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Sample records for water channel proteins

  1. Birth of water channel proteins-the aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe

    2003-01-01

    If we compare aquaporin (as a proteic pathway for water permeation across biological membranes) with a child we can say that he had a very long gestation period. His possible existence was predicted for a long time (Overton in 1985, Stein and Danielli in 1956), some of his features (transport of water and its reversible inhibition) were assigned by Macey and Farmer in 1970, however this child was first detected by Benga and coworkers in 1986. We clearly demonstrated for the first time the presence and location of a water channel at the human RBC membrane among the polypeptides migrating in the region having 35-60 kDa on the electrophoretogram of RBC membranes, labeled with 203Hg-PCMBS in the conditions of specific inhibition of water diffusion; I suggested that a minor membrane protein that binds PCMBS is involved in water transport and also indicated the way in which the specific protein could be further characterized: by purification and reconstitution in liposomes. Our landmark papers in 1986 can be compared with the first detection of a child "in utero" by ultrasonography, since we discovered one of the essential components of the "aquaporin child" (a molecular weight of 35-60 kDa for the glycosylated component); we have also indicated the way to recognize him after birth (among other children of his group!): placing the isolated children in a certain environment and asking them to perform the same task (one should read: reconstitution studies in liposomes and measurement of water permeability), like aligning athletes for a running test. This was the only certain way to know that the child is really the fastest runner and not just one that is helping (by various means) another child to be fastest runner. A "new child" was observed in 1988 by Agre and coworkers, who identified a novel integral membrane protein in human RBCs having a non-glycosylated component of 28 kDa and a glycosylated component migrating as a diffuse band of 35-60 kDa; they suggested that the new protein (nick-named CHIP28 in 1991) may play a role in linkage of the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer. In 1992 Agre and coworkers suggested that CHIP28 is a functional unit of membrane water channels; by reconstitution in liposomes it was demonstrated that CHIP28 is a water channel itself rather than a water channel regulator. In other words the child we first detected was recognized as having the predicted qualities only in 1992. In 1993 CHIP28 was renamed aquaporin 1. Looking in retrospect, asking the crucial question, when was the first water channel protein, aquaporin 1, discovered, a fair and clear cut answer would be: the first water channel protein, now called aquaporin 1, was identified or "seen" in situ in the human RBC membrane by Benga and coworkers in 1986. It was again "seen" when it was by chance purified by Agre and coworkers in 1988 and was again identified when its main feature, the water transport property was found by Agre and coworkers in 1992. If a comparison with the discovery of The New World of America is made, the first man who has "seen" a part, very small indeed, of The New Land was Columbus; later, others, including Amerigo Vespucci (from whom the name derived), have better "seen" a larger part of the new Continent and in the subsequent years many explorers discovered the complexity of the Americas! PMID:12972274

  2. Elucidating the mechanism of protein water channels by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubmuller, Helmut

    2004-03-01

    Aquaporins are highly selective water channels. Molecular dynamics simulations of multiple water permeation events correctly predict the measured rate and explain at the atomic level why these membrane channels are so efficient, while blocking other small molecules, ions, and even protons. High efficiency is achieved through a carefully tailored balance of hydrogen bonds that the protein substitutes for the bulk interactions; selectivity is achieved mainly by electrostatic barriers.

  3. The first discovered water channel protein, later called aquaporin 1: molecular characteristics, functions and medical implications.

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    After a decade of work on the water permeability of red blood cells (RBC) Benga group in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, discovered in 1985 the first water channel protein in the RBC membrane. The discovery was reported in publications in 1986 and reviewed in subsequent years. The same protein was purified by chance by Agre group in Baltimore, USA, in 1988, who called in 1991 the protein CHIP28 (CHannel forming Integral membrane Protein of 28 kDa), suggesting that it may play a role in linkage of the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer. In 1992 the Agre group identified CHIP28's water transport property. One year later CHIP28 was named aquaporin 1, abbreviated as AQP1. In this review the molecular structure-function relationships of AQP1 are presented. In the natural or model membranes AQP1 is in the form of a homotetramer, however, each monomer has an independent water channel (pore). The three-dimensional structure of AQP1 is described, with a detailed description of the channel (pore), the molecular mechanisms of permeation through the channel of water molecules and exclusion of protons. The permeability of the pore to gases (CO(2), NH(3), NO, O(2)) and ions is also mentioned. I have also reviewed the functional roles and medical implications of AQP1 expressed in various organs and cells (microvascular endothelial cells, kidney, central nervous system, eye, lacrimal and salivary glands, respiratory apparatus, gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary compartments, female and male reproductive system, inner ear, skin). The role of AQP1 in cell migration and angiogenesis in relation with cancer, the genetics of AQP1 and mutations in human subjects are also mentioned. The role of AQP1 in red blood cells is discussed based on our comparative studies of water permeability in over 30 species. PMID:22705445

  4. Molecular cloning, overexpression and characterization of a novel water channel protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Shen, Yue-xiao; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Butler, Peter J; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins are highly selective water channel proteins integrated into plasma membranes of single cell organisms; plant roots and stromae; eye lenses, renal and red blood cells in vertebrates. To date, only a few microbial aquaporins have been characterized and their physiological importance is not well understood. Here we report on the cloning, expression and characterization of a novel aquaporin, RsAqpZ, from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 17023. The protein was expressed homologously at a high yield (?20 mg/L culture) under anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth conditions. Stopped-flow light scattering experiments demonstrated its high water permeability (0.17±0.05 cm/s) and low energy of activation for water transport (2.93±0.60 kcal/mol) in reconstituted proteoliposomes at a protein to lipid ratio (w/w) of 0.04. We developed a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy based technique and utilized a fluorescent protein fusion of RsAqpZ, to estimate the single channel water permeability of RsAqpZ as 1.24 (±0.41) x 10(-12) cm(3)/s or 4.17 (±1.38)×10(10) H2O molecules/s, which is among the highest single channel permeability reported for aquaporins. Towards application to water purification technologies, we also demonstrated functional incorporation of RsAqpZ in amphiphilic block copolymer membranes. PMID:24497982

  5. Molecular Cloning, Overexpression and Characterization of a Novel Water Channel Protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Shen, Yue-xiao; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Butler, Peter J.; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins are highly selective water channel proteins integrated into plasma membranes of single cell organisms; plant roots and stromae; eye lenses, renal and red blood cells in vertebrates. To date, only a few microbial aquaporins have been characterized and their physiological importance is not well understood. Here we report on the cloning, expression and characterization of a novel aquaporin, RsAqpZ, from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 17023. The protein was expressed homologously at a high yield (?20 mg/L culture) under anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth conditions. Stopped-flow light scattering experiments demonstrated its high water permeability (0.17±0.05 cm/s) and low energy of activation for water transport (2.93±0.60 kcal/mol) in reconstituted proteoliposomes at a protein to lipid ratio (w/w) of 0.04. We developed a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy based technique and utilized a fluorescent protein fusion of RsAqpZ, to estimate the single channel water permeability of RsAqpZ as 1.24 (±0.41) x 10?12 cm3/s or 4.17 (±1.38)×1010 H2O molecules/s, which is among the highest single channel permeability reported for aquaporins. Towards application to water purification technologies, we also demonstrated functional incorporation of RsAqpZ in amphiphilic block copolymer membranes. PMID:24497982

  6. Highly permeable polymeric membranes based on the incorporation of the functional water channel protein Aquaporin Z

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Zilles, Julie; Clark, Mark; Meier, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The permeability and solute transport characteristics of amphiphilic triblock-polymer vesicles containing the bacterial water-channel protein Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) were investigated. The vesicles were made of a block copolymer with symmetric poly-(2-methyloxazoline)-poly-(dimethylsiloxane)-poly-(2-methyloxazoline) (PMOXA15-PDMS110-PMOXA15) repeat units. Light-scattering measurements on pure polymer vesicles subject to an outwardly directed salt gradient in a stopped-flow apparatus indicated that the polymer vesicles were highly impermeable. However, a large enhancement in water productivity (permeability per unit driving force) of up to ?800 times that of pure polymer was observed when AqpZ was incorporated. The activation energy (Ea) of water transport for the protein-polymer vesicles (3.4 kcal/mol) corresponded to that reported for water-channel-mediated water transport in lipid membranes. The solute reflection coefficients of glucose, glycerol, salt, and urea were also calculated, and indicated that these solutes are completely rejected. The productivity of AqpZ-incorporated polymer membranes was at least an order of magnitude larger than values for existing salt-rejecting polymeric membranes. The approach followed here may lead to more productive and sustainable water treatment membranes, whereas the variable levels of permeability obtained with different concentrations of AqpZ may provide a key property for drug delivery applications. PMID:18077364

  7. Molecular and functional characterization of multiple aquaporin water channel proteins from the western tarnished plant bug, Lygus hesperus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are integral membrane channel proteins that facilitate the bidirectional transfer of water or other small solutes across biological membranes involved in numerous essential physiological processes. In arthropods, AQPs belong to several subfamilies, which contribute to osmoregulatio...

  8. Characterization of OsPIP2;7, a water channel protein in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Min-Hua; Cai, Wei-Ming; Sun, Wei-Ning; Su, Wei-Ai

    2008-12-01

    Aquaporins are water channel proteins that facilitate passage of water and other small neutral molecules across biological membranes. There are usually a large number of members of this family in higher plants, which exhibit various physiological functions and are regulated in a time-specific and particular mode. We have previously shown that a rice gene, OsPIP2;7, was generally up-regulated in roots but down-regulated in shoots at the early stage of chilling stress. Here, OsPIP2;7 was cloned and proved to be an aquaporin with high activity in Xenopus oocytes. OsPIP2;7 was localized mainly in mesophyll cells of leaves. In roots it was detected in the vascular tissues, epidermis cells and exodermis cells at the elongation zone, as well as in the epidermis cells, exodermis cells and root hair at the maturation zone. Yeast cells overexpressing OsPIP2;7 showed a higher survival rate after freeze-thaw stress. Furthermore, OsPIP2;7 enhanced the transpiration rate and tolerance to low temperature when overexpressed in rice. These results indicated that OsPIP2;7 was involved in rapid water transport and maintenance of the water balance in cells, and ultimately improves the tolerance of yeast and rice to low temperature stress. PMID:18988636

  9. The Role of Water Channel Proteins in Facilitating Recovery of Leaf Hydraulic Conductance from Water Stress in Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Laur, Joan; Hacke, Uwe G.

    2014-01-01

    Gas exchange is constrained by the whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant). Leaves account for an important fraction of Kplant and may therefore represent a major determinant of plant productivity. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) decreases with increasing water stress, which is due to xylem embolism in leaf veins and/or the properties of the extra-xylary pathway. Water flow through living tissues is facilitated and regulated by water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs). Here we assessed changes in the hydraulic conductance of Populus trichocarpa leaves during a dehydration-rewatering episode. While leaves were highly sensitive to drought, Kleaf recovered only 2 hours after plants were rewatered. Recovery of Kleaf was absent when excised leaves were bench-dried and subsequently xylem-perfused with a solution containing AQP inhibitors. We examined the expression patterns of 12 highly expressed AQP genes during a dehydration-rehydration episode to identify isoforms that may be involved in leaf hydraulic adjustments. Among the AQPs tested, several genes encoding tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) showed large increases in expression in rehydrated leaves, suggesting that TIPs contribute to reversing drought-induced reductions in Kleaf. TIPs were localized in xylem parenchyma, consistent with a role in facilitating water exchange between xylem vessels and adjacent living cells. Dye uptake experiments suggested that reversible embolism formation in minor leaf veins contributed to the observed changes in Kleaf. PMID:25406088

  10. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  11. Identification and characterization of functional aquaporin water channel protein from alimentary tract of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some hemipteran xylem and phloem feeding insects have evolved specialized alimentary structures or filter chambers that rapidly transport water for excretion or osmoregulation. In the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, mass movement of water through opposing alimentary tract tissues within the filter chamber...

  12. A family of transcripts encoding water channel proteins: tissue-specific expression in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, S; Katsuhara, M; Kelly, W B; Michalowski, C B; Bohnert, H J

    1995-01-01

    Seawater-strength salt stress of the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) initially results in wilting, but full turgor is restored within approximately 2 days. We are interested in a mechanistic explanation for this behavior and, as a requisite for in-depth biochemical studies, have begun to analyze gene expression changes in roots coincident with the onset of stress. cDNAs that suggested changes in mRNA amount under stress were found; their deduced amino acid sequences share homologies with proteins of the Mip (major intrinsic protein) gene family and potentially encode aquaporins. One transcript, MipB, was found only in root RNA, whereas two other transcripts, MipA and MipC, were detected in roots and leaves. Transcript levels of MipB were of low abundance. All transcripts declined initially during salt stress but later recovered to at least prestress level. The most drastic decline was in MipA and MipC transcripts. MipA mRNA distribution in roots detected by in situ hybridization indicated that the transcript was present in all cells in the root tip. In the expansion zone of the root where vascular bundles differentiate, MipA transcript amounts were most abundant in the endodermis. In older roots, which had undergone secondary growth, MipA was highly expressed in cell layers surrounding individual xylem strands. MipA was also localized in leaf vascular tissue and, in lower amounts, in mesophyll cells. Transcripts for MipB seemed to be present exclusively in the tip of the root, in a zone before and possibly coincident with the development of a vascular system. MipA- and MipB-encoded proteins expressed in Xenopus oocytes led to increased water permeability. mRNA fluctuations of the most highly expressed MipA and MipC coincided with turgor changes in leaves under stress. As the leaves regained turgor, transcript levels of these water channel proteins increased. PMID:7549476

  13. Aquaporins: The renal water channels

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Gupta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Water is the most abundant molecule in any cell. Specialized membrane channel, proteins called aquaporins, facilitate water transport across cell membranes. At least seven aquaporins (AQP): 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 11 are expressed in the kidneys. Aquaporins play a role in both the short-term and long-term regulation of water balance as well as in the pathophysiology of water balance disorders. Aquaporin is composed of a single peptide chain consisting of approximately 270 amino acids. Inherited central and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus are primarily due to the decreased expression of AQP2 while mutation in the AQP2 molecule is responsible for inherited central diabetes insipidus. In acquired causes of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, there is a downregulation of AQP2 expression in the inner medulla of the kidney. Nephrotic syndrome is characterized by excessive sodium and water reabsorption, although in spite of this, patients do not develop hyponatremia. There is a marked downregulation of both AQP2 and AQP3 expression, which could be a physiologic response to extracellular water reabsorption in patients with nephrotic syndrome. There are some conditions in which aquaporin expression has been found to increase such as experimentally induced heart failure, cirrhosis, and pregnancy. Some drugs such as cisplatin and cyclosporine, also alter the expression of aquaporins. The three-pore model of peritoneal transport depicts the importance of aquaporins. Thus, the understanding of renal water channels has solved the mystery behind many water balance disorders. Further insights into the molecular structure and biology of aquaporins will help to lay a foundation for the development of future drugs. PMID:20142913

  14. Involvement of MAPK ERK activation in upregulation of water channel protein aquaporin 1 in a mouse model of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fan; Liu, Cai-Yue; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Lie; Qian, Yu-Xin; Yi, Jing; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to immunolocalize the aquaporin 1 water channel protein (AQP1) in Schwann cells of idiopathic facial nerve and explore its possible role during the development of facial palsy induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). HSV-1 was inoculated into the surface of posterior auricle of mouse to establish a paralyzed animal model. In HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, protein levels of AQP1 significantly increased on the 9th to 16th day after inoculation of HSV-1. The upregulation of AQP1 was closely related to the intratemporal facial nerve edema in facial nerve canal, which was also consistent with the symptom of facial palsy in mice. In a hypoxia model of Schwann cells in vitro, we found that U0126, an ERK antagonist, inhibited not only morphological changes of cultures Schwann cells but also upregulation of both AQP1 and phosphorylated ERK. Combined with increased phosphorylated ERK in HSV-1-induced facial palsy mice, we inferred that ERK MAPK pathway might also be involved in increased AQP1 in mouse model of Bell's palsy. Although the precise mechanism needs to be further explored, our findings suggest that AQP1 in Schwann cells of intratemporal facial nerve is involved in the evolution of facial palsy induced by HSV-1 and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. AQP1 might be a potential target, and the ERK antagonist U0126 could be a new drug for the treatment of HSV-1-induced Bell's palsy in an early stage. PMID:25527444

  15. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P.; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-11-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ˜15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a lipid bilayer.

  16. Computational optimization of synthetic water channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L. B.

    2012-12-01

    Membranes for liquid and gas separations and ion transport are critical to water purification, osmotic energy generation, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis. Often these membranes lack pore uniformity and robustness under operating conditions, which can lead to a decrease in performance. The lack of uniformity means that many pores are non-functional. Traditional membranes overcome these limitations by using thick membrane materials that impede transport and selectivity, which results in decreased performance and increased operating costs. For example, limitations in membrane performance demand high applied pressures to deionize water using reverse osmosis. In contrast, cellular membranes combine high flux and selective transport using membrane-bound protein channels operating at small pressure differences. Pore size and chemistry in the cellular channels is defined uniformly and with sub-nanometer precision through protein folding. The thickness of these cellular membranes is limited to that of the cellular membrane bilayer, about 4 nm thick, which enhances transport. Pores in the cellular membranes are robust under operating conditions in the body. Recent efforts to mimic cellular water channels for efficient water deionization produced a significant advance in membrane function. The novel biomimetic design achieved a 10-fold increase in membrane permeability to water flow compared to commercial membranes and still maintained high salt rejection. Despite this success, there is a lack of understanding about why this membrane performs so well. To address this lack of knowledge, we used highperformance computing to interrogate the structural and chemical environments experienced by water and electrolytes in the newly created biomimetic membranes. We also compared the solvation environments between the biomimetic membrane and cellular water channels. These results will help inform future efforts to optimize and tune the performance of synthetic biomimetic membranes for applications in water purification, energy, and catalysis.

  17. Potentials of mean force and permeabilities for carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water flux across a Rhesus protein channel and lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Hub, Jochen S; Winkler, Fritz K; Merrick, Mike; de Groot, Bert L

    2010-09-29

    As a member of the ubiquitous ammonium transporter/methylamine permease/Rhesus (Amt/MEP/Rh) family of membrane protein channels, the 50 kDa Rhesus channel (Rh50) has been implicated in ammonia (NH(3)) and, more recently, also in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) transport. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous full permeation events of ammonia and carbon dioxide across Rh50 from Nitrosomonas europaea. The simulations show that Rh50 is functional in its crystallographic conformation, without the requirement for a major conformational change or the action of a protein partner. To assess the physiological relevance of NH(3) and CO(2) permeation across Rh50, we have computed potentials of mean force (PMFs) and permeabilities for NH(3) and CO(2) flux across Rh50 and compare them to permeation through a wide range of lipid membranes, either composed of pure lipids or composed of lipids plus an increasing cholesterol content. According to the PMFs, Rh50 is expected to enhance NH(3) flux across dense membranes, such as membranes with a substantial cholesterol content. Although cholesterol reduces the intrinsic CO(2) permeability of lipid membranes, the CO(2) permeabilities of all membranes studied here are too high to allow significant Rh50-mediated CO(2) flux. The increased barrier in the PMF for water permeation across Rh50 shows that Rh50 discriminates 40-fold between water and NH(3). Thus, Rh50 channels complement aquaporins, allowing the cell to regulate water and NH(3) flux independently. The PMFs for methylamine and NH(3) are virtually identical, suggesting that methylamine provides an excellent model for NH(3) in functional experiments. PMID:20815391

  18. Channel incision and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, F. D.

    2009-12-01

    Watershed development often triggers channel incision that leads to radical changes in channel morphology. Although morphologic evolution due to channel incision has been documented and modeled by others, ecological effects, particularly water quality effects, are less well understood. Furthermore, environmental regulatory frameworks for streams frequently focus on stream water quality and underemphasize hydrologic and geomorphic issues. Discharge, basic physical parameters, solids, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), chlorophyll and bacteria were monitored for five years at two sites along a stream in a mixed cover watershed characterized by rapid incision of the entire channel network. Concurrent data were collected from two sites on a nearby stream draining a watershed of similar size and cultivation intensity, but without widespread incision. Data sets describing physical aquatic habitat and fish fauna of each stream were available from other studies. The second stream was impacted by watershed urbanization, but was not incised, so normal channel-floodplain interaction maintained a buffer zone of floodplain wetlands between the study reach and the urban development upstream. The incised stream had mean channel depth and width that were 1.8 and 3.5 times as large as for the nonincised stream, and was characterized by flashier hydrology. The median rise rate for the incised stream was 6.4 times as great as for the nonincised stream. Correlation analyses showed that hydrologic perturbations were associated with water quality degradation, and the incised stream had levels of turbidity and solids that were two to three times higher than the nonincised, urbanizing stream. Total phosphorus, total Kjeldahl N, and chlorophyll a concentrations were significantly higher in the incised stream, while nitrate was significantly greater in the nonincised, urbanizing stream (p < 0.02). Physical aquatic habitat and fish populations in the nonincised urbanizing stream were superior, as it supported almost twice as many species and yielded more than four times as much biomass per unit of effort. These results suggest that channel incision is associated with a complex of ecological stressors that includes channel erosion, hydrologic perturbation, and water quality and physical habitat degradation. Ecological engineering of stream corridors must focus at least as much energy on mediating hydrologic perturbations and managing habitat quality as on pollutant loadings.

  19. Ion channel regulation by protein palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2011-03-18

    Protein S-palmitoylation, the reversible thioester linkage of a 16-carbon palmitate lipid to an intracellular cysteine residue, is rapidly emerging as a fundamental, dynamic, and widespread post-translational mechanism to control the properties and function of ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. Palmitoylation controls multiple stages in the ion channel life cycle, from maturation to trafficking and regulation. An emerging concept is that palmitoylation is an important determinant of channel regulation by other signaling pathways. The elucidation of enzymes controlling palmitoylation and developments in proteomics tools now promise to revolutionize our understanding of this fundamental post-translational mechanism in regulating ion channel physiology. PMID:21216969

  20. The discovery by Gh. Benga of the first water channel protein in 1985 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, A few years before P. Agre (2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry).

    PubMed

    Cucuianu, M

    2006-01-01

    The first water channel protein, now called aquaporin 1, was identified or "seen" in situ in the human red blood cell membrane by Benga's group in 1985. It was again "seen" when it was by chance purified by Agre'group in 1988 and was again identified when its main feature, the water transport property, was found by Agre's group in 1992. Consequently, the omission of Gh. Benga from the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (half of which was awarded to P. Agre "for the discovery of the water channels") is a new mistake in the award of Nobel Prizes. The growing recognition of the priority of Gh. Benga over P. Agre in the discovery of water channels is documented in this paper. PMID:18386610

  1. Rapid stalk elongation in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) and the combined action of cold-induced invertase and the water-channel protein gammaTIP.

    PubMed

    Balk, P A; de Boer, A D

    1999-09-01

    Many bulbous plants need a low-temperature treatment for flowering. Cold, for example, affects the elongation of the stalk, thereby influencing the quality of the cut flower. How the elongation of the stalk is promoted by cold and which physiological and biochemical mechanisms are involved have remained obscure. As invertase has been shown to be involved in the cold-induced elongation of the flower stalks of tulips (Lambrechts et al., 1994, Plant Physiol 104: 515-520), we further characterized this enzyme by cloning the cDNA and analysing its expression in various tissues of the tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) stalk. In addition, the role of sucrose synthase was investigated. Since turgor pressure is an important force driving cell elongation, the role of a water-channel protein (gammaTIP) was studied in relation to these two enzymes. The mRNA level of the invertase found was substantially up-regulated as a result of cold treatment. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of this invertase revealed the presence of a vacuolar targeting signal. Two different forms of sucrose synthase were found, the expression of one of them appeared to be restricted to the vascular tissue while the other form was present in the surrounding tissue. Both sucrose synthases were present in the stalk during the entire period of bulb storage and after planting, but their activities declined during stalk elongation. The expression of the gammaTIP gene was restricted mainly to the vascular tissue and its expression profile was identical to that of invertase. Simultaneous expression of invertase and gammaTIP possibly leads to an increase in osmotic potential and vacuolar water uptake, thus providing a driving force for stretching the stalk cells. PMID:10502102

  2. Theoretical and computational studies of microscopic water channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fangqiang

    Water channels are ubiquitous in all life forms. A notable example is aquaporins (AQPs), a family of proteins which mainly function as passive water channels in cell membranes. The availability of the crystal structures of several AQPs in recent years allowed us to study them in atomic details. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on AQPs in lipid bilayers to study water permeation through these channels. We also simulated water conduction in carbon nanotubes, serving as simplified models for biological channels. We developed theories and methodologies aimed to reproduce and predict important experimental quantities of water channels from simulations. We showed that the diffusion permeability (pd), which is measured by tracer diffusion in experiments, can be calculated from equilibrium MD simulations. In order to calculate the osmotic permeability (p f), which is experimentally measured in the presence of a solute concentration difference, we developed a method to induce a hydrostatic pressure difference across the membrane under periodic boundary conditions. We calculated the osmotic permeability for aquaporin-1 using this method, which agrees with experiments. Using a continuous-time random-walk model, we showed that for single-file water channels, the ratio of p f to pd is roughly equal to the number of water molecules in the channel. Proton transfer through single water file was studied theoretically using network thermodynamics. Finally, we proposed a new model for general water channels, which gives a quantitative relationship between water permeations under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions, and therefore allows one to calculate pf from equilibrium MD simulations.

  3. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    PubMed

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. PMID:26489820

  4. Communication channels between membrane bound proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethna, James; Machta, Benjamin; Veatch, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Much of what might be called biological computation takes place on the plasma membrane, a 2D liquid composed of a diverse soup of lipids and embedded proteins. Motivated by the recent discovery that these membranes seem to be tuned close to a 2D liquid-liquid critical point, we set out to understand the different channels through which membrane bound proteins can communicate. Diffusing proteins can carry out reactions like phosphorylation when they come in contact with each other. Near criticality, proteins can also exert long-ranged critical Casimir forces on one another by coupling to the local composition order parameter. By modulating the growth and breakdown of the rigid cytoskeleton, they can direct forces on even more distant regions. In addition, proteins can control the release and production of second messengers that diffuse either through the bulk, or in the plane of the membrane itself. By making simple models for these processes we bound functional measures for them as communication channels. These include information theoretic measures of bandwidth, as well as physical measures of energetic efficiency and speed. Our results will likely shed light on the functional role of clustering and other collective behaviors often seen in experiments.

  5. Origin of Martian channels - Clathrates and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.; Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Criticism is directed at the suggestion that Martian channels may have been eroded by liquid water produced by the depressurization of CO2 hydrate. The release of pre-existing subsurface liquid water, such as that trapped under a permafrost layer, by meteorite impact or tectonic activity could produce sufficient flow and would not require heat transfer. The presence of water in a CO2 hydrate is shown to be detrimental to its release from an underground reservoir.

  6. 3D flexible water channel: stretchability of nanoscale water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jige; Wang, Chunlei; Wei, Ning; Wan, Rongzheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Artificial water channels can contribute to a better understanding of natural water channels and offer a highly selective, advanced conductance system. Most studies use nanotubes, however it is difficult to fabricate a flexible structure, and the nanosized diameter brings nanoconfinement effects, and nanotube toxicity arouses biosafety concerns. In this paper, we use an electric field to restrain the water molecules to form a nanoscale water bridge as an artificial water channel to connect a separated solid plate by molecular dynamics simulations. We observe strong 3D flexible stretchability in the water bridge, maintaining a variable length and an arbitrary angle for a considerably long time. The stretching of the water bridge enables it to be polarized at an arbitrary angle and the stretchability is linearly dependent upon the polarization strength. More interestingly, we show the possibility of establishing complex water networks, e.g., triangle, rectangle, hexagon, and tetrahedron-tetrahedron water networks. Our results may help realize structurally flexible and environmentally friendly water channels for lab-on-a-chip applications in nanofluidics.Artificial water channels can contribute to a better understanding of natural water channels and offer a highly selective, advanced conductance system. Most studies use nanotubes, however it is difficult to fabricate a flexible structure, and the nanosized diameter brings nanoconfinement effects, and nanotube toxicity arouses biosafety concerns. In this paper, we use an electric field to restrain the water molecules to form a nanoscale water bridge as an artificial water channel to connect a separated solid plate by molecular dynamics simulations. We observe strong 3D flexible stretchability in the water bridge, maintaining a variable length and an arbitrary angle for a considerably long time. The stretching of the water bridge enables it to be polarized at an arbitrary angle and the stretchability is linearly dependent upon the polarization strength. More interestingly, we show the possibility of establishing complex water networks, e.g., triangle, rectangle, hexagon, and tetrahedron-tetrahedron water networks. Our results may help realize structurally flexible and environmentally friendly water channels for lab-on-a-chip applications in nanofluidics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08072j

  7. Biophysical properties of epithelial water channels.

    PubMed

    Parisi, M; Amodeo, G; Capurro, C; Dorr, R; Ford, P; Toriano, R

    1997-10-01

    The biophysical models describing the structure of water pores or channels have evolved, during the last forty years, from a pure 'black box' approach to a molecular based proposal. The initial 'sieving pore' in which water and other molecules were moving together was replaced by a more restrictive model, where water is moving alone in a 'single file' mode. Aquaporins discovery and cloning [G.M. Preston, T.P. Carroll, W.B. Guggino, P. Agre, Science 256 (1992) 365] leaded to the 'hour-glass model' and other alternative proposals, combining information coming from molecular biology experiments and two dimensional crystallography. Concerning water transfers in epithelial barriers the problem is quite complex, because there are at least two alternative pathways: paracellular and transcellular and three different driving forces: hydrostatic pressure, osmotic pressure or 'transport coupled' movements. In the case of ADH-sensitive epithelia it is more or less accepted that regulated water channels (AQP2), that can be inserted in the apical membrane, coexist with basolateral resident water channels (AQP3). The mechanism underlying the so-called 'transport associated water transfer' is still controversial. From the classical standing gradient model to the ion-water co-transport, different hypothesis are under consideration. Coming back to hormonal regulations, other than the well-known regulation by neuro-hypophysis peptides, a steroid second messenger, progesterone, has been recently proposed [P. Ford, G. Amodeo, C. Capurro, C. Ibarra, R. Dorr, P. Ripoche, M. Parisi, Am. J. Physiol. 270 (1996) F880]. PMID:17029908

  8. Assembly of the Mitochondrial Protein Import Channel

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Thomas; Guiard, Bernard; Thornton, Nicolas; Zufall, Nicole; Stroud, David A.; Wiedemann, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The preprotein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) consists of a central ?-barrel channel, Tom40, and six proteins with ?-helical transmembrane segments. The precursor of Tom40 is imported from the cytosol by a pre-existing TOM complex and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). Tom40 then assembles with ?-helical Tom proteins to the mature TOM complex. The outer membrane protein Mim1 promotes membrane insertion of several ?-helical Tom proteins but also affects the biogenesis of Tom40 by an unknown mechanism. We have identified a novel intermediate in the assembly pathway of Tom40, revealing a two-stage interaction of the precursor with the SAM complex. The second SAM stage represents assembly of Tom5 with the precursor of Tom40. Mim1-deficient mitochondria accumulate Tom40 at the first SAM stage like Tom5-deficient mitochondria. Tom5 promotes formation of the second SAM stage and thus suppresses the Tom40 assembly defect of mim1? mitochondria. We conclude that the assembly of newly imported Tom40 is directly initiated at the SAM complex by its association with Tom5. The involvement of Mim1 in Tom40 biogenesis can be largely attributed to its role in import of Tom5. PMID:20668160

  9. Solubilization of membrane proteins in ethanol: new perspective method for isolation of ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Galina D.

    1997-06-01

    In spite of the successful use of detergents for the solubilization of a number of membrane proteins, this approach has some restrictions. It is mainly due to difficulties in removing detergents from the proteins which can influence the structure and function of the isolated proteins and interfere with channel activity measurements under the reconstruction of the proteins into lipid bilayers. We have developed a method using ethanol for the extraction of membrane proteins. The dielectric constant of ethanol is between those of water and carbohydrates which aids it to penetrate into the membrane between protein and lipids. This decrease the binding of lipids to proteins and promotes protein solubilization. We have applied this approach to the isolation and reconstitution in lipid bilayer of the large subunit of the (Na+, K+)- ATPase from microsomes and from mitochondria: two Ca2+-channels, thermogenin and the KATP channel. The properties of these channels remained native.

  10. 3D flexible water channel: stretchability of nanoscale water bridge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jige; Wang, Chunlei; Wei, Ning; Wan, Rongzheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-03-14

    Artificial water channels can contribute to a better understanding of natural water channels and offer a highly selective, advanced conductance system. Most studies use nanotubes, however it is difficult to fabricate a flexible structure, and the nanosized diameter brings nanoconfinement effects, and nanotube toxicity arouses biosafety concerns. In this paper, we use an electric field to restrain the water molecules to form a nanoscale water bridge as an artificial water channel to connect a separated solid plate by molecular dynamics simulations. We observe strong 3D flexible stretchability in the water bridge, maintaining a variable length and an arbitrary angle for a considerably long time. The stretching of the water bridge enables it to be polarized at an arbitrary angle and the stretchability is linearly dependent upon the polarization strength. More interestingly, we show the possibility of establishing complex water networks, e.g., triangle, rectangle, hexagon, and tetrahedron-tetrahedron water networks. Our results may help realize structurally flexible and environmentally friendly water channels for lab-on-a-chip applications in nanofluidics. PMID:26900012

  11. Desformylgramicidin: a model channel with an extremely high water permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Saparov, S M; Antonenko, Y N; Koeppe, R E; Pohl, P

    2000-01-01

    The water conductivity of desformylgramicidin exceeds the permeability of gramicidin A by two orders of magnitude. With respect to its single channel hydraulic permeability coefficient of 1.1.10(-12) cm(3) s(-1), desformylgramicidin may serve as a model for extremely permeable aquaporin water channel proteins (AQP4 and AQPZ). This osmotic permeability exceeds the conductivity that is predicted by the theory of single-file transport. It was derived from the concentration distributions of both pore-impermeable and -permeable cations that were simultaneously measured by double barreled microelectrodes in the immediate vicinity of a planar bilayer. From solvent drag experiments, approximately five water molecules were found to be transported by a single-file process along with one ion through the channel. The single channel proton, potassium, and sodium conductivities were determined to be equal to 17 pS (pH 2.5), 7 and 3 pS, respectively. Under any conditions, the desformyl-channel remains at least 10 times longer in its open state than gramicidin A. PMID:11053127

  12. Localization of the CHIP28 water channel in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Saboli?, I; Valenti, G; Verbavatz, J M; Van Hoek, A N; Verkman, A S; Ausiello, D A; Brown, D

    1992-12-01

    CHIP28 is an integral membrane protein that has been identified as the erythrocyte water channel and that is also expressed in the kidney. Antibodies against erythrocyte CHIP28 were used to localize this protein along the rat urinary tubule. By Western blotting, CHIP28 was detected in kidney plasma membrane and endosome fractions. With the use of immunocytochemistry, CHIP28 was located in brush-border and basolateral plasma membranes of the proximal tubule. The initial S1 segment was weakly stained, but the S2 and S3 segments were heavily labeled. Subapical vesicles were also positive. Apical and basolateral membranes of the long thin descending limb were strongly labeled, but ascending thin and thick limbs of Henle and distal convoluted tubules were negative. Some vasa recta profiles in the medulla were positive. CHIP28 is, therefore, present in membranes with a high constitutive water permeability, where it probably acts as a transmembrane water-conducting channel. Finally, a weak staining of apical and basolateral membranes of cortical collecting duct principal cells was detectable, suggesting a potential relationship of CHIP28 to the vasopressin-sensitive water channel. PMID:1282299

  13. The dipole moment of membrane proteins: potassium channel protein and beta-subunit.

    PubMed

    Takashima, S

    2001-12-25

    The mechanism of ion channel opening is one of the most fascinating problems in membrane biology. Based on phenomenological studies, early researchers suggested that the elementary process of ion channel opening may be the intramembrane charge movement or the orientation of dipolar proteins in the channel. In spite of the far reaching significance of these hypotheses, it has not been possible to formulate a comprehensive molecular theory for the mechanism of channel opening. This is because of the lack of the detailed knowledge on the structure of channel proteins. In recent years, however, the research on the structure of channel proteins made marked advances and, at present, we are beginning to have sufficient information on the structure of some of the channel proteins, e.g. potassium-channel protein and beta-subunits. With these new information, we are now ready to have another look at the old hypothesis, in particular, the dipole moment of channel proteins being the voltage sensor for the opening and closing of ion channels. In this paper, the dipole moments of potassium channel protein and beta-subunit, are calculated using X-ray diffraction data. A large dipole moment was found for beta-subunits while the dipole moment of K-channel protein was found to be considerably smaller than that of beta-subunits. These calculations were conducted as a preliminary study of the comprehensive research on the dipolar structure of channel proteins in excitable membranes, above all, sodium channel proteins. PMID:11804731

  14. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  15. 1. INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING NORTHEAST; WATER FROM BEAVER BROOK ENTERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING NORTHEAST; WATER FROM BEAVER BROOK ENTERS THE INTAKE CHANNEL HERE. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  16. Physiological functions of the TRPM4 channels via protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Young-Sun; Kim, Eunju; Hwang, Eun Mi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential, Melastatin-related, member 4 (TRPM4) channels are Ca2(+)-activated Ca2(+)-impermeable cation channels. These channels are expressed in various types of mammalian tissues including the brain and are implicated in many diverse physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In the past several years, the trafficking processes and regulatory mechanism of these channels and their interacting proteins have been uncovered. Here in this minireview, we summarize the current understanding of the trafficking mechanism of TRPM4 channels on the plasma membrane as well as heteromeric complex formation via protein interactions. We also describe physiological implications of protein-TRPM4 interactions and suggest TRPM4 channels as therapeutic targets in many related diseases. PMID:25441424

  17. Gating of the Mechanosensitive Channel Protein MscL: The Interplay of Membrane and Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jonggu; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) belongs to a family of transmembrane channel proteins in bacteria and functions as a safety valve that relieves the turgor pressure produced by osmotic downshock. MscL gating can be triggered solely by stretching of the membrane. This work reports an effort to understand this mechanotransduction by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the MscL of mycobacterium tuberculosis embedded in a palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylethanolamine membrane. Equilibrium MD under zero membrane tension produced a more compact protein structure, as measured by its radii of gyration, compared to the crystal structure, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Even under a large applied tension up to 1000 dyn/cm, the MscL lateral dimension largely remained unchanged after up to 20 ns of simulation. A nonequilibrium MD simulation of 3% membrane expansion showed a significant increase in membrane rigidity upon MscL inclusion, which can contribute to efficient mechanotransduction. Direct observation of channel opening was possible only when an explicit lateral bias force was applied to each of the five subunits of MscL in the radially outward direction. Using this force, open structures with a large pore of radius 10 Å could be obtained. The channel opening takes place in a stepwise manner and concurrently with the water chain formation across the channel, which occurs without direct involvement of protein hydrophilic residues. The N-terminal S1 helices stabilize the open structure, and the membrane asymmetry (different lipid density on the two leaflets of membrane) promotes channel opening. PMID:18212020

  18. Ion channel regulation by protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the reversible covalent fatty-acid modification of cysteine residues, has emerged as a dynamic posttranslational modification (PTM) that controls the diversity, life cycle, and physiological function of numerous ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. S-acylation is enzymatically mediated by a diverse family of acyltransferases (zDHHCs) and is reversed by acylthioesterases. However, for most ion channels, the dynamics and subcellular localization at which S-acylation and deacylation cycles occur are not known. S-acylation can control the two fundamental determinants of ion channel function: (1) the number of channels resident in a membrane and (2) the activity of the channel at the membrane. It controls the former by regulating channel trafficking and the latter by controlling channel kinetics and modulation by other PTMs. Ion channel function may be modulated by S-acylation of both pore-forming and regulatory subunits as well as through control of adapter, signaling, and scaffolding proteins in ion channel complexes. Importantly, cross-talk of S-acylation with other PTMs of both cysteine residues by themselves and neighboring sites of phosphorylation is an emerging concept in the control of ion channel physiology. In this review, I discuss the fundamentals of protein S-acylation and the tools available to investigate ion channel S-acylation. The mechanisms and role of S-acylation in controlling diverse stages of the ion channel life cycle and its effect on ion channel function are highlighted. Finally, I discuss future goals and challenges for the field to understand both the mechanistic basis for S-acylation control of ion channels and the functional consequence and implications for understanding the physiological function of ion channel S-acylation in health and disease. PMID:24821965

  19. Activation of maxi-anion channel by protein tyrosine dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Toychiev, Abduqodir H; Sabirov, Ravshan Z; Takahashi, Nobuyaki; Ando-Akatsuka, Yuhko; Liu, Hongtao; Shintani, Takafumi; Noda, Masaharu; Okada, Yasunobu

    2009-10-01

    The maxi-anion channel with a large single-channel conductance of >300 pS, and unknown molecular identity, is functionally expressed in a large variety of cell types. The channel is activated by a number of experimental maneuvers such as exposing cells to hypotonic or ischemic stress. The most effective and consistent method of activating it is patch membrane excision. However, the activation mechanism of the maxi-anion channel remains poorly understood at present. In the present study, involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in excision-induced activation was examined. In mouse mammary fibroblastic C127 cells, activity of the channel was suppressed by intracellular application of Mg-ATP, but not Mg-5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), in a concentration-dependent manner. When a cocktail of broad-spectrum tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors was applied, channel activation was completely abolished, whereas inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases had no effect. On the other hand, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors brought the channel out of an inactivated state. In mouse adult skin fibroblasts (MAFs) in primary culture, similar maxi-anion channels were found to be activated on membrane excision, in a manner sensitive to tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. In MAFs isolated from animals deficient in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)zeta, activation of the maxi-anion channel was significantly slower and less prominent compared with that observed in wild-type MAFs; however, channel activation was restored by transfection of the RPTPzeta gene. Thus it is concluded that activation of the maxi-anion channel involves protein dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases that include RPTPzeta in mouse fibroblasts, but not in C127 cells. PMID:19657061

  20. Molecular and Physiological Analysis of a Thylakoid K+ Channel Protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Z.; Mi, F.; Berkowitz, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Transport studies identified a K+ channel protein in preparations of purified spinach (Spinacea oleracea) thylakoid membrane. This protein was solubilized from native membranes and reconstituted into artificial proteoliposomes with maintenance of functional integrity. A 33-kD thylakoid polypeptide was identified as a putative component of this thylakoid protein. This identification was made using an antibody raised against a synthetic peptide representing a highly conserved region of K+ channel proteins. K+ channel activity co-migrated with the immunoreactive 33-kD polypeptide when solubilized thylakoid membrane protein was fractionated on a Suc density gradient. The antibody was used to immunoprecipitate the 33-kD polypeptide. Physiological function of this thylakoid membrane protein was elucidated by measuring photosynthetic electron transport of thylakoid preparations in the presence and absence of a K+ channel blocker. Results indicated that K+ efflux from the thylakoid lumen through this channel protein is required for the optimization of photosynthetic capacity. The effect this protein has on photosynthetic capacity is likely due to the requirement for K+ efflux from the thylakoid lumen to charge-balance light-induced proton pumping across this membrane. PMID:12228576

  1. Water transport by the bacterial channel alpha-hemolysin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Akeson, M.; Deamer, D.

    1999-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the ability of the bacterial channel alpha-hemolysin to facilitate water permeation across biological membranes. alpha-Hemolysin channels were incorporated into rabbit erythrocyte ghosts at varying concentrations, and water permeation was induced by mixing the ghosts with hypertonic sucrose solutions. The resulting volume decrease of the ghosts was followed by time-resolved optical absorption at pH 5, 6, and 7. The average single-channel permeability coefficient of alpha-hemolysin for water ranged between 1.3x10-12 cm/s and 1.5x10-12 cm/s, depending on pH. The slightly increased single-channel permeability coefficient at lower pH-values was attributed to an increase in the effective pore size. The activation energy of water transport through the channel was low (Ea=5.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that the properties of water inside the alpha-hemolysin channel resemble those of bulk water. This conclusion was supported by calculations based on macroscopic hydrodynamic laws of laminar water flow. Using the known three-dimensional structure of the channel, the calculations accurately predicted the rate of water flow through the channel. The latter finding also indicated that water permeation data can provide a good estimate of the pore size for large channels.

  2. Small Water Islands in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, V.; Wade, R. C.; McCammon, J. A.

    1998-03-01

    Proteins often contain water-filled cavities. Their presence may have functional reasons or may be related to protein folding. In any case, they are integral parts of the protein. Here, results from molecular dynamics simulations for two systems are presented. First, we analyzed the hydration of an empty buried enzyme active site, cytochrome P450cam. A hydration free energy landscape was obtained by calculating free energy differences for hydrating the active site with 5 to 8 water molecules. In agreement with the crystal structure and with experiments performed under high hydrostatic pressure, 6 water molecules were found to be most favourable thermodynamically [Helms & Wade, Proteins, submited]. Long-lived hydrogen bond networks exist between the water molecules in the active site and result in a significant ordering. Secondly, results are presented from 5 simulations of green fluorescent protein (GFP) of 1 ns length each. The crystal structures of different forms of GFP contain a cluster of five water molecules next to the chromophore. The water cluster seems to play a crucial part in allowing the protein to switch between a fluorescent and a dark state [Dickson et al., Nature, 388, 385-8]. In the simulations, the water molecules are again strongly ordered by a long-lived hydrogen bond network. Both scenarios are discussed in the context of bulk liquid water.

  3. Protein translocation through the Sec61/SecY channel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiliang

    2010-06-01

    Special codes are embedded in the primary sequence of newly synthesized proteins to determine their final destination. Protein translocation across biological membranes requires co-operation between the targeting and translocation machineries. A conserved membrane channel, the Sec61/SecY complex, mediates protein translocation across or integration into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. A combination of recent biochemical and structural data provides novel insights into the mechanism of how the channel allows polypeptide movement into the exoplasmic space and the lipid bilayer. PMID:20156192

  4. Regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels by RGK proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M.

    2013-01-01

    RGK proteins belong to the Ras superfamily of monomeric G-proteins, and currently include four members– Rad, Rem, Rem2, and Gem/Kir. RGK proteins are broadly expressed, and are the most potent known intracellular inhibitors of high-voltage-activated Ca2+ (CaV1 and CaV2) channels. Here, we review and discuss the evidence in the literature regarding the functional mechanisms, structural determinants, physiological role, and potential practical applications of RGK-mediated inhibition of CaV1/CaV2 channels. PMID:23063948

  5. Transcellular water transport in lung alveolar epithelium through mercury-sensitive water channels.

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, H G; Matthay, M A; Hasegawa, H; Kheradmand, F; Verkman, A S

    1994-01-01

    The movement of water between the air space and capillary compartments is important for the maintenance of air space hydration during respiration and for reabsorption of excess alveolar fluid. We have obtained immunocytochemical and functional evidence that plasma-membrane water channels are responsible for water transport in the intact lung. Northern and quantitative immunoblot analysis showed high expression of CHIP28 (channel-forming integral membrane protein of 28 kDa) water channels in rat lung; immunocytochemistry showed CHIP28 localization to epithelial cell plasma membranes. Stopped-flow light scattering measurements of osmotic water permeability (Pf) in freshly isolated rat alveolar type II epithelial cells indicated a high Pf of 0.015 +/- 0.002 cm/s (10 degrees C) that was weakly temperature-dependent (activation energy, 4 kcal/mol) and reversibly inhibited by 78 +/- 4% by 0.5 mM HgCl2. An in situ-perfused sheep lung model was used to determine the route for water movement in intact lung. Blood-to-air-space water transport was measured by sampling air space fluid after instillation into distal air spaces of hyperosmolar saline (900 mOsm) containing radioiodinated albumin and [14C]mannitol. In seven sets of experiments, air space osmolality and radioiodinated albumin equilibrated with a t1/2 of 0.85 +/- 0.1 min. In the contralateral lung perfused with 0.5 mM HgCl2, t1/2 increased to 2.7 +/- 0.4 min; the inhibitory effect of HgCl2 was fully reversed by 5 mM 2-mercaptoethanol. These results provide direct evidence for transcellular movement of water across the alveolar epithelium in intact lung through mercury-sensitive water channels. Images PMID:7515184

  6. Urine concentration and avian aquaporin water channels.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroko

    2008-07-01

    Although birds and mammals have evolved from primitive tetrapods and advanced divergently, both can conserve water by producing hyperosmotic urine. Unique aspects in the avian system include the presence of loopless and looped nephrons, lack of the thin ascending limb of Henle's loop, a corticomedullary osmotic gradient primarily consisting of NaCl without contribution of urea, and significant postrenal modification of final urine. The countercurrent multiplier mechanism operates between the descending and ascending limbs of Henle via recycling of a single solute (NaCl) with no water accompaniment, forming an osmotic gradient along the medullary cone. Bird kidneys and developing rat kidneys share morphological and functional characteristics. Avian kidneys express aquaporin (AQP) 1, 2, and 4 homologues that share considerable homology with mammalian counterparts, but their distribution and function may not be the same. AQP2 expression in Japanese quail (q) evolves in the collecting duct of early metanephric kidneys and continues to increase in intensity and distribution during nephrogenesis and maturation. qAQP2 mRNA and protein are increased by arginine vasotocin (avian ADH), but vasotocin-induced enhancement of cAMP production and water permeability are less marked than in mammalian kidneys. Nephrogenesis is delayed by insufficient nutrition in avian embryos and newborns and results in fewer nephrons and an impaired water balance in adults. Diabetes insipidus quail with homozygous autosomal recessive mutation and an unaffected vasotocin system have low AQP2 expression, underdeveloped medullary cones. Comparative studies will provide important insight into integrative, cellular, and molecular mechanisms of epithelial water transport and its control by humoral, neural, and hemodynamic mechanisms. PMID:18278509

  7. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways. PMID:1701981

  8. Water hardness influences Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine aspects of water chemistry responsible for large differences in pathogenesis and mortality rates in challenges of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus with Flavobacterium columnare; challenges were conducted in water supplying the Stuttgart National Aquaculture Res...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF RESONANCE WAVES IN OPEN WATER CHANNELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article presents a procedure to determine the characteristics of open water channels required for controller and filter design, with special focus on the resonance waves. Also, a new simplified model structure for open water channels is proposed. The procedure applies System Identification tool...

  10. Conductance and block of hair-cell mechanotransducer channels in transmembrane channel–like protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane channel–like (TMC) proteins TMC1 and TMC2 are crucial to the function of the mechanotransducer (MT) channel of inner ear hair cells, but their precise function has been controversial. To provide more insight, we characterized single MT channels in cochlear hair cells from wild-type mice and mice with mutations in Tmc1, Tmc2, or both. Channels were recorded in whole-cell mode after tip link destruction with BAPTA or after attenuating the MT current with GsMTx-4, a peptide toxin we found to block the channels with high affinity. In both cases, the MT channels in outer hair cells (OHCs) of wild-type mice displayed a tonotopic gradient in conductance, with channels from the cochlear base having a conductance (110 pS) nearly twice that of those at the apex (62 pS). This gradient was absent, with channels at both cochlear locations having similar small conductances, with two different Tmc1 mutations. The conductance of MT channels in inner hair cells was invariant with cochlear location but, as in OHCs, was reduced in either Tmc1 mutant. The gradient of OHC conductance also disappeared in Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants, in which a mechanically sensitive current could be activated by anomalous negative displacements of the hair bundle. This “reversed stimulus–polarity” current was seen with two different Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants, and with Tmc1/Tmc2/Tmc3 triple mutants, and had a pharmacological sensitivity comparable to that of native MT currents for most antagonists, except dihydrostreptomycin, for which the affinity was less, and for curare, which exhibited incomplete block. The existence in the Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants of MT channels with most properties resembling those of wild-type channels indicates that proteins other than TMCs must be part of the channel pore. We suggest that an external vestibule of the MT channel may partly account for the channel’s large unitary conductance, high Ca2+ permeability, and pharmacological profile, and that this vestibule is disrupted in Tmc mutants. PMID:24981230

  11. Human PIEZO1 Ion Channel Functions as a Split Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chilman; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Ziegler, Lynn; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    PIEZO1 is a mechanosensitive eukaryotic cation-selective channel that rapidly inactivates in a voltage-dependent manner. We previously showed that a fluorescent protein could be encoded within the hPIEZO1 sequence without loss of function. In this work, we split the channel into two at this site and asked if coexpression would produce a functional channel or whether gating and permeation might be contained in either segment. The split protein was expressed in two segments by a bicistronic plasmid where the first segment spanned residues 1 to 1591, and the second segment spanned 1592 to 2521. When the “split protein” is coexpressed, the parts associate to form a normal channel. We measured the whole-cell, cell-attached and outside-out patch currents in transfected HEK293 cells. Indentation produced whole-cell currents monotonic with the stimulus. Single channel recordings showed voltage-dependent inactivation. The Boltzmann activation curve for outside-out patches had a slope of 8.6/mmHg vs 8.1 for wild type, and a small leftward shift in the midpoint (32 mmHg vs 41 mmHg). The association of the two channel domains was confirmed by FRET measurements of mCherry on the N-terminus and EGFP on the C-terminus. Neither of the individual protein segments produced current when expressed alone. PMID:26963637

  12. Zn2+ Interaction with Alzheimer Amyloid β Protein Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arispe, Nelson; Pollard, Harvey B.; Rojas, Eduardo

    1996-02-01

    The Alzheimer disease 40-residue amyloid β protein (Aβ P[1-40]) forms cation-selective channels across acidic phospholipid bilayer membranes with spontaneous transitions over a wide range of conductances ranging from 40 to 4000 pS. Zn2+ has been reported to bind to Aβ P[1-40] with high affinity, and it has been implicated in the formation of amyloid plaques. We now report the functional consequences of such Zn2+ binding for the Aβ P[1-40] channel. Provided the Aβ P[1-40] channel is expressed in the low conductance (<400 pS) mode, Zn2+ blocks the open channel in a dosedependent manner. For Aβ P[1-40] channels in the giant conductance mode (>400 pS), Zn2+ doses in the millimolar range were required to exert substantial blockade. The Zn2+ chelator o-phenanthroline reverses the blockade. We also found that Zn2+ modulates Aβ P[1-40] channel gating and conductance only from one side of the channel. These data are consistent with predictions of our recent molecular modeling studies on Aβ P[1-40] channels indicating asymmetric Zn2+-Aβ P[1-40] interactions at the entrance to the pore.

  13. Renal aquaporin water channels: from molecules to human disease.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Robert W; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2003-02-01

    Following the discovery of the aquaporin-1 water channel in 1991, molecular techniques have been developed to examine the roles of renal aquaporins-1, -2, -3, and -4 in disorders of water balance. This article reviews current knowledge regarding aquaporin function and dysfunction in water-losing and water-retaining states. PMID:12565698

  14. Molecular identity of cardiac mitochondrial chloride intracellular channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnalagu, Devasena; Gururaja Rao, Shubha; Farber, Jason; Xin, Wenyu; Hussain, Ahmed Tafsirul; Shah, Kajol; Tanda, Soichi; Berryman, Mark; Edwards, John C; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidences demonstrate significance of chloride channels in cardiac function and cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Unlike mitochondrial potassium channels sensitive to calcium (BKCa) and ATP (KATP), molecular identity of majority of cardiac mitochondrial chloride channels located at the inner membrane is not known. In this study, we report the presence of unique dimorphic chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) proteins namely CLIC1, CLIC4 and CLIC5 as abundant CLICs in the rodent heart. Further, CLIC4, CLIC5, and an ortholog present in Drosophila (DmCLIC) localize to adult cardiac mitochondria. We found that CLIC4 is enriched in the outer mitochondrial membrane, whereas CLIC5 is present in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Also, CLIC5 plays a direct role in regulating mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our study highlights that CLIC5 is localized to the cardiac mitochondria and directly modulates mitochondrial function. PMID:26777142

  15. Innate immune responses of immune proteins in juvenile channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are raised for aquaculture in the Southeast U.S. and are susceptible to many bacterial and viral infections acquired from their pond environment. The innate immune proteins mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and lysozyme were studied during two consecutive years in ch...

  16. Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by accessory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Kelly; Dong, Yanbin; Sagnella, Giuseppe A

    2003-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is of fundamental importance in the control of sodium fluxes in epithelial cells. Modulation of sodium reabsorption through the distal nephron ENaC is an important component in the overall control of sodium balance, blood volume and thereby of blood pressure. This is clearly demonstrated by rare genetic disorders of sodium-channel activity (Liddle's syndrome and pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1), associated with contrasting effects on blood pressure. The mineralocorticoid aldosterone is a well-established modulator of sodium-channel activity. Considerable insight has now been gained into the intracellular signalling pathways linking aldosterone-mediated changes in gene transcription with changes in ion transport. Activating pathways include aldosterone-induced proteins and especially the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) and the small G-protein, K-Ras 2A. Targeting of the ENaC for endocytosis and degradation is now emerging as a major mechanism for the down-regulation of channel activity. Several proteins acting in concert are an intrinsic part of this process but Nedd4 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4) is of central importance. Other mechanisms known to interact with ENaC and affect sodium transport include channel-activating protease 1 (CAP-1), a membrane-anchored protein, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. The implications of research on accessory factors controlling ENaC activity are wide-ranging. Understanding cellular mechanisms controlling ENaC activity may provide a more detailed insight not only of ion-channel abnormalities in cystic fibrosis but also of the link between abnormal renal sodium transport and essential hypertension. PMID:12460120

  17. Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Kelly; Dong, Yanbin; Sagnella, Giuseppe A

    2003-04-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is of fundamental importance in the control of sodium fluxes in epithelial cells. Modulation of sodium reabsorption through the distal nephron ENaC is an important component in the overall control of sodium balance, blood volume and thereby of blood pressure. This is clearly demonstrated by rare genetic disorders of sodium-channel activity (Liddle's syndrome and pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1), associated with contrasting effects on blood pressure. The mineralocorticoid aldosterone is a well-established modulator of sodium-channel activity. Considerable insight has now been gained into the intracellular signalling pathways linking aldosterone-mediated changes in gene transcription with changes in ion transport. Activating pathways include aldosterone-induced proteins and especially the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) and the small G-protein, K-Ras 2A. Targeting of the ENaC for endocytosis and degradation is now emerging as a major mechanism for the down-regulation of channel activity. Several proteins acting in concert are an intrinsic part of this process but Nedd4 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4) is of central importance. Other mechanisms known to interact with ENaC and affect sodium transport include channel-activating protease 1 (CAP-1), a membrane-anchored protein, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. The implications of research on accessory factors controlling ENaC activity are wide-ranging. Understanding cellular mechanisms controlling ENaC activity may provide a more detailed insight not only of ion-channel abnormalities in cystic fibrosis but also of the link between abnormal renal sodium transport and essential hypertension. PMID:12460120

  18. Physiological evidence that pyramidal neurons lack functional water channels.

    PubMed

    Andrew, R David; Labron, Mark W; Boehnke, Susan E; Carnduff, Lisa; Kirov, Sergei A

    2007-04-01

    The physiological conditions that swell mammalian neurons are clinically important but contentious. Distinguishing the neuronal component of brain swelling requires viewing intact neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and axons and measuring their changing volume in real time. Cultured or dissociated neuronal somata swell within minutes under acutely overhydrated conditions and shrink when strongly dehydrated. But paradoxically, most central nervous system (CNS) neurons do not express aquaporins, the membrane channels that conduct osmotically driven water. Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), we monitored neuronal volume under osmotic stress in real time. Specifically, the volume of pyramidal neurons in cerebral cortex and axon terminals comprising cerebellar mossy fibers was measured deep within live brain slices. The expected swelling or shrinking of the gray matter was confirmed by recording altered light transmittance and by indirectly measuring extracellular resistance over a wide osmotic range of -80 to +80 milliOsmoles (mOsm). Neurons expressing green fluorescent protein were then imaged with 2PLSM between -40 and +80 mOsm over 20 min. Surprisingly, pyramidal somata, dendrites, and spines steadfastly maintained their volume, as did the cerebellar axon terminals. This precluded a need for the neurons to acutely regulate volume, preserved their intrinsic electrophysiological stability, and confirmed that these CNS nerve cells lack functional aquaporins. Thus, whereas water easily permeates the aquaporin-rich endothelia and glia driving osmotic brain swelling, neurons tenatiously maintain their volume. However, these same neurons then swell dramatically upon oxygen/glucose deprivation or [K+]0 elevation, so prolonged depolarization (as during stroke or seizure) apparently swells neurons by opening nonaquaporin channels to water. PMID:16723408

  19. WATER TEMPERATURE DYNAMICS IN EXPERIMENTAL FIELD CHANNELS: ANALYSIS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is on water temperature dynamics in the shallow field channels of the USEPA Monticello Ecological Research Station (MERS). The hydraulic and temperature environment in the MERS channels was measured and simulated to provide some background for several biological studie...

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of substrate channeling through an [alpha]-[beta] barrel protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Rommie; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2004-12-01

    Steered molecular dynamics simulations are used to probe the energetics of substrate channeling in an enzyme regulating histidine biosynthesis, imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS). IGPS is a multidomain globular protein complex: the glutaminase domain hydrolyzes glutamine to form glutamate and ammonia, and is docked to the cyclase domain, a (β/α) 8 barrel protein that completes the ring formation of imidazole glycerol phosphate. Recently, it has been suggested that this protein exploits its barrel structure to channel ammonia from one remote active-site to the other. The current work includes both domains, their substrates, ammonia, and explicit solvent. Compared to the apo-complex, the inclusion of substrates does indeed affect the barrier to ammonia entry into the channel as well its transport through the barrel. Based on bioinformatic data, we suggest an "open-gate" mechanism that has a low barrier to ammonia entry. We also perform the first systematic investigation of interface water molecules near the channel gate and argue that the optimum number of water molecules inside the channel is one.

  1. 11. SETTLING TANK OVERFLOW CHANNEL, NORTH SIDE. Hondius Water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SETTLING TANK OVERFLOW CHANNEL, NORTH SIDE. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  2. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization - Duration: 56 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  3. Information-theoretic model of evolution over protein communication channel.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liuling; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Schonfeld, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a communication model of evolution and investigate its information-theoretic bounds. The process of evolution is modeled as the retransmission of information over a protein communication channel, where the transmitted message is the organism's proteome encoded in the DNA. We compute the capacity and the rate distortion functions of the protein communication system for the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes. The tradeoff between the transmission rate and the distortion in noisy protein communication channels is analyzed. As expected, comparison between the optimal transmission rate and the channel capacity indicates that the biological fidelity does not reach the Shannon optimal distortion. However, the relationship between the channel capacity and rate distortion achieved for different biological domains provides tremendous insight into the dynamics of the evolutionary processes of the three domains of life. We rely on these results to provide a model of genome sequence evolution based on the two major evolutionary driving forces: mutations and unequal crossovers. PMID:21071803

  4. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Nunoki, K; Florio, V; Catterall, W A

    1989-01-01

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of 45Ca2+ uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Mg2+. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Images PMID:2549550

  5. Protein aggregation and deposition: implications for ion channel formation and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Kourie, J I; Henry, C L

    2001-08-01

    Protein deposition, aggregation, and formation of amyloids are associated with a wide range of pathologies, including several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition are a result of malfunction in protein folding, assembly, and transport, caused by protein mutation and/or changes in the cell environment. The mechanism of protein deposition and aggregation is triggered when the hydrophobic and positively charged regions of the misfolded proteins are exposed. The cells aim to regulate these misfolded and malfunctioning aggregation-prone proteins by degradation mechanisms, e.g., proteosomes, and/or by storing them in specialized compartments, e.g., Russell bodies and aggresomes. During these processes, however, some aggregation-prone protein intermediates are capable of aggregation and forming beta-sheet based channels in various negatively charged cellular membranes. Adverse cellular conditions, transitional metals, cellular proteins, and genetic mutations play an important role in the formation and function of these non-intrinsic channels. These channels, which can damage membrane function, are pathologic because they can disrupt the metabolic, ionic, and water homeostasis and distort signal transduction. We propose that different conformations of aggregation-prone proteins could alter cell regulation by modifying several ion transport systems and also by forming heterogeneous ion channels. The changes in membrane transport systems are proposed as early steps in impairing neuronal function preceding fibril formation. We conclude that these changes damage the membrane by compromising its integrity and increasing its ion permeability. This mechanism of membrane damage is a general mechanism that may explain other malfunctioning protein processing-related pathologies. PMID:11471187

  6. Acoustic MIMO communications in a very shallow water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuehai; Cao, Xiuling; Tong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Underwater acoustic channels pose significant difficulty for the development of high speed communication due to highly limited band-width as well as hostile multipath interference. Enlightened by rapid progress of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technologies in wireless communication scenarios, MIMO systems offer a potential solution by enabling multiple spatially parallel communication channels to improve communication performance as well as capacity. For MIMO acoustic communications, deep sea channels offer substantial spatial diversity among multiple channels that can be exploited to address simultaneous multipath and co-channel interference. At the same time, there are increasing requirements for high speed underwater communication in very shallow water area (for example, a depth less than 10 m). In this paper, a space-time multichannel adaptive receiver consisting of multiple decision feedback equalizers (DFE) is adopted as the receiver for a very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication system. The performance of multichannel DFE receivers with relatively small number of receiving elements are analyzed and compared with that of the multichannel time reversal receiver to evaluate the impact of limited spatial diversity on multi-channel equalization and time reversal processing. The results of sea trials in a very shallow water channel are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication.

  7. Solubilized proteins from carrot (Daucus carota L.) membranes bind calcium channel blockers and form calcium-permeable ion channels.

    PubMed

    Thuleau, P; Graziana, A; Ranjeva, R; Schroeder, J I

    1993-01-15

    Calcium channels have been suggested to play a major role in the initiation of a large number of signal transduction processes in higher plant cells. However, molecular components of higher plant Ca2+ channels remain unidentified to date. Calcium channel blockers of the phenylalkylamine family and bepridil specifically inhibit Ca2+ influx into carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells. By using a phenylalkylamine azido derivative, a 75-kDa carrot membrane protein has been previously identified. Here we have partially purified this Ca2+ channel blocker-binding protein by lectin-affinity and ion-exchange chromatographies. The protein fraction containing the 75-kDa binding protein was incorporated into giant liposomes. Single-channel patch-clamp studies on these proteoliposomes showed the presence of Ca2+-permeable channel currents. These Ca2+-permeable channels were not stable. Recordings after durations of 2-10 min showed the appearance of nonselective ion channels with a permeability to calcium and chloride ions. These nonselective Ca2+-permeable ion channels, in contrast, were stable and were recorded for extended durations. The addition of the Ca2+ channel-blocker bepridil (10 M) led to the inhibition of these nonselective Ca2+-permeable channels by reducing the probability of channel opening. These results suggest that the 75-kDa Ca2+ channel blocker-binding protein from carrot cells plays a role in channel sensitivity to Ca2+ channel inhibitors and may constitute one of the components of Ca2+ channels in higher plants. PMID:11607356

  8. Nanometer-scale water- and proton-diffusion heterogeneities across water channels in polymer electrolyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinsuk; Han, Oc Hee; Han, Songi

    2015-03-16

    Nafion, the most widely used polymer for electrolyte membranes (PEMs) in fuel cells, consists of a fluorocarbon backbone and acidic groups that, upon hydration, swell to form percolated channels through which water and ions diffuse. Although the effects of the channel structures and the acidic groups on water/ion transport have been studied before, the surface chemistry or the spatially heterogeneous diffusivity across water channels has never been shown to directly influence water/ion transport. By the use of molecular spin probes that are selectively partitioned into heterogeneous regions of the PEM and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization relaxometry, this study reveals that both water and proton diffusivity are significantly faster near the fluorocarbon and the acidic groups lining the water channels than within the water channels. The concept that surface chemistry at the (sub)nanometer scale dictates water and proton diffusivity invokes a new design principle for PEMs. PMID:25630609

  9. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  10. Model studies of dense water overflows in the Faroese Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbertson, Alan; Davies, Peter; Stashchuk, Nataliya; Vlasenko, Vasiliy

    2014-01-01

    The overflow of dense water from the Nordic Seas through the Faroese Channel system was investigated through combined laboratory experiments and numerical simulations using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model. In the experimental study, a scaled, topographic representation of the Faroe-Shetland Channel, Wyville-Thomson Basin and Ridge and Faroe Bank Channel seabed bathymetry was constructed and mounted in a rotating tank. A series of parametric experiments was conducted using dye-tracing and drogue-tracking techniques to investigate deep-water overflow pathways and circulation patterns within the modelled region. In addition, the structure of the outflowing dense bottom water was investigated through density profiling along three cross-channel transects located in the Wyville-Thomson Basin and the converging, up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel. Results from the dye-tracing studies demonstrate a range of parametric conditions under which dense water overflow across the Wyville-Thomson Ridge is shown to occur, as defined by the Burger number, a non-dimensional length ratio and a dimensionless dense water volume flux parameter specified at the Faroe-Shetland Channel inlet boundary. Drogue-tracking measurements reveal the complex nature of flow paths and circulations generated in the modelled topography, particularly the development of a large anti-cyclonic gyre in the Wyville-Thompson Basin and up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel, which diverts the dense water outflow from the Faroese shelf towards the Wyville-Thomson Ridge, potentially promoting dense water spillage across the ridge itself. The presence of this circulation is also indicated by associated undulations in density isopycnals across the Wyville-Thomson Basin. Numerical simulations of parametric test cases for the main outflow pathways and density structure in a similarly-scaled Faroese Channels model domain indicate excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental observations and measurements. In addition, the comparisons show that strong temporal variability in the predicted outflow pathways and circulations have a strong influence in regulating the Faroe Bank Channel and Wyville-Thomson Ridge overflows, as well as in determining the overall response in the Faroese Channels to changes in the Faroe-Shetland Channel inlet boundary conditions.

  11. Calcium channel gamma subunits: a functionally diverse protein family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren-Shiang; Deng, Tzyy-Chyn; Garcia, Thomas; Sellers, Zachary M; Best, Philip M

    2007-01-01

    The calcium channel gamma subunits comprise an eight-member protein family that share a common topology consisting of four transmembrane domains and intracellular N- and C-termini. Although the first gamma subunit was identified as an auxiliary subunit of a voltage-dependent calcium channel, a review of phylogenetic, bioinformatic, and functional studies indicates that they are a functionally diverse protein family. A cluster containing gamma1 and gamma6 conforms to the original description of the protein family as they seem to act primarily as subunits of calcium channels expressed in muscle. Members of a second cluster (gamma2, gamma3, gamma4, gamma8) function as regulators of AMPA receptor localization and function in the brain and are collectively known as TARPs. The function of members of the third cluster (gamma5, gamma7) remains unclear. Our analysis shows that the members of each cluster contain conserved regulatory motifs that help to differentiate the groups. However, the physiological significance of these motifs in many cases remains to be demonstrated. PMID:17652770

  12. 5. GATE 5, INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING SOUTH; WATER FROM GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GATE 5, INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING SOUTH; WATER FROM GATE 5 ENTERED DITCH AND IRRIGATED HONDIUS' FIELDS. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  13. CHIP28 water channels are localized in constitutively water-permeable segments of the nephron.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S; Smith, B L; Christensen, E I; Knepper, M A; Agre, P

    1993-01-01

    The sites of water transport along the nephron are well characterized, but the molecular basis of renal water transport remains poorly understood. CHIP28 is a 28-kD integral protein which was proposed to mediate transmembrane water movement in red cells and kidney (Preston, G. M., T. P. Carroll, W. B. Guggino, and P. Agre. 1992. Science [Wash. DC]. 256:385-387). To determine whether CHIP28 could account for renal epithelial water transport, we used specific polyclonal antibodies to quantitate and localize CHIP28 at cellular and subcellular levels in rat kidney using light and electron microscopy. CHIP28 comprised 3.8% of isolated proximal tubule brush border protein. Except for the first few cells of the S1 segment, CHIP28 was immunolocalized throughout the convoluted and straight proximal tubules where it was observed in the microvilli of the apical brush border and in basolateral membranes. Very little CHIP28 was detected in endocytic vesicles or other intracellular structures in proximal tubules. Uninterrupted, heavy immunostaining of CHIP28 was also observed over both apical and basolateral membranes of descending thin limbs, including both short and long loops of Henle. These nephron sites have constitutively high osmotic water permeabilities. CHIP28 was not detected in ascending thin limbs, thick ascending limbs, or distal tubules, which are highly impermeable to water. Moreover, CHIP28 was not detected in collecting duct epithelia, where water permeability is regulated by antidiuretic hormone. These determinations of abundance and structural organization provide evidence that the CHIP28 water channel is the predominant pathway for constitutive transepithelial water transport in the proximal tubule and descending limb of Henle's loop. PMID:7678419

  14. Heterologous expression of tulip petal plasma membrane aquaporins in Pichia pastoris for water channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Water channels formed by aquaporins (AQPs) play an important role in the control of water homeostasis in individual cells and in multicellular organisms. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) constitute a subclass of plant AQPs. TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2 from tulip petals are members of the PIP family. In this study, we overexpressed TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2 in Pichia pastoris and monitored their water channel activity (WCA) either by an in vivo spheroplast-bursting assay performed after hypo-osmotic shock or by growth assay. Osmolarity, pH, and inhibitors of AQPs, protein kinases (PKs), and protein phosphatases (PPs) affect the WCA of heterologous AQPs in this expression system. The WCA of TgPIP2;2-expressing spheroplasts was affected by inhibitors of PKs and PPs, which indicates that the water channel of this homologue is regulated by phosphorylation in P. pastoris. From the results reported herein, we suggest that P. pastoris can be employed as a heterologous expression system to assay the WCA of PIPs and to monitor the AQP-mediated channel gating mechanism, and it can be developed to screen inhibitors/effectors of PIPs. PMID:19251885

  15. Structural basis of water-specific transport through the AQP1 water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Haixin; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Lee, John K.; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing K.

    2001-12-01

    Water channels facilitate the rapid transport of water across cell membranes in response to osmotic gradients. These channels are believed to be involved in many physiological processes that include renal water conservation, neuro-homeostasis, digestion, regulation of body temperature and reproduction. Members of the water channel superfamily have been found in a range of cell types from bacteria to human. In mammals, there are currently 10 families of water channels, referred to as aquaporins (AQP): AQP0-AQP9. Here we report the structure of the aquaporin 1 (AQP1) water channel to 2.2Å resolution. The channel consists of three topological elements, an extracellular and a cytoplasmic vestibule connected by an extended narrow pore or selectivity filter. Within the selectivity filter, four bound waters are localized along three hydrophilic nodes, which punctuate an otherwise extremely hydrophobic pore segment. This unusual combination of a long hydrophobic pore and a minimal number of solute binding sites facilitates rapid water transport. Residues of the constriction region, in particular histidine 182, which is conserved among all known water-specific channels, are critical in establishing water specificity. Our analysis of the AQP1 pore also indicates that the transport of protons through this channel is highly energetically unfavourable.

  16. Regulation of Neurovascular Coupling in Autoimmunity to Water and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jukkola, Peter; Gu, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding autoimmune channelopathies, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are not always clear due to broad expression of some channel proteins. Recent studies show that autoimmune conditions that interfere with neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS) can lead to neurodegeneration. Cerebral blood flow that meets neuronal activity and metabolic demand is tightly regulated by local neural activity. This process of reciprocal regulation involves coordinated actions of a number of cell types, including neurons, glia, and vascular cells. In particular, astrocytic endfeet cover more than 90% of brain capillaries to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and wrap around synapses and nodes of Ranvier to communicate with neuronal activity. In this review, we highlight four types of channel proteins that are expressed in astrocytes, regarding their structures, biophysical properties, expression and distribution patterns, and related diseases including autoimmune disorders. Water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and inwardly-rectifying potassium (Kir4.1) channels are concentrated in astrocytic endfeet, whereas some voltage-gated Ca2+ and two-pore-domain K+ channels are expressed throughout the cell body of reactive astrocytes. More channel proteins are found in astrocytes under normal and abnormal conditions. This research field will contribute to a better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms underlying autoimmune disorders. PMID:25462580

  17. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution. PMID:26526878

  18. Structure of the native Sec61 protein-conducting channel

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Stefan; Burbaum, Laura; Unverdorben, Pia; Pech, Markus; Chen, Yuxiang; Zimmermann, Richard; Beckmann, Roland; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across or inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the universally conserved protein-conducting channel Sec61, which has been structurally studied in isolated, detergent-solubilized states. Here we structurally and functionally characterize native, non-solubilized ribosome-Sec61 complexes on rough ER vesicles using cryo-electron tomography and ribosome profiling. Surprisingly, the 9-Å resolution subtomogram average reveals Sec61 in a laterally open conformation, even though the channel is not in the process of inserting membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer. In contrast to recent mechanistic models for polypeptide translocation and insertion, our results indicate that the laterally open conformation of Sec61 is the only conformation present in the ribosome-bound translocon complex, independent of its functional state. Consistent with earlier functional studies, our structure suggests that the ribosome alone, even without a nascent chain, is sufficient for lateral opening of Sec61 in a lipid environment. PMID:26411746

  19. Structure of the native Sec61 protein-conducting channel.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Stefan; Burbaum, Laura; Unverdorben, Pia; Pech, Markus; Chen, Yuxiang; Zimmermann, Richard; Beckmann, Roland; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across or inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the universally conserved protein-conducting channel Sec61, which has been structurally studied in isolated, detergent-solubilized states. Here we structurally and functionally characterize native, non-solubilized ribosome-Sec61 complexes on rough ER vesicles using cryo-electron tomography and ribosome profiling. Surprisingly, the 9-Å resolution subtomogram average reveals Sec61 in a laterally open conformation, even though the channel is not in the process of inserting membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer. In contrast to recent mechanistic models for polypeptide translocation and insertion, our results indicate that the laterally open conformation of Sec61 is the only conformation present in the ribosome-bound translocon complex, independent of its functional state. Consistent with earlier functional studies, our structure suggests that the ribosome alone, even without a nascent chain, is sufficient for lateral opening of Sec61 in a lipid environment. PMID:26411746

  20. Control of the Aquaporin-4 Channel Water Permeability by Structural Dynamics of Aromatic/Arginine Selectivity Filter Residues.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Conner, Alex C

    2015-11-17

    The aquaporins (AQPs) make up a family of integral membrane proteins that control cellular water flow. Gating of the water channel by conformational changes induced by phosphorylation or protein-protein interactions is an established regulatory mechanism for AQPs. Recent in silico and crystallographic analyses of the structural biology of AQPs suggest that the rate of water flow can also be controlled by small movements of single-amino acid side chains lining the water pore. Here we use measurements of the membrane water permeability of mammalian cells expressing AQP4 mutants to provide the first in vitro evidence in support of this hypothesis. PMID:26512424

  1. Protein-protein interactions in intracellular Ca2+-release channel function.

    PubMed Central

    MacKrill, J J

    1999-01-01

    Release of Ca2+ ions from intracellular stores can occur via two classes of Ca2+-release channel (CRC) protein, the inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs) and the ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Multiple isoforms and subtypes of each CRC class display distinct but overlapping distributions within mammalian tissues. InsP3Rs and RyRs interact with a plethora of accessory proteins which modulate the activity of their intrinsic channels. Although many aspects of CRC structure and function have been reviewed in recent years, the properties of proteins with which they interact has not been comprehensively surveyed, despite extensive current research on the roles of these modulators. The aim of this article is to review the regulation of CRC activity by accessory proteins and, wherever possible, to outline the structural details of such interactions. The CRCs are large transmembrane proteins, with the bulk of their structure located cytoplasmically. Intra- and inter-complex protein-protein interactions between these cytoplasmic domains also regulate CRC function. Some accessory proteins modulate channel activity of all CRC subtypes characterized, whereas other have class- or even isoform-specific effects. Certain accessory proteins exert both direct and indirect forms of regulation on CRCs, occasionally with opposing effects. Others are themselves modulated by changes in Ca2+ concentration, thereby participating in feedback mechanisms acting on InsP3R and RyR activity. CRCs are therefore capable of integrating numerous signalling events within a cell by virtue of such protein-protein interactions. Consequently, the functional properties of InsP3Rs and RyRs within particular cells and subcellular domains are 'customized' by the accessory proteins present. PMID:9895277

  2. Stability Analysis of a Uniformly Heated Channel with Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega Gomez, T.; Class, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic stability of a uniformly heated channel at supercritical water pressure has been investigated to help understand the system instability phenomena which may occur in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors (SCWR). We have extended the modeling approach often used for Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) stability analysis to supercritical pressure operation conditions. We have shown that Ledinegg excursive instabilities and pressure-drop oscillations (PDO) will not occur in supercritical water systems. The linear stability characteristics of a typical uniformly heated channel were computed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the model. An analysis of non-linear instability phenomena was also performed in the time domain and the dynamic bifurcations were evaluated. (authors)

  3. Water-protein interactions: the secret of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Bonechi, Claudia; Foletti, Alberto; Rossi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Water-protein interactions help to maintain flexible conformation conditions which are required for multifunctional protein recognition processes. The intimate relationship between the protein surface and hydration water can be analyzed by studying experimental water properties measured in protein systems in solution. In particular, proteins in solution modify the structure and the dynamics of the bulk water at the solute-solvent interface. The ordering effects of proteins on hydration water are extended for several angstroms. In this paper we propose a method for analyzing the dynamical properties of the water molecules present in the hydration shells of proteins. The approach is based on the analysis of the effects of protein-solvent interactions on water protons NMR relaxation parameters. NMR relaxation parameters, especially the nonselective (R?(NS)) and selective (R?(SE)) spin-lattice relaxation rates of water protons, are useful for investigating the solvent dynamics at the macromolecule-solvent interfaces as well as the perturbation effects caused by the water-macromolecule interactions on the solvent dynamical properties. In this paper we demonstrate that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can be used to determine the dynamical contributions of proteins to the water molecules belonging to their hydration shells. PMID:23766672

  4. The stream channel incision syndrome and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed development often triggers channel incision, which accounts for 60-90% of sediments leaving many disturbed watersheds. Impacts of such incision on water quality processes and the implication of such impairment on stream biota are relevant to issues associated with establishing total maxim...

  5. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-07-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7542585

  6. Microfabricated Patch Clamp Electrodes for Improved Ion Channel Protein Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemic, James; Klemic, Kathryn; Reed, Mark; Sigworth, Frederick

    2002-03-01

    Ion channels are trans-membrane proteins that underlie many cell functions including hormone and neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction and cell signaling cascades. Ion channel proteins are commonly characterized via the patch clamp method in which an extruded glass tube containing ionic solution, manipulated by an expert technician, is brought into contact with a living cell to record ionic current through the cell membrane. Microfabricated planar patch electrodes, micromolded in the silicone elastomer poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) from microlithographically patterned structures, have been developed that improve on this method. Microfabrication techniques allow arrays of patch electrodes to be fabricated, increasing the throughput of the measurement technique. Planar patch electrodes readily allow the automation of cell sealing, further increasing throughput. Microfabricated electrode arrays may be readily integrated with microfluidic structures to allow fast, in situ solution exchange. Miniaturization of the electrode geometry should increase both the signal to noise and the bandwidth of the measurement. Microfabricated patch electrode arrays have been fabricated and measurements have been taken.

  7. High-Density Reconstitution of Functional Water Channels into Vesicular and Planar Block Copolymer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The exquisite selectivity and unique transport properties of membrane proteins can be harnessed for a variety of engineering and biomedical applications if suitable membranes can be produced. Amphiphilic block copolymers (BCPs), developed as stable lipid analogs, form membranes that functionally incorporate membrane proteins and are ideal for such applications. While high protein density and planar membrane morphology are most desirable, BCP–membrane protein aggregates have so far been limited to low protein densities in either vesicular or bilayer morphologies. Here, we used dialysis to reproducibly form planar and vesicular BCP membranes with a high density of reconstituted aquaporin-0 (AQP0) water channels. We show that AQP0 retains its biological activity when incorporated at high density in BCP membranes, and that the morphology of the BCP–protein aggregates can be controlled by adjusting the amount of incorporated AQP0. We also show that BCPs can be used to form two-dimensional crystals of AQP0. PMID:23082933

  8. The role of transmembrane channel–like proteins in the operation of hair cell mechanotransducer channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghee X.; Beurg, Maryline; Hackney, Carole M.; Furness, David N.; Mahendrasingam, Shanthini

    2013-01-01

    Sound stimuli elicit movement of the stereocilia that make up the hair bundle of cochlear hair cells, putting tension on the tip links connecting the stereocilia and thereby opening mechanotransducer (MT) channels. Tmc1 and Tmc2, two members of the transmembrane channel–like family, are necessary for mechanotransduction. To assess their precise role, we recorded MT currents elicited by hair bundle deflections in mice with null mutations of Tmc1, Tmc2, or both. During the first postnatal week, we observed a normal MT current in hair cells lacking Tmc1 or Tmc2; however, in the absence of both isoforms, we recorded a large MT current that was phase-shifted 180°, being evoked by displacements of the hair bundle away from its tallest edge rather than toward it as in wild-type hair cells. The anomalous MT current in hair cells lacking Tmc1 and Tmc2 was blocked by FM1-43, dihydrostreptomycin, and extracellular Ca2+ at concentrations similar to those that blocked wild type. MT channels in the double knockouts carried Ca2+ with a lower permeability than wild-type or single mutants. The MT current in double knockouts persisted during exposure to submicromolar Ca2+, even though this treatment destroyed the tip links. We conclude that the Tmc isoforms do not themselves constitute the MT channel but are essential for targeting and interaction with the tip link. Changes in the MT conductance and Ca2+ permeability observed in the absence of Tmc1 mutants may stem from loss of interaction with protein partners in the transduction complex. PMID:24127526

  9. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  10. Surface water-groundwater connectivity in deltaic distributary channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Knights, Deon

    2015-12-01

    Delta distributary channel networks increase river water contact with sediments and provide the final opportunity to process nutrients and other solutes before river water discharges to the ocean. In order to understand surface water-groundwater interactions at the scale of the distributary channel network, we created three numerical deltas that ranged in composition from silt to sand using Delft3D, a morphodynamic flow and sediment transport model. We then linked models of mean annual river discharge to steady groundwater flow in MODFLOW. Under mean annual discharge, exchange rates through the numerical deltas are enhanced relative to a single-threaded river. We calculate that exchange rates across a <10 km2 network are equivalent to exchange through ~10-100 km of single-threaded river channel. Exchange rates are greatest in the coarse-grained delta due to its permeability and morphology. Groundwater residence times range from hours to centuries and have fractal tails. Deltas are vanishing due to relative sea level rise. River diversion projects aimed at creating new deltaic land should also aim to restore surface water-groundwater connectivity, which is critical for biogeochemical processing in wetlands. We recommend designing diversions to capture more sand and thus maximize surface water-groundwater connectivity.

  11. Topological Predictions for Integral Membrane Channel and Carrier Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abhinay, Reddy; Jaehoon, Cho; Sam, Ling; Vamsee, Reddy; Maksim, Shlykov; Milton, Saier

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated topological predictions for nine different programs, HMMTOP, TMHMM, SVMTOP, DAS, SOSUI, TOPCONS, PHOBIUS, MEMSAT-SVM (hereinafter referred to as MEMSAT), and SPOCTOPUS. These programs were first evaluated using four large topologically well-defined families of secondary transporters, and the three best programs were further evaluated using topologically more diverse families of channels and carriers. In the initial studies, the order of accuracy was: SPOCTOPUS>MEMSAT>HMMTOP>TOPCONS>PHOBIUS>TMHMM>SVMTOP>DAS>S OSUI. Some families, such as the Sugar Porter family (2.A.1.1) of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS; TC# 2.A.1) and the Amino acid/Polyamine/Organocation (APC) Family (TC# 2.A.3), were correctly predicted with high accuracy while others, such as the Mitochondrial Carrier (MC) (TC# 2.A.29) and the K+ transporter (Trk) families (TC# 2.A.38), were predicted with much lower accuracy. For small, topologically homogeneous families, SPOCTOPUS and MEMSAT were generally most reliable, while with large, more diverse superfamilies, HMMTOP often proved to have the greatest prediction accuracy. We next developed a novel program, TM-STATS, that tabulates HMMTOP, SPOCTOPUS or MEMSAT-based topological predictions for any subdivision (class, subclass, superfamily, family, subfamily, or any combination of these) of the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; www.tcdb.org) and examined the following subclasses: α-type channel proteins (TC subclasses 1.A and 1.E), secreted poreforming toxins (TC subclass 1.C) and secondary carriers (subclass 2.A). Histograms 3 were generated for each of these subclasses, and the results were analyzed according to subclass, family and protein. The results provide an update of topological predictions for integral membrane transport proteins as well as guides for the development of more reliable topological prediction programs, taking family-specific characteristics into account. PMID:24992992

  12. Voltage Gated Ion Channel Function: Gating, Conduction, and the Role of Water and Protons

    PubMed Central

    Kariev, Alisher M.; Green, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels, which are found in every biological cell, regulate the concentration of electrolytes, and are responsible for multiple biological functions, including in particular the propagation of nerve impulses. The channels with the latter function are gated (opened) by a voltage signal, which allows Na+ into the cell and K+ out. These channels have several positively charged amino acids on a transmembrane domain of their voltage sensor, and it is generally considered, based primarily on two lines of experimental evidence, that these charges move with respect to the membrane to open the channel. At least three forms of motion, with greatly differing extents and mechanisms of motion, have been proposed. There is a “gating current”, a capacitative current preceding the channel opening, that corresponds to several charges (for one class of channel typically 12–13) crossing the membrane field, which may not require protein physically crossing a large fraction of the membrane. The coupling to the opening of the channel would in these models depend on the motion. The conduction itself is usually assumed to require the “gate” of the channel to be pulled apart to allow ions to enter as a section of the protein partially crosses the membrane, and a selectivity filter at the opposite end of the channel determines the ion which is allowed to pass through. We will here primarily consider K+ channels, although Na+ channels are similar. We propose that the mechanism of gating differs from that which is generally accepted, in that the positively charged residues need not move (there may be some motion, but not as gating current). Instead, protons may constitute the gating current, causing the gate to open; opening consists of only increasing the diameter at the gate from approximately 6 Å to approximately 12 Å. We propose in addition that the gate oscillates rather than simply opens, and the ion experiences a barrier to its motion across the channel that is tuned by the water present within the channel. Our own quantum calculations as well as numerous experiments of others are interpreted in terms of this hypothesis. It is also shown that the evidence that supports the motion of the sensor as the gating current can also be consistent with the hypothesis we present. PMID:22408417

  13. Protein and cell patterning in closed polymer channels by photoimmobilizing proteins on photografted poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Larsen, Niels B.

    2014-01-01

    Definable surface chemistry is essential for many applications of microfluidic polymer systems. However, small cross-section channels with a high surface to volume ratio enhance passive adsorption of molecules that depletes active molecules in solution and contaminates the channel surface. Here, we present a one-step photochemical process to coat the inner surfaces of closed microfluidic channels with a nanometer thick layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), well known to strongly reduce non-specific adsorption, using only commercially available reagents in an aqueous environment. The coating consists of PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) covalently grafted to polymer surfaces via UV light activation of the water soluble photoinitiator benzoyl benzylamine, a benzophenone derivative. The PEGDA coating was shown to efficiently limit the adsorption of antibodies and other proteins to <5% of the adsorbed amount on uncoated polymer surfaces. The coating could also efficiently suppress the adhesion of mammalian cells as demonstrated using the HT-29 cancer cell line. In a subsequent equivalent process step, protein in aqueous solution could be anchored onto the PEGDA coating in spatially defined patterns with a resolution of <15??m using an inverted microscope as a projection lithography system. Surface patterns of the cell binding protein fibronectin were photochemically defined inside a closed microfluidic device that was initially homogeneously coated by PEGDA. The resulting fibronectin patterns were shown to greatly improve cell adhesion compared to unexposed areas. This method opens for easy surface modification of closed microfluidic systems through combining a low protein binding PEG-based coating with spatially defined protein patterns of interest. PMID:25587375

  14. Filter gate closure inhibits ion but not water transport through potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Hoomann, Torben; Jahnke, Nadin; Horner, Andreas; Keller, Sandro; Pohl, Peter

    2013-06-25

    The selectivity filter of K(+) channels is conserved throughout all kingdoms of life. Carbonyl groups of highly conserved amino acids point toward the lumen to act as surrogates for the water molecules of K(+) hydration. Ion conductivity is abrogated if some of these carbonyl groups flip out of the lumen, which happens (i) in the process of C-type inactivation or (ii) during filter collapse in the absence of K(+). Here, we show that K(+) channels remain permeable to water, even after entering such an electrically silent conformation. We reconstituted fluorescently labeled and constitutively open mutants of the bacterial K(+) channel KcsA into lipid vesicles that were either C-type inactivating or noninactivating. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allowed us to count both the number of proteoliposomes and the number of protein-containing micelles after solubilization, providing the number of reconstituted channels per proteoliposome. Quantification of the per-channel increment in proteoliposome water permeability with the aid of stopped-flow experiments yielded a unitary water permeability pf of (6.9 ± 0.6) × 10(-13) cm(3)?s(-1) for both mutants. "Collapse" of the selectivity filter upon K(+) removal did not alter pf and was fully reversible, as demonstrated by current measurements through planar bilayers in a K(+)-containing medium to which K(+)-free proteoliposomes were fused. Water flow through KcsA is halved by 200 mM K(+) in the aqueous solution, which indicates an effective K(+) dissociation constant in that range for a singly occupied channel. This questions the widely accepted hypothesis that multiple K(+) ions in the selectivity filter act to mutually destabilize binding. PMID:23754382

  15. Filter gate closure inhibits ion but not water transport through potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Hoomann, Torben; Jahnke, Nadin; Horner, Andreas; Keller, Sandro; Pohl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The selectivity filter of K+ channels is conserved throughout all kingdoms of life. Carbonyl groups of highly conserved amino acids point toward the lumen to act as surrogates for the water molecules of K+ hydration. Ion conductivity is abrogated if some of these carbonyl groups flip out of the lumen, which happens (i) in the process of C-type inactivation or (ii) during filter collapse in the absence of K+. Here, we show that K+ channels remain permeable to water, even after entering such an electrically silent conformation. We reconstituted fluorescently labeled and constitutively open mutants of the bacterial K+ channel KcsA into lipid vesicles that were either C-type inactivating or noninactivating. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allowed us to count both the number of proteoliposomes and the number of protein-containing micelles after solubilization, providing the number of reconstituted channels per proteoliposome. Quantification of the per-channel increment in proteoliposome water permeability with the aid of stopped-flow experiments yielded a unitary water permeability pf of (6.9 ± 0.6) × 10?13 cm3?s?1 for both mutants. “Collapse” of the selectivity filter upon K+ removal did not alter pf and was fully reversible, as demonstrated by current measurements through planar bilayers in a K+-containing medium to which K+-free proteoliposomes were fused. Water flow through KcsA is halved by 200 mM K+ in the aqueous solution, which indicates an effective K+ dissociation constant in that range for a singly occupied channel. This questions the widely accepted hypothesis that multiple K+ ions in the selectivity filter act to mutually destabilize binding. PMID:23754382

  16. Steric Selectivity in Na Channels Arising from Protein Polarization and Mobile Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    Boda, Dezs?; Nonner, Wolfgang; Valiskó, Mónika; Henderson, Douglas; Eisenberg, Bob; Gillespie, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of equilibrium selectivity of Na channels with a DEKA locus are performed over a range of radius R and protein dielectric coefficient ?p. Selectivity arises from the balance of electrostatic forces and steric repulsion by excluded volume of ions and side chains of the channel protein in the highly concentrated and charged (?30 M) selectivity filter resembling an ionic liquid. Ions and structural side chains are described as mobile charged hard spheres that assume positions of minimal free energy. Water is a dielectric continuum. Size selectivity (ratio of Na+ occupancy to K+ occupancy) and charge selectivity (Na+ to Ca2+) are computed in concentrations as low as 10?5 M Ca2+. In general, small R reduces ion occupancy and favors Na+ over K+ because of steric repulsion. Small ?p increases occupancy and favors Na+ over Ca2+ because protein polarization amplifies the pore's net charge. Size selectivity depends on R and is independent of ?p; charge selectivity depends on both R and ?p. Thus, small R and ?p make an efficient Na channel that excludes K+ and Ca2+ while maximizing Na+ occupancy. Selectivity properties depend on interactions that cannot be described by qualitative or verbal models or by quantitative models with a fixed free energy landscape. PMID:17526571

  17. NMR Structure and Ion Channel Activity of the p7 Protein from Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Montserret, Roland; Saint, Nathalie; Vanbelle, Christophe; Salvay, Andrés Gerardo; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Ebel, Christine; Sapay, Nicolas; Renisio, Jean-Guillaume; Böckmann, Anja; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas; Dubuisson, Jean; Chipot, Christophe; Penin, François

    2010-01-01

    The small membrane protein p7 of hepatitis C virus forms oligomers and exhibits ion channel activity essential for virus infectivity. These viroporin features render p7 an attractive target for antiviral drug development. In this study, p7 from strain HCV-J (genotype 1b) was chemically synthesized and purified for ion channel activity measurements and structure analyses. p7 forms cation-selective ion channels in planar lipid bilayers and at the single-channel level by the patch clamp technique. Ion channel activity was shown to be inhibited by hexamethylene amiloride but not by amantadine. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the structure of p7 is mainly ?-helical, irrespective of the membrane mimetic medium (e.g. lysolipids, detergents, or organic solvent/water mixtures). The secondary structure elements of the monomeric form of p7 were determined by 1H and 13C NMR in trifluoroethanol/water mixtures. Molecular dynamics simulations in a model membrane were combined synergistically with structural data obtained from NMR experiments. This approach allowed us to determine the secondary structure elements of p7, which significantly differ from predictions, and to propose a three-dimensional model of the monomeric form of p7 associated with the phospholipid bilayer. These studies revealed the presence of a turn connecting an unexpected N-terminal ?-helix to the first transmembrane helix, TM1, and a long cytosolic loop bearing the dibasic motif and connecting TM1 to TM2. These results provide the first detailed experimental structural framework for a better understanding of p7 processing, oligomerization, and ion channel gating mechanism. PMID:20667830

  18. Restored physiology in protein-deficient yeast by a small molecule channel

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Alexander G.; Hou, Jennifer; Grillo, Anthony S.; Diaz, Katrina A.; Burke, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies of protein ion channels underlie many currently incurable human diseases. Robust networks of pumps and channels are usually responsible for the directional movement of specific ions in organisms ranging from microbes to humans. We thus questioned whether minimally selective small molecule mimics of missing protein channels might be capable of collaborating with the corresponding protein ion pumps to restore physiology. Here we report vigorous and sustainable restoration of yeast cell growth by replacing missing protein ion channels with imperfect small molecule mimics. We further provide evidence that this tolerance for imperfect mimicry is attributable to collaboration between the channel-forming small molecule and protein ion pumps. These results illuminate a mechanistic framework for pursuing small molecule replacements for deficient protein ion channels that underlie a range of challenging human diseases. PMID:26230309

  19. Involvement of aquaporin channels in water extrusion from biosilica during maturation of sponge siliceous spicules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    Aquaporins are a family of small, pore-forming, integral cell membrane proteins. This ancient protein family functions as water channels and is found in all kingdoms (including archaea, eubacteria, fungi, plants, and animals). We discovered that in sponges aquaporin plays a novel role during the maturation of spicules, their skeletal elements. Spicules are synthesized enzymatically via silicatein following a polycondensation reaction. During this process, a 1:1 stoichiometric release of water per one Si-O-Si bond formed is produced. The product of silicatein, biosilica, is a fluffy, soft material that must be hardened in order to function as a solid rod. Using the model of the demosponge species Suberites domuncula Olivi, 1792, which expresses aquaporin, cDNA was cloned and the protein was heterologously expressed. The sponge aquaporin is grouped with the type 8 aquaporins. The function of the sponge aquaporin can be blocked by Mn-sulfate (MnSO4) and mercury chloride (HgCl2). Microscopic and functional studies suggest that aquaporin is involved in removal of the reaction water at the site where siliceous spicules are formed. Another molecule that is likely to be involved in biosilica maturation is the mucin/nidogen-like polypeptide. cDNA has also been cloned from S. domuncula. Experimental studies suggest that water extrusion/suctioning from biosilica after enzymatic synthesis during spicule formation involves both aquaporin-mediated water channeling and "polymerization-induced phase separation" facilitated by the mucin/nidogen-like polypeptide. PMID:26338867

  20. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for water wave propagation in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Pourya; Norouzi, Hossein; Zarghami, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate the propagation of waves in an intermediate depth water channel. The major advantage of using SPH is that no special treatment of the free surface is required, which is advantageous for simulating highly nonlinear flows with possible wave breaking. The SPH method has an option of different formulations with their own advantages and drawbacks to be implemented. Here, we apply the classical and Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) formulation for wave propagation in a water channel. The classical SPH should come with an artificial viscosity which stabilizes the numerical algorithm and increases the accuracy. Here, we will show that the use of classical SPH with an artificial viscosity may cause the waves in the channel to decay. On the other hand, we will show that using the ALE-SPH algorithm with a Riemann solver is more stable, and in addition to producing the pressure fields with much less numerical noise, the waves propagate in the channel without dissipation.

  1. Actin directly interacts with different membrane channel proteins and influences channel activities: AQP2 as a model.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Sei; Yui, Naofumi; Noda, Yumi

    2014-02-01

    The interplay between actin and 10 membrane channel proteins that have been shown to directly bind to actin are reviewed. The 10 membrane channel proteins covered in this review are aquaporin 2 (AQP2), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ClC2, short form of ClC3 (sClC3), chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1), chloride intracellular channel 5 (CLIC5), epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (Maxi-K), transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), with particular attention to AQP2. In regard to AQP2, most reciprocal interactions between actin and AQP2 occur during intracellular trafficking, which are largely mediated through indirect binding. Actin and the actin cytoskeleton work as cables, barriers, stabilizers, and force generators for motility. However, as with ENaC, the effects of actin cytoskeleton on channel gating should be investigated further. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé. PMID:23770358

  2. Aquaporins: Highly Regulated Channels Controlling Plant Water Relations1

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, François; Tyerman, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and development are dependent on tight regulation of water movement. Water diffusion across cell membranes is facilitated by aquaporins that provide plants with the means to rapidly and reversibly modify water permeability. This is done by changing aquaporin density and activity in the membrane, including posttranslational modifications and protein interaction that act on their trafficking and gating. At the whole organ level aquaporins modify water conductance and gradients at key “gatekeeper” cell layers that impact on whole plant water flow and plant water potential. In this way they may act in concert with stomatal regulation to determine the degree of isohydry/anisohydry. Molecular, physiological, and biophysical approaches have demonstrated that variations in root and leaf hydraulic conductivity can be accounted for by aquaporins but this must be integrated with anatomical considerations. This Update integrates these data and emphasizes the central role played by aquaporins in regulating plant water relations. PMID:24449709

  3. Ion Channel Formation by Tau Protein: Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease and Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the channel forming properties of other amyloid peptides, we employed planar lipid bilayers and atomic force microscopy to test tau for its ability to form ion permeable channels. Our results demonstrate that tau can form such channels, but only under acidic conditions. The channels formed are remarkably similar to amyloid peptide channels in their appearance, physical and electrical size, permanence, lack of ion selectivity, and multiple channel conductances. These channels differ from amyloid channels in their voltage dependence and resistance to blockade by zinc ion. These channels could explain tau’s pathologic role in disease by lowering membrane potential, dysregulating calcium, depolarizing mitochondria, or depleting energy stores. Tau might also combine with amyloid beta peptides to form toxic channels. PMID:26575330

  4. Ion Channel Formation by Tau Protein: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirav; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Azimov, Rustam; Kagan, Bruce L; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-12-22

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the channel forming properties of other amyloid peptides, we employed planar lipid bilayers and atomic force microscopy to test tau for its ability to form ion permeable channels. Our results demonstrate that tau can form such channels, but only under acidic conditions. The channels formed are remarkably similar to amyloid peptide channels in their appearance, physical and electrical size, permanence, lack of ion selectivity, and multiple channel conductances. These channels differ from amyloid channels in their voltage dependence and resistance to blockade by zinc ion. These channels could explain tau's pathologic role in disease by lowering membrane potential, dysregulating calcium, depolarizing mitochondria, or depleting energy stores. Tau might also combine with amyloid beta peptides to form toxic channels. PMID:26575330

  5. Plant 14-3-3 proteins assist ion channels and pumps.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H

    2002-08-01

    Turgor pressure is a cellular parameter, important for a range of physiological processes in plants, like cell elongation, gas exchange and gravitropic/phototropic bending. Regulation of turgor pressure involves ion and water transport at the expense of metabolic energy (ATP). The primary pump in the plasma membrane (the H(+)-ATPase) is a key player in turgor regulation since it provides the driving force for ion uptake, followed by water influx through osmosis. Using the phytotoxin fusicoccin (a well-known activator of the ATPase) as a tool, 14-3-3 proteins were identified as regulators of the H(+)-ATPase. Since fusicoccin has a dramatic effect on K(+) accumulation and cellular respiration as well, we studied whether 14-3-3 proteins play a role in the regulation of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase and ion channels in the vacuolar and plasma membranes. Besides the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, we have identified thus far at least four other transport proteins that are regulated by 14-3-3 proteins. The mechanism of regulation will be described and the possibility that 14-3-3 proteins act as coordinators of ion transporters with varied but interdependent functions will be discussed. PMID:12196106

  6. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J.; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972), 10.2136/sssaj1972.03615995003600050010x]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water.

  7. A G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK4) from human hippocampus associates with other GIRK channels.

    PubMed

    Spauschus, A; Lentes, K U; Wischmeyer, E; Dissmann, E; Karschin, C; Karschin, A

    1996-02-01

    Transcripts of a gene, GIRK4, that encodes for a 419-amino-acid protein and shows high structural similarity to other subfamily members of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) have been identified in the human hippocampus. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, GIRK4 yielded functional GIRK channels with activity that was enhanced by the stimulation of coexpressed serotonin 1A receptors. GIRK4 potentiated basal and agonist-induced currents mediated by other GIRK channels, possibly because of channel heteromerization. Despite the structural similarity to a putative rat KATP channel, no ATP sensitivity or KATP-typical pharmacology was observed for GIRK4 alone or GIRK4 transfected in conjunction with other GIRK channels in COS-7 cells. In rat brain, GIRK4 is expressed together with three other subfamily members, GIRK1-3, most likely in identical hippocampal neurons. Thus, heteromerization or an unknown molecular interaction may cause the physiological diversity observed within this class of K+ channels. PMID:8558261

  8. Comparison of Channel and Blue Catfish Fed Diets Containing Various Levels of Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparative study was conducted on growth and protein requirements of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, and blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus. Four diets containing 24, 28, 32, or 36% protein were fed to both channel (initial weight 6.9 g/fish) and blue (6.6 g/fish) catfish for two growing seas...

  9. Biological gas channels for NH3 and CO2: evidence that Rh (Rhesus) proteins are CO2 channels.

    PubMed

    Kustu, S; Inwood, W

    2006-01-01

    Physiological evidence from our laboratory indicates that Amt/Mep proteins are gas channels for NH3, the first biological gas channels to be described. This view has now been confirmed by structural evidence and is displacing the previous belief that Amt/Mep proteins were active transporters for the NH4+ ion. Still disputed is the physiological substrate for Rh proteins, the only known homologues of Amt/Mep proteins. Many think they are mammalian ammonium (NH4+ or NH3) transporters. Following Monod's famous dictum, "Anything found to be true of E. coli must also be true of elephants" [Perspect. Biol. Med. 47(1) (2004) 47], we explored the substrate for Rh proteins in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is one of the simplest organisms to have Rh proteins and it also has Amt proteins. Physiological studies in this microbe indicate that the substrate for Rh proteins is CO2 and confirm that the substrate for Amt proteins is NH3. Both are readily hydrated gases. Knowing that transport of CO2 is the ancestral function of Rh proteins supports the inference from hematological research that a newly evolving role of the human Rh30 proteins, RhCcEe and RhD, is to help maintain the flexible, flattened shape of the red cell. PMID:16563833

  10. Mechanism underlying bupivacaine inhibition of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Arrabit, Christine; Choe, Senyon; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthetics, commonly used for treating cardiac arrhythmias, pain, and seizures, are best known for their inhibitory effects on voltage-gated Na+ channels. Cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity are unwanted side-effects from local anesthetics that cannot be attributed to the inhibition of only Na+ channels. Here, we report that extracellular application of the membrane-permeant local anesthetic bupivacaine selectively inhibited G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK:Kir3) but not other families of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (ROMK:Kir1 and IRK:Kir2). Bupivacaine inhibited GIRK channels within seconds of application, regardless of whether channels were activated through the muscarinic receptor or directly via coexpressed G protein G?? subunits. Bupivacaine also inhibited alcohol-induced GIRK currents in the absence of functional pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins. The mutated GIRK1 and GIRK2 (GIRK1/2) channels containing the high-affinity phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) domain from IRK1, on the other hand, showed dramatically less inhibition with bupivacaine. Surprisingly, GIRK1/2 channels with high affinity for PIP2 were inhibited by ethanol, like IRK1 channels. We propose that membrane-permeant local anesthetics inhibit GIRK channels by antagonizing the interaction of PIP2 with the channel, which is essential for G?? and ethanol activation of GIRK channels. PMID:11353868

  11. Nanosecond Relaxation Dynamics of Hydrated Proteins: Water versus protein contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Khodadadi, S; Curtis, J. E.; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    We have studied picosecond to nanosecond dynamics of hydrated protein powders using dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our analysis of hydrogen-atom single particle dynamics from MD simulations focused on main ( main tens of picoseconds) and slow ( slow nanosecond) relaxation processes that were observed in dielectric spectra of similar hydrated protein samples. Traditionally, the interpretation of these processes observed in dielectric spectra has been ascribed to the relaxation behavior of hydration water tightly bounded to a protein and not to protein atoms. Detailed analysis of the MD simulations and comparison to dielectric data indicate that the observed relaxation process in the nanosecond time range of hydrated protein spectra is mainly due to protein atoms. The relaxation processes involve the entire structure of protein including atoms in the protein backbone, side chains, and turns. Both surface and buried protein atoms contribute to the slow processes; however, surface atoms demonstrate slightly faster relaxation dynamics. Analysis of the water molecule residence and dipolar relaxation correlation behavior indicates that the hydration water relaxes at much shorter time scales.

  12. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  13. Rapid aquaporin translocation regulates cellular water flow: mechanism of hypotonicity-induced subcellular localization of aquaporin 1 water channel.

    PubMed

    Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C; Bland, Charlotte E; Taylor, Luke H J; Brown, James E P; Parri, H Rheinallt; Bill, Roslyn M

    2012-03-30

    The control of cellular water flow is mediated by the aquaporin (AQP) family of membrane proteins. The structural features of the family and the mechanism of selective water passage through the AQP pore are established, but there remains a gap in our knowledge of how water transport is regulated. Two broad possibilities exist. One is controlling the passage of water through the AQP pore, but this only has been observed as a phenomenon in some plant and microbial AQPs. An alternative is controlling the number of AQPs in the cell membrane. Here, we describe a novel pathway in mammalian cells whereby a hypotonic stimulus directly induces intracellular calcium elevations through transient receptor potential channels, which trigger AQP1 translocation. This translocation, which has a direct role in cell volume regulation, occurs within 30 s and is dependent on calmodulin activation and phosphorylation of AQP1 at two threonine residues by protein kinase C. This direct mechanism provides a rationale for the changes in water transport that are required in response to constantly changing local cellular water availability. Moreover, because calcium is a pluripotent and ubiquitous second messenger in biological systems, the discovery of its role in the regulation of AQP translocation has ramifications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, as well as providing an explanation for the rapid regulation of water flow that is necessary for cell homeostasis. PMID:22334691

  14. Molecular basis for the inhibition of G protein-coupled inward rectifier K+ channels by protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jinzhe; Wang, Xueren; Chen, Fuxue; Wang, Runping; Rojas, Asheebo; Shi, Yun; Piao, Hailan; Jiang, Chun

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels regulate cellular excitability and neurotransmission. The GIRK channels are activated by a number of inhibitory neurotransmitters through the G protein ?? subunit (G??) after activation of G protein-coupled receptors and inhibited by several excitatory neurotransmitters through activation of phospholipase C. If the inhibition is produced by PKC, there should be PKC phosphorylation sites in GIRK channel proteins. To identify the PKC phosphorylation sites, we performed systematic mutagenesis analysis on GIRK4 and GIRK1 subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our data showed that the heteromeric GIRK1/GIRK4 channels were inhibited by a PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) through reduction of single channel open-state probability. Direct application of the catalytic subunit of PKC to excised patches had a similar inhibitory effect. This inhibition was greatly eliminated by mutation of Ser-185 in GIRK1 and Ser-191 in GIRK4 that remained G protein sensitive. The PKC-dependent phosphorylation seems to mediate the channel inhibition by the excitatory neurotransmitter substance P (SP) as specific PKC inhibitors and mutation of these PKC phosphorylation sites abolished the SP-induced inhibition of GIRK1/GIRK4 channels. Thus, these results indicate that the PKC-dependent phosphorylation underscores the inhibition of GIRK channels by SP, and Ser-185 in GIRK1 and Ser-191 in GIRK4 are the PKC phosphorylation sites. PMID:14732702

  15. Protein packing defects "heat up" interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Sierra, María Belén; Accordino, Sebastián R; Rodriguez-Fris, J Ariel; Morini, Marcela A; Appignanesi, Gustavo A; Fernández Stigliano, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Ligands must displace water molecules from their corresponding protein surface binding site during association. Thus, protein binding sites are expected to be surrounded by non-tightly-bound, easily removable water molecules. In turn, the existence of packing defects at protein binding sites has been also established. At such structural motifs, named dehydrons, the protein backbone is exposed to the solvent since the intramolecular interactions are incompletely wrapped by non-polar groups. Hence, dehydrons are sticky since they depend on additional intermolecular wrapping in order to properly protect the structure from water attack. Thus, a picture of protein binding is emerging wherein binding sites should be both dehydrons rich and surrounded by easily removable water. In this work we shall indeed confirm such a link between structure and dynamics by showing the existence of a firm correlation between the degree of underwrapping of the protein chain and the mobility of the corresponding hydration water molecules. In other words, we shall show that protein packing defects promote their local dehydration, thus producing a region of "hot" interfacial water which might be easily removed by a ligand upon association. PMID:23797357

  16. Ion channel activity of influenza A virus M2 protein: characterization of the amantadine block.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Takeuchi, K; Pinto, L H; Lamb, R A

    1993-01-01

    The influenza A virus M2 integral membrane protein has ion channel activity which can be blocked by the antiviral drug amantadine. The M2 protein transmembrane domain is highly conserved in amino acid sequence for all the human, swine, equine, and avian strains of influenza A virus, and thus, known amino acid differences could lead to altered properties of the M2 ion channel. We have expressed in oocytes of Xenopus laevis the M2 protein of human influenza virus A/Udorn/72 and the avian virus A/chicken/Germany/34 (fowl plague virus, Rostock) and derivatives of the Rostock ion channel altered in the presumed pore region. The pH of activation of the M2 ion channels and amantadine block of the M2 ion channels were investigated. The channels were found to be activated by pH in a similar manner but differed in their apparent Kis for amantadine block. Images PMID:7688826

  17. Molecular basis of cardiac potassium channel stimulation by protein kinase A.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, X Y; Morielli, A D; Peralta, E G

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors accelerate heart rate by modulating ionic currents through a pathway involving cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Previous studies have focused on the regulation of Ca2+ channels by PKA; however, due to the heterogeneity of K+ channels expressed within the heart, little is known about the mechanism by which PKA modulates individual K+ channels. Here we report that PKA strongly enhanced the activity of a cloned delayed rectifier K+ channel that is normally expressed in cardiac atria. This effect required a single PKA consensus phosphorylation site located near the amino terminus of the channel protein. Furthermore, patch clamp analysis revealed that PKA phosphorylation increased the open time that single channels spend in higher conductance states. These studies provide evidence that hormonal modulation of a cardiac K+ channel involves direct phosphorylation by PKA. PMID:8290574

  18. Anchoring proteins confer G protein sensitivity to an inward-rectifier K(+) channel through the GK domain.

    PubMed

    Hibino, H; Inanobe, A; Tanemoto, M; Fujita, A; Doi, K; Kubo, T; Hata, Y; Takai, Y; Kurachi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Anchoring proteins cluster receptors and ion channels at postsynaptic membranes in the brain. They also act as scaffolds for intracellular signaling molecules including synGAP and NO synthase. Here we report a new function for intracellular anchoring proteins: the regulation of synaptic ion channel function. A neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channel, Kir3.2c, can not be activated either by M(2)-muscarinic receptor stimulation or by G(betagamma) overexpression. When coexpressed with SAP97, a member of the PSD/SAP anchoring protein family, the channel became sensitive to G protein stimulation. Although the C-terminus of Kir3. 2c bound to the second PDZ domain of SAP97, functional analyses revealed that the guanylate kinase (GK) domain of SAP97 is crucial for sensitization of the Kir3.2c channel to G protein stimulation. Furthermore, SAPAP1/GKAP, which binds specifically to the GK domain of membrane-associated guanylate kinases, prevented the SAP97-induced sensitization. The function of a synaptic ion channel can therefore be controlled by a network of various intracellular proteins. PMID:10619846

  19. 1,3-propanediol binds deep inside the channel to inhibit water permeation through aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Chen, L Laurie; Chen, Liao Y; Perry, George; McHardy, Stanton F; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins (AQPs) are membrane channel proteins responsible for transport of water and for transport of glycerol in addition to water across the cell membrane, respectively. They are expressed throughout the human body and also in other forms of life. Inhibitors of human AQPs have been sought for therapeutic treatment for various medical conditions including hypertension, refractory edema, neurotoxic brain edema, and so forth. Conducting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the binding affinity of acetazolamide to human AQP4 that agrees closely with in vitro experiments. Using this validated computational method, we found that 1,3-propanediol (PDO) binds deep inside the AQP4 channel to inhibit that particular aquaporin efficaciously. Furthermore, we used the same method to compute the affinities of PDO binding to four other AQPs and one aquaglyceroporin whose atomic coordinates are available from the protein data bank (PDB). For bovine AQP1, human AQP2, AQP4, AQP5, and Plasmodium falciparum PfAQP whose structures were resolved with high resolution, we obtained definitive predictions on the PDO dissociation constant. For human AQP1 whose PDB coordinates are less accurate, we estimated the dissociation constant with a rather large error bar. Taking into account the fact that PDO is generally recognized as safe by the US FDA, we predict that PDO can be an effective diuretic which directly modulates water flow through the protein channels. It should be free from the serious side effects associated with other diuretics that change the hydro-homeostasis indirectly by altering the osmotic gradients. PMID:26481430

  20. Ultrafast permeation of water through protein-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Jin, Jian; Nakamura, Yoshimichi; Ohno, Takahisa; Ichinose, Izumi

    2009-06-01

    Pressure-driven filtration by porous membranes is widely used in the production of drinking water from ground and surface water. Permeation theory predicts that filtration rate is proportional to the pressure difference across the filtration membrane and inversely proportional to the thickness of the membrane. However, these membranes need to be able to withstand high water fluxes and pressures, which means that the active separation layers in commercial filtration systems typically have a thickness of a few tens to several hundreds of nanometres. Filtration performance might be improved by the use of ultrathin porous silicon membranes or carbon nanotubes immobilized in silicon nitride or polymer films, but these structures are difficult to fabricate. Here, we report a new type of filtration membrane made of crosslinked proteins that are mechanically robust and contain channels with diameters of less than 2.2 nm. We find that a 60-nm-thick membrane can concentrate aqueous dyes from fluxes up to 9,000 l h-1 m-2 bar-1, which is ~1,000 times higher than the fluxes that can be withstood by commercial filtration membranes with similar rejection properties. Based on these results and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that protein-surrounded channels with effective lengths of less than 5.8 nm can separate dye molecules while allowing the ultrafast permeation of water at applied pressures of less than 1 bar.

  1. Multiple Scales in the Simulation of Ion Channels and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Computation of living processes creates great promise for the everyday life of mankind and great challenges for physical scientists. Simulations molecular dynamics have great appeal to biologists as a natural extension of structural biology. Once a biologist sees a structure, she/he wants to see it move. Molecular biology has shown that a small number of atoms, sometimes even one messenger ion, like Ca2+, can control biological function on the scale of cells, organs, tissues, and organisms. Enormously concentrated ions—at number densities of ~20 M—in protein channels and enzymes are responsible for many of the characteristics of living systems, just as highly concentrated ions near electrodes are responsible for many of the characteristics of electrochemical systems. Here we confront the reality of the scale differences of ions. We show that the scale differences needed to simulate all the atoms of biological cells are 107 in linear dimension, 1021 in three dimensions, 109 in resolution, 1011 in time, and 1013 in particle number (to deal with concentrations of Ca2+). These scales must be dealt with simultaneously if the simulation is to deal with most biological functions. Biological function extends across all of them, all at once in most cases. We suggest a computational approach using explicit multiscale analysis instead of implicit simulation of all scales. The approach is based on an energy variational principle EnVarA introduced by Chun Liu to deal with complex fluids. Variational methods deal automatically with multiple interacting components and scales. When an additional component is added to the system, the resulting Euler Lagrange field equations change form automatically—by algebra alone—without additional unknown parameters. Multifaceted interactions are solutions of the resulting equations. We suggest that ionic solutions should be viewed as complex fluids with simple components. Highly concentrated solutions—dominated by interactions of components—are easily computed by EnVarA. Successful computation of ions concentrated in special places may be a significant step to understanding the defining characteristics of biological and electrochemical systems. Indeed, computing ions near proteins and nucleic acids may prove as important to molecular biology and chemical technology as computing holes and electrons has been to our semiconductor and digital technology. PMID:21135913

  2. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  3. Structural mechanism for the regulation of HCN ion channels by the accessory protein TRIP8b.

    PubMed

    DeBerg, Hannah A; Bankston, John R; Rosenbaum, Joel C; Brzovic, Peter S; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels underlie the cationic Ih current present in many neurons. The direct binding of cyclic AMP to HCN channels increases the rate and extent of channel opening and results in a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation. TRIP8b is an accessory protein that regulates the cell surface expression and dendritic localization of HCN channels and reduces the cyclic nucleotide dependence of these channels. Here, we use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to show that TRIP8b binds to the apo state of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of HCN2 channels without changing the overall domain structure. With EPR and nuclear magnetic resonance, we locate TRIP8b relative to the HCN channel and identify the binding interface on the CNBD. These data provide a structural framework for understanding how TRIP8b regulates the cyclic nucleotide dependence of HCN channels. PMID:25800552

  4. Anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 Family Proteins Disassemble Ceramide Channels*s

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.; Feinstein, Laurence; Yu, Tingxi; Davis, Joseph S.; Jones, David; Choi, Jinna; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Tan, Wenzhi; Hill, R. Blake; Hardwick, J. Marie; Colombini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Early in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, the mitochondrial outer membrane becomes permeable to proteins that, when released into the cytosol, initiate the execution phase of apoptosis. Proteins in the Bcl-2 family regulate this permeabilization, but the molecular composition of the mitochondrial outer membrane pore is under debate. We reported previously that at physiologically relevant levels, ceramides form stable channels in mitochondrial outer membranes capable of passing the largest proteins known to exit mitochondria during apoptosis (Siskind, L. J., Kolesnick, R. N., and Colombini, M. (2006) Mitochondrion 6, 118–125). Here we show that Bcl-2 proteins are not required for ceramide to form protein-permeable channels in mitochondrial outer membranes. However, both recombinant human Bcl-xL and CED-9, the Caenorhabditis elegans Bcl-2 homologue, disassemble ceramide channels in the mitochondrial outer membranes of isolated mitochondria from rat liver and yeast. Importantly, Bcl-xL and CED-9 disassemble ceramide channels in the defined system of solvent-free planar phospholipid membranes. Thus, ceramide channel disassembly likely results from direct interaction with these anti-apoptotic proteins. Mutants of Bcl-xL act on ceramide channels as expected from their ability to be anti-apoptotic. Thus, ceramide channels may be one mechanism for releasing pro-apoptotic proteins from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:18171672

  5. Porin channels in Escherichia coli: studies with liposomes reconstituted from purified proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, H; Rosenberg, E Y

    1983-01-01

    Rates of diffusion of uncharged and charged solute molecules through porin channels were determined by using liposomes reconstituted from egg phosphatidylcholine and purified Escherichia coli porins OmpF (protein 1a), OmpC (protein 1b), and PhoE (protein E). All three porin proteins appeared to produce channels of similar size, although the OmpF channel appeared to be 7 to 9% larger than the OmpC and PhoE channels in an equivalent radius. Hydrophobicity of the solute retarded the penetration through all three channels in a similar manner. The presence of one negative charge on the solute resulted in about a threefold reduction in penetration rates through OmpF and OmpC channels, whereas it produced two- to tenfold acceleration of diffusion through the PhoE channel. The addition of the second negatively charged group to the solutes decreased the diffusion rates through OmpF and OmpC channels further, whereas diffusion through the PhoE channel was not affected much. These results suggest that PhoE specializes in the uptake of negatively charged solutes. At the present level of resolution, no sign of true solute specificity was found in OmpF and OmpC channels; peptides, for example, diffused through both of these channels at rates expected from their molecular size, hydrophobicity, and charge. However, the OmpF porin channel allowed influx of more solute molecules per unit time than did the equivalent weight of the OmpC porin when the flux was driven by a concentration gradient of the same size. This apparent difference in "efficiency" became more pronounced with larger solutes, and it is likely to be the consequence of the difference in the sizes of OmpF and OmpC channels. PMID:6294049

  6. Rim1 modulates direct G-protein regulation of Ca(v)2.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Norbert; Sandoval, Alejandro; Kyonaka, Shigeki; Felix, Ricardo; Mori, Yasuo; De Waard, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels is critical for depolarization-evoked neurotransmitter release. Various studies attempted to determine the functional implication of Rim1, a component of the vesicle release machinery. Besides to couple voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to the presynaptic vesicle release machinery, it was evidenced that Rim1 also prevents voltage-dependent inactivation of the channels through a direct interaction with the ancillary ?-subunits, thus facilitating neurotransmitter release. However, facilitation of synaptic activity may also be caused by a reduction of the inhibitory pathway carried by G-protein coupled receptors. Here, we explored the functional implication of Rim1 in G-protein regulation of Cav2.2 channels. Activation of ?-opioid receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells along with Cav2.2 channels produced a drastic current inhibition both in control and Rim1-expressing cells. In contrast, Rim1 considerably promoted the extent of current deinhibition following channel activation, favoring sustained Ca2+ influx under prolonged activity. Our data suggest that Rim1-induced facilitation of neurotransmitter release may come as a consequence of a decrease in the inhibitory pathway carried by G-proteins that contributes, together with the slowing of channel inactivation, to maintain Ca2+ influx under prolonged activity. The present study also furthers functional insights in the importance of proteins from the presynaptic vesicle complex in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels by G-proteins. PMID:21331761

  7. Morphology of Rain Water Channeling in Systematically Varied Model Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuli; Cejas, Cesare M.; Barrois, Rémi; Dreyfus, Rémi; Durian, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different rain conditions using a quasi-2D experimental setup and systematically determine the impact of the soil grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the water channeling phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of the soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed rain condition, we combine the effects of the grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to the rain water channeling phenomenon, including prewetting sandy soils at different levels before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  8. Thermodynamic stability of water molecules in the bacteriorhodopsin proton channel: a molecular dynamics free energy perturbation study.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B; Nina, M; Pomès, R; Smith, J C

    1996-01-01

    The proton transfer activity of the light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in the photochemical cycle might imply internal water molecules. The free energy of inserting water molecules in specific sites along the bR transmembrane channel has been calculated using molecular dynamics simulations based on a microscopic model. The existence of internal hydration is related to the free energy change on transfer of a water molecule from bulk solvent into a specific binding site. Thermodynamic integration and perturbation methods were used to calculate free energies of hydration for each hydrated model from molecular dynamics simulations of the creation of water molecules into specific protein-binding sites. A rigorous statistical mechanical formulation allowing the calculation of the free energy of transfer of water molecules from the bulk to a protein cavity is used to estimate the probabilities of occupancy in the putative bR proton channel. The channel contains a region lined primarily by nonpolar side-chains. Nevertheless, the results indicate that the transfer of four water molecules from bulk water to this apparently hydrophobic region is thermodynamically permitted. The column forms a continuous hydrogen-bonded chain over 12 A between a proton donor, Asp 96, and the retinal Schiff base acceptor. The presence of two water molecules in direct hydrogen-bonding association with the Schiff base is found to be strongly favorable thermodynamically. The implications of these results for the mechanism of proton transfer in bR are discussed. PMID:8842206

  9. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of water in protein environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyung-June; Dinner, Aaron R.; Roux, Benoît

    2004-10-01

    The grand canonical simulation algorithm is considered as a general methodology to sample the configuration of water molecules confined within protein environments. First, the probability distribution of the number of water molecules and their configuration in a region of interest for biochemical simulations, such as the active site of a protein, is derived by considering a finite subvolume in open equilibrium with a large system serving as a bulk reservoir. It is shown that the influence of the bulk reservoir can be represented as a many-body potential of mean force acting on the atoms located inside the subvolume. The grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) algorithm, augmented by a number of technical advances to increase the acceptance of insertion attempts, is implemented, and tested for simple systems. In particular, the method is illustrated in the case of a pure water box with periodic boundary conditions. In addition, finite spherical systems of pure water and containing a dialanine peptide, are simulated with GCMC while the influence of the surrounding infinite bulk is incorporated using the generalized solvent boundary potential [W. Im, S. Bernèche, and B. Roux, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2924 (2001)]. As a last illustration of water confined in the interior of a protein, the hydration of the central cavity of the KcsA potassium channel is simulated.

  10. Trapping a translocating protein within the anthrax toxin channel: implications for the secondary structure of permeating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jennings-Antipov, Laura D.; Jakes, Karen S.; Finkelstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). This last forms a heptameric channel, (PA63)7, in the host cell’s endosomal membrane, allowing the former two (which are enzymes) to be translocated into the cytosol. (PA63)7 incorporated into planar bilayer membranes forms a channel that translocates LF and EF, with the N terminus leading the way. The channel is mushroom-shaped with a cap containing the binding sites for EF and LF, and an ?100 Ŗlong, 15 Ŗwide stem. For proteins to pass through the stem they clearly must unfold, but is secondary structure preserved? To answer this question, we developed a method of trapping the polypeptide chain of a translocating protein within the channel and determined the minimum number of residues that could traverse it. We attached a biotin to the N terminus of LFN (the 263-residue N-terminal portion of LF) and a molecular stopper elsewhere. If the distance from the N terminus to the stopper was long enough to traverse the channel, streptavidin added to the trans side bound the N-terminal biotin, trapping the protein within the channel; if this distance was not long enough, streptavidin did not bind the N-terminal biotin and the protein was not trapped. The trapping rate was dependent on the driving force (voltage), the length of time it was applied, and the number of residues between the N terminus and the stopper. By varying the position of the stopper, we determined the minimum number of residues required to span the channel. We conclude that LFN adopts an extended-chain configuration as it translocates; i.e., the channel unfolds the secondary structure of the protein. We also show that the channel not only can translocate LFN in the normal direction but also can, at least partially, translocate LFN in the opposite direction. PMID:21402886

  11. Control of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Ion Channels From RNA to Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (CaV) ion channels convert neuronal activity into rapid intracellular calcium signals to trigger a myriad of cellular responses. Their involvement in major neurological and psychiatric diseases, and importance as therapeutic targets, has propelled interest in subcellular-specific mechanisms that align CaV channel activity to specific tasks. Here we highlight recent studies that delineate mechanisms controlling the expression of CaV channels at the level of RNA and protein. We discuss the roles of RNA editing and alternative pre-mRNA splicing in generating CaV channel isoforms with activities specific to the demands of individual cells; the roles of ubiquitination and accessory proteins in regulating CaV channel expression; and the specific binding partners which contribute to both pre- and post- synaptic CaV channel function. PMID:23907011

  12. Ferritin Protein Nanocages Use Ion Channels, Catalytic Sites, and Nucleation Channels To Manage Iron/Oxygen Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    The ferritin superfamily is composed of ancient, nanocage proteins with an internal cavity, 60% of total volume, that reversibly synthesize solid minerals of hydrated ferric oxide; the minerals are iron concentrates for cell nutrition as well as antioxidants due to ferrous and oxygen consumption during mineralization. The cages have multiple iron entry/exit channels, oxidoreductase enzyme sites, and, in eukaryotes, Fe(III)O nucleation channels with clustered exits that extend protein activity to include facilitated mineral growth. Ferritin protein cage differences include size, amino acid sequence, and location of the active sites, oxidant substrate and crystallinity of the iron mineral. Genetic regulation depends on iron and oxygen signals, which in animals includes direct ferrous signaling to RNA to release and to ubiquitin-ligases to degrade the protein repressors. Ferritin biosynthesis forms, with DNA, mRNA and the protein product, a feedback loop where the genetic signals are also protein substrates. The ferritin protein nanocages, which are required for normal iron homeostasis and are finding current use in delivery of nanodrugs, novel nanomaterials, and nanocatalysts, are likely contributors to survival and success during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic life. PMID:21296609

  13. Experimental observation of trapped modes in a water wave channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobelli, Pablo; Pagneux, Vincent; Maurel, AgnÈs; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    The fluid around a free surface piercing circular cylinder in a long narrow wave tank can exhibit a local oscillation that does not propagate down the channel but is confined to the vicinity of the cylinder. This is a manifestation of the so-called trapped modes, bound states occurring in a wide variety of situations in physics. In this study, we present the first whole-field time resolved measurements for the free surface deformation obtained by a Fourier transform profilometry technique. The scattering characteristics of the cylinder and consequently the behavior of the trapped mode frequency are determined. The experimental results show good agreement with the predictions arising from linear water-wave theory.

  14. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells. PMID:26202907

  15. Dramatic nano-fluidic properties of carbon nanotube membranes as a platform for protein channel mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have three key attributes that make them of great interest for novel membrane applications: 1) atomically flat graphite surface allows for ideal fluid slip boundary conditions and extremely fast flow rates 2) the cutting process to open CNTs inherently places functional chemistry at CNT core entrance for chemical selectivity and 3) CNT are electrically conductive allowing for electrochemical reactions and application of electric fields gradients at CNT tips. Pressure driven flux of a variety of solvents (H2O, hexane, decane ethanol, methanol) are 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than conventional Newtonian flow [Nature 2005, 438, 44] due to atomically flat graphite planes inducing nearly ideal slip conditions. However this is eliminated with selective chemical functionalization [ACS Nano 2011 5(5) 3867-3877] needed to give chemical selectivity. These unique properties allow us to explore the hypothesis of producing ``Gatekeeper'' membranes that mimic natural protein channels to actively pump through rapid nm-scale channels. With anionic tip functionality strong electroosmotic flow is induced by unimpeded cation flow with similar 10,000 fold enhancements [Nature Nano 2012 7(2) 133-39]. With enhanced power efficiency, carbon nanotube membranes were employed as the active element of a switchable transdermal drug delivery device that can facilitate more effective treatments of drug abuse and addiction. Recently methods to deposit Pt monolayers on CNT surface have been developed making for highly efficient catalytic platforms. Discussed are other applications of CNT protein channel mimetics, for large area robust engineering platforms, including water purification, flow battery energy storage, and biochemical/biomass separations. DOE EPSCoR (DE-FG02-07ER46375) and DARPA, W911NF-09-1-0267

  16. Inhibition of a background potassium channel by Gq protein alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangdong; Talley, Edmund M; Patel, Nitin; Gomis, Ana; McIntire, William E; Dong, Biwei; Viana, Félix; Garrison, James C; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2006-02-28

    Two-pore-domain K(+) channels provide neuronal background currents that establish resting membrane potential and input resistance; their modulation provides a prevalent mechanism for regulating cellular excitability. The so-called TASK channel subunits (TASK-1 and TASK-3) are widely expressed, and they are robustly inhibited by receptors that signal through Galphaq family proteins. Here, we manipulated G protein expression and membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) levels in intact and cell-free systems to provide electrophysiological and biochemical evidence that inhibition of TASK channels by Galphaq-linked receptors proceeds unabated in the absence of phospholipase C (PLC) activity, and instead involves association of activated Galphaq subunits with the channels. Receptor-mediated inhibition of TASK channels was faster and less sensitive to a PLCbeta1-ct minigene construct than inhibition of PIP(2)-sensitive Kir3.4(S143T) homomeric channels that is known to be dependent on PLC. TASK channels were strongly inhibited by constitutively active Galphaq, even by a mutated version that is deficient in PLC activation. Receptor-mediated TASK channel inhibition required exogenous Galphaq expression in fibroblasts derived from Galphaq/11 knockout mice, but proceeded unabated in a cell line in which PIP(2) levels were reduced by regulated overexpression of a lipid phosphatase. Direct application of activated Galphaq, but not other G protein subunits, inhibited TASK channels in excised patches, and constitutively active Galphaq subunits were selectively coimmunoprecipitated with TASK channels. These data indicate that receptor-mediated TASK channel inhibition is independent of PIP(2) depletion, and they suggest a mechanism whereby channel modulation by Galphaq occurs through direct interaction with the ion channel or a closely associated intermediary. PMID:16492788

  17. The influence of water on protein properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Baglioni, Piero; Corsaro, Carmelo; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-10-01

    The "dynamic" or "glass" transition in biomolecules is as important to their functioning as the folding process. This transition occurs in the low temperature regime and has been related to the onset of biochemical activity that is dependent on the hydration level. This protein transition is believed to be triggered by the strong hydrogen bond coupling in the hydration water. We study the vibrational bending mode and measure it using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. We demonstrate that at the molecular level the hydration water bending mode bonds the C=O and N-H peptide groups, and find that the temperature of the "dynamic" protein transition is the same as the fragile-to-strong dynamic transition in confined water. The fragile-to-strong dynamic transition in water governs the nature of the H bonds between water and peptides and appears to be universal in supercooled glass-forming liquids.

  18. Early innate immune response of immune proteins in juvenile channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are raised for aquaculture in the Southeast U.S. and are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections acquired from their pond environment. Innate immune proteins mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and lysozyme were studied during two consecutive years in channel cat...

  19. Molecular mechanism underlying ethanol activation of G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bodhinathan, Karthik; Slesinger, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) produces a wide range of pharmacological effects on the nervous system through its actions on ion channels. The molecular mechanism underlying ethanol modulation of ion channels is poorly understood. Here we used a unique method of alcohol-tagging to demonstrate that alcohol activation of a G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3) channel is mediated by a defined alcohol pocket through changes in affinity for the membrane phospholipid signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Surprisingly, hydrophobicity and size, but not the canonical hydroxyl, were important determinants of alcohol-dependent activation. Altering levels of G protein G?? subunits, conversely, did not affect alcohol-dependent activation, suggesting a fundamental distinction between receptor and alcohol gating of GIRK channels. The chemical properties of the alcohol pocket revealed here might extend to other alcohol-sensitive proteins, revealing a unique protein microdomain for targeting alcohol-selective therapeutics in the treatment of alcoholism and addiction. PMID:24145411

  20. Molecular mechanism underlying ethanol activation of G-protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bodhinathan, Karthik; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) produces a wide range of pharmacological effects on the nervous system through its actions on ion channels. The molecular mechanism underlying ethanol modulation of ion channels is poorly understood. Here we used a unique method of alcohol-tagging to demonstrate that alcohol activation of a G-protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3) channel is mediated by a defined alcohol pocket through changes in affinity for the membrane phospholipid signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Surprisingly, hydrophobicity and size, but not the canonical hydroxyl, were important determinants of alcohol-dependent activation. Altering levels of G protein G?? subunits, conversely, did not affect alcohol-dependent activation, suggesting a fundamental distinction between receptor and alcohol gating of GIRK channels. The chemical properties of the alcohol pocket revealed here might extend to other alcohol-sensitive proteins, revealing a unique protein microdomain for targeting alcohol-selective therapeutics in the treatment of alcoholism and addiction. PMID:24145411

  1. Cell signal control of the G protein-gated potassium channel and its subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Ishii, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    G protein-gated inward rectifier K+ (KG) channels are directly activated by the ?? subunits released from pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins, and contribute to neurotransmitter-induced deceleration of heart beat, formation of slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in neurones and inhibition of hormone release in endocrine cells. The physiological roles of KG channels are critically determined by mechanisms which regulate their activity and their subcellular localization. KG channels are tetramers of inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channel subunits, Kir3.x. The combination of Kir3.x subunits in each KG channel varies among tissues and cell types. Each subunit of the channel possesses one G?? binding site. The binding of G?? increases the number of functional KG channels via a mechanism that can be described by the Monod–Wyman–Changeux allosteric model. During voltage pulses KG channel current alters time dependently. The KG current exhibits inward rectification due to blockade of outward-going current by intracellular Mg2+ and polyamines. Upon repolarization, this blockade is relieved practically instantaneously and then the current slowly increases further. This slow current alteration is called ‘relaxation’. Relaxation is caused by the voltage-dependent behaviour of regulators of G protein signalling (RGS proteins), which accelerate intrinsic GTP hydrolysis mediated by the G? subunit. Thus, the relaxation behaviour of KG channels reflects the time course with which the G protein cycle is altered by RGS protein activity at each membrane potential. Subcellular localization of KG channels is controlled by several distinct mechanisms, some of which have been recently clarified. The neuronal KG channel, which contains Kir3.2c, is localized in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of various neurones including dopaminergic neurones in substantia nigra. Its localization at PSD may be controlled by PDZ domain-containing anchoring proteins. The KG channel in thyrotrophs is localized exclusively on secretary vesicles, which upon stimulation are rapidly inserted into the plasma membrane and causes hyperpolarization of the cell. This mechanism indicates a novel negative feedback regulation of exocytosis. In conclusion, KG channels are under the control of a variety of signalling molecules which regulate channel activity, subcellular localization and thus their physiological roles in myocytes, neurones and endocrine cells. PMID:12923211

  2. Ancient association between cation leak channels and Mid1 proteins is conserved in fungi and animals

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Ammon; Atkinson, Nigel S.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal resting potential can tune the excitability of neural networks, affecting downstream behavior. Sodium leak channels (NALCN) play a key role in rhythmic behaviors by helping set, or subtly changing neuronal resting potential. The full complexity of these newly described channels is just beginning to be appreciated, however. NALCN channels can associate with numerous subunits in different tissues and can be activated by several different peptides and second messengers. We recently showed that NALCN channels are closely related to fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. Here, we use this relationship to predict a family of NALCN-associated proteins in animals on the basis of homology with the yeast protein Mid1, the subunit of the yeast calcium channel. These proteins all share a cysteine-rich region that is necessary for Mid1 function in yeast. We validate this predicted association by showing that the Mid1 homolog in Drosophila, encoded by the CG33988 gene, is coordinately expressed with NALCN, and that knockdown of either protein creates identical phenotypes in several behaviors associated with NALCN function. The relationship between Mid1 and leak channels has therefore persisted over a billion years of evolution, despite drastic changes to both proteins and the organisms in which they exist. PMID:24639627

  3. Ancient association between cation leak channels and Mid1 proteins is conserved in fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Thompson, Ammon; Atkinson, Nigel S; Zakon, Harold H

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal resting potential can tune the excitability of neural networks, affecting downstream behavior. Sodium leak channels (NALCN) play a key role in rhythmic behaviors by helping set, or subtly changing neuronal resting potential. The full complexity of these newly described channels is just beginning to be appreciated, however. NALCN channels can associate with numerous subunits in different tissues and can be activated by several different peptides and second messengers. We recently showed that NALCN channels are closely related to fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. Here, we use this relationship to predict a family of NALCN-associated proteins in animals on the basis of homology with the yeast protein Mid1, the subunit of the yeast calcium channel. These proteins all share a cysteine-rich region that is necessary for Mid1 function in yeast. We validate this predicted association by showing that the Mid1 homolog in Drosophila, encoded by the CG33988 gene, is coordinately expressed with NALCN, and that knockdown of either protein creates identical phenotypes in several behaviors associated with NALCN function. The relationship between Mid1 and leak channels has therefore persisted over a billion years of evolution, despite drastic changes to both proteins and the organisms in which they exist. PMID:24639627

  4. Highly permeable artificial water channels that can self-assemble into two-dimensional arrays.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue-Xiao; Si, Wen; Erbakan, Mustafa; Decker, Karl; De Zorzi, Rita; Saboe, Patrick O; Kang, You Jung; Majd, Sheereen; Butler, Peter J; Walz, Thomas; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Hou, Jun-li; Kumar, Manish

    2015-08-11

    Bioinspired artificial water channels aim to combine the high permeability and selectivity of biological aquaporin (AQP) water channels with chemical stability. Here, we carefully characterized a class of artificial water channels, peptide-appended pillar[5]arenes (PAPs). The average single-channel osmotic water permeability for PAPs is 1.0(± 0.3) × 10(-14) cm(3)/s or 3.5(± 1.0) × 10(8) water molecules per s, which is in the range of AQPs (3.4 ? 40.3 × 10(8) water molecules per s) and their current synthetic analogs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, 9.0 × 10(8) water molecules per s). This permeability is an order of magnitude higher than first-generation artificial water channels (20 to ? 10(7) water molecules per s). Furthermore, within lipid bilayers, PAP channels can self-assemble into 2D arrays. Relevant to permeable membrane design, the pore density of PAP channel arrays (? 2.6 × 10(5) pores per ?m(2)) is two orders of magnitude higher than that of CNT membranes (0.1 ? 2.5 × 10(3) pores per ?m(2)). PAP channels thus combine the advantages of biological channels and CNTs and improve upon them through their relatively simple synthesis, chemical stability, and propensity to form arrays. PMID:26216964

  5. Highly permeable artificial water channels that can self-assemble into two-dimensional arrays

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yue-xiao; Si, Wen; Erbakan, Mustafa; Decker, Karl; De Zorzi, Rita; Saboe, Patrick O.; Kang, You Jung; Majd, Sheereen; Butler, Peter J.; Walz, Thomas; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Hou, Jun-li; Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Bioinspired artificial water channels aim to combine the high permeability and selectivity of biological aquaporin (AQP) water channels with chemical stability. Here, we carefully characterized a class of artificial water channels, peptide-appended pillar[5]arenes (PAPs). The average single-channel osmotic water permeability for PAPs is 1.0(±0.3) × 10−14 cm3/s or 3.5(±1.0) × 108 water molecules per s, which is in the range of AQPs (3.4∼40.3 × 108 water molecules per s) and their current synthetic analogs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, 9.0 × 108 water molecules per s). This permeability is an order of magnitude higher than first-generation artificial water channels (20 to ∼107 water molecules per s). Furthermore, within lipid bilayers, PAP channels can self-assemble into 2D arrays. Relevant to permeable membrane design, the pore density of PAP channel arrays (∼2.6 × 105 pores per μm2) is two orders of magnitude higher than that of CNT membranes (0.1∼2.5 × 103 pores per μm2). PAP channels thus combine the advantages of biological channels and CNTs and improve upon them through their relatively simple synthesis, chemical stability, and propensity to form arrays. PMID:26216964

  6. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature. PMID:26049527

  7. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  8. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming ?-helix and ?-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  9. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  10. Roles of heterotrimeric G proteins in guard cell ion channel regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stomata are formed by pairs of surrounding guard cells and perform important roles in photosynthesis, transpiration and innate immunity of terrestrial plants. Ionic solutes in the cytosol of guard cells are important for cell turgor and volume change. Consequently, trans-membrane flux of ions such as K+, Cl−, and malate2− through K+ channels and anion channels of guard cells are a direct driving force for turgor change, while the opening of calcium permeable channels can serve as a trigger of cytosolic free calcium concentration elevations or oscillations, which play second messenger roles. In plants, heterotrimeric G proteins have fewer members than in animals, but they are well investigated and found to regulate these channels and to play fundamental roles in guard cell function. This mini-review focuses on the recent understanding of G-protein regulation of ion channels on the plasma membrane of guard cells and their participation in stomatal movements. PMID:21617376

  11. Concentrating Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetanensis from Surface Water and Drinking Water by Continuous Separation Channel Centrifugation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of continuous separation channel centrifugation for concentrating Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetanensis from drinking water and environmental waters. Methods and Results: Ready-to-seed vials with known quantities of Toxoplasma gondii a...

  12. Sizing the protein translocation pathway of colicin Ia channels.

    PubMed

    Kienker, Paul K; Jakes, Karen S; Blaustein, Robert O; Miller, Christopher; Finkelstein, Alan

    2003-08-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin Ia forms voltage-gated channels in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin consists of three domains, with the carboxy-terminal domain (C-domain) responsible for channel formation. The C-domain contributes four membrane-spanning segments and a 68-residue translocated segment to the open channel, whereas the upstream domains and the amino-terminal end of the C-domain stay on the cis side of the membrane. The isolated C-domain, lacking the two upstream domains, also forms channels; however, the amino terminus and one of the normally membrane-spanning segments can move across the membrane. (This can be observed as a drop in single-channel conductance.) In longer carboxy-terminal fragments of colicin Ia that include /=90 mV, even a 26-A stopper is translocated. Upon reduction of their disulfide bonds, all of the stoppers are easily translocated, indicating that it is the folded structure, rather than some aspect of the primary sequence, that slows translocation of the stoppers. Thus, the pathway for translocation is >/=26 A in diameter, or can stretch to this value. This is large enough for an alpha-helical hairpin to fit through. PMID:12860927

  13. Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels in Mesangial Cells Inhibit Matrix Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Wang, Yanxia; Davis, Mark E; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Chaudhari, Sarika; Begg, Malcolm; Ma, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix derived from glomerular mesangial cells is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy. Ca(2+) signals mediated by store-operated Ca(2+) channels regulate protein production in a variety of cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells on extracellular matrix protein expression. In cultured human mesangial cells, activation of store-operated Ca(2+) channels by thapsigargin significantly decreased fibronectin protein expression and collagen IV mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibition of the channels by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly increased the expression of fibronectin and collagen IV. Similarly, overexpression of stromal interacting molecule 1 reduced, but knockdown of calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai1) increased fibronectin protein expression. Furthermore, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly augmented angiotensin II-induced fibronectin protein expression, whereas thapsigargin abrogated high glucose- and TGF-?1-stimulated matrix protein expression. In vivo knockdown of Orai1 in mesangial cells of mice using a targeted nanoparticle siRNA delivery system resulted in increased expression of glomerular fibronectin and collagen IV, and mice showed significant mesangial expansion compared with controls. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of stromal interacting molecule 1 in mesangial cells by recombinant adeno-associated virus-encoded shRNA markedly increased collagen IV protein expression in renal cortex and caused mesangial expansion in rats. These results suggest that store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells negatively regulate extracellular matrix protein expression in the kidney, which may serve as an endogenous renoprotective mechanism in diabetes. PMID:25788524

  14. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  15. Apparent digestibility of alternative plant-protein feedstuffs for channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted with channel catfish, Ictalurus puntatus to determine apparent digestibility/availability coefficients of protein, amino acids, lipid and energy for alternative plant-protein feedstuffs: corn gluten feed, corn germ meal, distillers dried grains with solubles, and canola meal, c...

  16. Effects of C-reactive protein on K(+) channel interaction protein 2 in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yong; Mai, Jing-Ting; Wang, Fei; Lin, Yong-Qing; Yuan, Wo-Liang; Luo, Nian-Sang; Fang, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Jing-Feng; Chen, Yang-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have found that C-reactive protein (CRP) was associated with QTc interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved. K(+) channel interaction protein 2 (KChIP2) is a necessary subunit for the formation of transient outward potassium current (Ito.f) which plays a critical role in early repolarization and QTc interval of heart. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of CRP on KChIP2 and Ito.f in cardiomyocytes and to explore the potential mechanism. The neonatal mice ventricular cardiomyocytes were cultured and treated with CRP at different concentrations. The expression of KChIP2 was detected by real time quantitative PCR and Western blot. In addition, Ito.f current density was evaluated by whole cell patch clamp techniques. Our results showed that CRP significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression of KChIP2 in time and doses dependent manners (P < 0.05), and also reduced the current density of Ito.f (P < 0.05). In addition, CRP increased the expression of NF-κB and decreased IκBα expression without significant influence on the expression of ERK1/2 and JNK. Meanwhile, the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly attenuated the effects of CRP on KChIP2 and Ito.f current density. In conclusion, CRP could significantly down-regulate KChIP2 expression and reduce current density of Ito.f partly through NF-κB pathway, suggesting that CRP may directly or indirectly influence QTc interval and arrhythmia via influencing KChIP2 expression and Ito.f current density of cardiomyocytes. PMID:26175853

  17. EFFECT OF ELEVATED WATER TEMPERATURE ON INSECT EMERGENCE IN OUTDOOR EXPERIMENTAL CHANNELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emergence of adult aquatic insects was evaluated weekly with plexiglass traps positioned in two outdoor experimental channels from April through August 1977. One channel was seasonal Mississippi River water temperature and the other maintained at 10C above. Maximum water temperat...

  18. Water behavior in serpentine micro-channel for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Peng; Zhou, Biao; Sobiesiak, Andrzej; Liu, Zhongsheng

    The behavior of water in the air-water flow inside a serpentine channel for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell was investigated using the FLUENT software package. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) model was adopted to track the dynamic air-water interface. Five cases with varying initial water phase distribution corresponding to different fuel cell operating conditions were numerically simulated to obtain a better understanding of water behavior inside a serpentine micro-channel. Results show that the bend area of a serpentine flow channel has significant effects on the flow field, which in turn affects the air-water flow and water liquid distribution inside the channel or along the interior channel surfaces. The simulation results also indicate that water flooding could occur in the "after-bend" section of a micro-channel. For the case with larger amount of water in the two-phase flow, the simulation shows that the "after-bend" water distribution might block the reactant supply to reaction sites and, in some extreme situations, might block the reactant transport inside the flow channel, thus decreasing fuel cell performance.

  19. Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels.

    PubMed

    Coste, Bertrand; Xiao, Bailong; Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Grandl, Jörg; Spencer, Kathryn S; Kim, Sung Eun; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Dubin, Adrienne E; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-03-01

    Mechanotransduction has an important role in physiology. Biological processes including sensing touch and sound waves require as-yet-unidentified cation channels that detect pressure. Mouse Piezo1 (MmPiezo1) and MmPiezo2 (also called Fam38a and Fam38b, respectively) induce mechanically activated cationic currents in cells; however, it is unknown whether Piezo proteins are pore-forming ion channels or modulate ion channels. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Piezo (DmPiezo, also called CG8486) also induces mechanically activated currents in cells, but through channels with remarkably distinct pore properties including sensitivity to the pore blocker ruthenium red and single channel conductances. MmPiezo1 assembles as a ?1.2-million-dalton homo-oligomer, with no evidence of other proteins in this complex. Purified MmPiezo1 reconstituted into asymmetric lipid bilayers and liposomes forms ruthenium-red-sensitive ion channels. These data demonstrate that Piezo proteins are an evolutionarily conserved ion channel family involved in mechanotransduction. PMID:22343900

  20. G protein modulation of CaV2 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Currie, Kevin P M

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels translate the electrical inputs of excitable cells into biochemical outputs by controlling influx of the ubiquitous second messenger Ca(2+) . As such the channels play pivotal roles in many cellular functions including the triggering of neurotransmitter and hormone release by CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels. It is well established that G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) orchestrate precise regulation neurotransmitter and hormone release through inhibition of CaV2 channels. Although the GPCRs recruit a number of different pathways, perhaps the most prominent, and certainly most studied among these is the so-called voltage-dependent inhibition mediated by direct binding of Gβγ to the α1 subunit of CaV2 channels. This article will review the basics of Ca(2+) -channels and G protein signaling, and the functional impact of this now classical inhibitory mechanism on channel function. It will also provide an update on more recent developments in the field, both related to functional effects and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, and advances made toward understanding the molecular interactions that underlie binding of Gβγ to the channel and the voltage-dependence that is a signature characteristic of this mechanism. PMID:21150298

  1. Alternative splicing controls G protein–dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Raingo, Jesica; Castiglioni, Andrew J; Lipscombe, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from mammalian sensory neurons is controlled by CaV2.2 N-type calcium channels. N-type channels are a major target of neurotransmitters and drugs that inhibit calcium entry, transmitter release and nociception through their specific G protein–coupled receptors. G protein–coupled receptor inhibition of these channels is typically voltage-dependent and mediated by G??, whereas N-type channels in sensory neurons are sensitive to a second G protein–coupled receptor pathway that inhibits the channel independent of voltage. Here we show that preferential inclusion in nociceptors of exon 37a in rat Cacna1b (encoding CaV2.2) creates, de novo, a C-terminal module that mediates voltage-independent inhibition. This inhibitory pathway requires tyrosine kinase activation but not G??. A tyrosine encoded within exon 37a constitutes a critical part of a molecular switch controlling N-type current density and G protein–mediated voltage-independent inhibition. Our data define the molecular origins of voltage-independent inhibition of N-type channels in the pain pathway. PMID:17293861

  2. Changes in Channel Trafficking and Protein Stability Caused by LQT2 Mutations in the PAS Domain of the HERG Channel

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carol A.; Jesus, Catarina S. H.; Carvalho, Ricardo; Brito, Rui M. M.; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2012-01-01

    Inherited human long-QT2 syndrome (LQTS) results from mutations in the gene encoding the HERG channel. Several LQT2-associated mutations have been mapped to the amino terminal cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of the HERG1a channel subunit. Here we have characterized the trafficking properties of some LQT2-associated PAS domain mutants and analyzed rescue of the trafficking mutants by low temperature (27°C) or by the pore blocker drug E4031. We show that the LQT2-associated mutations in the PAS domain of the HERG channel display molecular properties that are distinct from the properties of LQT2-associated mutations in the trans-membrane region. Unlike the latter, many of the tested PAS domain LQT2-associated mutations do not result in trafficking deficiency of the channel. Moreover, the majority of the PAS domain mutations that cause trafficking deficiencies are not rescued by a pore blocking drug. We have also explored the in vitro folding stability properties of isolated mutant PAS domain proteins using a thermal unfolding fluorescence assay and a chemical unfolding assay. PMID:22396785

  3. Crystal structure of a substrate-engaged SecY protein-translocation channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Park, Eunyong; Ling, JingJing; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde; Rapoport, Tom A

    2016-03-17

    Hydrophobic signal sequences target secretory polypeptides to a protein-conducting channel formed by a heterotrimeric membrane protein complex, the prokaryotic SecY or eukaryotic Sec61 complex. How signal sequences are recognized is poorly understood, particularly because they are diverse in sequence and length. Structures of the inactive channel show that the largest subunit, SecY or Sec61α, consists of two halves that form an hourglass-shaped pore with a constriction in the middle of the membrane and a lateral gate that faces lipid. The cytoplasmic funnel is empty, while the extracellular funnel is filled with a plug domain. In bacteria, the SecY channel associates with the translating ribosome in co-translational translocation, and with the SecA ATPase in post-translational translocation. How a translocating polypeptide inserts into the channel is uncertain, as cryo-electron microscopy structures of the active channel have a relatively low resolution (~10 Å) or are of insufficient quality. Here we report a crystal structure of the active channel, assembled from SecY complex, the SecA ATPase, and a segment of a secretory protein fused into SecA. The translocating protein segment inserts into the channel as a loop, displacing the plug domain. The hydrophobic core of the signal sequence forms a helix that sits in a groove outside the lateral gate, while the following polypeptide segment intercalates into the gate. The carboxy (C)-terminal section of the polypeptide loop is located in the channel, surrounded by residues of the pore ring. Thus, during translocation, the hydrophobic segments of signal sequences, and probably bilayer-spanning domains of nascent membrane proteins, exit the lateral gate and dock at a specific site that faces the lipid phase. PMID:26950603

  4. Single-channel analysis of the anion channel-forming protein from the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense

    PubMed Central

    Schürholz, Theo; Dloczik, Larissa; Neumann, Eberhard

    1993-01-01

    The anion channel protein from Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense (Schürholz, Th. et al. 1991, J. Membrane Biol. 123: 1-8) was analyzed at different concentrations of KCl and KF. At 0.8 M KCl the conductance G(Vm) increases exponentially from 21 pS at 50 mV up to 53 pS at Vm = 200 mV, 20°C. The concentration dependence of G(Vm) corresponds to a Michaelis-Menten type saturation function at all membrane voltage values applied (0-200 mV). The anion concentration K0.5, where G(Vm) has its half-maximum value, increases from 0.12 M at 50 mV to 0.24 M at 175 mV for channels in a soybean phospholipid bilayer. The voltage dependence of the single channel conductance, which is different for charged and neutral lipid bilayers, can be described either by a two-state flicker (2SF) model and the Nernst-Planck continuum theory, or by a two barrier, one-site (2B1S) model with asymmetric barriers. The increase in the number of open channels after a voltage jump from 50 mV to 150 mV has a time constant of 0.8 s. The changes of the single-channel conductance are much faster (<1 ms). The electric part of the gating process is characterized by the (reversible) molar electrical work ?G?el = ?ZgFVm ? -1.3 RT, which corresponds to the movement of one charge of the gating charge number ?Zg? = 1 across the fraction ? = ?Vm/Vm = 0.15 of the membrane voltage Vm = 200 mV. Unlike with chloride, the single channel conductance of fluoride has a maximum at about 150 mV in the presence of the buffer PIPES (?5 mM, pH 6.8) with K0.5 ? 1 M. It is shown that the decrease in conductance is due to a blocking of the channel by the PIPES anion. In summary, the results indicate that the anion transport by the Clavibacter anion channel (CAC) does not require a voltage dependent conformation change of the CAC. PMID:19431871

  5. RGA protein associates with a TRPV ion channel during biosynthesis and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Jason C; Stokes, Alexander J; Koblan-Huberson, Murielle; Shimoda, Lori M N; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Adra, Chaker N; Turner, Helen

    2004-03-01

    TRPV ion channels transduce a range of temperature stimuli. We proposed that analysis of the protein-protein interactions made by TRPV2 might give insight into the key issues surrounding this channel. These issues include the potential functional significance of TRPV2 in non-sensory tissues, the molecules involved in transducing its activation signal(s) and the mechanism by which its trafficking to the cell surface is regulated. Here we describe the interaction of TRPV2 channel with the RGA gene product. RGA is a four-transmembrane domain, intracellularly localized protein. RGA associates with TRPV2 in a rat mast cell line that is a native context for both proteins. The interaction between TRPV2 and RGA is transient and occurs intracellularly. RGA does not accompany TRPV2 to the cell surface. Formation of the TRPV2/RGA complex is dependent upon a cellular glycosylation event, suggesting that RGA may play a chaperone or targeting role for TRPV2 during the maturation of the ion channel protein. These data record a novel protein-protein interaction for TRPV2 and provide a foundation for future study of the potential regulatory contribution of RGA to TRPV2 function. PMID:14991772

  6. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the ?-subtype of human papillomaviruses (?-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the ?-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  7. Diffusion, molecular separation, and drug delivery from lipid mesophases with tunable water channels.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Renata; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-11-27

    Lyotropic liquid crystals characterized by a bicontinuous cubic phase (BCP) have a structure characterized by interpenetrated water channels following triply periodic minimal surfaces, which can be stable in excess water conditions and thus suitable in a multitude of applications. The control of the water channels size in these systems has a direct impact on their use for drug delivery, crystallization, and membrane separation processes. In this work we carry out systematic diffusion studies to show how the control on the water channel dimensions directly correlates with the release and separation performance of bicontinuous cubic phases. Specifically, we tune the water channels diameter of the monolinolein/water system by adding different amounts of sucrose stearate, which, having hydration-enhancing properties, can shift the boundaries of the phase diagram. We then design a model bicontinuous cubic phase lipidic membrane of the Im3m space group, having a sugar ester to monolinolein ratio of 20%, and we follow the diffusion within its water channels, by using molecules that differ systematically in size and molecular conformation, and we demonstrate, for each class of molecules, a diffusion-enhanced process upon increase of the water channel diameter. Finally, we also show the ability of the bicontinuous cubic phase to efficiently and selectively separate nanoparticles of a target size, by choosing an amount of sucrose stearate for which the water channel diameter and the nanoparticle dimensions match, demonstrating the possible use of these systems as filtering membranes of tunable molecular cutoff. PMID:23116138

  8. Evidence for a role of claudin 2 as a proximal tubular stress responsive paracellular water channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmes, Anja Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Pfaller, Walter; Jennings, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Claudins are the major proteins of the tight junctions and the composition of claudin subtypes is decisive for the selective permeability of the paracellular route and thus tissue specific function. Their regulation is complex and subject to interference by several factors, including oxidative stress. Here we show that exposure of cultured human proximal tubule cells (RPTEC/TERT1) to the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A (CsA) induces an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a decrease in dome formation (on solid growth supports) and a decrease in water transport (on microporous growth supports). In addition, CsA induced a dramatic decrease in the mRNA for the pore forming claudins -2 and -10, and the main subunits of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase. Knock down of claudin 2 by shRNA had no discernable effect on TEER or dome formation but severely attenuated apical to basolateral water reabsorption when cultured on microporous filters. Generation of an osmotic gradient in the basolateral compartment rescued water transport in claudin 2 knock down cells. Inhibition of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase with ouabain prevented dome formation in both cell types. Taken together these results provide strong evidence that dome formation is primarily due to transcellular water transport following a solute osmotic gradient. However, in RPTEC/TERT1 cells cultured on filters under iso-osmotic conditions, water transport is primarily paracellular, most likely due to local increases in osmolarity in the intercellular space. In conclusion, this study provides strong evidence that claudin 2 is involved in paracellular water transport and that claudin 2 expression is sensitive to compound induced cellular stress. - Highlights: • Cyclosporine A increased TEER and decreased water transport in RPTEC/TERT1 cells. • Claudins 2 and 10 were decreased in response to cyclosporine A. • Knock down of claudin 2 inhibited water transport in proximal tubular cells. • We propose that claudin 2 is a nephrotoxin sensitive water channel.

  9. Fiber optic multi-channel protein detector for use in preparative continuous annular chromatography.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, Athanasios; Lehmann, Hartmut; Schwotzer, Günter; Willsch, Reinhardt; Prior, Albert; Wolfgang, Jürgen; Klimant, Ingo; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2002-08-23

    Continuous annular chromatography is an effective method in the separation of preparative scale quantities of biological compounds including proteins where established batch chromatography borders on it. The need for identification or quantification of proteins triggered the development of respective detection units. Here, we describe two types of optical multi-channel detectors. The first is a fiber optic multi-channel detector suitable for the separation of aqueous protein solutions. The second is a technically improved (circular optic) device suitable for application in multi-channel detection. Specifically, UV-absorption measurements of proteins at 280 nm were carried out using newly designed fiber optic detectors having eight and 16 channels. Calibration plots were established for a series of stock solutions of known concentrations of proteins. Mathematical functions were derived from these calibration data to simulate the response of the detector. Limits of detection and the ranges of validity of the fit functions were determined. The 16-channel detector has a theoretical limit of detection that is equivalent to absorbance changes of 10(-4) units. PMID:12685565

  10. Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Arispe, N; Rojas, E; Pollard, H B

    1993-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein (A beta P) is the 40- to 42-residue polypeptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have incorporated this peptide into phosphatidylserine liposomes and then fused the liposomes with a planar bilayer. When incorporated into bilayers the A beta P forms channels, which generate linear current-voltage relationships in symmetrical solutions. A permeability ratio, PK/PCl, of 11 for the open A beta P channel was estimated from the reversal potential of the channel current in asymmetrical KCl solutions. The permeability sequence for different cations, estimated from the reversal potential of the A beta P-channel current for each system of asymmetrical solutions, is Pcs > PLi > PCa > or = PK > PNa. A beta P-channel current (either CS+ or Ca2+ as charge carriers) is blocked reversibly by tromethamine (millimolar range) and irreversibly by Al3+ (micromolar range). The inhibition of the A beta P-channel current by these two substances depends on transmembrane potential, suggesting that the mechanism of blockade involves direct interaction between tromethamine (or Al3+) and sites within the A beta P channel. Hitherto, A beta P has been presumed to be neurotoxic. On the basis of the present data we suggest that the channel activity of the polypeptide may be responsible for some or all of its neurotoxic effects. We further propose that a useful strategy for drug discovery for treatment of Alzheimer disease may include screening compounds for their ability to block or otherwise modify A beta P channels. PMID:8380642

  11. Signatures of protein structure in the cooperative gating of mechanosensitive ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2014-08-01

    Membrane proteins deform the surrounding lipid bilayer, which can lead to membrane-mediated interactions between neighboring proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we demonstrate how the observed differences in protein structure can affect membrane-mediated interactions and cooperativity among membrane proteins. We find that distinct oligomeric states of MscL lead to distinct gateway states for the clustering of MscL, and predict signatures of MscL structure and spatial organization in the cooperative gating of MscL. Our modeling approach establishes a quantitative relation between the observed shapes and the cooperative function of membrane proteins.

  12. Structure, function and translational relevance of aquaporin dual water and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Yool, Andrea J; Campbell, Ewan M

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins have been assumed to be selective for water alone, and aquaglyceroporins are accepted as carrying water and small uncharged solutes including glycerol. This review presents an expanded view of aquaporins as channels with more complex mechanisms of regulation and diverse repertoires of substrate permeabilities than were originally appreciated in the early establishment of the field. The role of aquaporins as dual water and gated ion channels is likely to have physiological and potentially translational relevance, and can be evaluated with newly developed molecular and pharmacological tools. Ion channel activity has been shown for Aquaporins -0, -1, and -6, Drosphila Big Brain, and plant Nodulin-26. Although the concept of ion channel function in aquaporins remains controversial, research advances are beginning to define not only the ion channel function but also the detailed molecular mechanisms that govern and mediate the multifunctional capabilities. With regard to physiological relevance, the adaptive benefit of expression of ion channel activity in aquaporins, implied by amino acid sequence conservation of the ion channel gating domains, suggests they provide more than water or glycerol and solute transport. Dual ion and water channels are of interest for understanding the modulation of transmembrane fluid gradients, volume regulation, and possible signal transduction in tissues expressing classes of aquaporins that have the dual function capability. Other aquaporin classes might be found in future work to have ion channel activities, pending identification of the possible signaling pathways that could govern activation. PMID:22342689

  13. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, B Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Jalife, José

    2015-06-15

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and ?1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances in therapy. PMID:25862830

  14. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ?3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ?7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  15. Antibodies to junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins: probes for the Ca2+-release channel.

    PubMed Central

    Zorzato, F; Chu, A; Volpe, P

    1989-01-01

    The junctional face membrane plays a key role in excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle. A protein of 350 kDa, tentatively identified as a component of the junctional feet, connects transverse tubules to terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum [Kawamoto, Brunschwig, Kim & Caswell (1986) J. Cell Biol. 103, 1405-1414]. The membrane topology and protein composition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-release channels of rabbit skeletal muscle were investigated using an immunological approach, with anti-(junctional face membrane) and anti-(350 kDa protein) polyclonal antibodies. Upon preincubation of the terminal cisternae with anti-(junctional face membrane) antibodies, Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+-loading activities were not affected, whereas anti-(350 kDa protein) antibodies stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity by 25% and inhibited Ca2+-loading activity by 50% (at an antibody/terminal cisternae protein ratio of 1:1). Specific photolabelling of terminal cisternae proteins with [14C]doxorubicin was prevented by both anti-(junctional face membrane) and anti-(350 kDa protein) antibodies. Stimulation of Ca2+ release by doxorubicin was prevented by both anti-(junctional face membrane) and anti-(350 kDa protein) antibodies. Half-maximal inhibition was obtained at an antibody/terminal cisternae protein ratio of 1:1. Kinetic measurements of Ca2+ release indicated that anti-(350 kDa protein) antibodies prevented Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, whereas the ATP-stimulation and the inhibition by Mg2+ were not affected. These results suggest that: (i) Ca2+- and doxorubicin-induced Ca2+ release is mediated by Ca2+ channels which are selectively localized in the junctional face membrane; (ii) the 350 kDa protein is a component of the Ca2+-release channel in native terminal cisternae vesicles; and (iii) the Ca2+-activating site of the channel is separate from other allosteric sites. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2552993

  16. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI. PMID:26386699

  17. Dengue virus M protein C-terminal peptide (DVM-C) forms ion channels.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, A; Horan, C R; Gage, P W

    2005-03-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide consisting of the C-terminus of the M protein of the Dengue virus type 1 strain Singapore S275/90 (DVM-C) produced ion channel activity in artificial lipid bilayers. The channels had a variable conductance and were more permeable to sodium and potassium ions than to chloride ions and more permeable to chloride ions than to calcium ions. Hexamethylene amiloride (100 microM) and amantadine (10 microM), blocked channels formed by DVM-C. Ion channels may play an important role in the life cycle of many viruses and drugs that block these channels may prove to be useful antiviral agents. PMID:16007501

  18. Stabilization of Kv1.5 channel protein by the inotropic agent olprinone.

    PubMed

    Endo, Ryo; Kurata, Yasutaka; Notsu, Tomomi; Li, Peili; Morikawa, Kumi; Kondo, Takehito; Ogura, Kazuyoshi; Miake, Junichiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Higaki, Katsumi; Kuwabara, Masanari; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2015-10-15

    Olprinone is an inotropic agent that inhibits phosphodiesterase (PDE) III and causes vasodilation. Olprinone has been shown to be less proarrhythmic and possibly affect expression of functional Kv1.5 channels that confer the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier K+ channel current (IKur) responsible for action potential repolarization. To reveal involvement of Kv1.5 channels in the less arrhythmic effect of olprinone, we examined effects of the agent on the stability of Kv1.5 channel proteins expressed in COS7 cells. Olprinone at 30-1000 nM increased the protein level of Kv1.5 channels in a concentration-dependent manner. Chase experiments showed that olprinone delayed degradation of Kv1.5 channels. Olprinone increased the immunofluorescent signal of Kv1.5 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus as well as on the cell surface. Kv1.5-mediated membrane currents, measured as 4-aminopyridine-sensitive currents, were increased by olprinone without changes in their activation kinetics. A protein transporter inhibitor, colchicine, abolished the olprinone-induced increase of Kv.1.5-mediated currents. The action of olprinone was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine, and was not mimicked by the application of 8-Bromo-cAMP. Taken together, we conclude that olprinone stabilizes Kv1.5 proteins at the ER through an action as a chemical chaperone, and thereby increases the density of Kv1.5 channels on the cell membrane. The enhancement of Kv1.5 currents could underlie less arrhythmogenicity of olprinone. PMID:26368666

  19. Investigation of water droplet dynamics in PEM fuel cell gas channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Preethi

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) has remained one of the most important issues that need to be addressed before its commercialization in automotive applications. Accumulation of water on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface in a PEMFC introduces a barrier for transport of reactant gases through the GDL to the catalyst layer. Despite the fact that the channel geometry is one of the key design parameters of a fluidic system, very limited research is available to study the effect of microchannel geometry on the two-phase flow structure. In this study, the droplet-wall dynamics and two-phase pressure drop across the water droplet present in a typical PEMFC channel, were examined in auto-competitive gas channel designs (0.4 x 0.7 mm channel cross section). The liquid water flow pattern inside the gas channel was analyzed for different air velocities. Experimental data was analyzed using the Concus-Finn condition to determine the wettability characteristics in the corner region. It was confirmed that the channel angle along with the air velocity and the channel material influences the water distribution and holdup within the channel. Dynamic contact angle emerged as an important parameter in controlling the droplet-wall interaction. Experiments were also performed to understand how the inlet location of the liquid droplet on the GDL surface affects the droplet dynamic behavior in the system. It was found that droplets emerging near the channel wall or under the land lead to corner filling of the channel. Improvements in the channel design has been proposed based on the artificial channel roughness created to act as capillary grooves to transport the liquid water away from the land area. For droplets emerging near the center of the channel, beside the filling and no-filling behavior reported in the literature, a new droplet jumping behavior was observed. As droplets grew and touched the sidewalls, they jumped off to the sidewall leaving the whole GDL exposed for gases to diffuse to the catalyst layer. A theoretical model was developed and a criterion was proposed to predict the droplet jumping behavior in the gas channel. A theoretical force balance model was proposed to predict the pressure force and air velocity required to remove the droplet from the channel to avoid complete channel blockage. The overall goal of this work was to identify the gas channel configuration that provides efficient water removal with a lower pressure drop in the system efficiency while meeting the US Department of Energy's specifications for a PEMFC for automotive application.

  20. Competing Lipid-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions Determine Clustering and Gating Patterns in the Potassium Channel from Streptomyces lividans (KcsA).

    PubMed

    Molina, M Luisa; Giudici, A Marcela; Poveda, José A; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Montoya, Estefanía; Renart, M Lourdes; Fernández, Asia M; Encinar, José A; Riquelme, Gloria; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José M

    2015-10-16

    There is increasing evidence to support the notion that membrane proteins, instead of being isolated components floating in a fluid lipid environment, can be assembled into supramolecular complexes that take part in a variety of cooperative cellular functions. The interplay between lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions is expected to be a determinant factor in the assembly and dynamics of such membrane complexes. Here we report on a role of anionic phospholipids in determining the extent of clustering of KcsA, a model potassium channel. Assembly/disassembly of channel clusters occurs, at least partly, as a consequence of competing lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions at nonannular lipid binding sites on the channel surface and brings about profound changes in the gating properties of the channel. Our results suggest that these latter effects of anionic lipids are mediated via the Trp(67)-Glu(71)-Asp(80) inactivation triad within the channel structure and its bearing on the selectivity filter. PMID:26336105

  1. Theoretical models of the ion channel structure of amyloid beta-protein.

    PubMed Central

    Durell, S R; Guy, H R; Arispe, N; Rojas, E; Pollard, H B

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical methods are used to develop models for the ion channel structure of the membrane-bound amyloid beta-protein. This follows recent observations that the beta-protein forms cation-selective channels in lipid bilayers in vitro. Amyloid beta-protein is the main component of the extracellular plaques in the brain that are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Based on the amino acid sequence and the unique environment of the membrane, the secondary structure of the 40-residue beta-protein is predicted to form a beta-hairpin followed by a helix-turn-helix motif. The channel structures were-designed as aggregates of peptide subunits in identical conformations. Three types of models were developed that are distinguished by whether the pore is formed by the beta-hairpins, the middle helices, or by the more hydrophobic C-terminal helices. The latter two types can be converted back and forth by a simple conformational change, which would explain the variable conduction states observed for a single channel. It is also demonstrated how lipid headgroups could be incorporated into the pore lining, and thus affect the ion selectivity. The atomic-scale detail of the models make them useful for designing experiments to determine the real structure of the channel, and thus further the understanding of peptide channels in general. In addition, if beta-protein-induced channel activity is found to be the cause of cell death in Alzheimer's disease, then the models may be helpful in designing counteracting drugs. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7535109

  2. Pxmp2 Is a Channel-Forming Protein in Mammalian Peroxisomal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rokka, Aare; Soininen, Raija; Immonen, Hanna L.; Pirilä, Päivi L.; Bergmann, Ulrich; Sormunen, Raija T.; Weckström, Matti; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomal metabolic machinery requires a continuous flow of organic and inorganic solutes across peroxisomal membrane. Concerning small solutes, the molecular nature of their traffic has remained an enigma. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, we show that disruption in mice of the Pxmp2 gene encoding Pxmp2, which belongs to a family of integral membrane proteins with unknown function, leads to partial restriction of peroxisomal membrane permeability to solutes in vitro and in vivo. Multiple-channel recording of liver peroxisomal preparations reveals that the channel-forming components with a conductance of 1.3 nS in 1.0 M KCl were lost in Pxmp2−/− mice. The channel-forming properties of Pxmp2 were confirmed with recombinant protein expressed in insect cells and with native Pxmp2 purified from mouse liver. The Pxmp2 channel, with an estimated diameter of 1.4 nm, shows weak cation selectivity and no voltage dependence. The long-lasting open states of the channel indicate its functional role as a protein forming a general diffusion pore in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance Pxmp2 is the first peroxisomal channel identified, and its existence leads to prediction that the mammalian peroxisomal membrane is permeable to small solutes while transfer of “bulky” metabolites, e.g., cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H, and CoA) and ATP, requires specific transporters. PMID:19352492

  3. Ion selectivity of the anthrax toxin channel and its effect on protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Damon; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three ?85-kD proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). PA63 (the 63-kD, C-terminal portion of PA) forms heptameric channels ((PA63)7) in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes that enable the translocation of LF and EF across the membrane. These mushroom-shaped channels consist of a globular cap domain and a 14-stranded ?-barrel stem domain, with six anionic residues lining the interior of the stem to form rings of negative charges. (PA63)7 channels are highly cation selective, and, here, we investigate the effects on both cation selectivity and protein translocation of mutating each of these anionic residues to a serine. We find that although some of these mutations reduce cation selectivity, selectivity alone does not directly predict the rate of protein translocation; local changes in electrostatic forces must be considered as well. PMID:26170174

  4. Ion selectivity of the anthrax toxin channel and its effect on protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schiffmiller, Aviva; Anderson, Damon; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-08-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three ? 85-kD proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). PA63 (the 63-kD, C-terminal portion of PA) forms heptameric channels ((PA63)7) in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes that enable the translocation of LF and EF across the membrane. These mushroom-shaped channels consist of a globular cap domain and a 14-stranded ?-barrel stem domain, with six anionic residues lining the interior of the stem to form rings of negative charges. (PA63)7 channels are highly cation selective, and, here, we investigate the effects on both cation selectivity and protein translocation of mutating each of these anionic residues to a serine. We find that although some of these mutations reduce cation selectivity, selectivity alone does not directly predict the rate of protein translocation; local changes in electrostatic forces must be considered as well. PMID:26170174

  5. The effect of protein dielectric coefficient on the ionic selectivity of a calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boda, Dezs?; Valiskó, Mónika; Eisenberg, Bob; Nonner, Wolfgang; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2006-07-01

    Calcium-selective ion channels are known to have carboxylate-rich selectivity filters, a common motif that is primarily responsible for their high Ca2+ affinity. Different Ca2+ affinities ranging from micromolar (the L-type Ca channel) to millimolar (the ryanodine receptor channel) are closely related to the different physiological functions of these channels. To understand the physical mechanism for this range of affinities given similar amino acids in their selectivity filters, we use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to assess the binding of monovalent and divalent ions in the selectivity filter of a model Ca channel. We use a reduced model where the electolyte is modeled by hard-sphere ions embedded in a continuum dielectric solvent, while the interior of protein surrounding the channel is allowed to have a dielectric coefficient different from that of the electrolyte. The induced charges that appear on the protein/lumen interface are calculated by the induced charge computation method [Boda et al., Phys. Rev. E 69, 046702 (2004)]. It is shown that decreasing the dielectric coefficient of the protein attracts more cations into the pore because the protein's carboxyl groups induce negative charges on the dielectric boundary. As the density of the hard-sphere ions increases in the filter, Ca2+ is absorbed into the filter with higher probability than Na+ because Ca2+ provides twice the charge to neutralize the negative charge of the pore (both structural carboxylate oxygens and induced charges) than Na+ while occupying about the same space (the charge/space competition mechanism). As a result, Ca2+ affinity is improved an order of magnitude by decreasing the protein dielectric coefficient from 80 to 5. Our results indicate that adjusting the dielectric properties of the protein surrounding the permeation pathway is a possible way for evolution to regulate the Ca2+ affinity of the common four-carboxylate motif.

  6. PIP1 aquaporins: Intrinsic water channels or PIP2 aquaporin modulators?

    PubMed

    Yaneff, Agustín; Vitali, Victoria; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-11-30

    The highly conserved plant aquaporins, known as Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs), are the main gateways for cell membrane water exchange. Years of research have described in detail the properties of the PIP2 subfamily. However, characterizing the PIP1 subfamily has been difficult due to the failure to localize to the plasma membrane. In addition, the discovery of the PIP1-PIP2 interaction suggested that PIP1 aquaporins could be regulated by a complex posttranslational mechanism that involves trafficking, heteromerization and fine-tuning of channel activity. This review not only considers the evidence and findings but also discusses the complexity of PIP aquaporins. To establish a new benchmark in PIP regulation, we propose to consider PIP1-PIP2 pairs as functional units for the purpose of future research into their physiological roles. PMID:26526614

  7. Study of gas-water flow in horizontal rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnov, E. A.; Ron'shin, F. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The two-phase flow in the narrow short horizontal rectangular channels 1 millimeter in height was studied experimentally. The features of formation of the two-phase flow were studied in detail. It is shown that with an increase in the channel width, the region of the churn and bubble regimes increases, compressing the area of the jet flow. The areas of the annular and stratified flow patterns vary insignificantly.

  8. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  9. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M.; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion. PMID:24743596

  10. Influenza A virus M2 ion channel protein: a structure-function analysis.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, L J; Nichani, D; Pinto, L H; Lamb, R A

    1994-03-01

    A structure-function analysis of the influenza A virus M2 ion channel protein was performed. The M2 protein of human influenza virus A/Udorn/72 and mutants containing changes on one face of the putative alpha helix of the M2 transmembrane (TM) domain, several of which lead to amantadine resistance when found in virus, were expressed in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. The membrane currents of oocytes expressing mutant M2 ion channels were measured at both normal and low pH, and the amantadine-resistant mutant containing the change of alanine at residue 30 to threonine was found to have a significantly attenuated low pH activation response. The specific activity of the channel current of the amantadine-resistant mutants was investigated by measuring the membrane current of individual oocytes followed by quantification of the amount of M2 protein expressed in these single oocytes by immunoblotting analysis. The data indicate that changing residues on this face of the putative alpha helix of the M2 TM domain alters properties of the M2 ion channel. Some of the M2 proteins containing changes in the TM domain were found to be modified by addition of an N-linked carbohydrate chain at an asparagine residue that is membrane proximal and which is not modified in the wild-type M2 protein. These N-linked carbohydrate chains were further modified by addition of polylactosaminoglycan. A glycosylated M2 mutant protein (M2 + V, A30T) exhibited an ion channel activity with a voltage-activated, time-dependent kinetic component. Prevention of carbohydrate addition did not affect the altered channel activity. The ability of the M2 protein to tolerate deletions in the TM domain was examined by expressing three mutants (del29-31, del28-31, and del27-31) containing deletions of three, four, and five residues in the TM domain. No ion channel activity was detected from expression of M2 del29-31 and del27-31, whereas expression of M2 del28-31 resulted in an ion channel activity that was activated by hyperpolarization (and not low pH) and was resistant to amantadine block. Examination of the oligomeric form of M2 del28-31 indicated that the oligomer is different from wild-type M2, and the data were consistent with M2 del28-31 forming a pentamer. PMID:7508997

  11. Mouse ERG K+ Channel Clones Reveal Differences in Protein Trafficking and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric C.; Moungey, Brooke M.; Lim, Evi; Concannon, Sarah P.; Anderson, Corey L.; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Balijepalli, Sadguna Y.; January, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mouse ether‐a‐go‐go‐related gene 1a (mERG1a, mKCNH2) encodes mERG K+ channels in mouse cardiomyocytes. The mERG channels and their human analogue, hERG channels, conduct IKr. Mutations in hERG channels reduce IKr to cause congenital long‐QT syndrome type 2, mostly by decreasing surface membrane expression of trafficking‐deficient channels. Three cDNA sequences were originally reported for mERG channels that differ by 1 to 4 amino acid residues (mERG‐London, mERG‐Waterston, and mERG‐Nie). We characterized these mERG channels to test the postulation that they would differ in their protein trafficking and biophysical function, based on previous findings in long‐QT syndrome type 2. Methods and Results The 3 mERG and hERG channels were expressed in HEK293 cells and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes and were studied using Western blot and whole‐cell patch clamp. We then compared our findings with the recent sequencing results in the Welcome Trust Sanger Institute Mouse Genomes Project (WTSIMGP). Conclusions First, the mERG‐London channel with amino acid substitutions in regions of highly ordered structure is trafficking deficient and undergoes temperature‐dependent and pharmacological correction of its trafficking deficiency. Second, the voltage dependence of channel gating would be different for the 3 mERG channels. Third, compared with the WTSIMGP data set, the mERG‐Nie clone is likely to represent the wild‐type mouse sequence and physiology. Fourth, the WTSIMGP analysis suggests that substrain‐specific sequence differences in mERG are a common finding in mice. These findings with mERG channels support previous findings with hERG channel structure–function analyses in long‐QT syndrome type 2, in which sequence changes in regions of highly ordered structure are likely to result in abnormal protein trafficking. PMID:25497881

  12. Membrane palmitoylated protein 2 is a synaptic scaffold protein required for synaptic SK2-containing channel function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gukhan; Luján, Rafael; Schwenk, Jochen; Kelley, Melissa H; Aguado, Carolina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fakler, Bernd; Maylie, James; Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons express apamin-sensitive SK2-containing channels in the post-synaptic membrane, positioned close to NMDA-type (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamate receptors. Activated by synaptically evoked NMDAR-dependent Ca(2+) influx, the synaptic SK2-containing channels modulate excitatory post-synaptic responses and the induction of synaptic plasticity. In addition, their activity- and protein kinase A-dependent trafficking contributes to expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). We have identified a novel synaptic scaffold, MPP2 (membrane palmitoylated protein 2; p55), a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family that interacts with SK2-containing channels. MPP2 and SK2 co-immunopurified from mouse brain, and co-immunoprecipitated when they were co-expressed in HEK293 cells. MPP2 is highly expressed in the post-synaptic density of dendritic spines on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Knocking down MPP2 expression selectively abolished the SK2-containing channel contribution to synaptic responses and decreased LTP. Thus, MPP2 is a novel synaptic scaffold that is required for proper synaptic localization and function of SK2-containing channels. PMID:26880549

  13. Membrane palmitoylated protein 2 is a synaptic scaffold protein required for synaptic SK2-containing channel function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gukhan; Luján, Rafael; Schwenk, Jochen; Kelley, Melissa H; Aguado, Carolina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fakler, Bernd; Maylie, James; Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons express apamin-sensitive SK2-containing channels in the post-synaptic membrane, positioned close to NMDA-type (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamate receptors. Activated by synaptically evoked NMDAR-dependent Ca2+ influx, the synaptic SK2-containing channels modulate excitatory post-synaptic responses and the induction of synaptic plasticity. In addition, their activity- and protein kinase A-dependent trafficking contributes to expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). We have identified a novel synaptic scaffold, MPP2 (membrane palmitoylated protein 2; p55), a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family that interacts with SK2-containing channels. MPP2 and SK2 co-immunopurified from mouse brain, and co-immunoprecipitated when they were co-expressed in HEK293 cells. MPP2 is highly expressed in the post-synaptic density of dendritic spines on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Knocking down MPP2 expression selectively abolished the SK2-containing channel contribution to synaptic responses and decreased LTP. Thus, MPP2 is a novel synaptic scaffold that is required for proper synaptic localization and function of SK2-containing channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12637.001 PMID:26880549

  14. The Large Conductance, Calcium-activated K+ (BK) Channel is regulated by Cysteine String Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated-K+ (BK) channels are widely distributed throughout the nervous system, where they regulate action potential duration and firing frequency, along with presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Our recent efforts to identify chaperones that target neuronal ion channels have revealed cysteine string protein (CSP?) as a key regulator of BK channel expression and current density. CSP? is a vesicle-associated protein and mutations in CSP? cause the hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, adult-onset autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL). CSP? null mice show 2.5 fold higher BK channel expression compared to wild type mice, which is not seen with other neuronal channels (i.e. Cav2.2, Kv1.1 and Kv1.2). Furthermore, mutations in either CSP?'s J domain or cysteine string region markedly increase BK expression and current amplitude. We conclude that CSP? acts to regulate BK channel expression, and consequently CSP?-associated changes in BK activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as ANCL. PMID:23945775

  15. Ceramide Channels Increase the Permeability of the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane to Small Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J; Kolesnick, Richard N; Colombini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing cytochrome c release from mitochondria. We have previously reported that C2- and C16-ceramide, but not dihydroceramide, form large channels in planar membranes (Siskind, L. J., and Colombini, M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38640-38644). Here we show that ceramides do not trigger a cytochrome c secretion or release mechanism, but simply raise the permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane, via ceramide channel formation, to include small proteins. Exogenously added reduced cytochrome c was able to freely permeate the mitochondrial outer membrane with entry to and exit from the intermembrane space facilitated by ceramides in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The permeability pathways were eliminated upon removal of C2-ceramide by bovine serum albumin, thus ruling out a detergent-like effect of C2-ceramide on membranes. Ceramide channels were not specific to cytochrome c, as ceramides induced release of adenylate kinase, but not fumerase from isolated mitochondria, showing some specificity of these channels for the outer mitochondrial membrane. SDS-PAGE results show that ceramides allow release of intermembrane space proteins with a molecular weight cut-off of about 60,000. These results indicate that the ceramide-induced membrane permeability increases in isolated mitochondria are via ceramide channel formation and not a release mechanism, as the channels that allow cytochrome c to freely permeate are reversible, and are not specific to cytochrome c. PMID:12006562

  16. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling to Kir channels in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher-Solis, Candice; Fribourg, Miguel; Spyridaki, Katerina; Younkin, Jason; Ellaithy, Amr; Xiang, Guoqing; Liapakis, George; Gonzalez-Maeso, Javier; Zhang, Hailin; Cui, Meng; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2015-01-01

    Kir3 (or GIRK) channels have been known for nearly three decades to be activated by direct interactions with the βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G (Gαβγ) proteins in a membrane-delimited manner. Gα also interacts with GIRK channels and since PTX-sensitive Gα subunits show higher affinity of interaction they confer signaling specificity to G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) that normally couple to these G protein subunits. In heterologous systems, overexpression of non PTX-sensitive Gα subunits scavenges the available Gβγ and biases GIRK activation through GPCRs that couple to these Gα subunits. Moreover, all Kir channels rely on their direct interactions with the phospholipid PIP2 to maintain their activity. Thus, signals that activate phospholipase C (e.g. through Gq signaling) to hydrolyze PIP2 result in inhibition of Kir channel activity. In this review, we illustrate with experiments performed in Xenopus oocytes that Kir channels can be used efficiently as reporters of GPCR function through Gi, Gs or Gq signaling. The membrane-delimited nature of this expression system makes it highly efficient for constructing dose-response curves yielding highly reproducible apparent affinities of different ligands for each GPCR tested. PMID:25374032

  17. Hydrogen peroxide treatments for channel catfish eggs infected with water molds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi, or water molds Saprolegnia spp., on channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus eggs can lower fry production. This requires the producer to spawn more catfish or face fingerling shortages. Few treatments have been tested against channel catfish eggs infested with an identified fungus. Hydrogen pe...

  18. Mapping energy transfer channels in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein complex.

    PubMed

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Butkus, Vytautas; Songaila, Egidijus; Augulis, Ram?nas; Gall, Andrew; Büchel, Claudia; Robert, Bruno; Abramavicius, Darius; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas

    2015-02-01

    Fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein (FCP) is the key molecular complex performing the light-harvesting function in diatoms, which, being a major group of algae, are responsible for up to one quarter of the total primary production on Earth. These photosynthetic organisms contain an unusually large amount of the carotenoid fucoxanthin, which absorbs the light in the blue-green spectral region and transfers the captured excitation energy to the FCP-bound chlorophylls. Due to the large number of fucoxanthins, the excitation energy transfer cascades in these complexes are particularly tangled. In this work we present the two-color two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments on FCP. Analysis of the data using the modified decay associated spectra permits a detailed mapping of the excitation frequency dependent energy transfer flow with a femtosecond time resolution. PMID:25445318

  19. Evidence for the existence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in plants: Modulation of stomatal movements and guard cell potassium channels by sulfonylureas and potassium?channel?openers

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Nathalie; Marin, Elena; Vavasseur, Alain; Forestier, Cyrille

    1997-01-01

    Limitation of water loss and control of gas exchange is accomplished in plant leaves via stomatal guard cells. Stomata open in response to light when an increase in guard cell turgor is triggered by ions and water influx across the plasma membrane. Recent evidence demonstrating the existence of ATP-binding cassette proteins in plants led us to analyze the effect of compounds known for their ability to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP) in animal cells. By using epidermal strip bioassays and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments with Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts, we describe a pharmacological profile that is specific for the outward K+ channel and very similar to the one described for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in mammalian cells. Tolbutamide and glibenclamide induced stomatal opening in bioassays and in patch-clamp experiments, a specific inhibition of the outward K+ channel by these compounds was observed. Conversely, application of potassium channel openers such as cromakalim or RP49356 triggered stomatal closure. An apparent competition between sulfonylureas and potassium channel openers occurred in bioassays, and outward potassium currents, previously inhibited by glibenclamide, were partially recovered after application of cromakalim. By using an expressed sequence tag clone from an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of the sulfonylurea receptor, a 7-kb transcript was detected by Northern blot analysis in guard cells and other tissues. Beside the molecular evidence recently obtained for the expression of ATP-binding cassette protein transcripts in plants, these results give pharmacological support to the presence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in the guard-cell plasma membrane tightly involved in the outward potassium channel regulation during stomatal movements. PMID:9391169

  20. Peroxisomal Pex11 is a pore-forming protein homologous to TRPM channels.

    PubMed

    Mindthoff, Sabrina; Grunau, Silke; Steinfort, Laura L; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Erdmann, Ralf; Antonenkov, Vasily D

    2016-02-01

    More than 30 proteins (Pex proteins) are known to participate in the biogenesis of peroxisomes-ubiquitous oxidative organelles involved in lipid and ROS metabolism. The Pex11 family of homologous proteins is responsible for division and proliferation of peroxisomes. We show that yeast Pex11 is a pore-forming protein sharing sequence similarity with TRPM cation-selective channels. The Pex11 channel with a conductance of ?=4.1nS in 1.0M KCl is moderately cation-selective (PK(+)/PCl(-)=1.85) and resistant to voltage-dependent closing. The estimated size of the channel's pore (r~0.6nm) supports the notion that Pex11 conducts solutes with molecular mass below 300-400Da. We localized the channel's selectivity determining sequence. Overexpression of Pex11 resulted in acceleration of fatty acids ?-oxidation in intact cells but not in the corresponding lysates. The ?-oxidation was affected in cells by expression of the Pex11 protein carrying point mutations in the selectivity determining sequence. These data suggest that the Pex11-dependent transmembrane traffic of metabolites may be a rate-limiting step in the ?-oxidation of fatty acids. This conclusion was corroborated by analysis of the rate of ?-oxidation in yeast strains expressing Pex11 with mutations mimicking constitutively phosphorylated (S165D, S167D) or unphosphorylated (S165A, S167A) protein. The results suggest that phosphorylation of Pex11 is a mechanism that can control the peroxisomal ?-oxidation rate. Our results disclose an unexpected function of Pex11 as a non-selective channel responsible for transfer of metabolites across peroxisomal membrane. The data indicate that peroxins may be involved in peroxisomal metabolic processes in addition to their role in peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:26597702

  1. Regulation of the Water Channel Aquaporin-2 via 14-3-3? and -?.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Hanne B; Slengerik-Hansen, Joachim; Aroankins, Takwa; Assentoft, Mette; MacAulay, Nanna; Moestrup, Soeren K; Bhalla, Vivek; Fenton, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The 14-3-3 family of proteins are multifunctional proteins that interact with many of their cellular targets in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Here, we determined that 14-3-3 proteins interact with phosphorylated forms of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and modulate its function. With the exception of ?, all 14-3-3 isoforms were abundantly expressed in mouse kidney and mouse kidney collecting duct cells (mpkCCD14). Long-term treatment of mpkCCD14 cells with the type 2 vasopressin receptor agonist dDAVP increased mRNA and protein levels of AQP2 alongside 14-3-3? and -?, whereas levels of 14-3-3? and -? were decreased. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies in mpkCCD14 cells uncovered an AQP2/14-3-3 interaction that was modulated by acute dDAVP treatment. Additional co-IP studies in HEK293 cells determined that AQP2 interacts selectively with 14-3-3? and -?. Use of phosphatase inhibitors in mpkCCD14 cells, co-IP with phosphorylation deficient forms of AQP2 expressed in HEK293 cells, or surface plasmon resonance studies determined that the AQP2/14-3-3 interaction was modulated by phosphorylation of AQP2 at various sites in its carboxyl terminus, with Ser-256 phosphorylation critical for the interactions. shRNA-mediated knockdown of 14-3-3? in mpkCCD14 cells resulted in increased AQP2 ubiquitylation, decreased AQP2 protein half-life, and reduced AQP2 levels. In contrast, knockdown of 14-3-3? resulted in increased AQP2 half-life and increased AQP2 levels. In conclusion, this study demonstrates phosphorylation-dependent interactions of AQP2 with 14-3-3? and -?. These interactions play divergent roles in modulating AQP2 trafficking, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, and degradation. PMID:26645691

  2. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  3. Unifying Mechanism of Controlling Kir3 Channel Activity by G Proteins and Phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Logothetis, Diomedes E; Mahajan, Rahul; Adney, Scott K; Ha, Junghoon; Kawano, Takeharu; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Cui, Meng

    2015-01-01

    The question that started with the pioneering work of Otto Loewi in the 1920s, to identify how stimulation of the vagus nerve decreased heart rate, is approaching its 100th year anniversary. In the meantime, we have learned that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine acting through muscarinic M2 receptors activates cardiac potassium (Kir3) channels via the ?? subunits of G proteins, an important effect that contributes to slowing atrial pacemaker activity. Concurrent stimulation of M1 or M3 receptors hydrolyzes PIP2, a signaling phospholipid essential to maintaining Kir3 channel activity, thus causing desensitization of channel activity and protecting the heart from overinhibition of pacemaker activity. Four mammalian members of the Kir3 subfamily, expressed in heart, brain, endocrine organs, etc., are modulated by a plethora of stimuli to regulate cellular excitability. With the recent great advances in ion channel structural biology, three-dimensional structures of Kir3 channels with PIP2 and the G?? subunits are now available. Mechanistic insights have emerged that explain how modulatory control of activity feeds into a core mechanism of channel-PIP2 interactions to regulate the conformation of channel gates. This complex but beautiful system continues to surprise us for almost 100 years with an apparent wisdom in its intricate design. PMID:26422981

  4. EVALUATION OF PROTEIN REDUCTION AND LYSINE SUPPLEMENTATION OF PRODUCTION DIETS FOR CHANNEL CATFISH ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2-year continuous production trial was conducted in earthen ponds to evaluate lysine supplementation of practical diets as a means to reduce the need for total dietary protein and limit nitrogenous waste production of channel catfish. Experimental diets consisted of three practical diets containi...

  5. Effects of Dietary Protein Concentration and Feeding Regimen on Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A factorial experiment was conducted to examine effects of dietary protein concentration (24, 28, 32, or 36%) and feeding regimen (feeding once daily or every other d) on channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus production in earthen ponds. Compared with fish fed daily, fish fed every other d had lower ...

  6. NATURAL CONTENT AND PROCESSING OF ALTERNATIVE PROTEIN SOURCES: HISTOLOGIC EFFECTS IN FINGERLING CHANNEL CATFISH (ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant effort has been made to utilize alternative protein sources like cottonseed meal (CSM) and soybean meal (SBM) to replace fishmeal in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) feed. These sources are readily available and have high nutritional value, but contain anti-nutritional factors (ANF...

  7. Effects of Fasting on IGF-Binding Proteins, Glucose, and Cortisol in Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of fasting on IGF-binding proteins, glucose, and cortisol in channel catfish were examined. Fed fish (controls) were compared to 14-, 30-, and 45-day fasted fish and 45-day fasted fish refed for 15 additional days. Body length and body weight changes, condition factor(CF), hepatosomati...

  8. Towards mimicking natural protein channels with aligned carbon nanotube membranes for active drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mainak; Stinchcomb, Audra; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes offer an exciting opportunity to mimic natural protein channels due to 1) a mechanism of dramatically enhanced fluid flow 2) ability to place ‘gatekeeper’ chemistry at the entrance to pores 3) the ability for biochemical reactions to occur on gatekeeper molecules and 4) an ability to chemically functionalize each side of the membrane independently. Main methods Aligned CNT membranes were fabricated and CNT pore entrances modified with gatekeeper chemistry. Pressure driven fluid flow and diffusion experiments were performed to study the mechanisms of transport through CNTs. Key findings The transport mechanism through CNT membranes is primarily 1) ionic diffusion near bulk expectation 2) gas flow enhanced 1–2 orders of magnitude primarily due to specular reflection 3) fluid flow 4–5 orders of magnitude faster than conventional materials due to a nearly ideal slip-boundary interface. The transport can be modulated by ‘gatekeeper’ chemistry at the pore entrance using steric hindrance, electrostatic attraction/repulsion, or biochemical state. The conformation of charged tethered molecules can be modulated by applied bias setting the stage for programmable drug release devices. Significance The membrane structure is mechanically far more robust than lipid bilayer films, allowing for large-scale chemical separations, delivery or sensing based on the principles of protein channels. The performance of protein channels is several orders of magnitude faster than conventional membrane materials. The fundamental requirements of mimicking protein channels are present in the CNT membrane system. PMID:19383500

  9. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K+ channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K+ channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K+ channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K+ channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K+ channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K+ channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions. PMID:23918407

  10. Epithelial sodium channel abundance is decreased by an unfolded protein response induced by hyperosmolality

    PubMed Central

    Crambert, Gilles; Ernandez, Thomas; Lamouroux, Christine; Roth, Isabelle; Dizin, Eva; Martin, Pierre?Yves; Féraille, Eric; Hasler, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Large shifts of osmolality occur in the kidney medulla as part of the urine concentrating mechanism. Hyperosmotic stress profoundly challenges cellular homeostasis and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here, we examined the unfolded protein response (UPR) in hyperosmotically?challenged principal cells of the kidney collecting duct (CD) and show its relevance in controlling epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) abundance, responsible for the final adjustment of Na+ excretion. Dehydration increases medullary but not cortical osmolality. Q?PCR analysis of microdissected CD of water?deprived mice revealed increased aquaporin?2 (AQP2) expression in outer medullary and cortical CD while ENaC abundance decreased in outer medullary but not cortical CD. Immunoblotting, Q?PCR and immunofluorescence revealed that hyperosmolality induced a transient ER stress?like response both ex vivo and in cultured CD principal cells and increased activity of the canonical UPR mediators PERK and ATF6. Both hyperosmolality and chemical induction of ER stress decreased ENaC expression in vitro. ENaC depletion by either stimulus was abolished by transcriptional inhibition and by the chemical chaperone 4?phenylbutyric acid and was partly abrogated by either PERK or ATF6 silencing. Our data suggest that induction of the UPR by hyperosmolality may help preserve body fluid homeostasis under conditions of dehydration by uncoupling AQP2 and ENaC abundance in outer medullary CD. PMID:25413317

  11. The small envelope protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus possesses ion channel protein-like properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-11-10

    The small envelope (E) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a hydrophobic 73 amino acid protein encoded in the internal open reading frame (ORF) of the bicistronic mRNA2. As a first step towards understanding the biological role of E protein during PRRSV replication, E gene expression was blocked in a full-length infectious clone by mutating the ATG translational initiation to GTG, such that the full-length mutant genomic clone was unable to synthesize the E protein. DNA transfection of PRRSV-susceptible cells with the E gene knocked-out genomic clone showed the absence of virus infectivity. P129-{delta}E-transfected cells however produced virion particles in the culture supernatant, and these particles contained viral genomic RNA, demonstrating that the E protein is essential for PRRSV infection but dispensable for virion assembly. Electron microscopy suggests that the P129-{delta}E virions assembled in the absence of E had a similar appearance to the wild-type particles. Strand-specific RT-PCR demonstrated that the E protein-negative, non-infectious P129-{delta}E virus particles were able to enter cells but further steps of replication were interrupted. The entry of PRRSV has been suggested to be via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and lysomotropic basic compounds and known ion-channel blocking agents both inhibited PRRSV replication effectively during the uncoating process. The expression of E protein in Escherichia coli-mediated cell growth arrests and increased the membrane permeability. Cross-linking experiments in cells infected with PRRSV or transfected with E gene showed that the E protein was able to form homo-oligomers. Taken together, our data suggest that the PRRSV E protein is likely an ion-channel protein embedded in the viral envelope and facilitates uncoating of virus and release of the genome in the cytoplasm.

  12. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K%2B channel proteins : application to problems in biodefense and bioenergy.

    SciTech Connect

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  13. Channel crossing: how are proteins shipped across the bacterial plasma membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Collinson, Ian; Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the first protein-conducting channel was determined more than a decade ago. Today, we are still puzzled by the outstanding problem of protein translocation—the dynamic mechanism underlying the consignment of proteins across and into membranes. This review is an attempt to summarize and understand the energy transducing capabilities of protein-translocating machines, with emphasis on bacterial systems: how polypeptides make headway against the lipid bilayer and how the process is coupled to the free energy associated with ATP hydrolysis and the transmembrane protein motive force. In order to explore how cargo is driven across the membrane, the known structures of the protein-translocation machines are set out against the background of the historic literature, and in the light of experiments conducted in their wake. The paper will focus on the bacterial general secretory (Sec) pathway (SecY-complex), and its eukaryotic counterpart (Sec61-complex), which ferry proteins across the membrane in an unfolded state, as well as the unrelated Tat system that assembles bespoke channels for the export of folded proteins. PMID:26370937

  14. K+ channel interactions detected by a genetic system optimized for systematic studies of membrane protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Obrdlik, Petr; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Hamacher, Tanja; Cappellaro, Corinna; Vilarino, Cristina; Fleischer, Carola; Ellerbrok, Heinz; Kamuzinzi, Richard; Ledent, Valérie; Blaudez, Damien; Sanders, Dale; Revuelta, Jose L.; Boles, Eckhard; André, Bruno; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2004-01-01

    Organization of proteins into complexes is crucial for many cellular functions. However, most proteomic approaches primarily detect protein interactions for soluble proteins but are less suitable for membrane-associated complexes. Here we describe a mating-based split ubiquitin system (mbSUS) for systematic identification of interactions between membrane proteins as well as between membrane and soluble proteins. mbSUS allows in vivo cloning of PCR products into a vector set, detection of interactions via mating, regulated expression of baits, and improved selection of interacting proteins. Cloning is simplified by introduction of ? attachment sites for GATEWAY. Homo- and heteromeric interactions between Arabidopsis K+ channels KAT1, AKT1, and AKT2 were identified. Tests with deletion mutants demonstrate that the C terminus of KAT1 and AKT1 is necessary for physical assembly of complexes. Screening of a sorted collection of 84 plant proteins with K+ channels as bait revealed differences in oligomerization between KAT1, AKT1, and AtKC1, and allowed detection of putative interacting partners of KAT1 and AtKC1. These results show that mbSUS is suited for systematic analysis of membrane protein interactions. PMID:15299147

  15. Crystallization of the Large Membrane Protein Complex Photosystem I in a Microfluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished non-trivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time consuming and resource intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these ‘difficult to crystallize’ proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed, yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer and micrometer sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date. PMID:24191698

  16. Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Reveals Water and Phosphate Interactions with the KcsA Potassium Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, John A.; Focia, Pamela J.; Gross, Adrian

    2010-08-13

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that {sup 31}P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate headgroup of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the {sup 31}P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins.

  17. Probing Membrane Protein Structure Using Water Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane peptide of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. PMID:25228502

  18. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  19. Close association of water channel AQP1 with amyloid-beta deposition in Alzheimer disease brains.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Tamako; Arima, Kunimasa; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Satoh, Jun-ichi

    2008-09-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a membrane water channel protein, is expressed exclusively in the choroid plexus epithelium in the central nervous system under physiological conditions. However, AQP1 expression is enhanced in reactive astrocytes, accumulating in brain lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and multiple sclerosis, suggesting a role of AQP1-expressing astrocytes in brain water homeostasis under pathological conditions. To clarify a pathological implication of AQP1 in Alzheimer disease (AD), we investigated the possible relationship between amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition and astrocytic AQP1 expression in the motor cortex and hippocampus of 11 AD patients and 16 age-matched other neurological disease cases. In all cases, AQP1 was expressed exclusively in a subpopulation of multipolar fibrillary astrocytes. The great majority of AQP1-expressing astrocytes were located either on the top of or in close proximity to Abeta plaques in AD brains but not in non-AD cases, whereas those independent of Abeta deposition were found predominantly in non-AD brains. By Western blot, cultured human astrocytes constitutively expressed AQP1, and the levels of AQP1 protein expression were not affected by exposure to Abeta(1-42) peptide, but were elevated by hypertonic sodium chloride. By immunoprecipitation, the C-terminal fragment-beta (CTFbeta) of amyloid precursor protein interacted with the N-terminal half of AQP1 spanning the transmembrane helices H1, H2 and H3. These observations suggest the possible association of astrocytic AQP1 with Abeta deposition in AD brains. PMID:18509662

  20. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 2 is a member of the mitochondrial channel proteins that regulate the flow of hydrogen ions and ATP generation. The relationship between UCP2 and nutrient metabolism has been well-defined in humans but unclear in fish. We hypothesized that increased muscle growth in channel catf...

  1. Computational Analysis of the Soluble Form of the Intracellular Chloride Ion Channel Protein CLIC1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Valenzuela, Stella M.; George, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) family of proteins has the remarkable property of maintaining both a soluble form and an integral membrane form acting as an ion channel. The soluble form is structurally related to the glutathione-S-transferase family, and CLIC can covalently bind glutathione via an active site cysteine. We report approximately 0.6 μs of molecular dynamics simulations, encompassing the three possible ligand-bound states of CLIC1, using the structure of GSH-bound human CLIC1. Noncovalently bound GSH was rapidly released from the protein, whereas the covalently ligand-bound protein remained close to the starting structure over 0.25 μs of simulation. In the unliganded state, conformational changes in the vicinity of the glutathione-binding site resulted in reduced reactivity of the active site thiol. Elastic network analysis indicated that the changes in the unliganded state are intrinsic to the protein architecture and likely represent functional transitions. Overall, our results are consistent with a model of CLIC function in which covalent binding of glutathione does not occur spontaneously but requires interaction with another protein to stabilise the GSH binding site and/or transfer of the ligand. The results do not indicate how CLIC1 undergoes a radical conformational change to form a transmembrane chloride channel but further elucidate the mechanism by which CLICs are redox controlled. PMID:24089665

  2. Water masses exchanged through the Channel of Sicily: Evidence for the presence of new water masses on the Tunisian side of the channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ismail, Sana; Sammari, Chérif; Gasparini, Gian Pietro; Béranger, Karine; Brahim, Mouldi; Aleya, Lotfi

    2012-05-01

    Studies of water masses present in the Channel of Sicily are relevant to understanding not only the overall Mediterranean circulation but also the Tunisian coastal shelf circulation. This study attempts to clarify the dynamics of water masses exchanged through the channel and its variability using data collected during six hydrographic cruises in the western half of the Cap Bon - Mazara del Vallo section during 2003. Hydrographic measurements clearly show the signature of the Atlantic Tunisian Current along the Tunisian coast characterized by important mesoscale variability. Computation of a normalized temperature and salinity standard deviation makes it possible to distinguish areas of high temporal variability located in the transitional layer between the Atlantic Water and the Levantine Intermediate Water. This transitional layer is created by the presence of both Western Intermediate Water and Ionian Water. In addition to highlighting the relevance of the mesoscale activity, a comparison between direct current measurements and adjusted geostrophic currents produced a more confident estimate of the surface and deep transports through the western part of the channel. Our conclusions on seasonal and mesoscale variability are confirmed by a high resolution numerical simulation.

  3. Microfiltration: Effect of channel diameter on limiting flux and serum protein removal.

    PubMed

    Hurt, E E; Adams, M C; Barbano, D M

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to determine the limiting flux and serum protein (SP) removal at 8, 9 and 10% true protein (TP) in the retentate recirculation loop using 0.1-µm ceramic graded permeability (GP) microfiltration (MF) membranes with 3mm channel diameters (CD). An additional objective was to compare the limiting flux and SP removal between 0.1-µm ceramic GP membranes with 3mm CD and previous research using 4-mm CD membranes. The MF system was operated at 50°C, using a diluted milk protein concentrate with 85% protein on a total solids basis (MPC85) as the MF feed. The limiting flux for the MF of diluted MPC85 was determined at 8, 9, and 10% TP concentration in the recirculation loop. The experiment using the 3-mm CD membranes was replicated 3 times for a total of 9 runs. On the morning of each run MPC85 was diluted with reverse osmosis water to a MF feed TP concentration of 5.4%. In all runs the starting flux was 55 kg/m2 per hour, the flux was then increased in steps until the limiting flux was reached. For the 3-mm CD membranes, the limiting flux was 128±0.3, 109±4, and 97±0.5 kg/m2 per hour at recirculation loop TP concentrations of 8.1±0.07, 9.2±0.04, and 10.2±0.03%, respectively. For the 3-mm CD membranes, increasing the flux from the starting to the limiting flux decreased the SP removal factor from 0.72±0.02 to 0.67±0.01; however, no difference in SP removal factor among the target recirculation loop TP concentrations was detected. The limiting flux at each recirculation loop target TP concentration was lower for the 3- compared with the 4-mm CD membranes. The differences in limiting fluxes between the 3- and 4-mm CD membranes were explained in part by the difference in cross-flow velocity (5.5±0.03 and 7.0±0.03 m/s for the 3- and 4-mm CD membranes, respectively). The SP removal factor was also lower for the 3- compared with the 4-mm CD membranes, indicating that more membrane fouling may have occurred in the 3- versus 4-mm CD membranes. PMID:25892692

  4. Radiolytic mapping of solvent-contact surfaces in Photosystem II of higher plants: experimental identification of putative water channels within the photosystem.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Laurie K; Sallans, Larry; Bellamy, Henry; Goettert, Jost S; Limbach, Patrick A; Bricker, Terry M

    2013-08-01

    Photosystem II uses water as an enzymatic substrate. It has been hypothesized that this water is vectored to the active site for water oxidation via water channels that lead from the surface of the protein complex to the Mn4O5Ca metal cluster. The radiolysis of water by synchrotron radiation produces amino acid residue-modifying OH(•) and is a powerful technique to identify regions of proteins that are in contact with water. In this study, we have used this technique to oxidatively modify buried amino acid residues in higher plant Photosystem II membranes. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was then used to identify these oxidized amino acid residues that were located in several core Photosystem II subunits (D1, D2, CP43, and CP47). While, as expected, the majority of the identified oxidized residues (?75%) are located on the solvent-exposed surface of the complex, a number of buried residues on these proteins were also modified. These residues form groups which appear to lead from the surface of the complex to the Mn4O5Ca cluster. These residues may be in contact with putative water channels in the photosystem. These results are discussed within the context of a number of largely computational studies that have identified putative water channels in Photosystem II. PMID:23814046

  5. Liquid Water Transport in the Reactant Channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rupak

    Water management has been identified as a critical issue in the development of PEM fuel cells for automotive applications. Water is present inside the PEM fuel cell in three phases, i.e. liquid phase, vapor phase and mist phase. Liquid water in the reactant channels causes flooding of the cell and blocks the transport of reactants to the reaction sites at the catalyst layer. Understanding the behavior of liquid water in the reactant channels would allow us to devise improved strategies for removing liquid water from the reactant channels. In situ fuel cell tests have been performed to identify and diagnose operating conditions which result in the flooding of the fuel cell. A relationship has been identified between the liquid water present in the reactant channels and the cell performance. A novel diagnostic technique has been established which utilizes the pressure drop multiplier in the reactant channels to predict the flooding of the cell or the drying-out of the membrane. An ex-situ study has been undertaken to quantify the liquid water present in the reactant channels. A new parameter, the Area Coverage Ratio (ACR), has been defined to identify the interfacial area of the reactant channel which is blocked for reactant transport by the presence of liquid water. A parametric study has been conducted to study the effect of changing temperature and the inlet relative humidity on the ACR. The ACR decreases with increase in current density as the gas flow rates increase, removing water more efficiently. With increase in temperature, the ACR decreases rapidly, such that by 60°C, there is no significant ACR to be reported. Inlet relative humidity of the gases does change the saturation of the gases in the channel, but did not show any significant effect on the ACR. Automotive powertrains, which is the target for this work, are continuously faced with transient changes. Water management under transient operating conditions is significantly more challenging and has not been investigated in detail. This study begins to investigate the effects of changing operating conditions on liquid water transport through the reactant channels. It has been identified that rapidly increasing temperature leads to the dry-out of the membrane and rapidly cooling the cell below 55°C results in the start of cell flooding. In changing the operating load of the PEMFC, overshoot in the pressure drop in the reactant channel has been identified for the first time as part of this investigation. A parametric study has been conducted to identify the factors which influence this overshoot behavior.

  6. Modeling Meandering Channel by Two-Dimensional Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Duan, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    This research is to simulate the process of channel meandering using a two-dimensional depth-averaged hydrodynamic model. The multiple interactions between unsteady flow, turbulence, secondary flow, nonequilibrium sediment transport and bank erosion are considered by the model. The governing equations are the 2D depth-averaged Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (2D-RANS) equations and the Exner equation for bed elevation evolution. The Reynolds stresses are calculated by the k-? turbulence model. The secondary flow, is modeled by the dispersion terms in momentum equations. The spatial lag between the instantaneous flow properties and the rate of sediment transport is simulated by the nonequilibrium sediment transport model. During the process of adaptation, the sediment transport rate gradually develops into the transport capacity of a given flow condition. The evolution of channel bed and bank is modeled by the general Exner equation that accounts for both vertical deformation of bed elevation as well as lateral migration of bank. The system of governing equations is solved by a semi-implicit finite volume method over the Cartesian mesh. The advective fluxes across each cell interface are simultaneously calculated by the extended HLL Riemann solver. At each time step, the diffusion terms in the governing equations are solved by the implicit Euler scheme. The source terms are discretized in a well-balanced way to retain the C-property of the proposed model. Application of the model to different test cases indicates that the model can correctly simulate different phases of meandering channel evolution which include streamwise migration, transverse migration and rotation of channel bends.

  7. Dependences of water permeation through cyclic octa-peptide nanotubes on channel length and membrane thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Fan, Jianfen; Cen, Min; Song, Xuezeng; Liu, Dongyan; Zhou, Weiqun; Liu, Zhao; Yan, Jianfeng

    2012-08-27

    Effects of the channel length and membrane thickness on the water permeation through the transmembrane cyclic octa-peptide nanotubes (octa-PNTs) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The water osmotic permeability (p(f)) through the PNTs of k × (WL)(4)/POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerophosphoethanolamine; k = 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10) was found to decay with the channel length (L) along the axis (~L(-2.0)). Energetic analysis showed that a series of water binding sites exist in these transmembrane PNTs, with the barriers of ~3k(B)T, which elucidates the tendency of p(f) well. Water diffusion permeability (p(d)) exhibits a relationship of ~L(-1.8), which results from the novel 1-2-1-2 structure of water chain in such confined nanolumens. In the range of simulation accuracy, the ratio (p(f)/p(d)) of the water osmotic and diffusion permeability is approximately a constant. MD simulations of water permeation through the transmembrane PNTs of 8 × (WL)(4)/octane with the different octane membrane thickness revealed that the water osmotic and diffusion permeability (p(f) and p(d)) are both independent of the octane membrane thickness, confirmed by the weak and nearly same interactions between the channel water and octane membranes with the different thickness. The results may be helpful for revealing the permeation mechanisms of biological water channels and designing artificial nanochannels. PMID:22834559

  8. AC conductance of transmembrane protein channels. The number of ionized residue mobile counterions at infinite dilution.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Eric N; White, Ryan J; Owens, Treggon G; Tang, John M; White, Henry S

    2007-08-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the AC and DC conductances of alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL) ion channels and outer membrane protein F (OmpF) porins in dilute ionic solutions is described. AC conductance measurements were performed by applying a 10 mV rms AC voltage across a suspended planar bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in the absence and presence of the protein and detecting the AC current response using phase-sensitive lock-in techniques. The conductances of individual alphaHL channels and OmpF porins were measured in symmetric KCl solutions containing between 5 and 1000 mM KCl. The AC and DC conductances of each protein were in agreement for all solution conditions, demonstrating the reliability of the AC method in single-channel recordings. Linear plots of conductance versus bulk KCl concentration for both proteins extrapolate to significant nonzero conductances (0.150 +/- 0.050 nS and 0.028 +/- 0.008 nS for OmpF and alphaHL, respectively) at infinite KCl dilution. The infinite dilution conductances are ascribed to mobile counterions of the ionizable residues within the protein lumens. A method of analyzing the plots of conductance vs KCl concentration is introduced that allows the determination of the concentration of mobile counterions associated with ionizable groups without knowledge of either the protein geometry or the ion mobilities. At neutral pH, an equivalent of 3 mobile counterions (K+ or Cl-) is estimated to contribute to the conductivity of the alphaHL channel. PMID:17602583

  9. Effect of ceramic membrane channel diameter on limiting retentate protein concentration during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Barbano, David M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of retentate flow channel diameter (4 or 6mm) of nongraded permeability 100-nm pore size ceramic membranes operated in nonuniform transmembrane pressure mode on the limiting retentate protein concentration (LRPC) while microfiltering (MF) skim milk at a temperature of 50°C, a flux of 55kg·m(-2)·h(-1), and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). At the above conditions, the retentate true protein concentration was incrementally increased from 7 to 11.5%. When temperature, flux, and average cross-flow velocity were controlled, ceramic membrane retentate flow channel diameter did not affect the LRPC. This indicates that LRPC is not a function of the Reynolds number. Computational fluid dynamics data, which indicated that both membranes had similar radial velocity profiles within their retentate flow channels, supported this finding. Membranes with 6-mm flow channels can be operated at a lower pressure decrease from membrane inlet to membrane outlet (?P) or at a higher cross-flow velocity, depending on which is controlled, than membranes with 4-mm flow channels. This implies that 6-mm membranes could achieve a higher LRPC than 4-mm membranes at the same ?P due to an increase in cross-flow velocity. In theory, the higher LRPC of the 6-mm membranes could facilitate 95% serum protein removal in 2 MF stages with diafiltration between stages if no serum protein were rejected by the membrane. At the same flux, retentate protein concentration, and average cross-flow velocity, 4-mm membranes require 21% more energy to remove a given amount of permeate than 6-mm membranes, despite the lower surface area of the 6-mm membranes. Equations to predict skim milk MF retentate viscosity as a function of protein concentration and temperature are provided. Retentate viscosity, retentate recirculation pump frequency required to maintain a given cross-flow velocity at a given retentate viscosity, and retentate protein determination by mid-infrared spectrophotometry were all useful tools for monitoring the retentate protein concentration to ensure a sustainable MF process. Using 6-mm membranes instead of 4-mm membranes would be advantageous for processors who wish to reduce energy costs or maximize the protein concentration of a MF retentate. PMID:26519975

  10. Viral M2 ion channel protein: a promising target for anti-influenza drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Pratheepa, V

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is an important RNA virus causing pandemics (Spanish Flu (1918), Asian Flu (1957), Hong Kong Flu (1968) and Swine Flu (2009)) over the last decades. Due to the spontaneous mutations of these viral proteins, currently available antiviral and anti-influenza drugs quickly develop resistance. To account this, only limited antiinfluenza drugs have been approved for the therapeutic use. These include amantadine and rimantadine (M2 proton channel blockers), zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir (neuraminidase inhibitors), favipravir (polymerase inhibitor) and laninamivir. This review provides an outline on the strategies to develop novel, potent chemotherapeutic agents against M2 proton channel. Primarily, the M2 proton channel blockers elicit pharmacological activity through destabilizing the helices by blocking the proton transport across the transmembrane. The biologically important compounds discovered using the scaffolds such as bisnoradmantane, noradamantane, triazine, spiroadamantane, isoxazole, amino alcohol, azaspiro, spirene, pinanamine, etc are reported to exhibit anti-influenza activity against wild or mutant type (S31N and V27A) of M2 proton channel protein. The reported studies explained that the adamantane based compounds (amantadine and rimantadine) strongly interact with His37 (through hydrogen bonding) and Ala30, Ile33 and Gly34 residues (hydrophobic interactions). The adamantane and the non-adamantane scaffolds fit perfectly in the active site pocket present in the wild type and the charged amino groups (ammonium) create positive electrostatic potential, which blocks the transport of protons across the pore. In the mutated proteins, larger or smaller binding pocket are created by small or large mutant residues, which do not allow the molecules fit in the active site. This causes the channel to be unblocked and the protons are allowed to transfer inside the pore. The structural analysis of the M2 proton channel blockers illustrated that the adamantane derivatives have action against both influenza A and B, but have no effect on the mutants. PMID:25342196

  11. AKAP79/150 signal complexes in G-protein modulation of neuronal ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Bal, Manjot; Bierbower, Sonya; Zaika, Oleg; Shapiro, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated M-type (KCNQ) K+ channels play critical roles in regulation of neuronal excitability. Previous work showed A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP)79/150-mediated protein kinase C phosphorylation of M channels to be involved in M current (IM) suppression by muscarinic M1, but not bradykinin B2 receptors. In this study, we first explored if purinergic and angiotensin suppression of IM in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) sympathetic neurons involves AKAP79/150. Transfection into rat SCG neurons of ?A-AKAP79, which lacks the A-domain necessary for PKC binding, or the absence of AKAP150 in AKAP150 (?/?) mice, did not affect IM suppression by purinergic agonist or by bradykinin, but reduced IM suppression by muscarinic agonist and angiotensin II. Transfection of AKAP79, but not ?A-AKAP79 or AKAP15, “rescued” suppression of IM by muscarinic receptors in AKAP150 (?/?) neurons. We also tested association of AKAP79 with M1, B2, P2Y6 and AT1 receptors, and KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 channels, via Förster resonance energy transfer on CHO cells under total internal refection fluorescence microscopy, which revealed substantial FRET between AKAP79 and M1 and AT1 receptors, and with the channels, but only weak FRET with P2Y6 or B2 receptors. The involvement of AKAP79/150 in Gq/11-coupled muscarinic regulation of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels and by cAMP/protein kinase A was also studied. We found AKAP79/150 to not play a role in the former, but to be necessary for forskolin-induced up-regulation of L-current. Thus, AKAP79/150 action correlates with the PIP2-depletion mode of IM suppression, but does not generalize to Gq/11-mediated inhibition of N- or L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:21562284

  12. From GTP and G proteins to TRPC channels: a personal account.

    PubMed

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2015-09-01

    By serendipity and good fortune, as a postdoctoral fellow in 1967, I landed at the right place at the right time, as I was allowed to investigate the mechanism by which hormones activate the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (then adenyl cyclase) in Martin Rodbell's Laboratory at the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. The work uncovered first, the existence of receptors separate from the enzyme and then, the existence of transduction mechanisms requiring guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) and Mg(2+). With my laboratory colleagues first and postdoctoral fellows after leaving NIH, I participated in the development of the field "signal transduction by G proteins," uncovered by molecular cloning several G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and became interested in both the molecular makeup of voltage-gated Ca channels and Ca2+ homeostasis downstream of activation of phospholipase C (PLC) by the Gq/11 signaling pathway. We were able to confirm the hypothesis that there would be mammalian homologues of the Drosophila "transient receptor potential" channel and discovered the existence of six of the seven mammalian genes, now called transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. In the present article, I summarize from a bird's eye view of what I feel were key findings along this path, not only from my laboratory but also from many others, that allowed for the present knowledge of cell signaling involving G proteins to evolve. Towards the end, I summarize roles of TRPC channels in health and disease. PMID:26377676

  13. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-? -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the ? -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  14. Isolation and identification of a sodium channel-inhibiting protein from eggs of black widow spiders.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Yan, Yizhong; Yu, Hai; Peng, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yiya; Hu, Weijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2014-04-01

    The eggs of black widow spider (L. tredecimguttatus) have been demonstrated to be rich in biologically active components that exhibit great research value and application foreground. In the present study, a protein toxin, named Latroeggtoxin-II, was isolated from the eggs using the combination of gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the protein was 28.69 kDa, and Edman degradation revealed that its N-terminal sequence was ESIQT STYVP NTPNQ KFDYE VGKDY-. After being abdominally injected into mice and P. americana, the protein could make the animals especially P. americana display a series of poisoning symptoms. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the protein could selectively inhibit tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, without significant effect on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channel currents. Using multiple proteomic strategies, the purified protein was shown to have only a few similarities to the existing proteins in the databases, suggesting that it was a novel protein isolated from the eggs of black widow spiders. PMID:24412150

  15. Claudins reign: The claudin/EMP/PMP22/? channel protein family in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Simske, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    The claudin family of integral membrane proteins was identified as the major protein component of the tight junctions in all vertebrates. Since their identification, claudins, and their associated pfam00822 superfamily of proteins have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes. Claudin homologs have been identified in invertebrates as well, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Recent studies demonstrate that the C. elegans claudins, clc-1-clc- 5, and similar proteins in the greater PMP22/EMP/claudin/voltage-gated calcium channel ? subunit family, including nsy-4, and vab-9, while highly divergent at a sequence level from each other and from the vertebrate claudins, in many cases play roles similar to those traditionally assigned to their vertebrate homologs. These include regulating cell adhesion and passage of small molecules through the paracellular space, channel activity, protein aggregation, sensitivity to pore-forming toxins, intercellular signaling, cell fate specification and dynamic changes in cell morphology. Study of claudin superfamily proteins in C. elegans should continue to provide clues as to how claudin family protein function has been adapted to perform diverse functions at specialized cell-cell contacts in metazoans. PMID:24665403

  16. Characterization of extended channel bioreactors for continuous-flow protein production

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, protein based therapeutics are an important class of drugs, used to treat a variety of medical conditions including cancer and autoimmune diseases. Requiring continuous cold storage, and having a limited shelf life, the ability to produce such therapeutics at the point-of-care would open up new opportunities in distributing medicines and treating patients in more remote locations. Here, the authors describe the first steps in the development of a microfluidic platform that can be used for point-of-care protein synthesis. While biologic medicines, including therapeutic proteins, are commonly produced using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology in large batch cell cultures, the system developed here utilizes cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) technology. CFPS is a scalable technology that uses cell extracts containing the biological machinery required for transcription and translation and combines those extracts with DNA, encoding a specific gene, and the additional metabolites required to produce proteins in vitro. While CFPS reactions are typically performed in batch or fed-batch reactions, a well-engineered reaction scheme may improve both the rate of protein production and the economic efficiency of protein synthesis reactions, as well as enable a more streamlined method for subsequent purification of the protein product—all necessary requirements for point-of-care protein synthesis. In this work, the authors describe a new bioreactor design capable of continuous production of protein using cell-free protein synthesis. The bioreactors were designed with three inlets to separate reactive components prior to on-chip mixing, which lead into a long, narrow, serpentine channel. These multiscale, serpentine channel bioreactors were designed to take advantage of microscale diffusion distances across narrow channels in reactors containing enough volume to produce a therapeutic dose of protein, and open the possibility of performing these reactions continuously and in line with downstream purification modules. Here, the authors demonstrate the capability to produce protein over time with continuous-flow reactions and examine basic design features and operation specifications fundamental to continuous microfluidic protein synthesis.

  17. Characterization of extended channel bioreactors for continuous-flow protein production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, protein based therapeutics are an important class of drugs, used to treat a variety of medical conditions including cancer and autoimmune diseases. Requiring continuous cold storage, and having a limited shelf life, the ability to produce such therapeutics at the point-of-care would open up new opportunities in distributing medicines and treating patients in more remote locations. Here, the authors describe the first steps in the development of a microfluidic platform that can be used for point-of-care protein synthesis. While biologic medicines, including therapeutic proteins, are commonly produced using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology in large batch cellmore » cultures, the system developed here utilizes cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) technology. CFPS is a scalable technology that uses cell extracts containing the biological machinery required for transcription and translation and combines those extracts with DNA, encoding a specific gene, and the additional metabolites required to produce proteins in vitro. While CFPS reactions are typically performed in batch or fed-batch reactions, a well-engineered reaction scheme may improve both the rate of protein production and the economic efficiency of protein synthesis reactions, as well as enable a more streamlined method for subsequent purification of the protein product—all necessary requirements for point-of-care protein synthesis. In this work, the authors describe a new bioreactor design capable of continuous production of protein using cell-free protein synthesis. The bioreactors were designed with three inlets to separate reactive components prior to on-chip mixing, which lead into a long, narrow, serpentine channel. These multiscale, serpentine channel bioreactors were designed to take advantage of microscale diffusion distances across narrow channels in reactors containing enough volume to produce a therapeutic dose of protein, and open the possibility of performing these reactions continuously and in line with downstream purification modules. Here, the authors demonstrate the capability to produce protein over time with continuous-flow reactions and examine basic design features and operation specifications fundamental to continuous microfluidic protein synthesis.« less

  18. Identification and characterisation of a functional aquaporin water channel (Anomala cuprea DRIP) in a coleopteran insect.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Tomone; Miyake, Seiji; Kosaki, Shiho; Azuma, Masaaki

    2013-07-15

    Water transport across the plasma membrane depends on the presence of the water channel aquaporin (AQP), which mediates the bulk movement of water through osmotic and pressure gradients. In terrestrial insects, which are solid and/or plant feeders, the entrance and exit of water is primarily executed along the alimentary tract, where the hindgut, particularly the rectum, is the major site of water conservation. A cDNA encoding the homologue of the water-specific Drosophila AQP [Drosophila integral protein (DRIP)] was identified through the RT-PCR of RNA isolated from the rectum of the cupreous chafer larvae, Anomala cuprea, a humus and plant root feeder. This gene (Anocu AQP1) has a predicted molecular mass of 26.471 kDa, similar to the DRIP clade of insect AQPs characterised from caterpillars, flies and several liquid-feeding insects. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, Anocu AQP1 showed the hallmarks of aquaporin-mediated water transport but no glycerol or urea permeability, and the reversible inhibition of elevated water transport through 1 mmol l(-1) HgCl2. This is the first experimental demonstration of the presence of a water-specific AQP, namely DRIP, in the Coleoptera. The genome of the model beetle Tribolium castaneum contains six putative AQP sequences, one of which (Trica-1a, XP_972862) showed the highest similarity to Anocu AQP1 (~60% amino acid identity). Anocu AQP1 is predominantly expressed in the rectum. Using a specific antibody raised against DRIP in the silkworm Bombyx mori (AQP-Bom1), Anocu AQP1 was localised to the apical plasma membrane of rectal epithelial cells, and lacking in the midgut and gastric caecal epithelia. Based on the BeetleBase prediction, there are three putative AQPs (Trica-3a, 3b, 3c: XP_970728, 970912, 970791) that are homologous to B. mori aquaglyceroporin [AQP-Bom2 (GLP)]. The immunocytochemical studies using the specific anti-peptide antibody against AQP-Bom2 revealed the presence of the GLP homologue at the apical plasma membrane of enterocytes in the midgut and gastric caeca. Thus, DRIP (Anocu AQP1) and the putative GLP share epithelial fluid-transporting roles along the alimentary tract in cupreous chafer larvae. PMID:23531819

  19. Mercury-sensitive water channels as possible sensors of water potentials in pollen.

    PubMed

    Shachar-Hill, Bruria; Hill, Adrian E; Powell, Janet; Skepper, Jeremy N; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2013-11-01

    The growing pollen tube is central to plant reproduction and is a long-standing model for cellular tip growth in biology. Rapid osmotically driven growth is maintained under variable conditions, which requires osmosensing and regulation. This study explores the mechanism of water entry and the potential role of osmosensory regulation in maintaining pollen growth. The osmotic permeability of the plasmalemma of Lilium pollen tubes was measured from plasmolysis rates to be 1.32±0.31×10(-3) cm s(-1). Mercuric ions reduce this permeability by 65%. Simulations using an osmotic model of pollen tube growth predict that an osmosensor at the cell membrane controls pectin deposition at the cell tip; inhibiting the sensor is predicted to cause tip bursting due to cell wall thinning. It was found that adding mercury to growing pollen tubes caused such a bursting of the tips. The model indicates that lowering the osmotic permeability per se does not lead to bursting but rather to thickening of the tip. The time course of induced bursting showed no time lag and was independent of mercury concentration, compatible with a surface site of action. The submaximal bursting response to intermediate mercuric ion concentration was independent of the concentration of calcium ions, showing that bursting is not due to a competitive inhibition of calcium binding or entry. Bursting with the same time course was also shown by cells growing on potassium-free media, indicating that potassium channels (implicated in mechanosensing) are not involved in the bursting response. The possible involvement of mercury-sensitive water channels as osmosensors and current knowledge of these in pollen cells are discussed. PMID:24098048

  20. Mercury-sensitive water channels as possible sensors of water potentials in pollen

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adrian E.

    2013-01-01

    The growing pollen tube is central to plant reproduction and is a long-standing model for cellular tip growth in biology. Rapid osmotically driven growth is maintained under variable conditions, which requires osmosensing and regulation. This study explores the mechanism of water entry and the potential role of osmosensory regulation in maintaining pollen growth. The osmotic permeability of the plasmalemma of Lilium pollen tubes was measured from plasmolysis rates to be 1.32±0.31×10–3 cm s–1. Mercuric ions reduce this permeability by 65%. Simulations using an osmotic model of pollen tube growth predict that an osmosensor at the cell membrane controls pectin deposition at the cell tip; inhibiting the sensor is predicted to cause tip bursting due to cell wall thinning. It was found that adding mercury to growing pollen tubes caused such a bursting of the tips. The model indicates that lowering the osmotic permeability per se does not lead to bursting but rather to thickening of the tip. The time course of induced bursting showed no time lag and was independent of mercury concentration, compatible with a surface site of action. The submaximal bursting response to intermediate mercuric ion concentration was independent of the concentration of calcium ions, showing that bursting is not due to a competitive inhibition of calcium binding or entry. Bursting with the same time course was also shown by cells growing on potassium-free media, indicating that potassium channels (implicated in mechanosensing) are not involved in the bursting response. The possible involvement of mercury-sensitive water channels as osmosensors and current knowledge of these in pollen cells are discussed. PMID:24098048

  1. CONCENTRATING TOXOPLASMA GONDII AND CYCLOSPORA CAYETANENSIS FROM SURFACE WATER AND DRINKING WATER BY CONTINUOUS SEPARATION CHANNEL CENTRIFUGATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of continuous separation channel centrifugation for concentrating Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetanensis from drinking water and environmental waters.Methods and Results: Ready-to-seed vials with known quantities of Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetane...

  2. Control of the Selectivity of the Aquaporin Water Channel Family by Global Orientational Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajkhorshid, Emad; Nollert, Peter; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Miercke, Larry J. W.; O'Connell, Joseph; Stroud, Robert M.; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-04-01

    Aquaporins are transmembrane channels found in cell membranes of all life forms. We examine their apparently paradoxical property, facilitation of efficient permeation of water while excluding protons, which is of critical importance to preserving the electrochemical potential across the cell membrane. We have determined the structure of the Escherichia coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF with bound water, in native (2.7 angstroms) and in W48F/F200T mutant (2.1 angstroms) forms, and carried out 12-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations that define the spatial and temporal probability distribution and orientation of a single file of seven to nine water molecules inside the channel. Two conserved asparagines force a central water molecule to serve strictly as a hydrogen bond donor to its neighboring water molecules. Assisted by the electrostatic potential generated by two half-membrane spanning loops, this dictates opposite orientations of water molecules in the two halves of the channel, and thus prevents the formation of a ``proton wire,'' while permitting rapid water diffusion. Both simulations and observations revealed a more regular distribution of channel water and an increased water permeability for the W48F/F200T mutant.

  3. The AQP-3 water channel is a pivotal modulator of glycerol-induced chloride channel activation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Deng, Zhiqin; Yang, Lili; Luo, Hai; Liu, Shanwen; Li, Yuan; Wei, Yan; Peng, Shuang; Zhu, Linyan; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) and chloride channels are ubiquitous in virtually all living cells, playing pivotal roles in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. We previously reported that AQP-3 aquaglyceroporin and ClC-3 chloride channels could form complexes to regulate cell volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. In this study, the roles of AQP-3 in their hetero-complexes were further investigated. Glycerol entered the cells via AQP-3 and induced two different Cl(-) currents through cell swelling-dependent or -independent pathways. The swelling-dependent Cl(-) current was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA. After siRNA-induced AQP-3 knock-down, the 140mM glycerol isoosmotic solution swelled cells by 22% (45% in AQP-3-intact cells) and induced a smaller Cl(-) current; this current was smaller than that activated by 8% cell volume swelling, which induced by the 140mM glycerol hyperosmotic solution in AQP-3-intact cells. This suggests that the interaction between AQP-3 and ClC-3 plays an important role in cell volume regulation and that AQP-3 may be a modulator that opens volume-regulated chloride channels. The swelling-independent Cl(-) current, which was activated by extracellular glycerol, was reduced by CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA pretreatment. Dialyzing glycerol into cells via the pipette directly induced the swelling-independent Cl(-) current; however this current was blocked by AQP-3 down-regulation, suggesting AQP-3 is essential for the opening of chloride channels. In conclusion, AQP-3 is the pathway for water, glycerol and other small solutes to enter cells, and it may be an essential modulator for the gating of chloride channels. PMID:26794461

  4. Asymmetric fluxes of water and sediments in a mesotidal mudflat channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a small tributary channel and its adjacent mudflat is studied in Willapa Bay, Washington State, USA. Velocity profiles and water levels are simultaneously measured at different locations in the channel and on the mudflat for two weeks. The above tidal flat and channel hydrodynamics differ remarkably during the tidal cycle. When the water surface level is above the tidal flat elevation, the channel is inactive. At this stage, the above tidal flat flow is predominantly aligned along the Bay axis, oscillating with the tide as a standing wave with peak velocities up to 0.3 m/s. When the mudflat becomes emergent, the flow concentrates in the channel. During this stage, current velocities up to 1 m/s are measured during ebb; and up to 0.6 m/s during flood. Standard equations for open-channel flow are utilized to study the channel hydrodynamics. From the continuity equation, a lateral inflow is predicted during ebb, which likely originates from the drainage of the mudflat through the lateral runnels. Both advective acceleration and lateral discharge terms, estimated directly from the velocity profiles, play a significant role in the momentum equation. The computed drag coefficient for bottom friction is small, due to an absence of vegetation and bottom bedforms in the channel. Sediment fluxes are calculated by combining flow and suspended sediment concentration estimated using the acoustic backscatter signal of the instruments. A net export of the sediment from the channel is found during ebb, which is not balanced by the sediment import during flood. When the mudflat is submerged, ebb-flood asymmetries in suspended sediment concentration are present, leading to a net sediment flux toward the inner part of the Willapa Bay. Finally, a residual flow is detected inside the channel at high slack water, probably associated with the thermohaline circulation.

  5. A single Gbeta subunit locus controls cross-talk between protein kinase C and G protein regulation of N-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Doering, Clinton J; Kisilevsky, Alexandra E; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Arnot, Michelle I; Peloquin, Jean; Hamid, Jawed; Barr, Wendy; Nirdosh, Aparna; Simms, Brett; Winkfein, Robert J; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2004-07-01

    The modulation of N-type calcium channels is a key factor in the control of neurotransmitter release. Whereas N-type channels are inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits in a G protein beta-isoform-dependent manner, channel activity is typically stimulated by activation of protein kinase C (PKC). In addition, there is cross-talk among these pathways, such that PKC-dependent phosphorylation of the Gbetagamma target site on the N-type channel antagonizes subsequent G protein inhibition, albeit only for Gbeta(1)-mediated responses. The molecular mechanisms that control this G protein beta subunit subtype-specific regulation have not been described. Here, we show that G protein inhibition of N-type calcium channels is critically dependent on two separate but adjacent approximately 20-amino acid regions of the Gbeta subunit, plus a highly conserved Asn-Tyr-Val motif. These regions are distinct from those implicated previously in Gbetagamma signaling to other effectors such as G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels, phospholipase beta(2), and adenylyl cyclase, thus raising the possibility that the specificity for G protein signaling to calcium channels might rely on unique G protein structural determinants. In addition, we identify a highly specific locus on the Gbeta(1) subunit that serves as a molecular detector of PKC-dependent phosphorylation of the G protein target site on the N-type channel alpha(1) subunit, thus providing for a molecular basis for G protein-PKC cross-talk. Overall, our results significantly advance our understanding of the molecular details underlying the integration of G protein and PKC signaling pathways at the level of the N-type calcium channel alpha(1) subunit. PMID:15105422

  6. Chloride channels in cancer: Focus on chloride intracellular channel 1 and 4 (CLIC1 AND CLIC4) proteins in tumor development and as novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Peretti, Marta; Angelini, Marina; Savalli, Nicoletta; Florio, Tullio; Yuspa, Stuart H; Mazzanti, Michele

    2015-10-01

    In recent decades, growing scientific evidence supports the role of ion channels in the development of different cancers. Both potassium selective pores and chloride permeabilities are considered the most active channels during tumorigenesis. High rate of proliferation, active migration, and invasiveness into non-neoplastic tissues are specific properties of neoplastic transformation. All these actions require partial or total involvement of chloride channel activity. In this context, this class of membrane proteins could represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of resistant tumors. However, this encouraging premise has not so far produced any valid new channel-targeted antitumoral molecule for cancer treatment. Problematic for drug design targeting ion channels is their vital role in normal cells for essential physiological functions. By targeting these membrane proteins involved in pathological conditions, it is inevitable to cause relevant side effects in healthy organs. In light of this, a new protein family, the chloride intracellular channels (CLICs), could be a promising class of therapeutic targets for its intrinsic individualities: CLIC1 and CLIC4, in particular, not only are overexpressed in specific tumor types or their corresponding stroma but also change localization and function from hydrophilic cytosolic to integral transmembrane proteins as active ionic channels or signal transducers during cell cycle progression in certain cases. These changes in intracellular localization, tissue compartments, and channel function, uniquely associated with malignant transformation, may offer a unique target for cancer therapy, likely able to spare normal cells. This article is part of a special issue itled "Membrane Channels and Transporters in Cancers." PMID:25546839

  7. Experimental observation of trapped modes in a water wave channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobelli, P. J.; Pagneux, V.; Maurel, A.; Petitjeans, P.

    2009-10-01

    The fluid around a free surface piercing circular cylinder in a long narrow wave tank can exhibit a local oscillation that does not propagate down the channel but is confined to the vicinity of the cylinder. This is a manifestation of the so-called trapped modes, bound states in the continuum occurring in many situations in physics. In this letter, using Fourier Transform Profilometry, fully space time resolved measurements for the free surface deformation are obtained. The scattering characteristics of the cylinder and consequently the behavior of the trapped-mode frequency are determined.

  8. A Role for VAMP8/Endobrevin in Surface Deployment of the Water Channel Aquaporin 2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Chun; Ng, Chee Peng; Shi, Hong; Liew, Hwee Chien; Guo, Ke; Zeng, Qi; Hong, Wanjin

    2010-01-01

    Vesicle-associated-membrane protein 8 (VAMP8) is highly expressed in the kidney, but the exact physiological and molecular functions executed by this v-SNARE protein in nephrons remain elusive. Here, we show that the depletion of VAMP8 in mice resulted in hydronephrosis. Furthermore, the level of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) was increased by three- to fivefold in VAMP8-null mice. Forskolin and [desamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (DDAVP)-induced AQP2 exocytosis was impaired in VAMP8-null collecting duct cells. VAMP8 was revealed to colocalize with AQP2 on intracellular vesicles and to interact with the plasma membrane t-SNARE proteins syntaxin4 and syntaxin3, suggesting that VAMP8 mediates the regulated fusion of AQP2-positive vesicles with the plasma membrane. PMID:19841070

  9. The dynamical crossover phenomenon in bulk water, confined water and protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Baglioni, Piero; Fratini, Emiliano; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-15

    We discuss a phenomenon regarding water that was until recently a subject of scientific controversy, i.e. the dynamical crossover from fragile-to-strong glass-forming material, for both bulk and protein hydration water. Such a crossover is characterized by a temperature T(L) at which significant dynamical changes occur, such as violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation and changes of behaviour of homologous transport parameters such as the density relaxation time and the viscosity. In this respect we will consider carefully the dynamic properties of water-protein systems. More precisely, we will study proteins and their hydration water as far as bulk and confined water. In order to clarify the controversy we will discuss in a comparative way many previous and new experimental data that have emerged using different techniques and molecular dynamic simulation (MD). We point out the reasons for the different dynamical findings from the use of different experimental techniques. PMID:22277288

  10. Gating of a G protein-sensitive Mammalian Kir3.1 Prokaryotic Kir Channel Chimera in Planar Lipid Bilayers*

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Pinto, Edgar; Gómez-Llorente, Yacob; Sundaram, Shobana; Tang, Qiong-Yao; Ivanova-Nikolova, Tatyana; Mahajan, Rahul; Baki, Lia; Zhang, Zhe; Chavez, Jose; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2010-01-01

    Kir3 channels control heart rate and neuronal excitability through GTP-binding (G) protein and phosphoinositide signaling pathways. These channels were the first characterized effectors of the ?? subunits of G proteins. Because we currently lack structures of complexes between G proteins and Kir3 channels, their interactions leading to modulation of channel function are not well understood. The recent crystal structure of a chimera between the cytosolic domain of a mammalian Kir3.1 and the transmembrane region of a prokaryotic KirBac1.3 (Kir3.1 chimera) has provided invaluable structural insight. However, it was not known whether this chimera could form functional K+ channels. Here, we achieved the functional reconstitution of purified Kir3.1 chimera in planar lipid bilayers. The chimera behaved like a bona fide Kir channel displaying an absolute requirement for PIP2 and Mg2+-dependent inward rectification. The channel could also be blocked by external tertiapin Q. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the chimera by single particle electron microscopy revealed a structure consistent with the crystal structure. Channel activity could be stimulated by ethanol and activated G proteins. Remarkably, the presence of both activated G? and G?? subunits was required for gating of the channel. These results confirm the Kir3.1 chimera as a valid structural and functional model of Kir3 channels. PMID:20937804

  11. Phospholipase C not protein kinase C is required for the activation of TRPC5 channels by cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Kurada, Lalitha; Cilz, Nicholas I; Porter, James E; Lei, Saobo

    2012-08-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the brain where it interacts with two G protein-coupled receptors (CCK1 and CCK2). Both types of CCK receptors are coupled to G(q/11) proteins resulting in increased function of phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. Whereas CCK has been suggested to increase neuronal excitability in the brain via activation of cationic channels, the types of cationic channels have not yet been identified. Here, we co-expressed CCK2 receptors and TRPC5 channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and studied the effects of CCK on TRPC5 channels using patch-clamp techniques. Our results demonstrate that activation of CCK2 receptors robustly potentiates the function of TRPC5 channels. CCK-induced activation of TRPC5 channels requires the functions of G-proteins and PLC and depends on extracellular Ca(2+). The activation of TRPC5 channels mediated by CCK2 receptors is independent of IP(3) receptors and protein kinase C. CCK-induced opening of TRPC5 channels is not store-operated because application of thapsigargin to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores failed to alter CCK-induced TRPC5 channel currents significantly. Bath application of CCK also significantly increased the open probability of TRPC5 single channel currents in cell-attached patches. Because CCK exerts extensive effects in the brain, our results may provide a novel mechanism to explain its roles in modulating neuronal excitability. PMID:22683873

  12. A large iris-like expansion of a mechanosensitive channel protein induced by membrane tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betanzos, Monica; Chiang, Chien-Sung; Guy, H. Robert; Sukharev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    MscL, a bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, is the first structurally characterized mechanosensor protein. Molecular models of its gating mechanisms are tested here. Disulfide crosslinking shows that M1 transmembrane alpha-helices in MscL of resting Escherichia coli are arranged similarly to those in the crystal structure of MscL from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An expanded conformation was trapped in osmotically shocked cells by the specific bridging between Cys 20 and Cys 36 of adjacent M1 helices. These bridges stabilized the open channel. Disulfide bonds engineered between the M1 and M2 helices of adjacent subunits (Cys 32-Cys 81) do not prevent channel gating. These findings support gating models in which interactions between M1 and M2 of adjacent subunits remain unaltered while their tilts simultaneously increase. The MscL barrel, therefore, undergoes a large concerted iris-like expansion and flattening when perturbed by membrane tension.

  13. The use of optical biosensors to detect modulation of Slack potassium channels by G-protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew R.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ion to flow through the plasma membrane. In order to regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex. Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins generally provide little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. We have now used a novel label-free technology to detect changes in the distribution of mass close to the plasma membrane following modulation of potassium channels by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). This technology uses optical sensors embedded in microplates to detect changes in the refractive index at the surface of cells. Although the activation of GPCRs has been studied with this system, protein-protein interactions due to modulation of ion channels have not yet been characterized. Here we present data that the characteristic pattern of mass distribution following GPCR activation is significantly modified by the presence of a sodium-activated potassium channel, Slack-B, a channel that is known to be potently modulated by activation of these receptors. PMID:19640220

  14. The threshold of vapor channel formation in water induced by pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenqing; Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Water plays an important role in laser ablation. There are two main interpretations of laser-water interaction: hydrokinetic effect and vapor phenomenon. The two explanations are reasonable in some way, but they can't explain the mechanism of laser-water interaction completely. In this study, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation induced by pulsed CO2 laser in static water layer was monitored by high-speed camera. The wavelength of pulsed CO2 laser is 10.64 um, and pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. The laser power ranged from 1 to 7 W with a step of 0.5 W. The frame rate of high-speed camera used in the experiment was 80025 fps. Based on high-speed camera pictures, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation was examined, and the threshold of vapor channel formation, pulsation period, the volume, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel were determined. The results showed that the threshold of vapor channel formation was about 2.5 W. Moreover, pulsation period, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel increased with the increasing of the laser power.

  15. Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) Films as Processing Platforms for Protein Analysis by Matrix-Assisted Laser/Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Jennifer J.; Manard, Benjamin T.; Kowalski, Paul J.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films have parallel, ?m-sized channels that induce solution wicking via capillary action. Efficient mass transport from the solution phase to the channel surface leads to adsorption of hydrophobic protein solutes. The basic premise by which C-CP films can be used as media to manipulate analyte solutions (e.g., proteins in buffer), for the purpose of desalting or chromatographic separation prior to MALDI-MS analysis is presented here. Cytochrome c and myoglobin prepared in a Tris-HCl buffer, and ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and transferrin prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), are used as the test solutions to demonstrate the desalting concept. Protein analysis is performed after deposition on a C-CP film with and without a water washing step, followed by spray deposition of a typical sinapinic acid matrix. Extracted MALDI mass spectra exhibit much improved signal-to-noise characteristics after water washing. A mixture of cytochrome c and myoglobin (2 ?L of 2.5 ?M each in Tris-HCl buffer) was applied, washed with water and spatially separated via simple capillary action (wicking) using a reversed-phase solvent composition of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in 50:50 acetonitrile (ACN):H2O. Subsequent application of sinapinic acid followed by imaging of the film using MALDI-MS reveals that as the protein solution is wicked down the film, separation occurs.

  16. Cooling of vertical heat-generating channels in steam-water counterflows

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyukhin, Yu.N.; Balunov, B.F.; Smirnov, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental research was conducted on a heat-emission crisis when water is boiling in vertical tubes with one closed end. This crisis is the result of a hydrodynamic crisis (''flooding'') of steam-water counterflows, which leads to a reduction in the flow rate of the downward-flowing water in the channel. An equation is given for determining the time interval between the moment that flooding starts until the moment that the surface temperature of the heat-generating channel begins to rise. A calculated function for determining the critical thermal flux is given and is compared with experimental data.

  17. Effect of channel catfish stocking rate on yield and water quality in an intensive production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of stocking rate on production of NWAC 103 strain channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and water quality was investigated using a completely randomized design in an intensively managed biofloc raceway system. Each of the 9 HDPE-lined raceways (4.6 m x 9.2 m with a 0.9-m water depth; 42.2...

  18. Remote Sensing of Water Vapor and Thin Cirrus Clouds using MODIS Near-IR Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major facility instrument on board the Terra Spacecraft, was successfully launched into space in December of 1999. MODIS has several near-IR channels within and around the 0.94 micrometer water vapor bands for remote sensing of integrated atmospheric water vapor over land and above clouds. MODIS also has a special near-IR channel centered at 1.375-micron with a width of 30 nm for remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In this paper, we describe briefly the physical principles on remote sensing of water vapor and cirrus clouds using these channels. We also present sample water vapor images and cirrus cloud images obtained from MODIS data.

  19. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1? were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1? was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  20. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  1. Using Ion Channel-Forming Peptides to Quantify Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Michael; Semetey, Vincent; Gitlin, Irina; Yang, Jerry; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for sensing affinity interactions by triggering disruption of self-assembly of ion channel-forming peptides in planar lipid bilayers. It shows that the binding of a derivative of alamethicin carrying a covalently attached sulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) resulted in the inhibition of ion channel conductance through the bilayer. We propose that the binding of the bulky CA II protein (MW ~30 kD) to the ion channel-forming peptides (MW ~2.5 kD) either reduced the tendency of these peptides to self-assemble into a pore, or extracted them from the bilayer altogether. In both outcomes, the interactions between the protein and the ligand lead to a disruption of self-assembled pores. Addition of a competitive inhibitor – 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide – to the solution released CA II from the alamethicin-sulfonamide conjugate and restored the current flow across the bilayer by allowing reassembly of the ion channels in the bilayer. Time-averaged recordings of the current over discrete time intervals made it possible to quantify this monovalent ligand binding interaction. This method gave a dissociation constant of ~2 µM for the binding of CA II to alamethicin-sulfonamide in the bilayer recording chamber: this value is consistent with a value obtained independently with CA II and a related sulfonamide derivative by isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:18179217

  2. An outer membrane channel protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with exotoxin activity

    PubMed Central

    Danilchanka, Olga; Sun, Jim; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Maueröder, Christian; Speer, Alexander; Siroy, Axel; Marrero, Joeli; Trujillo, Carolina; Mayhew, David L.; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Muñoz, Luis E.; Herrmann, Martin; Ehrt, Sabine; Berens, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the timing and mode of host cell death plays a pivotal role in microbial infections. Many bacteria use toxins to kill host cells and evade immune responses. Such toxins are unknown in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Virulent M. tuberculosis strains induce necrotic cell death in macrophages by an obscure molecular mechanism. Here we show that the M. tuberculosis protein Rv3903c (channel protein with necrosis-inducing toxin, CpnT) consists of an N-terminal channel domain that is used for uptake of nutrients across the outer membrane and a secreted toxic C-terminal domain. Infection experiments revealed that CpnT is required for survival and cytotoxicity of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpnT causes necrotic cell death in eukaryotic cells. Thus, CpnT has a dual function in uptake of nutrients and induction of host cell death by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24753609

  3. An outer membrane channel protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with exotoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Danilchanka, Olga; Sun, Jim; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Maueröder, Christian; Speer, Alexander; Siroy, Axel; Marrero, Joeli; Trujillo, Carolina; Mayhew, David L; Doornbos, Kathryn S; Muñoz, Luis E; Herrmann, Martin; Ehrt, Sabine; Berens, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The ability to control the timing and mode of host cell death plays a pivotal role in microbial infections. Many bacteria use toxins to kill host cells and evade immune responses. Such toxins are unknown in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Virulent M. tuberculosis strains induce necrotic cell death in macrophages by an obscure molecular mechanism. Here we show that the M. tuberculosis protein Rv3903c (channel protein with necrosis-inducing toxin, CpnT) consists of an N-terminal channel domain that is used for uptake of nutrients across the outer membrane and a secreted toxic C-terminal domain. Infection experiments revealed that CpnT is required for survival and cytotoxicity of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpnT causes necrotic cell death in eukaryotic cells. Thus, CpnT has a dual function in uptake of nutrients and induction of host cell death by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24753609

  4. Preparation of semi-solid aluminum alloy slurry poured through a water-cooled serpentine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng-Zhou; Mao, Wei-Min; Wu, Zong-Chuang

    2012-01-01

    A water-cooled serpentine channel pouring process was invented to produce semi-solid A356 aluminum alloy slurry for rheocasting, and the effects of pouring temperature and circulating cooling water flux on the microstructure of the slurry were investigated. The results show that at the pouring temperature of 640-680°C and the circulating cooling water flux of 0.9 m3/h, the semi-solid A356 aluminum alloy slurry with spherical primary ?(Al) grains can be obtained, whose shape factors are between 0.78 and 0.86 and the grain diameter can reach 48-68 ?m. When the pouring temperatures are at 660-680°C, only a very thin solidified shell remains inside the serpentine channel and can be removed easily. When the serpentine channel is cooled with circulating water, the microstructure of the semi-solid slurry can be improved, and the serpentine channel is quickly cooled to room temperature after the completion of one pouring. In terms of the productivity of the special equipment, the water-cooled serpentine channel is economical and efficient.

  5. Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rotin, D

    2000-09-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays a key role in the regulation of fluid absorption in the kidney, lung, colon and exocrine glands, and in the regulation of blood pressure. Abnormal functioning of ENaC is associated with several human diseases, including pseudohypoaldosteronism type I, Liddle's syndrome, pulmonary edema, and cystic fibrosis. ENaC is regulated by several hormones, ions and accessory proteins. This review focuses on the regulation of ENaC by recently described accessory proteins, mainly Nedd4, syntaxin 1A, CFTR, sgk, K-Ras2A and Cap-1. PMID:10990373

  6. PROFILE: Hungry Water: Effects of Dams and Gravel Mining on River Channels

    PubMed

    Kondolf

    1997-07-01

    / Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream). Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources.KEY WORDS: Dams; Aquatic habitat; Sediment transport; Erosion; Sedimentation; Gravel mining PMID:9175542

  7. Hungry water: Effects of dams and gravel mining on river channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kondolf, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream), Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources. 80 refs., 17 figs.

  8. A high-frequency warm shallow water acoustic communications channel model and measurements.

    PubMed

    Chitre, Mandar

    2007-11-01

    Underwater acoustic communication is a core enabling technology with applications in ocean monitoring using remote sensors and autonomous underwater vehicles. One of the more challenging underwater acoustic communication channels is the medium-range very shallow warm-water channel, common in tropical coastal regions. This channel exhibits two key features-extensive time-varying multipath and high levels of non-Gaussian ambient noise due to snapping shrimp-both of which limit the performance of traditional communication techniques. A good understanding of the communications channel is key to the design of communication systems. It aids in the development of signal processing techniques as well as in the testing of the techniques via simulation. In this article, a physics-based channel model for the very shallow warm-water acoustic channel at high frequencies is developed, which are of interest to medium-range communication system developers. The model is based on ray acoustics and includes time-varying statistical effects as well as non-Gaussian ambient noise statistics observed during channel studies. The model is calibrated and its accuracy validated using measurements made at sea. PMID:18189549

  9. Unidirectionally migrating deep-water channels: Architectural styles and flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C.; Steel, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Xu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    3D seismic data are used to investigate flow processes and sedimentation in deep-water slope channels of an alternate type characterized by short and straight channel courses, a lack of levees, and absence of any coeval fans. The study allows a picture of unusual flow processes in submarine channels. The studied channels can be divided into two discrete segments: (1) Upper segments are characterized by low aspect ratio(W/T), little lateral offset (Lm), and low migration/aggradation ratios (Lm/Va). These upper segment channels build vertically-stacked channel-complex sets (CCSs), each of which is characterized by a facies transition from fine-grained sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and then shale drapes. Energetic sediment density flows triggered by fluid escape and/or strong wave action were well able to bypass sediment and to mask relatively weak bottom currents, yielding deep-water channels characterized by little lateral offset and dominantly aggradational stacking patterns. (2) Lower segments are characterized by higher W/T, wide lateral offset (Lm), and high Lm/Va. They consist of laterally-migrated CCSs, each of which consists of fine-grained reworked sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and, finally, shale drapes. Bottom currents restricted within the channels would have induced a tilt of the interface between turbidity currents and the overriding bottom currents (Wedderburn number > 1). This would have deflected turbidity currents downward and back toward the gentle channel bank, thus causing channel migration (the steep bank) by ~2° to 15°, and yielding a helical flow circulation composed of a high-velocity zone along the steep bank and a low-velocity zone along the gentle bank. This bottom current-induced helical flow circulation promoted deposition on the gentle bank, but it favored erosion on the steep banke, yielding deep-water channels exhibiting wide lateral offset and dominantly laterally-offset stacking patterns. Sediment supplied to the studied channels was therefore sorted, winnowed and swept along the steep bank by the high-velocity zone along this bank, yielding bottom current-reworked sands that that are preferentially disturbed along the steep bank of the studied channels.

  10. Polypyrrole-supported membrane proteins for bio-inspired ion channels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; del Valle, Luis J; Armelin, Elaine; Michaux, Catherine; Roussel, Guillaume; Perpète, Eric A; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-01-28

    Biomedical platforms constructed by immobilizing membrane proteins in matrixes made of synthetic organic polymers is a challenge because the structure and function of these proteins are affected by environmental conditions. In this work, an operative composite that regulates the diffusion of alkali ions has been prepared by functionalizing a supporting matrix made of poly(N-methylpyrrole) (PNMPy) with a ?-barrel membrane protein (Omp2a) that forms channels and pores. The protein has been unequivocally identified in the composite, and its structure has been shown to remain unaltered. The PNMPy-Omp2a platform fulfills properties typically associated with functional bio-interfaces with biomedical applications (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegrabadility, and hydrophilicity). The functionality of the immobilized protein has been examined by studying the passive ion transport response in the presence of electrolytic solutions with Na(+) and K(+) concentrations close to those found in blood. Although the behavior of PNMPy and PNMPy-Omp2a is very similar for solutions with very low concentration, the resistance of the latter decreases drastically when the concentration of ions increases to ?100 mM. This reduction reflects an enhanced ion exchange between the biocomposite and the electrolytic medium, which is not observed in PNMPy, evidencing that PNMPy-Omp2a is particularly well suited to prepare bioinspired channels and smart biosensors. PMID:25585165

  11. Golgi Anti-apoptotic Proteins Are Highly Conserved Ion Channels That Affect Apoptosis and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guia; Saraiva, Nuno; Parsons, Maddy; Byrne, Bernadette; Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Golgi anti-apoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are multitransmembrane proteins that are expressed in the Golgi apparatus and are able to homo-oligomerize. They are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and are present in some prokaryotes and orthopoxviruses. Within eukaryotes, GAAPs regulate the Ca2+ content of intracellular stores, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell adhesion and migration. Data presented here demonstrate that purified viral GAAPs (vGAAPs) and human Bax inhibitor 1 form ion channels and that vGAAP from camelpox virus is selective for cations. Mutagenesis of vGAAP, including some residues conserved in the recently solved structure of a related bacterial protein, BsYetJ, altered the conductance (E207Q and D219N) and ion selectivity (E207Q) of the channel. Mutation of residue Glu-207 or -178 reduced the effects of GAAP on cell migration and adhesion without affecting protection from apoptosis. In contrast, mutation of Asp-219 abrogated the anti-apoptotic activity of GAAP but not its effects on cell migration and adhesion. These results demonstrate that GAAPs are ion channels and define residues that contribute to the ion-conducting pore and affect apoptosis, cell adhesion, and migration independently. PMID:25713081

  12. Manipulating L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes using split-intein protein transsplicing.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Prakash; Chang, Donald D; Fang, Kun; Xie, Wenjun; Marks, Andrew R; Colecraft, Henry M

    2013-09-17

    Manipulating expression of large genes (>6 kb) in adult cardiomyocytes is challenging because these cells are only efficiently transduced by viral vectors with a 4-7 kb packaging capacity. This limitation impedes understanding structure-function mechanisms of important proteins in heart. L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) regulate diverse facets of cardiac physiology including excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and gene expression. Many important questions about how LTCCs mediate such multidimensional signaling are best resolved by manipulating expression of the 6.6 kb pore-forming ?1C-subunit in adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we use split-intein-mediated protein transsplicing to reconstitute LTCC ?1C-subunit from two distinct halves, overcoming the difficulty of expressing full-length ?1C in cardiomyocytes. Split-intein-tagged ?1C fragments encoding dihydropyridine-resistant channels were incorporated into adenovirus and reconstituted in cardiomyocytes. Similar to endogenous LTCCs, recombinant channels targeted to dyads, triggered Ca(2+) transients, associated with caveolin-3, and supported ?-adrenergic regulation of excitation-contraction coupling. This approach lowers a longstanding technical hurdle to manipulating large proteins in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24003157

  13. Microfluidic Protein Patterning on Silicon Nitride Using Solvent Extracted Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Channels

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinya; Dandy, David S.; Henry, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Biomolecular patterning is essential for the creation of sensing motifs that rely on receptor-ligand binding for selectivity. Microfluidic devices have the potential to aid in the development of simple, robust methods for biomolecular patterning and therefore contribute to the generation of protein, DNA, and cell microarrays. In microfluidic patterning, the choice of both substrate and microfluidic channel material is essential for control of both the receptor binding for maximal signal generation as well as non-specific adsorption that acts as chemical noise. In this study, polystyrene, glass, silicon nitride, and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were evaluated as substrates for protein patterning using two types of PDMS microchannels for patterning, native PDMS and solvent-extracted PDMS (E-PDMS). E-PDMS microfluidic channels resulted in better patterning characteristics than native PDMS channels as determined by a higher fluorescence intensity of immobilized protein on all substrate types tested. Microfluidic patterning was then applied to perform two- and four-layer immunoassays. PMID:19238185

  14. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  15. Chemical synthesis approaches to the engineering of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kochendoerfer, Gerd G; Clayton, Daniel; Becker, Christian

    2005-11-01

    Chemoselective ligation strategies have previously provided synthetic access to water-soluble proteins with novel properties, and more recently these strategies have been used to prepare ion channels. Examples of ion channels prepared by total chemical synthesis include bacterial mechanosensitive channels, and viral ion channels. Chemical protein synthesis allows for the generation of ion channel proteins with both native, and engineered structural or conductance properties. PMID:16305542

  16. Ion channels in secretory granules of the pancreas and their role in exocytosis and release of secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Regulated secretion in exocrine and neuroendocrine cells occurs through exocytosis of secretory granules and the subsequent release of stored small molecules and proteins. The introduction of biophysical techniques with high temporal and spatial resolution, and the identification of Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent "docking" and "fusion" proteins, has greatly enhanced our understanding of exocytosis. The cloning of families of ion channel proteins, including intracellular ion channels, has also revived interest in the role of secretory granule ion channels in exocytotic secretion. Thus secretory granules of pancreatic acinar cell express a ClC-2 Cl(-) channel, a HCO-permeable member of the CLCA Ca(2+)-dependent anion channel family, and a KCNQ1 K(+) channel. Evidence suggests that these channels may facilitate the release of digestive enzymes and/or prevent exocytosed granules from collapsing during "kiss and run" recycling. In pancreatic beta-cells, a granular ClC-3 Cl(-) channel provides a shunt pathway for a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase. Acidification "primes" the granules for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and release of insulin. In summary, secretory granules are equipped with specific sets of ion channels, which modulate regulated exocytosis and the release of macromolecules. These channels could represent excellent targets for therapeutic interventions to control exocytotic secretion in relevant diseases, such as pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, or diabetes mellitus. PMID:12176723

  17. A single WW domain is the predominant mediator of the interaction between the human ubiquitin-protein ligase Nedd4 and the human epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Lott, J Shaun; Coddington-Lawson, Sarah J; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; McDonald, Fiona J

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is required for the maintenance of salt and water balance in the body. Channel activity is regulated by the ubiquitin-protein ligase Nedd4 ['neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated (gene 4)'] that interacts with the channel via its WW domains. Mutations in channel subunits that disrupt this interaction cause Liddle's syndrome, a severe inherited form of hypertension. In previous studies we showed that WW domains 2, 3 and 4 of human Nedd4 bound to the human ENaC (hENaC) subunits, whereas WW domain 1 did not. Here we extend this observation to determine the binding affinities of the human Nedd4 WW domains for hENaC C-terminal peptides. We show that WW domains 2, 3 and 4 bind with differing affinities to Na(+) channel subunit peptides. WW domain 3 has the highest affinity and we predict that WW domain 3 contributes most of the binding because a construct containing the three WW domains bound no better than WW domain 3 alone. Further, a single amino acid change (Arg(165)-->Thr) in WW domain 1 enables binding to the alpha subunit of the channel to occur, with an affinity comparable with that of WW domain 4. Differential binding propensities between the various WW domains and Na(+) channel subunit peptides are explained on the basis of quantitative structural modelling of the complexes and their isolated components. PMID:11802777

  18. Evaluation of a cathode gas channel with a water absorption layer/waste channel in a PEFC by using visualization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Nakata, Motoki; Yodo, Tadakatsu; Nishiguchi, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Makoto; Itoh, Yasuhiko

    The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathode is a performance-limiting component due to the slower oxygen reduction kinetics and mass transport limitations imposed by water generated in an electrochemical reaction. This water assists the performance of the PEFC by preventing drying of the polymer electrolyte. Conversely, the water hinders the transport of the reactant species by blocking the pores in the gas diffusion layer. Moreover, the effective electrode area is decreased, causing the cathode channel to become clogged with supersaturated water from the gas diffusion layer. This problem is overcome by separating the gas channel and the waste channel, and installing a water absorption layer (WAL). The new "WAL type" gas channel has an installed WAL in which the designed waste channel is compared with the gas flow characteristics of a conventional cathode gas channel by using the visualization technique. Gas flowing into the WAL type separator is barely blocked before the WAL absorbs water condensed in the cathode gas channel. Therefore, the WAL type separator effectively improves the PEFC performance.

  19. Channeling of aminoacyl-tRNA for protein synthesis in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Negrutskii, B.S.; Deutscher, M.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Channeling, the direct transfer of metabolic intermediates from one enzyme to another in a pathway, has received increased attention as an explanation for the high efficiency of cellular processes. The known structural organization of the protein biosynthetic machinery, and a recent suggestion that aminoacyl-tRNAs may be channeled, has led us to devise a direct test of this possibility. By employing the technique of electroporation, conditions were established for the introduction of aminoacyl-tRNAs into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We show, by coelectroporation of various combinations of free {sup 14}C amino acids and {sup 3}H aminoacyl-tRNAs, that whereas the free amino acids serve as effective precursors for protein synthesis, the exogenous aminoacyl-tRNAs are utilized poorly, if at all. The lack of incorporation into protein from added aminoacyl-tRNAs is not due to their leakage from the cell, to their instability, or to their damage during electroporation. Furthermore, in contrast to the findings with intact cells, extracts of CHO cells incorporate both free amino acids and aminoacyl-tRNAs into protein with similar efficiencies. Based on these observations, the authors conclude that the inability of exogenous aminoacyl-tRNAs to serve as precursors for protein synthesis is due to the structural organization of intact cells that leads to channeling of this substrate in vivo. Thus, they propose that endogenously synthesized aminoacyl-tRNA is directly transferred from aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase to elongation factor to ribosome without dissociation into the cell fluid, and as a consequence, usage of exogenously introduced molecules is precluded.

  20. Visualizing Water Molecules in Transmembrane Proteins Using Radiolytic Labeling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, T.; Gupta, S; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Essential to cells and their organelles, water is both shuttled to where it is needed and trapped within cellular compartments and structures. Moreover, ordered waters within protein structures often colocalize with strategically placed polar or charged groups critical for protein function, yet it is unclear if these ordered water molecules provide structural stabilization, mediate conformational changes in signaling, neutralize charged residues, or carry out a combination of all these functions. Structures of many integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), reveal the presence of ordered water molecules that may act like prosthetic groups in a manner quite unlike bulk water. Identification of 'ordered' waters within a crystalline protein structure requires sufficient occupancy of water to enable its detection in the protein's X-ray diffraction pattern, and thus, the observed waters likely represent a subset of tightly bound functional waters. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest the structures of ordered waters within GPCRs are as conserved (and thus as important) as conserved side chains. In addition, methods of radiolysis, coupled to structural mass spectrometry (protein footprinting), reveal dynamic changes in water structure that mediate transmembrane signaling. The idea of water as a prosthetic group mediating chemical reaction dynamics is not new in fields such as catalysis. However, the concept of water as a mediator of conformational dynamics in signaling is just emerging, because of advances in both crystallographic structure determination and new methods of protein footprinting. Although oil and water do not mix, understanding the roles of water is essential to understanding the function of membrane proteins.

  1. Mechanosensitive channels of Escherichia coli: the MscL gene, protein, and activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Martinac, B.; Kung, C.

    1997-01-01

    Although mechanosensory responses are ubiquitous and diverse, the molecular bases of mechanosensation in most cases remain mysterious MscL, a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance of Escherichia coli and its bacterial homologues are the first and currently only channel molecules shown to directly sense mechanical stretch of the membrane. In response to the tension conveyed via the lipid bilayer, MscL increases its open probability by several orders of magnitude. In the present review we describe the identification, cloning, and first sets of biophysical and structural data on this simplest mechanosensory molecule. We discovered a 2.5-ns mechanosensitive conductance in giant E. coli spheroplasts. Using chromatographies to enrich the target and patch clamp to assay the channel activity in liposome-reconstituted fractions, we identified the MscL protein and cloned the mscL gene. MscL comprises 136 amino acid residues (15 kDa), with two highly hydrophobic regions, and resides in the inner membrane of the bacterium. PhoA-fusion experiments indicate that the protein spans the membrane twice with both termini in the cytoplasm. Spectroscopic techniques show that it is highly helical. Expression of MscL tandems and covalent cross-linking suggest that the active channel complex is a homo-hexamer. We have identified several residues, which when deleted or substituted, affect channel kinetics or mechanosensitivity. Although unique when discovered, highly conserved MscL homologues in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found, suggesting their ubiquitous importance among bacteria.

  2. Protein kinase C-dependent activation of KATP channel enhances adenosine-induced cardioprotection.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, B T

    1998-01-01

    Prior activation of protein kinase C (PKC) can precondition the cardiac cell against injury during subsequent ischaemia. By using cultured chick ventricular cell model for simulated ischaemia and preconditioning, the present study investigated the biochemical mechanism underlying the PKC-mediated preconditioning. A 5 min exposure to PMA enhanced the ability of pinacidil to mediate cardioprotection during a subsequent 90 min period of ischaemia, which is consistent with a sustained activation of the KATP channel initiated by PKC. The brief prior exposure to PMA was also associated with an enhanced ability of the adenosine A1 or A3 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine or N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide to elicit a cardioprotective response during the subsequent ischaemia. In myocytes pretreated with PMA, the cardioprotection mediated by receptor agonist was blocked by the concomitant presence of KATP-channel antagonists glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid during the ischaemia. Thus the KATP channel acts downstream of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating the protective effect due to prior PMA exposure. KATP channel activation is responsible for the adenosine receptor-mediated effect. PMA treatment had no effect on other A1 or A3 receptor-mediated effects such as the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, ruling out a direct stimulation of the receptor or G-protein by PMA. The present results indicate that prior stimulation of PKC causes a sustained KATP channel activation, which in turn renders the myocyte more responsive to the protective action of adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists during the subsequent ischaemia. PMID:9820809

  3. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  4. Enantioselective Protein-Sterol Interactions Mediate Regulation of Both Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Inward Rectifier K+ Channels by Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    D'Avanzo, Nazzareno; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Enkvetchakul, Decha; Covey, Douglas F.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is the major sterol component of all mammalian cell plasma membranes and plays a critical role in cell function and growth. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol inhibits inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels, but have not distinguished whether this is due directly to protein-sterol interactions or indirectly to changes in the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. Using purified bacterial and eukaryotic Kir channels reconstituted into liposomes of controlled lipid composition, we demonstrate by 86Rb+ influx assays that bacterial Kir channels (KirBac1.1 and KirBac3.1) and human Kir2.1 are all inhibited by cholesterol, most likely by locking the channels into prolonged closed states, whereas the enantiomer, ent-cholesterol, does not inhibit these channels. These data indicate that cholesterol regulates Kir channels through direct protein-sterol interactions likely taking advantage of an evolutionarily conserved binding pocket. PMID:21559361

  5. Patch formation of a viral channel forming protein within a lipid membrane - Vpu of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Chen, Chin-Pei; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2016-04-22

    Ion channels and their viral companions are defined by their quaternary structure. The individual sub-units have to assemble into homo- or hetero-oligomers. Using Vpu of HIV-1, a putative viral channel forming protein (VCP), as a test case, the formation of a quaternary structure is monitored using coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations. Full length Vpu is generated by combining the helical transmembrane domain (TMD) with the cytoplasmic domain derived from NMR spectroscopy. Patches of 2 to 6 as well as patches of 16 and 32 Vpu proteins, Vpu-WT, containing unphosphorylated serines 52 and 56 are used to study assembly dynamics. The same patches are simulated for the Vpu double mutant, Vpu-DD, in which the two serines 52 and 56 are replaced by aspartic acid. Serines 52 and 56 in Vpu-WT allow short lived contacts between the cytoplasmic domains. Dimer formation is the first step for long lasting assemblies and is induced by the EYR motif. Roll-over movements allow rearrangement within the dimer. Independent of the number of Vpu proteins, Vpu-DD prefers smaller aggregates than Vpu-WT. In the case of simulation of 4 Vpu-WT proteins a pore-like assembly is directly identified with the TMD Ser-23 pointing towards a putative central pore axis. PMID:26899411

  6. Channel Formation by CarO, the Carbapenem Resistance-Associated Outer Membrane Protein of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Siroy, Axel; Molle, Virginie; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Vallenet, David; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Cozzone, Alain J.; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently shown that resistance to both imipenem and meropenem in multidrug-resistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii is associated with the loss of a heat-modifiable 25/29-kDa outer membrane protein, called CarO. This study aimed to investigate the channel-forming properties of CarO. Mass spectrometry analyses of this protein band detected another 25-kDa protein (called Omp25), together with CarO. Both proteins presented similar physicochemical parameters (Mw and pI). We overproduced and purified the two polypeptides as His-tagged recombinant proteins. Circular dichroism analyses demonstrated that the secondary structure of these proteins was mainly a ?-strand conformation with spectra typical of porins. We studied the channel-forming properties of proteins by reconstitution into artificial lipid bilayers. In these conditions, CarO induced ion channels with a conductance value of 110 pS in 1 M KCl, whereas the Omp25 protein did not form any channels, despite its suggested porin function. The pores formed by CarO showed a slight cationic selectivity and no voltage closure. No specific imipenem binding site was found in CarO, and this protein would rather form unspecific monomeric channels. PMID:16304148

  7. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  8. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-06-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  9. Suspended marine particulate proteins in coastal and oligotrophic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridoux, Maxime C.; Neibauer, Jaqui; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Nunn, Brook L.; Keil, Richard G.

    2015-03-01

    Metaproteomic analyses were performed on suspended sediments collected in one coastal environment (Washington margin, Pacific Ocean, n = 5) and two oligotrophic environments (Atlantic Ocean near BATS, n = 5, and Pacific Ocean near HOTS, n = 5). Using a database of 2.3 million marine proteins developed using the NCBI database, 443 unique peptides were detected from which 363 unique proteins were identified. Samples from the euphotic zone contained on average 2-3x more identifiable proteins than deeper waters (150-1500 m) and these proteins were predominately from photosynthetic organisms. Diatom peptides dominate the spectra of the Washington margin while peptides from cyanobacteria, such as Synechococcus sp. dominated the spectra of both oligotrophic sites. Despite differences in the exact proteins identified at each location, there is good agreement for protein function and cellular location. Proteins in surface waters code for a variety of cellular functions including photosynthesis (24% of detected proteins), energy production (10%), membrane production (9%) and genetic coding and reading (9%), and are split 60-40 between membrane proteins and intracellular cytoplasmic proteins. Sargasso Sea surface waters contain a suite of peptides consistent with proteins involved in circadian rhythms that promote both C and N fixation at night. At depth in the Sargasso Sea, both muscle-derived myosin protein and the muscle-hydrolyzing proteases deseasin MCP-01 and metalloprotease Mcp02 from γ-proteobacteria were observed. Deeper waters contain peptides predominately sourced from γ-proteobacteria (37% of detected proteins) and α-proteobacteria (26%), although peptides from membrane and photosynthetic proteins attributable to phytoplankton were still observed (13%). Relative to surface values, detection frequencies for bacterial membrane proteins and extracellular enzymes rose from 9 to 16 and 2 to 4% respectively below the thermocline and the overall balance between membrane proteins and intracellular proteins grows to an approximate 75-25 split. Unlike the phytoplankton membrane proteins, which are detrital in nature, the bacterial protein suite at depth is consistent with living biomass.

  10. Structural Waters Define a Functional Channel Mediating Activation of the GPCR, rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, T.; Gupta, S; Jastrzebska, B; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural water molecules may act as prosthetic groups indispensable for proper protein function. In the case of allosteric activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), water likely imparts structural plasticity required for agonist-induced signal transmission. Inspection of structures of GPCR superfamily members reveals the presence of conserved embedded water molecules likely important to GPCR function. Coupling radiolytic hydroxyl radical labeling with rapid H2O18 solvent mixing, we observed no exchange of these structural waters with bulk solvent in either ground state or for the Meta II or opsin states. However, the radiolysis approach permitted labeling of selected side chain residues within the transmembrane helices and revealed activation-induced changes in local structural constraints likely mediated by dynamics of both water and protein. These results suggest both a possible general mechanism for water-dependent communication in family A GPCRs based on structural conservation, and a strategy for probing membrane protein structure.

  11. RING finger protein 121 facilitates the degradation and membrane localization of voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Low, Sean E.; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Zhou, Weibin; Muto, Akira; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y.; Hirata, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Following their synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are transported to the membranes of excitable cells, where they often cluster, such as at the axon initial segment of neurons. Although the mechanisms by which NaV channels form and maintain clusters have been extensively examined, the processes that govern their transport and degradation have received less attention. Our entry into the study of these processes began with the isolation of a new allele of the zebrafish mutant alligator, which we found to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 121 (RNF121), an E3-ubiquitin ligase present in the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Here we demonstrate that RNF121 facilitates two opposing fates of NaV channels: (i) ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and (ii) membrane localization when coexpressed with auxiliary NaVβ subunits. Collectively, these results indicate that RNF121 participates in the quality control of NaV channels during their synthesis and subsequent transport to the membrane. PMID:25691753

  12. Inhibition of synaptic transmission and G protein modulation by synthetic CaV2.2 Ca2+ channel peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Giovanna; Mochida, Sumiko; Stephens, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels is a major means of controlling neurotransmitter release. The CaV2.2 Ca2+ channel subunit contains several inhibitory interaction sites for G?? subunits, including the amino terminal (NT) and I–II loop. The NT and I–II loop have also been proposed to undergo a G protein-gated inhibitory interaction, whilst the NT itself has also been proposed to suppress CaV2 channel activity. Here, we investigate the effects of an amino terminal (CaV2.2[45–55]) ‘NT peptide’ and a I–II loop alpha interaction domain (CaV2.2[377–393]) ‘AID peptide’ on synaptic transmission, Ca2+ channel activity and G protein modulation in superior cervical ganglion neurones (SCGNs). Presynaptic injection of NT or AID peptide into SCGN synapses inhibited synaptic transmission and also attenuated noradrenaline-induced G protein modulation. In isolated SCGNs, NT and AID peptides reduced whole-cell Ca2+ current amplitude, modified voltage dependence of Ca2+ channel activation and attenuated noradrenaline-induced G protein modulation. Co-application of NT and AID peptide negated inhibitory actions. Together, these data favour direct peptide interaction with presynaptic Ca2+ channels, with effects on current amplitude and gating representing likely mechanisms responsible for inhibition of synaptic transmission. Mutations to residues reported as determinants of Ca2+ channel function within the NT peptide negated inhibitory effects on synaptic transmission, Ca2+ current amplitude and gating and G protein modulation. A mutation within the proposed QXXER motif for G protein modulation did not abolish inhibitory effects of the AID peptide. This study suggests that the CaV2.2 amino terminal and I–II loop contribute molecular determinants for Ca2+ channel function; the data favour a direct interaction of peptides with Ca2+ channels to inhibit synaptic transmission and attenuate G protein modulation. PMID:21521766

  13. TRP channels and STIM/ORAI proteins: sensors and effectors of cancer and stroma cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, N; Lindemann, O; Schwab, A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are strongly influenced by host cells within the tumour stroma and vice versa. This leads to the development of a tumour microenvironment with distinct physical and chemical properties that are permissive for tumour progression. The ability to migrate plays a central role in this mutual interaction. Migration of cancer cells is considered as a prerequisite for tumour metastasis and the migration of host stromal cells is required for reaching the tumour site. Increasing evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and STIM/ORAI proteins affect key calcium-dependent mechanisms implicated in both cancer and stroma cell migration. These include, among others, cytoskeletal remodelling, growth factor/cytokine signalling and production, and adaptation to tumour microenvironmental properties such as hypoxia and oxidative stress. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding TRP channels and STIM/ORAI proteins in cancer and stroma cell migration. We focus on how TRP channel or STIM/ORAI-mediated Ca2+ signalling directly or indirectly influences cancer and stroma cell migration by affecting the above listed mechanisms. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cytoskeleton, Extracellular Matrix, Cell Migration, Wound Healing and Related Topics. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-24 PMID:24724725

  14. Pentameric Assembly of Potassium Channel Tetramerization Domain-Containing Protein 5 (KCTD5)

    PubMed Central

    Dementieva, Irina S.; Tereshko, Valentina; McCrossan, Zoe A.; Solomaha, Elena; Araki, Daniel; Xu, Chen; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2009-01-01

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of human potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing protein 5 (KCTD5), the first member of the family to be so characterized. Four findings were unexpected. First, the structure reveals assemblies of five subunits while tetramers were anticipated; pentameric stoichiometry is observed also in solution by scanning transmission electron microscopy mass analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation. Second, the same Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack, Broad Complex (BTB) domain surface mediates assembly of five KCTD5 and four voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits; four amino acid differences appear crucial. Third, KCTD5 complexes have well-defined N- and C-terminal modules separated by a flexible linker that swivels ~30°; the C-module shows a new fold and is required to bind Golgi re-assembling stacking protein 55 with ~1 ?M affinity as judged by surface plasmon resonance and ultracentrifugation. Fourth, despite the homology reflected in its name, KCTD5 does not impact operation of Kv4.2, Kv3.4, Kv2.1 or Kv1.2 channels. PMID:19361449

  15. Generation, comparison, and merging of pathways between protein conformations: gating in K-channels.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Angela; Raveh, Barak; Furman-Schueler, Ora; Halperin, Dan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2008-10-01

    We present a general framework for the generation, alignment, comparison, and hybridization of motion pathways between two known protein conformations. The framework, which is rooted in probabilistic motion-planning techniques in robotics, allows for the efficient generation of collision-free motion pathways, while considering a wide range of degrees of freedom involved in the motion. Within the framework, we provide the means to hybridize pathways, thus producing, the motion pathway of the lowest energy barrier out of the many pathways proposed by our algorithm. This method for comparing and hybridizing pathways is modular, and may be used within the context of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The framework was implemented within the Rosetta software suite, where the protein is represented in atomic detail. The K-channels switch between open and closed conformations, and we used the overall framework to investigate this transition. Our analysis suggests that channel-opening may follow a three-phase pathway. First, the channel unlocks itself from the closed state; second, it opens; and third, it locks itself in the open conformation. A movie that depicts the proposed pathway is available in the Supplementary Material (Movie S1) and at http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~angela/SuppKcsA.html. PMID:18621834

  16. Estimating Small Scale River Channel Roughness Using a Through-water Photo-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Scarborough, F.; Folkard, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Channel roughness is critical to the understanding of fluvial geomorphology and hydrology due to its connection with the transportation of sediment and effect on flow discharge. Due to manual measurement methods being costly and time consuming, and traditional visual observation methods being subjective, we have explored the use of a close-range remote sensing approach, based on through-water photography to estimate channel characteristics. Previous similar photo-based measurements have focused on estimating water depth by correcting data from stereo image pairs for refraction at the water surface. Here, we extend this approach to multi-image data sets, and implement refraction correction for data from commonly used 'structure from motion' based software. The accuracy of applied corrections is assessed in a laboratory setting using a gravel surface submerged at a range of water depths. We demonstrate the approach in the field by photographing cross sections to produce high density point clouds and hence digital elevation models of the stream bed. Correcting submerged regions for refraction effects allows channel characteristics such as wetted perimeter and water depth to be estimated. We explore the use of parameters thus estimated for deriving coefficients of channel flow resistance such as Manning's coefficient.

  17. Coupled Radon and Water Temperature Measurements to Characterize the Effects of Altered Stream Channel Planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerson, B. E.; Poole, G. C.; O'Daniel, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In summer 2011, a 2.6 km reach of Meacham Creek, Oregon, USA, was altered from a straight, steep wall-based channel to more a sinuous, low-gradient channel. Key objectives of this restoration project were to increase the rate and magnitude of hyporheic exchange. The overarching goal was to initiate increased buffering and lagging of water temperature in the subsurface to mitigate warm surface water temperature in Meacham Creek, an important spawning and rearing stream for depressed populations of Chinook salmon and summer steelhead. To evaluate progress toward project goals and objectives, stream temperature and groundwater temperature in 22 wells have been measured hourly at the restoration site since March 2011. In addition, the radioactive isotope 222Rn was measured in each well and in the surface water on two occasions. The relative residence time of down welling stream water measured in the wells can be determined by ranked amplitude depression and lagged phase of annual temperature signals in the wells relative to that of the open channel flow. Residence times predicted by annual temperature signal dynamics are corroborated by 222Rn concentrations in each well. The data collected to date provide a foundation for developing a groundwater thermal model to predict the effects of channel reconfiguration on ground-surface water exchange and associated temperature effects at the reach scale.

  18. 4D photogrammetric technique to study free surface water in open channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, Damien; Berkaoui, Amine; Vinatier, Fabrice; Bailly, Jean-Stéphane; Belaud, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Characteristics of three-dimensional surface water are considered as the most valuable information to understand hydrodynamic phenomena in open channel flow. An accurate and coherent description of the free water surface morphology improves the accuracy of hydraulic models which study river processes. However, amongst existing techniques to measure three-dimensional surface, stereo-photogrammetry is clearly the most effective technique to obtain an instantaneous and high accurate 3D free water surface and it's suitable to both flume and field condition. Our study aims at developing this technique in two controlled channels, one in interior with glass borders (length: 6 m, width: 0.3 m and depth: 0.5 m) and one outside with cement borders (length: 13 m, width: 0.7 m and depth: 0.4 m). A system consisting in three NIKON-D3200 cameras, mounted to an adjustable tripod head, which is fixed to an inverted aluminium T-bar with the center camera higher than the two side cameras. Each camera is fitted with a 28 mm lens and cameras are synchronized using a Phottix(R) system. The system was mounted at a downstream position from the channel with an oblique configuration. A series of pictures taken at a 3 s interval during the water weight bearing were reported and analyzed using the Photoscan Pro(R) software for image matching. Validation procedure of the technique was realized using an orthophotography of the lateral border of the interior channel to delimit the line of water surface, and using a video capture of a slide fixed inside the outside channel. A high resolution and dynamic elevation map of the surface water was constructed. Our study give encouraging results, with a good capture of water surface morphology and a limited occlusion issues. The confrontation of the results with the validation dataset highlight limitations that need to be discussed with the audience.

  19. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Enhancement of water permeation across nanochannels by partial charges mimicked from biological channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2008-07-01

    In biological water channel aquaporins (AQPs), it is believed that the bipolar orientation of the single-file water molecules inside the channel blocks proton permeation but not water transport. In this paper, the water permeation and particularly the water-selective behaviour across a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with two partial charges adjacent to the wall of the SWNT are studied by molecular dynamics simulations, in which the distance between the two partial charges is varied from 0.14 nm to 0.5 nm and the charges each have a quantity of 0.5 e. The two partial charges are used to mimic the charge distribution of the conserved non-pseudoautosomal (NPA) (asparagine/proline/alanine) regions in AQPs. Compared with across the nanochannel in a system with one +1 e charge, the water permeation across the nanochannel is greatly enhanced in a system with two +0.5 e charges when charges are close to the nanotube, i.e. the two partial charges permit more rapid water diffusion and maintain better bipolar order along the water file when the distance between the two charges and the wall of SWNT is smaller than about 0.05 nm. The bipolar orientation of the single-file water molecules is crucial for the exclusion of proton transfer. These findings may serve as guidelines for the future nanodevices by using charges to transport water and have biological implications because membrane water channels share a similar single-file water chain and positive charged region at centre and provide an insight into why two residues are necessitated in the central region of water channel protein.

  20. Slip Effects on Mixed Convective Peristaltic Transport of Copper-Water Nanofluid in an Inclined Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles. PMID:25170908

  1. Slip effects on mixed convective peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles. PMID:25170908

  2. Role of protein sulfation in vasodilation induced by minoxidil sulfate, a K+ channel opener

    SciTech Connect

    Meisheri, K.D.; Oleynek, J.J.; Puddington, L. )

    1991-09-01

    Evidence from contractile, radioisotope ion flux and electrophysiological studies suggest that minoxidil sulfate (MNXS) acts as a K+ channel opener in vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to examine possible biochemical mechanisms by which MNXS exerts such an effect. Experiments performed in the isolated rabbit mesenteric artery (RMA) showed that MNXS, 5 microM, but not the parent compound minoxidil, was a potent vasodilator. Whereas the relaxant effects of an another K+ channel opener vasodilator, BRL-34915 (cromakalim), were removed by washing with physiological saline solution, the effects of MNXS persisted after repeated washout attempts. Furthermore, after an initial exposure of segments of intact RMA to (35S) MNXS, greater than 30% of the radiolabel was retained 2 hr after removal of the drug. In contrast, retention of radiolabel was not detected with either (3H)MNXS (label on the piperidine ring of MNXS) or (3H)minoxidil (each less than 3% after a 2-hr washout). These data suggested that the sulfate moiety from MNXS was closely associated with the vascular tissue. To determine if proteins were the acceptors of sulfate from MNXS, intact RMAs were incubated with (35S)MNXS, and then 35S-labeled proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by fluorography. Preferential labeling of a 116 kD protein was detected by 2 and 5 min of treatment. A 43 kD protein (resembling actin) also showed significant labeling. A similar profile of 35S-labeled proteins was observed in (35S) MNXS-treated A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, suggesting that the majority of proteins labeled by (35S)MNXS in intact RMA were components of smooth muscle cells.

  3. Ca2+/calcineurin regulation of cloned vascular KATP channels: crosstalk with the protein kinase A pathway

    PubMed Central

    Orie, NN; Thomas, AM; Perrino, BA; Tinker, A; Clapp, LH

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Vascular ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are activated by cyclic AMP elevating vasodilators through protein kinase A (PKA). Direct channel phosphorylation is a critical mechanism, though the phosphatase opposing these effects is unknown. Previously, we reported that calcineurin, a Ca2+-dependent phosphatase, inhibits KATP channels, though neither the site nor the calcineurin isoform involved is established. Given that the type-2 regulatory (RII) subunit of PKA is a substrate for calcineurin we considered whether calcineurin regulates channel activity through interacting with PKA. Experimental approach: Whole-cell recordings were made in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the vascular KATP channel (KIR6.1/SUR2B). The effect of intracellular Ca2+ and modulators of the calcineurin and PKA pathway on glibenclamide-sensitive currents were examined. Key results: Constitutively active calcineurin A? but not A? significantly attenuated KATP currents activated by low intracellular Ca2+, whereas calcineurin inhibitors had the opposite effect. PKA inhibitors reduced basal KATP currents and responses to calcineurin inhibitors, consistent with the notion that some calcineurin action involves inhibition of PKA. However, raising intracellular Ca2+ (equivalent to increasing calcineurin activity), almost completely inhibited KATP channel activation induced by the catalytic subunit of PKA, whose enzymatic activity is independent of the RII subunit. In vitro phosphorylation experiments showed calcineurin could directly dephosphorylate a site in Kir6.1 that was previously phosphorylated by PKA. Conclusions and implications: Calcineurin A? regulates KIR6.1/SUR2B by inhibiting PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the channel as well as PKA itself. Such a mechanism is likely to directly oppose the action of vasodilators on the KATP channel. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) 157, 554–564; doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00221.x; published online 7 May 2009 This article is commented on by Tammaro, pp. 551–553 of this issue and is part of a themed section on Endothelium in Pharmacology. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19422382

  4. Dynamics and mechanism of water-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2011-03-01

    Water-protein interactions are essential to biology and such interactions are not static but dynamic in nature. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, we have systematically investigated protein surface hydration dynamics and the actual time scales of their fluctuations. These new results are significant to understanding the physics of protein dynamics at the most fundamental level.

  5. Regulatory-auxiliary subunits of CLC chloride channel-transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Gradogna, Antonella; Zanardi, Ilaria; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-09-15

    The CLC family of chloride channels and transporters is composed by nine members, but only three of them, ClC-Ka/b, ClC-7 and ClC-2, have been found so far associated with auxiliary subunits. These CLC regulatory subunits are small proteins that present few common characteristics among them, both structurally and functionally, and their effects on the corresponding CLC protein are different. Barttin, a protein with two transmembrane domains, is essential for the membrane localization of ClC-K proteins and their activity in the kidney and inner ear. Ostm1 is a protein with a single transmembrane domain and a highly glycosylated N-terminus. Unlike the other two CLC auxiliary subunits, Ostm1 shows a reciprocal relationship with ClC-7 for their stability. The subcellular localization of Ostm1 depends on ClC-7 and not the other way around. ClC-2 is active on its own, but GlialCAM, a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule with two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, regulates its subcellular localization and activity in glial cells. The common theme for these three proteins is their requirement for a proper homeostasis, since their malfunction leads to distinct diseases. We will review here their properties and their role in normal chloride physiology and the pathological consequences of their improper function. PMID:25762128

  6. Ancient Origins of RGK Protein Function: Modulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Preceded the Protostome and Deuterostome Split

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Lu, Van B.; Won, Yu-Jin; Sasson, Yehezkel; Hirsch, Joel A.; Ono, Fumihito; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    RGK proteins, Gem, Rad, Rem1, and Rem2, are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins that interact with Ca2+ channel ? subunits to modify voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function. In addition, RGK proteins affect several cellular processes such as cytoskeletal rearrangement, neuronal dendritic complexity, and synapse formation. To probe the phylogenetic origins of RGK protein–Ca2+ channel interactions, we identified potential RGK-like protein homologs in genomes for genetically diverse organisms from both the deuterostome and protostome animal superphyla. RGK-like protein homologs cloned from Danio rerio (zebrafish) and Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) expressed in mammalian sympathetic neurons decreased Ca2+ current density as reported for expression of mammalian RGK proteins. Sequence alignments from evolutionarily diverse organisms spanning the protostome/deuterostome divide revealed conservation of residues within the RGK G-domain involved in RGK protein – Cav? subunit interaction. In addition, the C-terminal eleven residues were highly conserved and constituted a signature sequence unique to RGK proteins but of unknown function. Taken together, these data suggest that RGK proteins, and the ability to modify Ca2+ channel function, arose from an ancestor predating the protostomes split from deuterostomes approximately 550 million years ago. PMID:24992013

  7. The experimental study of the features of water flowing through a sharpcrested weir in channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turalina, Dinara; Yembergenova, Dinara; Alibayeva, Karlygash

    2015-05-01

    This article contains the experimental research of water flowing through a weir in a rectangular open channel. Nine regimes of water flowrate investigated in this study. Upstream water levels partially determined for each regime. The coefficient of discharge to the weir determined from the flowrate equation. The determined coefficient of discharge value compared to the value from the Rehbock formula. The diagram of values shows the dependence of the coefficient of discharge Cd on the upstream water level yc/h. Experimental study conducted on the Armfield S16 hydraulic flow demonstrator and hydraulic bench F1-10.

  8. The nature of ion and water barrier crossings in a simulated ion channel.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S. W.; Novotny, J. A.; Jakobsson, E.

    1993-01-01

    Using a combination of techniques, including molecular dynamics, time-correlation analysis, stochastic dynamics, and fitting of continuum diffusion theory to electrophysiological data, a characterization is made of thermally driven sodium, water, and D2O motion within the gramicidin A channel. Since the channel contents are constrained to move in a single-file fashion, the motion that corresponds to experimentally measurable rates of permeation of the membrane is the motion of the center of mass of the channel contents. We therefore emphasize channel contents center-of-mass motion in our analysis of molecular dynamics computations. The usual free energy calculation techniques would be of questionable validity when applied to such motion. As an alternative to those techniques, we postulate a periodic sinusoidal free energy profile (related to the periodic structure of the helical channel) and deduce the fluid dynamic diffusion coefficient and the height and spacing of the free energy barriers from the form of the mean-square-deviation function, using stochastic computations. The fluid dynamic friction in each case appears similar to that for aqueous solution. However, the diffusive motions are modulated by a spatially periodic free energy profile with a periodicity characteristic of an L-D pair of amino acids in the gramicidin helix, approximately 1.7 A in the model we use. The barrier height depends on which substance is moving in the channel, but in each case is several times thermal energy. For barriers of this width and height, the motion is intermediate between the low-friction (transition-state) and high-friction (Brownian) limits. Thus, neither of these formalisms that have been used commonly to describe membrane permeation gives an accurate picture of the underlying physical process (although the Brownian description seems closer to correct). The non-Markovian Langevin equation must be solved to describe properly the statistics of the process. The "channel state of matter" characteristic of the channel contents appears to have some properties typical of the solid and some typical of the liquid state. The magnitude of the local friction and nature of the ion solvation are similar to the liquid state, but the periodicities of structure, free energy, and dynamics are somewhat solid-like. The alignment of water dipoles in the channel bears some resemblance to the orientational ordering of a nematic liquid crystal, but unlike a nematic liquid crystal, the waters have a degree of translational order as well. Thus, the "channel state" is not adequately described by analogy to either the solid or liquid states or to liquid crystals but must be dealt with as its own characteristic type of condensed matter. PMID:7679301

  9. CSF-contacting epithelia in altered gravity: changes in apical structures and water channels expression.

    PubMed

    Masseguin, Christophe; Siderenko, Lydia; Pronina, Tatiana; Ershov, Petr; Grigoriev, Anatoli; Ugrumov, Mikhail; Gabrion, Jacqueline

    2002-07-01

    Apical cytoskeletal structures and water channels are affected in both choroidal and ependymal cells lining the cerebral ventricles. Structural alterations and changes in expression of AQPI and AQP4, evaluated by immuno-cytochemistry and in situ hybridization confirm the impact of variations in gravity in CSF-lining epithelia. PMID:15002591

  10. Tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 water channels in liposomes and cell membranes: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Verbavatz, J M; Brown, D; Saboli?, I; Valenti, G; Ausiello, D A; Van Hoek, A N; Ma, T; Verkman, A S

    1993-11-01

    Channel forming integral protein of 28 kD (CHIP28) functions as a water channel in erythrocytes, kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. CHIP28 morphology was examined by freeze-fracture EM in proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified CHIP28, CHO cells stably transfected with CHIP28k cDNA, and rat kidney tubules. Liposomes reconstituted with HPLC-purified CHIP28 from human erythrocytes had a high osmotic water permeability (Pf0.04 cm/s) that was inhibited by HgCl2. Freeze-fracture replicas showed a fairly uniform set of intramembrane particles (IMPs); no IMPs were observed in liposomes without incorporated protein. By rotary shadowing, the IMPs had a diameter of 8.5 +/- 1.3 nm (mean +/- SD); many IMPs consisted of a distinct arrangement of four smaller subunits surrounding a central depression. IMPs of similar size and appearance were seen on the P-face of plasma membranes from CHIP28k-transfected (but not mock-transfected) CHO cells, rat thin descending limb (TDL) of Henle, and S3 segment of proximal straight tubules. A distinctive network of complementary IMP imprints was observed on the E-face of CHIP28-containing plasma membranes. The densities of IMPs in the size range of CHIP28 IMPs, determined by non-linear regression, were (in IMPs/microns 2): 2,494 in CHO cells, 5,785 in TDL, and 1,928 in proximal straight tubules; predicted Pf, based on the CHIP28 single channel water permeability of 3.6 x 10(-14) cm3/S (10 degrees C), was in good agreement with measured Pf of 0.027 cm/S, 0.075 cm/S, and 0.031 cm/S, respectively, in these cell types. Assuming that each CHIP28 monomer is a right cylindrical pore of length 5 nm and density 1.3 g/cm3, the monomer diameter would be 3.2 nm; a symmetrical arrangement of four cylinders would have a greatest diameter of 7.2 nm, which after correction for the thickness of platinum deposit, is similar to the measured IMP diameter of approximately 8.5 nm. These results provide a morphological signature for CHIP28 water channels and evidence for a tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 monomers in reconstituted proteoliposomes and cell membranes. PMID:7693713

  11. Impact of Salt and Water on Protein Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thubagere, Anu; Kelemen, Lorand; Nie, Beining; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Xie, Aihua

    2008-03-01

    Water is known as the lubricant of life. Without water, most proteins would lose their biological functions. Extensive studies have been carried out on how high concentration salts (dissolved in water) alter the stability and solubility of proteins. Such effects are thought to be mediated via salt-water interactions and water-protein interactions. This classic research field is known as the Hofmeister Series. We report the effects of Hofmeister Salts on the structural dynamics of proteins. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial blue light photoreceptor protein, is employed as a model system in this study. Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopic techniques allow us to probe the structural changes in proteins. Our data reveal that high concentration salt solutions alter the proton transfer pathway and suppress conformational changes in PYP upon photo-excitation. This study opens up a new dimension in the field of Hofmeister series. Further theoretical and experimental studies are needed in order to understand the dynamic properties of salt-water interactions and water-protein interactions.

  12. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  13. Pannexin1 Channel Proteins in the Zebrafish Retina Have Shared and Unique Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo. PMID:24194896

  14. Pannexin1 channel proteins in the zebrafish retina have shared and unique properties.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo. PMID:24194896

  15. On the turbulent flow around water turbines placed in an open channel: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Chamorro, L. P.; Arndt, R.

    2010-12-01

    A growing interest in water turbines (using tidal, river, marine currents) has been observed during the last few years. Fundamental understanding of the turbulent flow around the water turbines is crucial to predict the potential effects of these structures on the local morphology, water flow and power available in the current, among others. In this study, a series of model water turbines (single and an aligned array) of 50 cm rotor diameter were placed in the main channel of the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. The main channel is approx 2.5 m wide, 1.8 m height and 85 m long. Flow around the water turbines were analyzed under subcritical conditions. Turbine hub heights coincided with the channel mid height. A series of acoustic Doppler anemometers (ADV) were used to obtain 3 velocity components of the flow at a rate of 200 Hz. Selected streamwise and spanwise vertical planes were measured to describe the kinematics around the water turbines. Potential interactions with the lateral walls were also addressed. High order statistics (mean velocity, turbulence intensities and Reynolds stresses) as well as two point correlations and spectra were computed to infer fundamental differences and similitude with their counterparts, the wind turbines.

  16. Rh proteins vs Amt proteins: an organismal and phylogenetic perspective on CO2 and NH3 gas channels.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Huang, C H

    2006-01-01

    Rh (Rhesus) proteins are homologues of ammonium transport (Amt) proteins. Physiological and structural evidence shows that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH(3), but the substrate of Rh proteins, be it CO2 as shown in green alga, or NH3/NH4+ as shown in mammalian cells, remains disputed. We assembled a large dataset generated of Rh and Amt to explore how Rh originated from and evolved independently of Amt relatives. Analysis of this rich data implies that Rh was split from Amt first to emerge in archaeal species. The Rh ancestor underwent divergence and duplication along speciation, leading to neofunctionalization and subfunctionalization of the Rh family. The characteristic organismal distribution of Rh vs. Amt reflects their early separation and subsequent independent evolution: they coexist in microbes and invertebrates but do not in fungi, vascular plants or vertebrates. Rh gene-duplication was prominent in vertebrates: while epithelial RhBG/RhCG displayed strong purifying selection, erythroid Rh30 and RhAG experienced different episodes of positive selection in each of which adaptive evolution occurred at certain time points and in a few codon sites. Mammalian Rh30 and RhAG were subject to particularly strong positive selection in some codon sites in the lineage from rodents to human. The grounds of this adaptive evolution may be driven by the necessity to increase the surface/volume ratio of biconcave erythrocytes for facilitative gas diffusion. Altogether, these results are consistent with Rh proteins not being the orthologue of Amt proteins but having gained the function for CO2/HCO3- transport, with important roles in systemic pH regulation. PMID:16564193

  17. Role of pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein, K+ channels, and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the antinociceptive effect of inosine.

    PubMed

    Macedo-Junior, Sérgio José; Nascimento, Francisney Pinto; Luiz-Cerutti, Murilo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2013-03-01

    Inosine is the first metabolite of adenosine. It exerts an antinociceptive effect by activating the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors. We have previously demonstrated that inosine exhibits antinociceptive properties in acute and chronic mice models of nociception. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors, as well as K(+) and Ca(2+) channels, in the antinociception promoted by inosine in the formalin test. Mice were pretreated with pertussis toxin (2.5 ?g/site, i.t., an inactivator of G(i/0) protein); after 7 days, they received inosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (2.5 mg/kg, s.c., used as positive control) immediately before the formalin test. Another group of animals received tetraethylammonium (TEA) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (1 ?g/site, i.t., a non-specific voltage-gated K(+) channel blockers), apamin (50 ng/site, i.t., a small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocker), charybdotoxin (250 pg/site, i.t., a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocker), glibenclamide (100 ?g/site, i.t., an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) or CaCl(2) (200 nmol/site, i.t.). Afterwards, the mice received inosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i.p., a positive control), or morphine (2.5 mg/kg, s.c., a positive control) immediately before the formalin test. The antinociceptive effect of inosine was reversed by the pre-administration of pertussis toxin (2.5 ?g/site, i.t.), TEA, 4-aminopyridine, charybdotoxin, glibenclamide, and CaCl(2), but not apamin. Further, all K(+) channel blockers and CaCl(2) reversed the antinociception induced by diclofenac and morphine, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that the antinociceptive effect of inosine is mediated, in part, by pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled receptors and the subsequent activation of voltage gated K(+) channel, large conductance Ca(2+)-activated and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels or inactivation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Finally, small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are not involved in the antinociceptive effect of inosine. PMID:22806273

  18. Interannual variability of water mass properties in the Tunisia-Sicily Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ismail, Sana; Schroeder, Katrin; Sammari, Chérif; Gasparini, Gian Pietro; Borghini, Mireno; Aleya, Lotfi

    2014-07-01

    We analysed in situ CTD data collected on 36 joint Tunisian-Italian oceanographic cruises in the Tunisia-Sicily Channel (Cap Bon-Mazara del Vallo section) from 1995 to 2009 in order to identify the water masses in the region and to estimate the interannual variability of their hydrological characteristics. Besides the well-known AW (Atlantic Water) and LIW (Levantine Intermediate Water), other water masses have been identified though their presence is neither as steady nor as stable as the aforementioned ones. The WIW (Western Intermediate Water) flows beneath the AW towards the eastern basin while the IW (Ionian Water), with a highly intermittent character, flows within the subsurface layer towards the western basin. The flow of subsurface water (WIW and IW) is affected by intense mixing which modifies the water masses, tending to make them disappear. Moreover, the same hydrological time series produced interesting results concerning the increase in both temperature and salinity in the Tunisia-Sicily Channel. This trend especially concerns the deeper layers (LIW and tEMDW, i.e. transitional Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water) and we hypothesise that this is a direct response to climatic change occurring in the eastern basin.

  19. Integration of thermal and osmotic regulation of water homeostasis: the role of TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of body water homeostasis is critical for preventing hyperthermia, because evaporative cooling is the most efficient means of dissipating excess body heat. Water homeostasis is achieved by regulation of water intake and water loss by the kidneys. The former is achieved by sensations of thirst that motivate water acquisition, whereas the latter is regulated by the antidiuretic action of vasopressin. Vasopressin secretion and thirst are stimulated by increases in the osmolality of the extracellular fluid as well as decreases in blood pressure and/or blood volume, signals that are precipitated by water depletion associated with the excess evaporative water loss required to prevent hyperthermia. In addition, they are stimulated by increases in body temperature. The sites and molecular mechanisms involved in integrating thermal and osmotic regulation of thirst and vasopressin secretion are reviewed here with a focus on the role of the thermal and mechanosensitive transient receptor potential-vanilloid (TRPV) family of ion channels. PMID:23883678

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations on the Escherichia coli ammonia channel protein AmtB: mechanism of ammonia/ammonium transport.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuchun; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2006-08-23

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed at the atomic level to study the ammonium/ammonia transport across the Escherichia coli AmtB membrane protein. Although ammonia primarily exists in the form of NH(4)(+) in aqueous solution, the recent X-ray structure determination of AmtB reveals that the ammonium/ammonia transporter proteins are ammonia-conducting channels rather than ammonium ion transporters [Khademi, S.; et al. Science 2004, 305, 1587; Zheng, L.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2004, 101, 17090]. Our simulations showed that the entrance of NH(4)(+) into the periplasmic recruitment vestibule requires only 3.1 kcal/mol of energy. This is consistent with the X-ray crystal structure, where one NH(4)(+) is captured in the binding vestibule. In this vestibule, NH(4)(+) loses one water of hydration, but the loss is compensated by a hydrogen bond, first with the backbone carbonyl oxygen of Phe161 then with the hydroxyl group of Ser219, as well as the stabilizing pi-cation interactions with the aromatic rings of Trp148 and Phe107 in the AmtB protein. In the end of this recruitment vestibule, the phenyl ring of Phe107 dynamically switches to an open state. This is correlated with a slight rotation and shifting of the indole ring of Trp148, which eventually creates a slot for the initially buried carboxylate group of Asp160 to become exposed to the bulk solvent. A hydrogen bond wire between NH(4)(+) and the carboxylate group of Asp160 via two water molecules was observed. Thus, Asp160 is most likely the proton acceptor from NH(4)(+). This explains the high conservation of Asp160 in Amt proteins and why the D160A mutant would completely quench the activity of AmtB [Javelle, A.; et al. J. Biol. Chem. 2004, 279, 8530; Marini, A. M.; et al. Curr. Genet. 2006, 49, 364]. Once NH(4)(+) deprotonates, the phenyl ring of Phe215 rotates to open, and the subsequent passage of NH(3) through the channel is straightforward. PMID:16910683

  1. Contribution of Water to Pressure and Cold Denaturation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Valentino; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here, we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering. PMID:26382703

  2. Contribution of Water to Pressure and Cold Denaturation of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Valentino; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here, we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  3. Characterization of proteins released from legume seeds in hot water.

    PubMed

    Hirano, H; Kagawa, H; Okubo, K

    1992-03-01

    When immersed in water at 50-60 degrees, mature soybean seeds release a large amount of protein. The major protein released was basic 7S globulin (Bg), which is present in the cotyledons of soybean seeds. The released Bg consisted of the 27,000 and 16,000 subunits which were linked by disulphide bonding and glycosylated. The released Bg exhibited an identical structure with the mature Bg which was synthesized in the normal developing seeds. Proteins like Bg were also found to be released into hot water from the seeds of legume species such as azuki-bean, cowpea, mung-bean and winged-bean. Besides Bg and Bg-like proteins, a few proteins including the 9,000 hydrophobic protein in soybean, ubiquitin in cowpea and mung-bean, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor in winged-bean, were released from the seeds in hot water. PMID:1368037

  4. Ser123 is essential for the water channel activity of McPIP2;1 from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Pantoja, Omar; Vera-Estrella, Rosario

    2010-05-28

    The increased expression of McPIP2;1 (MipC), a root-specific aquaporin (AQP) from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, under salt stress has suggested a role for this AQP in the salt tolerance of the plant. However, whether McPIP2;1 transports water or another solute and how its activity is regulated are so far unknown. Therefore, wild type (wt) or mutated McPIP2;1 protein was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Then, the osmotic water permeability (P(f)) of the oocytes membrane was assessed by hypotonic challenges. Selectivity of McPIP2;1 to water was determined by radiolabeled glycerol or urea uptake assays. Moreover, swelling and in vitro phosphorylation assays revealed that both water permeation and phosphorylation status of McPIP2;1 were significantly increased by the phosphorylation agonists okadaic acid (OA), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and 8-Br-cAMP, and markedly decreased by the inhibitory peptides PKI 14-22 and PKC 20-28, inhibitors of protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC), respectively. Substitution of Ser(123) or both, Ser(123) and Ser(282), abolished the water channel activity of McPIP2;1 while substitution of Ser(282) only partially inhibited it (51.9% inhibition). Despite lacking Ser(123) and/or Ser(282), the McPIP2;1 mutant forms were still phosphorylated in vitro, which suggests that phosphorylation may have a dual role on this AQP. Our results indicate that McPIP2;1 water permeability depends completely on Ser(123) and is positively regulated by PKA- and PKC-mediated phosphorylation. Regulation of the phosphorylation status of McPIP2;1 may contribute to control water transport through root cells when the plant is subjected to high salinity conditions. PMID:20332086

  5. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov's ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin

    2015-04-01

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  6. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov’s ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin

    2015-04-16

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  7. Phylogenetic conservation of protein-lipid motifs in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barrantes, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    Using the crosstalk between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and its lipid microenvironment as a paradigm, this short overview analyzes the occurrence of structural motifs which appear not only to be conserved within the nAChR family and contemporary eukaryotic members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) superfamily, but also extend to prokaryotic homologues found in bacteria. The evolutionarily conserved design is manifested in: 1) the concentric three-ring architecture of the transmembrane region, 2) the occurrence in this region of distinct lipid consensus motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic pLGIC and 3) the key participation of the outer TM4 ring in conveying the influence of the lipid membrane environment to the middle TM1-TM3 ring and this, in turn, to the inner TM2 channel-lining ring, which determines the ion selectivity of the channel. The preservation of these constant structural-functional features throughout such a long phylogenetic span likely points to the successful gain-of-function conferred by their early acquisition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25839355

  8. Groundwater-surface water interaction in the riparian zone of an incised channel, Walnut Creek, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.-K.

    2006-01-01

    Riparian zones of many incised channels in agricultural regions are cropped to the channel edge leaving them unvegetated for large portions of the year. In this study we evaluated surface and groundwater interaction in the riparian zone of an incised stream during a spring high flow period using detailed stream stage and hydraulic head data from six wells, and water quality sampling to determine whether the riparian zone can be a source of nitrate pollution to streams. Study results indicated that bank storage of stream water from Walnut Creek during a large storm water runoff event was limited to a narrow 1.6 m zone immediately adjacent to the channel. Nitrate concentrations in riparian groundwater were highest near the incised stream where the unsaturated zone was thickest. Nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations and nitrate-chloride ratios increased during a spring recharge period then decreased in the latter portion of the study. We used MODFLOW and MT3DMS to evaluate dilution and denitrification processes that would contribute to decreasing nitrate concentrations in riparian groundwater over time. MT3DMS model simulations were improved with a denitrification rate of 0.02 1/d assigned to the floodplain sediments implying that denitrification plays an important role in reducing nitrate concentrations in groundwater. We conclude that riparian zones of incised channels can potentially be a source of nitrate to streams during spring recharge periods when the near-stream riparian zone is largely unvegetated. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discrete cage form of water hexamer in the hydrophilic channels assembled by heterocyclic azopyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenming

    2015-07-01

    A heterocyclic azopyrrole compound, meso-diethyl-5,5?-bis(thiazolyldiazo)-dipyrromethane (1), has been synthesized and its two crystals have been characterized by X-ray crystallography. The molecules of compound 1 self-assembled into channel structure in the crystal of 1·3H2O, whereas interlocked type dimer in the crystal of 1·CHCl3. In the 1-D hydrophilic channels of 1·3H2O, six water molecules were held together by eight O-H…O hydrogen bonds and formed discrete cage hexameric clusters. The dehydration/rehydration processes of the compound 1 are also studied.

  10. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of water permeation through the alpha-hemolysin channel.

    PubMed

    Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak; Karttunen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-hemolysin (AHL) nanochannel is a non-selective channel that allows for uncontrolled transport of small molecules across membranes leading to cell death. Although it is a bacterial toxin, it has promising applications, ranging from drug delivery systems to nano-sensing devices. This study focuses on the transport of water molecules through an AHL nanochannel using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that AHL can quickly transport water across membranes. The first-passage time approach was used to estimate the diffusion coefficient and the mean exit time. To study the energetics of transport, the potential of mean force (PMF) of a water molecule along the AHL nanochannel was calculated. The results show that the energy barriers of water permeation across a nanopore are always positive along the channel and the values are close to thermal energy (kBT). These findings suggest that the observed quick permeation of water is due to small energy barriers and a hydrophobic inner channel surface resulting in smaller friction. We speculate that these physical mechanisms are important in how AHL causes cell death. PMID:26264478

  12. Collective motion of symmetric camphor papers in an annular water channel.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Yumihiko S; Heisler, Eric; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Nakata, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the collective motion of symmetric self-propelled objects that are driven by a difference in the surface tension. The objects move around an annular water channel spontaneously and interact through the camphor layer that develops on the water surface. We found that two collective motion modes, discrete and continuous density waves, are generated depending on the number of self-propelled objects. The two modes are characterized by examining the local and global dynamics, and the collective motion mechanism is discussed in relation to the distribution of camphor concentration in the annular water channel. We conclude that the difference between these two modes originates from that of the driving mechanism that pushes a camphor paper away from a cluster, through which mechanism density waves are generated and maintained. PMID:23944542

  13. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque 1818, Tetraspanin Membrane Protein Family: Characterization and Expression Analysis of CD81 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD81, also known as the target of an antiproliferative antibody 1 (TAPA-1), is a member of tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immune functions. In this report, we characterized and analyzed expression of the channel catfish CD81 transcript. T...

  14. Molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of five protein arginine methyltransferase genes of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein arginine methylation, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT), has recently emerged as an important modification in the regulation of gene expression. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish orthologs to human PRMT 1, 3, 4 and 5, and PRMT4 ...

  15. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Meng; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Yao, Xin-Qiu; Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 ; She, Zhen-Su

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  16. Use of Label-free Optical Biosensors to Detect Modulation of Potassium Channels by G-protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew R.; Shamah, Steven M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane1. To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex2,3. Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs. PMID:24562095

  17. Note: An underwater multi-channel plasma array for water sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Kim, H.; Starikovskiy, A.; Cho, Y. I.; Fridman, A.

    2011-09-01

    A simple yet effective method to generate multi-channel plasma array in water is presented in this paper. Thin circular metal disks sandwiched between dielectric layers were used, allowing the production of large-volume underwater plasma array with higher stability. The system can be further scaled up by stacking multiple metal disks, making it suitable for large-scale industrial water treatment. Generation of UV and reactive species was identified by optical emission spectroscopy. Sterilization experiments were performed. Results show that the device was effective in deactivating E. coli in water over a wide range of initial concentrations ranging from 104 to 108 CFU/ml.

  18. Communication: Protein dynamical transition vs. liquid-liquid phase transition in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fomina, Margarita; Cupane, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we compare experimental data on myoglobin hydrated powders from elastic neutron scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Our aim is to obtain new insights on the connection between the protein dynamical transition, a fundamental phenomenon observed in proteins whose physical origin is highly debated, and the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) possibly occurring in protein hydration water and related to the existence of a low temperature critical point in supercooled water. Our results provide a consistent thermodynamic/dynamic description which gives experimental support to the LLPT hypothesis and further reveals how fundamental properties of water and proteins are tightly related.

  19. Subunit-specific inhibition of acid sensing ion channels by stomatin-like protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Kozlenkov, Alexey; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Lewin, Gary R; Smith, Ewan St John

    2014-01-01

    There are five mammalian stomatin-domain genes, all of which encode peripheral membrane proteins that can modulate ion channel function. Here we examined the ability of stomatin-like protein 1 (STOML1) to modulate the proton-sensitive members of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family. STOML1 profoundly inhibits ASIC1a, but has no effect on the splice variant ASIC1b. The inactivation time constant of ASIC3 is also accelerated by STOML1. We examined STOML1 null mutant mice with a ?-galactosidase-neomycin cassette gene-trap reporter driven from the STOML1 gene locus, which indicated that STOML1 is expressed in at least 50% of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. Patch clamp recordings from mouse DRG neurones identified a trend for larger proton-gated currents in neurones lacking STOML1, which was due to a contribution of effects upon both transient and sustained currents, at different pH, a finding consistent with an endogenous inhibitory function for STOML1. PMID:24247984

  20. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites. PMID:24698275

  1. Expression of the Astrocyte Water Channel Aquaporin-4 in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Hsu, Mike S.; Seldin, Marcus M.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a bidirectional water channel that is found on astrocytes throughout the central nervous system. Expression is particularly high around areas in contact with cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that AQP4 plays a role in fluid exchange between the cerebrospinal fluid compartments and the brain. Despite its significant role in the brain, the overall spatial and region-specific distribution of AQP4 has yet to be fully characterized. In this study, we used Western blotting and immunohistochemical techniques to characterize AQP4 expression and localization throughout the mouse brain. We observed AQP4 expression throughout the forebrain, subcortical areas, and brainstem. AQP4 protein levels were highest in the cerebellum with lower expression in the cortex and hippocampus. We found that AQP4 immunoreactivity was profuse on glial cells bordering ventricles, blood vessels, and subarachnoid space. Throughout the brain, AQP4 was expressed on astrocytic end-feet surrounding blood vessels but was also heterogeneously expressed in brain tissue parenchyma and neuropil, often with striking laminar specificity. In the cerebellum, we showed that AQP4 colocalized with the proteoglycan brevican, which is synthesized by and expressed on cerebellar astrocytes. Despite the high abundance of AQP4 in the cerebellum, its functional significance has yet to be investigated. Given the known role of AQP4 in synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, the widespread and region-specific expression pattern of AQP4 suggests involvement not only in fluid balance and ion homeostasis but also local synaptic plasticity and function in distinct brain circuits. PMID:26489685

  2. Grazing Land Management Strongly Controls Water Quality, Sediment and Channel Dynamics in Tallgrass Prairie Headwater Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, B. G.; Daniels, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the prairie remnants of North America, watershed sediment regimes are heavily influenced by livestock grazing practices. Despite dramatic declines in stream water quality and ecosystem function concomitant with increasing gazing pressures, there have been no studies to quantitatively assess the relationship between various grazing treatments and sediment production in natural grassland ecosystems. In this study, we evaluate suspended sediment transport and channel morphology in the Flint Hills physiographic province using a paired whole-watershed approach, including 2 replicates of high density cattle grazing, 2 replicates of low density cattle grazing, 3 replicates of bison grazing and 3 replicates of no grazing. As expected, results demonstrate that cattle grazing operations increase e-coli, sediment concentrations and increase channel width. However, no significant differences in e-coli, suspended sediment dynamics or channel geomorphology were found between bison grazed and ungrazed watersheds.

  3. Tip-link protein protocadherin 15 interacts with transmembrane channel-like proteins TMC1 and TMC2

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Reo; Kindt, Katie S.; Mo, Weike; Morgan, Clive P.; Erickson, Timothy; Zhao, Hongyu; Clemens-Grisham, Rachel; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.; Nicolson, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The tip link protein protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) is a central component of the mechanotransduction complex in auditory and vestibular hair cells. PCDH15 is hypothesized to relay external forces to the mechanically gated channel located near its cytoplasmic C terminus. How PCDH15 is coupled to the transduction machinery is not clear. Using a membrane-based two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that bind to PCDH15, we detected an interaction between zebrafish Pcdh15a and an N-terminal fragment of transmembrane channel-like 2a (Tmc2a). Tmc2a is an ortholog of mammalian TMC2, which along with TMC1 has been implicated in mechanotransduction in mammalian hair cells. Using the above-mentioned two-hybrid assay, we found that zebrafish Tmc1 and Tmc2a can interact with the CD1 or CD3 cytoplasmic domain isoforms of Pcdh15a, and this interaction depends on the common region shared between the two Pcdh15 isoforms. Moreover, an interaction between mouse PCDH15-CD3 and TMC1 or TMC2 was observed in both yeast two-hybrid assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. To determine whether the Pcdh15–Tmc interaction is relevant to mechanotransduction in vivo, we overexpressed N-terminal fragments of Tmc2a in zebrafish hair cells. Overexpression of the Tmc2a N terminus results in mislocalization of Pcdh15a within hair bundles, together with a significant decrease in mechanosensitive responses, suggesting that a Pcdh15a–Tmc complex is critical for mechanotransduction. Together, these results identify an evolutionarily conserved association between the fish and mouse orthologs of PCDH15 and TMC1 and TMC2, supporting the notion that TMCs are key components of the transduction complex in hair cells. PMID:25114259

  4. Moving Fe2+ from ferritin ion channels to catalytic OH centers depends on conserved protein cage carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Ferritin biominerals are protein-caged metabolic iron concentrates used for iron-protein cofactors and oxidant protection (Fe(2+) and O2 sequestration). Fe(2+) passage through ion channels in the protein cages, like membrane ion channels, required for ferritin biomineral synthesis, is followed by Fe(2+) substrate movement to ferritin enzyme (Fox) sites. Fe(2+) and O2 substrates are coupled via a diferric peroxo (DFP) intermediate, ?max 650 nm, which decays to [Fe(3+)-O-Fe(3+)] precursors of caged ferritin biominerals. Structural studies show multiple conformations for conserved, carboxylate residues E136 and E57, which are between ferritin ion channel exits and enzymatic sites, suggesting functional connections. Here we show that E136 and E57 are required for ferritin enzyme activity and thus are functional links between ferritin ion channels and enzymatic sites. DFP formation (Kcat and kcat/Km), DFP decay, and protein-caged hydrated ferric oxide accumulation decreased in ferritin E57A and E136A; saturation required higher Fe(2+) concentrations. Divalent cations (both ion channel and intracage binding) selectively inhibit ferritin enzyme activity (block Fe(2+) access), Mn(2+) < Co(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+), reflecting metal ion-protein binding stabilities. Fe(2+)-Cys126 binding in ferritin ion channels, observed as Cu(2+)-S-Cys126 charge-transfer bands in ferritin E130D UV-vis spectra and resistance to Cu(2+) inhibition in ferritin C126S, was unpredicted. Identifying E57 and E136 links in Fe(2+) movement from ferritin ion channels to ferritin enzyme sites completes a bucket brigade that moves external Fe(2+) into ferritin enzymatic sites. The results clarify Fe(2+) transport within ferritin and model molecular links between membrane ion channels and cytoplasmic destinations. PMID:24843174

  5. Heat transfer performance of Al2O3/water nanofluids in a mini channel heat sink.

    PubMed

    Dominic, A; Sarangan, J; Suresh, S; Sai, Monica

    2014-03-01

    The high density heat removal in electronic packaging is a challenging task of modern days. Finding compact, energy efficient and cost effective methods of heat removal is being the interest of researchers. In the present work, mini channel with forced convective heat transfer in simultaneously developing regime is investigated as the heat transfer coefficient is inversely proportional to hydraulic diameter. Mini channel heat sink is made from the aluminium plate of 30 mm square with 8 mm thickness. It has 15 mini channel of 0.9 mm width, 1.3 mm height and 0.9 mm of pitch. DI water and water based 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions of Al2O3/water nanofluids are used as coolant. The flow rates of the coolants are maintained in such a way that it is simultaneously developing. Reynolds number is varied from 400 to 1600 and heat input is varied from 40 W to 70 W. The results showed that heat transfer coefficient is more than the heat transfer coefficient of fully developed flow. Also the heat transfer is more for nanofluids compared to DI water. PMID:24745233

  6. Channel Incision and Water-Table Decline Along a Recently Formed Proglacial Stream, Mendenhall Valley, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Retreat of the Mendenhall Glacier, in southeastern Alaska, resulted in the formation of Mendenhall Lake, which has reduced the supply of coarse sediment to the proglacial Mendenhall River. Channel geometry surveys conducted in 1969 and 1998 over a 5.3 km reach of the Mendenhall River revealed reductions in mean bed elevations ranging from 0.4 to 1.5 meters based on cross sections replicated at 7 locations. Channel incision in the Mendenhall River is believed to be the result of a combination of factors resulting from localized and region-wide glacial retreat. In addition to a reduction of river stage due to channel incision, a decline in water-table elevations of about 0.6 m during a 17-year period from 1984 to 2001 was identified in an observation well located 250 m from the incising stream channel. Water-table elevations 600 m from the incising channel in the adjacent alluvial outwash aquifer respond in phase to changes in river stage, indicating water-levels in the adjacent aquifer are declining in response to river-channel incision. This study suggests channel incision can rapidly lower water-table elevations for large distances in the adjacent aquifer, potentially modifying the hydrology to a degree capable of influencing adjacent surface-water features, such as off-channel wetlands and flood-plain side channels.

  7. Effect of channelization of Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels in the San Juan metropolitan area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padilla, Ingrid

    1991-01-01

    Channelization and concrete lining of the Rio Puerto Nuevo and its tributaries in the San Juan Metropolitan area has been proposed to control flooding in low lying areas adjacent to the stream. Concern about the effect of these channel modifications on the ground-water system prompted the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to conduct an investigation of surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Rio Puerto Nuevo basin in 1988. A principal objective of this investigation was to determine the potential effect of channelization of the Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels.

  8. Convergent and Parallel Activation of Low-Conductance Potassium Channels by Calcium and cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidofsky, Steven D.

    1995-07-01

    K^+ channels, which have been linked to regulation of electrogenic solute transport as well as Ca2+ influx, represent a locus in hepatocytes for the concerted actions of hormones that employ Ca2+ and cAMP as intracellular messengers. Despite considerable study, the single-channel basis for synergistic effects of Ca2+ and cAMP on hepatocellular K^+ conductance is not well understood. To address this question, patch-clamp recording techniques were applied to a model liver cell line, HTC hepatoma cells. Increasing the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]_i) in HTC cells, either by activation of purinergic receptors with ATP or by inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, activated low-conductance (9-pS) K^+ channels. Studies with excised membrane patches suggested that these channels were directly activated by Ca2+. Exposure of HTC cells to a permeant cAMP analog, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP, also activated 9-pS K^+ channels but did not change[Ca2+]_i. In excised membrane patches, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (the downstream effector of cAMP) activated K^+ channels with conductance and selectivity identical to those of channels activated by Ca2+. In addition, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activated a distinct K^+ channel type (5 pS). These data represent the differential regulation of low-conductance K^+ channels by signaling pathways mediated by Ca2+ and cAMP. Moreover, since low-conductance Ca2+ -activated K^+ channels have been identified in a variety of cell types, these findings suggest that differential regulation of K^+ channels by hormones with distinct signaling pathways may provide a mechanism for hormonal control of solute transport and Ca2+-dependent cellular functions in the liver as well as other nonexcitable tissues.

  9. Reaction enthalpies along the two channels of geminate electron recombination in liquid-to-supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Robert; Horváth, Ákos

    2013-11-01

    Ionizing radiation or UV light produces electrons and H2O+ ions in water. These species transform into hydrated electron, e-aq, hydrated H3O+ ion, and ·OH radical in each other's neighborhood much faster than any forthcoming chemical transformation. Part of the electrons escapes their geminate partners. There exists two possible paths for the remaining fraction to react: H3O++e-aq=H3O· [channel (A)] and ·OH+e-aq=OH- [channel (B)]. We devised two thermodynamic cycles for the computation of the reaction enthalpies of both channels. Channel (A) was found to be endothermic with an enthalpy of 3.61 eV at room temperature. The enthalpy is seen to be almost constant up to 500 K, to increase at 600 K and to drop abruptly around 650 K, i.e. in the region where the dielectric constant is below 20. Channel (B) was found to be exothermic with an enthalpy of -2.33 eV at room temperature. It is becoming gradually less exothermic with increasing temperature the variation becoming fast around 650 K. The tendency of these thermochemical results parallel with recent kinetic calculations by Torres-Alacan et al. (J. Torres-Alacan, S. Kratz, P. Vöhringer, 2011. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 20806-20819)

  10. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Water and Hilly Terrain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.; Sun, Ruoyu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work completed over the past year on our project, entitled "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Research: The AG Channel, Robust Waveforms, and Aeronautical Network Simulations." This project is funded under the NASA project "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS)." In this report we provide the following: an update on project progress; a description of the over-freshwater and hilly terrain initial results on path loss, delay spread, small-scale fading, and correlations; complete path loss models for the over-water AG channels; analysis for obtaining parameter statistics required for development of accurate wideband AG channel models; and analysis of an atypical AG channel in which the aircraft flies out of the ground site antenna main beam. We have modeled the small-scale fading of these channels with Ricean statistics, and have quantified the behavior of the Ricean K-factor. We also provide some results for correlations of signal components, both intra-band and inter-band. An updated literature review, and a summary that also describes future work, are also included.

  11. Microfiltration: Effect of retentate protein concentration on limiting flux and serum protein removal with 4-mm-channel ceramic microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Hurt, E E; Adams, M C; Barbano, D M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of our study was to determine if the limiting flux and serum protein (SP) removal were different at 8, 9, or 10% true protein (TP) in the microfiltration (MF) retentate recirculation loop using 0.1-µm ceramic graded permeability membranes with 4-mm-channel diameters operated at 50 °C using a diluted milk protein concentrate with 85% protein on a total solids basis (MPC85) as the MF feed. The limiting flux for the MF of diluted MPC85 was determined at 3 TP concentrations in the recirculation loop (8, 9, and 10%). The experiment was replicated 3 times for a total of 9 runs. On the morning of each run, MPC85 was diluted with reverse osmosis water to an MF feed TP concentration of 5.4%. In all runs, the starting flux was 55 kg/m(2) per hour, the flux was increased in steps until the limiting flux was reached. The minimum flux increase was 10 kg/m(2) per hour. The limiting flux decreased as TP concentration in the recirculation loop increased. The limiting flux was 154 ± 0.3, 133 ± 0.7, and 117 ± 3.3 kg/m(2) per hour at recirculation loop TP concentrations of 8.2 ± 0.07, 9.2 ± 0.04, and 10.2 ± 0.09%, respectively. No effect of recirculation loop TP concentration on the SP removal factor was detected. However, the SP removal factor decreased from 0.80 ± 0.02 to 0.75 ± 0.02 as flux was increased from the starting flux of 55 kg/m(2) per hour to the limiting flux, with a similar decrease seen at all recirculation loop TP concentrations. PMID:25682139

  12. Water-mediated interaction at a protein-protein interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikura, Teikichi; Urakubo, Yoshiaki; Ito, Nobutoshi

    2004-12-01

    The water-mediated indirect interaction between barnase and barstar was investigated by surface plasmon resonance measurement and cryogenic X-ray crystallography. Mutations of four acidic residues of barstar, D35A, D39A, E76A and E80A, decreased the binding free energies by 17.2, 25.2, 3.8 and 2.1 kJ mol -1, respectively, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. The changes of the hydrated structures of the complexes caused by the mutations were localized around the mutational site, suggesting that difference in the binding free energy is closely correlated with difference in the local hydrated structure. Then, the averaged binding free energy was estimated at 4.4 kJ mol -1 per water-mediated indirect interaction on the basis of the difference in hydrogen bonding network.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Seepage Field of Tailing Water Channel Under Different Conditions in Operation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feihan; Yan, Guoxin; Chen, Deling

    According to mathematical model of rock and soil, it calculated seepage field of tailing water channel under different conditions. The results showed that under condition of no.1, the seepage discharge from outside to inside of channel is 0.394 m3/h and the discharge under plastic concrete cut-off is 0.358m3/h, and that under condition of no.2, the seepage discharge from outside to inside of channel is 0.249 m3/h and the discharge under plastic concrete cut-off is 0.236m3/h. Under condition of no.1, the outflow of saturation line is at elevation of 411.0m which is under sand and gravel filling layer and near boundary of drift gravel sand layer. Under condition of no.2, the outflow of saturation line is at elevation of 403.0m which is under drift gravel sand layer and near rock foundation. The results showed that numerical simulation can be used to do with seepage problems of tailing water channel.

  14. Protein Aggregates May Differ in Water Entrapment but Are Comparable in Water Confinement.

    PubMed

    Urbonaite, V; de Jongh, H H J; van der Linden, E; Pouvreau, L

    2015-10-14

    Aggregate size and density are related to gel morphology. In the context of the water distribution in complex food systems, in this study, it was aimed to investigate whether protein aggregates varying in size and density differ in entrapped and confined water. Heat-set soy protein aggregates (1%, v/v) prepared in the presence of 3.5 mM divalent salts increased in size and decreased in apparent density following the salt type order MgSO4, MgCl2, CaSO4, and CaCl2. In the absence of applied (centrifugal) forces, larger and less dense aggregates entrap more water. When force is applied from larger and more deformable aggregates, more water can be displaced. Entrapped water of ?8-13 g of water/g of protein is associated with (pelleted) aggregates, of which approximately 4.5-8.5 g of water/g of protein is not constrained in exchangeability with the solvent. The amount of confined water within aggregates was found to be independent of the aggregate density and accounted for ?3.5 g of water/g of protein. Confined water in aggregates is hindered in its diffusion because of physical structure constraints and, therefore, not directly exchangeable with the solvent. These insights in the protein aggregate size and deformability in relation to water entrapment and confinement could be used to tune water holding on larger length scales when force is applied. PMID:26416128

  15. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  16. Estimating Field-scale Soil Water Dynamics at a Heterogeneous Site Using Multi-channel GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Zhang, J.; Roth, K.

    2011-12-01

    One important reason for the spatial variability of the crop yield is the subsurface architecture which influences hydrological processes as well as nutrient transport. The infiltration and redistribution of water in soils in column has been well studied and simulated by various models in the laboratory as well as in many detailed plot studies. A major challenge is to bridge the gap between the plot-scale of a few meters to the field scale of hundreds of meters up to a few kilometers. Geophysical methods have been increasingly used to characterize subsurface architecture and soil water dynamics. As a non-invasive tool, multi-channel GPR can provide reflector depth and soil water content simultaneously with a relative high spatial resolution. From a time series of measurements, the temporal variation of soil water content can be captured. Through monitoring the spatio-temporal variability of soil water content, we investigate the influences of the heterogeneous vadose zone deposits to the field-scale hydrological processes with multi-channel GPR. In this study, we present a hydrogeophysical data set from an agricultural field in an ancient dune region and we demonstrate the potential of the method by monitoring the evolution of the soil water distribution after a precipitation event.

  17. Iterative Receiver in Time-Frequency Domain for Shallow Water Acoustic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Ge, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    Inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by multi-path propagation, especially in shallow water channel, degrades the performance of underwater acoustic (UWA) communication systems. In this paper, we combine soft minimum mean squared error (MMSE) equalization and the serially concatenated trellis coded modulation (SCTCM) decoding to develop an iterative receiver in time-frequency domain (TFD) for underwater acoustic point to point communications. Based on sound speed profile (SSP) measured in the lake and finite-element ray (FER) tracing method (Bellhop), the shallow water channel is constructed to evaluate the performance of the proposed iterative receiver. The results suggest that the proposed iterative receiver can reduce the calculation complexity of the equalizer and obtain better performance using less receiving elements.

  18. Cloning and characterization of a zebrafish homologue of human AQP1: a bifunctional water and gas channel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Ming; Zhao, Jinhua; Musa-Aziz, Raif; Pelletier, Marc F; Drummond, Iain A; Boron, Walter F

    2010-11-01

    The mammalian aquaporins AQP1, AQP4, and AQP5 have been shown to function not only as water channels but also as gas channels. Zebrafish have two genes encoding an AQP1 homologue, aqp1a and aqp1b. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA that encodes the zebrafish protein Aqp1a from the 72-h postfertilization (hpf) embryo of Danio rerio, as well as from the swim bladder of the adult. The deduced amino-acid sequence of aqp1a consists of 260 amino acids and is 59% identical to human AQP1. By analyzing the genomic DNA sequence, we identified four exons in the aqp1a gene. By in situ hybridization, aqp1a is expressed transiently in the developing vasculature and in erythrocytes from 16 to 48 h of development. Later, at 72 hpf, aqp1a is expressed in dermal ionocytes and in the swim bladder. Western blot analysis of adult tissues reveals that Aqp1a is most highly expressed in the eye and swim bladder. Xenopus oocytes expressing aqp1a have a channel-dependent (*) osmotic water permeability (P(f)(*)) that is indistinguishable from that of human AQP1. On the basis of the magnitude of the transient change in surface pH (?pH(S)) that were recorded as the oocytes were exposed to either CO(2) or NH(3), we conclude that zebrafish Aqp1a is permeable to both CO(2) and NH(3). The ratio (?pH(S)(*))((CO)2)/P(f)(*) is about half that of human AQP1, and the ratio (?pH(S)(*))(NH3)/P(f)(*) is about one-quarter that of human AQP1. Thus, compared with human AQP1, zebrafish Aqp1a has about twice the selectivity for CO(2) over NH(3). PMID:20739606

  19. Receptor stimulation causes slow inhibition of IRK1 inwardly rectifying K+ channels by direct protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Wischmeyer, E; Karschin, A

    1996-01-01

    Strongly rectifying IRK-type inwardly rectifying K+ channels are involved in the control of neuronal excitability in the mammalian brain. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments show that cloned rat IRK1 (Kir 2.1) channels, when heterologously expressed in mammalian COS-7 cells, are inhibited following the activation of coexpressed serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) type 1A receptors by receptor agonists. Inhibition is mimicked by internal perfusion with GTP[gamma-S] and elevation of internal cAMP concentrations. Addition of the catalytic subunits of protein kinase A (PKA) to the internal recording solution causes complete inhibition of wild-type IRK1 channels, but not of mutant IRK1(S425N) channels in which a C-terminal PKA phosphorylation site has been removed. Our data suggest that in the nervous system serotonin may negatively control IRK1 channel activity by direct PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8650176

  20. Heat shock proteins and p53 play a critical role in K+ channel-mediated tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaobing; Wang, Fang; Yao, Weixing; Xing, Hui; Weng, Danhui; Song, Xiaohong; Chen, Gang; Xi, Ling; Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Wang, Shixuan; Meng, Li; Iadecola, Costantino; Wang, Gang; Ma, Ding

    2007-10-01

    Plasma membrane potassium (K+) channels are required for tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the signal transduction mechanisms underlying K+ channel-dependent tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis remains elusive. Using HeLa and A2780 cells as study models, we tested the hypothesis that apoptotic proteins are linked with K+ channel-dependent tumor cell cycle and apoptosis. The patch-clamping study using the whole-cell mode revealed two components of voltage-gated outward K+ currents: one is sensitive to either tetraethylammonium (TEA) or tetrandrine (Tet), a maxi-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel blocker, and the other is sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a delayed rectifier K+ channel blocker. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that TEA, Tet, or iberiotoxin (Ibtx), a selective BK channel blocker, inhibited HeLa and A2780 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with G1 phase arrest. Pretreatment with TEA or Tet also induced apoptosis in HeLa and A2780 cells. However, glibenclamide (Gli), an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, did not influence K+ currents, proliferation or apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that while pretreatment of TEA and Tet produced an increase in expressions of p53, p21, and Bax, pretreatment of these two agents led to a decrease in expressions of heat shock protein (hsp)90alpha, hsp90beta, and hsp70. Our results indicate that the blockade of BK channels results in tumor cell apoptosis and cycle arrest at G1 phase, and the transduction pathway underlying the anti-proliferative effects is linked to the increased expression of apoptotic protein p53 and the decreased expression of its chaperone proteins hsp. PMID:17624594

  1. Gas-discharge probe microscopy of water-carrying channels in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.; Ivanova, E. I.

    2012-04-01

    We have used a gas-discharge imaging technique to study the water transport channels (tracheids) in wood samples. Results obtained for the samples of bitch and aspen show features of this variant of the probe microscopy and show its additional possibilities as compared to optical microscopy. It is concluded that gas-discharge probe microscopy can be used for additional diagnostics of the structure of plant and animal tissues.

  2. Wind-forced circulation model and water exchanges through the channel in the Bay of Toulon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Christiane; Duffa, Céline; Rey, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the Bay of Toulon has been developed for use as a post-accident radionuclide dispersion simulation tool. Located in a Mediterranean urban area, the Bay of Toulon is separated into two basins by a 1.4-km long seawall. The Little Bay is semi-enclosed and connected to the Large Bay by a fairway channel. This channel is the site of significant water mass exchange as a result of both wind-driven currents and bathymetry. It is therefore a focal point for marine contamination. As part of the model calibration and validation process, the first step consisted of studying the water mass exchange between the two basins. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler was moored in the channel for 1 year. The present study analyses in situ data to determine the current intensity and direction, and also to better understand the vertical current profile, which is highly correlated with meteorological forcing. Comparisons of model-generated and measured data are presented, and various atmospheric forcing datasets are used to enhance computed results. It appears that accurate meteorological forcing data is needed to enhance the accuracy of the hydrodynamic model. This channel is an important location for water mass renewal in the Bay of Toulon, and model results are used to quantify these exchanges. The mean calculated annual water exchange time is approximately 3.4 days. However, this duration is strongly wind dependent and shortens during windy winter months. It ranges from 1.5 days during strong wind periods to 7.5 days during calm weather. Residence time values calculated through tracer dispersion modelling after release at the back of the Little Bay are found to be comparable to the mean exchange time values, especially for windy conditions.

  3. Experiments on strong interactions between solitary waves. [shallow water waves propagating in rectangular channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Maxworthy, T.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on the interaction between solitary shallow-water waves propagating in the same direction have been performed in a rectangular channel. Two methods were devised to compensate for the dissipation of the waves in order to compare results with Hirota's (1971) solution for the collision of solitons described by the Korteweg-de Vries equation. Both qualitative and quantitative agreement with theory is obtained using the proposed corrections for wave damping.

  4. Patients with autosomal nephrogenic diabetes insipidus homozygous for mutations in the aquaporin 2 water-channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lieburg, A.F. van; Verdijk, M.A.J.; Knoers, V.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Oost, B.A. van; Os, C.H. van; Deen, P.M.T.; Essen, A.J. van; Proesmans, W.; Mallmann, R.

    1994-10-01

    Mutations in the X-chromosomal V2 receptor gene are known to cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Besides the X-linked form, an autosomal mode of inheritance has been described. Recently, mutations in the autosomal gene coding for water-channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) of the renal collecting duct were reported in an NDI patient. In the present study, missense mutations and a single nucleotide deletion in the aquaporin 2 gene of three NDI patients from consanquineous matings are described. Expression studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that the missense AQP2 proteins are nonfunctional. These results prove that mutations in the AQP2 gene cause autosomal recessive NDI. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Mapping hydration dynamics and coupled water-protein fluctuations around a protein surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Wang, Lijuan; Kao, Ya-Ting; Qiu, Weihong; Yang, Yi; Okobiah, Oghaghare; Zhong, Dongping

    2009-03-01

    Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of water-protein interactions is critical to understanding many fundamental aspects of protein science, such as protein folding and misfolding and enzyme catalysis. We recently carried out a global mapping of protein-surface hydration dynamics around a globular ?-helical protein apomyoglobin. The intrinsic optical probe tryptophan was employed to scan the protein surface one at a time by site-specific mutagenesis. With femtosecond resolution, we mapped out the dynamics of water-protein interactions with more than 20 mutants and for two states, native and molten globular. A robust bimodal distribution of time scales was observed, representing two types of water motions: local relaxation and protein-coupled fluctuations. The time scales show a strong correlation with the local protein structural rigidity and chemical identity. We also resolved two distinct contributions to the overall Stokes-shifts from the two time scales. These results are significant to understanding the role of hydration water on protein structural stability, dynamics and function.

  6. Capillary isoelectric focusing in pseudo-closed channel coupled to matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Mok, Michelle L-S; Hua, Lin; Phua, Jonathan B-C; Wee, Michael K-T; Sze, Newman S-K

    2004-02-01

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) was performed in pseudo-closed channel to separate proteins on a plastic chip. Pseudo-closed channel provided a novel way to couple protein separation by CIEF to MALDI mass spectrometry without eluting the focused proteins. PMID:14752551

  7. Water surface and channel bed morphology change before and after a laboratory meander neck cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Meander evolution of narrowing point bars ultimately forms a straight reach and an associated oxbow lake after meand bend cutoff. Observing the water surface and bed topography change during the meander cutoff process allows scientists and engineers to better understand flow mechanisms in meandering rivers, predict river behavior following cutoff, and minimize damage to life and property. Theoretical river evolution model indicates that head loss between the upstream and downstream meander neck increases during meander evolution, and this leads to an increasing hydraulic gradient and intensification of the cutoff. Yet no detailed observations are available to support the theory. In this research, we establish a physical model of a meander cutoff in a 1.8 m * 3.7 m laboratory river table using 0.18 mm median diameter sand and river discharge of 100 mL/s. The initial meander is a highly curved meander with a sinuosity of 5.6. Erosion is initiated by stream flow and the meander goes through the cutoff process. Water surface elevation along the river, river bed topography, and groundwater head in the intra-meander zone are precisely measured with an accuracy of up to 0.4 mm using a close range photogrammetry technique and ultrasonic sensors. The measurements are taken every 5 hours before the cutoff, immediately after the cutoff, and 1 hour, 5 hours after the cutoff respectively. Our results show that hydraulic gradient gradually steepens crossing the meander neck before the cutoff. River bed elevation gradients crossing the meander neck are enlarged due to the continuous deposition at the upstream neck and erosion at the downstream neck. However, the river bed elevation differences is counter balanced by the water depth which is smaller at the upstream and larger at the downstream, and the head loss across the neck remains nearly the same during cutoff. Immediately after the meander cutoff, a cascade emerges, and then rapidly dissipates into the new channel during rapid headwater erosion. After 1 hour of the cutoff the oxbow lake has separated from the main river channel, and the water surface in the oxbow lake is flat but higher than that in the main river channel. After 5 hours of the cutoff, water surface at the oxbow lake is regulated to that in the main river channel. Some of the abandoned channel morphology in the oxbow lake forms islands due to the decreased water depth.

  8. Streambed and water profile response to in-channel restoration structures in a laboratory meandering stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bangshuai; Chu, Hong-Hanh; Endreny, Theodore A.

    2015-11-01

    In-channel structures are often installed in alluvial rivers during restoration to steer currents, but they also modify the streambed morphology and water surface profile, and alter hydraulic gradients driving ecologically important hyporheic exchange. Although river features before and after restoration need to be compared, few studies have collected detailed observations to facilitate this comparison. We created a laboratory mobile-bed alluvial meandering river and collected detailed measurements in the highly sinuous meander before and after installation of in-channel structures, which included one cross vane and six J-hooks situated along 1 bar unit. Measurements of streambed and water surface elevation with submillimeter vertical accuracy and horizontal resolution were obtained using close-range photogrammetry. Compared to the smooth gradually varied water surface profile for control runs without structures, the structures created rapidly varied flow with subcritical to supercritical flow transitions, as well as backwater and forced-morphology pools, which increased volumetric storage by 74% in the entire stream reach. The J-hooks, located along the outer bank of the meander bend and downstream of the cross vane, created stepwise patterns in the streambed and water surface longitudinal profiles. The pooling of water behind the cross vane increased the hydraulic gradient across the meander neck by 1% and increased local groundwater gradients by 4%, with smaller increases across other transects through the intrameander zone. Scour pools developed downstream of the cross vane and around the J-hooks situated near the meander apex. In-channel structures significantly changed meander bend hydraulic gradients, and the detailed streambed and water surface 3-D maps provide valuable data for computational modeling of changes to hyporheic exchange.

  9. Convergent regulation of skeletal muscle Ca2+ channels by dystrophin, the actin cytoskeleton, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Barry D.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2005-03-01

    The skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1), which is responsible for initiating muscle contraction, is regulated by phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a voltage-dependent manner that requires direct physical association between the channel and the kinase mediated through A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The role of the actin cytoskeleton in channel regulation was investigated in skeletal myocytes cultured from wild-type mice, mdx mice that lack the cytoskeletal linkage protein dystrophin, and a skeletal muscle cell line, 129 CB3. Voltage dependence of channel activation was shifted positively, and potentiation was greatly diminished in mdx myocytes and in 129 CB3 cells treated with the microfilament stabilizer phalloidin. Voltage-dependent potentiation by strong depolarizing prepulses was reduced in mdx myocytes but could be restored by positively shifting the stimulus potentials to compensate for the positive shift in the voltage dependence of gating. Inclusion of PKA in the pipette caused a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation and restored voltage-dependent potentiation in mdx myocytes. These results show that skeletal muscle Ca2+ channel activity and voltage-dependent potentiation are controlled by PKA and microfilaments in a convergent manner. Regulation of Ca2+ channel activity by hormones and neurotransmitters that use the PKA signal transduction pathway may interact in a critical way with the cytoskeleton and may be impaired by deletion of dystrophin, contributing to abnormal regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations in dystrophic muscle.

  10. Water in Nonpolar Confinement: From Nanotubes to Proteins and Beyond *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    Water molecules confined to nonpolar pores and cavities of nanoscopic dimensions exhibit highly unusual properties. Water filling is strongly cooperative, with the possible coexistence of filled and empty states and sensitivity to small perturbations of the pore polarity and solvent conditions. Confined water molecules form tightly hydrogen-bonded wires or clusters. The weak attractions to the confining wall, combined with strong interactions between water molecules, permit exceptionally rapid water flow, exceeding expectations from macroscopic hydrodynamics by several orders of magnitude. The proton mobility along 1D water wires also substantially exceeds that in the bulk. Proteins appear to exploit these unusual properties of confined water in their biological function (e.g., to ensure rapid water flow in aquaporins or to gate proton flow in proton pumps and enzymes). The unusual properties of water in nonpolar confinement are also relevant to the design of novel nanofluidic and molecular separation devices or fuel cells.

  11. Hydration water dynamics and instigation of protein structuralrelaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    Until a critical hydration level is reached, proteins do not function. This critical level of hydration is analogous to a similar lack of protein function observed for temperatures below a dynamical temperature range of 180-220K that also is connected to the dynamics of protein surface water. Restoration of some enzymatic activity is observed in partially hydrated protein powders, sometimes corresponding to less than a single hydration layer on the protein surface, which indicates that the dynamical and structural properties of the surface water is intimately connected to protein stability and function. Many elegant studies using both experiment and simulation have contributed important information about protein hydration structure and timescales. The molecular mechanism of the solvent motion that is required to instigate the protein structural relaxation above a critical hydration level or transition temperature has yet to be determined. In this work we use experimental quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate hydration water dynamics near a greatly simplified protein system. We consider the hydration water dynamics near the completely deuterated N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA) solute, a hydrophobic amino acid side chain attached to a polar blocked polypeptide backbone, as a function of concentration between 0.5M-2.0M under ambient conditions. We note that roughly 50-60% of a folded protein's surface is equally distributed between hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, domains whose lengths are on the order of a few water diameters, that justify our study of hydration dynamics of this simple model protein system. The QENS experiment was performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the disk chopper time of flight spectrometer (DCS). In order to separate the translational and rotational components in the spectra, two sets of experiments were carried out using different incident neutron wavelengths of 7.5{angstrom} and 5.5{angstrom} to give two different time resolutions. All the spectra have been measure at room temperature. The spectra were corrected for the sample holder contribution and normalized using the vanadium standard. The resulting data were analyzed with DAVE programs (http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/dave/). The AMBER force field and SPCE water model were used for modeling the NALMA solute and water, respectively. For the analysis of the water dynamics in the NALMA aqueous solutions, we performed simulations of a dispersed solute configuration consistent with our previous structural analysis, where we had primarily focused on the structural organization of these peptide solutions and their connection to protein folding. Further details of the QENS experiment and molecular dynamics simulations are reported elsewhere.

  12. Protein kinase C modulation of thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential channels: Implications for pain signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Sravan; Armati, Patricia J.; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of molecules are reported to be involved in chronic pain. This review outlines the specifics of protein kinase C (PKC), its isoforms and their role in modulating thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1-4, TRPM8, and TRPA1. Anatomically, PKC and thermo-sensitive TRPs are co-expressed in cell bodies of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which are used as physiological correlates of peripheral and central projections involved in pain transmission. In the past decade, modulation of painful heat-sensitive TRPV1 by PKC has received the most attention. Recently, PKC modulation of other newly discovered thermo-sensitive pain-mediating TRPs has come into focus. Such modulation may occur under conditions of chronic pain resulting from nerve damage or inflammation. Since thermo-TRPs are primary detectors of acute pain stimuli, their modulation by PKC can severely alter their function, resulting in chronic pain. Comprehensive knowledge of pain signaling involving interaction of specific isoforms of PKC with specific thermo-sensitive TRP channels is incomplete. Such information is necessary to dissect out modality specific mechanisms to better manage the complex polymodal nature of chronic pain. This review is an attempt to update the readers on current knowledge of PKC modulation of thermo-sensitive TRPs and highlight implications of such modulation for pain signaling PMID:22470230

  13. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  14. Comparisons of the hydraulics of water flows in Martian outflow channels with flows of similar scale on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The hydraulics of channelized water flows on Mars and the resulting sediment transport rates are calculated, and similar computations are performed for such terrestrial analogs as the Mississippi River and the catastrophic Lake Missoula floods that formed the Channeled Scabland in eastern Washington State. The morphologies of deep-sea channels formed by catastrophic turbidity currents are compared with the Martian channels, many similarities are pointed out, and the hydraulics of the various flows are compared. The results indicate that the velocities, discharges, bottom shear stresses, and sediment-transport capacity of water flows along the Martian channels would be comparable to those of the oceanic turbidity currents and the Lake Missoula floods. It is suggested that the submarine canyons from which turbidity currents originate are the terrestrial counterparts to the chaotic-terrain areas or craters that serve as sources for many of the Martian channels.

  15. Modulation of the Arabidopsis KAT1 channel by an activator of protein kinase C in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aiko; Gambale, Franco; Dreyer, Ingo; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2010-05-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana K(+) channel KAT1 has been suggested to play a key role in the regulation of the aperture of stomatal pores on the surface of plant leaves. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signaling pathways are involved in abscisic acid-mediated regulation of guard cell turgidity. Although the activity of the KAT1 channel is thought to be regulated by calcium-dependent protein kinases, the effect of phosphorylation on KAT1 and the phosphorylated target sites remain elusive. Because it has been proposed that the phosphorylation recognition sequence of plant calcium-dependent protein kinases resembles that of animal protein kinases C, in this study, we used the Xenopus laevis oocyte protein kinase C to identify the target sites of calcium-dependent protein kinases. KAT1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes was inhibited by the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. On the basis of an in silico search, we selected S/T-X-K/R motifs facing the cytosol, as it has been reported that protein kinase C and calcium-dependent protein kinase share a common consensus sequence. Mutagenesis analyses revealed that six Ser/Thr residues were responsible for the reduction in activity after phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate application. Simultaneous mutation of the five residues located in the carboxyl-terminus region of KAT1 led to a K(+) channel mutant that was insensitive to protein kinase C. These results indicate that, in plant cells, a kinase analogous to protein kinase C might exist that may modulate KAT1 channel activity through calcium-dependent phosphorylation at some of the pinpointed residues in the cytosolic region of KAT1. PMID:20423459

  16. Crystal Structure of the Mammalian GIRK2 KplusChannel and Gating Regulation by G Proteins PIP2 and Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    M Whorton; R MacKinnon

    2011-12-31

    G protein-gated K{sup +} channels (Kir3.1--Kir3.4) control electrical excitability in many different cells. Among their functions relevant to human physiology and disease, they regulate the heart rate and govern a wide range of neuronal activities. Here, we present the first crystal structures of a G protein-gated K{sup +} channel. By comparing the wild-type structure to that of a constitutively active mutant, we identify a global conformational change through which G proteins could open a G loop gate in the cytoplasmic domain. The structures of both channels in the absence and presence of PIP{sub 2} suggest that G proteins open only the G loop gate in the absence of PIP{sub 2}, but in the presence of PIP{sub 2} the G loop gate and a second inner helix gate become coupled, so that both gates open. We also identify a strategically located Na{sup +} ion-binding site, which would allow intracellular Na{sup +} to modulate GIRK channel activity. These data provide a structural basis for understanding multiligand regulation of GIRK channel gating.

  17. Cloud area determination from AVIRIS data using water vapor channels near 1. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, B.C.; Goetz, A.F.H. )

    1991-02-20

    Fractional cloud area is derived from spectral images collected by the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS covers the spectral region from 0.4 to 2.5 {mu}m with 224 channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 {times} 20 m from an altitude of 20 km. The derivation is made by ratioing radiances near the 0.94- and the 1.14-{mu}m water vapor band centers against those in the intermediate atmospheric window regions. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of most ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and the 1.14-{mu}m water vapor band absorption regions, and (2) the peak absorptions of the water vapor band over cloudy areas are smaller than those over nearby clear surface areas because of the rapidly decreasing atmospheric water vapor concentration with height. The band ratioing technique effectively discriminates among clouds and surface areas having similar reflectance values. Such discrimination is not possible using standard radiance thresholding techniques. It is expected that the use of water vapor channels in the near-infrared region in future satellites will improve the ability to determine cloud cover over the land.

  18. ABA signaling in guard cells entails a dynamic protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL-RCAR family receptors to ion channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Lim, Chae Woo; Lan, Wenzhi; He, Kai; Luan, Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) serves as an integrator of environmental stresses such as drought to trigger stomatal closure by regulating specific ion channels in guard cells. We previously reported that SLAC1, an outward anion channel required for stomatal closure, was regulated via reversible protein phosphorylation events involving ABA signaling components, including protein phosphatase 2C members and a SnRK2-type kinase (OST1). In this study, we reconstituted the ABA signaling pathway as a protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL/RCAR-type receptors, to the PP2C-SnRK2 phosphatase-kinase pairs, to the ion channel SLAC1. The ABA receptors interacted with and inhibited PP2C phosphatase activity against the SnRK2-type kinase, releasing active SnRK2 kinase to phosphorylate, and activate the SLAC1 channel, leading to reduced guard cell turgor and stomatal closure. Both yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to verify the interactions among the components in the pathway. These biochemical assays demonstrated activity modifications of phosphatases and kinases by their interaction partners. The SLAC1 channel activity was used as an endpoint readout for the strength of the signaling pathway, depending on the presence of different combinations of signaling components. Further study using transgenic plants overexpressing one of the ABA receptors demonstrated that changing the relative level of interacting partners would change ABA sensitivity. PMID:22935148

  19. Performance analysis of quantum key distribution based on air-water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun

    2015-03-01

    Considering the air-water interface and ocean water's optical attenuation, the performance of quantum key distribution (QKD) based on air-water channel is studied. The effects of photons' various incident angles to air-water interface on quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the maximum secure transmission distance are analyzed. Taking the optical attenuation of ocean water into account, the performance bounds of QKD in different types of ocean water are discussed. The simulation results show that the maximum secure transmission distance of QKD gradually reduces as the incident angle from air to ocean water increases. In the clearest ocean water with the lowest attenuation, the maximum secure transmission distance of photons far exceeds the the working depth of underwater vehicles. In intermediate and murky ocean waters with higher attenuation, the secure transmission distance shortens, but the underwater vehicle can deploy other accessorial methods for QKD with perfect security. So the implementation of OKD between the satellite and the underwater vehicle is feasible.

  20. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Outer Membrane Channel Protein CpnT Confers Susceptibility to Toxic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Danilchanka, Olga; Pires, David

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is protected from toxic solutes by an effective outer membrane permeability barrier. Recently, we showed that the outer membrane channel protein CpnT is required for efficient nutrient uptake by M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In this study, we found that the cpnT mutant of M. bovis BCG is more resistant than the wild type to a large number of drugs and antibiotics, including rifampin, ethambutol, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin, by 8- to 32-fold. Furthermore, the cpnT mutant of M. bovis BCG was 100-fold more resistant to nitric oxide, a major bactericidal agent required to control M. tuberculosis infections in mice. Thus, CpnT constitutes the first outer membrane susceptibility factor in slow-growing mycobacteria. The dual functions of CpnT in uptake of nutrients and mediating susceptibility to toxic molecules are reflected in macrophage infection experiments: while loss of CpnT was detrimental for M. bovis BCG in macrophages that enable bacterial replication, presumably due to inadequate nutrient uptake, it conferred a survival advantage in macrophages that mount a strong bactericidal response. Importantly, the cpnT gene showed a significantly higher density of nonsynonymous mutations in drug-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis strains, indicating that CpnT is under selective pressure in human tuberculosis and/or during chemotherapy. Our results indicate that the CpnT channel constitutes an outer membrane gateway controlling the influx of nutrients and toxic molecules into slow-growing mycobacteria. This study revealed that reducing protein-mediated outer membrane permeability might constitute a new drug resistance mechanism in slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:25645841

  1. Simulations of the effects of water vapor, cloud liquid water, and ice on AMSU moisture channel brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Bradley M.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Xiang, Xuwu

    1994-01-01

    Radiative transfer simulations are performed to determine how water vapor and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water and ice particles within typical midlatitude atmospheres affect brightness temperatures T(sub B)'s of moisture sounding channels used in the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and AMSU-like instruments. The purpose is to promote a general understanding of passive top-of-atmosphere T(sub B)'s for window frequencies at 23.8, 89.0, and 157.0 GHz, and water vapor frequencies at 176.31, 180.31, and 182.31 GHz by documenting specific examples. This is accomplished through detailed analyses of T(sub B)'s for idealized atmospheres, mostly representing temperate conditions over land. Cloud effects are considered in terms of five basic properties: droplet size distribution, phase, liquid or ice water content, altitude, and thickness. Effects on T(sub B) of changing surface emissivity also are addressed. The brightness temperature contribution functions are presented as an aid to physically interpreting AMSU T(sub B)'s. Both liquid and ice clouds impact the T(sub B)'s in a variety of ways. The T(sub B)'s at 23.8 and 89 GHz are more strongly affected by altostratus liquid clouds than by cirrus clouds for equivalent water paths. In contrast, channels near 157 and 183 GHz are more strongly affected by ice clouds. Higher clouds have a greater impact on 157- and 183-GHz T(sub B)'s than do lower clouds. Clouds depress T(sub B)'s of the higher-frequency channels by suppressing, but not necessarily obscuring, radiance contributions from below. Thus, T(sub B)'s are less closely associated with cloud-top temperatures than are IR radiometric temperatures. Water vapor alone accounts for up to 89% of the total attenuation by a midtropospheric liquid cloud for channels near 183 GHz. The Rayleigh approximation is found to be adequate for typical droplet size distributions; however, Mie scattering effects from liquid droplets become important for droplet size distribution functions with modal radii greater than 20 micrometers near 157 and 183 GHz, and greater than 30-40 micrometers at 89 GHz. This is due mainly to the relatively small concentrations of droplets much larger than the mode radius. Orographic clouds and tropical cumuli have been observed to contain droplet size distributions with mode radii in the 30-40 micrometers range. Thus, as new instruments bridge the gap between microwave and infrared to frequencies even higher than 183 GHz, radiative transfer modelers are cautioned to explicitly address scattering characteristics of such clouds.

  2. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters. PMID:26371748

  3. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  4. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC. PMID:19692483

  5. The cAMP Signaling Pathway and Direct Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation Regulate Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Velázquez, Irina F; Streets, Andrew J; Ong, Albert C M; Cantiello, Horacio F

    2015-09-25

    Polycystin-2 (PC2) is a TRP-type, Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channel that plays an important role in Ca(2+) signaling in renal and non-renal cells. The effect(s) of the cAMP pathway and kinase mediated phosphorylation of PC2 seem to be relevant to PC2 trafficking and its interaction with polycystin-1. However, the role of PC2 phosphorylation in channel function is still poorly defined. Here we reconstituted apical membranes of term human syncytiotrophoblast (hST), containing endogenous PC2 (PC2hst), and in vitro translated channel protein (PC2iv). Addition of the catalytic subunit of PKA increased by 566% the spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the presence of ATP. Interestingly, 8-Br-cAMP also stimulated spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the absence of the exogenous kinase. Either stimulation was inhibited by addition of alkaline phosphatase, which in turn, was reversed by the phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. Neither maneuver modified the single channel conductance but instead increased channel mean open time. PKA directly phosphorylated PC2, which increased the mean open time but not the single channel conductance of the channel. PKA phosphorylation did not modify either R742X truncated or S829A-mutant PC2iv channel function. The data indicate that the cAMP pathway regulates PC2-mediated cation transport in the hST. The relevant PKA site for PC2 channel regulation centers on a single residue serine 829, in the carboxyl terminus. PMID:26269590

  6. The TRPC family of TRP channels: roles inferred (mostly) from knockout mice and relationship to ORAI proteins.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanhong; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Aside from entering into cells through voltage gated Ca channels and Na/Ca exchangers in those cells that express these proteins, for all cells be they excitable or non-excitable, Ca(2+) enters through channels that are activated downstream of phosphoinositide mobilization (activation of phospholipase C, PLC) and through channels that are activated secondary to depletion of internal stores. Depletion of internal stores activates plasma membrane channels known as ORAIs. Activation of PLCs activates the canonical class of transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs), and, because this activation also causes depletion of Ca(2+) stores, also ORAI based channels. Whereas the activation of ORAI is a well-accepted phenomenon, it appears that TRPC channels also participate in Ca(2+) entry triggered by store depletion with or without participation of ORAI molecules. Regardless of molecular makeup of TRPC containing channels, a plethora of studies have shown TRPCs to be important both in physiologic systems as well as in pathophysiologic phenomena. Particularly important in defining roles of TRPCs, have been studies with mice with targeted disruption of their genes, i.e., with TRPC KO mice. In this chapter we first focus on TRPCs as regulators of body functions in health and disease, and then focus on the possible make-up of the channels of which they participate. A hypothesis is set forth, whereby ORAI dimers are proposed to be regulatory subunits of tetrameric TRPC channels and serve as structural units that form ORAI channels either as dimers of dimers or trimers of dimers. PMID:24961980

  7. Bordetella pertussis major outer membrane porin protein forms small, anion-selective channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, S K; Parr, T R; Parker, C D; Hancock, R E

    1986-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein of molecular weight 40,000 (the 40K protein) of a virulent isolate of Bordetella pertussis was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified protein formed an oligomer band (of apparent molecular weight 90,000) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after solubilization at low temperatures. The porin function of this protein was characterized by the black lipid bilayer method. The 40K protein formed channels smaller than all other constitutive major outer membrane porins studied to date. The average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl was 0.56 nS. This was less than a third of the conductance previously observed for Escherichia coli porins. Zero-current potential measurements made of the porin to determine its ion selectivity revealed the porin to be more than 100-fold selective for anions over cations. The single-channel conductance was measured as a function of salt concentration. The data could be fitted to a Lineweaver-Burk plot suggesting an anion binding site with a Kd of 1.17 M Cl- and a maximum possible conductance through the channel of 1.28 nS. Images PMID:2420780

  8. Vpr Protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Forms Cation-Selective Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, S. C.; Ewart, G. D.; Premkumar, A.; Cox, G. B.; Gage, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    A small (96-aa) protein, virus protein R (Vpr), of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 contains one hydrophobic segment that could form a membrane-spanning helix. Recombinant Vpr, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography, formed ion channels in planar lipid bilayers when it was added to the cis chamber and when the trans chamber was held at a negative potential. The channels were more permeable to Na+ than to Cl- ions and were inhibited when the trans potential was made positive. Similar channel activity was caused by Vpr that had a truncated C terminus, but the potential dependence of channel activity was no longer seen. Antibody raised to a peptide mimicking part of the C terminus of Vpr (AbC) inhibited channel activity when added to the trans chamber but had no effect when added to the cis chamber. Antibody to the N terminus of Vpr (AbN) increased channel activity when added to the cis chamber but had no effect when added to the trans chamber. The effects of potential and antibodies on channel activity are consistent with a model in which the positive C-terminal end of dipolar Vpr is induced to traverse the bilayer membrane when the opposite (trans) side of the membrane is at a negative potential. The C terminus of Vpr would then be available for interaction with AbC in the trans chamber, and the N terminus would be available for interaction with AbN in the cis chamber. The ability of Vpr to form ion channels in vitro suggests that channel formation by Vpr in vivo is possible and may be important in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and/or may cause changes in cells that contribute to AIDS-related pathologies.

  9. Chryse Planitia region, Mars: Channeling history, flood-volume estimates, and scenarios for bodies of water in the northern plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotto, Susan L.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    The Chryse Planitia region of Mars includes several outflow channels that debouched into a single basin. Here we evaluate possible volumes and areal extents of standing bodies of water that collected in the northern lowland plains, based on evidence provided by topography, fluvial relations, and channel chronology and geomorphology.

  10. Conserved BK channel-protein interactions reveal signals relevant to cell death and survival.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Bernd; Orchard, Sandra; Harvey, Margaret; Sridhar, Settu; Sakai, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel and its ?-subunit underlie tuning in non-mammalian sensory or hair cells, whereas in mammals its function is less clear. To gain insights into species differences and to reveal putative BK functions, we undertook a systems analysis of BK and BK-Associated Proteins (BKAPS) in the chicken cochlea and compared these results to other species. We identified 110 putative partners from cytoplasmic and membrane/cytoskeletal fractions, using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation, 2-D gel, and LC-MS/MS. Partners included 14-3-3?, valosin-containing protein (VCP), stathmin (STMN), cortactin (CTTN), and prohibitin (PHB), of which 16 partners were verified by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation. Bioinformatics revealed binary partners, the resultant interactome, subcellular localization, and cellular processes. The interactome contained 193 proteins involved in 190 binary interactions in subcellular compartments such as the ER, mitochondria, and nucleus. Comparisons with mice showed shared hub proteins that included N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and ATP-synthase. Ortholog analyses across six species revealed conserved interactions involving apoptosis, Ca(2+) binding, and trafficking, in chicks, mice, and humans. Functional studies using recombinant BK and RNAi in a heterologous expression system revealed that proteins important to cell death/survival, such as annexinA5, ?-actin, lamin, superoxide dismutase, and VCP, caused a decrease in BK expression. This revelation led to an examination of specific kinases and their effectors relevant to cell viability. Sequence analyses of the BK C-terminus across 10 species showed putative binding sites for 14-3-3, RAC-? serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK3?) and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). Knockdown of 14-3-3 and Akt caused an increase in BK expression, whereas silencing of GSK3? and PDK1 had the opposite effect. This comparative systems approach suggests conservation in BK function across different species in addition to novel functions that may include the initiation of signals relevant to cell death/survival. PMID:22174833

  11. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Koprowski, Piotr; Grajkowski, Wojciech; Balcerzak, Marcin; Filipiuk, Iwona; Fabczak, Hanna; Kubalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS) channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS) family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:25996836

  12. Schlieren visualization of water natural convection in a vertical ribbed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossa, M.; Misale, M.; Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Schlieren techniques are valuable tools for the qualitative and quantitative visualizations of flows in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. A large number of schlieren systems have been developed and documented in the literature; majority of applications involve flows of gases, typically air. In this work, a schlieren technique is applied to visualize the buoyancy-induced flow inside vertical ribbed channels using water as convective fluid. The test section consists of a vertical plate made of two thin sheets of chrome-plated copper with a foil heater sandwiched between them; the external sides of the plate are roughened with transverse, square-cross-sectioned ribs. Two parallel vertical walls, smooth and unheated, form with the heated ribbed plate two adjacent, identical and asymmetrically heated, vertical channels. Results include flow schlieren visualizations with colour-band filters, reconstructions of the local heat transfer coefficient distributions along the ribbed surfaces and comparisons with past experiments performed using air as working fluid.

  13. The English Channel: Contamination status of its transitional and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Tappin, A D; Millward, G E

    2015-06-30

    The chemical contamination (organic compounds, metals, radionuclides, microplastics, nutrients) of English Channel waters has been reviewed, focussing on the sources, concentrations and impacts. River loads were only reliable for Pb, whereas atmospheric loads appeared robust for Cd, Pb, Hg, PCB-153 and γ-HCH. Temporal trends in atmospheric inputs were decreasing. Contaminant concentrations in biota were relatively constant or decreasing, but not for Cd, Hg and HBCDD, and deleterious impacts on fish and copepods were reported. However, data on ecotoxicological effects were generally sparse for legacy and emerging contaminants. Intercomparison of activity concentrations of artificial radionuclides in sediments and biota on both Channel coasts was hindered by differences in methodological approaches. Riverine phosphate loads decreased with time, while nitrate loads remained uniform. Increased biomass of algae, attributable to terrestrial inputs of nutrients, has affected benthic production and shellfisheries. A strategic approach to the identification of contaminant impacts on marine biota is recommended. PMID:25649837

  14. The TatA component of the twin-arginine protein transport system forms channel complexes of variable diameter.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Ulrich; Pullan, Lee; McDevitt, Christopher A; Porcelli, Ida; de Leeuw, Erik; Palmer, Tracy; Saibil, Helen R; Berks, Ben C

    2005-07-26

    The Tat system mediates Sec-independent transport of folded precursor proteins across the bacterial plasma membrane or the chloroplast thylakoid membrane. Tat transport involves distinct high-molecular-weight TatA and TatBC complexes. Here we report the 3D architecture of the TatA complex from Escherichia coli obtained by single-particle electron microscopy and random conical tilt reconstruction. TatA forms ring-shaped structures of variable diameter in which the internal channels are large enough to accommodate known Tat substrate proteins. This morphology strongly supports the proposal that TatA forms the protein-conducting channel of the Tat system. One end of the channel is closed by a lid that might gate access to the channel. On the basis of previous protease accessibility measurements, the lid is likely to be located at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The observed variation in TatA diameter suggests a model for Tat transport in which the number of TatA protomers changes to match the size of the channel to the size of the substrate being transported. Such dynamic close packing would provide a mechanism to maintain the membrane permeability barrier during transport. PMID:16027357

  15. PIP3 inhibition of RGS protein and its reversal by Ca2+/calmodulin mediate voltage-dependent control of the G protein cycle in a cardiac K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Masaru; Inanobe, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2002-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) accelerate intrinsic GTP hydrolysis on ? subunits of trimeric G proteins and play crucial roles in the physiological regulation of G protein-mediated cell signaling. The control mechanisms of the action of RGS proteins per se are poorly clarified, however. We recently showed a physiological mode of action of a RGS protein in cardiac myocytes. The voltage-dependent formation of Ca2+/calmodulin facilitated the GTPase activity of RGS by an unidentified mechanism, which underlay the “relaxation” behavior of G protein-gated K+ (KG) channels. Here we report the mechanism which is the reversal by Ca2+/calmodulin of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5,-trisphosphate (PIP3)-mediated inhibition of RGS. Purified RGS4 protein alone inhibited GTP-induced KG channel activity in inside-out patches from atrial myocytes. The inhibitory effect of RGS4 was reduced by PIP3 and restored by addition of Ca2+/calmodulin. The intracellular application of anti-PIP3 antibody abolished the RGS-dependent relaxation behavior of KG current in atrial myocytes. This study, therefore, reveals a general physiological control mechanism of RGS proteins by lipid–protein interaction. PMID:11904384

  16. Phase separation predicted to induce water-rich channels in fuel cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Daniel; Witten, Thomas; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan; Maes, Ashley; Herring, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Fuel cells are a promising alternative energy technology that convert chemical fuel directly into electric power. One important fundamental property is exactly how and where water is absorbed in the polyelectrolyte membrane. Previous theoretical studies have used idealized parameters. In this talk, I show how we made a rigorous connection to experiment to make parameter-free predictions of the water-swelling behavior, using self-consistent field theory. The model block co-polymers we studied form alternating hydrophilic/hydrophobic lamellar domains that absorb water in humid air. I will show how simple measurements of the hydrophilic portion in solution lead to predictions of non-uniform water distribution in the membrane, and compare the results to x-ray scattering. The results suggest locally near-uniform water distributions. In special cases, however, each hydrophilic lamella phase-separates, forming an additional water-rich lamella down the center, a beneficial arrangement for ion conductivity. A small amount of water enhances conductivity most when it is partitioned into such channels, improving fuel-cell performance. MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  17. Antibodies to Kv1 potassium channel-complex proteins leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein-2 in limbic encephalitis, Morvan’s syndrome and acquired neuromyotonia

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Sarosh R.; Alexander, Sian; Waters, Patrick; Kleopa, Kleopas A.; Pettingill, Philippa; Zuliani, Luigi; Peles, Elior; Buckley, Camilla; Lang, Bethan

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies that immunoprecipitate 125I-?-dendrotoxin-labelled voltage-gated potassium channels extracted from mammalian brain tissue have been identified in patients with neuromyotonia, Morvan’s syndrome, limbic encephalitis and a few cases of adult-onset epilepsy. These conditions often improve following immunomodulatory therapies. However, the proportions of the different syndromes, the numbers with associated tumours and the relationships with potassium channel subunit antibody specificities have been unclear. We documented the clinical phenotype and tumour associations in 96 potassium channel antibody positive patients (titres >400 pM). Five had thymomas and one had an endometrial adenocarcinoma. To define the antibody specificities, we looked for binding of serum antibodies and their effects on potassium channel currents using human embryonic kidney cells expressing the potassium channel subunits. Surprisingly, only three of the patients had antibodies directed against the potassium channel subunits. By contrast, we found antibodies to three proteins that are complexed with 125I-?-dendrotoxin-labelled potassium channels in brain extracts: (i) contactin-associated protein-2 that is localized at the juxtaparanodes in myelinated axons; (ii) leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein that is most strongly expressed in the hippocampus; and (iii) Tag-1/contactin-2 that associates with contactin-associated protein-2. Antibodies to Kv1 subunits were found in three sera, to contactin-associated protein-2 in 19 sera, to leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein in 55 sera and to contactin-2 in five sera, four of which were also positive for the other antibodies. The remaining 18 sera were negative for potassium channel subunits and associated proteins by the methods employed. Of the 19 patients with contactin-associated protein-antibody-2, 10 had neuromyotonia or Morvan’s syndrome, compared with only 3 of the 55 leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein-antibody positive patients (P < 0.0001), who predominantly had limbic encephalitis. The responses to immunomodulatory therapies, defined by changes in modified Rankin scores, were good except in the patients with tumours, who all had contactin-associated-2 protein antibodies. This study confirms that the majority of patients with high potassium channel antibodies have limbic encephalitis without tumours. The identification of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein-2 as the major targets of potassium channel antibodies, and their associations with different clinical features, begins to explain the diversity of these syndromes; furthermore, detection of contactin-associated protein-2 antibodies should help identify the risk of an underlying tumour and a poor prognosis in future patients. PMID:20663977

  18. Note: an underwater multi-channel plasma array for water sterilization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Kim, H; Starikovskiy, A; Cho, Y I; Fridman, A

    2011-09-01

    A simple yet effective method to generate multi-channel plasma array in water is presented in this paper. Thin circular metal disks sandwiched between dielectric layers were used, allowing the production of large-volume underwater plasma array with higher stability. The system can be further scaled up by stacking multiple metal disks, making it suitable for large-scale industrial water treatment. Generation of UV and reactive species was identified by optical emission spectroscopy. Sterilization experiments were performed. Results show that the device was effective in deactivating E. coli in water over a wide range of initial concentrations ranging from 10(4) to 10(8) CFU/ml. PMID:21974630

  19. Drying kinetics driven by the shape of the air/water interface in a capillary channel.

    PubMed

    Keita, Emmanuel; Koehler, Stephan A; Faure, Paméla; Weitz, David A; Coussot, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    We look at the drying process in a simple glass channel with dominant capillary effects as is the case in microfluidics. We find drying kinetics commonly observed for confined geometry, namely a constant period followed by a falling rate period. From visualization of the air/water interface with high resolution, we observe that the drying rate decreases without a drying front progression although this is the usually accepted mechanism for confined geometries. We show with FEM that in our specific geometry the falling rate period is due to changes in the shape of the air-water interface at the free surface where most evaporation occurs. Our simulations show that the sensitivity of the drying rate to the shape of the first air-water interface from the sample free surface implies that slight changes of the wetting or pinning conditions can significantly modify the drying rate. PMID:26920526

  20. Activation of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 4 and ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Cumulatively Decreases Superoxide Production in Insect Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Slocińska, Malgorzata; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    It has been evidenced that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and ATP-regulated potassium channel (mKATP channel) of insect Gromphadorhina coqereliana mitochondria decrease superoxide anion production. We elucidated whether the two energy-dissipating systems work together on a modulation of superoxide level in cockroach mitochondria. Our data show that the simultaneous activation of UCP4 by palmitic acid and mKATP channel by pinacidil revealed a cumulative effect on weakening mitochondrial superoxide formation. The inhibition of UCP4 by GTP (and/or ATP) and mKATP channel by ATP elevated superoxide production. These results suggest a functional cooperation of both energy-dissipating systems in protection against oxidative stress in insects. PMID:26548865

  1. A multi-channel gel electrophoresis and continuous fraction collection apparatus for high throughput protein separation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Megan; Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Cornell, Earl; Dong, Ming; Biggin, Mark D.; Jin, Jian

    2009-10-02

    To facilitate a direct interface between protein separation by PAGE and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we developed a multichannel system that continuously collects fractions as protein bands migrate off the bottom of gel electrophoresis columns. The device was constructed using several short linear gel columns, each of a different percent acrylamide, to achieve a separation power similar to that of a long gradient gel. A Counter Free-Flow elution technique then allows continuous and simultaneous fraction collection from multiple channels at low cost. We demonstrate that rapid, high-resolution separation of a complex protein mixture can be achieved on this system using SDS-PAGE. In a 2.5 h electrophoresis run, for example, each sample was separated and eluted into 48-96 fractions over a mass range of 10-150 kDa; sample recovery rates were 50percent or higher; each channel was loaded with up to 0.3 mg of protein in 0.4 mL; and a purified band was eluted in two to three fractions (200 L/fraction). Similar results were obtained when running native gel electrophoresis, but protein aggregation limited the loading capacity to about 50 g per channel and reduced resolution.

  2. Effects of fluoxetine on protein expression of potassium ion channels in the brain of chronic mild stress rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Ling; Rong, Xianfang; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of major potassium channel subtypes in the brain of chronical mild stress (CMS) rats and reveal the effects of fluoxetine on the expression of these channels. Rats were exposed to a variety of unpredictable stress for three weeks and induced anhedonia, lower sucrose preference, locomotor activity and lower body weight. The protein expressions were determined by Western blot. CMS significantly increased the expression of Kv2.1 channel in frontal cortex but not in hippocampus, and the expression level was normalized after fluoxetine treatment. The expression of TREK-1 channel was also obviously increased in frontal cortex in CMS rats. Fluoxetine treatment might prevent this increase. However, the expression of Kv3.1 and Kv4.2 channels was considerably decreased in hippocampus after CMS, and was not affected by fluoxetine. These results suggest that different subtypes of potassium channels are associated with the pathophysiology of depression and that the therapeutical effects of fluoxetine may relate to Kv2.1 and TREK-1 potassium channels. PMID:26579425

  3. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  4. A structural model for facultative anion channels in an oligomeric membrane protein: the yeast TRK (K(+)) system.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Juan Pablo; González-Andrade, Martin; Allen, Kenneth; Kuroda, Teruo; Slayman, Clifford L; Rivetta, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    TRK transporters, a class of proteins which generally carry out the bulk of K(+) accumulation in plants, fungi, and bacteria, mediate ion currents driven by the large membrane voltages (-150 to -250 mV) common to non-animal cells. Bacterial TRK proteins resemble K(+) channels in their primary sequence, crystallize as membrane dimers having intramolecular K(+)-channel-like folding, and complex with a cytoplasmic collar formed of four RCK domains (Nature 471:336, 2011; Ibid 496:324, 2013). Fungal TRK proteins appear simpler in form than the bacterial members, but do possess two special features: a large built-in regulatory domain, and a highly conserved pair of transmembrane helices (TM7 and TM8, ahead of the C-terminus), which were postulated to facilitate intramembranal oligomerization (Biophys. J. 77:789, 1999; FEMS Yeast Res. 9:278, 2009). A surprising associated functional process in the fungal proteins which have been explored (Saccharomyces, Candida, and Neurospora) is facilitation of channel-like chloride efflux. That process is suppressed by osmoprotective agents, appears to involve hydrophobic gating, and strongly resembles conduction by Cys-loop ligand-gated anion channels. And it leads to a rather general hypothesis: that the thermodynamic tendency for hydrophobic or amphipathic transmembrane helices to self-organize into oligomers can create novel ionic pathways through biological membranes: fundamental hydrophobic nanopores, pathways of low selectivity governed by the chaotropic behavior of individual ionic species and under the strong influence of membrane voltage. PMID:26100673

  5. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  6. [The reconstruction of ion channels created by protein neurotoxins in bilayer lipid membranes as a research tool for exocytosis processes].

    PubMed

    Shaturs'ky?, O Ia

    2011-01-01

    The direct transport of inorganic ions and much highly organized biomolecules across native membranes by the specific membrane proteins--ionic channels provides the functioning of a number of important biochemical processes like depolarization, Ca(2+)-release and exocytosis in nerve or muscle cells at the synaptic transmission. Therefore, the investigation of the structure and ion-conducting properties for neurotoxin channels and different factors affecting channels themselves and neuro-muscular transmission plays an important role in the research of pathologies that appear in intoxicated nerve tissues. As the massive release of neurotransmitters resulting from toxin-induced increase in Ca(2+)-permeability of the nerve endings occurs after the interaction of pore-forming neurotoxins alpha-latrotoxin, alpha- and delta-latroinsectotoxin from black widow spider venom with the specific receptors located on plasma membrane of the vertebrate or invertebrate nerve cells most attention in the review is paid to the reconstitution of above toxins channels. The part the pore-forming proteins reconstruction research takes to determine the exocytosis regulation endogenous cell proteins may participate has been observed on the example of latrotoxin-like L-protein from bovine brain nerve cells cytoplasm capable of binding with antibodies against alpha-latrotoxin. PMID:21851042

  7. Outer membrane protein P of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: regulation by phosphate deficiency and formation of small anion-specific channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, R E; Poole, K; Benz, R

    1982-01-01

    A new major outer membrane protein, P, was induced in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 upon growth in medium containing 0.2 mM or less inorganic phosphate. Studies with media containing different levels of phosphate and with mutants of PAO1 suggested that protein P was coregulated with alkaline phosphatase and phospholipase C. Protein P was substantially purified and shown to form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant oligomers on polyacrylamide gels. The incorporation of purified protein P into artificial lipid bilayers resulted in an increase of the membrane conductance by many orders of magnitude. Single-channel experiments demonstrated that protein P channels were substantially smaller than all previously studied porins from P. aeruginosa and enteric bacteria, with an average single-channel conductance in 1 M NaCl of 0.25 nS. The protein P channel was apparently not voltage induced or regulated. The results of single-channel conductance experiments, using a variety of different salts, allowed a minimum channel diameter estimate of 0.7 nm. Furthermore, from these results it was concluded that the protein P channel was highly specific for anions. Zero-current potential measurements confirmed that protein P was at least 30-fold more permeable for Cl- than for K+ ions. The possible biological role of the small, anion-specific protein P channels in phosphate uptake from the medium is discussed. Images PMID:6279569

  8. Why do proteins aggregate? “Intrinsically insoluble proteins” and “dark mediators” revealed by studies on “insoluble proteins” solubilized in pure water

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianxing

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, I reviewed and proposed a model for our discovery in 2005 that unrefoldable and insoluble proteins could in fact be solubilized in unsalted water. Since then, this discovery has offered us and other groups a powerful tool to characterize insoluble proteins, and we have further addressed several fundamental and disease-relevant issues associated with this discovery. Here I review these results, which are conceptualized into several novel scenarios. 1) Unlike 'misfolded proteins', which still retain the capacity to fold into well-defined structures but are misled to 'off-pathway' aggregation, unrefoldable and insoluble proteins completely lack this ability and will unavoidably aggregate in vivo with ~150 mM ions, thus designated as 'intrinsically insoluble proteins (IIPs)' here. IIPs may largely account for the 'wastefully synthesized' DRiPs identified in human cells. 2) The fact that IIPs including membrane proteins are all soluble in unsalted water, but get aggregated upon being exposed to ions, logically suggests that ions existing in the background play a central role in mediating protein aggregation, thus acting as 'dark mediators'. Our study with 14 salts confirms that IIPs lack the capacity to fold into any well-defined structures. We uncover that salts modulate protein dynamics and anions bind proteins with high selectivity and affinity, which is surprisingly masked by pre-existing ions. Accordingly, I modified my previous model. 3) Insoluble proteins interact with lipids to different degrees. Remarkably, an ALS-causing P56S mutation transforms the ?-sandwich MSP domain into a helical integral membrane protein. Consequently, the number of membrane-interacting proteins might be much larger than currently recognized. To attack biological membranes may represent a common mechanism by which aggregated proteins initiate human diseases. 4) Our discovery also implies a solution to the 'chicken-and-egg paradox' for the origin of primitive membranes embedded with integral membrane proteins, if proteins originally emerged in unsalted prebiotic media. PMID:24555050

  9. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins behaved similarly on addition of the alkaline-surfactant cleaning solution, in that platinum and gold exhibited an increase, while tungsten, titanium, and stainless steel showed a decrease in weight. According to dissipation measurements with the QCM-D, the adsorbed layer for platinum and gold was rigid, while that for the tungsten, titanium, and stainless steel was much more flexible. The removal efficiency of adsorbed-protein by alkaline solution of SDS depended on the water content of the adsorbed layers for W, Ti, and SS, while for Pt and Au, it depended on secondary structural content. When protein adsorption was high (Pt, Au), protein-protein interactions and protein-surface interactions were dominant and the removal of protein layers was limited. Water content of the adsorbed protein layer was the determining factor for how efficiently the layer was removed by alkaline SDS when protein adsorption was low. Hence, protein-protein and protein-surface interactions were minimal and protein structure was less perturbed in comparison with those for high protein adsorption. Secondary structural content determined the efficient removal of adsorbed protein for high adsorbed amount. PMID:21182242

  10. Seismic patterns and migration history of submarine fan channels in deep-water area, Niger Delta, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guotao; Zhang, Shangfeng; Li, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The channels of deep-water submarine fan under Niger delta slope are characterized by large dimensions special deposition positions and complex formation processes, its geographical location and sedimentary environment also hinder the research and exploration development. According to the strata slicing, RMS amplitude attribute and other techniques, we exhibit the platforms patterns of channels at different period, and based on the analysis of internal architecture and deformation history of channel-leveed systems, migration and evolution process of channel systems could be understood accurately. A great quantity of isolated channels develop in middle Miocene and aggrading streams in late Miocene, which generating because of large scale of turbidity caused by the drop of second order sea-level, which characterized by vertical accretion at smooth channel, while vertical accretion and lateral migration at bend. Evolution of channel systems can be divided into three stages: the initial erosion, erosion and filling alternately, and abandoned stage. With these three stages, the sinuosity of channel change from moderate to high, then decrease. Incision and filling of channels, being during the three development phases, is the driving force of meander-loops migration, which promote three kinds of migration patterns: lateral, down-system and combination migration. The research provides theoretical basis for high-precision prediction and evaluation of deep-water reservoir.

  11. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-02-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations.

  12. Infiltration and quality of water for two arroyo channels, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1988-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.

    1995-01-01

    Selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were studied to collect information about the amount and quality of infiltration through arroyo channels. Infiltration rate was calculated for selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo based on instantaneous streamflow-loss volumes, wetted channel area, and instantaneous evaporation rates measured during 1988-92. Infiltration rates at Grant Line Arroyo ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 foot per day, and at Tijeras Arroyo from 2.28 to 30 feet per day. The evaporation rate ranged from one-tenth of 1 percent to 2 percent of the infiltration rate. Infiltration rates differed with the location of the reach isolated for measurement and with the time of day of the infiltration-rate measurement. Differences in intrinsic permeability of the sediments may be the most important factor affecting spatial variations in infiltration. The most important factor affecting temporal variations in infiltration may be the temperature of the water and sediment where infiltration occurs. Annual evaporation rates were greatest over saturated stream sediments and ranged from 802 to 1,025 millimeters per year or from 31.57 to 40.35 inches per year. Annual evaporation rates were least over unsaturated, unvegetated soil and ranged from 174 to 291 millimeters per year or from 6.85 to 11.46 inches per year. Annual evapotranspiration rates over grasses or shrubs or both were about one-half the rates over saturated stream sediments. Rates were similar for Grant Line and Tijeras Arroyos. The land- surface vegetation, availability of water at the land surface, availability of energy to enable a change of state from water to vapor, existence of a vapor concentration gradient, and a turbulent atmosphere to carry the vapor away may be the factors that determine the amount of evaporation and evapotranspiration. Water in Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo met U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations for nitrate, volatile organic compounds, dissolved lead, and dissolved and total arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, silver, zinc, selenium, chloride, and sulfate concentrations. Total lead concentration in one sample from Tramway Floodway Channel, a tributary to Tijeras Arroyo, was 55 micrograms per liter, exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulation of 50 micrograms per liter. Dissolved-solids concentrations calculated from the sum of cations and anions usually exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water dissolved-solids regulation of 500 milligrams per liter at Tijeras Arroyo above Four Hills Bridge.

  13. Enhanced water and cryoprotectant permeability of porcine oocytes after artificial expression of human and zebrafish aquaporin-3 channels.

    PubMed

    Morató, Roser; Chauvigné, François; Novo, Sergi; Bonet, Sergi; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-05-01

    One of the major obstacles for the vitrification of mature porcine oocytes with ethylene glycol is their low permeability to this cryoprotectant, which results in osmotic stress-induced cell damage and low survival. Pig blastocysts, on the other hand, show enhanced water and cryoprotectant permeability, which has been related to the transcriptional activation of aquaporin-3 (AQP3) channels at this stage of development. In this study, we asked if expression of cRNAs encoding two aquaglyceroporins, human AQP3 (hAQP3) or the zebrafish Aqp3b-T85A mutant, in porcine oocytes can increase their permeability. Microinjection of germinal-vesicle-stage oocytes with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or AQP3 cRNAs resulted in the expression of the corresponding proteins in ?26% of the metaphase-II stage oocytes at 40-44?hr of in vitro culture; co-injection of EGFP cRNA appeared to be a suitable marker for oocyte selection since all EGFP-positive oocytes also expressed the corresponding aquaporin. Using this method, we found that mature oocytes co-expressing EGFP and hAQP3 or EGFP and Aqp3b-T85A showed approximately a twofold increase of the hydraulic conductivity (Lp ) with respect non-injected or EGFP alone-injected oocytes in a 0.43?M sucrose or 1.3?M ethylene glycol solution, whereas the ethylene glycol permeability (PEG ) of EGFP?+?hAQP3 and EGFP?+?Aqp3b-T85A oocytes was 6.7- and 12-fold higher, respectively, than control oocytes. These data demonstrate that the artificial expression of aquaglyceroporins in porcine metaphase-II oocytes improves their permeability, and that the zebrafish Aqp3b-T85A mutant is more efficient than the human channel at increasing the oocyte permeability to ethylene glycol. PMID:24488947

  14. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  15. The mechanism of proton exclusion in the aquaporin-1 water channel.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Bert L; Frigato, Tomaso; Helms, Volkhard; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2003-10-17

    Aquaporins are efficient, yet strictly selective water channels. Remarkably, proton permeation is fully blocked, in contrast to most other water-filled pores which are known to conduct protons well. Blocking of protons by aquaporins is essential to maintain the electrochemical gradient across cellular and subcellular membranes. We studied the mechanism of proton exclusion in aquaporin-1 by multiple non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations that also allow proton transfer reactions. From the simulations, an effective free energy profile for the proton motion along the channel was determined with a maximum-likelihood approach. The results indicate that the main barrier is not, as had previously been speculated, caused by the interruption of the hydrogen-bonded water chain, but rather by an electrostatic field centered around the fingerprint Asn-Pro-Ala (NPA) motif. Hydrogen bond interruption only forms a secondary barrier located at the ar/R constriction region. The calculated main barrier height of 25-30 kJ mol(-1) matches the barrier height for the passage of protons across pure lipid bilayers and, therefore, suffices to prevent major leakage of protons through aquaporins. Conventional molecular dynamics simulations additionally showed that negatively charged hydroxide ions are prevented from being trapped within the NPA region by two adjacent electrostatic barriers of opposite polarity. PMID:14529616

  16. Concerted action of two cation filters in the aquaporin water channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binghua; Steinbronn, Christina; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Zeuthen, Thomas; Beitz, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) facilitated water transport is common to virtually all cell membranes and is marked by almost perfect specificity and high flux rates. Simultaneously, protons and cations are strictly excluded to maintain ionic transmembrane gradients. Yet, the AQP cation filters have not been identified experimentally. We report that three point mutations turned the water-specific AQP1 into a proton/alkali cation channel with reduced water permeability and the permeability sequence: H+ ?K+ >Rb+ >Na+ >Cs+ >Li+. Contrary to theoretical models, we found that electrostatic repulsion at the central asn-pro-ala (NPA) region does not suffice to exclude protons. Full proton exclusion is reached only in conjunction with the aromatic/arginine (ar/R) constriction at the pore mouth. In contrast, alkali cations are blocked by the NPA region but leak through the ar/R constriction. Expression of alkali-leaking AQPs depolarized membrane potentials and compromised cell survival. Our results hint at the alkali-tight but solute-unselective NPA region as a feature of primordial channels and the proton-tight and solute-selective ar/R constriction variants as later adaptations within the AQP superfamily. PMID:19574955

  17. A new view of water dynamics in immobilized proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Halle, B; Denisov, V P

    1995-01-01

    The inflection frequency of the deuteron magnetic relaxation dispersion from water in rotationally immobilized protein samples has recently been found to be essentially independent of temperature and protein structure. This remarkable invariance has been interpreted in terms of a universal residence time of 1 microseconds for protein-associated water molecules. We demonstrate here that this interpretation is an artifact of the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation, which is not valid for rotationally immobile proteins. Using a newly developed non-perturbative, stochastic theory of spin relaxation, we identify the apparent correlation time of 1 microseconds with the inverse of the nuclear quadrupole frequency, thus explaining its invariance. The observed dispersion profiles are consistent with a broad distribution of residence times, spanning the microseconds range. Furthermore, we argue that the deuteron dispersion is due to buried water molecules rather than to the traditional surface hydration previously invoked, and that the contribution from rapidly exchanging protein hydrogens cannot be neglected. The conclusions of the present work are also relevant to proton relaxation in immobilized protein samples and to magnetic resonance imaging of soft tissue. PMID:7669901

  18. Plumes and Blooms: Modeling the Case II Waters of the Santa Barbara Channel. Chapter 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Maritorena, S.; Nelson, N. B.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Plumes and Blooms (PnB) project is to develop, validate and apply to imagery state-of-the-art ocean color algorithms for quantifying sediment plumes and phytoplankton blooms for the Case II environment of the Santa Barbara Channel. We conduct monthly to twice-monthly transect observations across the Santa Barbara Channel to develop an algorithm development and product validation data set. The PnB field program started in the summer of 1996. At each of the 7 PnB stations, a complete verification bio-geo-optical data set is collected. Included are redundant measures of apparent optical properties (remote sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation spectra), as well as in situ profiles of spectral absorption, beam attenuation and backscattering coefficients. Water samples are analyzed for component in vivo absorption spectra, fluorometric chlorophyll, phytoplankton pigment (by the SDSU CHORS laboratory), and inorganic nutrient concentrations. A primary goal is to use the PnB field data set to objectively tune semi-analytical models of ocean color for this site and apply them using available satellite imagery (SeaWiFS and MODIS). In support of this goal, we have also been addressing SeaWiFS ocean color and AVHRR SST imagery. We also are using the PnB data set to address time/space variability of water masses in the Santa Barbara Channel and its relationship to the 1997/1998 El Nino. However, the comparison between PnB field observations and satellite estimates of primary products has been disappointing. We find that field estimates of water-leaving radiance, L(sub wN)(lambda), correspond poorly to satellite estimates for both SeaWiFS and MODIS local area coverage imagery. We believe this is due to poor atmospheric correction due to complex mixtures of aerosol types found in these near-coastal regions. Last, we remain active in outreach activities.

  19. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars: Channeled Aprons in a Small Crater within Newton Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Newton Crater is a large basin formed by an asteroid impact that probably occurred more than 3 billion years ago. It is approximately 287 kilometers (178 miles) across. The picture shown here (top) highlights the north wall of a specific, smaller crater located in the southwestern quarter of Newton Crater (above). The crater of interest was also formed by an impact; it is about 7 km (4.4 mi) across, which is about 7 times bigger than the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona in North America.

    The north wall of the small crater has many narrow gullies eroded into it. These are hypothesized to have been formed by flowing water and debris flows. Debris transported with the water created lobed and finger-like deposits at the base of the crater wall where it intersects the floor (bottom center top image). Many of the finger-like deposits have small channels indicating that a liquid--most likely water--flowed in these areas. Hundreds of individual water and debris flow events might have occurred to create the scene shown here. Each outburst of water from higher upon the crater slopes would have constituted a competition between evaporation, freezing, and gravity.

    The individual deposits at the ends of channels in this MOC image mosaic were used to get a rough estimate of the minimum amount of water that might be involved in each flow event. This is done first by assuming that the deposits are like debris flows on Earth. In a debris flow, no less than about 10% (and no more than 30%) of their volume is water. Second, the volume of an apron deposit is estimated by measuring the area covered in the MOC image and multiplying it by a conservative estimate of thickness, 2 meters (6.5 feet). For a flow containing only 10% water, these estimates conservatively suggest that about 2.5 million liters (660,000 gallons) of water are involved in each event; this is enough to fill about 7 community-sized swimming pools or enough to supply 20 people with their water needs for a year.

    The MOC high resolution view is located near 41.1oS, 159.8oW and is a mosaic of three different pictures acquired between January and May 2000. The MOC scene is illuminated from the left; north is up. The context picture was acquired in 1977 by the Viking 1 orbiter and is illuminated from the upper right.

  20. Estradiol activates epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar cells through the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Megan M; Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D; Yu, Ling; Yue, Qiang; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Harrell, Constance S; Neigh, Gretchen N; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-12-01

    Female sex predisposes individuals to poorer outcomes during respiratory disorders like cystic fibrosis and influenza-associated pneumonia. A common link between these disorders is dysregulation of alveolar fluid clearance via disruption of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. Recent evidence suggests that female sex hormones directly regulate expression and activity of alveolar ENaC. In our study, we identified the mechanism by which estradiol (E2) or progesterone (P4) independently regulates alveolar ENaC. Using cell-attached patch clamp, we measured ENaC single-channel activity in a rat alveolar cell line (L2) in response to overnight exposure to either E2 or P4. In contrast to P4, E2 increased ENaC channel activity (NPo) through an increase in channel open probability (Po) and an increased number of patches with observable channel activity. Apical plasma membrane abundance of the ENaC ?-subunit (?ENaC) more than doubled in response to E2 as determined by cell surface biotinylation. ?ENaC membrane abundance was approximately threefold greater in lungs from female rats in proestrus, when serum E2 is greatest, compared with diestrus, when it is lowest. Our results also revealed a significant role for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (Gper) to mediate E2's effects on ENaC. Overall, our results demonstrate that E2 signaling through Gper selectively activates alveolar ENaC through an effect on channel gating and channel density, the latter via greater trafficking of channels to the plasma membrane. The results presented herein implicate E2-mediated regulation of alveolar sodium channels in the sex differences observed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. PMID:24097558

  1. Water and sediment budgets for the stormwater-drainage channel at the Navy Ships Parts Control Center near Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, water year 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, L.A.; Durlin, R.R.; Bender, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Navy Ships Parts Control Center near Mechanicsburg, Pa., occupies an area of 824 acres, of which 358 are covered by impervious surfaces. Most of the impervious area is drained by stormwater systems that discharge to an open channel that extends about 7,900 feet from its headwaters to its confluence with Trindle Spring Run. The channel drains an area of 992 acres, of which 435 are covered by impervious surfaces. The entire area of the Center including the stormwater-drainage channel is situated in karst terrain. Parts of the drainage channel contain large sinkholes and most of the storm runoff that enters the channel drains to the sinkholes. From 1992 to 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Department of the Navy, conducted a detailed study of water and sediment flows in the stormwater-drainage channel. The purpose of this study was to quantify the discharge of stormwater and suspended sediment to the ground-water system, by way of sinkholes, and to Trindle Spring Run. From October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993, the data-collection period for the study, discharge and suspended-sediment concentrations were measured at three sites along the drainage channel. During the period, water inflow to the channel totaled 679 acre-feet and outflow to Trindle Spring Run totaled 131 acre-feet. Water loss to sinkholes in the drainage channel totaled 548 acre-feet or 81 percent of inflow. Total sediment inflow to the drainage channel was 97 tons, outflow to Trindle Spring Run was 22 tons, sediment loss to sinkholes was 63 tons, and the residual 12 tons of sediment was deposited in the channel. The effect of filling the sinkholes on flooding was estimated through use of a step-backwater model. The model was used to simulate undampened water-surface elevations that would result from the maximum instantaneous discharge recorded during October 1992-September 1993. The model is constrained by uncertainty in the values of the channel-roughness parameter. Analysis of the model results indicates that during high flows, inflow to sinkholes results in a moderate reduction in discharge and water-surface elevations in the drainage channel. This analysis shows that filling the sinkholes will result in increased frequency and magnitude of flooding in downstream parts of the drainage channel and increased discharge of storm runoff and suspended sediment to Trindle Spring Run.

  2. Experimental study of Cu-water nanofluid forced convective flow inside a louvered channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, M.; Hormozi, F.; Zamzamian, A.

    2015-03-01

    Heat transfer enhancement plays a very important role for energy saving in plate-fin heat exchangers. In the present study, the influences of simultaneous utilization of a louvered plate-fin channel and copper-base deionized water nanofluid on performance of these exchangers are experimentally explored. The effects of flow rate (2-5 l/min) and nanoparticles weight fraction (0-0.4 %) on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics are determined. Experimental results indicate that the use of louvered channel instead of the plain one can improve the heat transfer performance. Likewise, addition of small amounts of copper nanoparticles to the base fluid augments the convective heat transfer coefficient remarkably. The maximum rise of 21.7 % in the convective heat transfer coefficient is observed for the 0.4 % wt nanofluid compared to the base fluid. Also, pumping power for the base fluid and nanofluids are calculated based on the measured pressure drop in the louvered channel. The average increase in pumping power is 11.8 % for the nanofluid with 0.4 % wt compared to the base fluid. Applied performance criterion shows a maximum performance index of 1.167 for the nanofluid with 0.1 % wt Finally, two correlations are proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor which fit the experimental data with in ±10 %.

  3. The water channel aquaporin-1 partitions into exosomes during reticulocyte maturation: implication for the regulation of cell volume.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Lionel; Liu, Jing; Vidal, Michel; Chasis, Joel Anne; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla

    2009-10-29

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), the universal water channel, is responsible for rapid response of cell volume to changes in plasma tonicity. In the membrane of the red cell the concentration of the protein is tightly controlled. Here, we show that AQP-1 is partially lost during in vitro maturation of mouse reticulocytes and that it is associated with exosomes, released throughout this process. AQP-1 in young reticulocytes localizes to the plasma membrane and also in endosomal compartments and exosomes, formed both in vitro and in vivo. During maturation a part of the total pool of AQP-1 is differentially sorted and released via the exosomal pathway. A proteasome inhibitor, MG132, suppresses secretion of AQP-1, implying that ubiquitination is a sorting signal for its release. We further show that modulation of medium tonicity in vitro regulates the secretion of AQP-1, thus showing that extracellular osmotic conditions can drive sorting of selected proteins by the exosomal pathway. These results lead us to suggest that AQP-1 sorting into exosomes may be the mechanism by which the reticulocyte adapts to environmental changes during its maturation. PMID:19724054

  4. The water channel aquaporin-1 partitions into exosomes during reticulocyte maturation: implication for the regulation of cell volume

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Vidal, Michel; Chasis, Joel Anne; Mohandas, Narla

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), the universal water channel, is responsible for rapid response of cell volume to changes in plasma tonicity. In the membrane of the red cell the concentration of the protein is tightly controlled. Here, we show that AQP-1 is partially lost during in vitro maturation of mouse reticulocytes and that it is associated with exosomes, released throughout this process. AQP-1 in young reticulocytes localizes to the plasma membrane and also in endosomal compartments and exosomes, formed both in vitro and in vivo. During maturation a part of the total pool of AQP-1 is differentially sorted and released via the exosomal pathway. A proteasome inhibitor, MG132, suppresses secretion of AQP-1, implying that ubiquitination is a sorting signal for its release. We further show that modulation of medium tonicity in vitro regulates the secretion of AQP-1, thus showing that extracellular osmotic conditions can drive sorting of selected proteins by the exosomal pathway. These results lead us to suggest that AQP-1 sorting into exosomes may be the mechanism by which the reticulocyte adapts to environmental changes during its maturation. PMID:19724054

  5. Plasma-assisted quadruple-channel optosensing of proteins and cells with Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenghui; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-01

    Information extraction from nano-bio-systems is crucial for understanding their inner molecular level interactions and can help in the development of multidimensional/multimodal sensing devices to realize novel or expanded functionalities. The intrinsic fluorescence (IF) of proteins has long been considered as an effective tool for studying protein structures and dynamics, but not for protein recognition analysis partially because it generally contributes to the fluorescence background in bioanalysis. Here we explored the use of IF as the fourth channel optical input for a multidimensional optosensing device, together with the triple-channel optical output of Mn-doped ZnS QDs (fluorescence from ZnS host, phosphorescence from Mn2+ dopant, and Rayleigh light scattering from the QDs), to dramatically improve the protein recognition and discrimination resolution. To further increase the cross-reactivity of the multidimensional optosensing device, plasma modification of proteins was explored to enhance the IF difference as well as their interactions with Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Such a sensor device was demonstrated for highly discriminative and precise identification of proteins in human serum and urine samples, and for cancer and normal cells as well.Information extraction from nano-bio-systems is crucial for understanding their inner molecular level interactions and can help in the development of multidimensional/multimodal sensing devices to realize novel or expanded functionalities. The intrinsic fluorescence (IF) of proteins has long been considered as an effective tool for studying protein structures and dynamics, but not for protein recognition analysis partially because it generally contributes to the fluorescence background in bioanalysis. Here we explored the use of IF as the fourth channel optical input for a multidimensional optosensing device, together with the triple-channel optical output of Mn-doped ZnS QDs (fluorescence from ZnS host, phosphorescence from Mn2+ dopant, and Rayleigh light scattering from the QDs), to dramatically improve the protein recognition and discrimination resolution. To further increase the cross-reactivity of the multidimensional optosensing device, plasma modification of proteins was explored to enhance the IF difference as well as their interactions with Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Such a sensor device was demonstrated for highly discriminative and precise identification of proteins in human serum and urine samples, and for cancer and normal cells as well. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S20 Tables S1-S12, and full experimental details and procedures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09130f

  6. Spacial Distribution of Salinity and the Mechanism of Saltwater Intrusion in the Modaomen Water Channel of Pear River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. B.; Bao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Modaomen channel is an important fresh water resource in Pearl River Delta. It has been impacted by saltwater intrusion frequently in the last decade. This has drawn more and more attention from scientists and engineers. The hydrodynamic mechanism of saltwater intrusion is still impercipient. In the present paper, hydrographs of velocity and salinity in the channel are analyzed based on field observations of velocity and salinity of upper, middle, and lower water layers at several stations along the Modaomen channel. It is found that the transport of salinity in Modaomen channel is obviously different from other estuaries. As the tidal range increases from neap to spring tide, the salinity in each water layer decreases unexpectedly. This peculiar phenomenon is attributed to the extraordinary flow process in the channel. When salinity value in each layer and vertical salinity gradient are lower during spring tide, no matter on rising or ebbing tide, the flow velocity monotonously decreases from water surface to the bottom, which is suggested by common sense. However, when salinity values and vertical salinity gradient are higher during neap tide, the flow velocity unexpectedly increases from water surface to the bottom during flood period, and flood duration of the bottom current is surprisingly as long as 15-18 hours. In addition, an inflexional velocity profile may remain amazingly for about 9 hours. This could be driven by the baroclinic pressure under the condition of tides, topography and upstream runoff discharge of this channel.

  7. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  8. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area. PMID:26298765

  9. Identification of a family of calcium sensors as protein ligands of inositol trisphosphate receptor Ca2+ release channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; McBride, Sean; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Vardi, Noga; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Haeseleer, Françoise; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2002-01-01

    The inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular Ca2+ channel that mediates complex cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, regulating diverse cellular processes, including synaptic plasticity. Activation of the InsP3R channel is normally thought to require binding of InsP3 derived from receptor-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositol lipid hydrolysis. Here we identify a family of neuronal Ca2+-binding proteins as high-affinity protein agonists of the InsP3R, which bind to the channel and activate gating in the absence of InsP3. CaBP/caldendrin, a subfamily of the EF-hand-containing neuronal calcium sensor family of calmodulin-related proteins, bind specifically to the InsP3-binding region of all three InsP3R channel isoforms with high affinity (Ka ? 25 nM) in a Ca2+-dependent manner (Ka ? 1 ?M). Binding activates single-channel gating as efficaciously as InsP3, dependent on functional EF-hands in CaBP. In contrast, calmodulin neither bound with high affinity nor activated channel gating. CaBP1 and the type 1 InsP3R associate in rat whole brain and cerebellum lysates, and colocalize extensively in subcellular regions in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Thus, InsP3R-mediated Ca2+ signaling in cells is possible even in the absence of InsP3 generation, a process that may be particularly important in responding to and shaping changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration by InsP3-independent pathways and for localizing InsP3-mediated Ca2+ signals to individual synapses. PMID:12032348

  10. Pyruvate restores ?-adrenergic sensitivity of L-type Ca(2+) channels in failing rat heart: role of protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Qi; Li, Xun; Tang, Kang; Sharma, Neeru M; Wyatt, Todd A; Patel, Kaushik P; Gao, Lie; Bidasee, Keshore R; Rozanski, George J

    2013-05-15

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of heart failure, where the contractile response to ?-adrenergic stimulation is profoundly depressed. This condition involves L-type Ca(2+) channels, but the mechanisms underlying their impaired adrenergic regulation are unclear. Thus the present study explored the basis for impaired adrenergic control of Ca(2+) channels in a rat infarction model of heart failure. Patch-clamp recordings of L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) from ventricular myocytes isolated from infarcted hearts showed a blunted response to intracellular cAMP that was reversed by treatment with exogenous pyruvate. Biochemical studies showed that basal and cAMP-stimulated protein kinase A activities were similar in infarcted and sham-operated hearts, whereas molecular analysis also found that binding of protein kinase A to the ?(1C) subunit of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel isoform 1.2 was not different between groups. By contrast, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity and binding to ?(1C) were significantly less in infarcted hearts. The PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid markedly increased I(Ca,L) in sham-operated myocytes, but this response was significantly less in myocytes from infarcted hearts. However, pyruvate normalized I(Ca,L) stimulation by okadaic acid, and this effect was blocked by inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase, implicating a functional role for the redox-active thioredoxin system. Our data suggest that blunted ?-adrenergic stimulation of I(CaL) in failing hearts results from hyperphosphorylation of Ca(2+) channels secondary to oxidation-induced impairment of PP2A function. We propose that the redox state of Ca(2+) channels or PP2A is controlled by the thioredoxin system which plays a key role in Ca(2+) channel remodeling of the failing heart. PMID:23504177

  11. Enhanced detection of quantum dots labeled protein by simultaneous bismuth electrodeposition into microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Miserere, Sandrine; Cadevall, Miquell; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose an electrochemical immunoassay into a disposable microfluidic platform, using quantum dots (QDs) as labels and their enhanced detection using bismuth as an alternative to mercury electrodes. CdSe@ZnS QDs were used to tag human IgG as a model protein and detected through highly sensitive stripping voltammetry of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium in our case). The modification of the screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) was done by a simple electrodeposition of bismuth that was previously mixed with the sample containing QDs. A magneto-immunosandwich assay was performed using a micromixer. A magnet placed at its outlet in order to capture the magnetic beads used as solid support for the immunoassay. SPCEs were integrated at the end of the channel as detector. Different parameters such as bismuth concentration, flow rate, and incubation times, were optimized. The LOD for HIgG in presence of bismuth was 3.5 ng/mL with a RSD of 13.2%. This LOD was about 3.3-fold lower than the one obtained without bismuth. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the system was increased 100-fold respect to experiments carried out with classical screen-printed electrodes, both in presence of bismuth. PMID:26419211

  12. Mercury-sensitive residues and pore site in AQP3 water channel.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, M; Gu, Y; Ishibashi, K; Marumo, F; Sasaki, S

    1997-11-18

    Water channel function of all aquaporins (AQPs) but AQP4 can be inhibited by mercurial reagents. Mercurial reagents are believed to bind specifically to cysteine residues and block the aqueous pore of AQPs. Because of the low homology of AQP3 to other AQPs, it is not certain whether the pore structure of AQP3 is similar to that of the others. Determination of mercury-sensitive cysteine residues in AQP3 and comparison with those in other AQPs will help to resolve this question. When AQP3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, incubation with 0.3 mM HgCl2 decreased its osmotic water permability (Pf) by approximately 30%. To identify the mercury-sensitive site, six individual cysteine residues in human AQP3 (at positions 11, 29, 40, 91, 174, and 267) were altered by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutants of C11S and C11A had a similar basal Pf to wild-type but acquired mercury resistance. Replacement of Cys-11 with Trp, which possesses a large side chain, did not change Pf. Mercurial inhibition of Pf was still observed in five other Cys-to-Ser mutants. These results suggest that Cys-11 is the mercury-sensitive residue in AQP3 and that this residue might be independent of water channel function. Mutation of Tyr-212, a position corresponding to the mercury-sensitive residues in AQP1 and AQP2, to cysteine enhanced the mercurial inhibition of Pf. Y212W had no water channel activity. Expression of AQP3 increased glycerol permeability (Pgly) 3.1-fold, whereas Pgly of Y212W-expressing oocytes was similar to Pgly of control oocytes. Cysteine mutation at Tyr-212 increased the inhibitory effect of mercury on Pgly. These results suggest that the structure of the aqueous pore of AQP3 resembles those of AQP1 and AQP2 and support the hypothesis that water and small molecules share a common pore in AQP3. PMID:9369468

  13. Purification and Characterization of the Voltage-Dependent Anion-Selective Channel Protein from Wheat Mitochondrial Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, A.; Kahn, K.; Beja, O.; Galun, E.; Colombini, M.; Breiman, A.

    1993-01-01

    An approximately 29-kD protein was purified from the membrane fraction of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Dganit) mitochondria by the utilization of standard liquid chromatography techniques. The protein, designated MmP29 for mitochondrial membrane protein having a molecular mass of approximately 29 kD, exhibited cationic properties in a buffering solution, adjusted to pH 7.5. This positive charge enabled its passage through a diethylaminoethyl column, without interaction with the positively charged matrix. Subsequently, this protein was separated from the remaining polypeptides by a preferential elution from a hydroxylapatite/celite mixed column. Reconstituted liposomes containing this protein were characterized as being permeable to 8-amino-naphthalene 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid disodium salt (Mr 445) but non-permeable to dextran fluorescein (Mr 40,000). Additionally, MmP29 was inserted into planar phospholipid membranes, and anion-selective, voltage-dependent channels were demonstrated. All of the MmP29 properties mentioned highly resemble voltagedependent, anion-selective channel (VDAC) proteins, suggesting that MmP29 is the mitochondrial outer membrane VDAC protein of wheat. PMID:12231713

  14. Low-level water vapor fields from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) 'split window' channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Robinson, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    A simple physical algorithm is presented which calculates the water vapor content of the lower troposphere from the 11 and 12 micron (split window) channels on the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. The algorithm is used to analyze a time series of VAS split window radiances observed at 15 km horizontal resolution over eastern North America during a 12 hr period on 13 July 1981. Results of the color coded images of the derived precipitable water fields are found to show vivid water vapor features whose broad structure and evolution are verified by the radiosonde and surface networks. The satellite moisture fields also show significant mesoscale features and rapid developments which are not resolved by the conventional networks. The VAS split window is determined to clearly differentiate those areas in which water vapor extends over a deep layer and is more able to support convective cells from those areas in which water vapor is confined to a shallow layer and is therefore less able to support convection. It is concluded that the VAS split windows can be used operationally to monitor mesoscale developments in the low-level moisture fields over relatively cloud-free areas of the United States.

  15. Copper accumulation in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed to water borne copper sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.; Griffin, B.; Schlenk, D.; Kadlubar, F.; Brand, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Liver and axial muscle of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was analyzed for residual copper after exposure to water borne copper sulfate. Copper sulfate was continuously introduced into well water in three fiber glass tanks to achieve 1.7 mg/L, 2.7 mg/L and 3.6 mg/L copper sulfate concentrations in exposure waters. Milli-Q quality water was metered into a fourth tank at the same rate for unexposed fish. Actual levels of copper in exposure waters were determined by daily sampling and analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAA). Tissue samples were taken from six fish from each of the exposed and unexposed tanks at two-week intervals, Samples were collected until tissue analysis indicated an equilibrium had been established between the uptake and elimination in both the muscle and liver tissue. Elimination was followed until a clear rate of deputation could be established. Samples were digested in nitric acid in a micro wave digestor and analyzed by GFAA. Results of tissue analysis will be presented to demonstrate bioaccumulation and the effect of copper concentration, length of copper exposure, and gender on copper uptake, establishment of tissue:environmental copper equilibrium, and rate of copper elimination following exposure.

  16. The NOAA Water Instrument: A Two-Channel, Tunable Diode Laser-Based Hygrometer for Measurement of Water Vapor and Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. Combining the measurements from the two channels allows the determination of cloud ice water content (IWC), an important metric for evaluating the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cirrus IWC sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1 σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol/mol), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 µm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting IWC detection limit (2 σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2 µg m-3, with an estimated overall uncertainty of 20%.

  17. Unintended consequences? Water molecules at biological and crystallographic protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mostafa H; Habtemariam, Mesay; Safo, Martin K; Scarsdale, J Neel; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Kellogg, Glen E

    2013-12-01

    The importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly appreciated, as these interactions lie at the core of virtually every biological process. Small molecule modulators that target PPIs are under exploration as new therapies. One of the greatest obstacles faced in crystallographically determining the 3D structures of proteins is coaxing the proteins to form "artificial" PPIs that lead to uniform crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction. This work compares interactions formed naturally, i.e., "biological", with those artificially formed under crystallization conditions or "non-biological". In particular, a detailed analysis of water molecules at the interfaces of high-resolution (?2.30 Å) X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes, where 140 are biological protein-protein complex structures and 112 include non-biological protein-protein interfaces, was carried out using modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield. Surprisingly few and relatively subtle differences were observed between the two types of interfaces: (i) non-biological interfaces are more polar than biological interfaces, yet there is better organized hydrogen bonding at the latter; (ii) biological associations rely more on water-mediated interactions with backbone atoms compared to non-biological associations; (iii) aromatic/planar residues play a larger role in biological associations with respect to water, and (iv) Lys has a particularly large role at non-biological interfaces. A support vector machines (SVMs) classifier using descriptors from this study was devised that was able to correctly classify 84% of the two interface types. PMID:24076743

  18. Optical Detection of Disordered Water Within a Protein Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeck, Robert A.; Pillsbury, Marlisa L.; Jensen, Russell A.; Mendoza, Juan L.; Nguyen, Rosa L.; Olson, John S.; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S.; Esquerra, Raymond M.

    2009-01-01

    Internal water molecules are important to protein structure and function, but positional disorder and low occupancies can obscure their detection by x-ray crystallography. Here we show that water can be detected within the distal cavities of myoglobin mutants by subtle changes in the absorbance spectrum of pentacoordinate heme, even when the presence of solvent is not readily observed in the corresponding crystal structures. A well defined, non-coordinated water molecule hydrogen bonded to the distal histidine (His64) is seen within the distal heme pocket in the crystal structure of wild type (wt) deoxymyoglobin. Displacement of this water decreases the rate of ligand entry into wt Mb, and we have shown previously that the entry of this water is readily detected optically after laser photolysis of MbCO complexes. However, for L29F and V68L Mb no discrete positions for solvent molecules are seen in the electron density maps of the crystal structures even though His64 is still present and slow rates of ligand binding indicative of internal water are observed. In contrast, time-resolved perturbations of the visible absorption bands of L29F and V68L deoxyMb generated after laser photolysis detect the entry and significant occupancy of water within the distal pockets of these variants. Thus, the spectral perturbation of pentacoordinate heme offers a potentially robust system for measuring non-specific hydration of the active sites of heme proteins. PMID:19655795

  19. Monitoring water masses properties by Glider in Sardinia Channel during summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gana, Slim; Iudicone, Daniele; Ghenim, Leila; Mortier, Laurent; Testor, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquin; Olita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    1. Summary In the framework of the EC funded project, PERSEUS (WP3, Subtask 3.3.1: Repeated glider sections in key channels and sub-basin) and with the support of JERICO TNA (EU-FP7), a deep water glider (up to 1000m) was deployed from the R/V Tethys in the Sardinia Channel and has carried out 3 return trips during the period spanning from the 16th of August 2014 to the 19th of September 2014. The Gilder was equipped with CTD, O2 sensors, Fluorometers (ChlA), back scattering from 470 to 880 nm and was programmed to follow a path close to SARAL satellite track #887. During this experiment, a significant dataset, as never obtained before for this area, has been collected. The innovation stands in the high spatial resolution, in the temporal repetitivity and in the number of parameters sampled simultaneously. The first step of the work will focuses on the analysis of the hydrological properties of the existing water masses in the area. 2. Frame and aim of the experiment The Sardinia Channel is a zonally oriented passage connecting the Algerian and the Tyrrhenian basins, with a sill depth of about 1900 m. In spite of the considerable amount of work achieved and accurate results obtained about the circulation in the Western Mediterranean Sea, during the last 20 years, the Sardinia Channel is still one of the region where the dynamical processes and water exchanges are not clearly identified. Previous studies (Garzoli S. and C. Maillard, 1979, and Ozturgut Erdogan, 1975) pointed out the complexity of the processes in the region and the role of the bottom topography in sustaining them, and provided a first estimation of the involved fluxes. The main knowledge about the water masses crossing this region mostly concerns the AW (Atlantic Water) and the LIW (Levantine Intermediate Water). Along the Algerian coast, the AW is transported mainly by the Algerian current (AC Millot, 1985) from which the anticyclonic Algerian eddies (AEs, Puillat et al., 2002; Taupier-Letage et al., 2003), often involving surface and intermediate waters, are generated by baroclinic instabilities of the AC itself. The AEs generally remain more or less included in the main AC flow. The AEs alongslope-downstream propagation usually ends in the Channel of Sardinia, where AEs dramatically interact with the bathymetry and can remain almost blocked in the Sardinia Channel area for several months before collapsing (Puillat et al., 2002). In order to clarify some of these processes, including the behavior of the Algerian current and associated eddies, our methodology is based on a combined approach using glider observations and sea surface features observed by satellite. By autonomously collecting high-quality observations in three dimensions, gliders allow high-resolution oceanographic monitoring and provide useful contributions for the understanding of mesoscale dynamics and multidisciplinary interactions (e.g., Hodges and Fratantoni, 2009). On top of that, the glider route follows the ground track of the satellite SARAL, equipped with a Ka band altimeter (AltiKa), with the view to implement a methodology of analysis as performed by Bouffard et al. (2010). The main objectives of the project are : • identification of the physical properties of the surface and intermediate water masses between Northern Tunisian Coast and Sardinia and evaluation of the transport of water, salt and heat through the area • study of the variability of the physical properties of surface and intermediate water masses through the use of in-situ and satellite data. • understanding exchanges through sub-basins and the complex interactions through eddies • validation of the operational hydrodynamic numerical model of the western Mediterranean (http://www.seaforecast.cnr.it/en/fl/wmed.php) through the use of in-situ and satellite data. 3. Preliminary results of the experiment The glider carried out 6 legs during the period spanning from the 16th of August 2014 to the 19th of September 2014: Leg#1 (16 to 23 August 2014), Leg#2 (23 to 28 August 2014), Leg#3 (28 Aug. to 03 Sept. 2014) Leg#4 (03 to 08 Sept. 2014), Leg#5 (08 to 13 Sept. 2014), Leg#6 (13 to 19 Sept. 2014). As mentioned above, the first aim of this work is to analyze the hydrological properties of the surface and intermediate water masses and their variability, focusing first on T/S properties. The comparison of the successive T/S diagrams and T/S hydrological sections allows us to quantify the intensity of temporal variability and to assess mixing processes occurring within and between water masses. The core of LIW is clearly observed with S>38.7 psu (T~13.75 °C, S~38.75 psu) at depths between 250m and 450m and the spreading of this water mass appears clearly from one leg to the other. According Astraldi et al. (2002), this water mass is coming from the strait of Sicily and outflows into the Algero-Provencal Basin. This water mass should not be confounded with the so-called 'old' LIW, that recirculates to reenter the lower intermediate layer of the area from west to east. Near the surface, lenses of fresh water are observed at about 50m depth, all along the section, with a typical radius of 20 km. These lenses are generated by the meandering of the Algerian Current, which is advecting MAW first eastward along the Algerian slope, and then, at the vicinity of the Channel of Sardinia, a few lenses (AEs according Puillat et al., 2002) detach from the Algerian slope and propagate along the Sardinian one. We will show that the signature of these lenses are also detected by satellite, both in the altimetric signal and in the sea color radiometric data. 4. References • Astraldi, M., Conversano, F., Civitarese, G., Gasparini, G. P., Ribera d'Alcalà, M., and Vetrano, A.,: Water mass properties and chemical signatures in the central Mediterranean region, J. Mar. Syst., 33-34, 155-177, 2002 • Bouffard, J., A. Pascual, S. Ruiz, Y. Faugère, and J. Tintoré (2010), Coastal and mesoscale dynamics characterization using altimetry and gliders: A case study in the Balearic Sea, J. Geophys. Res., 115, C10029, doi:10.1029/2009JC006087. • Garzoli S. and C. Maillard, Winter circulation in the Sicily and Sardinia straits region. Deep-Sea Research, vol. 26A, 933-954, 1979. • Hodges, B. A. and D. M. Fratantoni, 2009. A thin layer of phytoplankton observed in the Philippine Sea with a synthetic moored array of autonomous gliders. Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, 114, doi:10.1029/2009JC005294. • Millot, C. (1987a) Circulation in the Western Mediterranean. Oceanologica Acta 10(2), 143-149. • Ozturgut Erdogan, Temporal and spatial variability of water masses: the Strait of Sicily (Medmiloc 72). Saclantcen SM-65, pp 26, 1975. • Puillat I., I. Taupier-Letage, C. Millot, 2002: Algerian Eddies lifetime can near 3 years - Journal of Marine Systems 31, 245- 259 • Ruiz S., Pascual A., Garau B., Pujol I., Tintoré J. 2009. Vertical motion in the upper ocean from glider and altimetry data, Geophys. Res. Lett. 36(14): L14607. • Taupier-Letage et al, J.Geophys.Res., 108, 3245, 2003. • Testor P., K. Béranger and L. Mortier (2005). Modeling the deep eddy field in the southwestern Mediterranean: the life cycle of Sardinian Eddies. In Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 32(13):13602.

  20. Channel water balance and exchange with subsurface flow along a mountain headwater stream in Montana, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payn, R.A.; Gooseff, M.N.; McGlynn, B.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Wondzell, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Channel water balances of contiguous reaches along streams represent a poorly understood scale of stream-subsurface interaction. We measured reach water balances along a headwater stream in Montana, United States, during summer base flow recessions. Reach water balances were estimated from series of tracer tests in 13 consecutive reaches delineated evenly along a 2.6 km valley segment. For each reach, we estimated net change in discharge, gross hydrologic loss, and gross hydrologic gain from tracer dilution and mass recovery. Four series of tracer tests were performed during relatively high, intermediate, and low base flow conditions. The relative distribution of channel water along the stream was strongly related to a transition in valley structure, with a general increase in gross losses through the recession. During tracer tests at intermediate and low flows, there were frequent substantial losses of tracer mass (>10%) that could not be explained by net loss in flow over the reach, indicating that many of the study reaches were concurrently losing and gaining water. For example, one reach with little net change in discharge exchanged nearly 20% of upstream flow with gains and losses along the reach. These substantial bidirectional exchanges suggest that some channel interactions with subsurface flow paths were not measurable by net change in flow or transient storage of recovered tracer. Understanding bidirectional channel water balances in stream reaches along valleys is critical to an accurate assessment of stream solute fate and transport and to a full assessment of exchanges between the stream channel and surrounding subsurface.

  1. CRMP2 protein SUMOylation modulates NaV1.7 channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Ju, Weina; Xiao, Yucheng; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-08-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) trafficking is incompletely understood. Post-translational modifications of NaVs and/or auxiliary subunits and protein-protein interactions have been posited as NaV-trafficking mechanisms. Here, we tested if modification of the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) by a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) could affect NaV trafficking; CRMP2 alters the extent of NaV slow inactivation conferred by the anti-epileptic (R)-lacosamide, implying NaV-CRMP2 functional coupling. Expression of a CRMP2 SUMOylation-incompetent mutant (CRMP2-K374A) in neuronal model catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells did not alter lacosamide-induced NaV slow inactivation compared with CAD cells expressing wild type CRMP2. Like wild type CRMP2, CRMP2-K374A expressed robustly in CAD cells. Neurite outgrowth, a canonical CRMP2 function, was moderately reduced by the mutation but was still significantly higher than enhanced GFP-transfected cortical neurons. Notably, huwentoxin-IV-sensitive NaV1.7 currents, which predominate in CAD cells, were significantly reduced in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A. Increasing deSUMOylation with sentrin/SUMO-specific protease SENP1 or SENP2 in wild type CRMP2-expressing CAD cells decreased NaV1.7 currents. Consistent with a reduction in current density, biotinylation revealed a significant reduction in surface NaV1.7 levels in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A; surface NaV1.7 expression was also decreased by SENP1 + SENP2 overexpression. Currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing NaV1.7 were reduced by CRMP2-K374A in a manner dependent on the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. No decrement in current density was observed in HEK293 cells co-expressing CRMP2-K374A and NaV1.1 or NaV1.3. Diminution of sodium currents, largely NaV1.7, was recapitulated in sensory neurons expressing CRMP2-K374A. Our study elucidates a novel regulatory mechanism that utilizes CRMP2 SUMOylation to choreograph NaV1.7 trafficking. PMID:23836888

  2. Soy protein polymers: Enhancing the water stability property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    Soy protein based plastics have been processed in the past by researchers for various short-term applications; however a common issue is the high water sensitivity of these plastics. This work concentrates on resolving this water sensitivity issue of soy protein polymers by employing chemical and mechanical interaction at the molecular level during extrusion. The primary chemical interactions employed were anhydride chemistries such as maleic anhydride (MA), phthalic anhydride (PTA), and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These were respectively used in conjunction with glycerol as a plasticizer to produce relatively water stable soy protein based plastics. Formulations with varying additive levels of the chemistries were extruded and injection molded to form the samples for characterization. The additive levels of anhydrides were varied between 3-10% tw/tw (total mass). Results indicated that phthalic anhydride formulations resulted in highest water stability. Plastic formulations with concentration up to 10% phthalic anhydride were observed to have water absorption as low as 21.5% after 24 hrs of exposure to water with respect to 250% for the control formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to characterize and confirm the fundamental mechanisms of water stability achieved by phthalic and maleic anhydride chemistries. In addition, the anhydride formulations were modified by inclusion of cotton fibers and pretreated cotton powder in order to improve mechanical properties. The incorporation of cotton fibers improved the dry strength by 18%, but did not significantly improve the wet state strength of the plastics. It was also observed that the butylated-hydroxy anisole (BHA) formulation exhibited high extension values in the dry state and had inferior water absorption properties in comparison with anhydride formulations.

  3. Detrusor overactivity is associated with downregulation of large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel protein

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shaohua; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Hypolite, Joseph A.; Marx, James; Alanzi, Jaber; Zderic, Stephen A.; Malkowicz, Bruce; Wein, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels have been shown to play a role in detrusor overactivity (DO). The goal of this study was to determine whether bladder outlet obstruction-induced DO is associated with downregulation of BK channels and whether BK channels affect myosin light chain 20 (MLC20) phosphorylation in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) was surgically induced in male New Zealand White rabbits. The rabbit PBOO model shows decreased voided volumes and increased voiding frequency. DSM from PBOO rabbits also show enhanced spontaneous contractions compared with control. Both BK channel ?- and ?-subunits were significantly decreased in DSM from PBOO rabbits. Immunostaining shows BK? mainly expressed in DSM, and its expression is much less in PBOO DSM compared with control DSM. Furthermore, a translational study was performed to see whether the finding discovered in the animal model can be translated to human patients. The urodynamic study demonstrates several overactive DSM contractions during the urine-filling stage in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with DO, while DSM is very quiet in BPH patients without DO. DSM biopsies revealed significantly less BK channel expression at both mRNA and protein levels. The degree of downregulation of the BK ?-subunit was greater than that of the BK ?-subunit, and the downregulation of BK was only associated with DO, not BPH. Finally, the small interference (si) RNA-mediated downregulation of the BK ?-subunit was employed to study the effect of BK depletion on MLC20 phosphorylation. siRNA-mediated BK channel reduction was associated with an increased MLC20 phosphorylation level in cultured DSM cells. In summary, PBOO-induced DO is associated with downregulation of BK channel expression in the rabbit model, and this finding can be translated to human BPH patients with DO. Furthermore, downregulation of the BK channel may contribute to DO by increasing the basal level of MLC20 phosphorylation. PMID:20392804

  4. Coupling of Retinal, Protein, and Water Dynamics in Squid Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    The light-induced isomerization of the retinal from 11-cis to all-trans triggers changes in the conformation of visual rhodopsins that lead to the formation of the activated state, which is ready to interact with the G protein. To begin to understand how changes in the structure and dynamics of the retinal are transmitted to the protein, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of squid rhodopsin with 11-cis and all-trans retinal, and with two different force fields for describing the retinal molecule. The results indicate that structural rearrangements in the binding pocket, albeit small, propagate toward the cytoplasmic side of the protein, and affect the dynamics of internal water molecules. The sensitivity of the active-site interactions on the retinal force-field parameters highlights the coupling between the retinal molecule and its immediate protein environment. PMID:20923654

  5. Wetting and dewetting of narrow hydrophobic channels by orthogonal electric fields: Structure, free energy, and dynamics for different water models.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Abhijit; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-12-14

    Wetting and dewetting of a (6,6) carbon nanotube in presence of an orthogonal electric field of varying strengths are studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using seven different models of water. We have looked at filling of the channel, occupancy and structure of water inside it, associated free energy profiles, and also dynamical properties like the time scales of collective dipole flipping and residence dynamics. For the current systems where the entire simulation box is under the electric field, the nanotube is found to undergo electrodrying, i.e., transition from filled to empty states on increase of the electric field. The free energy calculations show that the empty state is the most stable one at higher electric field as it raptures the hydrogen bond environment inside the carbon nanotube by reorienting water molecules to its direction leading to a depletion of water molecules inside the channel. We investigated the collective flipping of water dipoles inside the channel and found that it follows a fast stepwise mechanism. On the dynamical side, the dipole flipping is found to occur at a faster rate with increase of the electric field. Also, the rate of water flow is found to decrease dramatically as the field strength is increased. The residence time of water molecules inside the channel is also found to decrease with increasing electric field. Although the effects of electric field on different water models are found to be qualitatively similar, the quantitative details can be different for different models. In particular, the dynamics of water molecules inside the channel can vary significantly for different water models. However, the general behavior of wetting and dewetting transitions, enhanced dipole flips, and shorter residence times on application of an orthogonal electric field hold true for all water models considered in the current work. PMID:26671397

  6. Wetting and dewetting of narrow hydrophobic channels by orthogonal electric fields: Structure, free energy, and dynamics for different water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayal, Abhijit; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-12-01

    Wetting and dewetting of a (6,6) carbon nanotube in presence of an orthogonal electric field of varying strengths are studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using seven different models of water. We have looked at filling of the channel, occupancy and structure of water inside it, associated free energy profiles, and also dynamical properties like the time scales of collective dipole flipping and residence dynamics. For the current systems where the entire simulation box is under the electric field, the nanotube is found to undergo electrodrying, i.e., transition from filled to empty states on increase of the electric field. The free energy calculations show that the empty state is the most stable one at higher electric field as it raptures the hydrogen bond environment inside the carbon nanotube by reorienting water molecules to its direction leading to a depletion of water molecules inside the channel. We investigated the collective flipping of water dipoles inside the channel and found that it follows a fast stepwise mechanism. On the dynamical side, the dipole flipping is found to occur at a faster rate with increase of the electric field. Also, the rate of water flow is found to decrease dramatically as the field strength is increased. The residence time of water molecules inside the channel is also found to decrease with increasing electric field. Although the effects of electric field on different water models are found to be qualitatively similar, the quantitative details can be different for different models. In particular, the dynamics of water molecules inside the channel can vary significantly for different water models. However, the general behavior of wetting and dewetting transitions, enhanced dipole flips, and shorter residence times on application of an orthogonal electric field hold true for all water models considered in the current work.

  7. Tentative Study on Performance of Darriues-Type Hydroturbine Operated in Small Open Water Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, D.; Moriyama, R.; Nakashima, K.; Watanabe, S.; Okuma, K.; Furukawa, A.

    2014-03-01

    The development of small hydropower is one of the realistic and preferable utilizations of renewable energy, but the extra-low head hydropower less than 2 m is almost undeveloped yet for some reasons. The authors have developed several types of Darrieus-type hydro-turbine system, and among them, the Darrieus-turbine with a wear and a nozzle installed upstream of turbine is so far in success to obtain more output power, i.e. more shaft torque, by gathering all water into the turbine. However, there can several cases exist, in which installing the wear covering all the flow channel width is unrealistic. Then, in the present study, the hydraulic performances of Darrieus-type hydro-turbine with the inlet nozzle is investigated, putting alone in a small open channel without upstream wear. In the experiment, the five-bladed Darrieus-type runner with the pitch-circle diameter of 300 mm and the blade span of 300 mm is vertically installed in the open channel with the width of 1,200 mm. The effectiveness of the shape of the inlet nozzle is also examined using two types of two-dimensional symmetric nozzle, the straight line nozzle (SL nozzle) with the converging angle of 45 degrees and the half diameter curved nozzle (HD nozzle) whose radius is a half diameter of runner pitch circle. Inlet and outlet nozzle widths are in common for the both nozzles, which are 540 mm and 240 mm respectively. All the experiments are carried out under the conditions with constant flow rate and downstream water level, and performances are evaluated by measured output torque and the measured head difference between the water levels upstream and downstream of the turbine. As a result, it is found that the output power is remarkably increased by installing the inlet nozzle, and the turbine with SL nozzle produces larger power than that with HD nozzle. However, the peak efficiency is deteriorated in both cases. The speed ratio defined by the rotor speed divided by the downstream water velocity at the peak efficiency is larger in both cases with the inlet nozzle, partly due to the increase of inflow velocity into the turbine. In order to understand the cause of the differences of power, i.e. torque characteristics of the turbine with SL and HD nozzles, twodimensional CFD simulation is carried out. It is found that the instantaneous torque variation is important for the overall turbine performances, indicating the possibility of further performance improvement through the optimization of nozzle geometry.

  8. Thermodynamic Properties of Water Molecules at a Protein–Protein Interaction Surface

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have been identified as a vital regulator of cellular pathways and networks. However, the determinants that control binding affinity and specificity at protein surfaces are incompletely characterized and thus unable to be exploited for the purpose of developing PPI inhibitors to control cellular pathways in disease states. One of the key factors in intermolecular interactions that remains poorly understood is the role of water molecules and in par