Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Hernández, José A; Sánchez-Blanco, María J

    2014-12-01

    The use of reclaimed water (RW) constitutes a valuable strategy for the efficient management of water and nutrients in landscaping. However, RW may contain levels of toxic ions, affecting plant production or quality, a very important aspect for ornamental plants. The present paper evaluates the effect of different quality RWs on physiological and biochemical parameters and the recovery capacity in Myrtus communis L. plants. M. communis plants were submitted to 3 irrigation treatments with RW from different sources (22 weeks): RW1 (1.7 dS m(-1)), RW2 (4.0 dS m(-1)) and RW3 (8.0 dS m(-1)) and one control (C, 0.8 dS m(-1)). During a recovery period of 11 weeks, all plants were irrigated with the control water. The RW treatments did not negatively affect plant growth, while RW2 even led to an increase in biomass. After recovery,only plants irrigated with RW3 showed some negative effects on growth, which was related to a decrease in the net photosynthesis rate, higher Na accumulation and a reduction in K levels. An increase in salinity was accompanied by decreases in leaf water potential, relative water content and gas exchange parameters, and increases in Na and Cl uptake. Plants accumulated Na in roots and restricted its translocation to the aerial part. The highest salinity levels produced oxidative stress, as seen from the rise in electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation. The use of regenerated water together with carefully managed drainage practices, which avoid the accumulation of salt by the substrate, will provide economic and environmental benefits. PMID:25394799

  7. Surfactant Adsorption at the Salt/Water Interface: Comparing the Conformation and Interfacial Water Structure for Selected Surfactants

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Surfactant Adsorption at the Salt/Water Interface: Comparing the Conformation and Interfacial Water of the monolayers formed and the interactions of interfacial water molecules with these monolayers. FundamentalVersity of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-1253 ReceiVed: September 8, 2004; In Final Form: January 4, 2005 We report

  8. The Transport of Salt and Water across Isolated Rat Ileum: Evidence for at least two distinct pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Clarkson

    1967-01-01

    The flows of sodium, potassium, and chloride under electrical and chemical gradients and of salt and water in the presence of osmotic pressure gradients are described by phenomenological equations based on the thermo- dynamics of irreversible processes. The aim was to give the simplest possible description, that is to postulate the least number of active transport processes and the least

  9. Lorentz Force on Sodium and Chlorine Ions in a Salt Water Solution Flow under a Transverse Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, by applying elementary concepts in electromagnetism and electrochemistry to a system consisting of salt water flowing in a thin rectangular pipe at an average velocity v[subscript A] under the influence of a transverse magnetic field B[subscript 0], an electromotive force generator can be conceived. In fact, the Lorentz force…

  10. 46 CFR 45.77 - Salt water freeboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    (b) When the displacement at the summer load waterline cannot be certified, the addition in inches to the minimum freeboard in fresh water may be obtained by multiplying 0.25 by the summer draught in feet measured from the top of the keel to the center of the load line...

  11. 46 CFR 45.77 - Salt water freeboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    (b) When the displacement at the summer load waterline cannot be certified, the addition in inches to the minimum freeboard in fresh water may be obtained by multiplying 0.25 by the summer draught in feet measured from the top of the keel to the center of the load line...

  12. 46 CFR 45.77 - Salt water freeboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...be certified, the addition in inches to the minimum freeboard in fresh water may be obtained by multiplying 0.25 by the summer draught in feet measured from the top of the keel to the center of the load line...

  13. 46 CFR 45.77 - Salt water freeboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...be certified, the addition in inches to the minimum freeboard in fresh water may be obtained by multiplying 0.25 by the summer draught in feet measured from the top of the keel to the center of the load line...

  14. Response of two coast redwood ( Sequoia sempervirens Endl.) varieties to moderate levels of salt and boron spray measured by stress symptoms: Implications for landscape irrigation using recycled water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Wu; Xun Guo

    2006-01-01

    Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens Endl.) is a popular evergreen tree in landscapes of California and the Pacific Coast States of the United States and Western Canada. Two varieties, Aptos Blue and Los Altos, were tested firstly for tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl) and boron (B) spray and then in landscape setting when irrigated with recycled water. The NaCl and B

  15. The promoter of the sunflower HD-Zip protein gene Hahb4 directs tissue-specific expression and is inducible by water stress, high salt concentrations and ABA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos A. Dezar; Griselda V. Fedrigo; Raquel L. Chan

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, we have analysed the promoter region of the sunflower nuclear gene Hahb4, encoding an homeodomain-leucine zipper protein involved in water stress responses. This region is represented in two different but highly conserved alleles of 1015 and 1221bp, respectively, in the sunflower hybrid studied. To gain insight into the structure and function of these promoter forms, we

  16. DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT

    E-print Network

    DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT Vincent E. Larson1 1-negative everywhere and is normalized. Gregory et al. (2002), Wilson and Gregory (2003), and Bushell et al. (2003 that accounts for how liquid water varies with both total water content and temperature. The variable s has

  17. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-print Network

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo, 195U #12;ABSTRACT The distribution of inorganic and total phosphorus in the waters along the west

  18. Climate Change & Water Presented by Douglas Yoder

    E-print Network

    Sukop, Mike

    1 Climate Change & Water Resources Presented by Douglas Yoder Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department · Climate Change Adaptation Plan · Energy Efficient Operations and Buildings #12;10 Conclusions · Beyond/Flooding · Water Supply/Salt Intrusion · More Frequent Drought/Intense Rain · Natural System Changes

  19. Remote sensing of leaf, canopy and vegetation water contents for satellite climate data records

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  20. Salt Marsh Sediment Biogeochemical Response to the Deep Water Horizon BP Oil Spill (Skiff Island, LA, and Cat Island, Marsh Point, and Salt Pan Island, MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, C. L.; McNeal, K. S.; Mishra, D. R.; Blakeney, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The large scale impact of the Deep Water Horizon BP Oil Spill on biological communities can be better predicted by developing an understanding of how carbon loading from the spill is affecting the microbial and biological communities of salt marshes along the Mississippi and Louisiana Gulf Coast. Sediment biogeochemical processes that degrade enriched carbon pools through sulfate reduction are primarily responsible for the biological breakdown of spilled hydrocarbons (Shin et al., 2000). Determination of sulfide concentration in contaminated areas, therefore, allows for an assessment of the oil spill impact on salt marsh at Skiff Island, LA, and Marsh Point, Cat Island, and Salt Pan Island, MS. As a result of carbon loading, porewater hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentrations are expected to show an increase in the largely anoxic wetland sediment, making the sediment more toxic and inhospitable to marsh vegetation (Alber et al., 2008). High sulfide levels due to carbon loading in hydrocarbon contaminated salt marshes cause microbial activity to increase at the plant rhizospere, leading to plant browning and die back (Eldridge and Morse 2000). Preliminary analysis of the Marsh Point study area was conducted in Fall 2010. Sediment cores indicated that sulfate reducing bacteria are significantly more active in contaminated sediments, producing sulfide concentrations 20x higher than in non-contaminated sediments. The difference in the sediment biogeochemistry between the contaminated site and non-contaminated site at Marsh Point, MS indicated that the effects of hydrocarbon contamination on sulfur cycling in salt marshes should be more spatially explored. In Fall 2011, the study was expanded to include Skiff Island, LA, and Cat Island, and Salt Pan Island, MS in addition to Marsh Point, MS. Sediment electrode profiles (H2S, O2, pH, and Eh), degree of hydrocarbon contamination (GC), grain size analysis, microbial community substrate level carbon utilization profiles, and total organic carbon results will be presented on these four locations in order to explore the potential sedimentary geochemical processes impacting salt marsh dieback, which may be enhanced as a result of the Deep Water Horizon BP Oil Spill.

  1. Polymer capture by ?-hemolysin pore upon salt concentration gradient.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byoung-jin; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the rate of capture of single molecules of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) by ?-hemolysin protein pore by varying applied voltage, pH, and the salt concentration asymmetry across the pore. We show that electrostatic interaction between the polyelectrolyte and the protein pore significantly affects the polymer capture rate in addition to the enhancement of drift arising from electrolyte concentration gradient. At higher pH values where the electrostatic interaction between the polymer and the ?-hemolysin pore is repulsive, an antagonistic coupling with the drift induced by salt concentration gradient emerges. This antagonistic coupling results in a nonmonotonic dependence of the polymer capture rate on the salt concentration in the donor compartment. The coupling between the pore-polymer interaction and drift can be weakened by increasing the strength of the electric field that drives the polymer translocation. In contrast, at lower pH values where the polymer-pore interaction is attractive, a synergy with the additional drift from salt concentration asymmetry arises and the capture rate depends monotonically on the donor salt concentration. For higher pH, we identify two regimes for the enhancement of capture rate by salt concentration gradient: (a) drift-dominated regime, where the capture rate is roughly quadratic in the ratio of salt concentration in the receiver compartment to that in the donor compartment, and (b) antagonistic coupling regime at higher values of this ratio with a linear relation for the polymer capture rate. PMID:24410240

  2. Salt tolerance underlies the cryptic invasion of North American salt marshes by an introduced haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis (Poaceae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vasquez, E.A.; Glenn, E.P.; Brown, J.J.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Nelson, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    A distinct, non-native haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis has become invasive in Atlantic coastal Spartina marshes. We compared the salt tolerance and other growth characteristics of the invasive M haplotype with 2 native haplotypes (F and AC) in greenhouse experiments. The M haplotype retained 50% of its growth potential up to 0.4 M NaCl, whereas the F and AC haplotypes did not grow above 0.1 M NaCl. The M haplotype produced more shoots per gram of rhizome tissue and had higher relative growth rates than the native haplotypes on both freshwater and saline water treatments. The M haplotype also differed from the native haplotypes in shoot water content and the biometrics of shoots and rhizomes. The results offer an explanation for how the M haplotype is able to spread in coastal salt marshes and support the conclusion of DNA analyses that the M haplotype is a distinct ecotype of P. australis.

  3. Access to nitriles from aldehydes mediated by an oxoammonium salt.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christopher B; Lambert, Kyle M; Mercadante, Michael A; Ovian, John M; Bailey, William F; Leadbeater, Nicholas E

    2015-03-27

    A scalable, high yielding, rapid route to access an array of nitriles from aldehydes mediated by an oxoammonium salt (4-acetylamino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxoammonium tetrafluoroborate) and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as an ammonia surrogate has been developed. The reaction likely involves two distinct chemical transformations: reversible silyl-imine formation between HMDS and an aldehyde, followed by oxidation mediated by the oxoammonium salt and desilylation to furnish a nitrile. The spent oxidant can be easily recovered and used to regenerate the oxoammonium salt oxidant. PMID:25665019

  4. Effect of post treatments on the corrosion resistance of plasma sprayed duplex stainless steel coating in salt water

    SciTech Connect

    Kinos, T.; Siitonen, P.; Kettunen, P.; Laurila, V.J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    The uniform composition of a thermally sprayed duplex stainless steel coating is essential to ensure its good corrosion resistance in salt water. Stainless steel coatings made by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) always contain pores and oxides accompanied with chromium-depleted zones which destroy the corrosion resistance of such coatings. To reduce porosity and oxidation of the coatings, several post treatments for the coatings sprayed by APS and by APS with gas shielding around the plasma jet (APS/S) were studied including resin impregnation, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), shot peening and vacuum annealing. Electrochemical corrosion tests revealed that the corrosion resistance of the APS coatings could not be improved by any post treatments because oxidation during spraying caused chromium-depleted zones in the coating. The best corrosion resistance was obtained by using the shielding gas shroud with APS. Such coatings had a very low oxide content and primarily ferritic structure. The corrosion resistance of these APS/S coatings can be further improved by shot peening to densify the coating or by post annealing, which balances the austenite/ferrite ratio of the coating as well as reduce porosity.

  5. Grain orientation in high Tc superconductors by molten salt powder synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sudhakar; Schulze, Walter A.

    1991-01-01

    The molten salt or the flux method is used to fabricate a grain oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (123) superconductor. Here we suggest a two-stage approach in using the 'green phase', Y2BaCuO5 (211), as seed crystals in the formation of YBa2Cu3O(7-x). The process uses Y2BaCuO5 formed by molten salt synthesis. The Y2BaCuO5 phase was observed to be stable in water and in most of the salt systems. Salt processing can form a small quantity of anisotropic particles of Y2BaCuO5. This material can form the 123 phase when tape cast and sintered in the presence of the required levels of Ba and Cu.

  6. [Bio-oil production from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt].

    PubMed

    Ji, Dengxiang; Cai, Tengyue; Ai, Ning; Yu, Fengwen; Jiang, Hongtao; Ji, Jianbing

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of pyrolysis conditions on bio-oil production from biomass in molten salt, experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a self-designed reactor in which the molten salt ZnCl2-KCl (with mole ratio 7/6) was selected as heat carrier, catalyst and dispersion agent. The effects of metal salt added into ZnCl2-KCl and biomass material on biomass pyrolysis were discussed, and the main compositions of bio-oil were determined by GC-MS. Metal salt added into molten salt could affect pyrolysis production yields remarkably. Lanthanon salt could enhance bio-oil yield and decrease water content in bio-oil, when mole fraction of 5.0% LaCl3 was added, bio-oil yield could reach up to 32.0%, and water content of bio-oil could reduce to 61.5%. The bio-oil and char yields were higher when rice straw was pyrolysed, while gas yield was higher when rice husk was used. Metal salts showed great selectivity on compositions of bio-oil. LiCl and FeCl2 promoted biomass to pyrolyse into smaller molecular weight compounds. CrCl3, CaCl2 and LaCl3 could restrain second pyrolysis of bio-oil. The research provided a scientific reference for production of bio-oil from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt. PMID:21650030

  7. Biological treatment of tannery wastewater by using salt-tolerant bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan; Sekar, Sudharshan; Rajakumar, Susheela

    2008-01-01

    Background High salinity (1–10% w/v) of tannery wastewater makes it difficult to be treated by conventional biological treatment. Salt tolerant microbes can adapt to these saline conditions and degrade the organics in saline wastewater. Results Four salt tolerant bacterial strains isolated from marine and tannery saline wastewater samples were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus flexus, Exiguobacterium homiense and Staphylococcus aureus. Growth factors of the identified strains were optimized. Tannery saline wastewater obtained from a Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) near Chennai (southern India) was treated with pure and mixed consortia of four salt tolerant bacterial strains. Experiments with optimized conditions and varying salt content (between 2 and 10% (w/v) were conducted. Salt inhibition effects on COD removal rate were noted. Comparative analysis was made by treating the tannery saline wastewater with activated sludge obtained from CETP and with natural habitat microbes present in raw tannery saline wastewater. Conclusion Salt tolerant bacterial mixed consortia showed appreciable biodegradation at all saline concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% w/v) with 80% COD reduction in particular at 8% salinity level the consortia could be used as suitable working cultures for tannery saline wastewater treatment. PMID:18445252

  8. Microbially mediated CH 4 consumption and N 2 O emission is affected by elevated CO 2 , soil water content, and composition of semi-arid grassland species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feike A. Dijkstra; Jack A. Morgan; Daniel R. LeCain; Ronald F. Follett

    2010-01-01

    Elevated CO2 affects plant productivity, but also water availability and plant species composition in semi-arid grasslands, thereby potentially\\u000a causing complex effects on CH4 consumption and N2O emission. We studied the effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration (400 vs 780 ?L L?1), water content (15 vs 20% gravimetric soil moisture), and composition of semi-arid grassland species (perennial grasses\\u000a Bouteloua gracilis, Hesperostipa comata, and

  9. Salt Effect on Microstructures in Cationic Gemini Surfactant Solutions as Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianbin

    formed by C12CSC12 serials (S ) 4, 6, 8, 10, 12) in deionized water were transformed to micelles whenSalt Effect on Microstructures in Cationic Gemini Surfactant Solutions as Studied by Dynamic LightVed September 12, 2007. In Final Form: NoVember 6, 2007 A cationic gemini surfactant, dodecanediyl-1,12-bis

  10. [Fluoride content in well water in rural areas in Morocco].

    PubMed

    El Jaoudi, R; El Cadi, M Ait; Bouslimane, Y; Fekhaoui, M; Bouklouze, A; Cherrah, Y

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was to determine fluorides (F-) content in the well water consumed as drinking water by some Moroccan populations in rural areas. All samples were collected between April and October 2011. Measurements were performed by an ion selective electrode. Thirty wells spread to cover most of the country and locally chosen based on the number of inhabitants who consume its water. All wells were in rural areas. The mean (+/- SD) of F- was 1.84 +/- 1.6 mg/L with a range from 0.42 to 8.95 mg/L Concentrations of F- in phosphate regions were higher than those found in other regions. More than half of the samples exceeded the current standard. Our study showed that water of some Moroccan regions is naturally rich in F-exposing people who consume it at high risk of fluorosis. PMID:25223146

  11. Fracture of porous materials induced by crystallization of salt

    E-print Network

    Katzoff, Golda Y

    2006-01-01

    The penetration of salt into porous materials is known to have deleterious effects, often resulting in fracture. The damage process begins with a saline solution penetrating the porous network by way of capillary action. ...

  12. Involvement of a glucosinolate (sinigrin) in the regulation of water transport in Brassica oleracea grown under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Muries, Beatriz; Moreno, Diego Ángel; Dominguez-Perles, Raúl; García-Viguera, Cristina; Carvajal, Micaela

    2014-02-01

    Members of the Brassicaceae are known for their contents of nutrients and health-promoting phytochemicals, including glucosinolates. The concentrations of these chemopreventive compounds (glucosinolate-degradation products, the bioactive isothiocyanates) may be modified under salinity. In this work, the effect of the aliphatic glucosinolate sinigrin (2-propenyl-glucosinolate) on plant water balance, involving aquaporins, was explored under salt stress. For this purpose, water uptake and its transport through the plasma membrane were determined in plants after NaCl addition, when sinigrin was also supplied. We found higher hydraulic conductance (L0 ) and water permeability (Pf ) and increased abundance of PIP2 aquaporins after the direct administration of sinigrin, showing the ability of the roots to promote cellular water transport across the plasma membrane in spite of the stress conditions imposed. The higher content of the allyl-isothiocyanate and the absence of sinigrin in the plant tissues suggest that the isothiocyanate is related to water balance; in fact, a direct effect of this nitro-sulphate compound on water uptake is proposed. This work provides the first evidence that the addition of a glucosinolate can regulate aquaporins and water transport: this effect and the mechanism(s) involved merit further investigation. PMID:23837634

  13. The Fatty Acid Content of Ocean Water 

    E-print Network

    Slowey, James Frank

    1960-01-01

    was used. The ethyl acetate was redistilled through a Vigreaux column and only the middle two-thirds of the distillate were used for ex- traction of sea water. B. Benzene. Analytical reagent grade benzene manufactured by Mallinckrodt Chemical Works... to that for ethyl acetate, F. Sodium sulfate. Anhydrous, analytical reagent grade sodium sulfate manufactured by Mallinckrodt Chemical Works was used to dry the methyl esters, G. Sodium bicarbonate. Analytical reagent grade sodium bicarbo- nate manufactured...

  14. The Effects of Tidal Export from Salt Marsh Ditches on Estuarine Water Quality and Plankton Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian Koch; Christopher J. Gobler

    2009-01-01

    Salt marshes are an important transition zone between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and in their natural state, they\\u000a often function to cycle or trap terrestrially derived nutrients and organic matter. Many US salt marshes were ditched during\\u000a the twentieth century, potentially altering their functionality. The goal of this 4-year study was to assess the impact of\\u000a water from ditches within

  15. Determination of trace metal ions in common salt by stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Ali, A M

    1999-01-01

    Sensitive voltammetric methods using cathodic and anodic differential pulse stripping techniques were applied for determination of trace ions cadmium(II), cobalt(II), copper(II), lead(II), manganese(II), nickel(II), and zinc(II), which are usually found in different grades of common salt as contaminants. The optimal conditions, i.e., deposition time, preconcentration potential, supporting electrolyte, and ionic strength, were investigated for each metal ion. Concentration of the metal ion was determined by the standard addition method. Metal content varied according to the quality of the table salt. PMID:10589495

  16. The influence of the hydrophobic agent, catalyst, solvent and water content on the wetting properties of the silica films prepared by one-step sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Maedeh; Vaezi, Mohammad Reza; Kazemzadeh, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we used one-step sol-gel process to prepare the hydrophobic silica films on the glass substrate from the ethyltriethoxysilane (ETES) as a precursor and iso-octyltrimethoxysilane (Iso-OTMS) as a hydrophobic agent. In order to study the effect of the hydrophobic agent on the water repellent properties of the silica films, the alcosol was prepared by keeping constant the molar ratio of ETES:EtOH:H2O at 1:36.2:6.3, with 6 M ammonium hydroxide and Iso-OTMS/ETES molar ratio varied from 0.2 to 1.4. Also, we investigated the influence of the other sol-gel reaction parameters, such as catalyst, solvent and water content and their effect on the morphology and hydrophobic properties of the silica films. The results revealed that by altering the molar ratio of NH4OH, EtOH and H2O, different sizes of silica nanoparticles from 41.24 to 86.16 nm were obtained. The silica films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images, contact angle measurement (CA) and percentage of optical transmission.

  17. The common killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, inhabits brackish water estuaries and salt marshes along the eastern

    E-print Network

    Scott, Graham

    3399 The common killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, inhabits brackish water estuaries and saltMichele and Westerman, 1997). Species within the genus Fundulus are suggested to have arisen from brackish water within F. heteroclitus that form the basis for variation in freshwater tolerance. The Journal

  18. Estimation of Water Circulation in a Mediterranean Salt Marsh and its Relationship with Flooding Causes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xavier D. Quintana

    Variations in water volume in small depressions in Mediterranean salt marshes in Girona (Spain) are described and the poten- tial causes for these variations analysed. Although the basins appear to be endorrheic, groundwater circulation is intense, as estimated from the difference between water volume observed and that expected from the balance precipitation \\/ evaporation. The rate of variation in volume

  19. Pure water injection into porous rock with superheated steam and salt in a solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montegrossi, G.; Tsypkin, G.; Calore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Most of geothermal fields require injection of fluid into the hot rock to maintain pressure and productivity. The presence of solid salt in porous space may cause an unexpected change in the characteristics of the reservoir and produced fluids, and dramatically affect the profitability of the project. We consider an injection problem of pure water into high temperature geothermal reservoir, saturated with superheated vapour and solid salt. Pure water moves away from injection point and dissolves solid salt. When salty water reaches the low-pressure hot domain, water evaporation occurs and, consequently, salt precipitates. We develop a simplified analytical model of the process and derive the similarity solutions for a 1-D semi-infinite reservoir. These solutions are multi-valued and describe the reduction in permeability and porosity due to salt precipitation at the leading boiling front. If the parameters of the system exceed critical values, then similarity solution ceases to exist. We identify this mathematical behaviour with reservoir sealing in the physical system. The TOUGH2-EWASG code has been used to verify this hypothesis and investigate the precipitate formation for an idealized bounded 1-D geothermal system of a length of 500 m with water injection at one extreme and fluid extraction at the other one. Both boundaries are kept at constant pressure and temperature. The result for the semi-infinite numerical model show that the monotonic grow of the solid salt saturation to reach asymptotic similarity solution generally occurs over a very large length starting from the injection point. Reservoir sealing occurs if solid salt at the initial state occupies a considerable part of the porous space. Numerical experiments for the bounded 500 m system demonstrate that a small amount of salt is enough to get reservoir sealing. Generally, salt tend to accumulate near the production well, and salt plug forms at the elements adjacent to the extraction point. This type of simulation studies can be applied to Hot Dry Rock systems to investigate the effects of dissolution/precipitation of solid salt, if present in the system, on the feasibility of the project.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Soil Water Content as Influenced by Environmental Factors in a Small Catchment on the Hilly-Gully Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Wen, Fenxiang; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Hu, Yani

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of soil water content (SWC) profiles at catchment scale has profound implications for understanding hydrological processes of the terrestrial water cycle, thereby contributing to sustainable water management and ecological restoration in arid and semi-arid regions. This study described the vertical profiles of SWC at the small catchment scale on the hilly and gully Loess Plateau in Northeast China, and evaluated the influences of selected environmental factors (land-use type, topography and landform) on average SWC within 300 cm depth. Soils were sampled from 101 points across a small catchment before and after the rainy season. Cluster analysis showed that soil profiles with high-level SWC in a stable trend (from top to bottom) were most commonly present in the catchment, especially in the gully related to terrace. Woodland soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in a descending or stable trend. Most abandoned farmland and grassland soil profiles had medium-level SWC with vertical variations in varying trends. No soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in an ascending trend. Multi-regression analysis showed that average SWC was significantly affected by land-use type in different soil layers (0–20, 20–160, and 160–300 cm), generally in descending order of terrace, abandoned farmland, grassland, and woodland. There was a significant negative correlation between average SWC and gradient along the whole profile (P<0.05). Landform significantly affected SWC in the surface soil layer (0–20 cm) before the rainy season but throughout the whole profile after the rainy season, with lower levels on the ridge than in the gully. Altitude only strongly affected SWC after the rainy season. The results indicated that land-use type, gradient, landform, and altitude should be considered in spatial SWC estimation and sustainable water management in these small catchments on the Loess Plateau as well as in other complex terrains with similar settings. PMID:25313829

  1. Increased renal ANP synthesis, but decreased or unchanged cardiac ANP synthesis in water-deprived and salt-restricted rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shyi-Jang Shin; Jin-Der Wen; I-Hsuan Chen; I; Feng-Jie Lai; Ming-Chia Hsieh; Tusty-Jiuan Hsieh; Mian-Shin Tan; Juei-Hsiung Tsai

    1998-01-01

    Increased renal ANP synthesis, but decreased or unchanged cardiac ANP synthesis in water-deprived and salt-restricted rats.BackgroundExperiments were performed to examine the effect of water deprivation and salt restriction on ANP synthesis in the kidneys and hearts of normal rats.MethodsA 4-day water deprivation (WD) and 7-day salt restriction (SR; 0.01% NaCl) were performed in 12 and 14 rats, respectively. Atrial natriuretic

  2. Experimental Study on Hydrothermal Plume Dynamics in a Stratified Salt Water Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; He, Z.; Jiang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal plumes are generated by high temperature hydrothermal venting systems occurred at many places along the mid-ocean ridges. The understanding of interaction between plumes and surrounding seawater are important since plumes transport significant heat and chemicals from the lithosphere to the ocean. This paper presents an experimental study on plume generation, mixing, entrainment and rising in a stratified salt water tank. The two-tank method is first improved to produce a stable linear stratification in the tank. A series of plume experiments using different orifice diameters and fluxes are then carried out to evaluate the characteristics of plumes. The stratification of salt water is measured and buoyancy frequency is calculated to provide the background information. The plume shape, flow field, rise height, and buoyancy flux are analyzed using image processing methods. The results show that the established experimental system is capable of providing stable linear stratifications for laboratory studies of hydrothermal plumes. The measured plume shapes and rise heights are in good agreement with available empirical formulae in the literature.

  3. Iatrogenic salt water drowning and the hazards of a high central venous pressure.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    Current teaching and guidelines suggest that aggressive fluid resuscitation is the best initial approach to the patient with hemodynamic instability. The source of this wisdom is difficult to discern, however, Early Goal Directed therapy (EGDT) as championed by Rivers et al. and the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines appears to have established this as the irrefutable truth. However, over the last decade it has become clear that aggressive fluid resuscitation leading to fluid overload is associated with increased morbidity and mortality across a diverse group of patients, including patients with severe sepsis as well as elective surgical and trauma patients and those with pancreatitis. Excessive fluid administration results in increased interstitial fluid in vital organs leading to impaired renal, hepatic and cardiac function. Increased extra-vascular lung water (EVLW) is particularly lethal, leading to iatrogenic salt water drowning. EGDT and the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines recommend targeting a central venous pressure (CVP)?>?8 mmHg. A CVP?>?8 mmHg has been demonstrated to decrease microcirculatory flow, as well as renal blood flow and is associated with an increased risk of renal failure and death. Normal saline (0.9% salt solution) as compared to balanced electrolyte solutions is associated with a greater risk of acute kidney injury and death. This paper reviews the adverse effects of large volume resuscitation, a high CVP and the excessive use of normal saline. PMID:25110606

  4. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  5. Water Dynamics in Divalent and Monovalent Concentrated Salt Chiara H. Giammanco, Daryl B. Wong, and Michael D. Fayer*

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Divalent and Monovalent Concentrated Salt Solutions Chiara H. Giammanco, Daryl B, United States ABSTRACT: Water hydrogen bond dynamics in concentrated salt solutions are studied using causes a shift in absorption frequency relative to that of the OD stretch absorption in bulk pure water

  6. Fundamental salt and water transport properties in directly copolymerized disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Xie; Joe Cook; Ho Bum Park; Benny D. Freeman; Chang Hyun Lee; James E. McGrath

    2011-01-01

    Water and sodium chloride solubility, diffusivity and permeability in disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPS) copolymers were measured for both acid and salt form samples at sulfonation levels from 20 to 40 mol percent. The hydrophilicity of these materials, based on water uptake, increased significantly as sulfonation level increased. The water permeability of BPS materials in both the salt and acid forms

  7. Water, salt, and energy balances of the Dead Sea N. G. Lensky, Y. Dvorkin, and V. Lyakhovsky

    E-print Network

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Water, salt, and energy balances of the Dead Sea N. G. Lensky, Y. Dvorkin, and V. Lyakhovsky, and energy balances of the Dead Sea, Water Resour. Res., 41, W12418, doi:10.1029/2005WR004084. 1 is less than that from a freshwater surface because the dissolved salts lower the free energy of the water

  8. Electrodialysis technology for salt recovery from aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.; Krumdick, G.; Graziano, D.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    2000-02-02

    Electrodialysis technology for recovering salt from aluminum salt cake is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Salt cake, a slag-like aluminum-industry waste stream, contains aluminum metal, salt (NaCl and KCl), and nonmetallics (primarily aluminum oxide). Salt cake can be recycled by digesting with water and filtering to recover the metal and oxide values. A major obstacle to widespread salt cake recycling is the cost of recovering salt from the process brine. Electrodialysis technology developed at Argonne appears to be a cost-effective approach to handling the salt brines, compared to evaporation or disposal. In Argonne's technology, the salt brine is concentrated until salt crystals are precipitated in the electrodialysis stack; the crystals are recovered downstream. The technology is being evaluated on the pilot scale using Eurodia's EUR 40-76-5 stack.

  9. MONITORING OF SALT-INDUCED DEFORMATIONS IN POROUS SYSTEMS BY MICROSCOPIC SPECKLE PATTERN INTERFEROMETRY

    E-print Network

    Hinsch, Klaus

    MONITORING OF SALT-INDUCED DEFORMATIONS IN POROUS SYSTEMS BY MICROSCOPIC SPECKLE PATTERN porosity distribution, and its negligible humidity expansion. The glass sam- ples, soaked with salt: electronic speckle pattern interferometry, deformation measurement, salt crys- tallization, phase transition

  10. Water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes, northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Carr; S. J. Halasz; F. Liscum

    1980-01-01

    This report contains water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine Salt Domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin. Water-quality data were compiled for aquifers in the Wilcox Group, the Carrizo Sand, and the Queen City Sand. The data include analyses for dissolved solids, pH, temperature, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate,

  11. Leaching of lead by ammonium salts and EDTA from Salvinia minima biomass produced during aquatic phytoremediation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Aurelio Núñez-López; Yunny Meas; Silvia Citlalli Gama; Raúl Ortega Borges; Eugenia J. Olguín

    2008-01-01

    Plant biomass harvested after heavy-metal phytoremediation must be considered as a hazardous waste that should be contained or treated appropriately before disposal or reuse. As a potential method to detoxify the biomass and to convert this material to a suitable fertilizer or mulch, leaching of lead (Pb) from Salvinia minima biomass was studied by testing water, several aqueous ammonium salts,

  12. Ephemeral thermal and solute plumes formed by upwelling groundwaters near salt domes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Williams; Vishnu Ranganathan

    1994-01-01

    Geochemical observations made by previous workers indicate that rapid upward advection of hot water has occurred along the flanks of some salt domes in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Basin and in the Danish Central Trough. The observations are based on pore fluid chemistry and on high temperatures of formation of metal sulfides and other diagenetic minerals near the crests

  13. Promotion of meridional overturning by Mediterranean-derived salt during the last deglaciation

    E-print Network

    Rohling, Eelco

    Promotion of meridional overturning by Mediterranean-derived salt during the last deglaciation M of the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) prior to and through the last deglaciation played an important role that they gradually increased through the last deglaciation. Between 17.5 and 14.6 thousand years ago (ka B.P., where

  14. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Water Content using Shortwave Infrared Reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. The Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) had an objective of developing and testing algorithms for a vegetation water content (VWC) data product using sh...

  15. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  16. Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Content using the Forward

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    Citation Flight 4 Hz averaged FSSP and King Probe cloud liquid water content data. #12;4 Hz averaged FSSP and King Probe cloud liquid water content data. September 24, 2004 Citation Flight #12;How well do) On the Right Wing of the Citation Research Aircraft #12;The beam splitter divides the scattered light onto two

  17. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants' response to water- or salinity-stress ranges from full compensation to severe reduction in transpiration, depending on the availability of water in their surrounding soil. Results of applying different treatments of salinity and drought will be shown. Available models of root water uptake will be employed to simulate the obtained results.

  18. Water resources, salinity and salt yields of the rivers of the Bolivian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Michel-Alain; Jauregui, Carlos Fernandez

    1988-06-01

    This is the first time that the water resources, the salinity and the yields of the upper basins of the Madera River have been reported. Formed by the confluence of the Beni and Mamore, the Madera is one of the world's largest rivers: 17,000 m 3s -1, approximately half the discharge of the Congo River. It has a dissolved discharge close to that of the Congo River: 1 ts -1 of ions. Likewise, the Beni and the Mamore Rivers, are also classified as large rivers, greater than the Volga River, the largest in Europe, and the Niger River, the second largest in Africa. The amounts of water involved are considerable. The average dissolved content of these rivers, 57-61 mg l -1 respectively, is relatively low to medium. Many types of water, classified according to their ionic compositions, have been characterized in the Andes, the Amazon Plain, and in the main drainage axis. The slightly mineralized black water of the plain seems the most unique type. Recycling of water vapor in the Amazon Basin is confirmed by the low chloride and sodium contents of the water in the plain. Thus the importance of this phenomenon in the genesis of rainfall throughout the basin is emphasized. The contribution of the Upper Madera River to the Amazon River is 9.7% of the water and 10.9% of ionic load.

  19. Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan B.

    2010-09-01

    Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

  20. ATTACHMENT OF ESCHERICHIA COLI TO SOIL AGGREGATES AS AFFECTED BY AGGREGATE WATER CONTENT AND PRESENCE OF MANURE COLLOIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many soils contain relatively large structural units that do not slack when soil is being wetted. Soil aggregates, obtained from dry soil samples by sieving, present a model media to study the interactions of intact soils with dissolved or suspended contaminants. Land-applied manures may contain var...

  1. Impacts of Metal Salt Addition on Water Chemistry of Lake Elsinore, California: 2. Calcium Salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Anderson

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory studies using water samples collected from Lake Elsinore in June 2002 demonstrated that addition of CA substantively changed the water chemistry. The addition of agricultural gypsum, rock gypsum and CaCl2 all lowered equilibrium pH and alkalinity levels, while increasing the dissolved Ca concentration. Solution pH decreased linearly with increasing Ca dose, from 9.0 with no added Ca, to about

  2. Regulation of mdr2 P-glycoprotein expression by bile salts.

    PubMed Central

    Frijters, C M; Ottenhoff, R; van Wijland, M J; van Nieuwkerk, C M; Groen, A K; Oude Elferink, R P

    1997-01-01

    The phosphatidyl translocating activity of the mdr2 P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in the canalicular membrane of the mouse hepatocyte is a rate-controlling step in the biliary secretion of phospholipid. Since bile salts also regulate the secretion of biliary lipids, we investigated the influence of the type of bile salt in the circulation on mdr2 Pgp expression and activity. Male mice were led a purified diet to which either 0.1% (w/w) cholate or 0.5% (w/w) ursodeoxycholate was added. This led to a near-complete replacement of the endogenous bile salt pool (mainly tauromuricholate) by taurocholate or tauroursodeoxycholate respectively. The phospholipid secretion capacity was then determined by infusion of increasing amounts of tauroursodeoxycholate. Cholate feeding resulted in a 55% increase in maximal phospholipid secretion compared with that in mice on the control diet. Northern blotting revealed that cholate feeding increased mdr2 Pgp mRNA levels by 42%. Feeding with ursodeoxycholate did not influence the maximum rate of phospholipid output or the mdr2 mRNA content. Female mice had a higher basal mdr2 Pgp mRNA level than male mice, and this was also correlated with a higher phospholipid secretion capacity. This could be explained by the 4-fold higher basal cholate content in the bile of female compared with male mice. Our results suggest that the type of bile salts in the circulation influences the expression of the mdr2 gene. PMID:9020871

  3. ESTIMATING SOIL WATER CONTENT USING COKRIGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using cokriging, estimates and estimation variances of the gravimetric moisture content (GMC) were made using one and two additional random functions: the bare soil surface temperature and the percent sand content. Various measures of the differences and quality of the estimates ...

  4. Preparation of Al-La Master Alloy by Thermite Reaction in NaF-NaCl-KCl Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Poknam; Li, Hyonmo; Kim, Wenjae; Wang, Zhaowen; Liu, Fengguo

    2015-05-01

    A NaF-NaCl-KCl ternary system containing La2O3 was investigated for the preparation of Al-La master alloy by the thermite reaction method. The solubility of La2O3 in NaF-NaCl-KCl molten salt was determined by the method of isothermal solution saturation. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to consider the content of La2O3 in molten salt and the supernatant composition of molten salt after dissolution of La2O3, respectively. The results showed that the content of NaF had a positive influence on the solubility of La2O3 in NaF-NaCl-KCl molten salts, and the solubility of La2O3 could reach 8.71 wt.% in molten salts of 50 wt.%NaF-50 wt.% (44 wt.%NaCl + 56 wt.%KCl). The XRD pattern of cooling molten salt indicated the formation of LaOF in molten salt, which was probably obtained by the reaction between NaF and La2O3. The kinetic study showed that the thermite reaction was in accord with a first-order reaction model. The main influence factors on La content in the Al-La master alloy product, including molten salt composition, amount of Al, concentration of La2O3, stirring, reduction time and temperature, were investigated by single-factor experimentation. The content of La in the Al-La master alloy could be reached to 10.1 wt.%.

  5. Water-Insoluble Surface Coatings of Polyion-Surfactant Ion Complex Salts Respond to Additives in a Surrounding Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Charlotte; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Piculell, Lennart

    2015-06-16

    Hydrated, but water-insoluble, "complex salts" (CS) composed of alkyltrimethylammonium surfactant ions with polyacrylate counterions are known to exhibit a rich phase behavior in bulk mixtures with water and have recently been shown to act as water-responsive surface coatings. Here it is shown, by SAXS measurements, that surface coatings of CS also respond to various added solutes in a surrounding aqueous solution, by altering their liquid crystalline structure. The obtained results provide new information on the phase behavior of CS in contact with water and aqueous solutions. Solutes such as acids, salts, excess ionic surfactant, or water-soluble polymers act on the CS by altering the polyion charge density, screening the electrostatic interaction, changing the curvature of the surfactant aggregate, or increasing the osmotic pressuring in the surrounding solution, all of which may result in a phase transition in the film. In water, all studied CS surface coatings had a micellar cubic structure, which could change to 2D hexagonal, HCP, or disordered micellar structure, depending on the identity of the CS and the identity and concentration of the added solute. For some systems, even dissolved CO2 from the ambient air was sufficient to induce a structural change in the film. Especially the films containing the long polyions remained intact even for large concentrations of solutes in the contacting solutions, and extensive washing in water resulted, in most cases, in films with the "original" structure found in water. PMID:26017683

  6. SALT SPRAY DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS WATER STATUS, NECROSIS, AND GROWTH IN COASTAL SANDPLAIN HEATHLAND SPECIES1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MEGAN E. GRIFFITHS; COLIN M. ORIANS

    2003-01-01

    Sandplain heathlands are disturbance-dependent plant communities that occur infrequently in coastal areas of the northeastern United States. We hypothesize that salt spray plays a role in maintaining the composition of the heathland community by excluding salt- intolerant species close to the ocean. We examined the distributions of Solidago nemoralis, Myrica pensylvanica, Pinus rigida, and Quercus spp. in heathlands and conducted

  7. Mineralogical study of stream waters and efflorescent salts in Sierra Minera, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria luz; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Hernandez, Carmen; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements contained in the residues from mining and metallurgical operations are often dispersed by wind and/or water after their disposal. These areas have severe erosion problems caused by water run-off in which soil and mine spoil texture, landscape topography and regional and microclimate play an important role. Water pollution by dissolved metals in mining areas has mainly been associated with the oxidation of sulphide-bearing minerals exposed to weathering conditions, resulting in low quality effluents of acidic pH and containing a high level of dissolved metals. The studied area, Sierra Minera, is close to the mining region of La Unión (Murcia, SE Spain). This area constituted an important mining centre for more than 2500 years, ceasing activity in 1991. The ore deposits of this zone have iron, lead and zinc as the main metal components. Studied area showed a lot of contaminations sources, formed by mining steriles, waste piles and foundry residues. As a consequence of the long period of mining activity, large volumes of wastes were generated during the mineral concentration and smelting processes. Historically, these wastes were dumped into watercourses, filling riverbeds and contaminating their surroundings. 40 sediment samples were collected from the area affected by mining exploitations, and at increasing distances from the contamination sources in 4 zones In addition, 36 surficial water samples were collected after a rain episode The Zn and Fe content was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Pb and Cd content was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The As content was measured by atomic fluorescence spectrometry using an automated continuous flow hydride generation spectrometer and Al content was determined by ICP-MS. Mineralogical composition of the samples was made by X Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis using Cu-K? radiation with a PW3040 Philips Diffractometer. Zone A: Water sample collected in A5 is strongly influenced by a tailing dump, and showed high trace element contents. In addition, is influenced by the sea water and then showed high bromide, chloride, sodium and magnesium content, together with a basic pH.The DRX results of evaporate water showed that halite, hexahydrite and gypsum are present: halite corroborates the sea influence and gypsum and hexahydrite the importance of soluble sulphates. A9 water showed acid pH and high trace elements content; is influenced by the tailing dump and also by waters from El Beal gully watercourse, transporting materials from Sierra Minera Waters affected by secondary contamination are influenced by mining wastes, the sea water and also are affected by agricultural activities (nitrate content). These waters have been mixed with carbonate materials, present in the zone increasing the pH. Some elements have precipitated, such as Cu and Pb, while Cd, Zn and As are soluble. The DRX analysis in the evaporate if A14 showed that halite and gypsum are present: halite confirms the seawater influence and gypsum the relationship between calcium and sulphates A2 and A6 waters are affected by tertiary contamination and showed basic pH, soluble carbonates and lower trace element content. Only Zn, Cd and Al are present. Zone B: All waters are strongly affected by mining activities and showed: acid pH, high trace element content and high content of soluble sulphates. The evaporate of B8 and B12 showed the presence of soluble sulphates: gypsum, halite, bianchite, paracoquimbite, halotrichite and siderotil in B8; gypsum, bianchite, paracoquimbite and coquimbite in B12; gypsum, hexahydrite, carnalite, bianchite, copiapite and sideroti in B10 and polihalite, gypsum, bianchite, coquimbite and paracoquimbite in B14. All the sampling points collected in Zone C are affected by primary contamination, because there are a lot of tailing dumps and sampling points are located close to them. C1 showed high trace element content because is a reception point of a lot of tailing dumps. Water samples from C3 to C8 also had

  8. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR METAL IMMOBILIZATION APPLICATION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVE CAPS IN FRESH AND SALT WATER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M

    2006-11-17

    This research evaluated the removal of inorganic contaminants by a variety of amendments and mixtures of amendments in fresh and salt water. A series of removal and retention batch experiments was conducted to identify the best treatment for metal removal. Metal removal by the amendments was evaluated by calculating the partition coefficient and percent removal. Retention of metals by the amendments was evaluated in retention (desorption) studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays (e.g., OCB-750), and the biopolymer, chitosan, are very effective in removal and retention of metals in both fresh and salt water. These amendments are being evaluated further as components in the development of active caps for sediment remediation.

  9. Single- and dual-wavelength radar determination of liquid-water content in a Texas thunderstorm

    E-print Network

    Linn, Charles Theodore

    1976-01-01

    SINGLE- AND DUAL-WAVELENGTH RADAR DETERMINATION OF LIQUID-WATER CONTENT IN A TEXAS THUNDERSTORM A Thesis by CHARLES THEODORE LINN l Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1976 Major Subject: Meteorology SINGLE-AND DUAL-WAVELENGTH RADAR DETERMINATION OF LIQUID-WATER CONTENT IN A TEXAS THUNDERSTORM A Thesis by CHARLES THEODORE LINN Approved as to style and content by: (Ch rman...

  10. Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

  11. Polder Effects on Sediment-to-Soil Conversion: Water Table, Residual Available Water Capacity, and Salt Stress Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Radimy, Raymond Tojo; Dudoignon, Patrick; Hillaireau, Jean Michel; Deboute, Elise

    2013-01-01

    The French Atlantic marshlands, reclaimed since the Middle Age, have been successively used for extensive grazing and more recently for cereal cultivation from 1970. The soils have acquired specific properties which have been induced by the successive reclaiming and drainage works and by the response of the clay dominant primary sediments, that is, structure, moisture, and salinity profiles. Based on the whole survey of the Marais Poitevin and Marais de Rochefort and in order to explain the mechanisms of marsh soil behavior, the work focuses on two typical spots: an undrained grassland since at least 1964 and a drained cereal cultivated field. The structure-hydromechanical profiles relationships have been established thanks to the clay matrix shrinkage curve. They are confronted to the hydraulic functioning including the fresh-to-salt water transfers and to the recording of tensiometer profiles. The CE1/5 profiles supply the water geochemical and geophysical data by their better accuracy. Associated to the available water capacity calculation they allow the representation of the parallel evolution of the residual available water capacity profiles and salinity profiles according to the plant growing and rooting from the mesophile systems of grassland to the hygrophile systems of drained fields. PMID:23990758

  12. Wittig reactions in water. Synthesis of new water-soluble phosphonium salts and their reactions with substituted benzaldehydes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew G Russell; Stuart Warren

    1998-01-01

    We report the synthesis of new phosphonium salts which are soluble and stable in basic aqueous solution. The Wittig reactions of these phosphonium salts with substituted benzaldehydes in aqueous sodium hydroxide are discussed. These reactions exclude the use of any organic solvents and the products are isolated by a simple filtration.

  13. Efficiency improvement of heat exchangers by the rational choice of the range of frequencies of electromagnetic water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, D. M.; Laptev, A. G.

    2015-05-01

    The electromagnetic water treatment is considered as one of the reagentless methods to reduce the scaling and to improve the cooling efficiency of high-temperature gas flows. It is achieved by the rational choice of the frequency range under laboratory conditions. The choice is made by the lowest particle size distribution of the precipitated particles. The time analysis of the content of hardness salts in the treated water is carried out at the input to and output of the heat exchanger.

  14. Water transfer in soil at low water content. Is the local equilibrium assumption still appropriate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouedraogo, F.; Cherblanc, F.; Naon, B.; Bénet, J.-C.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of water content in the superficial layers of soils is critical in the modelling of land-surface processes. In arid regions, vapour flux contributes significantly to the global water mass balance. To account for it in theoretical descriptions, most of the models proposed in the literature rely on the local equilibrium assumption that constrains the vapour pressure to remain at its equilibrium value. It implicitly amounts to consider an instantaneous phase change. Recent works underlined a retardation time and a decrease in phase change rate as the water content gets lower. Therefore, the objective is to revisit water transport modelling by rejecting the local equilibrium assumption. This requires developing a non-equilibrium model by taking into account the phase change kinetics. To assess the interest of this approach, a natural soil of Burkina-Faso has been experimentally characterized from independent tests and soil column experiments have been carried out. The comparison of experimental drying kinetics and water content profiles with computational predictions confirms the reliability of this description. Liquid/gas non-equilibrium is significant in a limited subsurface zone which defines explicitly the transition from liquid transport in lower layers to vapour transport in upper layers, i.e., the evaporation front. The overall moisture dynamics is governed by the coupling between water transport mechanisms (liquid filtration, vapour diffusion, phase change) that mainly occurs in this transition zone.

  15. Apoplastic barrier development and water transport in Zea mays seedling roots under salt and osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Guoxin; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The development of apoplastic barriers was studied in Zea mays seedling roots grown in hydroculture solution supplemented with 0-200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Casparian bands in the endodermis of both NaCl- and PEG-treated roots were observed closer to the root tip in comparison with those of control roots, but the cell wall modifications in the endodermis and exodermis induced by salt and osmotic stresses differed. High salinity induced the formation of a multiseriate exodermis, which ranged from several cell layers to the entire cortex tissue but did not noticeably influence cell wall suberization in the endodermis. In contrast, osmotic stress accelerated suberization in both the endodermis and exodermis, but the exodermis induced by osmotic stress was limited to several cell layers in the outer cortex adjacent to the epidermis. The hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp) had decreased significantly after 1 day of PEG treatment, whereas in NaCl-treated roots, Lp decreased to a similar level after 5 days of treatment. Peroxidase activity in the roots increased significantly in response to NaCl and PEG treatments. These data indicate that salt stress and osmotic stress have different effects on the development of apoplastic barriers and water transport in Z. mays seedling roots. PMID:24965373

  16. A route to explain water anomalies from results on an aqueous solution of salt

    E-print Network

    D. Corradini; M. Rovere; P. Gallo

    2010-03-26

    In this paper we investigate the possibility to detect the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in supercooled aqueous solutions of salts. Molecular dynamics computer simulations are conducted on bulk TIP4P water and on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride in TIP4P water, with concentration c = 0.67 mol/kg. The liquid-liquid critical point is found both in the bulk and in the solution. Its position in the thermodynamic plane shifts to higher temperature and lower pressure for the solution. Comparison with available experimental data allowed us to produce the phase diagrams of both bulk water and the aqueous solution as measurable in experiments. Given the position of the liquid-liquid critical point in the solution as obtained from our simulations, the experimental determination of the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in aqueous solutions of salts appears possible.

  17. Study on internal water vapor content and related military standards of hermetic package devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shao-Hua Yu; Cheng Gao; Xiang-Fen Wang

    2010-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important contaminants which caused devices failure. Internal water vapor content of hermetic package devices is closely related to the sealing performance, water absorption substances inside the package, leak plugging and other factors. The main mechanisms of leak plugging and water absorption by moisture absorbing substances are theoretically analyzed in this paper. Considering the

  18. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Mikhailov; S. Vlasenko; R. Niessner; U. Pöschl

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Köhler theory calculations (100-300nm particle size range, 298K, 960hPa). BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance

  19. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Mikhailov; S. Vlasenko; R. Niessner; U. Pöschl

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles in the 100-200 nm size range composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor at ambient temperature and pressure (25°C, 1 atm) has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Köhler theory calculations.

  20. Salt marsh retreat induced by wind waves: experiments, field and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, L.; Francalanci, S.; Bendoni, M.; Cappietti, L.

    2013-12-01

    Edge erosion of salt marshes due to surface waves and tide forcing is likely the chief mechanism that models marsh boundaries and by which salt marshes in worldwide areas are being lost. To address this problem, an experimental investigation in a laboratory flume and field measurements collected in the lagoon of Venice were conducted to understand the main processes controlling marsh edge retreat with a focus on the erosion mechanisms caused by the impact of wind waves in the case of various tidal levels. A physical model reproducing a salt marsh bank was built inside a long wave current flume where random surface waves have been generated according to a given wave spectrum. The physical model was constructed with the original soil of salt marshes from the Venice Lagoon, while the wave climate was reproduced according to field measurements. In order to reveal the effect of vegetation on bank stability, two identical banks were built but for the inclusion of halophytic plants. A first set of experiments was conducted reproducing only tidal waves, a second set with wind waves superimposed to the tide. A third set o f experiments were aimed to investigate the dynamic impact and transmission of the waves on and within the bank. The following quantities were collected during the experiments: water content and pore water pressure inside the bank, water levels and velocities at various distances from the bank, dynamic pressures on the bank edge surface and internal pressure fluctuations due to wave impact. Bank geometry profile and bottom topography at different times have also been collected to characterize the erosion rate with time and the evolution of bank retreat. Two types of mass failures were observed during the experiments: slides and toppling failures. The latter were most frequently observed failures, consisting in the toppling of blocks and were often the consequence of the presence of deep tension cracks. In most cases the impact of wind waves caused the overturning of the block. In both the unvegetated and vegetated experiments, mass failures occurred in the first part of the experiment whereas the remaining part was characterized by particle by particle erosion. Effect of vegetation lead to a delay in block failures due the presence of roots, although the total eroded volume differed slightly between the two scenarios. The field measurements were aimed at quantifying the erosion characteristics of marsh soil and the wave climate close to the bank edge during a moderate wind event. Several pressure transducers installed 0.15 m above the bed and adequately spaced were used to collect wave height and wave direction with respect to the edge of the marsh. Then, on the base of experimental and field evidence, a new toppling model is proposed and test against laboratory data: a block of cohesive material at incipient failing condition is attached to the underlying layer and identified by the presence of tension crack; it behaves as a dynamical system subjected to several forces, until the tensile strength of the material is exceed. Test of the model showed its capability at reproducing the failure process and it highlighted which are the most crucial conditions in promoting the failure of a bank edge subjected to wave attack and tide forcing.

  1. Quantification of water, salt and nutrient exchange processes at the mouth of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Sylaios, Georgios K; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A; Akratos, Christos; Haralambidou, Kiriaki

    2006-08-01

    Vassova lagoon is a typical Mediterranean (small, shallow, micro-tidal, well-mixed) coastal lagoon, receiving limited seasonal freshwater inflows from direct precipitation and underground seepage. An intensive study was carried out in order to quantify the mechanisms responsible for the intra-tidal and residual transport of water, salt, nutrients and chlorophyll at the mouth of this lagoon and to assess the lagoon's flushing behavior. Results indicated that although the system is micro-tidal, tidal effects appeared to be the dominant factor for the longitudinal distribution of physical and chemical parameters, while the associated residual flow is also important and serves as a baseline measure of overall circulation. However, analysis of the net longitudinal currents and fluxes of water, salt and nutrients revealed the importance of non-tidal effects (wind effect and precipitation incidents) in the mean tidal transport. It is shown that the Eulerian residual currents transported water and its properties inwards under southern winds, while a seaward transport was induced during precipitation incidents and northern winds. The Stokes drift effect was found an order of magnitude lower than the Eulerian current, directed towards the lagoon, proving the partially-progressive nature of the tide. Nutrients and chlorophyll-alpha loads are exported from the lagoon to the open sea during the ebb phase of the autumn and winter tidal cycles, associated with the inflow of nutrient-rich freshwater, seeped through the surrounding drainage canal. The reverse transport occurs in spring and early summer, when nutrients enter the lagoon during the flood tidal phase, from the nutrient-rich upper layer of the stratified adjacent sea. Application of a tidal prism model shows that Vassova lagoon has a mean flushing time of 7.5 days, ranging between 4 to 18 days, affected inversely by the tidal oscillation. PMID:16741822

  2. Direct estimate of water, heat, and salt transport through the Strait of Otranto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yari, Sadegh; Kova?evi?, Vedrana; Cardin, Vanessa; Ga?i?, Miroslav; Bryden, Harry L.

    2012-09-01

    The transport of water volume, salt and heat was calculated using continuous measurements of currents in the Otranto Strait for a one-year period in 1994-95. Temperature and salinity data sets, available from five hydrographic surveys, were used to obtain the seasonal temperature and salinity distributions at the Otranto transect. The Variational Inverse Method (VIM) was applied to reconstruct spatial distributions of the de-tided low-pass inflowing current component, salinity and temperature. Errors associated with estimates of transports are influenced by the data coverage: the higher the spatial resolution, the smaller the error and vice versa. Volume transport reaches a maximum in winter and spring and attains its minimum in summer. The obtained volume transport [˜1 Sv (106 m3s-1)] should be considered a lower limit value since in that period the Adriatic was producing relatively small quantities of deep water due to the inflow of low-salinity (high buoyancy) waters and relatively mild winters. Comparing the mean advective heat input and the air-sea heat loss, the same order of magnitude between the two has been obtained which is satisfactory considering the possible errors of the two approaches. The relative importance of the eddy heat transport to the total transport is estimated to be only about 5% and thus it can be neglected in a first approximation. The salt transport estimates show a net input, suggesting a salinity increase during the period of study; this was confirmed from the long-term salinity data in the Southern Adriatic.

  3. Intra-Abdominal Pressure Correlates with Extracellular Water Content

    PubMed Central

    D?browski, Wojciech; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Jaroszynski, Andrzej; Zadora, Przemyslaw; Pilat, Jacek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Zaluska, Wojciech; Schneditz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume. Material and Methods Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI) and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW), extracellular water content (ECW) and volume excess (VE) were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients. Results One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP. Conclusion IAP strongly correlates with ECW. PMID:25849102

  4. Effect of soil water content, sampling method and sample storage on the quantification of root lesion nematodes ( Pratylenchus spp.) by different methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant J. Hollaway; Kathy M. Ophel-Keller; Sharyti P. Taylor; Russell A. Burns; Alan C. McKay

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus thornei and P. neglectus) was evaluated using three different methods; the Whitehead tray method, the mister method and the commercially available\\u000a quantitative DNA assay. These methods were compared to determine the effect of soil water content, sampling method and soil\\u000a storage conditions on estimates of pre-sowing densities of nematodes. The Whitehead tray method, which

  5. Measurements of Water Vapor and Total Water on the NASA WB57: Validation and Determination of Cirrus Ice Water Content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Weinstock; J. Smith; D. Sayres; J. Pittman; J. Anderson; R. Herman

    2003-01-01

    We describe an instrument that makes accurate in situ measurements of total water. Cloud ice water content is determined using simultaneous water vapor measurements. The total water instrument integrates an aerodynamically shaped inlet and an in-stream heater with photofragment resonance fluorescence detection to quantitatively measure the total water content of ambient air. The air is isokinetically drawn into the instrument

  6. Variation of O 18 content of waters from natural sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Epstein; T. Mayeda

    1953-01-01

    A number of marine water and fresh water samples were examined for the relative O 18 \\/O 16 ratio, and the variation of this ratio was determined to a precision of ± 0.1%. In the case of surface marine waters, for a range of salinity of 29.40%., the O 16 content varies over a range of approximately 6%. The low

  7. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  8. Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting of nonspherical ice particles

    E-print Network

    Baum, Bryan A.

    ). In particular, the focus is on measurements offered by Cloud- Sat, a spaceborne radar launched on 28 April 2006Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting investigates the relationship between ice water content (IWC) and equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) at 94 GHz

  9. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates From WindSat and MODIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of soil moisture content by microwave remote sensing is important for quantifying the global energy, water and biogeochemical cycles. Vegetation water content (VWC, kg m-2) is one of the important parameters for retrieval of soil moisture using passive microwave radiometers. Liquid w...

  10. Conformational Preferences of N,N-Dimethylsuccinamate as a Function of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Salts: Experimental Studies in DMSO and Water As Determined by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fraction of gauche conformers of N,N-dimethylsuccinamic acid (1) and its Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and N(Bu)4+ salts were estimated in DMSO and D2O solution by comparing the experimental vicinal proton–proton couplings determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy with those calculated using the Haasnoot, de Leeuw, and Altona (HLA) equation. In DMSO, the gauche preferences were found to increase with decreasing Ahrens ionic radius of the metal counterion. The same trend was not seen in D2O, where the gauche fraction for all of the metallic salts were estimated to be approximately statistical or less. This highlights the importance of metal chelation on the conformation of organic molecules in polar aprotic media, which has implications for protein folding. PMID:24506581

  11. On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content, 92000 Nanterre ABSTRACT To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil

  12. Dramatically Stabilizing Multiprotein Complex Structure in the Absence of Bulk Water using Tuned Hofmeister Salts

    PubMed Central

    Han, Linjie; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2012-01-01

    The role that water plays in the salt-based stabilization of proteins is central to our understanding of protein biophysics. Ion hydration and the ability of ions to alter water surface tension are typically invoked, along with direct ion-protein binding, to describe Hofmeister stabilization phenomena observed for proteins experimentally, but the relative influence of these forces has been extraordinarily difficult to measure directly. Recently, we have used gas-phase measurements of proteins and large multiprotein complexes, using a combination of innovative ion mobility (IM) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, to assess the ability of bound cations and anions to stabilize protein ions in the absence of the solvation forces described above. Our previous work has studied a broad set of 12 anions bound to a range of proteins and protein complexes, and while primarily motivated by the analytical challenges surrounding the gas-phase measurement of solution-phase relevant protein structures, our work has also lead to a detailed physical mechanism of anion-protein complex stabilization in the absence of bulk solvent. Our more-recent work has screened a similarly-broad set of cations for their ability to stabilize gas-phase protein structure, and we have discovered surprising differences between the operative mechanisms for cations and anions in gas-phase protein stabilization. In both cases, cations and anions affect protein stabilization in the absence of solvent in a manner that is generally reversed relative to their ability to stabilize the same proteins in solution. In addition, our evidence suggests that the relative solution-phase binding affinity of the anions and cations studied here is preserved in our gas-phase measurements, allowing us to study the influence of such interactions in detail. In this report, we collect and summarize such gas-phase measurements to distill a generalized picture of salt-based protein stabilization in the absence of bulk water. Further, we communicate our most recent efforts to study the combined effects of stabilizing cations and anions on gas-phase proteins, and identify those salts that bear anion/cation pairs having the strongest stabilizing influence on protein structures in vacuo. PMID:23795511

  13. Carbonhydrate Content and Root Growth in Seeds Germinated Under Salt Stress: Implications for Seed Conditioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugars and sugar alcohols have well documented roles in salt tolerance in whole plants and maturing seeds. Less is known, however, about possible effects of these compounds during germination. Seeds from mannitol-accumulating salt-tolerant celery [Apium graveloens L. var. dulce (P. Mill.) DC], non...

  14. REMOTE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-TRITIUM-CONTENT WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; Raymond Sigg, R; Leah Arrigo, L; Donald Pak, D

    2007-08-07

    Systems to safely analyze for tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres are being developed for use at Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. Analysis results will guide whether the material contains sufficient tritium for economical recovery, or whether it should be stabilized for disposal as waste. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to the process laboratory's routine analysis by liquid-scintillation counting. The newer systems determine tritium concentrations by measuring bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions. One of the systems determines tritium activity in liquid streams, the other determines tritium activity in water vapor. Topics discussed include counting results obtained by modeling and laboratory testing and corrections that are made for low-energy photon attenuation.

  15. Stimulation of fibroblast proliferation by insoluble gadolinium salts.

    PubMed

    Bleavins, Katherine; Perone, Patricia; Naik, Madhav; Rehman, Muneeb; Aslam, Muhammad N; Dame, Michael K; Meshinchi, Sasha; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Varani, James

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess insoluble salts containing gadolinium (Gd(3+)) for effects on human dermal fibroblasts. Responses to insoluble Gd(3+) salts were compared to responses seen with Gd(3+) solubilized with organic chelators, as in the Gd(3+)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) used for magnetic resonance imaging. Insoluble particles of either Gd(3+) phosphate or Gd(3+) carbonate rapidly attached to the fibroblast cell surface and stimulated proliferation. Growth was observed at Gd(3+) concentrations between 12.5 and 125 ?M, with toxicity at higher concentrations. Such a narrow window did not characterize GBCA stimulation. Proliferation induced by insoluble Gd(3+) salts was inhibited in the presence of antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathways (similar to chelated Gd(3+)) but was not blocked by an antibody to the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (different from chelated Gd(3+)). Finally, high concentrations of the insoluble Gd(3+) salts failed to prevent fibroblast lysis under low-Ca(2+) conditions, while similar concentrations of chelated Gd(3+) were effective. In conclusion, while insoluble Gd(3+) salts are capable of stimulating fibroblast proliferation, one should be cautious in assuming that GBCA dechelation must occur in vivo to produce the profibrotic changes seen in association with GBCA exposure in the subset of renal failure patients that develop nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. PMID:21882070

  16. A decision support model to assess vulnerability to salt water intrusion in the great bend prairie aquifer of Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Ma, T.

    1998-01-01

    A relatively simple ground water decision support system (DSS) was developed to assist in identifying salt water vulnerable areas and in developing management policies to prevent salt water intrusion in central Kansas. The DSS is based on a combination of numerical modeling sensitivity analyses, multiple regression analyses, and classification procedures derived from our knowledge of the area. Six ground water salinity models are proposed to evaluate irrigation well permit applications. The choice of model depends on the availability of site-specific data. The DSS takes advantage of GIS database management procedures, and is applied to an actual salt water intrusion problem site in south-central Kansas. This approach can help local ground water management districts make better decisions on protecting ground water use in salt water vulnerable areas.

  17. High precision balance from salt and water and the slow swelling of ping-pong balls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Imre M J ´; G ´ abor Szab; Tam ´ as

    Density gradient columns are the most accurate type of equipment for determining unknown densities. Commercial equipment is designed for chemical engineering practice, where the typical sample size hardly exceeds a few grams. The accuracy of measurements crucially depends on the precision of height determination. Here we demonstrate that stratified salt water in much larger containers (used for experiments in geophysical

  18. Quantum calculations on salt bridges with water: Potentials, structure, and properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sing Liao; Michael E. Green

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with

  19. Calculation of Phase Equilibria in Ternary Systems Uranyl Salt-Water-Organic Solvent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Myagkova-Romanova; L. L. Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Simulation of extraction equilibria in systems consisting of uranyl salt (nitrate, haloacetates), water, and oxygen-containing organic solvent was performed. A method based on a thermodynamic approach was suggested for calculating equilibria, and phase diagrams of 12 extraction systems were calculated. The results were compared with available experimental data, and the efficiency of systems that were not studied experimentally was predicted.

  20. Flocculation of Clay and Organic Matter in Turbid Salt Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. H.; Yin, H.; Zhang, G.; Tan, X.; Furukawa, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment transport and deposition in estuaries and tidal flats are often dominated by the aggregation of clay and organic matter into composite particles or “flocs”. The stability of the flocs is important in determining the distance over which the sediment is transported and the areas to which the sediment is deposited. During floc transport from riverine to oceanic environments, stability is determined by suspended sediment concentrations, sediment types, organic matter type, fluid flow rates and small scale turbulence. In a series of laboratory experiments, interactions between clay sediments and organic matter were evaluated within a flow column that was filled with saline water. The focus of this investigation was on changes in floc size, density and strength as flow velocities and turbulent stresses were altered. Significant changes in the floc shape, consolidation, density and behavior were determined for flow rates and Reynolds numbers that are common to riverine environments. The variability in floc composition was also shown to influence bulk sediment properties: heat transport, acoustic propagation and shear strength, while sediments were entrained in high-density suspensions and low-density deposits.

  1. Assessment of soil electromagnetic parameters and their variation with soil water, salts: a comparison among EMI and TDR measuring methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaali, Nesrine; Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have analyzed the possibility of the extension of Electromagnetic Induction EMI calibration coefficients determined at field scale, to predict the depth distribution of bulk electrical conductivity ECb within unmonitored sites and/or times, in order to appraise the effect of salts dynamics on soils and plants. However, in the literature, it has been determined that the extension of those EMI calibration coefficients can be awkward since the calibration parameters are highly site-specific because of changes in water content, temperature, root development, soil physical properties, etc... So they can only be used in sites having similar characteristics in terms of EMI. Furthermore there is a difference in the observation windows of EMI sensors and of sensors (Time Domain Reflectometry TDR, Electrical Resistance Tomography ERT, ect...) used for measuring the ECb to be then used for the calibration and validation of the EMI. By consequence the actual variability of the soil salinity will be hidden due to the fact that data coming from EMI and other sensors have different variability patterns and structure, and are then influenced by different noises. The main objectives of this work were: 1) develop a practical and cost-effective technique that uses TDR data as ground-truth data for calibrating and validating of the EMI larger scale sensor, 2) using a Fourier transform FT analysis by applying a specific noise filter to the original data, to find the correlations between the TDR and the EMI data. An experiment was designed by irrigating three transects of green beans, 30 m long each, with three irrigation salinity inputs (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). The irrigation volumes were estimated by measuring soil water content at different depths by using a Diviner 2000. During the experiment, the EM in both the vertical (EMV) and horizontal (EMH) configurations were regularly measured by a Geonics EM38 device. TDR probes were inserted vertically at the soil surface in 24 sites, each corresponding to the central point of an EM38 reading. EM38 and TDR probes were used to measure ECb along 24 m in the central line of each transect during the whole growth season. Soil samples were taken at 1 m distance along each transect for laboratory analyses. The FT analyses allowed separating the original EMI and TDR data signals from noise at different salinity levels, and thus finding better information about the existing correlation.

  2. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: Implications for the water content of the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4 × 10?2?10?1 S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01–0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  3. Analogue modelling of salt diapirism induced by differential loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warsitzka, Michael; Kley, Jonas; Kukowski, Nina; Jähne, Fabian

    2010-05-01

    In salt tectonics, two general concepts exist to explain salt diapirism. First, the theory of active piercement by Trusheim (1960) states that salt rises up and pierces its overburden autonomously by buoyancy forces. Second, the theory of reactive piercement by Vendeville and Jackson (1992) considers a tectonic stress field responsible for initiation of salt uplift and has been tested in many analogue experiments. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis in which salt diapir formation is activated by sedimentary processes alone, i.e. without a tectonic trigger. Our models consisted of a viscous silicone layer simulating rock salt overlain by layers of sand that mimic brittle behaviour in natural overburden sediments. The experiments were monitored with a high-resolution strain analysis tool based on digital image correlation (particle image velocimetry, PIV). Deformation in the silicone was initiated by a lateral variation in the thickness or density of the overburden, which established a differential loading on the silicone layer. Subsequent sedimentation in certain time intervals forced the silicone to rise up and break through the initial sand layer by buoyancy forces. The model results support the hypothesis of active piercement of diapirs. Uplift of the silicone and creation of a pillow structure with a significant elevation can be achieved if the overburden does not exceed a critical thickness and if the load gradient in the overburden reaches a minimum value. Then, ongoing sedimentation in adjacent areas increases the lateral load gradient until the buoyancy force in the silicone is high enough to overcome the shear strength of the sand. Synkinematic sedimentation produces some typical strata geometries in the sand layer that can also be observed in nature, e.g. drag folds bordering the diapirs and layer thickening in the peripherical rim synclines. The creation of one diapir and its peripherical sinks induces a lateral migration of the deformation to the adjoining areas. This leads to further generation of diapirs in a purely "halokinetic" way. The potential to form these "secondary diapirs" (Parker and McDowell, 1955) basically depends on the thickness of the silicone layer and on the sedimentation rate. The deformation paths and the strains in the experiments can be well observed with the PIV, which offers a new application in the analogue modelling of salt diapirism. Our experiments contribute new insights in the discussion of diapir formation. They show that sedimentary processes can initiate diapirism without any tectonic influence if the salt movement starts early after its deposition. Additionally, the model results provide a validation of the theory of "salt-stock families" in the Northwest German Basin (Sannemann, 1965) in the light of new analogue modelling techniques. References Parker, T.J., McDowell, A.N. (1955): Model studies of salt-dome tectonics, Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, vol. 39, no. 12, p. 2384-2471 Sannemann, D. (1965): Salt-stock families in Northwestern Germany, Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, vol. 49. p. 261-270. Trusheim, F. (1960): Mechanism of salt migration in Northern Germany, Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, vol. 44, no. 9, p. 1519-1540. Vendeville, B.C. and Jackson, M. P. A. (1992): The rise of diapirs during thin-skinned extension, Marine and Petroleum Geology, vol. 9, no. 4, p. 331-353.

  4. The springs of Lake Pátzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2004-01-01

    Lake Pa??tzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and ??18O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO3. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9??106 m3/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0??106 m3/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. GPR study of pore water content and salinity in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hagrey, S.A.; Mueller, C.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution studies of hydrological problems of the near-surface zone can be better accomplished by applying ground-probing radar (GPR) and geoelectrical techniques. The authors report on GPR measurements (500 and 900 MHz antennae) which were carried out on a sorted, clean sand, both in the laboratory and at outdoor experimental sites. The outdoor sites include a full-scale model measuring 5 x 3 x 2.4 m{sup 3} with three buried sand bodies saturated with water of various salinities. Studies investigate the capability of GPR to determine the pore water content and to estimate the salinity. These parameters are important for quantifying and evaluating the water quality of vadose zones and aquifers. The radar technique is increasingly applied in quantifying soil moisture but is still rarely used in studying the problems of water salinity and quality. The reflection coefficient at interfaces is obtained from the amplitude spectrum in the frequency and time domains and is confirmed by 1D wavelet modelling. In addition, the GPR velocity to a target at a known depth is determined using techniques of two-way traveltime, CMP semblance analysis and fitting an asymptotic diffraction curve. The results demonstrate that the reflection coefficient increases with increasing salinity of the moisture. These results may open up a new approach for applications in environmental problems and groundwater prospecting, e.g., mapping and monitoring of contamination and evaluation of aquifer salinity, especially in coastal areas with a time-varying fresh-water lens.

  6. Published in J. Phys. Oceanogr.2003, 33, No2., 390-406. The alternative density structures of cold/salt water pools on a sloping

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Georgy

    parts of the world dense water formed on continental shelves propagates along a sloping sea bed, either masses are likely to take the form of either isolated lenses (cold or salt pools) or dense plumes, in Spencer Gulf (South Australia) dense (salty) water is formed at the head of the gulf by evaporative

  7. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

  8. Monitoring water content in the course of microwave heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Markov; Yu. P. Yulenets

    2005-01-01

    A method of monitoring the water content of homogeneous (single-layer) and composite (two-layer) materials in the course of\\u000a microwave heating is described. According to this, microwave heating is performed for a short period of time, after which\\u000a the temperature is measured in each layer and the water content is calculated using relations established with allowance for\\u000a the attenuation of the

  9. Acid generation upon thermal concentration of natural water: The critical water content and the effects of ionic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, April L.; Needham, Karen M.; Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad A.; Marks, Charles R.; Gorman, Jeffrey A.; Shettel, Donald L.; Barkatt, Aaron

    2009-10-01

    Thermal evaporation of a variety of simulated pore waters from the region of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, produced acidic liquids and gases during the final stages of evaporation. Several simulated pore waters were prepared and then thermally distilled in order to collect and analyze fractions of the evolved vapor. In some cases, distillates collected towards the end of the distillation were highly acidic; in other cases the pH of the distillate remained comparatively unchanged during the course of the distillation. The results suggest that the pH values of the later fractions are determined by the initial composition of the water. Acid production stems from the hydrolysis of magnesium ions, especially at near dryness. Near the end of the distillation, magnesium nitrate and magnesium chloride begin to lose water of hydration, greatly accelerating their thermal decomposition to form acid. Acid formation is promoted further when precipitated calcium carbonate is removed. Specifically, calcium chloride-rich pore waters containing moderate (10-20 ppm) levels of magnesium and nitrate and low levels of bicarbonate produced mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, resulting in a precipitous drop in pH to values of 1 or lower after about 95% of the original volume was distilled. Waters with either low or moderate magnesium content coupled with high levels of bicarbonate produced slightly basic fractions (pH 7-9). If calcium was present in excess of bicarbonate, waters containing moderate levels of magnesium produced acid even in the presence of bicarbonate, due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Other salts such as halite and anhydrite promote the segregation of acidic vapors from residual basic solids. The concomitant release of wet acid gas has implications for the integrity of the alloys under consideration for containers at the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Condensed acid gases at very low pH, especially mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, are capable of corroding even alloys, such as nickel-based Alloy 22, which are considered to be corrosion-resistant under milder conditions.

  10. Structural studies of starches with different water contents.

    PubMed

    Bogracheva, T Y; Wang, Y L; Wang, T L; Hedley, C L

    2002-08-15

    The proportion of double helices in starches from a series of pea [rb, rug4-b, rug3-a, and lam-c mutants, and the wild type (WT) parental line], potato and maize (normal and low amylose), and wheat (normal) lines, ranged from about 30-50% on a dry weight basis. In relatively dry starch powders, only about half of the double helices were in crystalline order, this proportion being higher for A-type than for B-type starches. Using starch from WT pea as an example, it was found that increasing water content results in an increase in total crystallinity. When the water content was raised to a level similar to that in excess water, the proportion of crystallinity was close to the proportion of double helices (DH). Measuring crystallinity in starches with a high water content is difficult using traditional methods such as x-ray diffraction. A method was developed, therefore, for determining starch structural characteristics in excess water by measuring the enthalpy of gelatinization transition in quasi-equilibrium differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments. It is suggested that DH% = DeltaH(sp)/DeltaH(DH) x 100%, where DeltaH(sp) and DeltaH(DH) represent the specific enthalpies of gelatinisation transition, DeltaH(sp) being measured as J/g dry starch weight and DeltaH(DH) as J/g DH, in starch. Studies on potato and maize starches in excess water and in 0.6M KCl showed, respectively, that DeltaH(DH) was 36.3 and 35.6 J/g for B-type polymorphs and 33.0 and 35.0 J/g for A-type polymorphs. For C-type starches, such as those from pea, intermediate values of DeltaH(DH), related to the proportions A-/B-polymorphs, should be used. The type of crystallinity in starch can be determined by the shift in peak temperature for thermograms in excess water and in excess 0.6M KCl. For B-polymorphs this shift was found to be approximately 2-3 degrees C and for A-polymorphs approximately 7-12 degrees C. The ratio between ordered areas with both A- and B-polymorphs can be determined from the enthalpies of disruption of each area. These enthalpies can be obtained by deconvolution of bimodal thermograms produced by C-type starches in excess 0.6M KCl. This methodical approach can be applied to all starches that give a sharp gelatinisation thermogram in excess water. Using a range of methods, including DSC, it was found that starch granules from the mutant peas are constructed in a similar way to those from the WT, with B-polymorphs in the centre and A-polymorphs at the periphery of all granules. The proportion of A/B-polymorphs, however, differed between the mutants. It was found that in addition to increasing the total crystallinity, increasing the water content within the granules also resulted in an increase in the proportion of B-polymorphs. PMID:12115134

  11. Fractionation of Deoxyribonucleoprotein by Successive Extraction with Constant Salt Concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Lucy; J. A. V. Butler

    1954-01-01

    IN recent papers Chargaff and his collaborators1, and Brown and Watson2, have shown the possibility of obtaining nucleic acids (DNA) of varying composition from deoxyribonucleoprotein. Chargaff's fractionation was achieved by successive extractions of nucleoprotein with salt solutions of increasing strength, after the nucleoprotein had been precipitated by a mixture of chloroform and n-octanol. This yielded a series of nucleic acid

  12. Tailoring supramolecular nanotubes by bile salt based surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gubitosi, Marta; Travaglini, Leana; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Pavel, Nicolae V; Vázquez Tato, José; Sennato, Simona; Olsson, Ulf; Schillén, Karin; Galantini, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    An approach for tailoring self-assembled tubular structures is described. By controlling the relative composition of a two-component surfactant mixture comprising the natural bile salt lithocholate and its bolamphiphilic derivative, it was possible to finely tune the nanotube cross-section of the mixed tubular aggregates that self-associated spontaneously in aqueous solution at pH?12. The diameter was found to vary up to 50?% when the stoichiometric ratio of the two bile salts was changed. The tuning of supramolecular nanochannels with such remarkable precision is of significant interest for technological applications of these materials. PMID:25925079

  13. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-print Network

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  14. Salt tectonics driven by differential sediment loading: Stability analysis and finite element experiments

    E-print Network

    Beaumont, Christopher

    1 Salt tectonics driven by differential sediment loading: Stability analysis and finite element University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT United Kingdom e-mail: lykke@earth.leeds.ac.uk Short running title: Salt salt layer drives salt deformation and has a significant impact on the structural evolution

  15. Solvation of actinide salts in water using a polarizable continuum model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M

    2015-01-29

    In order to determine how actinide atoms are dressed when solvated in water, density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the equilibrium structure of uranium plutonium and thorium salts (UO2(2+), PuO2(2+), Pu(4+), and Th(4+)) both in vacuum as well as in solution represented by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. This information is of paramount importance for the development of sensitive nanosensors. Both UO2(2+) and PuO2(2+) ions show coordination number of 4-5 with counterions replacing one or two water molecules from the first coordination shell. On the other hand, Pu(4+), has a coordination number of 8 both when completely solvated and also in the presence of chloride and nitrate ions with counterions replacing water molecules in the first shell. Nitrates were found to bind more strongly to Pu(IV) than chloride anions. In the case of the Th(IV) ion, the coordination number was found to be 9 or 10 in the presence of chlorides. Moreover, the Pu(IV) ion shows greater affinity for chlorides than the Th(IV) ion. Adding dispersion and ZPE corrections to the binding energy does not alter the trends in relative stability of several conformers because of error cancelations. All structures and energetics of these complexes are reported. PMID:25563344

  16. Identification of sources and mechanisms of salt-water pollution ground-water quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Richter; A. R. Dutton; C. W. Kreitler

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on salinization of soils and ground water that is widespread in the Concho River watershed and other semiarid areas in Texas and the United States. Using more than 1,200 chemical analyses of water samples, the authors were able to differentiate various salinization mechanisms by mapping salinity patterns and hydrochemical facies and by analyzing isotopic compositions and ionic

  17. Evaluation of the Pollutant Content in Road Runoff First Flush Waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giovanna Mangani; Arnaldo Berloni; Francesca Bellucci; Fabio Tatàno; Michela Maione

    2005-01-01

    Road runoff waters are able to convey a number of organic and inorganic pollutants originated by different non-point sources and by the road surface itself. Such pollutants can enter aquatic systems, thus contributing to water and soil contamination. This study was aimed at evaluating the pollutant content in first flush runoff waters from a highway located in Central Italy. A

  18. Effect of salts on formation and stability of vitamin E-enriched mini-emulsions produced by spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2014-11-19

    Emulsion-based delivery systems are being utilized to incorporate lipophilic bioactive components into various food, personal care, and pharmaceutical products. This study examined the influence of inorganic salts (NaCl and CaCl2) on the formation, stability, and properties of vitamin E-enriched emulsions prepared by spontaneous emulsification. These emulsions were simply formed by titration of a mixture of vitamin E acetate (VE), carrier oil (MCT), and nonionic surfactant (Tween 80) into an aqueous salt solution with continuous stirring. Salt type and concentration (0-1 N NaCl or 0-0.5 N CaCl2) did not have a significant influence on the initial droplet size of the emulsions. On the other hand, the isothermal and thermal stabilities of the emulsions depended strongly on salt levels. The cloud point of the emulsions decreased with increasing salt concentration, which was attributed to accelerated droplet coalescence in the presence of salts. Dilution (2-6 times) of the emulsions with water appreciably improved their thermal stability by increasing their cloud point, which was mainly attributed to the decrease in aqueous phase salt levels. The isothermal storage stability of the emulsions also depended on salt concentration; however, increasing the salt concentration decreased the rate of droplet growth, which was the opposite of its effect on thermal stability. Potential physicochemical mechanisms for these effects are discussed in terms of the influence of salt ions on van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. This study provides important information about the effect of inorganic salts on the formation and stability of vitamin E emulsions suitable for use in food, personal care, and pharmaceutical products. PMID:25343750

  19. Electrochemical and physicochemical properties of small phosphonium cation ionic liquid electrolytes with high lithium salt content.

    PubMed

    Girard, G M A; Hilder, M; Zhu, H; Nucciarone, D; Whitbread, K; Zavorine, S; Moser, M; Forsyth, M; MacFarlane, D R; Howlett, P C

    2015-04-14

    Electrolytes of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), trimethyl(isobutyl)phosphonium (P111i4) bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (FSI) with a wide range of lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt concentrations (up to 3.8 mol kg(-1) of salt in the RTIL) were characterised using a combination of techniques including viscosity, conductivity, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). We show that the FSI-based electrolyte containing a high salt concentration (e.g. 1?:?1 salt to IL molar ratio, equivalent to 3.2 mol kg(-1) of LiFSI) displays unusual transport behavior with respect to lithium ion mobility and promising electrochemical behavior, despite an increase in viscosity. These electrolytes could compete with the more traditionally studied nitrogen-based ionic liquids (ILs) in lithium battery applications. PMID:25820549

  20. Factors affecting properties of pork sausage patties made with reduced salt contents

    E-print Network

    Matlock, Robert Gerard

    1983-01-01

    and Aberl e (1 980) reported higher thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values--indicating greater oxidative rancidity--in salted pork samples vs. unsalted samples. Although the reduction of salt in processed meats is beneficial for reducing the development of off... over extended periods of frozen storage. Sodium chloride alone increased TBA values, but the use of phosphates or vacuum packaging reduced the development of off-flavor and rancidity during extended periods of frozen storage. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  1. Salt-enhanced removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions by adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Bao, Zongbi; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xing, Huabin; Su, Baogen; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2013-12-15

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol has extensive industrial applications in solvent extraction, however, in view of its potential pollution to environment, the removal and recovery of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is considered an essential step toward its sustainable use in the future. In this work, we report the removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions containing salts in high concentrations by adsorption on a coal-based activated carbon. Adsorption thermodynamics showed that the experimental isotherms were conformed well to the Langmuir equation. Also it was found that inorganic salts, i.e. MgCl2 and CaCl2 in high concentration significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity from 223 mg/g in the deionized water to 277 mg/g in a saline water. This phenomenon of adsorption enhancement could be ascribed to the salt-out effect. Kinetic analysis indicated that adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order equation and the adsorption rate constants increase with the salt concentration. The dynamic breakthrough volume and adsorbed amount of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were significantly elevated when the salt is present in the water. The dynamic saturated adsorption amount increased from 218.3mg/g in the deionized water to 309.5mg/g in a salt lake brine. The Tomas model was well applied to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the characteristics parameters of the adsorption column. PMID:24144367

  2. THE DENATURATION OF PROTEINS BY SYNTHETIC DETERGENTS AND BILE SALTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Anson

    1939-01-01

    All the synthetic detergents and bile salts I have tried denature proteins such as hemoglobin and egg albumin at the isoelectric point 1 and keep the denatured isoelectric protein in solution. Some detergents in sufficiently high concentration can prevent the precipitation of denatured protein by trichloracetic acid, tungstic acid, and acid ferric sulfate. In fact, the origin of the present

  3. Water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes, northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Jerry E.; Halasz, Stephen J.; Liscum, Fred

    1980-01-01

    This report contains water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine Salt Domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin. Water-quality data were compiled for aquifers in the Wilcox Group, the Carrizo Sand, and the Queen City Sand. The data include analyses for dissolved solids, pH, temperature, hardness , calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate. Water-quality and streamflow data were obtained from 63 surface-water sites in the vicinity of the domes. These data include water discharge, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Samples were collected at selected sites for analysis of principal and selected minor dissolved constituents. (USGS)

  4. Relation between species assemblages of fishes and water quality in salt ponds and sloughs in South San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mejia, F.; Saiki, M.K.; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize fishery resources inhabiting salt-evaporation ponds and sloughs in South San Francisco Bay, and to identify key environmental variables that influence distribution of fishes. The ponds, which were originally constructed and operated for commercial production of salt, have undergone preliminary modifications (installation of culverts, gates, and other water-control structures) in preparation for full restoration to mostly tidal wetlands over the next 2 decades. We sampled fish from two salt-pond complexes (Alviso complex and Eden Landing complex), each consisting of several pond systems and their associated sloughs. Cluster analysis of species of fish indicated that at least two species assemblages were present, one characteristic of ponds and the other characteristic of sloughs and slough-like ponds. The slough-like ponds exhibited water-quality conditions (especially salinity) that resembled conditions found in the sloughs. Pond fishes were represented by 12 species, whereas slough fishes were represented by 22 species. Except for bay pipefish (Syngnathus leptorhynchus), which was unique to ponds, all species present in ponds also were in sloughs and slough-like ponds. These results indicated that species of fish in ponds originated from the sloughs. According to canonical-discriminant analysis, four environmental variables were useful for discriminating between the two species assemblages. Most discriminatory power was contributed by the index of habitat connectivity, a measure of minimum distance that a fish must travel to reach a particular pond from the nearest slough. Apparently, as fish from sloughs enter and move through interconnected salt ponds, environmental stress factors increase in severity until only the more tolerant species remain. The most likely source of stress is salinity, because this variable was second in importance to the index of habitat connectivity in discriminating between the two species assemblages. Water temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen also seemingly influenced spatial distribution of fishes, although they were less important than salinity.

  5. Sugar and water contents of honey with dielectrc property sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of pure yellow locust, jujube and rape flower honey and their water-adulterated products with water content from 18% to 42.6% were measured with open-ended coaxial-line probe technology and a network analyzer from 10 to 4500 MHz at 25oC. Dielectric constants of pure honeys ...

  6. The mineral content of tap water in United States households

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition of tap water contributes to dietary intake of minerals. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper...

  7. Verification of Ground Penetrating Radar for Soil Water Content Measuring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Ermolaeva; A. Zeiliguer

    2009-01-01

    Spatially distributed water at the land surface is a vital natural resource for human being and ecosystems. Soil water content at vadose zone at regional scale controls exchange of moisture and energy between Earth surface and atmosphere, at the catchment scale - the separation of precipitation into infiltration, runoff and evapotranspiration, at the field scale - plant growing, at the

  8. Salt-stress alters proton transport by the tonoplast ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, F.; Morrissey, P. (U.S.D.A. Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction was obtained from roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv CM72) seedlings grown in half-strength nutrient solution with or without 100 mM NaCl. Proton transport by the tonoplast ATPase was measured using acridine orange, quinacrine or uptake of ({sup 14}C)-methylamine. The Vmax for proton transport was 2 to 4-fold higher for the ATPase from salt-grown compared to control roots. However, the rate of ATP hydrolysis was not significantly different for the two treatments. The percent inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by DCCD, DIDS and KNO{sub 3} was similar for the two treatments, as was the percent stimulation by Cl. The pH optimum for proton transport was more alkaline for the ATPase from salt-grown roots. No difference was observed between membranes from control and salt-grown roots when oxonol fluorescence was used to measure formation of a membrane potential by the ATPase. Immunoblots of SDS gels were reacted with the antibody to the 68-kD subunit from red beet to assess the relative amount of the 68-kD subunit of the tonoplast ATPase from control or salt-grown roots. The relative amount of the 16-kD DCCD-binding subunit was compared by binding of ({sup 14}C)-DCCD. The amounts of the two subunits were not significantly different in membranes from control or salt-grown roots. The increase in rate of formation of the pH gradient was not accounted for by an increase in the amount of the ATPase.

  9. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the spray were measured in the chamber for a stable flame. The experimental results indicate significant preferential vaporization of ethanol over water. Modeling results support this observation and indicate that the vaporization process is best described as the distillation limit mode with enhanced mass transfer by convection. Further, the influence of preferential vaporization on flame stability was investigated. A procedure was developed to evaluate the extent of preferential vaporization and subsequent flame stability of a fuel in aqueous solution. Various water soluble fuels were analyzed via this procedure in order to identify a chemical fuel showing strong preferential vaporization. t-Butanol was identified as having excellent physical and chemical properties, indicating stronger preferential vaporization than ethanol. Flame stability tests were run for aqueous solutions of both t-butanol and ethanol under identical flow conditions. Flame stability was characterized by the blow-off limit. In each comparison, the energy contents in the two solutions were kept the same. For the experiments under high swirl flow conditions (100% swirl flow), 12.5 wt% t-butanol has slightly lower blow-off limits than 15 wt% ethanol, and 8.3 wt% t-butanol has much lower blow-off limits than 10 wt% ethanol. For the experiments under a low swirl flow condition (50% swirl/50% axial flow), 12.5 wt% t-butanol has a much lower blow-off limit than 15 wt% ethanol. The time to release the fuel from a droplet was also calculated for both ethanol and t-butanol. For the same size droplet, the time to release t-butanol is much shorter than that of ethanol under the same conditions. Faster release of the fuel from water enhances flame stability, which is consistent with the experimental results. For the oxy-combustion characteristics of low-volatility fuel with high water content, glycerol was chosen as the fuel to study. It is found that self-sustained flame can be obtained for glycerol solution with concentration as high as 60 wt%, when burned in pure O2. However, the flame is lifted far away f

  10. Water content of aluminum, dialysis dementia, and osteomalacia.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, M R; Savory, J

    1985-01-01

    In the presence of normal renal function, a high concentration of aluminum in drinking water has been implicated as a factor in the etiology of a neurological syndrome in one specific geographical area. The role of aluminum as a toxic agent in other neurological disorders, where renal function is normal, is controversial. Aluminum is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is normally excreted by the kidneys in the urine. In patients with chronic renal failure, aluminum appears to be of proven toxicological importance. In these patients the accumulation of aluminum in tissues causes an encephalopathy (dialysis encephalopathy or dialysis dementia), a specific form of metabolic bone disease (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy), and an anemia and also plays an etiological role in some of the other complications associated with end-stage chronic renal disease. A failure in the normal renal excretory mechanism accounts for the tissue accumulation in chronic renal failure. The majority of chronic renal failure patients who develop aluminum toxicity are on long-term treatment with either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis; some patients develop toxicity who are only on treatment with aluminum-containing phosphate-binding agents. Aluminum in the dialysate appears to be the major source of the metal in chronic renal failure patients who develop aluminum toxicity. The aluminum content of the dialysate depends primarily on the content of the water with which it is prepared; there may be some contribution from the chemicals used in the concentrate which is added to the water. Some domestic tap-water supplies contain aluminum in high concentration, either naturally or because aluminum has been added as a flocculant in the purification process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3908086

  11. Water solubility enhancement effects of some polychlorinated organic pollutants by dissolved organic carbon from a soil with a higher organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masami; Tanabe, Yasuaki; Yabuta, Hikaru; Tanaka, Fumiko; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji; Watanabe, Akira

    2006-01-01

    To elucidate the role of a soil humic acid (HA) in the transport of polychlorinated organic pollutants (PCOPs), such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and coplanar-polychlorinated biphenyls, their partition coefficients (Kdoc) into an HA were compared with their adsorption coefficients (KOC) for a soil with a higher organic carbon (OC) content. The soil sample (ando soil) used in the present study was collected in the same location as the HA. The log Kdoc values were positively correlated with logarithm of octanol-water partition coefficients (log KOW) of the PCOPs, indicating that the partitioning of PCOPs into the HA was mainly due to hydrophobic interactions. However, the correlation between log Kdoc and log KOC was negative. This can be attributed to the enhanced water solubility of the PCOPs as the result of the dissolved organic matter from the soil. That is, when the more hydrophobic PCOPs with higher log KOW values are partitioned into the HA, then the larger quantities of PCOPs that are partitioned into the HA are able to dissolve in the aqueous phase. These results suggest that, in a soil with a higher OC content, the HA can serve as more effective carrier of PCOPs from the soil to an aquatic environment. PMID:16835105

  12. Polyaluminum chloride with high Al30 content as removal agent for arsenic-contaminated well water

    E-print Network

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    -established coagulant in water treatment with high removal efficiency for arsenic. A high content of Al30 nanoclusters Coagulationeflocculatione sedimentation Water treatment Aggregation a b s t r a c t Polyaluminum chloride (PACl) is a well with 75% Al30 nanoclusters (PAClAl30) for the treatment of arsenic-contaminated well water by laboratory

  13. USE OF LIMITED SOIL PROPERTY DATA AND MODELING TO ESTIMATE ROOT ZONE SOIL WATER CONTENT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modeling root zone soil water content at watershed scales is important for both the strategic and tactical management of water resources, but detailed soil physical and hydraulic property data required by most physically-based soil water models are generally not available over large land areas. Wit...

  14. Effects of Salt-Drought Stress on Growth and Physiobiochemical Characteristics of Tamarix chinensis Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Xia, Jiangbao; Fang, Yanming; Li, Tian; Liu, Jingtao

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to clarify the effects of salinity and water intercross stresses on the growth and physiobiochemical characteristics of Tamarix chinensis seedlings by pots culture under the artificial simulated conditions. The growth, activities of SOD, POD, and contents of MDA and osmotic adjusting substances of three years old seedlings of T. chinensis were studied under different salt-drought intercross stress. Results showed that the influence of salt stress on growth was greater than drought stress, the oxidation resistance of SOD and POD weakened gradually with salt and drought stresses intensified, and the content of MDA was higher under severe drought and mild and moderate salt stresses. The proline contents increased with the stress intensified but only significantly higher than control under the intercross stresses of severe salt-severe drought. It implied that T. chinensis could improve its stress resistance by adjusted self-growth and physiobiochemical characteristics, and the intercross compatibility of T. chinensis to salt and drought stresses can enhance the salt resistance under appropriate drought stress, but the dominant factors influencing the physiological biochemical characteristics of T. chinensis were various with the changing of salt-drought intercross stresses gradients. PMID:25140348

  15. Augmented water binding and low cellular water content in erythrocytes of camel and camelids.

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, P; Csutora, P; Cameron, I L; Wheatley, D N; Miseta, A

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a link between hemoglobin primary structure, hemoglobin hydrophobicity-hydrophilicity, and erythrocyte water content in various mammalian species. Some hemoglobin molecules, particularly those of the camel and camelids, contain more charged amino acid residues and are more hydrophilic than the hemoglobins of human and a number of other mammalian species. To test the in vivo significance of these alterations of hemoglobin primary structure, we determined the osmotically unresponsive erythrocyte water fractions in mannit solutions of various osmolarities at 4 degreesC. Among the species investigated, the size of the osmotically unresponsive erythrocyte water fraction relates in a positive linear way to hemoglobin hydrophilicity. The extreme low total erythrocyte water content of camel erythrocytes (1.1-1.3 g water/g dry mass) may be explained by a comparatively high osmotically unresponsive erythrocyte water fraction. It is proposed that alterations of hemoglobin sequences of camel and camelids may be the part of a natural selection process aimed at protecting these animals against osmotic dehydration in arid environments. PMID:9826628

  16. Pb and Cd accumulation and phyto-excretion by salt cedar (Tamarix smyrnensis Bunge).

    PubMed

    Kadukova, Jana; Manousaki, Eleni; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation and excretion of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) by salt cedar (Tamarix smyrnensis Bunge) were investigated in this study. Tamarix smyrnensis plants were exposed to the mixtures of Pb and Cd and high salinity for 10 wk. Subsequently, Pb and Cd uptake was quantified in the shoots and roots of the plants by ICP-AES. In addition, physiological parameters such as biomass production, shoot length, plant appearance, and chlorophyll content were examined. The roots accumulated the highest amount of Pb. Salinity was found to not have an important effect on Pb translocation to the leaves. Cd was translocated into the aerial part in a higher portion than Pb. Cd content in leaves of T. smyrnensis increased with the increasing salinity. The visible toxicity symptoms, if present, were connected only to the high salinity. The excretion of Pb and Cd by salt glands was observed and quantified. T. smyrnensis excreted a significant amount of metals on the leaf surface. This characteristic of salt cedar plants can be viewed as a novel phytoremediation process for the remediation of sites contaminated with heavy metals that we have termed "phyto-excretion." PMID:18709930

  17. On the water content of the solvent\\/monoolein\\/water sponge (L 3) phase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annika Ridell; Katarina Ekelund; Hans Evertsson; Sven Engström

    2003-01-01

    The water content of the solvent\\/monoolein\\/water sponge phase depends on the lipophilicity of the solvent used. The relatively lipophilic solvent 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) gives a sponge phase at about 60 wt.% water compared with 30 wt.% for the sponge phase formed with polyethylene glycol (Mw?400, PEG 400). A reasonably good correlation is found between the water content of the sponge phase

  18. Salt and drought tolerance of sugarcane under iso-osmotic salt and water stress: growth, osmolytes accumulation, and antioxidant defense

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vikas Yadav Patade; Sujata Bhargava; Penna Suprasanna

    2011-01-01

    In order to discriminate between the ionic and osmotic components of salt stress, sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. cv. Co 86032) plants were treated with salt-NaCl or polyethylene glycol-PEG 8000 solutions (?0.7 MPa) for 15 days. Both the salt and PEG treatments significantly reduced leaf width, number of green leaves, and chlorophyll stability index. Osmotic adjustment (OA) indicated that both the

  19. Critical behavior of a cationic-surfactant-water-salt system near and far from the Krafft temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Ana; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G.

    1995-08-01

    The cationic micellar system docecylammonium chloride +water+KCl has been studied by light scattering near the critical point for different concentrations of salt. For the lowest value of salt concentration, the critical point is rather close to the Krafft line, and therefore there is a critical mixture in equilibrium with two noncritical phases: vapor and pure solid surfactant. Both the correlation length and osmotic susceptibility data for the critical mixtures can be accurately described by the usual three-dimensional Ising exponents for all values of the concentration of KCl (cKCl). This is in agreement with theoretical predictions that indicate that approaching a critical end point does not affect the critical exponents. Two off-critical mixtures have also been studied, and their behavior has been found to be compatible with the linear model equation of state.

  20. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter of maize during water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Judge, Jasmeet; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Microwave emission and backscatter of vegetated surfaces are influenced by vegetation water content (VWC), which varies in response to availability of soil moisture in the root zone. Understanding the influence of diurnal VWC dynamics on radar backscatter will improve soil moisture retrievals using microwave remote sensing, and will provide insight into the potential use for radar to directly monitor vegetation water status. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of diurnal variation in VWC of an agricultural canopy on backscatter for different radar configurations. Water stress was induced in a corn (Zea mays) canopy near Citra, Florida, between September 1 and October 20, 2013. Diurnal destructive samples from the canopy were collected to determine leaf, stalk and total VWC. Water stress was quantified by calculating the evaporation deficit and measuring the soil water tension. The water-cloud model was used to model the influence of VWC and soil moisture variations on backscatter for a range of frequencies, polarizations and incidence angles. Furthermore, radar backscatter time series was simulated to show the effect of water stress on the diurnal variation in backscatter due to VWC. Results of this study show the very significant effects that VWC dynamics have on radar backscatter. We also highlight the potential for vegetation and soil water status monitoring using microwave remote sensing.

  1. Neutron diffraction structures of water in crystalline hydrates of metal salts.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Graham S; Wajrak, Magdalena; Khan, R Nazim

    2015-06-01

    Neutron diffraction structures of water molecules in crystalline hydrates of metal salts have been collected from the literature up to December 2011. Statistical methods were used to investigate the influence on the water structures of the position and nature of hydrogen bond acceptors and cations coordinated to the water oxygen. For statistical modelling the data were pruned so that only structures with oxygen as hydrogen acceptors, single hydrogen bonds, and no more than two metals or hydrogens coordinated to the water oxygen were included. Multiple linear regression models were fitted with the water OH bond length and bond angle as response variables. Other variables describing the position and nature of the acceptors and ions coordinated to the waters were taken as explanatory variables. These variables were sufficient to give good models for the bond lengths and angles. There were sufficient structures involving coordinated Mg^{2+} or Cu^{2+} for a separate statistical modelling to be done for these cases. PMID:26027003

  2. The Extent of Salt Water Intrusion, Southern Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, D.; Tick, G.; Zheng, C.

    2006-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater due to saltwater intrusion has become a major concern for coastal communities which rely on groundwater as their principal source of drinking water. With increasing development and tourism in these regions both groundwater resources and environmentally sensitive areas such as coastal wetlands and ecological coastal habitats will be at risk. As a result, the protection of groundwater resources from saltwater intrusion and groundwater overdraft has become and will continue to be a critical concern in these areas. A regional-scale study evaluating the extent of saltwater intrusion as a result of increased groundwater pumping was conducted for Baldwin County, Alabama, a region on the gulf coast which has experienced continuously increasing growth and development over the last decade. An extensive reconnaissance of groundwater wells that includes water supply wells, irrigation and agricultural wells, monitoring wells, and private wells was conducted for the study area. The wells were sampled and analyzed for chloride, salinity, and TDS to determine the extent of saltwater intrusion, chloride and salinity fluxes, and the location of the saltwater/freshwater interface in the region. Groundwater pumping rates in addition to critical well-point data including hydraulic head, construction details, and lithology (well logs) were collected to determine the hydrogeological conditions in the region. ArcGIS software was used to develop head contour maps and iso-concentration maps for chloride, TDS, and salinity. A variable-density flow model SEAWAT based on MODFLOW and MT3DMS was developed to test management scenarios incorporating current and predicted demands on groundwater pumping to evaluate changing freshwater/saltwater interface, salinity and chloride fluxes, and rates of saltwater encroachment. The study will provide scientific basis for effective management of the coastal aquifers in the study region.

  3. Real-time monitoring of changes of adsorbed and crystalline water contents in tablet formulation powder containing theophylline anhydrate at various temperatures during agitated granulation by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Kanai, Yoshinori; Hattori, Yusuke

    2014-09-01

    Real-time monitoring of adsorbed water content (FW) and hydrate formation of theophylline anhydrate (THA) in tablet formulation during agitated granulation was investigated by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. As the wet-granulation process of THA tablet formulation involves change in pseudo-polymorphs between THA and theophylline monohydrate (THM), the pharmaceutical properties of THA tablet depend on the degree of hydration during granulation. After mixing of the powder materials (4 g) containing THA, and excipients and the addition of 600 ?L of binding water, the powder was kneaded at 27°C, 40°C, and 50°C and then dried. The mixing, granulating, and drying processes were monitored using NIR. The calibration models to predict THM and total water contents during granulation in THA tablet formulation were obtained by partial least-squares regression. The FW in the formulation was determined by subtracting THM from the water content. The results of the THA formulation powder bed during granulation by NIR monitoring indicated that the transformation pathway of the THA powder was THA ? THM ? THA at 27°C and 40°C, but that at 50°C was THA ? THA ? THA. The pharmaceutical properties, such as tablet porosity, hardness, tablet disintegration time, and dissolution rate of the final THA tablet products, were affected by the degree of crystalline transformation during granulation. PMID:24832393

  4. Salt-sensitive hypertension in ANP knockout mice is prevented by AT1 receptor antagonist losartan.

    PubMed

    Melo, L G; Veress, A T; Chong, C K; Ackermann, U; Sonnenberg, H

    1999-09-01

    Mice harboring a functional deletion of the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene (-/-) develop salt-sensitive hypertension relative to their wild-type (+/+) counterparts after prolonged (>1 wk) maintenance on high-salt (HS, 8% NaCl) diet. We reported recently that the sensitization of arterial blood pressure (ABP) to dietary salt in the -/- mice is associated with failure to downregulate plasma renin activity. To further characterize the role and mechanism of ANG II in the sensitization of ABP to salt in the ANP "knockout" mice, we measured ABP, heart rate (HR), and plasma catecholamine and aldosterone concentrations in -/- and +/+ mice maintained on HS for 4 wk and treated with daily injections of AT1 receptor antagonist DuP-753 (losartan) or distilled water (control). Daily food and water intake and fluid and electrolyte excretion were also measured during the first and last weeks of the dietary regimen. Cumulative urinary excretion of fluid and electrolytes did not differ significantly between genotypes and was not altered by chronic treatment with losartan. Basal ABP and HR were significantly elevated in control -/- mice compared with control +/+ mice. Losartan did not affect ABP or HR in +/+ mice, but reduced ABP and HR in the -/- mice to the levels in the +/+ mice. Total plasma catecholamine was elevated by approximately ten-fold in control -/- mice compared with control +/+ mice. Losartan reduced plasma catecholamine concentration significantly in -/- mice and abrogated the difference in plasma catecholamine between -/- and +/+ mice on HS diet. Plasma aldosterone did not differ significantly between genotypes and was not altered by losartan. We conclude that salt sensitivity of ABP in ANP knockout mice is mediated, at least in part, by a synergistic interaction between ANG II and sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:10484477

  5. Metabolic regulation by salt inducible kinases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Berdeaux

    2011-01-01

    In fasting mammals, the liver is the primary source of glucose production for maintenance of normoglycemia. In this setting,\\u000a circulating peptide hormones and catecholamines cause hepatic glucose output by stimulating glycogen breakdown as well as\\u000a de novo glucose production through gluconeogenesis. Fasting gluconeogenesis is regulated by a complex transcriptional cascade culminating\\u000a in elevated expression of hepatic enzymes that promote gluconeogenesis

  6. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  7. Effect of salt stress in the regulation of anthocyanins and color of hibiscus flowers by digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Trivellini, Alice; Gordillo, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco J; Borghesi, Eva; Ferrante, Antonio; Vernieri, Paolo; Quijada-Morín, Natalia; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-07-23

    The effect of salt stress (200 mM NaCl for 28 days) on physiological characteristics of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, such as abscisic acid (ABA) content, electrolyte leakage, and photochemical efficiency in leaves, and its influence on biomass production, anthocyanin composition, and color expression of flowers were evaluated. Salinity significantly increased electrolyte leakage and ABA content in leaves and reduced the flower fresh weight. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were lower in salt stress condition, compared to control. Moreover, salt stress negatively affected the content of anthocyanins (mainly cyanidin-3-sophoroside), which resulted in a visually perceptible loss of color. The detailed anthocyanin composition monitored by HPLC-DAD-MS and the color variations by digital image analysis due to salt stress showed that the effect was more noticeable at the basal portion of petals. A forward stepwise multiple regression was performed for predicting the content of anthocyanins from appearance characteristics obtained by image analysis, reaching R-square values up to 0.90. PMID:25005605

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  9. Fresh and Salt-Water Transport Observations in the Bay of Bengal from the Aquarius satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal is a unique area of the Indian Ocean due to its relatively low salinity compared to the neighboring Arabian Sea as a result of large freshwater input from rivers and the seasonal monsoons. The NASA and CONAE Aquarius/SAC-D salinity mission was successfully launched on June 10, 2011, providing global maps of surface salinity by measuring the ocean's brightness temperature. We used Aquarius and Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite salinity observations and surface current velocities from the Ocean Surface Currents Analyses Real-time (OSCAR) project to estimate near-surface fresh and salt-water transports over a 12-month period from August 2011 to July 2012, in order to understand the variability and distribution of salt in the Bay of Bengal. High-resolution (1/12°) HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) estimates of salinity and current velocity as well as in-situ Argo buoy observations are used to compare results from Aquarius and SMOS. AVISO altimetry observations are also used to observe the seasonal equatorial Kelvin wave and determine its role in fresh and salt-water transport, especially south of Sri Lanka from 5°N to 5°S.

  10. Salt crystal purification by deliquescence/crystallization cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desarnaud, J.; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, N.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we show how by repetitive humidity cycling high-quality single crystals of salt (NaCl) can be obtained. The drying of droplets of saturated salt solution, leads to many individual microcrystallites that grow close to the contact line due to the "coffee stain effect". Subsequent humidity cycling leads to the growth of a smaller number of crystals by expulsing impurities. This allows us to obtain only one single crystal instead of several dozens of crystallites in as little as three cycles. The reduction in the number of cycles needed to obtain a single crystal can even be improved by the combination of two effects; firstly the deliquescence/recrystallisation cycling and secondly by controlling the wetting properties of the substrate with grafted monolayer treatments.

  11. Salt Water Intrusion Modeling of an Aquifer in the Northwest of Maharlu Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghader, Fatemeh; Zaree, Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    Coastal aquifers are important supply sources of fresh water in numerous area of earth. The problem of saltwater intrusion has been widely caused the deterioration of water qulity in these sources. As fresh water flows from the aquifer near the coastline. Eventually dynamic equilibrium is reached between the fresh and saltwater. Intrusion of pumping wells within coastal aquifer has the potential to disturb this equilibrium. Maharloo Lake is a salt lake located 27 km southeast of Shiraz. There are many fresh coastal aquifera around this lake that naturally are recharged by fresh water entering from the landward karstic aquifer. The hydraulic equilibrium could be disturbed due to large extraction rate and consequently dropping in groundwater table. So, the lake saltwater with high salinity (Ec more than 300ms/cm in summer) coukd flow toward the aquifer. This lake salinity is much more than oceans salinity, so aquifer salinity could be changed very much even at low equilibrium disturbance. As a result, the management and maintenance of this aquifer is very important. The object of this research is preparation of an intrusion model of a coastal aquifer at the northwestern of Maharloo Lake, where the coastal aquifer is the single supply source of fresh water and the saltwater intrusion has been widely caused the deterioration of water quality. In this study SEAWAT computer code, a three dimensional finit difference model, used to study the intrusion mechanisms and groundwater systems. After data collection including qualitative and quantitative data and geology and hydrogeology of study area in the field, a conseptual model were prepared. On the basis of collected data, condition of the aquifer in February 2008 were taken as the initial condition and the length of calibration and verification periods consequently take 150 and 121 days after this time. After model calibration and verification, the aquifer conditions for next year predicted on the basis of two following strategies : 1. The present condition for the next year. 2.Raising condition of Lake water level in the next year. However, with the constructed model, other strategies could be tasted base on the real situation.

  12. Remote sensing of atmospheric water content from Bhaskara SAMIR data. [using statistical linear regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohil, B. S.; Hariharan, T. A.; Sharma, A. K.; Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    The 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz passive microwave radiometers (SAMIR) on board the Indian satellite Bhaskara have provided very useful data. From these data has been demonstrated the feasibility of deriving atmospheric and ocean surface parameters such as water vapor content, liquid water content, rainfall rate and ocean surface winds. Different approaches have been tried for deriving the atmospheric water content. The statistical and empirical methods have been used by others for the analysis of the Nimbus data. A simulation technique has been attempted for the first time for 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz radiometer data. The results obtained from three different methods are compared with radiosonde data. A case study of a tropical depression has been undertaken to demonstrate the capability of Bhaskara SAMIR data to show the variation of total water vapor and liquid water contents.

  13. A hydrodynamic curiosity: The salt oscillator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seelye Martin

    1970-01-01

    If a vertically oriented hypodermic syringe with the plunger removed is filled with salt water and partially submerged in a beaker of fresh water, then under the proper conditions, the system develops finite amplitude oscillations. These oscillations appear as a downward jet of salt water, followed by an upward jet of fresh water, and so on for many cycles. The

  14. Evaluation of salt-tolerant forages for sequential water reuse systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Grieve; J. A. Poss; S. R. Grattan; D. L. Suarez; S. E. Benes; P. H. Robinson

    2004-01-01

    Implementation of the saline drainage water reuse system proposed for the westside of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California requires development of sustainable cropping systems, which incorporate useful, salt-tolerant agronomic species. Ion composition in the saline drainage effluents present in the SJV is unique, with Na+, SO42?, Cl?, Mg2+ and Ca2+ predominating in that order. To identify potentially suitable

  15. Salt Waters of the Northern Apennine Foredeep Basin (Italy): Origin and Evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiziano Boschetti; Lorenzo Toscani; Orfan Shouakar-Stash; Paola Iacumin; Giampiero Venturelli; Claudio Mucchino; Shaun K. Frape

    2011-01-01

    The salt waters from the Emilia-Romagna sector of the Northern Apennine Foredeep have been investigated using major and trace\\u000a element and stable isotope (?2H, ?18O, ?37Cl, ?81Br and 87Sr\\/86Sr ratio). Ca, Mg, Na, K, Sr, Li, B, I, Br and SO4 vs. Cl diagrams suggest the subaerial evaporation of seawater beyond gypsum and before halite precipitation as primary process\\u000a to

  16. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on photosynthesis and water status of maize plants under salt stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Sheng; Ming Tang; Hui Chen; Baowei Yang; Fengfeng Zhang; Yanhui Huang

    2008-01-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae on characteristics of the growth, water status, chlorophyll concentration, gas exchange, and chlorophyll fluorescence of\\u000a maize plants under salt stress was studied in the greenhouse. Maize plants were grown in sand and soil mixture with five NaCl\\u000a levels (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g\\/kg dry substrate) for 55 days, following 15 days of

  17. Remote Sensing of Leaf Equivalent Water Thickness and Vegetation Water Content using Shortwave Infrared Reflectances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. The Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) had an objective of developing and testing algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwav...

  18. Corrosion behaviour of weathering steel in diluted Qinghai salt lake water in a laboratory accelerated test that involved cyclic wet\\/dry conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; W. Ke

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of CortenA weathering steel has been investigated using a laboratory accelerated test that involved cyclic wet\\/dry conditions in Qinghai salt lake water diluted 30 times. The characteristics of the rust layers on tested samples were observed by SEM and EPMA, analyzed by IRS and XRD, and studied by polarization and EIS measurements. The weight loss was almost

  19. Water content and the conversion of phytochrome regulation of lettuce dormancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Vertucci, F. A.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to determine which biological reactions can occur in relation to the water content of seeds, the regulation of lettuce seed dormancy by red and far red light was determined at various hydration levels. Far red light had an inhibiting effect on germination for seeds at all moisture contents from 4 to 32% water. Germination was progressively stimulated by red light as seed hydration increased from 8 to 15%, and reached a maximum at moisture contents above 18%. Red light was ineffective at moisture contents below 8%. Seeds that had been stimulated by red light and subsequently dried lost the enhanced germinability if stored at moisture contents above 8%. The contrast between the presumed photoconversion of phytochrome far red-absorbing (Pfr) to (Pr) occurring at any moisture content and the reverse reaction occurring only if the seed moisture content is greater than 8% may be explained on the basis of the existence of unstable intermediates in the Pr to Pfr conversion. Our results suggest that the initial photoreaction involved in phytochrome conversion is relatively independent of water content, while the subsequent partial reactions become increasingly facilitated as water content increases from 8 to 18%.

  20. Climate change impact on water and salt balances: an assessment of the impact of climate change on catchment salt and water balances in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenet Austin; Lu Zhang; Roger N. Jones; Warrick Dawes; Peter Hairsine

    2010-01-01

    Climate change has potentially significant implications for hydrology and the quantity and quality of water resources. This\\u000a study investigated the impacts of climate change and revegetation on water and salt balance, and stream salt concentration\\u000a for catchments within the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. The Biophysical Capacity to Change model was used with climate\\u000a change scenarios obtained using the CSIRO DARLAM 125