Sample records for water depth dose

  1. A method to improve accuracy and precision of water surface identification for photon depth dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ververs, J. D.; Schaefer, M. J.; Kawrakow, I.; Siebers, J. V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The objective of this study is to present a method to reduce the setup error inherent in clinical depth dose measurements and, in doing so, to improve entrance dosimetry measurement reliability. Ionization chamber (IC) depth dose measurements are acquired with the depth scan extended into the air above the water surface. An inflection region is obtained in each resulting percent depth ionization (PDI) curve that can be matched against other measurements or to an inflection region obtained from an analogous Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Measurements are made with various field sizes for the 6 and 18 MV photon beams, with and without a Pb foil in the beam, to determine the sensitivity of the dose inflection region to the beam conditions. The offset between reference and test data set inflection regions is quantified using two separate methods. When comparing sets of measured data, maxima in the second derivative of ionization are compared. When comparing measured data to MC simulation, the offset that minimizes the sum of squared differences between the reference and test curves in the ionization inflection region is found. These methods can be used to quantify the offset between an initial setup (test) position and the true surface (reference) position. The ionization inflection location is found to be insensitive to changes in field size, electron contamination, and beam energy. Data from a single reference condition should be sufficient to identify the surface location. The method of determining IC offsets is general and should be applicable to any IC and other radiation sources. The measurement method could reduce the time and effort required in the initial IC setup at a water surface as setup errors can be corrected offline. Given a reliable set of reference data to compare with, this method could increase the ability of quality assurance (QA) measurements to detect discrepancies in beam output as opposed to discrepancies in IC localization. Application of the measurement method standardizes the procedure for localizing cylindrical ICs at a water surface and thereby improves the reliability of measurements taken with these devices at all depths.

  2. Water surface depth instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Q. C., IV

    1970-01-01

    Measurement gage provides instant visual indication of water depth based on capillary action and light diffraction in a group of solid, highly polished polymethyl methacrylate rods. Rod lengths are adjustable to measure various water depths in any desired increments.

  3. Monte Carlo study of the energy response and depth dose water equivalence of the MOSkin radiation dosimeter at clinical kilovoltage photon energies.

    PubMed

    Lian, C P L; Othman, M A R; Cutajar, D; Butson, M; Guatelli, S; Rosenfeld, A B

    2011-06-01

    Skin dose is often the quantity of interest for radiological protection, as the skin is the organ that receives maximum dose during kilovoltage X-ray irradiations. The purpose of this study was to simulate the energy response and the depth dose water equivalence of the MOSkin radiation detector (Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Australia), a MOSFET-based radiation sensor with a novel packaging design, at clinical kilovoltage photon energies typically used for superficial/orthovoltage therapy and X-ray CT imaging. Monte Carlo simulations by means of the Geant4 toolkit were employed to investigate the energy response of the CMRP MOSkin dosimeter on the surface of the phantom, and at various depths ranging from 0 to 6 cm in a 30 × 30 × 20 cm water phantom. By varying the thickness of the tissue-equivalent packaging, and by adding thin metallic foils to the existing design, the dose enhancement effect of the MOSkin dosimeter at low photon energies was successfully quantified. For a 5 mm diameter photon source, it was found that the MOSkin was water equivalent to within 3% at shallow depths less than 15 mm. It is recommended that for depths larger than 15 mm, the appropriate depth dose water equivalent correction factors be applied to the MOSkin at the relevant depths if this detector is to be used for depth dose assessments. This study has shown that the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit is useful for characterising the surface energy response and depth dose behaviour of the MOSkin. PMID:21559885

  4. Depth from water reflection.

    PubMed

    Linjie Yang; Jianzhuang Liu; Xiaoou Tang

    2015-04-01

    The scene in a water reflection image often exhibits bilateral symmetry. In this paper, we design a framework to reconstruct the depth from a single water reflection image. This problem can be regarded as a special case of two-view stereo vision. It is challenging to obtain correspondences from the real scene and the mirror scene due to their large appearance difference. We first propose an appearance adaptation method to transform the appearance of the mirror scene so that it is much closer to the real scene. We then present a stereo matching algorithm to obtain the disparity map of the real scene. Compared with other depth-from-symmetry work that deals with man-made objects, our algorithm can recover the depth maps of a variety of scenes, where both natural and man-made objects may exist. PMID:25643408

  5. Depth dose characteristics of electron beams at extended SSDS.

    PubMed

    Gunhan, Basri; Karaçam, Songül; Koca, Ayse; Demir, Bayram; Emre, Dervis; Akin, Nil

    The purpec: of this study is to investigate the behaviour of the percent depth dose curves (%DD) and surface doses of electronbeams at extended Source-to Surface Distances (SSDS). A (GE) Saturne 42 linear accelerator was used in this study, which produces dual photon energies of 6 and 15 MV as well as eight electron energies ranging between 4.5 and 21 MeV. The % Depth Dose curves were geneated with water scanning equipment at 6, 9, and 15 MeV for 4x4 cm(2) and 20x20 cm(2) field sizes at SSDS of 100 cm, 108 cm, and 115 cm. According to the measurements from surface to the depth of dose maximum the surface dose increased for all of the electron energies studied at extended SSDS for small field sizes. On the other hand for larger field sizes the surface doses decreased at extended SSDS. It was also observed that the increase in the surface dose diminished as the field size approached to 10x10cm(2) then the surface dose started decreasing at extended SSDS as the field sizes increased. Extended SSDS have no observable effect on the tail portion of the depth dose curves. PMID:18348849

  6. Tissue-phantom ratios from percentage depth doses.

    PubMed

    Bjärngard, B E; Zhu, T C; Ceberg, C

    1996-05-01

    When converting fractional (percentage) depth doses to tissue-phantom ratios, one must use a factor that accounts for the different source-to-point distances. Two minor correction factors are also involved. One is the ratio of total to primary dose at the two different distances from the source, for the same depth and field size. This factor is usually ignored. It was determined experimentally that this can introduce up to 1.5% error at 6 MV. The second correction factor reflects differences related to scattered photons and electrons at the depth of normalization in the two geometries. This correction is accounted for in published conversion procedures. It was found to be less than 1% provided the normalization depth is sufficient for electron equilibrium, which occurs first well beyond the depth of maximum dose. One may avoid electron-equilibrium problems by using an interim normalization depth that provides electron equilibrium with some margin, renormalizing to a shallower depth if desired. With this precaution, the accuracy when measured fractional depth doses were converted to tissue-phantom ratios was comparable to that of directly measured tissue-phantom ratios even when the correction factors were ignored. PMID:8724733

  7. Water depth penetration film test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Perry, L.; Sauer, G. E.; Lamar, N. T.

    1974-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Resources Program, a comparative and controlled evaluation of nine film-filter combinations was completed to establish the relative effectiveness in recording water subsurface detail if exposed from an aerial platform over a typical water body. The films tested, with one exception, were those which prior was suggested had potential. These included an experimental 2-layer positive color film, a 2-layer (minus blue layer) film, a normal 3-layer color film, a panchromatic black-and-white film, and a black-and-white infrared film. Selective filtration was used with all films.

  8. Calculating percent depth dose with the electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Antolak, John A; White, R Allen; Bloch, Charles D; Boyd, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the accuracy of the electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) in calculating central-axis percent depth dose in water for rectangular fields. The PBRA energy correction factor C(E) was determined so that PBRA-calculated percent depth dose best matched the percent depth dose measured in water. The hypothesis tested was that a method can be implemented into the PBRA that will enable the algorithm to calculate central-axis percent depth dose in water at a 100-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) with an accuracy of 2% or 1-mm distance to agreement for rectangular field sizes > or = 2 x 2 cm. Preliminary investigations showed that C(E), determined using a single percent depth dose for a large field (that is, having side-scatter equilibrium), was insufficient for the PBRA to accurately calculate percent depth dose for all square fields > or = 2 x 2 cm. Therefore, two alternative methods for determining C(E) were investigated. In Method 1, C(E), modeled as a polynomial in energy, was determined by fitting the PBRA calculations to individual rectangular-field percent depth doses. In Method 2, C(E) for square fields, described by a polynomial in both energy and side of square W [that is, C = C(E,W)], was determined by fitting the PBRA calculations to measured percent depth dose for a small number of square fields. Using the function C(E,W), C(E) for other square fields was determined, and C(E) for rectangular field sizes was determined using the geometric mean of C(E) for the two measured square fields of the dimension of the rectangle (square root method). Using both methods, PBRA calculations were evaluated by comparison with measured square-field and derived rectangular-field percent depth doses at 100-cm SSD for the Siemens Primus radiotherapy accelerator equipped with a 25 x 25-cm applicator at 10 MeV and 15 MeV. To improve the fit of C(E) and C(E,W) to the electron component of percent depth dose, it was necessary to modify the PBRA's photon depth dose model to include dose buildup. Results showed that, using both methods, the PBRA was able to predict percent depth dose within criteria for all square and rectangular fields. Results showed that second- or third-order polynomials in energy (Methods 1 and 2) and in field size (Method 2) were typically required. Although the time for dose calculation using Method 1 is approximately twice that using Method 2, we recommend that Method 1 be used for clinical implementation of the PBRA because it is more accurate (most measured depth doses predicted within approximately 1%) and simpler to implement. PMID:17592466

  9. Central axis depth dose curve for electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, W.J. (Department of Medical Physics, Medical University of Southern Africa, P.O. Medunsa 0204 (Republic of South Africa))

    1991-11-01

    In this article an analytical equation for electron depth dose is proposed for electron energies from 6--20 MeV. The equation contains four parameters and it fits the build-up region, fall-off region as well as the bremsstrahlung background region. The calculated values from this equation fit within 1,5% of the measured data in the build-up region and in the fall-off region within 0,5 mm for the energy range 5--10 MeV and within 1 mm for the range 12--20 MeV. This equation can be applied beyond the practical range.

  10. Radiographic film dosimetry of proton beams for depth-dose constancy check and beam profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Inhwan J; Teran, Anthony; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Johnson, Matt; Patyal, Baldev

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic film dosimetry suffers from its energy dependence in proton dosimetry. This study sought to develop a method of measuring proton beams by the film and to evaluate film response to proton beams for the constancy check of depth dose (DD). It also evaluated the film for profile measurements. To achieve this goal, from DDs measured by film and ion chamber (IC), calibration factors (ratios of dose measured by IC to film responses) as a function of depth in a phantom were obtained. These factors imply variable slopes (with proton energy and depth) of linear characteristic curves that relate film response to dose. We derived a calibration method that enables utilization of the factors for acquisition of dose from film density measured at later dates by adapting to a potentially altered processor condition. To test this model, the characteristic curve was obtained by using EDR2 film and in-phantom film dosimetry in parallel with a 149.65 MeV proton beam, using the method. An additional validation of the model was performed by concurrent film and IC measurement perpendicular to the beam at various depths. Beam profile measurements by the film were also evaluated at the center of beam modulation. In order to interpret and ascertain the film dosimetry, Monte Carlos simulation of the beam was performed, calculating the proton fluence spectrum along depths and off-axis distances. By multiplying respective stopping powers to the spectrum, doses to film and water were calculated. The ratio of film dose to water dose was evaluated. Results are as follows. The characteristic curve proved the assumed linearity. The measured DD approached that of IC, but near the end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), a spurious peak was observed due to the mismatch of distal edge between the calibration and measurement films. The width of SOBP and the proximal edge were both reproducible within a maximum of 5mm; the distal edge was reproducible within 1 mm. At 5 cm depth, the dose was reproducible within 10%. These large discrepancies were identified to have been contributed by film processor uncertainty across a layer of film and the misalignment of film edge to the frontal phantom surface. The deviations could drop from 5 to 2 mm in SOBP and from 10% to 4.5% at 5 cm depth in a well-controlled processor condition(i.e., warm up). In addition to the validation of the calibration method done by the DD measurements, the concurrent film and IC measurement independently validated the model by showing the constancy of depth-dependent calibration factors. For profile measurement, the film showed good agreement with ion chamber measurement. In agreement with the experimental findings, computationally obtained ratio of film dose to water dose assisted understanding of the trend of the film response by revealing relatively large and small variances of the response for DD and beam profile measurements, respectively. Conclusions are as follows. For proton beams, radiographic film proved to offer accurate beam profile measurements. The adaptive calibration method proposed in this study was validated. Using the method, film dosimetry could offer reasonably accurate DD constancy checks, when provided with a well-controlled processor condition. Although the processor warming up can promote a uniform processing across a single layer of the film, the processing remains as a challenge. PMID:26103499

  11. Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

  12. The influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina Pla; Conrado Pla; Ervin B. Podgorsak

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept

  13. Measurement of depth-dose of linear accelerator and simulation by use of Geant4 computer code

    PubMed Central

    Sardari, D.; Maleki, R.; Samavat, H.; Esmaeeli, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an established method of cancer treatment. New technologies in cancer radiotherapy need a more accurate computation of the dose delivered in the radiotherapy treatment plan. This study presents some results of a Geant4-based application for simulation of the absorbed dose distribution given by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC geometry is accurately described in the Monte Carlo code with use of the accelerator manufacturer's specifications. The capability of the software for evaluating the dose distribution has been verified by comparisons with measurements in a water phantom; the comparisons were performed for percentage depth dose (PDD) and profiles for various field sizes and depths, for a 6-MV electron beam. Experimental and calculated dose values were in good agreement both in PDD and in transverse sections of the water phantom. PMID:24376926

  14. Spatially continuous interpolation of water stage and water depths using the Everglades depth estimation network (EDEN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearlstine, Leonard; Higer, Aaron; Palaseanu, Monica; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Mazzotti, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level monitoring, ground-elevation modeling, and water-surface modeling that provides scientists and managers with current (2000-present), online water-stage and water-depth information for the entire freshwater portion of the Greater Everglades. Continuous daily spatial interpolations of the EDEN network stage data are presented on a 400-square-meter grid spacing. EDEN offers a consistent and documented dataset that can be used by scientists and managers to (1) guide large-scale field operations, (2) integrate hydrologic and ecological responses, and (3) support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem responses to the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) The target users are biologists and ecologists examining trophic level responses to hydrodynamic changes in the Everglades.

  15. Tissue depth dose calculations for breast cancer using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, C. B.; Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.

    2002-10-01

    Determining the dose rate as a function of distance within both cancerous tumor tissue as well as healthy tissue represents a proof of concept for medical diagnostic techniques finding overall dose absorption. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) was used to replicate radiotherapy treatments of external-beam radiation and high-dose-rate brachytherapy used in stages one and two of breast cancer. Modeling of conventional diagnostic radiology methods is limited by not only the chosen complexity of tissue material, but also in understanding absorbed dose. Preliminary results will be presented.

  16. Characteristics of the absorbed dose to water standard at ENEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, A. S.; Laitano, R. F.; Pimpinella, M.

    1996-04-01

    The primary standard of absorbed dose to water established at ENEA for the Co-60 gamma-ray quality is based on a graphite calorimeter and an ionometric transfer system. This standard was recently improved after a more accurate assessment of some perturbation effects in the calorimeter and a modification of the water phantom shape and size. The conversion procedure requires two corresponding depths, one in graphite and one in water, where the radiation energy spectra must be the same. The energy spectra at the corresponding points were determined by a Monte Carlo simulation in water and graphite scaled phantoms. A thorough study of the calorimeter gap effect corrections was also made with regard to their dependence on depth and field size. A comparison between the ionization chamber calibration procedures based on the standards of absorbed dose to water and of air kerma was also made, confirming the consistency of the two methods.

  17. Percent depth-dose distribution discrepancies from very small volume ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Hui; Lynch, Bart; James, Joshua A; McCullough, Kiernan T; Salter, Bill J

    2015-01-01

    As very small ion chambers become commercially available, medical physicists may be inclined to use them during the linear accelerator commissioning process to better characterize the beam in steep dose gradient areas. For this work, a total of eight different ion chambers (volumes from 0.007 cc to 0.6 cc) and four different scanning systems were used to scan PDDs at both +300V and -300V biases. We observed a reproducible, significant difference (overresponse with depth) in PDDs acquired when using very small ion chambers, with specific bias/water tank combinations - up to 5% at a depth of 25 cm in water. This difference was not observed when the PDDs were sampled using the ion chamber in static positions in conjunction with an external electrometer. This suggests noise/signal interference produced by the controller box and cable system assemblies, which can become relatively significant for the very small current signals collected by very small ion chambers, especially at depth as the signal level is even further reduced. Based on the results observed here, the use of very small active volume chambers under specific scanning conditions may lead to collection of erroneous data, introducing systematic errors into the treatment planning system. In case the use of such a chamber is required, we recommend determining whether such erroneous effect exists by comparing the scans with those obtained with a larger chamber. PMID:26103196

  18. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  19. Nuclear-interaction correction of integrated depth dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Hara, Y.; Furukawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In treatment planning of charged-particle therapy, tissue heterogeneity is conventionally modeled as water with various densities, i.e. stopping effective densities {?\\text{S}}, and the integrated depth dose measured in water (IDD) is applied accordingly for the patient dose calculation. Since the chemical composition of body tissues is different from that of water, this approximation causes dose calculation errors, especially due to difference in nuclear interactions. Here, we propose and validate an IDD correction method for these errors in patient dose calculations. For accurate handling of nuclear interactions, {?\\text{S}} of the patient is converted to nuclear effective density {?\\text{N}}, defined as the ratio of the probability of nuclear interactions in the tissue to that in water using a recently formulated semi-empirical relationship between the two. The attenuation correction factor ? \\text{w}\\text{p}, defined as the ratio of the attenuation of primary carbon ions in a patient to that in water, is calculated from a linear integration of {?\\text{N}} along the beam path. In our treatment planning system, a carbon-ion beam is modeled to be composed of three components according to their transverse beam sizes: primary carbon ions, heavier fragments, and lighter fragments. We corrected the dose contribution from primary carbon ions to IDD as proportional to ? \\text{w}\\text{p}, and corrected that from lighter fragments as inversely proportional to ? \\text{w}\\text{p}. We tested the correction method for some non-water materials, e.g. milk, lard, ethanol and water solution of potassium phosphate (K2HPO4), with un-scanned and scanned carbon-ion beams. In un-scanned beams, the difference in IDD between a beam penetrating a 150?mm-thick layer of lard and a beam penetrating water of the corresponding thickness amounted to ?4%, while it was +6% for a 150?mm-thick layer of 40% K2HPO4. The observed differences were accurately predicted by the correction method. The corrected IDDs agreed with the measurements within ±1% for all materials and combinations of them. In scanned beams, the dose estimation error in target dose amounted to 4% for a 150?mm-thick layer of 40% K2HPO4. The error is significantly reduced with the correction method. The planned dose distributions with the method agreed with the measurements within ±1.5% of target dose for all materials not only in the target region but also in the plateau and fragment-tail regions. We tested the correction method of IDD in some non-water materials to verify that this method would offer the accuracy and simplicity required in carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning.

  20. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW30013, NACP-02, and Roos chambers agreed well with that of water by using the optimal EPOM. Therefore, the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers can be expected for PDD measurements in clinical electron beams.

  1. Low energy electron generator design and depth dose prediction for micro-superficies tumors treatment purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rajaee, Azimeh; Ahmadinejad, Marjan; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Ettelaee, Mehdi

    2014-09-01

    We investigate deposited energy and linear energy transfer (LET) of low energy ejection electrons in air and water layers of a generator design via a plasma source. A structured model of a concave cold cathode electron generator was designed and simulated by using Monte Carlo n-particle version X 2.7.0 (MCNPX) code. A negative dc high voltage was applied to a concave cathode up to -12 kV to determine electron energy activity. Results determined that the geometric dimensions of field size toward the anode increased in relation to the angle of the conic beam, widening the accumulated bulks. The increased field size increased the anode current, which also resulted in an increase of electron energy, a reduction in LET, a stretched build-up area and a dose curve that shifted to a higher depth. The biological effect of low energy electron radiation can be increased with an increase of LET; as the depth dose decreased, the electron energy increased at the same time. The study of electron irradiation as a conic beam from an electron generator may provide an accurate investigation of the indirect effect of low energy electrons on bystander cells.

  2. ConcepTest: Ice Sheets and Water Depth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ice sheets covered much of the Northern Hemisphere one million years ago during part of the last ice age. How did this affect the depth of water in the oceans? a. Oceans were shallower than today b. Oceans were ...

  3. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)]. E-mail: sli1@hfhs.org; Aref, Ibrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Walker, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach.

  4. A depth-dependent formula for shallow water propagation.

    PubMed

    Sertlek, Hüseyin Özkan; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    In shallow water propagation, the sound field depends on the proximity of the receiver to the sea surface, the seabed, the source depth, and the complementary source depth. While normal mode theory can predict this depth dependence, it can be computationally intensive. In this work, an analytical solution is derived in terms of the Faddeeva function by converting a normal mode sum into an integral based on a hypothetical continuum of modes. For a Pekeris waveguide, this approach provides accurate depth dependent propagation results (especially for the surface decoupling) without requiring complex calculation methods for eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions. PMID:25096092

  5. Shallow water table depth algorithm in SWAT: Recent developments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the shallow water table depth (wtd) is crucial in many studies including determination of optimum irrigation and drainage management systems for agricultural production, farm machine trafficability, and water quality due to agricultural chemical transport and soil salinity. Therefore, i...

  6. Hyperspectral remote sensing for shallow waters: 2. Deriving bottom depths and water properties

    E-print Network

    Lee, Zhongping

    Hyperspectral remote sensing for shallow waters: 2. Deriving bottom depths and water properties very well in retrieving in-water optical properties and bottom depths from above-surface hyperspectral, and the optical properties of the water col- umn have to be known or derived. In earlier studies1­8 values

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of depth dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM & EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  8. Measurements of relative depth doses and Cerenkov light using a scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter with Co-60 radiotherapy source.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Han, Ki Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, which consists of an organic scintillator and a plastic optical fiber, for radiotherapy dosimetry. To select an adequate kind and length of scintillator for ?-rays generated from a Co-60 source, scintillating light from various kinds and lengths of organic scintillators is measured. Using a scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, the ?-rays generated from a Co-60 therapy unit are measured and relative doses are obtained according to the field size of the ?-ray beam and the depth in a water phantom. Also, Cerenkov light generated by the interactions of primary or secondary electrons and the plastic optical fiber is measured with different field sizes and depths of a water phantom using a background optical fiber. PMID:21889353

  9. A comparison of depth dependence of dose and linear energy transfer spectra in aluminum and polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Cucinotta, F A

    2000-01-01

    A set of four tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), with their detector heads at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 7 and 9-inch-diameter aluminum spheres, were flown on Shuttle flight STS-89. Five such detectors at the centers of polyethylene spheres were flown 1 year earlier on STS-81. The results of dose-depth dependence for the two materials convincingly show the merits of using material rich in hydrogen to decrease the radiation exposure to the crew. A comparison of the calculated galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates using the radiation transport code HZETRN with nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 and the measured GCR absorbed dose rates and dose-equivalent rates shows that they agree within root mean square (rms) error of 12.5 and 8.2%, respectively. However, there are significant depth-dependent differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. A comparison for trapped protons using the proton transport code BRYNTRN and the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model shows a systematic bias, with the model underpredicting dose and dose-equivalent rates. These results show the need for improvements in the radiation transport and/or fragmentation models. PMID:10630971

  10. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-print Network

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  11. New electron backscatter correction factors for accurate skin depth dose calculation from skin contamination by hot particles.

    PubMed

    Chibani, O

    2001-10-01

    New backscatter correction factors have been calculated using the GEPTS Monte Carlo code system for the case of an isotropic electron point source located at the boundary of a semi-infinite water medium. The backscatter correction factor is defined as the ratio of the dose in a semi-infinite medium to the dose, at the same point, in an infinite medium. It is found that the backscatter correction factor variation with position inside the medium is significant. However, the backscatter correction factor variation with energy is quite small for electron energies less than 1 MeV. The backscatter correction factor data are tabulated for energies of 1, 2, 3, and 4 MeV as functions of radial distance and angular direction. The proposed backscatter correction factors can be used for skin depth-dose calculations from beta particles emitted by either point sources or planar sources. Arbitrary target volumes and beta particle spectra can be considered. The new backscatter correction factors provide an alternative to the current data for accurate skin depth-dose calculations from skin contamination by hot particles. PMID:11569636

  12. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  13. Depth.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space-a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  14. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R N; Frederick, E B

    1980-03-15

    Initial base-line field test performance results of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the bathymetry mode are presented. Flight tests over the Atlantic Ocean yielded water depth measurements to 10 m. Water depths to 4.6 m were measured in the more turbid Chesapeake Bay. Water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat were taken at the same time as the aircraft overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. Beam attenuation coefficient a and depth d product alphad was established early in the program as the performance criterion index. A performance product of 6 was determined to be the goal. This performance goal was successfully met or exceeded in the large number of field tests executed. Included are selected data from nadir-angle tests conducted at 0 degrees , 5 degrees , 10 degrees , and 15 degrees . Field-of-view data chosen from the 2-, 5-, 10-, and 20-mrad tests are also presented. Depth measurements obtained to altitudes of 456 m are given for additional comparison. This laser bathymetry system represents a significant improvement over prior models in that (1) the complete surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape at a rate of 400 pulse waveforms/sec, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using the 30 degrees full-angle conical scanner. Space does not allow all the 5,000,000 laser soundings to be included. Qualified interested users may obtain complete data sets for their own in-depth analysis. PMID:20220950

  15. Depth distribution of absorbed dose on the external surface of Cosmos 1887 biosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Watts, J. W. Jr; Parnell, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Significant absorbed dose levels exceeding 1.0 Gy day-1 have been measured on the external surface of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite as functions of depth in stacks of thin thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) of U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. manufacture. The dose was found to decrease rapidly with increasing absorber thickness, thereby indicating the presence of intensive fluxes of low-energy particles. Comparison between the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. results and calculations based on the Vette Model environment are in satisfactory agreement. The major contribution to the dose under thin shielding thickness is shown to be from electrons. The fraction of the dose due to protons and heavier charged particles increases with shielding thickness.

  16. Compact water depth sensor with LPFG using the photoelastic effect and heat-shrinkable tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takama, Shinya; Kudomi, Takamasa; Ohashi, Masaharu; Miyoshi, Yuji

    2011-12-01

    We propose a compact water depth sensor with a long period fiber grating (LPFG) using a heat-shrinkable tube. The pressure property of the LPFG is investigated experimentally to confirm the feasibility of the water depth sensor. Moreover, the water depth in the 2m long water-filled pipe is successfully estimated by the proposed water sensors.

  17. Water-depth dependent infiltration into burnt forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Christoph; Sheridan, Gary; Noske, Phil; Metzen, Daniel; Lane, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Infiltration into severely burnt forest soils in South Eastern Australia exhibits a behaviour that is at odds with traditional infiltration theories that assumes a coherent soil matrix, which has important implications for upscaling from plot to hillslope. Infiltration patterns were studied at three severely burnt sites with different soils by applying a blue dye solution during rainfall and runon experiments, and subsequent profile excavation. Rainfall and runon rates were varied on each plot, runoff measured, and orthogonal photos taken during quasi-steady states. From transects on these photos average inundation fractions of the surface were measured, and 1.5 mm horizontal resolution DEMs were generated with image-based software. This information was combined in a DEM inundation algorithm that calculated water depth maps for each plot and rainfall and runon rate. At all three sites, nearly 100% of infiltration occurred through macropores that bypass the matrix of a water repellent layer. Average fractions of subsoil dye staining were 3% in shallow soils with a northerly aspect and low trees, 60% in deep soils with southerly aspects and high trees, and 20% in an intermediate soil. This was consistent with runoff coefficients of 0.94 for the shallow soil, 0.08 for the deep soil, and 0.71 for the intermediate soil. Irrespective of the runoff coefficient or dyed fraction there was a positive relationship between average water depth and infiltration rates on a given plot. Functions of water depth vs. bypass infiltration were derived inversely for each plot by matching average infiltration rates with the rates derived from sampling the water depth distributions. Additionally, characteristic bypass infiltration rates for all sites as function of runon and rainfall intensity were derived, normalized by the maximum infiltration rate at full inundation. These infiltration functions represent the water depth-dependent dynamics of runoff generation in bypass infiltration-dominated soils much better than traditional wetting front models. They are therefore more appropriate for upscaling plot scale runoff generation to the entire hillslope in those soils.

  18. Numerical modeling for target water depth estimation of marine-target impact craters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Ormö; Valery V. Shuvalov; Maurits Lindström

    2002-01-01

    Marine impacts can develop a crater in the seafloor if the target water depth is shallow in relation to the size of the impactor. The geology of this marine-target crater is influenced by the layer of water in the upper part of the target. The influence increases with increased water depth. The target water depth is essential when calculating the

  19. Calculated and measured depth dose profiles in a phantom exposed to neutron radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Tanner, J.E.; Sigalla, L.A.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    An accurate evaluation of doses caused by external sources of neutron radiation depends on knowledge of the transport of radiation inside the human body. Health physicists use two primary methods for studying this radiation transport: computer calculations and measurements. Both computer calculations and measurements were performed under well controlled, nearly identical conditions to determine the extent of their agreement. A comparison of the dose profiles predicted by both measurements and calculations was thus possible. The measurements were performed in a cylindrical phantom made of tissue equivalent plastic. The phantom size, 61 cm high and 30 cm in diameter, was chosen to approximate the human torso and to match the dimensions of cylindrical phantoms used by previous calculations. Holes were drilled down through the phantom to accommodate small tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) at various depths in the phantom. These counters were used to measure the neutron dose inside the phantom when it was exposed to various sources of neutrons. The holes in the phantom could also accommodate miniature Geiger-Mueller detectors to measure the gamma component of the dose. Neutron and gamma dose profiles were measured for two different sources of neutrons: an unmoderated /sup 252/Cf source and a 733-keV neutron beam generated by a Van de Graaff accelerator. 14 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Dual-packer testing of water-supply wells for discrete-depth water quality profiling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Colby; B. Kent

    1995-01-01

    Packer testing was performed on several 16-inch-diameter water supply wells to assess water quality at discrete depth intervals in a regional southern California aquifer. The purpose of the packer testing was to identify specific saturated intervals that were contributing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the drinking water supply wells. Packer testing has been used frequently by the oil and gas

  1. First experimental-based characterization of oxygen ion beam depth dose distributions at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Kurz, C; Mairani, A; Parodi, K

    2012-08-01

    Over the last decades, the application of proton and heavy-ion beams to external beam radiotherapy has rapidly increased. Due to the favourable lateral and depth dose profile, the superposition of narrow ion pencil beams may enable a highly conformal dose delivery to the tumour, with better sparing of the surrounding healthy tissue in comparison to conventional radiation therapy with photons. To fully exploit the promised clinical advantages of ion beams, an accurate planning of the patient treatments is required. The clinical treatment planning system (TPS) at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) is based on a fast performing analytical algorithm for dose calculation, relying, among others, on laterally integrated depth dose distributions (DDDs) simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Important input parameters of these simulations need to be derived from a comparison of the simulated DDDs with measurements. In this work, the first measurements of (16)O ion DDDs at HIT are presented with a focus on the determined Bragg peak positions and the understanding of factors influencing the shape of the distributions. The measurements are compared to different simulation approaches aiming to reproduce the acquired data at best. A simplified geometrical model is first used to optimize important input parameters, not known a priori, in the simulations. This method is then compared to a more realistic, but also more time-consuming simulation approach better accounting for the experimental set-up and the measuring process. The results of this work contributed to a pre-clinical oxygen ion beam database, which is currently used by a research TPS for corresponding radio-biological cell experiments. A future extension to a clinical database used by the clinical TPS at HIT is foreseen. As a side effect, the performed investigations showed that the typical water equivalent calibration approach of experimental data acquired with water column systems leads to slight deviations between the experimentally determined and the real Bragg peak positions. For improved accuracy, the energy dependence of the stopping power, and herewith the water equivalent thickness, of the material downstream of the water tank should be considered in the analysis of measured data. PMID:22805295

  2. Proceedings, Coasts and Ports, Manly, September 2013 Ship Squat in Non-Uniform Water Depth

    E-print Network

    Proceedings, Coasts and Ports, Manly, September 2013 Ship Squat in Non-Uniform Water Depth Tim P outer water depth for the dredged channel. #12;Proceedings, Coasts and Ports, Manly, September 2013.Gourlay@cmst.curtin.edu.au Abstract The problem of predicting ship squat in non-uniform water depth is studied in this paper

  3. Determination of the Absorbed Dose Rate to Water for the 18-mm Helmet of a Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Tai [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youngho [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Sangil [Nanotechnology Lab, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yongsoo [Faculty of Liberal Arts and Basic Science, Hankyung National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Hong [Department of Neurosurgery, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Kook Jin, E-mail: chunkj@kriss.re.k [Center for Ionizing Radiation, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To measure the absorbed dose rate to water of {sup 60}Co gamma rays of a Gamma Knife Model C using water-filled phantoms (WFP). Methods and Materials: Spherical WFP with an equivalent water depth of 5, 7, 8, and 9 cm were constructed. The dose rates at the center of an 18-mm helmet were measured in an 8-cm WFP (WFP-3) and two plastic phantoms. Two independent measurement systems were used: one was calibrated to an air kerma (Set I) and the other was calibrated to the absorbed dose to water (Set II). The dose rates of WFP-3 and the plastic phantoms were converted to dose rates for an 8-cm water depth using the attenuation coefficient and the equivalent water depths. Results: The dose rate measured at the center of WFP-3 using Set II was 2.2% and 1.0% higher than dose rates measured at the center of the two plastic phantoms. The measured effective attenuation coefficient of Gamma Knife photon beam in WFPs was 0.0621 cm{sup -1}. After attenuation correction, the difference between the dose rate at an 8-cm water depth measured in WFP-3 and dose rates in the plastic phantoms was smaller than the uncertainty of the measurements. Conclusions: Systematic errors related to the characteristics of the phantom materials in the dose rate measurement of a Gamma Knife need to be corrected for. Correction of the dose rate using an equivalent water depth and attenuation provided results that were more consistent.

  4. Predictive risk mapping of water table depths in a Brazilian cerrado area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Manzione; M. Knotters; G. B. M. Heuvelink; Asmuth von J. R; G. Câmara

    2009-01-01

    Information about hydrological systems and water table fluctuations is important for water management and is needed to assess choices for long-term water management policy. Preferably, uncertainty about the future water table depths is quantified to enable risk assessment. The aim of this study is to map water table depths and quantify the associated uncertainty, in order to indicate extreme scenarios

  5. The Effect of Irrigation Schedules on Water Table Depth and Root Zone Soil Moisture

    E-print Network

    Walker, Jeff

    The Effect of Irrigation Schedules on Water Table Depth and Root Zone Soil Moisture 1 H. T. Nguyen-Mail: thuhien@civenv.unimelb.edu.au Keywords: Irrigation schedules; water table depth; soil moisture; root zone EXTENDED ABSTRACT Indiscriminate use of irrigation water, particularly in existing areas of shallow water

  6. Depth-dose equivalent relationship for cosmic rays at various solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) pose a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or a Mars transfer vehicle, the radiation exposure determines the GCR shielding thickness, and hence the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, and data on the differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe, from 1965 to 1989, it has been shown that (1) the flux is determined by the diffusion parameter which is a function of the time in the solar cycle, and (2) the fluxes in the 1954 and 1976-1977 solar minima were similar and higher than those in 1965. In this paper, we have extended the spherical solar modulation theory back to 1954. The 1954-1955 GCR flux was nearly the same as that from 1976 to 1977; the 1965 flux values were nearly the same as those in 1986. Using this theory we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei, and calculated the depth dose as a function of Al thickness. It is shown that the shielding required to stay below 0.5 Sv is 17.5 -3/+8 g/sq cm of Al, and 9 -1.5/+5 g/sq cm to stay below 0.6 Sv. The calculated dose equivalent using the ICRP 60 values for quality factors is about 15 percent higher than that calculated using the ICRP 26 value.

  7. Relationship between body condition of American alligators and water depth in the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rice, Kenneth G.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Feeding opportunities of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in freshwater wetlands in south Florida are closely linked to hydrologic conditions. In the Everglades, seasonally and annually fluctuating surface water levels affect populations of aquatic organisms that alligators consume. Since prey becomes more concentrated when water depth decreases, we hypothesized an inverse relationship between body condition and water depth in the Everglades. On average, condition of adult alligators in the dry season was significantly higher than in the wet season, but this was not the case for juveniles/subadults. The correlation between body condition and measured water depth at capture locations was weak; however, there was a significant negative correlation between the condition and predicted water depth prior to capture for all animals except for spring juveniles/subadults which had a weak positive condition-water depth relationship. Overall, a relatively strong inverse correlation occurred at 10-49 days prior to the capture day, suggesting that current body condition of alligators may depend on feeding opportunities during that period. Fitted regression of body condition on water depth (mean depth of 10 days when condition-water depth correlation was greatest) resulted in a significantly negative slope, except for spring adult females and spring juveniles/subadults for which slopes were not significantly different from zero. Our results imply that water management practices may be critical for alligators in the Everglades since water depth can affect animal condition in a relatively short period of time.

  8. Dual-packer testing of water-supply wells for discrete-depth water quality profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, N.; Kent, B. [Geomatrix Consultants Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Packer testing was performed on several 16-inch-diameter water supply wells to assess water quality at discrete depth intervals in a regional southern California aquifer. The purpose of the packer testing was to identify specific saturated intervals that were contributing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the drinking water supply wells. Packer testing has been used frequently by the oil and gas industry and the environmental consulting industry to obtain discrete-depth well data. However, to the authors` knowledge, relatively few packer tests have been performed on water-supply wells to assess vertical variability in water quality. A dual-packer assembly was built for these tests, consisting of a 10-inch-diameter perforated steel pipe with an inflatable rubber packer at each end. The distance between packers was adjustable to 20 feet or 40 feet to accommodate different perforated interval lengths. The depths of perforated intervals tested ranged from approximately 120 to 450 feet below ground surface. Pressure transducers were placed above the packer assembly, between the packers, and below the packer assembly to monitor head changes. Well logging, consisting of video surveying, Flow Vision{trademark} surveying, and fluid resistivity, temperature, and gamma logging was performed on each well prior to packer testing. Before packer testing began, a wire brush was used to remove iron scale that had accumulated on the interior of the well casing and in well perforations.

  9. Genetic Algorithms for Optimal Scheduling of Chlorine Dosing in Water

    E-print Network

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    for determining the optimal schedule of chlorine dosing within a water distribution system considering multiple-based method), is in progress. INTRODUCTION Controlling the levels of chlorine within the distribution systemoz343 Genetic Algorithms for Optimal Scheduling of Chlorine Dosing in Water Distribution Systems

  10. Monitoring waterbird abundance in wetlands: The importance of controlling results for variation in water depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolduc, F.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Wetland use by waterbirds is highly dependent on water depth, and depth requirements generally vary among species. Furthermore, water depth within wetlands often varies greatly over time due to unpredictable hydrological events, making comparisons of waterbird abundance among wetlands difficult as effects of habitat variables and water depth are confounded. Species-specific relationships between bird abundance and water depth necessarily are non-linear; thus, we developed a methodology to correct waterbird abundance for variation in water depth, based on the non-parametric regression of these two variables. Accordingly, we used the difference between observed and predicted abundances from non-parametric regression (analogous to parametric residuals) as an estimate of bird abundance at equivalent water depths. We scaled this difference to levels of observed and predicted abundances using the formula: ((observed - predicted abundance)/(observed + predicted abundance)) ?? 100. This estimate also corresponds to the observed:predicted abundance ratio, which allows easy interpretation of results. We illustrated this methodology using two hypothetical species that differed in water depth and wetland preferences. Comparisons of wetlands, using both observed and relative corrected abundances, indicated that relative corrected abundance adequately separates the effect of water depth from the effect of wetlands. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Optimization of coagulant dosing process in water purification system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tae-Hwan Han; Eui-Suck Nahm; Kwang-Bang Woo; C. J. Kim; Jeong-Woong Ryu

    1997-01-01

    In the water purification plant, chemicals are injected for quick purification of raw water. The amount of chemicals intrinsically depends on the water quality such as turbidity, temperature, pH and alkalinity, etc. This paper presents the method of deriving the optimum dosing rate of coagulant in water purification system. A fuzzy model for normal condition and a neural network model

  12. Palliative radiation for vertebral metastases: the effect of variation in prescription parameters on the dose received at depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachael Barton; Graham Robinson; Eric Gutierrez; Peter Kirkbride; Michael McLean

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of prescription parameters on the dose received by the spine during palliative radiotherapy.Methods and Materials: In a survey, members of the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists were asked to define their prescription parameters for vertebral metastases. The depth of the spinal canal and vertebral body at 8 spinal levels was measured in 20 magnetic resonance

  13. DOSE CONTROLLER FOR AGUACLARA WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expected results include a proven design for a gravity powered dose controller that works for calcium hypochlorite or aluminum sulfate solutions. The dose controller will be coupled with plant flow rate measuring systems that have compatible relationships between flow rate...

  14. Correction for depth biases to shallow water multibeam bathymetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan-lin; Li, Jia-biao; Liu, Zhi-min; Han, Li-tao

    2013-04-01

    Vertical errors often present in multibeam swath bathymetric data. They are mainly sourced by sound refraction, internal wave disturbance, imperfect tide correction, transducer mounting, long period heave, static draft change, dynamic squat and dynamic motion residuals, etc. Although they can be partly removed or reduced by specific algorithms, the synthesized depth biases are unavoidable and sometimes have an important influence on high precise utilization of the final bathymetric data. In order to confidently identify the decimeter-level changes in seabed morphology by MBES, we must remove or weaken depth biases and improve the precision of multibeam bathymetry further. The fixed-interval profiles that are perpendicular to the vessel track are generated to adjust depth biases between swaths. We present a kind of postprocessing method to minimize the depth biases by the histogram of cumulative depth biases. The datum line in each profile can be obtained by the maximum value of histogram. The corrections of depth biases can be calculated according to the datum line. And then the quality of final bathymetry can be improved by the corrections. The method is verified by a field test.

  15. Ground Water Depth and Water use by Phreatophyte Communities During Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C. N.

    2003-12-01

    Demand for limited water resources along the middle Rio Grande of New Mexico has been exacerbated by drought in recent years. Since the last wet year in 1999, river flows have been well below normal and ceased in some reaches. Alluvial ground water elevations have declined steadily. Riparian vegetation consists primarily of native cottonwoods and introduced saltcedar, phreatophytes which are commonly groundwater-dependent. We investigated how drought-induced lowering of local water tables affects riparian water use. Since 1999, we have quantified rates of evapotranspiration (ET) and water table (WT) depths at two sites with relatively deep WTs (> 1.5 m) dominated by saltcedar, and since 2000 at two relatively shallow WT sites (< 1.5 m) dominated by cottonwood. Our results indicate that drought conditions and lowered ground water levels do not influence water use in the shallow WT cottonwood forests but do appear to limit water use in deeper WT saltcedar stands, particularly where seasonal WT fluctuations are large. As facultative phreatophytes, saltcedars are more flexible in their use of water resources. It is unlikely cottonwoods could compete effectively with saltcedars in sites characterized by relatively deep groundwater and dynamic WT hydrographs. Restoration efforts along the middle Rio Grande, such as cottonwood planting, saltcedar thinning, and managed flooding must plan for drought. Restoration will likely be more successful in more stable, shallow WT environments, where cottonwood forests are able to sustain access to water resources during drought.

  16. Growth responses of Urtica dioica L. to different water table depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miroslav Šrutek

    1997-01-01

    The study has examined the effect of water table depth (WTD) on production, biomass allocation, allometric relationships and transpiration rate in Urtica dioica. The essential importance of WTD for occurence and spread of Urtica has been documented. Water table depths were: 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, and 10 cm below the soil surface. Thirty individuals of Urtica for each WTD,

  17. Changes in photosynthetic pigment concentration in seaweeds as a function of water depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rarnus; S. I. Beale; D. Mauzerall; K. L. Howard

    1976-01-01

    We conducted a study of the relationship between changes in photosynthetic pigment content and water depth in Great Harbor near Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA, on the green algae Ulva lactuca and Codium fragile and the red algae Porphyra umbilicalis and Chondrus crispus. A calibrated underwater photometer equipped with spectral band filters measured light attenuation by the water column. The depth

  18. Decreased summer water table depth affects peatland vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Breeuwer; Bjorn J. M. Robroek; Juul Limpens; Monique M. P. D. Heijmans; Matthijs G. C. Schouten; Frank Berendse

    2009-01-01

    Climate change can be expected to increase the frequency of summer droughts and associated low water tables in ombrotrophic peatlands. We studied the effects of periodic water table drawdown in a mesocosm experiment. Mesocosms were collected in Southern Sweden, and subsequently brought to an experimental field in the Netherlands. Two water table treatments were applied: one with constant water tables

  19. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  20. Borehole sounding device with sealed depth and water level sensors

    DOEpatents

    Skalski, Joseph C.; Henke, Michael D.

    2005-08-02

    A borehole device having proximal and distal ends comprises an enclosure at the proximal end for accepting an aircraft cable containing a plurality of insulated conductors from a remote position. A water sensing enclosure is sealingly attached to the enclosure and contains means for detecting water, and sending a signal on the cable to the remote position indicating water has been detected. A bottom sensing enclosure is sealingly attached to the water sensing enclosure for determining when the borehole device encounters borehole bottom and sends a signal on the cable to the remote position indicating that borehole bottom has been encountered.

  1. Links between climate change, water-table depth, and water chemistry in a mineralized mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Caine; Todd, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that climate change is causing rising solute concentrations in mountain lakes and streams. These changes may be more pronounced in mineralized watersheds due to the sensitivity of sulfide weathering to changes in subsurface oxygen transport. Specific causal mechanisms linking climate change and accelerated weathering rates have been proposed, but in general remain entirely hypothetical. For mineralized watersheds, a favored hypothesis is that falling water tables caused by declining recharge rates allow an increasing volume of sulfide-bearing rock to become exposed to air, thus oxygen. Here, we test the hypothesis that falling water tables are the primary cause of an increase in metals and SO4 (100-400%) observed since 1980 in the Upper Snake River (USR), Colorado. The USR drains an alpine watershed geologically and climatologically representative of many others in mineralized areas of the western U.S. Hydrologic and chemical data collected from 2005 to 2011 in a deep monitoring well (WP1) at the top of the USR watershed are utilized. During this period, both water table depths and groundwater SO4 concentrations have generally increased in the well. A numerical model was constructed using TOUGHREACT that simulates pyrite oxidation near WP1, including groundwater flow and oxygen transport in both saturated and unsaturated zones. The modeling suggests that a falling water table could produce an increase in metals and SO4 of a magnitude similar to that observed in the USR (up to 300%). Future water table declines may produce limited increases in sulfide weathering high in the watershed because of the water table dropping below the depth of oxygen penetration, but may continue to enhance sulfide weathering lower in the watershed where water tables are shallower. Advective air (oxygen) transport in the unsaturated zone caused by seasonally variable recharge and associated water table fluctuations was found to have little influence on pyrite oxidation rates near WP1. However, this mechanism could be important in the case of a shallow dynamic water table and more abundant/reactive sulfides in the shallow subsurface. Data from WP1 and numerical modeling results are thus consistent with the falling water table hypothesis, and illustrate fundamental processes linking climate and sulfide weathering in mineralized watersheds.

  2. MCNP simulation of radiation doses distributions in a water phantoms simulating interventional radiology patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Selby, Bayne; Yao, Hai

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose distributions in water cylinders simulating patients undergoing Interventional Radiological examinations. Method: The irradiation geometry consisted of an x-ray source, dose-area-product chamber, and image intensifier as currently used in Interventional Radiology. Water cylinders of diameters ranging between 17 and 30 cm were used to simulate patients weighing between 20 and 90 kg. X-ray spectra data with peak x-ray tube voltages ranging from 60 to 120 kV were generated using XCOMP3R. Radiation dose distributions inside the water cylinder (Dw) were obtained using MCNP5. The depth dose distribution along the x-ray beam central axis was normalized to free-in-air air kerma (AK) that is incident on the phantom. Scattered radiation within the water cylinders but outside the directly irradiated region was normalized to the dose at the edge of the radiation field. The total absorbed energy to the directly irradiated volume (Ep) and indirectly irradiated volume (Es) were also determined and investigated as a function of x-ray tube voltage and phantom size. Results: At 80 kV, the average Dw/AK near the x-ray entrance point was 1.3. The ratio of Dw near the entrance point to Dw near the exit point increased from ~ 26 for the 17 cm water cylinder to ~ 290 for the 30 cm water cylinder. At 80 kV, the relative dose for a 17 cm water cylinder fell to 0.1% at 49 cm away from the central ray of the x-ray beam. For a 30 cm water cylinder, the relative dose fell to 0.1% at 53 cm away from the central ray of the x-ray beam. At a fixed x-ray tube voltage of 80 kV, increasing the water cylinder diameter from 17 to 30 cm increased the Es/(Ep+Es) ratio by about 50%. At a fixed water cylinder diameter of 24 cm, increasing the tube voltage from 60 kV to 120 kV increased the Es/(Ep+Es) ratio by about 12%. The absorbed energy from scattered radiation was between 20-30% of the total energy absorbed by the water cylinder, and was affected more by patient size than x-ray beam energy. Conclusion: MCNP offers a powerful tool to study the absorption and transmission of x-ray energy in phantoms that can be designed to represent patients undergoing Interventional Radiological procedures. This ability will permit a systematic investigation of the relationship between patient dose and diagnostic image quality, and thereby keep patient doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).

  3. Sugarcane Response to Water-Table Depth and Periodic Flooding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of Florida is often exposed to high water tables and periodic floods. Growers are concerned that elevated water tables for prolonged periods and during certain phases of growth reduce yields. However, these wet conditions help redu...

  4. Depth colonization of eelgrass ( Zostera marina ) and macroalgae as determined by water transparency in Danish coastal waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Laurentius Nielsen; Kaj Sand-Jensen; Jens Borum; Ole Geertz-Hansen

    2002-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis of lower depth limits for growth of eelgrass, large brown algae and other macroalgae measured\\u000a by SCUBA-diving along 162 transects in 27 Danish fjords and coastal waters, coupled to 1,400 data series of water chemistry\\u000a (especially nitrogen) and Secchi depth transparency collected between March and October. Danish coastal waters are heavily\\u000a eutrophied and characterized by

  5. Feeling Pressured: Water Pressure and Depth (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These two activities illustrate the relationship between water pressure and depth. They offer students an exploration of the relationship between pressure and depth, an opportunity to construct an experimental apparatus, experience in taking measurements with the apparatus, and an introduction to the impact of pressure on the lungs.

  6. Effect of plant uptake strategy on the water?optimal root depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Guswa

    2010-01-01

    The depth of plant roots depends on a variety of conditions, including soil properties, vegetation type, nutrient availability, and climate. A water-optimal root depth is determined by equating the marginal carbon cost of deeper roots with the benefit of those roots to continued transpiration. This work compares the effect of two bounding strategies of plant uptake, conservative and intensive, on

  7. Water Samples from Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Robert Sanders, with Temple University, is collecting water samples from the CTD. Both Robert and Rebecca Gast, with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, were using the samples to study microorganisms in the Arctic Ocean....

  8. Tracking water pathways in steep hillslopes by ?18O depth profiles of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Matthias H.; Alaoui, Abdallah; Kuells, Christoph; Leistert, Hannes; Meusburger, Katrin; Stumpp, Christine; Weiler, Markus; Alewell, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Assessing temporal variations in soil water flow is important, especially at the hillslope scale, to identify mechanisms of runoff and flood generation and pathways for nutrients and pollutants in soils. While surface processes are well considered and parameterized, the assessment of subsurface processes at the hillslope scale is still challenging since measurement of hydrological pathways is connected to high efforts in time, money and personnel work. The latter might not even be possible in alpine environments with harsh winter processes. Soil water stable isotope profiles may offer a time-integrating fingerprint of subsurface water pathways. In this study, we investigated the suitability of soil water stable isotope (?18O) depth profiles to identify water flow paths along two transects of steep subalpine hillslopes in the Swiss Alps. We applied a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model using ?18O values of precipitation (ranging from -24.7 to -2.9‰) as input data to simulate the ?18O profiles of soil water. The variability of ?18O values with depth within each soil profile and a comparison of the simulated and measured ?18O profiles were used to infer information about subsurface hydrological pathways. The temporal pattern of ?18O in precipitation was found in several profiles, ranging from -14.5 to -4.0‰. This suggests that vertical percolation plays an important role even at slope angles of up to 46°. Lateral subsurface flow and/or mixing of soil water at lower slope angles might occur in deeper soil layers and at sites near a small stream. The difference between several observed and simulated ?18O profiles revealed spatially highly variable infiltration patterns during the snowmelt periods: The ?18O value of snow (-17.7 ± 1.9‰) was absent in several measured ?18O profiles but present in the respective simulated ?18O profiles. This indicated overland flow and/or preferential flow through the soil profile during the melt period. The applied methods proved to be a fast and promising tool to obtain time-integrated information on soil water flow paths at the hillslope scale in steep subalpine slopes.

  9. Is topsoil water repellency a mechanism for improving water conservation in depth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is widespread in forest soils under different climatic conditions, soil types and vegetation covers (Doerr et al., 2000). It is normally characterized by a high spatial variability in persistence, showing wettable and water repellent patches. This phenomenon has a special interest in semiarid areas, such as the Mediterranean ecosystems, where water resources are limited. For that reason, it is thought to be a possible mechanism for improving water conservation in soil profile, which would minimize evaporation losses from the soil surface (Doerr et al., 2000; Robinson et al. 2010). The ecological function of having a patchy hydrophobic surface might be the means of transporting water deeper into the soil profile and away from surface evaporation. In addition, it may also inhibit the growth of other vegetal species. This could increase the resistance of plants to drought by increasing water availability through reducing losses to surface evaporation or other plants. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that soil WR improves the water conservation within the soil. We have compared the temporal evolution of soil moisture between samples with repellent and wettable layers. Repellent and wettable soil samples were collected from an agricultural area in Biar (Alicante, Spain). Samples were put in 100ml plastic pots (n=30). Each one had two layers (WR and wettable or both wettable) with depth around 2.5cm for superficial and 3.5cm for deeper wettable horizon. We measured the evolution under different initial conditions of soil water content (around 20% and 9%) and soil superficial WR persistence (wettable, slight, strong and severe soil (n=5 per treatment)). Pots were kept under laboratory conditions (between 30-50% of relative air humidity and ? 20°C). Soil water content was controlled daily by weight measurement. Our results showed a clear significant difference in evaporation rates, which were higher in samples with a wettable superficial layer. However, differences in evaporation rates were not significant between samples with different WR levels of persistence nor between samples with different initial water content. Our preliminary results indicated that soil WR is a mechanism which clearly contributes to the conservation of moisture in depth, making more sense of the hypothesis of a possible ecological strategy for plants. Keywords: Soil water repellency, hydrophobicity. References: Doerr, S.H., Shakesby, R.A., Walsh, R.P.D., 2000. Soil water repellency: its causes, characteristics and hydro-geomorphological significance. Earth-Sci. Rev. 51, 33-65. Robinson D.A., Lebron I., Ryel R.J., Jones S.B., 2010. Soil Water Repellency: A Method of Soil Moisture Sequestration in Pinyon-Juniper Woodland Soil Science Society of America Journal 74 (2), 624-634. Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., 2000. Ecohydrology: a hydrologic perspective of climate-soil-vegetation dynamics. Water Resour. Res., 36 (1), 3-9.

  10. Application of Image Technique to Water Depth measurement of Dam-Break Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Lee, F.; Lai, J.; Guo, W.; Tsung, S.; Tan, Y.; Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, dams around the world suffered from dam-break problems due to several extreme weather conditions such as typhoon events. Dam-break releases water with high velocity and rapid water level variation is found at the downstream of dam. Water depth measurement of dam-break is difficult using traditional method, such as point gauge. Recently the video device with high capture frequency is well developed. In addition, image technique is widely applied to flow measurement. Particle Tracking Velocitmetry, for instance, is popular to identify 3D position of particle with high velocity. Therefore, in this study, we apply image technique to measure water depth variation at the downstream of dam. To measure rapid water depth variation, experiments in flume are performed. The flume dimensions are presented in Figure 1. Flow of dam-break is simulated by suddenly lifting the gate. A laser beam locates at the center-line of the flume and gate. A 30-fps digital camera with a fixed angle of depression is placed at side of the flume. Coordinate transformation between image and space is first performed and image analysis is then used to identify the spatial water surface position from captured images. The validation of image technique is considered by measuring water depth using point gauge at a steady flow released from the gate. Three cases are considered in this study. The initial water depths at the upstream side of dam are 5, 10 and 15 cm and the bed is fixed at the downstream side. The measured water depth variations at x = 10 cm to ensure the measurements, numerical model, NTU-SFM2D, is used to simulate the experiments. The comparisons between experiments and simulations verify the application of image technique to rapid water depth variation at the downstream side of dam-break. Dimensions of experimental flume

  11. Seed Bank Variation Along a Water Depth Gradient in a Subtropical Lakeshore Marsh, Longgan Lake, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Long-Yi Yuan; Gui-Hua Liu; Wei Li; En-Hua Li

    2007-01-01

    Although zonation patterns of the standing vegetation along a water depth gradient in wetlands have been well described, few\\u000a studies have explored whether such patterns also occur in the seed bank. This study examined patterns of the seed bank along\\u000a a water depth gradient in three vegetation types (submerged zone, floating-leaved zone, and emergent zone) of a subtropical\\u000a lakeshore marsh,

  12. Geospatial Database of Ground-Water Altitude and Depth-to-Ground-Water Data for Utah, 1971-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buto, Susan G.; Jorgensen, Brent E.

    2007-01-01

    A geospatial database of ground-water-level altitude and depth-to-ground-water data for Utah was developed. Water-level contours from selected published reports were converted to digital Geographic Information System format and attributes describing the contours were added. Water-level altitude values were input to an inverse distance weighted interpolator to create a raster of interpolated water-level altitude for each report. The water-level altitude raster was subtracted from digital land-surface altitude data to obtain depth-to-water rasters for each study. Comparison of the interpolated rasters to actual water-level measurements shows that the interpolated water-level altitudes are well correlated with measured water-level altitudes from the same time period. The data can be downloaded and displayed in any Geographic Information System or can be explored by downloading a data package and map from the U.S. Geological Survey.

  13. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are compounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrapolation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over- or underestimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be predicted to within about a +10% accuracy using space radiation transport models for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped radiation behind shielding. However for solar particle event (SPE) with steep energy spectra and for extra-vehicular activities on the surface of the moon where only tissue shielding is present, transport models predict that there are large differences in model assumptions in projecting organ doses. Therefore experimental verification of SPE induced organ doses may be crucial for the design of lunar missions. In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field with the phantom torso. Lymphocyte cells are strategically embedded at selected locations at the skin and internal organs and are processed after irradiation to assess the effects of shielding on the yield of chromosome damage. The initial focus of the present experiment is to correlate biological results with physical dosimetry measurements in the phantom torso. Further on, the results of the passive dosimetry within the anthropomorphic phantoms represent the best tool to generate reliable data to benchmark computational radiation transport models in a radiation field of interest. The presentation will give first results of the physical dose distribution, the comparison with GEANT4 computer simulations based on a Voxel model of the phantom, and a comparison with the data from the chromosome aberration study.

  14. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  15. Underwater plasma spraying for components located in greater water depths

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Rass, J. [Materials Science Inst., Aachen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Current activities in offshore oil and gas production, freshwater and naval applications on the one hand and energy technologies on the other hand requires specific technologies for production, repair and maintenance underwater. Concerning the deep water atmosphere the development of viable practical systems of fabricating and processing materials centers around welding and cutting technologies. But new applications e.g. coatings on as sealings for corrosion attacked surfaces require new kinds of high energy techniques in hyperbaric atmospheres.

  16. Design and Verification of an Inexpensive Ultrasonic Water Depth Sensor Using Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihevc, T. M.; Rajagopal, S.

    2012-12-01

    A system that combines the arduino micro-controller, a Parallax PING Ultrasonic distance sensor and a secure digital card to log the data is developed to help monitor water table depths in multiple settings. Traditional methods of monitoring water table depths involve the use of a pressure transducer and expensive data loggers that cost upward of 1000. The present system is built for less than 100, with the caveat that the accuracy of the measurements is 1cm. In this laboratory study, we first build the arduino based system to monitor water table depths in a piezometer and compare these measurements to those made by a pressure transducer. Initial results show that the depth measurements are accurate in comparison to actual tape measurements. Results from this benchmarking experiment will be presented at the meeting.

  17. Relations between erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column and aerosol optical depth at Uccle, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, V.; De Backer, H.; Van Malderen, R.; Mangold, A.; Delcloo, A.

    2014-06-01

    At Uccle, a long time series (1991-2013) of simultaneous measurements of erythemal ultraviolet (UV) dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column (TOC) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) (at 320.1 nm) is available which allows for an extensive study of the changes in the variables over time. A change-point analysis, which determines whether there is a significant change in the mean of the time series, is applied to the monthly anomalies time series of the variables. Only for erythemal UV dose and TOC, a significant change point (without any known instrumental cause) was present in the time series around February 1998 and March 1998 respectively. The change point in TOC corresponds with results found in literature, where the change in ozone levels (around 1997) is attributed to the recovery of ozone. Linear trends were determined for the different (monthly anomalies) time series. Erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation and TOC all increase with respectively 7, 4 and 3% per decade. AOD shows an (insignificant) negative trend of -8% per decade. These trends agree with results found in literature for sites with comparable latitudes. A multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to the data in order to study the influence of global solar radiation, TOC and AOD on the erythemal UV dose. Together these parameters are able to explain 94% of the variation in erythemal UV dose. Most of the variation (56%) in erythemal UV dose is explained by global solar radiation. The regression model performs well with a slight tendency to underestimate the measured erythemal UV doses and with a Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE) of 18%. However, in winter, negative erythemal UV dose values are modeled. Applying the MLR to the individual seasons solves this issue. The seasonal models have an adjusted R2 value higher than 0.8 and the correlation between modeled and measured erythemal UV dose values is higher than 0.9 for each season. The summer model gives the best performance, with an absolute mean error of only 6%. Again, global solar radiation is the factor that contributes the most to the variation in erythemal UV dose, so there is no doubt about the necessity to include this factor in the regression models. A large part of the influence of AOD is already represented by the global solar radiation parameter. Therefore the individual contribution of AOD to erythemal UV dose is so low. For this reason, it seems unnecessary to include AOD in the MLR analysis. Including TOC however, is justified as the adjusted R2 increases and the MABE of the model decreases compared to a model where only global solar radiation is used as explanatory variable.

  18. Monte Carlo calculations of monoenergetic electron depth dose distributions in LiF chips: skin dose correction factors for beta rays.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Hirning, C R; Yuen, P; Wong, P

    1994-10-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out for monoenergetic electrons from 0.1 to 4 MeV irradiating LiF chips in both perpendicular and isotropic geometry. This enabled the calculation of skin dose correction factors (beta factors) for typical beta energy spectra as measured with a beta-ray spectrometer at CANDU nuclear generating stations. The correction factors were estimated by averaging the depth dose distributions for the monoenergetic electrons over the experimentally measured beta-ray spectra. The calculations illustrate the large uncertainty in beta factors arising from the unknown angular distribution of the beta-ray radiation field and uncertainties in the shape of the beta-ray spectra below 500 keV. PMID:8083045

  19. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  20. Direct absorbed dose to water determination based on water calorimetry in scanning proton beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, A.; Clasie, B.; Chung, E.; Lu, H. M.; Flanz, J.; Cascio, E.; Engelsman, M.; Paganetti, H.; Seuntjens, J. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3G-1A4 (Canada); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3G-1A4 (Canada); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3G-1A4 (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this manuscript is to describe the direct measurement of absolute absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton radiotherapy beam using a water calorimeter primary standard. Methods: The McGill water calorimeter, which has been validated in photon and electron beams as well as in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, was used to measure the absorbed dose to water in double scattering and scanning proton irradiations. The measurements were made at the Massachusetts General Hospital proton radiotherapy facility. The correction factors in water calorimetry were numerically calculated and various parameters affecting their magnitude and uncertainty were studied. The absorbed dose to water was compared to that obtained using an Exradin T1 Chamber based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on absorbed dose to water amounts to 0.4% and 0.6% in scattered and scanned proton water calorimetry, respectively. This compares to an overall uncertainty of 1.9% for currently accepted IAEA TRS-398 reference absorbed dose measurement protocol. The absorbed dose from water calorimetry agrees with the results from TRS-398 well to within 1-sigma uncertainty. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that a primary absorbed dose standard based on water calorimetry is feasible in scattered and scanned proton beams.

  1. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirin A Enger; Anders Ahnesjö; Frank Verhaegen; Luc Beaulieu

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that modern dose calculation algorithms should be able to report absorbed dose both as dose to the local medium, Dm,m, and as dose to a water cavity embedded in the medium, Dw,m, using conversion factors from cavity theory. Assuming that the cell nucleus with its DNA content is the most important target for biological response, the

  2. Organic compounds at different depths in a sandy soil and their role in water repellency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. MorleyA; K. A. MainwaringA; S. H. Doerr; P. Douglas; C. T. Llewellyn; L. W. Dekker

    2005-01-01

    The causes of soil water repellency are still only poorly understood. It is generally assumed that hydrophobic organic compounds are responsible, but those concerned have not previously been identified by comparison between samples taken from a water repellent topsoil and the wettable subsoil. In this study we separated, characterised, and compared the organic compounds present at 4 different depths in

  3. STUDY OF WATER BOLUS EFFECT ON SAR PENETRATION DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE FIELD SIZE FOR LOCAL HYPERTHERMIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi-Ganjeh; Amir R. Attari

    2008-01-01

    Abstract—Water bolus is used in microwave hyperthermia of cancer treatment to control the body surface temperature. In this paper the effect of water bolus on SAR distribution is investigated in the muscle layer of a three layered tissue model. Both the SAR penetration depth and the effective field size (EFS) are computed and compared in presence and in absence of

  4. Out-of-field dose measurements in a water phantom using different radiotherapy modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Ramm, U.; Licher, J.; La Tessa, C.

    2012-08-01

    This investigation focused on the characterization of the lateral dose fall-off following the irradiation of the target with photons, protons and carbon ions. A water phantom was irradiated with a rectangular field using photons, passively delivered protons as well as scanned protons and carbon ions. The lateral dose profile in the depth of the maximum dose was measured using an ion chamber, a diamond detector and thermoluminescence detectors TLD-600 and TLD-700. The yield of thermal neutrons was estimated for all radiation types while their complete spectrum was measured with bubble detectors during the irradiation with photons. The peripheral dose delivered by photons is significantly higher compared to both protons and carbon ions and exceeds the latter by up to two orders of magnitude at distances greater than 50 mm from the field. The comparison of passive and active delivery techniques for protons shows that, for the chosen rectangular target shape, the former has a sharper penumbra whereas the latter has a lower dose in the far-out-of-field region. When comparing scanning treatments, carbon ions present a sharper dose fall-off than protons close to the target but increasing peripheral dose with increasing incident energy. For photon irradiation, the contribution to the out-of-field dose of photoneutrons appears to be of the same order of magnitude as the scattered primary beam. Charged particles show a clear supremacy over x-rays in achieving a higher dose conformality around the target and in sparing the healthy tissue from unnecessary radiation exposure. The out-of-field dose for x-rays increases with increasing beam energy because of the production of biologically harmful neutrons.

  5. Estimation of missing water-level data for the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN), 2013 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petkewich, Matthew D.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network is an integrated network of real-time water-level gaging stations, a ground-elevation model, and a water-surface elevation model designed to provide scientists, engineers, and water-resource managers with water-level and water-depth information (1991-2013) for the entire freshwater portion of the Greater Everglades. The U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystems Science provides support for the Everglades Depth Estimation Network in order for the Network to provide quality-assured monitoring data for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. In a previous study, water-level estimation equations were developed to fill in missing data to increase the accuracy of the daily water-surface elevation model. During this study, those equations were updated because of the addition and removal of water-level gaging stations, the consistent use of water-level data relative to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988, and availability of recent data (March 1, 2006, to September 30, 2011). Up to three linear regression equations were developed for each station by using three different input stations to minimize the occurrences of missing data for an input station. Of the 667 water-level estimation equations developed to fill missing data at 223 stations, more than 72 percent of the equations have coefficients of determination greater than 0.90, and 97 percent have coefficients of determination greater than 0.70.

  6. Vertical distribution of wave shear stress in variable water depth: Theory and field observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingping Zou; Anthony J. Bowen; Alex E. Hay

    2006-01-01

    A generalized analytical model is developed to describe the vertical distribution of wave-induced shear stress in the presence of bottom slope, bottom friction and depth-induced wave breaking in the shoaling region and surf zone. The theory is compared to data obtained on an unbarred beach in 3.7-m mean water depth over a 2° bottom slope. Bottom slope and bottom friction

  7. Effect of seedling age and water depth on morphological and physiological aspects of transplanted rice under high temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KHAKWANI Abdul Aziz; SHIRAISHI Masaaki; ZUBAIR Muhammad; BALOCH Mohammad Safdar; NAVEED Khalid; AWAN Inayatullah

    To study the effect of high temperature, rice seedlings 20, 30, 40 and 50 d were kept at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm water depth in a water pool. Meteorological findings indicated that water temperature varied up to 10 cm but became stable below this depth. Deep water inflicted higher tiller mortality, minimal increase in dry weight of aerial

  8. Resistance to Water Diffusion in the Stratum Corneum Is Depth-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    van Logtestijn, Mark D. A.; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Stamatas, Georgios N.; Tanaka, Reiko J.

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides a permeability barrier that limits the inflow and outflow of water. The permeability barrier is continuously and dynamically formed, maintained, and degraded along the depth, from the bottom to the top, of the SC. Naturally, its functioning and structure also change dynamically in a depth-dependent manner. While transepidermal water loss is typically used to assess the function of the SC barrier, it fails to provide any information about the dynamic mechanisms that are responsible for the depth-dependent characteristics of the permeability barrier. This paper aims to quantitatively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier using in vivo non-invasive measurement data for understanding the underlying mechanisms for barrier formation, maintenance, and degradation. As a framework to combine existing experimental data, we propose a mathematical model of the SC, consisting of multiple compartments, to explicitly address and investigate the depth-dependency of the SC permeability barrier. Using this mathematical model, we derive a measure of the water permeability barrier, i.e. resistance to water diffusion in the SC, from the measurement data on transepidermal water loss and water concentration profiles measured non-invasively by Raman spectroscopy. The derived resistance profiles effectively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier, with three distinct regions corresponding to formation, maintenance, and degradation of the barrier. Quantitative characterization of the obtained resistance profiles allows us to compare and evaluate the permeability barrier of skin with different morphology and physiology (infants vs adults, different skin sites, before and after application of oils) and elucidates differences in underlying mechanisms of processing barriers. The resistance profiles were further used to predict the spatial-temporal effects of skin treatments by in silico experiments, in terms of spatial-temporal dynamics of percutaneous water penetration. PMID:25671323

  9. Resistance to water diffusion in the stratum corneum is depth-dependent.

    PubMed

    van Logtestijn, Mark D A; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Stamatas, Georgios N; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides a permeability barrier that limits the inflow and outflow of water. The permeability barrier is continuously and dynamically formed, maintained, and degraded along the depth, from the bottom to the top, of the SC. Naturally, its functioning and structure also change dynamically in a depth-dependent manner. While transepidermal water loss is typically used to assess the function of the SC barrier, it fails to provide any information about the dynamic mechanisms that are responsible for the depth-dependent characteristics of the permeability barrier. This paper aims to quantitatively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier using in vivo non-invasive measurement data for understanding the underlying mechanisms for barrier formation, maintenance, and degradation. As a framework to combine existing experimental data, we propose a mathematical model of the SC, consisting of multiple compartments, to explicitly address and investigate the depth-dependency of the SC permeability barrier. Using this mathematical model, we derive a measure of the water permeability barrier, i.e. resistance to water diffusion in the SC, from the measurement data on transepidermal water loss and water concentration profiles measured non-invasively by Raman spectroscopy. The derived resistance profiles effectively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier, with three distinct regions corresponding to formation, maintenance, and degradation of the barrier. Quantitative characterization of the obtained resistance profiles allows us to compare and evaluate the permeability barrier of skin with different morphology and physiology (infants vs adults, different skin sites, before and after application of oils) and elucidates differences in underlying mechanisms of processing barriers. The resistance profiles were further used to predict the spatial-temporal effects of skin treatments by in silico experiments, in terms of spatial-temporal dynamics of percutaneous water penetration. PMID:25671323

  10. Dependence of absorbed dose along the radiation beam axis on depth and on radiation field for photons produced in linac Saturne II plus.

    PubMed

    Lobodziec, W

    1987-05-01

    The paper discusses the dependence of percentage depth dose and tissue phantom ratio on depth and on radiation field size for photons produced in a linac Saturne II plus. The results expressed by the simple formulas have been presented in tables and on graphs. PMID:3589960

  11. Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M. [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Guthrie Clinic/Robert Packard Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania 18840 (United States); EBG MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria A2700 (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

  12. Nest survival of American Coots relative to grazing, burning, and water depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.; Buhl, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Water and emergent vegetation are key features influencing nest site selection and success for many marsh-nesting waterbirds. Wetland management practices such as grazing, burning, and water-level manipulations directly affect these features and can influence nest survival. We used model selection and before-after-control-impact approaches to evaluate the effects of water depth and four common land-management practices or treatments, i.e., summer grazing, fall grazing, fall burning, and idle (no active treatment) on nest survival of American coots (Fulica americana) nesting at Grays Lake, a large montane wetland in southeast Idaho. The best model included the variables year × treatment, and quadratic functions of date, water depth, and nest age; height of vegetation at the nest did not improve the best model. However, results from the before-after-control-impact analysis indicate that management practices affected nest success via vegetation and involved interactions of hydrology, residual vegetation, and habitat composition. Nest success in idled fields changed little between pre- and post-treatment periods, whereas nest success declined in fields that were grazed or burned, with the most dramatic declines the year following treatments. The importance of water depth may be amplified in this wetland system because of rapid water-level withdrawal during the nesting season. Water and land-use values for area ranchers, management for nesting waterbirds, and long-term wetland function are important considerations in management of water levels and vegetation.

  13. Application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data for improved production well construction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gossell, M.A.; Nishikawa, T.; Hanson, R.T.; Izbicki, J.A.; Tabidian, M.A.; Bertine, K.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water production wells commonly are designed to maximize well yield and, therefore, may be screened over several water-bearing zones. These water-bearing zones usually are identified, and their hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality are inferred, on the basis of indirect data such as geologic and geophysical logs. Production well designs based on these data may result in wells that are drilled deeper than necessary and are screened through zones having low permeability or poor-quality ground water. In this study, we examined the application of flowmeter logging and depth-dependent water quality samples for the improved design of production wells in a complex hydrogeologic setting. As a demonstration of these techniques, a flowmeter log and depth-dependent water quality data were collected from a long-screened production well within a multilayered coastal aquifer system in the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California. Results showed that the well yields most of its water from four zones that constitute 58% of the screened interval. The importance of these zones to well yield was not readily discernible from indirect geologic or geophysical data. The flowmeter logs and downhole water quality data also show that small quantities of poor-quality water could degrade the overall quality of water from the well. The data obtained from one well can be applied to other proposed wells in the same hydrologic basin. The application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data to well design can reduce installation costs and improve the quantity and quality of water produced from wells in complex multiple-aquifer systems.

  14. Application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data for improved production well construction.

    PubMed

    Gossell, M A; Nishikawa, T; Hanson, R T; Izbicki, J A; Tabidian, M A; Bertine, K

    1999-01-01

    Ground water production wells commonly are designed to maximize well yield and, therefore, may be screened over several water-bearing zones. These water-bearing zones usually are identified, and their hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality are inferred, on the basis of indirect data such as geologic and geophysical logs. Production well designs based on these data may result in wells that are drilled deeper than necessary and are screened through zones having low permeability or poor-quality ground water. In this study, we examined the application of flowmeter logging and depth-dependent water quality samples for the improved design of production wells in a complex hydrogeologic setting. As a demonstration of these techniques, a flowmeter log and depth-dependent water quality data were collected from a long-screened production well within a multilayered coastal aquifer system in the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California. Results showed that the well yields most of its water from four zones that constitute 58% of the screened interval. The importance of these zones to well yield was not readily discernible from indirect geologic or geophysical data. The flowmeter logs and downhole water quality data also show that small quantities of poor-quality water could degrade the overall quality of water from the well. The data obtained from one well can be applied to other proposed wells in the same hydrologic basin. The application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data to well design can reduce installation costs and improve the quantity and quality of water produced from wells in complex multiple-aquifer systems. PMID:19125926

  15. (Depth-dose curves of the beta reference fields (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2.

    PubMed

    Brunzendorf, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The most common reference fields in beta dosimetry are the ISO 6980 series 1 radiation fields produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2 and its predecessor BSS. These reference fields require sealed beta radiation sources ((147)Pm, (85)Kr or (90)Sr/(90)Y) in combination with a source-specific beam-flattening filter, and are defined only at a given distance from the source. Every radiation sources shipped with the BSS2 is sold with a calibration certificate of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The calibration workflow also comprises regular depth-dose measurements. This work publishes complete depth-dose curves of the series 1 sources (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y in ICRU tissue up to a depth of 11 mm,when all electrons are stopped. For this purpose, the individual depth-dose curves of all BSS2 sources calibrated so far have been determined, i.e. the complete datasets of all BSS2 beta sources have been re-evaluated. It includes 191 depth-dose curves of 116 different sources comprising more than 2200 data points in total. Appropriate analytical representations of the nuclide-specific depth-dose curves are provided for the first time. PMID:22267274

  16. Investigation on optimization design of equivalent water depth truncated mooring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huoming; Sun, Zhilin; Yang, Jianmin; Gao, Mingzheng

    2009-02-01

    The oil industry is now increasingly concentrating their efforts and activities in connection with developing fields in deeper waters, ranging typically from 500 m to 3000 m worldwide. However, the modeling of a full-depth system has become difficult presently; no tank facility is sufficiently large to perform the testing of a complete FPS with compliant mooring in 1000 m to 3000 m depth, within reasonable limits of model scale. Until recently, the most feasible procedure to meet this challenge seems to be the so-called “hybrid model testing technique”. To implement this technique, the first and important step is to design the equivalent water depth truncated mooring system. In this work, the optimization design of the equivalent water depth truncated mooring system in hybrid model testing for deep sea platforms is investigated. During the research, the similarity of static characteristics between the truncated and full depth system is mainly considered. The optimization mathematical model for the equivalent water depth truncated system design is set up by using the similarity in numerical value of the static characteristics between the truncated system and the full depth one as the objective function. The dynamic characteristic difference between the truncated and full depth mooring system can be minished by selecting proper design rule. To calculate the static characteristics of the mooring system, the fourth order Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the static equilibrium equation of the single mooring line. After the static characteristic of the single mooring line is calculated, the static characteristic of the whole mooring system is calculated with Lagrange numerical interpolation method. The mooring line material database is established and the standard material name and the diameter of the mooring line are selected as the primary key. The improved simulated annealing algorithm for continual & discrete variables and the improved complex algorithm for discrete variables are employed to perform the optimization calculation. The C++ programming language is used to develop the computer program according to the object-oriented programming idea. To perform the optimization calculation with the two algorithms mentioned above respectively and the better result is selected as the final one. To examine the developed program, an example of equivalent water depth truncated mooring system optimum design calculation on a 100,000-t, turret mooring FPSO in water depth of 320 m are performed to obtain the conformation parameters of the truncated mooring system, in which the truncated water depth is 160 m. The model test under some typical environment conditions are performed for both the truncated and the full depth system with model scale factor ?=80. After comparing the corresponding results from the test of the truncated system with those from the full depth system test, it’s found that the truncated mooring system design in this work is successful.

  17. Dose calculations for nuclear criticality accidents shielded by large amounts of water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. Schwinkendorf; A. D. Wilcox; S. P. Roblyer; H. Toffer

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear criticality accident under a large amount of water will yield, at first analysis, only a trivial dose to any person standing above the water surface. Attenuation by 15 ft of water reduces the gamma dose substantially, and virtually eliminates dose from neutrons. However, due to an activation product, ¹⁶N, which may be transported to the water surface on

  18. A unit for collection of dissolved oxygen and water column temperature at multiple depths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2004 field study conducted during actual channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus harvests, and a small-scale research study conducted in 2005, required continuous collection of dissolved oxygen concentration and temperature at two depths in the water column. The on-farm study required data collection...

  19. Reclaiming Hard Rock Mines: An In Depth Look at Vegetation, Soil, and Water on the Bullion

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Reclaiming Hard Rock Mines: An In Depth Look at Vegetation, Soil, and Water on the Bullion Mine, nine miles north of Basin, Montana, the hard rock Bullion Mine produced gold, silver, lead, zinc with tailings piles, waste rock and acid mine drainage (AMD; Figure 1). Waste rock, the soil and rock material

  20. QUALITY OF WATERS FOUND AT DEPTH WITHIN A LOESS-HILLS AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns about nitrate-N in ground waters of Midwest agricultural watersheds have increased in recent years. We installed a transect of multi-depth piezometers and lysimeters in each of two adjacent first-order watersheds in the loess hills of southwest Iowa, and monitored NO3-N concentrations each ...

  1. Accurate navigation of airborne image sequences for rapid surveys of water depths and currents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Dugan; Cindy Piotrowski; Alan Evans; Udayan Bhapkar

    2001-01-01

    An airborne digital framing camera has been used to collect a temporal sequence of images of the nearshore ocean with the objective to retrieve water depths and currents by analyzing the propagation of shoaling gravity waves. To accurately map the imagery of the waves onto a rectilinear grid on the surface, the camera location and attitude is measured with an

  2. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-print Network

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow processes of storm and wave reworking influence the seabed through submarine erosion and sediment

  3. Morphology, growth and carbohydrate storage of the plant Typha angustifolia at different water depths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Sharma; T. Asaeda; M. Kalibbala; T. Fujino

    2008-01-01

    Morphological characteristics, growth and carbohydrate storage dynamics of Typha angustifolia in relation to water depth were investigated. The study was based on observations carried out in two stands, namely Akigase and Teganuma, for two growth seasons. The latter stand was about two times deeper than the former. Teganuma stands exhibited significantly higher number of thick shoots compared to those of

  4. A NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH TO DERIVING OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND DEPTHS OF SHALLOW WATERS

    E-print Network

    Lee, Zhongping

    1 A NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH TO DERIVING OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND DEPTHS OF SHALLOW WATERS Z. P. Lee1@monty.marine.usf.edu ABSTRACT A Neural Network (NN) approach is studied in deriving information of bathymetry for optically is desired. Over the past several years, more attention have been paid for artificial neural networks (NN

  5. CO2 Snow Depth and Subsurface Water-Ice Abundance in the

    E-print Network

    Zuber, Maria

    CO2 Snow Depth and Subsurface Water-Ice Abundance in the Northern Hemisphere of Mars I. G. Mars undergoes seasons in which volatile spe- cies, carbon dioxide (CO2) and, to a much lesser extent hemispheres consists of con- densed CO2 whose accumulation and sublima- tion are controlled mainly by solar

  6. Growth and Physiological Responses to Water Depths in Carex schmidtii Meinsh.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Liu, Ruiquan; Liu, Zinan; Wang, Xue; Luo, Wenbo; Sheng, Lianxi

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed to investigate growth and physiological responses to water depth in completely submerged condition of a wetland plant Carex schmidtii Meinsh., one of the dominant species in the Longwan Crater Lake wetlands (China). Growth and physiological responses of C. schmidtii were investigated by growing under control (non-submerged) and three submerged conditions (5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm water level). Total biomass was highest in control, intermediate in 5 cm treatment and lowest in the other two submerged treatments. Water depth prominently affected the first-order lateral root to main root mass ratio. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity decreased but malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased as water depth increased. The starch contents showed no differences among the various treatments at the end of the experiment. However, soluble sugar contents were highest in control, intermediate in 5 cm and 15 cm treatments and lowest in 25 cm treatment. Our data suggest that submergence depth affected some aspects of growth and physiology of C. schmidtii, which can reduce anoxia damage not only through maintaining the non-elongation strategy in shoot part but also by adjusting biomass allocation to different root orders rather than adjusting root-shoot biomass allocation. PMID:26009895

  7. Growth and Physiological Responses to Water Depths in Carex schmidtii Meinsh

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Liu, Ruiquan; Liu, Zinan; Wang, Xue; Luo, Wenbo; Sheng, Lianxi

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed to investigate growth and physiological responses to water depth in completely submerged condition of a wetland plant Carex schmidtii Meinsh., one of the dominant species in the Longwan Crater Lake wetlands (China). Growth and physiological responses of C. schmidtii were investigated by growing under control (non-submerged) and three submerged conditions (5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm water level). Total biomass was highest in control, intermediate in 5 cm treatment and lowest in the other two submerged treatments. Water depth prominently affected the first-order lateral root to main root mass ratio. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity decreased but malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased as water depth increased. The starch contents showed no differences among the various treatments at the end of the experiment. However, soluble sugar contents were highest in control, intermediate in 5 cm and 15 cm treatments and lowest in 25 cm treatment. Our data suggest that submergence depth affected some aspects of growth and physiology of C. schmidtii, which can reduce anoxia damage not only through maintaining the non-elongation strategy in shoot part but also by adjusting biomass allocation to different root orders rather than adjusting root-shoot biomass allocation. PMID:26009895

  8. Oblique wave-free potentials for water waves in constant finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Rajdeep; Basu, Uma; Mandal, B. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method to construct oblique wave-free potentials in the linearised theory of water waves for water with uniform finite depth is presented in a systematic manner. The water has either a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. For the case of free surface, the effect of surface tension may be neglected or taken into account. Here, the wave-free potentials are singular solutions of the modified Helmholtz equation, having singularity at a point in the fluid region and they satisfy the conditions at the upper surface and the bottom of water region and decay rapidly away from the point of singularity. These are useful in obtaining solutions to oblique water wave problems involving bodies with circular cross-sections such as long horizontal cylinders submerged or half-immersed in water of uniform finite depth with a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a floating elastic plate. Finally, the forms of the upper surface related to the wave-free potentials constructed here are depicted graphically in a number of figures to visualize the wave motion. The results for non-oblique wave-free potentials and the upper surface wave-free potentials are obtained. The wave-free potentials constructed here will be useful in the mathematical study of water wave problems involving infinitely long horizontal cylinders, either half-immersed or completely immersed in water.

  9. Oblique wave-free potentials for water waves in constant finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Rajdeep; Basu, Uma; Mandal, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a method to construct oblique wave-free potentials in the linearised theory of water waves for water with uniform finite depth is presented in a systematic manner. The water has either a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. For the case of free surface, the effect of surface tension may be neglected or taken into account. Here, the wave-free potentials are singular solutions of the modified Helmholtz equation, having singularity at a point in the fluid region and they satisfy the conditions at the upper surface and the bottom of water region and decay rapidly away from the point of singularity. These are useful in obtaining solutions to oblique water wave problems involving bodies with circular cross-sections such as long horizontal cylinders submerged or half-immersed in water of uniform finite depth with a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a floating elastic plate. Finally, the forms of the upper surface related to the wave-free potentials constructed here are depicted graphically in a number of figures to visualize the wave motion. The results for non-oblique wave-free potentials and the upper surface wave-free potentials are obtained. The wave-free potentials constructed here will be useful in the mathematical study of water wave problems involving infinitely long horizontal cylinders, either half-immersed or completely immersed in water.

  10. Relationship of salinity and depth to the water table on Tamarix spp. (Saltcedar) growth and water use. 

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Kurtiss Michael

    2004-09-30

    Seymour, Texas on the Wichita River, and local cottonwood and willow from Temple, TX. They were planted in 4 blocks, each block containing all 4 species with each species occupying 3 holes. They were planted using cuttings approx 0.3 m long and 1.3 cm............................................................... 17 Model Testing...................................................................................................... 19 Effect of Salinity and Water Table Depth on Saltcedar Growth and Water Use ........ 20 Cutting Establishment...

  11. Reverse evolution in RH1 for adaptation of cichlids to water depth in Lake Tanganyika.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Haruka; Terai, Yohey; Sugawara, Tohru; Imai, Hiroo; Nishihara, Hidenori; Hori, Michio; Okada, Norihiro

    2011-06-01

    Reverse evolution is a widespread phenomenon in biology, but the genetic mechanism for the reversal of a genetic change for adaptation to the ancestral state is not known. Here, we report the first case of complete reverse evolution of two amino acids, serine and alanine, at a single position in RH1 opsin pigment for adaptation to water depth. We determined RH1 sequences of cichlid fishes from four tribes of Lake Tanganyika with different habitat depths. Most of the species were divided into two types: RH1 with 292A for species in shallow water or 292S for species in deep water. Both types were adapted to their ambient light environments as indicated by the absorption spectra of the RH1 pigments. Based on the RH1 locus tree and ecological data, we inferred the ancestral amino acids at position 292 and the distribution of the depth ranges (shallow or deep) of ancestral species of each tribe. According to these estimates, we identified two distinct parallel adaptive evolutions: The replacement A292S occurred at least four times for adaptation from shallow to deep water, and the opposite replacement S292A occurred three times for adaptation from deep to shallow water. The latter parallelism represents the complete reverse evolution from the derived to the ancestral state, following back adaptive mutation with reversal of the RH1 pigment function accompanied by reversal of the species habitat shift. PMID:21172834

  12. Optimal design of equivalent water depth truncated mooring system based on baton pattern simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huo-ming; Huang, Sai-hua; Guan, Wei-bing

    2014-03-01

    The highest similarity degree of static characteristics including both horizontal and vertical restoring force-displacement characteristics of total mooring system, as well as the tension-displacement characteristics of the representative single mooring line between the truncated and full depth system are obtained by annealing simulation algorithm for hybrid discrete variables (ASFHDV, in short). A "baton" optimization approach is proposed by utilizing ASFHDV. After each baton of optimization, if a few dimensional variables reach the upper or lower limit, the boundary of certain dimensional variables shall be expanded. In consideration of the experimental requirements, the length of the upper mooring line should not be smaller than 8 m, and the diameter of the anchor chain on the bottom should be larger than 0.03 m. A 100000 t turret mooring FPSO in the water depth of 304 m, with the truncated water depth being 76 m, is taken as an example of equivalent water depth truncated mooring system optimal design and calculation, and is performed to obtain the conformation parameters of the truncated mooring system. The numerical results indicate that the present truncated mooring system design is successful and effective.

  13. A statistical study of the depth of precipitable water in western Texas and eastern New Mexico

    E-print Network

    Baker, Samuel Erick

    1969-01-01

    O IV TESTING THE DA, A OR NORlvALITY 15 V PROBABLE DEPTHl OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VI DISTRIBUTION OF THE ANNUAL SERIES 36 VI I SUMMARY Al'l0 CO. "lCLUSIONS 41 REFERENCES 43 Appendices A Dates Represented by Pentads B Probable Depth of Precipitable... on the followi ig pages follow the style of the Journal of AppLied Meteomologi. . . 1. 5 MEAN PRECIPITATION MEAN PRECIPITABLE WATER N IJI I. O Z / / 0. 0 J F M A M J J A S 0 N D FIG. I. PRECIPITABLE WATER AND PRECIPITA- TION VS Tl ME OF YEA R ( EL...

  14. Arsenic-related water quality with depth and water quality of well-head samples from production wells, Oklahoma, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Greer, James R.; Smith, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey well profiler was used to describe arsenic-related water quality with well depth and identify zones yielding water with high arsenic concentrations in two production wells in central and western Oklahoma that yield water from the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington and Rush Springs aquifers, respectively. In addition, well-head samples were collected from 12 production wells yielding water with historically large concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) from the Garber-Wellington aquifer, Rush Springs aquifer, and two minor aquifers: the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer in southern Oklahoma and a Permian-aged undefined aquifer in north-central Oklahoma. Three depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Rush Springs aquifer had similar water-quality characteristics to the well-head sample and did not show any substantial changes with depth. However, slightly larger arsenic concentrations in the two deepest depth-dependent samples indicate the zones yielding noncompliant arsenic concentrations are below the shallowest sampled depth. Five depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer showed increases in arsenic concentrations with depth. Well-bore travel-time information and water-quality data from depth-dependent and well-head samples showed that most arsenic contaminated water (about 63 percent) was entering the borehole from perforations adjacent to or below the shroud that overlaid the pump. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 10.4 to 124 micrograms per liter in 11 of the 12 production wells sampled at the well head, exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter for drinking water. pH values of the 12 well-head samples ranged from 6.9 to 9. Seven production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer had the largest arsenic concentrations ranging from 18.5 to 124 micrograms per liter. Large arsenic concentrations (10.4-18.5) and near neutral to slightly alkaline pH values (6.9-7.4) were detected in samples from one well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer, three production wells in the Rush Springs aquifer, and one well in an undefined Permian-aged aquifer. All well-head samples were oxic and arsenate was the only species of arsenic in water from 10 of the 12 production wells sampled. Arsenite was measured above the laboratory reporting level in water from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer and was the only arsenic species measured in water from the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer. Fluoride and uranium were the only trace elements, other than arsenic, that exceeded the maximum contaminant level for drinking water in well-head samples collected for the study. Uranium concentrations in four production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer ranged from 30.2 to 99 micrograms per liter exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 30 micrograms per liter for drinking water. Water from these four wells also had the largest arsenic concentrations measured in the study ranging from 30 to 124 micrograms

  15. EBT2 film as a depth-dose measurement tool for radiotherapy beams over a wide range of energies and modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Tailor, Ramesh; Zhao Li; Devic, Slobodan [Department of Radiation Oncology, McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: One of the fundamental parameters used for dose calculation is percentage depth-dose, generally measured employing ionization chambers. There are situations where use of ion chambers for measuring depth-doses is difficult or problematic. In such cases, radiochromic film might be an alternative. The EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film was investigated as a potential tool for depth-dose measurement in radiotherapy beams over a broad range of energies and modalities. Methods: Pieces of the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film were exposed to x-ray, electron, and proton beams used in radiotherapy. The beams employed for this study included kilovoltage x-rays (75 kVp), {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, megavoltage x-rays (18 MV), electrons (7 and 20 MeV), and pristine Bragg-peak proton beams (126 and 152 MeV). At each beam quality, film response was measured over the dose range of 0.4-8.0 Gy, which corresponds to optical densities ranging from 0.05 to 0.4 measured with a flat-bed document scanner. To assess precision in depth-dose measurements with the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film, uncertainty in measured optical density was investigated with respect to variation in film-to-film and scanner-bed uniformity. Results: For most beams, percentage depth-doses measured with the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film show an excellent agreement with those measured with ion chambers. Some discrepancies are observed in case of (i) kilovoltage x-rays at larger depths due to beam-hardening, and (ii) proton beams around Bragg-peak due to quenching effects. For these beams, an empirical polynomial correction produces better agreement with ion-chamber data. Conclusions: The EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film is an excellent secondary dosimeter for measurement of percentage depth-doses for a broad range of beam qualities and modalities used in radiotherapy. It offers an easy and efficient way to measure beam depth-dose data with a high spatial resolution.

  16. The effect of depth of step on the water performance of a flying-boat hull model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Joe W

    1935-01-01

    NACA model 11-C was tested with four different depths of step to obtain information as to the effect of the depth of step on the water performance. The depths of step were selected to cover the practicable range of depths and in each case the included angle between the forebody and afterbody keels was kept the same 6-1/2 degrees. Small depths of step were found to give lower resistance at speeds below and at the hump speed of the model and greater depths of step lower resistance at high speeds. For low resistance throughout the speed range of the model investigated the most desirable depth of step is from 2.5 to 4.0 percent of the beam. The change of the best trim angle caused by variation of the depth of step was not appreciable. Increased depth of step caused increases in the maximum positive trimming moments at all trim angles investigated.

  17. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Reniers, Brigitte; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222?keV up to 356?keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

  18. Dose specification for (192)Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Reniers, Brigitte; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with (192)Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for (192)Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222?keV up to 356?keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. PMID:26009538

  19. A Computer Based File of X-Ray and Electron Beam Central Axis Depth Dose Data for Use in Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, James A.; Harms, William B.; Fivozinsky, Sherman

    1980-01-01

    The central axis absorbed dose data for x-ray and electron beams generated by linear accelerators in the energy range 4 thru 25 MV are being compiled. The compilation includes specific x-ray beam parameters (surface doses, output factors, percent depth doses, tissue-phantom ratios, and wedge factors) as well as electron beam parameters (percent depth doses and output factors). The compilation includes published data sets of these parameters and those obtained directly from over 100 institutions participating in the study. The data are grouped by accelerator model and input into computer files that provide a standard format suitable for intercomparisons. The software used to construct the computer files and to manipulate the data is discussed. Selected examples of the average values of parameters obtained to date with the standard deviations, the coefficients of variation, and the maximum and minimum values will be presented for several different linear accelerator models.

  20. A study on multi-body floating system in finite water depth by separate region method

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Xuangang [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The research on multi-body floating system has been carried out by many researchers in recent days because of its increased practical uses. In these researches, almost all, three-dimensional source method is applied. In this paper, a relatively simple but effective method, separated region method, is applied for predicting the responses of multi-floating bodies in finite water depth. For a floating rectangular section in the finite water depth, the separated region method (eigenvalue method) is very useful to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the body. The method has been extended here, so as to apply to the problems of multi-floating bodies. To check the validity of the method, motion responses of two floating bodies were calculated and the results were compared with experimental data carried out by M. Ohkusu (1976) and M. Kubo et al. (1989). The agreements between the theoretical and the experimental results of motions of two floating bodies are fairly good.

  1. Effect of water depth on the rhizome dynamics of Typha angustifolia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pratima Sharma; Takashi Asaeda; Takeshi Fujino

    2008-01-01

    The rhizome dynamics of Typha angustifolia in relation to water depth were investigated. Observations were made in two different stands, namely Akigase from April 2002\\u000a to December 2003, and Teganuma from April 2003 to December 2004. The mean rhizome length in the two stands was not significantly\\u000a different but the mean rhizome diameter and biomass showed a significant difference. The

  2. Effects of Light, Temperature, and Water Depth on Growth of a Rare Aquatic Plant, Ranunculus kadzusensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    In Su Jo; Dong Uk Han; Yong Joo Cho; Eun Ju Lee

    2010-01-01

    Ranunculus kadzusensis is an endangered aquatic plant species that commonly reproduces in the rice paddies of Korea and Japan during winter and\\u000a early spring. Here, we investigated the effects of main aquatic environmental factors—light, temperature, and water depth—on\\u000a its growth, with the goal of seeking information that will contribute to its in situ conservation. As the amount of shading\\u000a increased,

  3. Investigation on optimization design of equivalent water depth truncated mooring system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huoming Zhang; Zhilin Sun; Jianmin Yang; Mingzheng Gao

    2009-01-01

    The oil industry is now increasingly concentrating their efforts and activities in connection with developing fields in deeper\\u000a waters, ranging typically from 500 m to 3000 m worldwide. However, the modeling of a full-depth system has become difficult\\u000a presently; no tank facility is sufficiently large to perform the testing of a complete FPS with compliant mooring in 1000\\u000a m to

  4. Effect of minor water depth treatments on competitive effect and response of eight wetland plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauchlan H. Fraser; Tara E. Miletti

    2008-01-01

    Two facets of plant competition, competitive effect (CE) and competitive response (CR), can be used to explain plant community\\u000a composition but our understanding of abiotic factors that may differentially affect species’ competitive ability is incomplete.\\u000a We tested whether water-depth affected CE (ability to suppress neighbour) and CR (avoid suppression from neighbour), and if\\u000a so whether there was consistence in the

  5. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  6. Shallow sea-floor reflectance and water depth derived by unmixing multispectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwirth, P.N.; Lee, T.J.; Burne, R.V. (Marine Spill Response Corp., Washington, DC (United States) Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A major problem for mapping shallow water zones by the analysis of remotely sensed data is that contrast effects due to water depth obscure and distort the special nature of the substrate. This paper outlines a new method which unmixes the exponential influence of depth in each pixel by employing a mathematical constraint. This leaves a multispectral residual which represents relative substrate reflectance. Input to the process are the raw multispectral data and water attenuation coefficients derived by the co-analysis of known bathymetry and remotely sensed data. Outputs are substrate-reflectance images corresponding to the input bands and a greyscale depth image. The method has been applied in the analysis of Landsat TM data at Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Algorithm derived substrate reflectance images for Landsat TM bands 1, 2, and 3 combined in color represent the optimum enhancement for mapping or classifying substrate types. As a result, this color image successfully delineated features, which were obscured in the raw data, such as the distributions of sea-grasses, microbial mats, and sandy area. 19 refs.

  7. Nematode assemblages from the Kandalaksha Depression (White Sea, 251-288 m water depth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutin, Dmitry M.; Miljutina, Maria A.; Tchesunov, Alexei V.; Mokievsky, Vadim O.

    2014-03-01

    The shallow-water nematodes of the White Sea are relatively well studied; however, information on the nematode fauna inhabiting the deepest part of this sea is very scarce. The composition of the nematode assemblages (at species and genus level) was studied in samples collected during four sampling occasions in the deepest part of the Kandalaksha Depression (the White Sea) in July 1998, October 1998, May 1999, and November 1999. Samples were collected from a depth of 251-288 m with the aid of a multicorer. In total, 59 nematode morphotypes belonging to 37 genera and 18 families were distinguished. The genera Sabatieria and Filipjeva dominated at all stations, followed by Aponema, Desmoscolex, and Quadricoma. The composition of the dominant genera can be considered typical for this depth range in temperate and Arctic waters, although Filipjeva and Aponema were among the dominant genera for the first time. The most abundant species were Sabatieria ornata, Aponema bathyalis, and Filipjeva filipjevi. In general, diversity of the nematode assemblages was lower than in the temperate and Arctic continental shelf and slope with reduced evenness and species richness. The evenness of nematode assemblages and other diversity indices decreased with increasing sediment depth. Based on the valid species and genera recorded, the nematode fauna of the Kandalaksha Depression showed a higher resemblance to that found in the shallow waters of Kandalaksha Bay.

  8. Conversion from dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossomme, S.; Palmans, H.; Shipley, D.; Thomas, R.; Lee, N.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.; Bertrand, D.; Vynckier, S.

    2013-08-01

    Based on experiments and numerical simulations, a study is carried out pertaining to the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in a carbon ion beam. This conversion is needed to establish graphite calorimeters as primary standards of absorbed dose in these beams. It is governed by the water-to-graphite mass collision stopping power ratio and fluence correction factors, which depend on the particle fluence distributions in each of the two media. The paper focuses on the experimental and numerical determination of this fluence correction factor for an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam. Measurements have been performed in the nuclear physics laboratory INFN-LNS in Catania (Sicily, Italy). The numerical simulations have been made with a Geant4 Monte Carlo code through the GATE simulation platform. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated results for the fluence correction factors and are found to be close to unity. The experimental values increase with depth reaching 1.010 before the Bragg peak region. They have been determined with an uncertainty of 0.25%. Different numerical results are obtained depending on the level of approximation made in calculating the fluence correction factors. When considering carbon ions only, the difference between measured and calculated values is maximal just before the Bragg peak, but its value is less than 1.005. The numerical value is close to unity at the surface and increases to 1.005 near the Bragg peak. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factors are lower than unity at the surface and increase with depth up to 1.025 before the Bragg peak. Besides carbon ions, secondary particles created due to nuclear interactions have to be included in the analysis: boron ions (10B and 11B), beryllium ions (7Be), alpha particles and protons. At the conclusion of this work, we have the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water to apply to the response of a graphite calorimeter in an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam. This conversion consists of the product of two contributions: the water-to-graphite electronic mass collision stopping power ratio, which is equal to 1.115, and the fluence correction factor which varies linearly with depth, as kfl, all = 0.9995 + 0.0048?zw-eq. The latter has been determined on the basis of experiments and numerical simulations.

  9. Conversion from dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Palmans, H; Shipley, D; Thomas, R; Lee, N; Romano, F; Cirrone, P; Cuttone, G; Bertrand, D; Vynckier, S

    2013-08-21

    Based on experiments and numerical simulations, a study is carried out pertaining to the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in a carbon ion beam. This conversion is needed to establish graphite calorimeters as primary standards of absorbed dose in these beams. It is governed by the water-to-graphite mass collision stopping power ratio and fluence correction factors, which depend on the particle fluence distributions in each of the two media. The paper focuses on the experimental and numerical determination of this fluence correction factor for an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam. Measurements have been performed in the nuclear physics laboratory INFN-LNS in Catania (Sicily, Italy). The numerical simulations have been made with a Geant4 Monte Carlo code through the GATE simulation platform. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated results for the fluence correction factors and are found to be close to unity. The experimental values increase with depth reaching 1.010 before the Bragg peak region. They have been determined with an uncertainty of 0.25%. Different numerical results are obtained depending on the level of approximation made in calculating the fluence correction factors. When considering carbon ions only, the difference between measured and calculated values is maximal just before the Bragg peak, but its value is less than 1.005. The numerical value is close to unity at the surface and increases to 1.005 near the Bragg peak. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factors are lower than unity at the surface and increase with depth up to 1.025 before the Bragg peak. Besides carbon ions, secondary particles created due to nuclear interactions have to be included in the analysis: boron ions ((10)B and (11)B), beryllium ions ((7)Be), alpha particles and protons. At the conclusion of this work, we have the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water to apply to the response of a graphite calorimeter in an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam. This conversion consists of the product of two contributions: the water-to-graphite electronic mass collision stopping power ratio, which is equal to 1.115, and the fluence correction factor which varies linearly with depth, as k(fl, all) = 0.9995 + 0.0048(zw-eq). The latter has been determined on the basis of experiments and numerical simulations. PMID:23877166

  10. Testing peatland water-table depth transfer functions using high-resolution hydrological monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Holden, Joseph; Raby, Cassandra L.; Turner, T. Edward; Blundell, Antony; Charman, Dan J.; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-07-01

    Transfer functions are now commonly used to reconstruct past environmental variability from palaeoecological data. However, such approaches need to be critically appraised. Testate amoeba-based transfer functions are an established method for the quantitative reconstruction of past water-table variations in peatlands, and have been applied to research questions in palaeoclimatology, peatland ecohydrology and archaeology. We analysed automatically-logged peatland water-table data from dipwells located in England, Wales and Finland and a suite of three year, one year and summer water-table statistics were calculated from each location. Surface moss samples were extracted from beside each dipwell and the testate amoebae community composition was determined. Two published transfer functions were applied to the testate-amoeba data for prediction of water-table depth (England and Europe). Our results show that estimated water-table depths based on the testate amoeba community reflect directional changes, but that they are poor representations of the real mean or median water-table magnitudes for the study sites. We suggest that although testate amoeba-based reconstructions can be used to identify past shifts in peat hydrology, they cannot currently be used to establish precise hydrological baselines such as those needed to inform management and restoration of peatlands. One approach to avoid confusion with contemporary water-table determinations is to use residuals or standardised values for peatland water-table reconstructions. We contend that our test of transfer functions against independent instrumental data sets may be more powerful than relying on statistical testing alone.

  11. Functional traits composition predict macrophytes community productivity along a water depth gradient in a freshwater lake

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hui; Zhong, Jiayou; Yuan, Guixiang; Ni, Leyi; Xie, Ping; Cao, Te

    2014-01-01

    Functional trait composition of plant communities has been proposed as a helpful key for understanding the mechanisms of biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning. In this study, we applied a step-wise modeling procedure to test the relative effects of taxonomic diversity, functional identity, and functional diversity on macrophytes community productivity along water depth gradient. We sampled 42 plots and 1513 individual plants and measured 16 functional traits and abundance of 17 macrophyte species. Results showed that there was a significant decrease in taxonomic diversity, functional identity (i.e., stem dry mass content, leaf [C] and leaf [N]), and functional diversity (i.e., floating leaf, mean Julian flowering date and rooting depth) with increasing water depth. For the multiple-trait functional diversity (FD) indices, functional richness decreased, while functional divergence increased with water depth gradient. Macrophyte community productivity was strongly determined by functional trait composition within community, but not significantly affected by taxonomic diversity. Community-weighted means (CWM) showed a two times higher explanatory power relative to FD indices in determining variations in community productivity. For nine of sixteen traits, CWM and FD showed significant correlations with community productivity, although the strength and direction of those relations depended on selected trait. Furthermore, functional composition in a community affected productivity through either additive or opposite effects of CWM and FD, depending on the particular traits being considered. Our results suggested both mechanisms of mass ratio and niche complementarity can operate simultaneously on variations in community productivity, and considering both CWM and FD would lead to a more profound understanding of traits–productivity relationships. PMID:24967072

  12. The derivation of tissue-maximum ratio from percentage depth dose requires peak scatter factor to be considered a function of source-to-surface distance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J L BEDFORD; V N HANSEN; S WEBB; Surrey SM

    A formula for the calculation of tissue-maximum ratio (TMR) from percentage depth dose (PDD) and peak scatter factor (PSF) is derived from first principles using a simple geometric model for the case when the field size for PDD and PSF is defined at the surface. The derivation is carried out in two ways: (a) taking field size for PDD and

  13. Aquila field - advanced contracting strategies for the offshore development, in 850 meter water depth

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, E.; Ciprigno, M.

    1996-12-31

    Aquila oil field is located in 850 meters of water in the middle of the Otranto Channel, in the Mediterranean Sea, at about 45 km from the shore and is subject to both difficult sea and weather conditions. The many difficulties, mainly due to the very high water depth, imposed the use of advanced technology, that could be obtained only through the direct association of contractor companies, leaders in their own field. Such a solution safeguards the technological reliability and allows the maximum control of time and cost. The selection of an FPSO (Floating, Production, Storage and Offloading) comes from a feasibility study indicating this solution as the only one, allowing the economical exploitation of the Aquila field. This paper deals with a series of technical solutions and contractual agreements with a Joint-Venture embracing two leading world contractors for developing, manufacturing and installing the FPSO {open_quotes}Agip Firenze{close_quotes}, permanently anchored at a world record 850 m water depth. The system includes flowlines and control lines. The ship, has been especially redesigned and purchased by contractors. They will use the vessel to manage the field development. Agip will provide the subsea production system: christmas tree and control system with artificial lift. The Aquila field development project aims to identify an economically viable, low risk method of producing hydrocarbons from a deep water location where previously the reserves were technologically and economically out of range.

  14. Effect of seedling age and water depth on morphological and physiological aspects of transplanted rice under high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khakwani, Abdul Aziz; Shiraishi, Masaaki; Zubair, Muhammad; Baloch, Mohammad Safdar; Naveed, Khalid; Awan, Inayatullah

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of high temperature, rice seedlings 20, 30, 40 and 50 d were kept at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm water depth in a water pool. Meteorological findings indicated that water temperature varied up to 10 cm but became stable below this depth. Deep water inflicted higher tiller mortality, minimal increase in dry weight of aerial parts and leaf area, decrease in root length, and decrease in root dry weight especially at 20 cm water depth and produced an unbalanced T/R ratio (top versus root dry weight). However, deep water tended to increase plant length. These parameters, however, excel in shallow water. Older seedlings, with the exception of root dry weight, could not perform well compared to young seedlings in all physiological and morphological aspects. The study revealed that seedlings, particularly young ones, stand well in shallow water and can cope with high temperature. PMID:15822153

  15. [Niches of plant species in wetlands of the Yellow River Delta under gradients of water table depth and soil salinity].

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Cui, Bao-Shan; Zhao, Xin-Sheng; Fu, Hua-Ling

    2008-05-01

    Ordination methods were used to arrange in turn the 19 plant species in wetlands of the Yellow River Delta under gradients of water table depth and soil salinity, and to classify them into three ecological species groups, i. e. low, medium, and high water table depth/soil salinity ecological species groups. Their niche breadths and niche overlaps under the two gradients were also analyzed. The results indicated that for the gradient of water table depth, the species in medium water table depth ecological species group, such as Phragmites australis and Suaeda salsa, occupied a broad niche breadth, and those in high water table depth ecological species group, such as Typha orientalis and Myriophyllum spicatum, occupied the narrowest niche breadth. For the gradient of soil salinity, the species in high soil salinity ecological species group, such as Suaeda salsa and Tamarix chinensis, occupied a broad niche breadth, while those belonging to the medium and low soil salinity ecological species groups occupied a narrow niche breadth. The niche overlaps changed regularly along the gradients of water table depth and soil salinity. In general, the niche overlaps between the plant species of the same ecological species groups were large, whilst those between the plant species of different ecological species groups were small. Niche differentiations of the plant species under the gradients of water table depth and soil salinity might promote species coexistence, and contribute to the explanation of plant zonation mechanisms in this Delta. PMID:18655579

  16. Use of artificial neural networks for predicting optimal alum doses and treated water quality parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holger R. Maier; Nicolas Morgan; Christopher W. K. Chow

    2004-01-01

    Coagulation is an important component of water treatment. Determination of optimal coagulant doses is vital, as insufficient dosing will result in undesirable treated water quality. On the other hand, doses that are too high can result in high cost and health problems related to high levels of residual aluminium (if alum is used as the coagulant). Traditionally, jar tests are

  17. Rooting depth: a key trait connecting water and carbon metabolism of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, Tadeja; Dal Borgo, Anna; Casolo, Valentino; Bressan, Alice; Stenni, Barbara; Zini, Luca; Bertoncin, Paolo; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Drought episodes accompanied by heat waves are thought to be the main cause of increasing rates of tree decline and mortality in several biomes with consequent ecological/economical consequences. Three possible and not mutually exclusive mechanisms have been proposed to be the drivers of this phenomenon: hydraulic failure caused by massive xylem cavitation and leading to strong reduction of root-to-leaf water transport, carbon starvation caused by prolonged stomatal closure and leading to impairment of primary and secondary metabolism, and finally attacks of biotic agents. The different mechanisms have been reported to have different relevance in the different species. We analyzed the seasonal changes of water relations, xylem sap isotopic composition, and concentration of non-structural carbohydrates in four different woody species co-occurring in the same habitat during a summer drought. Analysis of rain and deep soil water isotopic composition were also performed. Different species showed differential access to deep water sources which influences the gas exchanges and the concentration of non structural carbohydrates (NSC) during the dry season. Species with access to deeper water maintained higher NSC content and were also able to better preserve the integrity of the water transport pathway. On the basis of our results, we propose that rooting depth is a key trait connecting water and carbon plant metabolism, thus mediating the likelihood of hydraulic failure vs carbon starvation in trees subjected to global warming.

  18. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2013-04-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies <20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient Dw, med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med.

  19. Modeling bulk density and snow water equivalent using daily snow depth observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreight, J. L.; Small, E. E.

    2014-03-01

    Bulk density is a fundamental property of snow relating its depth and mass. Previously, two simple models of bulk density (depending on snow depth, date, and location) have been developed to convert snow depth observations to snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates. However, these models were not intended for application at the daily time step. We develop a new model of bulk density for the daily time step and demonstrate its improved skill over the existing models. Snow depth and density are negatively correlated at short (10 days) timescales while positively correlated at longer (90 days) timescales. We separate these scales of variability by modeling smoothed, daily snow depth (long timescales) and the observed positive and negative anomalies from the smoothed time series (short timescales) as separate terms. A climatology of fit is also included as a predictor variable. Over half a million daily observations of depth and SWE at 345 snowpack telemetry (SNOTEL) sites are used to fit models and evaluate their performance. For each location, we train the three models to the neighboring stations within 70 km, transfer the parameters to the location to be modeled, and evaluate modeled time series against the observations at that site. Our model exhibits improved statistics and qualitatively more-realistic behavior at the daily time step when sufficient local training data are available. We reduce density root mean square error (RMSE) by 9.9 and 4.5% compared to previous models while increasing R2 from 0.46 to 0.52 to 0.56 across models. Focusing on the 21-day window around peak SWE in each water year, our model reduces density RMSE by 24 and 17.4% relative to the previous models, with R2 increasing from 0.55 to 0.58 to 0.71 across models. Removing the challenge of parameter transfer over the full observational record increases R2 scores for both the existing and new models, but the gain is greatest for the new model (R2 = 0.75). Our model shows general improvement over existing models when data are more frequent than once every 5 days and at least 3 stations are available for training.

  20. Simultaneous Estimation of Depth, Density, and Water Equivalent of Snow using a Mobile GPR Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, T.; Griessinger, N.; Gindraux, S.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial and airborne laser scanning of snow has significantly increased our ability to improve our understanding of the spatial variability of snow depth. However, methods to provide corresponding datasets of snow water equivalent of similar quality are unavailable to date. Similar to laser scan technology, ground penetration radar (GPR) has become more accessible to snow researchers and is currently successfully used in the context of snow hydrological studies. GPR systems can be used and set up in different ways to measure snow properties. In this study we elaborate on a mobile GPR system that allows simultaneous estimation of snow depth, density, water equivalent in a snow survey setting. For this purpose we have built a GPR platform around a sledge system with four antenna pairs set up as a common-mid-point array and a separate fifth antenna pair dedicated to analyze the frequency change of the radar signal when propagating through the snowpack. Liquid water content can be accounted for by assessing the frequency dependent attenuation of the radar signal. We will present data from field campaigns that were carried out in 2013 and 2014 to test the ability of our GPR system to estimate snow bulk properties along several test transects. Along with the results, we will discuss system configuration and post-processing issues.

  1. Troll oil pipeline: High precision seabed preparation down to 540 m water depth

    SciTech Connect

    Schuit, P. [A/S Jebsens ACZ, Gorinchem (Netherlands); Baldascino, G.; Canu, M. [Snamprogetti Spa, Fano (Italy); Oeverby, S.H. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-12-01

    Oil and Gas Developments are finding their way to increasingly deep waters and complicated seabed topography, for which until recently the feasibility was doubted. Statoil`s Troll Oil pipeline Development Project is a typical example of such a project which is characterized by strong undulating seabed geometries, poor bearing capacities of the subsoil and water depths up to 540 m. By means of gravel supports and stabilization berms, removing soft soils at water depths up to 350 m and installation of concrete lateral supports, the seabed has been prepared to enable the Troll Oil pipeline to be laid without being overstressed and avoiding geotechnical instabilities of the subsoil. These seabed preparatory works were executed by means of the three Fallpipe Vessels operated by A/S Jebsens ACZ. The paper addresses the most recent developments in the execution of high precision seabed preparatory works, called Pre-lay Intervention Works, which are performed prior to laying of the pipeline. Special attention will be given to the required accuracy during construction/execution and possible improvements for future seabed preparatory works.

  2. Escape from water or remain quiescent? Lotus tenuis changes its strategy depending on depth of submergence

    PubMed Central

    Manzur, M. E.; Grimoldi, A. A.; Insausti, P.; Striker, G. G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Two main strategies that allow plants to cope with soil waterlogging or deeper submergence are: (1) escaping by means of upward shoot elongation or (2) remaining quiescent underwater. This study investigates these strategies in Lotus tenuis, a forage legume of increasing importance in areas prone to soil waterlogging, shallow submergence or complete submergence. Methods Plants of L. tenuis were subjected for 30 d to well-drained (control), waterlogged (water-saturated soil), partially submerged (6 cm water depth) and completely submerged conditions. Plant responses assessed were tissue porosity, shoot number and length, biomass and utilization of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSCs) and starch in the crown. Key Results Lotus tenuis adjusted its strategy depending on the depth of submergence. Root growth of partially submerged plants ceased and carbon allocation prioritized shoot lengthening (32 cm vs. 24·5 cm under other treatments), without depleting carbohydrate reserves to sustain the faster growth. These plants also developed more shoot and root porosity. In contrast, completely submerged plants became quiescent, with no associated biomass accumulation, new shoot production or shoot elongation. In addition, tissue porosity was not enhanced. The survival of completely submerged plants is attributed to consumption of WSCs and starch reserves from crowns (concentrations 50–75 % less than in other treatments). Conclusions The forage legume L. tenuis has the flexibility either to escape from partial submergence by elongating its shoot more vigorously to avoid becoming totally submerged or to adopt a non-elongating quiescent strategy when completely immersed that is based on utilizing stored reserves. The possession of these alternative survival strategies helps to explain the success of L. tenuis in environments subjected to unpredictable flooding depths. PMID:19687031

  3. Direct MC conversion of absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water for 60Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Franich, R D; Harty, P D; Oliver, C P; Ramanathan, G; Webb, D V; Wright, T

    2013-06-01

    The ARPANSA calibration service for (60)Co gamma rays is based on a primary standard graphite calorimeter that measures absorbed dose to graphite. Measurements with the calorimeter are converted to the absorbed dose to water using the calculation of the ratio of the absorbed dose in the calorimeter to the absorbed dose in a water phantom. ARPANSA has recently changed the basis of this calculation from a photon fluence scaling method to a direct Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The MC conversion uses an EGSnrc model of the cobalt source that has been validated against water tank and graphite phantom measurements, a step that is required to quantify uncertainties in the underlying interaction coefficients in the MC code. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 showed an agreement of 0.9973 (53). PMID:23152147

  4. Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/Water Interface

    E-print Network

    Majda, Marcin

    Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/water interface to characterize the lateral mobilities of several long alkyl chain ferrocene amphiphiles strongly on the headgroup polarity, demonstrating that the immersion depth of the amphiphiles is the key

  5. Effect of Depth of Flooding on the Rice Water Weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus, and Yield of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Tindall, Kelly V.; Bernhardt, John L.; Stout, Michael J.; Beighley, Donn H.

    2013-01-01

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus (Kuschel) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a semi-aquatic pest of rice and is the most destructive insect pest of rice in the United States. Adults oviposit after floods are established, and greenhouse studies have shown that plants exposed to deep floods have more eggs oviposited in leaf sheaths than plants exposed to a shallow flood. Experiments were conducted in three mid-southern states in the USA to determine if the depth of flooding would impact numbers of L. oryzophilus on rice plants under field conditions. Rice was flooded at depths of approximately 5 or 10 cm in Arkansas in 2007 and 2008 and Louisiana in 2008, and at depths between 0–20 cm in Missouri in 2008. Plants were sampled three and four weeks after floods were established in all locations, and also two weeks after flood in Missouri. On all sampling dates in four experiments over two years and at three field sites, fewer L. oryzophilus larvae were collected from rice in shallow-flooded plots than from deep-flooded plots. The number of L. oryzophilus was reduced by as much as 27% in shallow-flooded plots. However, the reduction in insect numbers did not translate to a significant increase in rice yield. We discuss how shallow floods could be used as a component of an integrated pest management program for L. oryzophilus. PMID:23906324

  6. An Integrated System for the Study of Wind-Wave Source Terms in Finite-Depth Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner; Mark A. Donelan; Alexander V. Babanin; W. Kendall Melville; Fabrice Veron; Cyril McCormick

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment to study the spectral balance of the source terms for wind-generated waves in finite water depth was carried out in Lake George, Australia. The measurements were made from a shore- connected platform at varying water depths from 1.2 m down to 20 cm. Wind conditions and the geometry of the lake were such that fetch-limited conditions with

  7. Primary and secondary particle contributions to the depth dose distribution in a phantom shielded from solar flare and Van Allen protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Claiborne, H. C.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been made using the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC to estimate the absorbed dose and dose equivalent distributions in astronauts inside space vehicles bombarded by solar flare and Van Allen protons. A spherical shell shield of specific radius and thickness with a 30-cm-diam. tissue ball at the geometric center was used to simulate the spacecraft-astronaut configuration. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent from primary protons, secondary protons, heavy nuclei, charged pions, muons, photons, and positrons and electrons are given as a function of depth in the tissue phantom. Results are given for solar flare protons with a characteristic rigidity of 100 MV and for Van Allen protons in a 240-nautical-mile circular orbit at 30 degree inclination angle incident on both 20-g/sq cm-thick aluminum and polyethylene spherical shell shields.

  8. The influence of water table depth and the free atmospheric state on convective rainfall predisposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Sara; Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Putti, Mario; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-04-01

    A mechanistic model for the soil-plant system is coupled to a conventional slab representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to explore the role of groundwater table (WT) variations and free atmospheric (FA) states on convective rainfall predisposition (CRP) at a Loblolly pine plantation site situated in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina. Predisposition is quantified using the crossing between modeled lifting condensation level (LCL) and convectively grown ABL depth. The LCL-ABL depth crossing is necessary for air saturation but not sufficient for cloud formation and subsequent convective rainfall occurrence. However, such crossing forms the main template for which all subsequent dynamical processes regulating the formation (or suppression) of convective rainfall operate on. If the feedback between surface fluxes and FA conditions is neglected, a reduction in latent heat flux associated with reduced WT levels is shown to enhance the ABL-LCL crossing probability. When the soil-plant system is fully coupled with ABL dynamics thereby allowing feedback with ABL temperature and humidity, FA states remain the leading control on CRP. However, vegetation water stress plays a role in controlling ABL-LCL crossing when the humidity supply by the FA is within an intermediate range of values. When FA humidity supply is low, cloud formation is suppressed independent of surface latent heat flux. Similarly, when FA moisture supply is high, cloud formation can occur independent of surface latent heat flux. In an intermediate regime of FA moisture supply, the surface latent heat flux controlled by soil water availability can supplement (or suppress) the necessary water vapor leading to reduced LCL and subsequent ABL-LCL crossing. It is shown that this intermediate state corresponds to FA values around the mode in observed humidity lapse rates ?w (between -2.5 × 10-6 and -1.5 × 10-6 kg kg-1m-1), suggesting that vegetation water uptake may be controlling CRP at the study site.

  9. Enhanced migratory waterfowl distribution modeling by inclusion of depth to water table data.

    PubMed

    Kreakie, Betty J; Fan, Ying; Keitt, Timothy H

    2012-01-01

    In addition to being used as a tool for ecological understanding, management and conservation of migratory waterfowl rely heavily on distribution models; yet these models have poor accuracy when compared to models of other bird groups. The goal of this study is to offer methods to enhance our ability to accurately model the spatial distributions of six migratory waterfowl species. This goal is accomplished by creating models based on species-specific annual cycles and introducing a depth to water table (DWT) data set. The DWT data set, a wetland proxy, is a simulated long-term measure of the point either at or below the surface where climate and geological/topographic water fluxes balance. For species occurrences, the USGS' banding bird data for six relatively common species was used. Distribution models are constructed using Random Forest and MaxEnt. Random Forest classification of habitat and non-habitat provided a measure of DWT variable importance, which indicated that DWT is as important, and often more important, to model accuracy as temperature, precipitation, elevation, and an alternative wetland measure. MaxEnt models that included DWT in addition to traditional predictor variables had a considerable increase in classification accuracy. Also, MaxEnt models created with DWT often had higher accuracy when compared with models created with an alternative measure of wetland habitat. By comparing maps of predicted probability of occurrence and response curves, it is possible to explore how different species respond to water table depth and how a species responds in different seasons. The results of this analysis also illustrate that, as expected, all waterfowl species are tightly affiliated with shallow water table habitat. However, this study illustrates that the intensity of affiliation is not constant between seasons for a species, nor is it consistent between species. PMID:22272288

  10. Evaluation of the depth-integration method of measuring water discharge in large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The depth-integration method oor measuring water discharge makes a continuos measurement of the water velocity from the water surface to the bottom at 20 to 40 locations or verticals across a river. It is especially practical for large rivers where river traffic makes it impractical to use boats attached to taglines strung across the river or to use current meters suspended from bridges. This method has the additional advantage over the standard two- and eight-tenths method in that a discharge-weighted suspended-sediment sample can be collected at the same time. When this method is used in large rivers such as the Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio, a microwave navigation system is used to determine the ship's position at each vertical sampling location across the river, and to make accurate velocity corrections to compensate for shift drift. An essential feature is a hydraulic winch that can lower and raise the current meter at a constant transit velocity so that the velocities at all depths are measured for equal lengths of time. Field calibration measurements show that: (1) the mean velocity measured on the upcast (bottom to surface) is within 1% of the standard mean velocity determined by 9-11 point measurements; (2) if the transit velocity is less than 25% of the mean velocity, then average error in the mean velocity is 4% or less. The major source of bias error is a result of mounting the current meter above a sounding weight and sometimes above a suspended-sediment sampling bottle, which prevents measurement of the velocity all the way to the bottom. The measured mean velocity is slightly larger than the true mean velocity. This bias error in the discharge is largest in shallow water (approximately 8% for the Missouri River at Hermann, MO, where the mean depth was 4.3 m) and smallest in deeper water (approximately 3% for the Mississippi River at Vickbsurg, MS, where the mean depth was 14.5 m). The major source of random error in the discharge is the natural variability of river velocities, which we assumed to be independent and random at each vertical. The standard error of the estimated mean velocity, at an individual vertical sampling location, may be as large as 9%, for large sand-bed alluvial rivers. The computed discharge, however, is a weighted mean of these random velocities. Consequently the standard error of computed discharge is divided by the square root of the number of verticals, producing typical values between 1 and 2%. The discharges measured by the depth-integrated method agreed within ??5% of those measured simultaneously by the standard two- and eight-tenths, six-tenth and moving boat methods. ?? 1992.

  11. Investigation on optimization design of an equivalent water depth truncated mooring system based on INSGA-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huoming; Gao, Wenjun; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Juan; Zhao, Zhou

    2012-06-01

    At present, equivalent water depth truncated mooring system optimization design is regarded as the priority of hybrid model testing for deep sea platforms, and will replace the full depth system test in the future. Compared with the full depth system, the working depth and span are smaller in the truncated one, and the other characteristics maintain more consistency as well. In this paper, an inner turret moored floating production storage & offloading system (FPSO) which works at a water depth of 320m, was selected to be a research example while the truncated water depth was 80m. Furthermore, an improved non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (INSGA-II) was selected to optimally calculate the equivalent water depth truncated system, considering the stress condition of the total mooring system in both the horizontal and vertical directions, as well as the static characteristic similarity of the representative single mooring line. The results of numerical calculations indicate that the mathematical model is feasible, and the optimization method is fast and effective.

  12. Relations between erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column and aerosol optical depth at Uccle, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, V.; De Backer, H.; Van Malderen, R.; Mangold, A.; Delcloo, A.

    2014-11-01

    At Uccle, Belgium, a long time series (1991-2013) of simultaneous measurements of erythemal ultraviolet (UV) dose (Sery), global solar radiation (Sg), total ozone column (QO3) and aerosol optical depth (?aer) (at 320.1 nm) is available, which allows for an extensive study of the changes in the variables over time. Linear trends were determined for the different monthly anomalies time series. Sery, Sg and QO3 all increase by respectively 7, 4 and 3% per decade. ?aer shows an insignificant negative trend of -8% per decade. These trends agree with results found in the literature for sites with comparable latitudes. A change-point analysis, which determines whether there is a significant change in the mean of the time series, is applied to the monthly anomalies time series of the variables. Only for Sery and QO3, was a significant change point present in the time series around February 1998 and March 1998, respectively. The change point in QO3 corresponds with results found in the literature, where the change in ozone levels around 1997 is attributed to the recovery of ozone. A multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to the data in order to study the influence of Sg, QO3 and ?aer on Sery. Together these parameters are able to explain 94% of the variation in Sery. Most of the variation (56%) in Sery is explained by Sg. The regression model performs well, with a slight tendency to underestimate the measured Sery values and with a mean absolute bias error (MABE) of 18%. However, in winter, negative Sery are modeled. Applying the MLR to the individual seasons solves this issue. The seasonal models have an adjusted R2 value higher than 0.8 and the correlation between modeled and measured Sery values is higher than 0.9 for each season. The summer model gives the best performance, with an absolute mean error of only 6%. However, the seasonal regression models do not always represent reality, where an increase in Sery is accompanied with an increase in QO3 and a decrease in ?aer. In all seasonal models, Sg is the factor that contributes the most to the variation in Sery, so there is no doubt about the necessity to include this factor in the regression models. The individual contribution of ?aer to Sery is very low, and for this reason it seems unnecessary to include ?aer in the MLR analysis. Including QO3, however, is justified to increase the adjusted R2 and to decrease the MABE of the model.

  13. Hand powered portable ultraviolet sterilizing water bottle with active UV dose sensing

    E-print Network

    Das, Chandan (Chandan K.)

    2007-01-01

    A portable hand powered water sterilization device was created to address a portion of the growing epidemic of global water contamination. As being more supply chain independent and having an active dose sensing component ...

  14. Depth of cinder deposits and water-storage capacity at Cinder Lake, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Amoroso, Lee; Kennedy, Jeff; Unema, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Schultz fire northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona, burned more than 15,000 acres on the east side of San Francisco Mountain from June 20 to July 3. As a result, several drainages in the burn area are now more susceptible to increased frequency and volume of runoff, and downstream areas are more susceptible to flooding. Resultant flooding in areas downgradient of the burn has resulted in extensive damage to private lands and residences, municipal water lines, and roads. Coconino County, which encompasses Flagstaff, has responded by deepening and expanding a system of roadside ditches to move flood water away from communities and into an area of open U.S. Forest Service lands, known as Cinder Lake, where rapid infiltration can occur. Water that has been recently channeled into the Cinder Lake area has infiltrated into the volcanic cinders and could eventually migrate to the deep regional groundwater-flow system that underlies the area. How much water can potentially be diverted into Cinder Lake is unknown, and Coconino County is interested in determining how much storage is available. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys and drilled four boreholes to determine the depth of the cinder beds and their potential for water storage capacity. Results from the geophysical surveys and boreholes indicate that interbedded cinders and alluvial deposits are underlain by basalt at about 30 feet below land surface. An average total porosity for the upper 30 feet of deposits was calculated at 43 percent for an area of 300 acres surrounding the boreholes, which yields a total potential subsurface storage for Cinder Lake of about 4,000 acre-feet. Ongoing monitoring of storage change in the Cinder Lake area was initiated using a network of gravity stations.

  15. The Export of Salty Surface Water to Depth in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busecke, J. J. M.; Gordon, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Excess evaporation in the subtropics forms a local surface salinity maximum in all subtropical ocean basins. Descent of these waters to depth creates a core layer marked by a subsurface salinity maximum (S-max) spreading towards the equator, an integral part of the lower limb of the meridional subtropical overturning cell. Here we will investigate what governs the evolution of the S-max core layer in the North Atlantic. It is suggested that the export is not just determined by subduction along isopycnals. The S-max core layer is modified along its spreading path by a non uniform diapycnal mixing profile, leading to a migration of the S-max across density surfaces (induced core layer). We propose a combination of diabatic surface fluxes and double diffusion beneath the salty surface waters as crucial for the properties and spreading path of the S-max towards the equator. The regional differences in stratification and potential for double diffusive processes in the central waters of the world ocean basins pose an interesting aspect for future research. It might be an important mechanism responsible for differences in the behavior of the shallow overturning in each basin. For further details on the surface salinity maxima linked to this topic see: Gordon, Giulivi, Busecke, Bingham, submitted to the SPURS Oceanography special issue.

  16. Distribution of Wading Birds Relative to Vegetation and Water Depths in the Northern Everglades of Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. T HOMAS; D ALE E. G AWLIK; K EN R UTCHEY

    The response of Great Blue Herons ( Ardea herodias ), Great Egrets ( Casmerodius albus ), Wood Storks ( Mycteria americana ), and White Ibises ( Eudocimus albus ) to water level (index of depth) and vegetation in the north- ern Everglades of Florida was studied in two years, each with dissimilar water levels. A regression model was con- structed

  17. Effect of crop sequence, soil sample location and depth on soil water holding capacity under center pivot irrigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yousef A. Al-Rumikhani

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the changes that may occur to the soil water holding capacity under center pivot irrigation systems when grown with different crop patterns over a long period of time. The changes of water holding capacity were checked as affected by crop location and depth. The study was carried out in a dominantly sandy loam

  18. An estimate of the influence of sediment concentration and type on remote sensing penetration depth for various coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Under the assumptions of collimated light, a homogenous water column, zero molecular scattering, and constant ratio of volume scattering function to scattering coefficient, estimates of the remote sensing depth parameter, Z90, are made for various coastal waters at 540 nm. Calculations indicate that sediment concentration and type have a strong influence on remote sensing depth when concentrations are below 5 mg/theta. Above 5 mg/theta, the absorption coefficient of the sediments becomes large in comparison to that of water, causing Z90 values to be less than 2 m with only small differences between various sediment types.

  19. Sedimentological data indicate greater range of water depths for Costistricklandia lirata in the Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, J.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Two distinct horizons of the pentamerid brachiopod Costistricklandia lirata occur in the upper part of the Red Mountain Formation (Lower Silurian) in northern Alabama. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics of the rocks associated with the brachiopods suggest water depths of 15-150 m during times of low rates of terrigenous influx. Costistricklandid assemblages from the lower horizon are composed of extremely large individuals in association with a diverse population of large corals. They are interpreted to have lived in a protected environment. In an overlying horizon, costistricklandids occur in growth position at the base of a thick siliciclastic interval. These brachiopods lived in a storm-dominated environment and were buried in situ by the rapid influx of sediment associated with a passing storm.

  20. Depth dependence of absorbed dose, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer spectra of galactic and trapped particles in polyethylene and comparison with calculations of models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A matched set of five tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), embedded at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 5, 8 and 12-inch-diameter polyethylene spheres, were flown on the Shuttle flight STS-81 (inclination 51.65 degrees, altitude approximately 400 km). The data obtained were separated into contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). From the measured linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, the absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates were calculated. The results were compared to calculations made with the radiation transport model HZETRN/NUCFRG2, using the GCR free-space spectra, orbit-averaged geomagnetic transmission function and Shuttle shielding distributions. The comparison shows that the model fits the dose rates to a root mean square (rms) error of 5%, and dose-equivalent rates to an rms error of 10%. Fairly good agreement between the LET spectra was found; however, differences are seen at both low and high LET. These differences can be understood as due to the combined effects of chord-length variation and detector response function. These results rule out a number of radiation transport/nuclear fragmentation models. Similar comparisons of trapped-proton dose rates were made between calculations made with the proton transport model BRYNTRN using the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model and Shuttle shielding distributions. The predictions of absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates are fairly good. However, the prediction of the LET spectra below approximately 30 keV/microm shows the need to improve the AP-8 model. These results have strong implications for shielding requirements for an interplanetary manned mission.

  1. Variation of Water Quality Parameters with Siltation Depth for River Ichamati Along International Border with Bangladesh Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. K.; Pal, S.; Banerjee, G.; Biswas Roy, M.; Ray, D.; Majumder, A.

    2014-12-01

    River is considered as one of the main sources of freshwater all over the world. Hence analysis and maintenance of this water resource is globally considered a matter of major concern. This paper deals with the assessment of surface water quality of the Ichamati river using multivariate statistical techniques. Eight distinct surface water quality observation stations were located and samples were collected. For the samples collected statistical techniques were applied to the physico-chemical parameters and depth of siltation. In this paper cluster analysis is done to determine the relations between surface water quality and siltation depth of river Ichamati. Multiple regressions and mathematical equation modeling have been done to characterize surface water quality of Ichamati river on the basis of physico-chemical parameters. It was found that surface water quality of the downstream river was different from the water quality of the upstream. The analysis of the water quality parameters of the Ichamati river clearly indicate high pollution load on the river water which can be accounted to agricultural discharge, tidal effect and soil erosion. The results further reveal that with the increase in depth of siltation, water quality degraded.

  2. Natural succession of macroalgal-dominated epibenthic assemblages at different water depths and after transplantation from deep to shallow water on Spitsbergen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Fricke; Markus Molis; Christian Wiencke; Nelson Valdivia; Annelise S. Chapman

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the primary succession of seaweeds over different time periods at different water depths.\\u000a Furthermore, we followed the succession of field-grown benthic communities of different successional age, developing on ceramic\\u000a tiles, prior to and after transplantation from 8 to 0.5 m water depth. The transplantation simulated changes associated with\\u000a the break up of sea-ice cover, e.g.

  3. Evaluating the value of ENVISAT ASAR Data for the mapping and monitoring of peatland water table depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, Michel; Schlaffer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard ENVISAT collected C-Band microwave backscatter data from 2005 to 2012. Backscatter in the C-Band depends to a large degree on the roughness and the moisture status of vegetation and soil surface with a penetration depth of ca. 3 cm. In wetlands with stable high water levels, the annual soil surface moisture dynamics are very distinct compared to the surrounding areas, which allows the monitoring of such environments with ASAR data (Reschke et al. 2012). Also in drained peatlands, moisture status of vegetation and soil surface strongly depends on water table depth due to high hydraulic conductivities of many peat soils in the low suction range (Dettmann et al. 2014). We hypothesize that this allows the characterization of water table depths with ASAR data. Here we analyze whether ASAR data can be used for the spatial and temporal estimation of water table depths in different peatlands (natural, near-natural, agriculturally-used and rewetted). Mapping and monitoring of water table depths is of crucial importance, e.g. for upscaling greenhouse gas emissions and evaluating the success of peatland rewetting projects. Here, ASAR data is analyzed with a new map of water table depths for the organic soils in Germany (Bechtold et al. 2014) as well as with a comprehensive data set of monitored peatland water levels from 1100 dip wells and 54 peatlands. ASAR time series from the years 2005-2012 with irregular temporal sampling intervals of 3-14 days were processed. Areas covered by snow were masked. Primary results about the accuracy of spatial estimates show significant correlations between long-term backscatter statistics and spatially-averaged water table depths extracted from the map at the resolution of the ASAR data. Backscatter also correlates with long-term averages of point-scale water table depth data of the monitoring wells. For the latter, correlation is highest between the dry reference backscatter values and summer mean water table depth. Using the boosted regression tree model of Bechtold et al., we evaluate whether the ASAR data can improve prediction accuracy and/or replace parts of ancillary data that is often not available in other countries. In the temporal domain primary results often show a better dependency between backscatter and water table depths compared to the spatial domain. For a variety of vegetation covers the temporal monitoring potential of ASAR data is evaluated at the level of annual water table depth statistics. Bechtold, M., Tiemeyer, B., Laggner, A., Leppelt, T., Frahm, E., and Belting, S., 2014. Large-scale regionalization of water table depth in peatlands optimized for greenhouse gas emission upscaling, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 3319-3339. Dettmann, U., Bechtold, M., Frahm, E., Tiemeyer, B., 2014. On the applicability of unimodal and bimodal van Genuchten-Mualem based models to peat and other organic soils under evaporation conditions. Journal of Hydrology, 515, 103-115. Reschke, J., Bartsch, A., Schlaffer, S., Schepaschenko, D., 2012. Capability of C-Band SAR for Operational Wetland Monitoring at High Latitudes. Remote Sens. 4, 2923-2943.

  4. Understanding patterns in global water table depth: the enormous data challenges (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Li, H.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Miguez-Macho, G.

    2013-12-01

    The depth to groundwater can tell us much about where societies and land ecosystems can potentially depend on this water resource, but to have a coherent picture of this variable in space and time requires real data support. Here we outline the key roles that groundwater plays in land surface processes, and present some rudimentary effort in compiling observations and building simple models, the latter as a case study to expose the vast deficiency in data and the need for community-level, and international coordination. Key challenges include the establishment of a global network of groundwater time series for syntheses and analyses of patterns and trends (e.g., the Pan-Africa effort led by Richard Taylor), and a global database of upper crustal porosity and permeability for supporting model simulations (e.g., MacroStrat led by Shanan Peters and the new Digital Crust initiative at NSF-USGS Powell Synthesis Center). Real steps must be taken to build these community data infrastructure if we are to understand the functions of groundwater in shaping terrestrial water fluxes.

  5. Modelling Contrasting Responses of Wetland Productivity to Changes in Water Table Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R. F.; Desai, A. R.; Sulman, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    Responses of wetland productivity to changes in water table depth (WTD) are controlled by complex interactions among several soil and plant processes, and hence are site-specific rather than general in nature. Hydrological controls on wetland productivity were studied by representing these interactions in connected hummock and hollow sites in the ecosystem model ecosys, and by testing CO2 and energy fluxes from the model with those measured by eddy covariance (EC) during years with contrasting WTD in a shrub fen at Lost Creek, WI. Modelled interactions among coupled processes for O2 transfer, O2 uptake, C oxidation, N mineralization, N uptake and C fixation by diverse microbial, root and mycorrhizal populations enabled the model to simulate complex responses of CO2 exchange to changes in WTD that depended on the WTD at which change was occurring. At the site scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater CO2 influxes and effluxes over hummocks vs. hollows, as has been found at field sites. At the landscape scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under cooler weather when water tables were shallow, but also smaller diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under warmer weather when water tables were deeper, as was also apparent in the EC flux measurements. At an annual time scale, these diurnal responses to WTD in the model caused lower net primary productivity (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh), but higher net ecosystem productivity (NEP = NPP - Rh), to be simulated in a cooler year with a shallower water table than in a warmer year with a deeper one. This difference in NEP was consistent with those estimated from gap-filled EC fluxes in years with different water tables at Lost Creek and at similar boreal fens elsewhere. In sensitivity test of the model, annual NEP declined with increasing WTD in a year with a shallow water table, but rose in a year with a deeper one. The model thus provided an integrated set of hypotheses for explaining site-specific and sometimes contrasting responses of wetland productivity to changes in WTD as found in different field experiments.

  6. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  7. Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso after irradiation with a simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Berger; Daniel Matthiä; Christine Koerner; Kerry George; Jordan Rhone; Francis A. Cucinotta; Guenther Reitz

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are com-pounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body

  8. Depth dose distributions measured with thermoluminescence detectors inside the anthropomorphic torso of the MATROSHKA experiment inside and outside the ISS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Berger; Guenther Reitz; Michael Hajek; Robert Bergmann; Pawel Bilski; Msc. Monika Puchalska

    2008-01-01

    The ESA MATROSHKA (MTR) facility was realized through the German Aerospace Center, DLR, Cologne, as main contractor, aiming for the determination of skin and organ doses within a simulated human upper torso. MTR simulates, by applying an anthropomorphic upper torso, as exact as possible an astronaut performing either an extravehicular activity (EVA) (MTR Phase 1) or an astronaut working inside

  9. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min-Hui Lo; James S. Famiglietti; P. J.-F. Yeh; T. H. Syed

    2010-01-01

    Several previous studies have shown the significance of representing shallow groundwater in land surface model (LSM) simulations. However, optimal methods for parameter estimation in order to realistically simulate water table depth have received little attention. The recent availability of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) water storage data provides a unique opportunity to constrain LSM simulations of terrestrial hydrology. In

  10. Comparison of minirhizotrons and the soil-water-depletion method to determine maize and soybean root length and depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Kirkham; S. J. Grecu; E. T. Kanemasu

    1998-01-01

    Root length density of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], measured with minirhizotrons, was compared with soil-water depletion, measured with neutron probes, to determine whether the soil-water-depletion method could indicate root length density and root depth in a stratified soil. The study was carried out in southeast Kansas, USA, on a Parsons silt loam soil (Mollic

  11. Seasonal and depth-related dynamics of prokaryotes and viruses in surface and deep waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    E-print Network

    Winter, Christian

    Seasonal and depth-related dynamics of prokaryotes and viruses in surface and deep waters Keywords: Bacteriophage Virus Prokaryote Marine Deep sea Flow cytometry a b s t r a c t The study site of prokaryotes and viruses was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). Prokaryotic abundance in the epi-, meso

  12. Correlation of changes in pigment content with photosynthetic capacity of seaweeds as a function of water depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Ramus; S. I. Beale; D. Mauzerall

    1976-01-01

    We conducted a study of the relationship between changes in photosynthetic pigment content and photosynthetic capacity as a function of water depth in Great Harbor near Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA, on the green algae Ulva lactuca and Codium fragile and the red algae Porphyra umbilicalis and Chondrus crispus. Seaweeds were attached to vertically buoyed lines at 0.5 and 10 m

  13. Water-table depth and oxygen content of deep peat in relation to root growth of Pinus contorta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Boggie

    1977-01-01

    Summary Oxygen concentrations were measured at monthly intervals in deep peat in plots in which the water-tables are maintained artificially at levels ranging in depth from 11 cm to 33 cm below the surface. Good correlation was observed between weight of roots of 11 year oldPinus contorta in these plots and oxygen concentrations in different horizons at all times of

  14. Some relationships between Secchi depth and inherent optical properties of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, H. R.; Wouters, A. W.

    1978-01-01

    Relationships between the inherent and optical properties of the ocean (Gorden et al., 1975 and Preisendorfer, 1961) are combined with the Duntley-Preisendorfer equation to show the dependence of these properties on the depth at which a Secchi disk disappears from view. An expression relating the Secchi depth to the limiting contrast of the disk is derived in terms of the average beam attenuation coefficient, the average diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance, the albedo of the disk, and the reflectance functions at the Secchi depth and just below the surface. It is shown that combining Secchi depth observations with other optical properties yields significant information about the constituents of the medium.

  15. Effects of Water Depth, Seasonal Exposure, and Substrate Orientation on Microbial Bioerosion in the Ionian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean)

    PubMed Central

    Färber, Claudia; Wisshak, Max; Pyko, Ines; Bellou, Nikoleta; Freiwald, André

    2015-01-01

    The effects of water depth, seasonal exposure, and substrate orientation on microbioerosion were studied by means of a settlement experiment deployed in 15, 50, 100, and 250 m water depth south-west of the Peloponnese Peninsula (Greece). At each depth, an experimental platform was exposed for a summer period, a winter period, and about an entire year. On the up- and down-facing side of each platform, substrates were fixed to document the succession of bioerosion traces, and to measure variations in bioerosion and accretion rates. In total, 29 different bioerosion traces were recorded revealing a dominance of microborings produced by phototrophic and organotrophic microendoliths, complemented by few macroborings, attachment scars, and grazing traces. The highest bioerosion activity was recorded in 15 m up-facing substrates in the shallow euphotic zone, largely driven by phototrophic cyanobacteria. Towards the chlorophyte-dominated deep euphotic to dysphotic zones and the organotroph-dominated aphotic zone the intensity of bioerosion and the diversity of bioerosion traces strongly decreased. During summer the activity of phototrophs was higher than during winter, which was likely stimulated by enhanced light availability due to more hours of daylight and increased irradiance angles. Stable water column stratification and a resulting nutrient depletion in shallow water led to lower turbidity levels and caused a shift in the photic zonation that was reflected by more phototrophs being active at greater depth. With respect to the subordinate bioerosion activity of organotrophs, fluctuations in temperature and the trophic regime were assumed to be the main seasonal controls. The observed patterns in overall bioeroder distribution and abundance were mirrored by the calculated carbonate budget with bioerosion rates exceeding carbonate accretion rates in shallow water and distinctly higher bioerosion rates at all depths during summer. These findings highlight the relevance of bioerosion and accretion for the carbonate budget of the Ionian Sea. PMID:25893244

  16. Effects of water depth, seasonal exposure, and substrate orientation on microbial bioerosion in the Ionian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Färber, Claudia; Wisshak, Max; Pyko, Ines; Bellou, Nikoleta; Freiwald, André

    2015-01-01

    The effects of water depth, seasonal exposure, and substrate orientation on microbioerosion were studied by means of a settlement experiment deployed in 15, 50, 100, and 250 m water depth south-west of the Peloponnese Peninsula (Greece). At each depth, an experimental platform was exposed for a summer period, a winter period, and about an entire year. On the up- and down-facing side of each platform, substrates were fixed to document the succession of bioerosion traces, and to measure variations in bioerosion and accretion rates. In total, 29 different bioerosion traces were recorded revealing a dominance of microborings produced by phototrophic and organotrophic microendoliths, complemented by few macroborings, attachment scars, and grazing traces. The highest bioerosion activity was recorded in 15 m up-facing substrates in the shallow euphotic zone, largely driven by phototrophic cyanobacteria. Towards the chlorophyte-dominated deep euphotic to dysphotic zones and the organotroph-dominated aphotic zone the intensity of bioerosion and the diversity of bioerosion traces strongly decreased. During summer the activity of phototrophs was higher than during winter, which was likely stimulated by enhanced light availability due to more hours of daylight and increased irradiance angles. Stable water column stratification and a resulting nutrient depletion in shallow water led to lower turbidity levels and caused a shift in the photic zonation that was reflected by more phototrophs being active at greater depth. With respect to the subordinate bioerosion activity of organotrophs, fluctuations in temperature and the trophic regime were assumed to be the main seasonal controls. The observed patterns in overall bioeroder distribution and abundance were mirrored by the calculated carbonate budget with bioerosion rates exceeding carbonate accretion rates in shallow water and distinctly higher bioerosion rates at all depths during summer. These findings highlight the relevance of bioerosion and accretion for the carbonate budget of the Ionian Sea. PMID:25893244

  17. Modulation depth and breaking strength for deep-water wave groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alina Galchenko; Alexander Babanin; Dmitry Chalikov; Ian Young; Tai-Wen Hsu

    2010-01-01

    Progression of nonlinear wave groups to breaking was studied numerically and experimentally. Evolution of such wave group parameters as distance to breaking and modulation depth was described. The wave modulation depth R is a height ratio of the highest Hh and the lowest Hl waves in the group: R = Hh-Hl (Babanin et al. 2009). This parameter, together with distance

  18. Airborne detection of oceanic turbidity cell structure using depth-resolved laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser-induced, depth-resolved water Raman backscatter is useful in the detection and mapping of water optical transmission variations. This test, together with other field experiments, has identified the need for additional field experiments to resolve the degree of the contribution to the depth-resolved, Raman-backscattered signal waveform that is due to (1) sea surface height or elevation probability density; (2) off-nadir laser beam angle relative to the mean sea surface; and (3) the Gelbstoff fluorescence background, and the analytical techniques required to remove it. When converted to along-track profiles, the waveforms obtained reveal cells of a decreased Raman backscatter superimposed on an overall trend of monotonically decreasing water column optical transmission.

  19. Dependence of Yb-169 absorbed dose energy correction factors on self-attenuation in source material and photon buildup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medich, David C.; Munro, John J. III [Radiation Laboratory, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Absorbed dose energy correction factors, used to convert the absorbed dose deposited in a LiF thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) into the clinically relevant absorbed dose to water, were obtained for both spherical volumetric sources and for the model 4140 HDR Yb-169 source. These correction factors have a strong energy dependence below 200 keV; therefore, spectral changes were quantified as Yb-169 photons traveled through both source material (Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and water with the corresponding absorbed dose energy correction factors, f(r,{theta}), calculated as a function of location in a phantom. Methods: Using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation program, the Yb-169 spectrum emerging from spherical Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources (density 6.9 g/cm{sup 3}) with radii between 0.2 and 0.9 mm were analyzed and their behavior compared against those for a point-source. The absorbed dose deposited to both LiF and H{sub 2}O materials was analyzed at phantom depths of 0.1-10 cm for each source radius and the absorbed dose energy correction factor calculated as the ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of LiF. Absorbed dose energy correction factors for the Model 4140 Yb-169 HDR brachytherapy source similarly were obtained and compared against those calculated for the Model M-19 Ir-192 HDR source. Results: The Yb-169 average spectral energy, emerging from Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} spherical sources 0.2-0.9 mm in radius, was observed to harden from 7% to 29%; as these photons traveled through the water phantom, the photon average energy softened by as much as 28% at a depth of 10 cm. Spectral softening was dependent on the measurement depth in the phantom. Energy correction factors were found to vary both as a function of source radius and phantom depth by as much as 10% for spherical Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources. The Model 4140 Yb-169 energy correction factors depended on both phantom depth and reference angle and were found to vary by more than 10% between depths of 1 and 10 cm and angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg. This was in contrast to that of the Model M-19 Ir-192 source which exhibited approximately 3.5%-4.4% variation in its energy correction factors from phantom depths of 0.5-10 cm. The absorbed dose energy correction factor for the Ir-192 source, on the other hand, was independent of angle to within 1%. Conclusions: The application of a single energy correction factor for Yb-169 TLD based dosimetry would introduce a high degree of measurement uncertainty that may not be reasonable for the clinical characterization of a brachytherapy source; rather, an absorbed dose energy correction function will need to be developed for these sources. This correction function should be specific to each source model, type of TLD used, and to the experimental setup to obtain accurate and precise dosimetric measurements.

  20. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-31

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of {approx}10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate.

  1. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the CTDIair measurement. PMID:25992894

  2. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44–50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the CTDIair measurement.

  3. The radial depth–dose distribution of a 188W\\/188Re ? line source measured with novel, ultra-thin TLDs in a PMMA phantom: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis R Schaart; Adrie J J Bos; August J M Winkelman; Martijn C Clarijs

    2002-01-01

    The radial depth–dose distribution of a prototype 188W\\/188Re ? particle line source of known activity has been measured in a PMMA phantom, using a novel, ultra-thin type of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent detector (TLD). The measured radial dose function of this intravascular brachytherapy source agrees well with MCNP4C Monte Carlo simulations, which indicate that 188Re accounts for ?99% of the dose between

  4. Modulation depth and breaking strength for deep-water wave groups.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galchenko, Alina; Babanin, Alexander; Chalikov, Dmitry; Young, Ian; Hsu, Tai-Wen

    2010-05-01

    Progression of nonlinear wave groups to breaking was studied numerically and experimentally. Evolution of such wave group parameters as distance to breaking and modulation depth was described. The wave modulation depth R is a height ratio of the highest Hh and the lowest Hl waves in the group: R = Hh-Hl (Babanin et al. 2009). This parameter, together with distance to breaking, was studied by means of the fully-nonlinear Chalikov-Sheinin (CS) model (Chalikov and Sheinin, 2005). Subsequent experiment demonstrated a good qualitative agreement with the numerical results. In the present study, both in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments, a wave group was initially generated as a superposition of two waves with primary and secondary wave steepnesses and close wave numbers, and allowed to evolve. It was shown that the modulation depth decreases as a function of the primary wave steepness, that distance to breaking also decreases with primary wave steepness, but grows as a function of the ratio of the primary and secondary wave steepnesses. Babanin et al (2007) investigated initially monochromatic wave trains, where the side bands necessary for the Benjamin-Feir (BF) modulation (Benjamin and Feir 1967) grew naturally from the background noise. These monochromatic waves experienced self-modulation, and developed into strongly modulated wave groups. In the subsequent study, Babanin et al. (2009) noticed that the depth of this modulation is essentially affected by the wind and, in turn, influences the breaking severity. In the present study, in order to achieve different modulation depths and investigate this connection of wave groups with the breaking strength, but to avoid the complicating action of the wind, the wave groups were initially imposed. It was shown that energy loss, i.e. the breaking severity is a function of modulation depth. Energy loss grows with modulation depth up to a certain level of the latter. It was also found that breaking probability for wave groups with modulation depth R

  5. Changes in soil aggregate stability under different irrigation doses of waste water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alicia Morugán; Fuensanta García-Orenes; Jorge Mataix-Solera; Victoria Arcenegui; Gema Bárcenas

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater availability and soil degradation are two of the most important environmental problems in the Mediterranean area acerbated by incorrect agricultural use of irrigation in which organic matter is not correctly managed, the use of low quality water for irrigation, and the inefficiency of dose irrigation. For these reasons strategies for saving water and for the restoration of the mean

  6. Natural radionuclides in bottled drinking waters produced in Croatia and their contribution to radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Rožmari?, Martina; Rogi?, Matea; Benedik, Ljudmila; Strok, Marko

    2012-10-15

    Activity concentrations of (234)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Po and (210)Pb in all Croatian bottled drinking natural spring and natural mineral water products, commercially available on the market, were determined. The samples originated from various geological regions of Croatia. Activity concentrations of measured radionuclides are in general decreasing in this order: (234)U>(238)U>(226)Ra>(228)Ra>(210)Pb>(210)Po and (226)Ra>(228)Ra>(234)U>(238)U>(210)Pb>(210)Po for natural spring and mineral waters, respectively. Based on the radionuclide activity concentrations average total annual effective ingestion doses for infants, children and adults, as well as contribution of each particular radionuclide to total dose, were assessed and discussed. The highest doses were calculated for children from 7 to 12 years of age, which makes them the most critical group of population. All values for each type of water, as well as for each population group, were well below the recommended reference dose level (RDL) of 0.1 mSv from one year's consumption of drinking water according to the European Commission recommendations from 1998. Contribution of each particular radionuclide to total doses varied among different water types and within each water type, as well as between different age groups, where the lowest contribution was found for uranium isotopes and the highest for (228)Ra. PMID:22906977

  7. A Monte Carlo study of absorbed dose distributions in both the vapor and liquid phases of water by intermediate energy electrons based on different condensed-history transport schemes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Bousis; D. Emfietzoglou; P. Hadjidoukas; H. Nikjoo

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo transport calculations of dose point kernels (DPKs) and depth dose profiles (DDPs) in both the vapor and liquid phases of water are presented for electrons with initial energy between 10 keV and 1 MeV. The results are obtained by the MC4 code using three different implementations of the condensed-history technique for inelastic collisions, namely the continuous slowing down

  8. The Incredible Shrinking Cup Lab: Connecting with Ocean and Great Lakes Scientists to Investigate the Effect of Depth and Water Pressure on Polystyrene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Chantelle M.; Adams, Jacqueline M.; Hinchey, Elizabeth K.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Patterson, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure increases rapidly with depth in a water body. Ocean and Great Lakes scientists often use this physical feature of water as the basis of a fun pastime performed aboard research vessels around the world: the shrinking of polystyrene cups. Depending on the depth to which the cups are deployed, the results can be quite striking! Capitalizing…

  9. The climate influence on the mid-depth Northeast Atlantic gyres viewed by cold-water corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; Frank, Norbert; Colin, Christophe; Wienberg, Claudia; Eisele, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition (expressed in epsilon units, $\\varepsilon$Nd) of reef framework-forming cold-water corals provides unique measures of water mass provenance and mixing within the Northeast Atlantic today and in the past. A reconstruction of near thermocline water $\\varepsilon$Nd from cold-water corals of the Gulf of Cádiz and Porcupine Seabight spanning over the past 300,000 years, now revealed that climate cooling during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 7.2 and MIS 8/9 led to a retraction of the mid-depth Subpolar Gyre (mSPG) to the west. Conversely, Northern Hemisphere warming and increasing fresh water fluxes to the northwest (Labrador Sea) favor a stronger eastward extension of the mSPG blocking the northward flow of temperate Atlantic water as observed during the early MIS 1 and the early stage MIS 5.5. These changes are likely the result of large-scale south-north displacement of the westerlies similar to present-day observations that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is linked with mid-depth ocean circulation. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that further climate warming will also strengthen the mSPG leading to a salt and temperature decrease in the Northeast Atlantic whereas salinity and temperature will increase in the temperate Atlantic. However, the amplitude of such changes on North Atlantic overturning remains to be tested.

  10. Offshore permafrost decay and massive seabed methane escape in water depths >20 m at the South Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, A.; Mienert, J.; Cherkashov, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We study the West-Yamal Shelf in the Kara Sea, offshore Western Russia. We present new high-resolution seismic data (2-16 kHz) and gas geochemical data from 2012 cruises. In high-resolution seismic data, we found extensive acoustic anomalies in the water column, which we interpreted to be gas (bubble) flares rising from the seafloor. These anomalies were widespread throughout the study area, but seemed to be limited to water depths > 20 meters below sea level (mbsl). One seepage site in ~6m water depth released gas that reached almost to the sea surface. The hydroacoustic anomalies are limited by the 20 m isobaths, and it may be controlled by the extension of permafrost that is still present below the seafloor at these depths providing an impermeable layer through which gas and other fluids cannot migrate. We detected acoustically transparent zones in sediments in the upper 2-5 meters below seafloor (mbsf). We interpret these acoustic anomalies to record the presence of free gas. Deeper seismic data show that acoustic anomalies in sediments near the seafloor are connected to gas chimneys that extend to depths >2000 mbsf. This suggests that gas is migrating from deeper hydrocarbon reservoirs and therefore it has very likely a thermogenic origin. In addition to the more widespread and disperse acoustically transparent zones, we discovered two prominent transparent mounds that are 1.5-2 km in diameter and that are elevated 10-15 meters above the seafloor. These features bear striking resemblance to the pingo-like features (PLF) that have been studied on the Beaufort Shelf (e.g. Shearer et al., 1971; Paull et al., 2007), and Pechora Sea (Rokos, 2009). Tentative results of numerical modelling estimate the thickness of permafrost, which was during the last sea level regression 170-300 meters thick. Based on the model of permafrost melting we state, that continuous sub-seabed permafrost may extend to water depths of ~20 m offshore creating a seal through which gas cannot migrate. Discontinuous and local permafrost areas may exist further offshore in up to 115 m water depth. This study provides one of the key examples of an Arctic marine shelf where seafloor gas release is widespread and where permafrost degradation is an ongoing process. These initial results provided targets for drilling and data acquisition in the summer of 2013 and for future research cruises in the Kara Sea. A better understanding of hydrocarbon seepage at the seafloor is important for assessing both the natural release of gas to the atmosphere and the hydrocarbon potential for new exploration regions like the Kara Sea.

  11. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  12. Comparative analysis of doses to aquatic biota in water bodies impacted by radioactive contamination.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

    2012-06-01

    Comparative analysis of doses to the reference species of freshwater biota was performed for the following water bodies in Russia or former USSR: Chernobyl NPPs cooling pond, Lakes Uruskul and Berdenish located in the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace, Techa River, Yenisei River. It was concluded that the doses to biota were considerably different in the acute and chronic periods of radioactive contamination. The most vulnerable part of all considered aquatic ecosystems was benthic trophic chain. A numerical scale on the "dose rate - effects" relationships for fish was formulated. Threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in fish were evaluated to be the following: 1 mGy d(-1) for appearance of the first morbidity effects in fish; 5 mGy d(-1) for the first negative effects on reproduction system; 10 mGy d(-1) for the first effects on life shortening of fish. The results of dose assessment to biota were compared with the scale "dose rate - effects" and the literature data on the radiobiological effects observed in the considered water bodies. It was shown that in the most contaminated water bodies the dose rates were high enough to cause the radiobiological effects in fish. PMID:21924530

  13. Offshore permafrost decay and massive seabed methane escape in water depths >20 m at the South Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, Alexey; Smith, Andrew J.; Mienert, Jürgen; Cherkashov, Georgy; Rekant, Pavel; Semenov, Peter; Serov, Pavel; Vanshtein, Boris

    2013-08-01

    Since the Last Glacial Maximum (~19 ka), coastal inundation from sea-level rise has been thawing thick subsea permafrost across the Arctic. Although subsea permafrost has been mapped on several Arctic continental shelves, permafrost distribution in the South Kara Sea and the extent to which it is acting as an impermeable seal to seabed methane escape remains poorly understood. Here we use >1300 km of high-resolution seismic data to map hydroacoustic anomalies, interpreted to record seabed gas release, on the West Yamal shelf. Gas flares are widespread over an area of at least 7500 km2 in water depths >20 m. We propose that continuous subsea permafrost extends to water depths of ~20 m offshore and creates a seal through which gas cannot migrate. This Arctic shelf region where seafloor gas release is widespread suggests that permafrost has degraded more significantly than previously thought.

  14. Cumulative soil water evaporation as a function of depth and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the surface water balance and the surface energy balance. Accurate and dynamic measurements of soil water evaporation enhance the understanding of water and energy partitioning at the land-atmosphere interface. The objective of this study is to mea...

  15. Depth to water in the western Snake River Plain and surrounding tributary valleys, southwestern Idaho and eastern Oregon, calculated using water levels from 1980 to 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.

    1991-01-01

    The vulnerability of ground water to contamination in Idaho is being assessed by the ISHW/DEQ (Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environmental Quality), using a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency DRASTIC methods (Allers and others, 1985). The project was designed as a technique to: (1) Assign priorities for development of ground-water management and monitoring programs; (2) build support for, and public awareness of, vulnerability of ground water to contamination; (3) assist in the development of regulatory programs; and (4) provide access to technical data through the use of a GIS (geographic information system) (C. Grantham, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, written commun., 1989). Digital representation of first-encountered water below land surface is an important element in evaluating vulnerability of ground water to contamination. Depth-to-water values were developed using existing data and computer software to construct a GIS data set to be combined with a soils data set developed by the SCS (Soul Conservation Service) and the IDHW/WQB (Idaho Department of Health and Welfare/Water Quality Bureau), and a recharge data set developed by the IDWR/RSF (idaho Department of Water Resources/Remote Sensing Facility). The USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) has developed digital depth-to-water values for eleven 1:100,00-scale quadrangles on the eastern Snake River Plain and surrounding tributary valleys.

  16. Depth to water in the eastern Snake River Plain and surrounding tributary valleys, southwestern Idaho and eastern Oregon, calculated using water levels from 1980 to 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.

    1992-01-01

    The vulnerability of ground water to contamination in Idaho is being assessed by the IDHW/DEQ (Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environmental Quality), using a modified version of the Environmental Orotection Agency DRASTIC methods (Allers and others, 1985). The project was designed as a technique to: (1) Assign priorities for development of ground-water management and monitoring programs; (2) build support for, and public awareness of, vulnerability or ground water to contamination; (3) assist in the development of regulatory programs; and (4) provide access to technical data through the use of a GIS (geographic information system) (C. Grantha,, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, written commun., 1989). A digital representation of first-encountered water below land surface is an important element in evaluating vulnerability of ground water to contamination. Depth-to-water values were developed using existing data and computer software to construct a GIS data set to be combined with a sols data set developed by the SCS (Soil Conservation Service) and IDHW/WQB (Idaho Department of Health and Welfare/Water Quality Bureau), and a recharge data set developed by the IDWR/RSF (Idaho Department of Water Resources/Remote Sensing Facility). The USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) developed digital depth-to-water values for eleven 1:100,000-scale quadrangles on the eastern Snake River Plain and surrounding tributary valleys.

  17. Modeling scale-dependent runoff generation in a small semi-arid watershed accounting for rainfall intensity and water depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Christoph; Govers, Gerard; Diels, Jan; Stone, Jeffry J.; Nearing, Mark A.

    2014-07-01

    Observed scale effects of runoff on hillslopes and small watersheds derive from complex interactions of time-varying rainfall rates with runoff, infiltration and macro- and microtopographic structures. A little studied aspect of scale effects is the concept of water depth-dependent infiltration. For semi-arid rangeland it has been demonstrated that mounds underneath shrubs have a high infiltrability and lower lying compacted or stony inter-shrub areas have a lower infiltrability. It is hypothesized that runoff accumulation further downslope leads to increased water depth, inundating high infiltrability areas, which increases the area-averaged infiltration rate. A model was developed that combines the concepts of water depth-dependent infiltration, partial contributing area under variable rainfall intensity, and the Green-Ampt theory for point-scale infiltration. The model was applied to rainfall simulation data and natural rainfall-runoff data from a small sub-watershed (0.4 ha) of the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in the semi-arid US Southwest. Its performance to reproduce observed hydrographs was compared to that of a conventional Green-Ampt model assuming complete inundation sheet flow, with runon infiltration, which is infiltration of runoff onto pervious downstream areas. Parameters were derived from rainfall simulations and from watershed-scale calibration directly from the rainfall-runoff events. The performance of the water depth-dependent model was better than that of the conventional model on the scale of a rainfall simulator plot, but on the scale of a small watershed the performance of both model types was similar. We believe that the proposed model contributes to a less scale-dependent way of modeling runoff and erosion on the hillslope-scale.

  18. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D{sub 90(w,m)} over D{sub 90(m,m)} for clinical implants matches D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} at 1 cm from the single point sources. Conclusions: Given the small variation with distance, using conversion factors based on the emitted photon spectrum (or its mean energy) of a given source introduces minimal error. The large differences observed between scoring schemes underline the need for guidelines on choice of media for dose reporting. Providing such guidelines is beyond the scope of this work.

  19. Dose-dependent inhibition of gastric injury by hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrogen has been reported to relieve damage in many disease models, and is a potential additive in drinking water to provide protective effects for patients as several clinical studies revealed. However, the absence of a dose–response relationship in the application of hydrogen is puzzling. We attempted to identify the dose–response relationship of hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water through the aspirin induced gastric injury model. Methods In this study, hydrogen-rich alkaline water was obtained by adding H2 to electrolyzed water at one atmosphere pressure. After 2 weeks of drinking, we detected the gastric mucosal damage together with MPO, MDA and 8-OHdG in rat aspirin induced gastric injury model. Results Hydrogen-dose dependent inhibition was observed in stomach mucosal. Under pH 8.5, 0.07, 0.22 and 0.84 ppm hydrogen exhibited a high correlation with inhibitory effects showed by erosion area, MPO activity and MDA content in the stomach. Gastric histology also demonstrated the inhibition of damage by hydrogen-rich alkaline water. However, 8-OHdG level in serum did not have significant hydrogen-dose dependent effect. pH 9.5 showed higher but not significant inhibitory response compared with pH 8.5. Conclusions Hydrogen is effective in relieving the gastric injury induced by aspirin-HCl, and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The reason behind this may be that hydrogen-rich water directly interacted with the target tissue, while the hydrogen concentration in blood was buffered by liver glycogen, evoking a suppressed dose–response effect. Drinking hydrogen-rich water may protect healthy individuals from gastric damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:24589018

  20. Maize Yield as Affected by Water Availability, Soil Depth, and Crop Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Calviño; F. H. Andrade; V. O. Sadras

    2003-01-01

    els. However, standard statistics may be limited in bio- logical meaning while crop simulation models have their The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of rainfall, own problems (Monteith, 1996; Passioura, 1996; Sinclair soil depth, and crop management practices on the yield of dryland maize (Zea mays L.) crops of the Argentine Pampas. We were con- and

  1. Scattering calculations for a sphere ensonified by a fully depth sampling TRM in a shallow water waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Kevin D.; McDonald, B. Edward

    2003-10-01

    One potential application of a Time Reversal Mirror (TRM) is as an acoustic tripwire [Kuperman et al., IEEE J. Oceanic Eng (submitted)] where the focus of the TRM at the probe source range and depth is degraded by the presence of an object in the waveguide. Here an efficient technique for approximating the time domain scattered field of a rigid or elastic sphere in a shallow water waveguide is presented based on the Ingenito model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82, 2051-2059 (1987)], a WKB decomposition of normal modes into up- and down-going plane waves at the scatterer depth, and the narrowband approximation for the time domain signal broadcast from a fully depth sampling TRM. Results show that the degradation of the TRM focusing near the focal region is as expected a strong function of the scatter size and frequency, as well as the usual parameter of the critical angle in the bottom. Calculations in the nearfield of the scatterer show shadowing for spheres above ka=1 of all the pseudo plane wave components of the TRM field, which yields an interesting evolution of the forward scattered field as a function of time, angle, and scatterer depth. [Work supported by ONR.

  2. Variation in functional rooting depth and soil water partitioning along an elevational gradient in the southwestern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Hungate, B. A.; Kolb, T.; KOCH, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    In semi-arid environments, co-existing plant species may vary in rooting depth, reflecting functional differences in water sources. In mountains of the southwestern U.S., moisture availability increases with elevation and winter and summer precipitation inputs differ isotopically. Examining variation in functional rooting depth among different plant communities and seasons is important to understanding how these communities may respond to the predicted warming and drying of the Southwest. The goal of this study was to assess the water partitioning of the woody plant community along an elevational moisture gradient using water isotopes as a proxy for rooting depth. We hypothesized that spatial and temporal water partitioning would be greatest in low elevation, moisture-stressed sites and would decrease as moisture availability increases with elevation. Five plots were established in each of five biotic communities: upland Sonoran desert, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, mixed-conifer forest, and spruce-fir forest. Soils (surface, 20 cm, 40 cm) and stem samples of dominant woody perennials were sampled during the late spring dry season and in late summer following monsoon rains, water was extracted using a cryo-vacuum line, and ?D and ?18O values were determined by off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Soil moisture content increased with elevation across all sites and increased with soil depth in the desert, pinyon-juniper, and ponderosa sites. The ?D values differed significantly among species in the desert and the ponderosa forest communities (p=0.014 and 0.039 ), while no species differences in ?D were found in the pinyon-juniper woodland or mixed-conifer forest. With the exception of the pinyon-juniper woodland, these data support our hypothesis that niche differentiation between species becomes less significant higher on the topographic moisture gradient, in the mixed-conifer forest. While spatial water partitioning mostly follows our predictions during the late spring, the lack of differentiation between species in the pinyon-juniper woodland indicates that temporal partitioning may be key to species coexistence in this system.

  3. Chemical composition of selected Kansas brines as an aid to interpreting change in water chemistry with depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingman, R.J.; Angino, E.E.

    1969-01-01

    Chemical analyses of approximately 1,881 samples of water from selected Kansas brines define the variations of water chemistry with depth and aquifer age. The most concentrated brines are found in the Permian rocks which occupy the intermediate section of the geologic column of this area. Salinity decreases below the Permian until the Ordovician (Arbuckle) horizon is reached and then increases until the Precambrian basement rocks are reached. Chemically, the petroleum brines studied in this small area fit the generally accepted pattern of an increase in calcium, sodium and chloride content with increasing salinity. They do not fit the often-predicted trend of increases in the calcium to chloride ratio, calcium content and salinity with depth and geologic age. The calcium to chloride ratio tends to be asymptotic to about 0.2 with increasing chloride content. Sulfate tends to decrease with increasing calcium content. Bicarbonate content is relatively constant with depth. If many of the hypotheses concerning the chemistry of petroleum brines are valid, then the brines studied are anomolous. An alternative lies in accepting the thesis that exceptions to these hypotheses are rapidly becoming the rule and that indeed we still do not have a valid and general hypothesis to explain the origin and chemistry of petroleum brines. ?? 1969.

  4. Discoloration of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as a proxy for water-table depth in peatlands: validation and assessment of seasonal variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, Robert K.; Hotchkiss, Sara C.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: 1. Discoloration of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape has been used in peatland ecological and hydrological studies as an inexpensive way to monitor changes in water-table depth and reducing conditions. 2. We investigated the relationship between depth of PVC tape discoloration and measured water-table depth at monthly time steps during the growing season within nine kettle peatlands of northern Wisconsin. Our specific objectives were to: (1) determine if PVC discoloration is an accurate method of inferring water-table depth in Sphagnum-dominated kettle peatlands of the region; (2) assess seasonal variability in the accuracy of the method; and (3) determine if systematic differences in accuracy occurred among microhabitats, PVC tape colour and peatlands. 3. Our results indicated that PVC tape discoloration can be used to describe gradients of water-table depth in kettle peatlands. However, accuracy differed among the peatlands studied, and was systematically biased in early spring and late summer/autumn. Regardless of the month when the tape was installed, the highest elevations of PVC tape discoloration showed the strongest correlation with midsummer (around July) water-table depth and average water-table depth during the growing season. 4. The PVC tape discoloration method should be used cautiously when precise estimates are needed of seasonal changes in the water-table.

  5. Defining restoration targets for water depth and salinity in wind-dominated Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. coastal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, J. A.; La Peyre, M. K.; Caldwell, A.; Piazza, S.; Thom, C.; Winslow, C.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryCoastal wetlands provide valued ecosystem functions but the sustainability of those functions often is threatened by artificial hydrologic conditions. It is widely recognized that increased flooding and salinity can stress emergent plants, but there are few measurements to guide restoration, management, and mitigation. Marsh flooding can be estimated over large areas with few data where winds have little effect on water levels, but quantifying flooding requires hourly measurements over long time periods where tides are wind-dominated such as the northern Gulf of Mexico. Estimating salinity of flood water requires direct daily measurements because coastal marshes are characterized by dynamic salinity gradients. We analyzed 399,772 hourly observations of water depth and 521,561 hourly observations of water salinity from 14 sites in Louisiana coastal marshes dominated by Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. Unlike predicted water levels, observed water levels varied monthly and annually. We attributed those observed variations to variations in river runoff and winds. In stable marshes with slow wetland loss rates, we found that marsh elevation averaged 1 cm above mean high water, 15 cm above mean water, and 32 cm above mean low water levels. Water salinity averaged 3.7 ppt during April, May, and June, and 5.4 ppt during July, August, and September. The daily, seasonal, and annual variation in water levels and salinity that were evident would support the contention that such variation be retained when designing and operating coastal wetland management and restoration projects. Our findings might be of interest to scientists, engineers, and managers involved in restoration, management, and restoration in other regions where S. patens or similar species are common but local data are unavailable.

  6. Defining restoration targets for water depth and salinity in wind-dominated Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. coastal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyman, J.A.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Piazza, Sarai; Thom, C.; Winslow, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal wetlands provide valued ecosystem functions but the sustainability of those functions often is threatened by artificial hydrologic conditions. It is widely recognized that increased flooding and salinity can stress emergent plants, but there are few measurements to guide restoration, management, and mitigation. Marsh flooding can be estimated over large areas with few data where winds have little effect on water levels, but quantifying flooding requires hourly measurements over long time periods where tides are wind-dominated such as the northern Gulf of Mexico. Estimating salinity of flood water requires direct daily measurements because coastal marshes are characterized by dynamic salinity gradients. We analyzed 399,772 hourly observations of water depth and 521,561 hourly observations of water salinity from 14 sites in Louisiana coastal marshes dominated by Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. Unlike predicted water levels, observed water levels varied monthly and annually. We attributed those observed variations to variations in river runoff and winds. In stable marshes with slow wetland loss rates, we found that marsh elevation averaged 1 cm above mean high water, 15 cm above mean water, and 32 cm above mean low water levels. Water salinity averaged 3.7 ppt during April, May, and June, and 5.4 ppt during July, August, and September. The daily, seasonal, and annual variation in water levels and salinity that were evident would support the contention that such variation be retained when designing and operating coastal wetland management and restoration projects. Our findings might be of interest to scientists, engineers, and managers involved in restoration, management, and restoration in other regions where S. patens or similar species are common but local data are unavailable.

  7. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  8. Penetration Depth and Transient Oxidation of Graphite by Oxygen and Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, Robert [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Equations are derived for the approach to equilibrium in the oxidation of graphite under assumptions of constant graphite density and linearized oxidation kinetics. A two-factor expression is assumed for the effective diffusivity. Equilibration may be estimated by observing the convergence of profiles with time or by means of an algebraic approximation. At large times, the profiles converge to the steady state. Oxidation depths show fair agreement with published measurements and follow closely the observed temperature trend.

  9. Seasonal variation in light, mixing depth and primary productivity in temperate northern hemisphere waters

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lauren Sahl

    In this exercise students work with light, temperature, and phytoplankton biomass proxy (chlorophyll a concentration) data to; Become more skilled in reading and interpreting semi log graphs, temperature profiles, and time series plots. Practice unit conversions. Gain an understanding of k, the attenuation coefficient for nondirectional light. See how the depth of the photic zone and the surface mixed layer varies seasonally at temperate latitudes and how this relates to seasonal phytoplankton productivity dynamics.

  10. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in water depth and surface velocity during large flood at steep mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2015-04-01

    Understanding discharge capacity of the channel and changes in hydraulic property during large storms are essential for the flash flood prediction, however, those information are limited for the steep mountain channels because of complex nature of steep channels and lack of measured data. Thus, we aimed to obtain detailed water level and surface velocity data during large flood at steep mountain channel and document how complex channel morphology could affect water flows during large storms. We installed water level and surface velocity sensors at cascade and 10m downstream pool cross section of the cascade-pool channel at Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of The University of Tokyo Forests, in Japan and measured for 1-minutes interval. We could obtain data for storm with total precipitation of 288 mm falling in 59 hours with maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/hr on relatively wet condition. During this storm, relative water depth increased from 0.35 to 1.57m and surface velocity increased from 0.35 to 4.15m/s. As expected, changes in water depth, surface velocity and velocity profiles were complex and even different between adjacent cascade and pool cross section. Changes in flow characteristics occurred fist at the cascade when discharge increased to some point, water was suddenly stagnated locally at the foot of the cascade. From this moment, water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. Then, at the downstream pool, when most of rocks were submerged at the mean depth of 0.7m, surface velocity suddenly started to increase remarkably and velocity profile changed, as they might develop negative flow in the lower portion of the profile, but water level did not increase as much. When rainfall diminished, first, surface velocity markedly declined and velocity profile went back to original state at the pool, then submerged flows at the bottom of the cascade was cancelled. Those data proved the longtime hypothesis that marked change in flow characteristics would occur when steps became submerged based on field data. Presented temporally and spatially detailed flow measurements were effective to document and understand flow characteristics during large flood in steep mountain channel.

  11. Sensible Heat Measurements Indicating Depth and Magnitude of Subsurface Soil Water Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is typically determined by techniques that assume the latent heat flux originates from the soil surface. Here, we describe a new technique for determining in situ soil water evaporation dynamics from fine-scale measurements of soil temperature and thermal properties with heat ...

  12. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  13. Investigation of Arctic and Antarctic spatial and depth patterns of sea water in CTD profiles using chemometric data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwa, Ewelina; Lacorte, Silvia; Duarte, Carlos; Tauler, Roma

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we examine 2- and 3-way chemometric methods for analysis of Arctic and Antarctic water samples. Standard CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) sensor devices were used during two oceanographic expeditions (July 2007 in the Arctic; February 2009 in the Antarctic) covering a total of 174 locations. The output from these devices can be arranged in a 3-way data structure (according to sea water depth, measured variables, and geographical location). We used and compared 2- and 3-way statistical tools including PCA, PARAFAC, PLS, and N-PLS for exploratory analysis, spatial patterns discovery and calibration. Particular importance was given to the correlation and possible prediction of fluorescence from other physical variables. MATLAB's mapping toolbox was used for geo-referencing and visualization of the results. We conclude that: 1) PCA and PARAFAC models were able to describe data in a satisfactory way, but PARAFAC results were easier to interpret; 2) applying a 2-way model to 3-way data raises the risk of flattening the covariance structure of the data and losing information; 3) the distinction between Arctic and Antarctic seas was revealed mostly by PC1, relating to the physico-chemical properties of the water samples; and 4) we confirm the ability to predict fluorescence values from physical measurements when the 3-way data structure is used in N-way PLS regression.

  14. Influence of water depth on the carbon sequestration capacity of seagrasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Mateo, Miguel Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The actual estimates of carbon stocks beneath seagrass meadows worldwide are derived from few data, resulting in a tendency to generalize global carbon stocks from a very limited number of seagrass habitats. We surveyed Posidonia oceanica and Posidonia sinuosa meadows along depth-induced gradients of light availability to assess the variability in their sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks and accretion rates. This study showed a fourfold decrease in Corg stocks from 2-4 m to 6-8 m depth P. sinuosa meadows (averaging 7.0 and 1.8 kg m-2, respectively; top meter of sediment) and a fourteenfold to sixteenfold decrease from shallow (2 m) to deep (32 m) P. oceanica meadows (200 and 19 kg m-2 average, respectively; top 2.7 m of sediment). The average Corg accretion rates in shallow P. sinuosa meadows were higher (10.5 g m-2 yr-1) than in deeper meadows (2.1 g m-2 yr-1). The reduction of sedimentary Corg stocks and accretion rates along depth-related gradients of light reduction suggests that irradiance, controlling plant productivity, meadow density, and sediment accretion rates, is a key environmental factor affecting Corg storage potential of seagrasses. The results obtained highlighted the exceptional carbon storage capacity of P. oceanica meadows at Balearic Islands (Spain), containing the highest areal Corg stocks of all seagrasses (estimated in up to 691-770 kg m-2 in 8-13 m thick deposits). Seagrass communities are experiencing worldwide decline, and reduced irradiance (following e.g., eutrophication or sediment regime alterations) will lead to photoacclimation responses (i.e., reduced plant productivity and shoot density), which may impact the carbon sequestration capacity of seagrasses.

  15. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  16. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Ahnesjö, Anders; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that modern dose calculation algorithms should be able to report absorbed dose both as dose to the local medium, Dm,m, and as dose to a water cavity embedded in the medium, Dw,m, using conversion factors from cavity theory. Assuming that the cell nucleus with its DNA content is the most important target for biological response, the aim of this study is to investigate, by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the relationship of the dose to a cell nucleus in a medium, Dn,m, to Dm,m and Dw,m, for different combinations of cell nucleus compositions and tissue media for different photon energies used in brachytherapy. As Dn,m is very impractical to calculate directly for routine treatment planning, while Dm,m and Dw,m are much easier to obtain, the questions arise which one of these quantities is the best surrogate for Dn,m and which cavity theory assumptions should one use for its estimate. The Geant4.9.4 MC code was used to calculate Dm,m, Dw,m and Dn,m for photon energies from 20 (representing the lower energy end of brachytherapy for 103Pd or125I) to 300 keV (close to the mean energy of 192Ir) and for the tissue media adipose, breast, prostate and muscle. To simulate the cell and its nucleus, concentric spherical cavities were placed inside a cubic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 mm3). The diameter of the simulated nuclei was set to 14 µm. For each tissue medium, three different setups were simulated; (a) Dn,m was calculated with nuclei embedded in tissues (MC-Dn,m). Four different published elemental compositions of cell nuclei were used. (b) Dw,m was calculated with MC (MC-Dw,m) and compared with large cavity theory calculated Dw,m (LCT-Dw,m), and small cavity theory calculated Dw,m (SCT-Dw,m). (c) Dm,m was calculated with MC (MC-Dm,m). MC-Dw,m is a good substitute for MC-Dn,m for all photon energies and for all simulated nucleus compositions and tissue types. SCT-Dw,m can be used for most energies in brachytherapy, while LCT-Dw,m should only be considered for source spectra well below 50 keV, since contributions to the absorbed dose inside the nucleus to a large degree stem from electrons released in the surrounding medium. MC-Dm,m is not an appropriate substitute for MC-Dn,m for the lowest photon energies for adipose and breast tissues. The ratio of MC-Dm,m to MC-Dn,m for adipose and breast tissue deviates from unity by 34% and 15% respectively for the lowest photon energy (20 keV), whereas the ratio is close to unity for higher energies. For prostate and muscle tissue MC-Dm,m is a good substitute for MC-Dn,m. However, for all photon energies and tissue types the nucleus composition with the highest hydrogen content behaves differently than other compositions. Elemental compositions of the tissue and nuclei affect considerably the absorbed dose to the cell nuclei for brachytherapy sources, in particular those at the low-energy end of the spectrum. Thus, there is a need for more accurate data for the elemental compositions of tumours and healthy cells. For the nucleus compositions and tissue types investigated, MC-Dw,m is a good substitute to MC-Dn,m for all simulated photon energies. Whether other studied surrogates are good approximations to MC-Dn,m depends on the target size, target composition, composition of the surrounding tissue and photon energy.

  17. CO2 snow depth and subsurface water-ice abundance in the northern hemisphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, I G; Zuber, M T; Litvak, M L; Boynton, W V; Smith, D E; Drake, D; Hamara, D; Kozyrev, A S; Sanin, A B; Shinohara, C; Saunders, R S; Tretyakov, V

    2003-06-27

    Observations of seasonal variations of neutron flux from the high-energy neutron detector (HEND) on Mars Odyssey combined with direct measurements of the thickness of condensed carbon dioxide by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on Mars Global Surveyor show a latitudinal dependence of northern winter deposition of carbon dioxide. The observations are also consistent with a shallow substrate consisting of a layer with water ice overlain by a layer of drier soil. The lower ice-rich layer contains between 50 and 75 weight % water, indicating that the shallow subsurface at northern polar latitudes on Mars is even more water rich than that in the south. PMID:12829779

  18. DETERMINATION OF MINIMAL INFECTIOUS DOSE OF AN ENTEROVIRUS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of this project were to determine the minimal infectious dose and medical significance of an enteric virus ingested in drinking water. The study was conducted under double-blind, placebo-controlled, random-selection conditions. A total of 149 susceptible (antibody-free)...

  19. Dose calculations for nuclear criticality accidents that occur under large amounts of water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Schwinkendorf

    1992-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the dose consequence to a worker directly above a hypothetical nuclear criticality on the floor of a fuel storage pool. This accident was assumed to have been caused by a critical accumulation of low-enriched uranium metallic fuel in a hemispherical pile on the pool floor. The basin contained [approx]16 ft of water. The fuel

  20. Hyperscale Analysis of River Morphology Though Optical Remote Mapping of Water Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The science of in-channel river processes and forms has profited enormously from the introduction of specialized remote sensing tools such as LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging during the past decade. However, the cost and lack of historical data make them a less than ideal choice for many geomorphic questions. As an alternative to high-performance technology, a new analytical technique applied to older color aerial imagery allows extraction of the three-dimensional river environment over enormous distances. In clearwater rivers, some light often reaches the riverbed and returns to the surface, providing optical information about different components of the physical habitat structure. The HAB-2 transform combines the Beer-Lambert law of light absorption with hydrodynamic rules to allow the estimation of river depth at each image pixel, and it allows separation of the depth effect from the remaining image information. The widespread availability of CIR digital orthophotoquads across much of the United States allows the use of HAB approaches to extract three dimensional data for large area riverscapes at scales from about a meter to that of the entire watershed. The rapid and widespread utility of image-based river DTMs allows hitherto unparalleled investigation of geomorphic structures. As one example of this utility, HAB- calibrated high-resolution imagery of the Nueces River watershed, Texas, shows systematic deviations from the classic theory of the downstream hydraulic geometry as well as an unprecedented level of randomness at most scales.

  1. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,?0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380?MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250?kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3?mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at the reference position for TG-43 (1?cm from the source on the transverse axis, in a water phantom) was estimated to be 0.8% with the dominant uncertainty coming from the determination of the G-value. A comparison with absorbed dose to water obtained using the product of air-kerma strength and the dose rate constant gave agreement within 1.5% for three different Ir-192 sources, which is within the combined standard uncertainties of the two methods.

  2. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,?0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380?MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250?kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3?mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at the reference position for TG-43 (1?cm from the source on the transverse axis, in a water phantom) was estimated to be 0.8% with the dominant uncertainty coming from the determination of the G-value. A comparison with absorbed dose to water obtained using the product of air-kerma strength and the dose rate constant gave agreement within 1.5% for three different Ir-192 sources, which is within the combined standard uncertainties of the two methods. PMID:25988983

  3. LNE-LNHB air-kerma and absorbed dose to water primary standards for low dose-rate 125I brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubineau-Lanièce, I.; Chauvenet, B.; Cutarella, D.; Gouriou, J.; Plagnard, J.; Aviles Lucas, P.

    2012-10-01

    The devices and methods applied for the LNE-LNHB primary standards in terms of reference air-kerma and absorbed dose to water for low dose-rate brachytherapy sources are described. Both standards are based on ionometric measurements, using a circular-shaped free-in-air ionization chamber, and Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors. Results for an IBt Bebig 125I source are presented and used here to assess the dose-rate constant. Uncertainties of 1.5% and 1.6% (with k = 1) were found for the air-kerma rate and the absorbed dose to water rate estimated with the new primary standards. Good agreement was found between our values and the AAPM published dose-rate constants. Comparisons with other primary standards are in progress.

  4. Simultaneous retrievals of cloud optical depth and droplet concentration from solar irradiance and microwave liquid water path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Reinout

    1997-12-01

    A 20-month time series of continuous observations of microwave radiation and solar irradiance was used to estimate the cloud optical depth and droplet number concentration at the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station, Tasmania, (40°41'S, 144°41'E). The data were selected by wind directions. When the air was from "baseline" origin, i.e., it had travelled over long oceanic distances and was mostly devoid of anthropogenic influences, the retrieved droplet concentration and optical depth were lower than when the air was from "nonbaseline" i.e., continental origin. Therefore the observed variation in cloud microphysical properties reflects the difference between the natural background conditions over the Southern Ocean and continental conditions with elevated droplet counts. Under baseline conditions the retrieved cloud optical depth exhibits a weak but perceptible seasonal cycle that has been previously observed from satellite data with a minimum in the austral winter, and a maximum in the austral summer. The results demonstrate that routine retrievals of cloud microphysical properties are possible using only a pyranometer and a microwave liquid water radiometer.

  5. Mid-depth Subtropical Water Circulation and Distribution Near Tidewater Glaciers in Uummannaq Fjord, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenty, I. G.; Rignot, E. J.; Cai, C.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The melting of grounded glaciers and ice sheets contribute about 65% of total global mean sea level rise and are responsible for about 50% of its acceleration from 2 to 3 mm yr-1 over the past two decades. Remote sensing and in situ observations have revealed that much of Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss has been synchronous with a temperature increase of the relatively warm subsurface waters of the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean that circulate around the island's continental shelf. At key locations, these warm waters cross the continental shelf and are able to reach fjords with outlet tidewater glaciers terminating in direct contact with the ocean. The existence of these warm waters in fjords with shrinking outlet glaciers has been previously documented at several locations around Greenland. Here we use oceanographic data collected in August 2012 and 2013 to show for the first time the existence and distribution of these warm waters throughout Uummannaq Fjord, a major fjord complex in West Greenland. The distribution of these warm waters in conjunction with estimates of ocean circulation and new ocean seafloor measurements reveals the set of glaciers that are likely venerable to enhanced submarine melting in a warming climate.

  6. Transient temperature responses of hydronic radiant floor heating system by different pipe embedding depth and water supply condition.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Sohn, J Y; Baik, Y K; Kang, J S

    1993-07-01

    "Ondol" is a Korean unique heating system. It is a specific radiant floor heating system using combustion heat of briquette or timber in Korea. Such traditional "Ondol" is changed to radiant heating system with pipe-coil embedded in the floor or slab. This study has contributed to the understandings of the transient behaviours of Ondol-heated floor panels and enclosure exposed to this type of heating system. The result is that the water supply temperature had a large effect on the rate of increase in floor surface and room air temperature. But, in spite of a higher water supply temperature, the heat flow rate was not increased considerably. The shallow pipe embedding depths, of course, result in a low heat flow rate. PMID:8373479

  7. Radiological characterization of tap waters in Croatia and the age dependent dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Rožmari?, Martina; Rogi?, Matea; Benedik, Ljudmila; Bariši?, Delko; Planinšek, Petra

    2014-09-01

    Activity concentrations of (234)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Po and (210)Pb in tap waters, originating from various geological regions of Croatia, were determined. Activity concentrations of measured radionuclides are in general decreasing in this order: (238)U?(234)U>(228)Ra?(210)Pb>(226)Ra?(210)Po. Based on the radionuclide activity concentrations average total annual internal doses for infants, children and adults, as well as contribution of each particular radionuclide to total dose, were assessed and discussed. The highest doses were calculated for infants, which makes them the most critical group of population. All values for each population group were well below the recommended reference dose level (RDL) of 0.1mSv from one year's consumption of drinking water according to European Commission recommendations from 1998. Contribution of each particular radionuclide to total doses varied among different age groups but for each group the lowest contribution was found for (226)Ra and the highest for (228)Ra. PMID:24997928

  8. Depth to and concentrations of water in large bodies of silicic magma. Progress report, July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.

    1983-03-03

    Large bodies of silicic magma are potential sources of geothermal energy and ore. They also pose threats of catastrophic eruptions. The depths of such bodies are related to their economic potential and probably to their eruption mechanisms. The concentrations of water in the magmas are important for their eruptive and dynamical behavior and for the development of ores. Estimates of viscosity and density of melt require knowledge of concentration of water. The concentration of water in melt before ascent and eruption can be measured in inclusions of glass which became trapped in crystals before extrusion. The depth of a magma body can be estimated or delimited if we can find out the concentrations of both carbon dioxide and water in the inclusions of glass. Initial results on the Bishop Tuff of Long Valley Caldera, California yield 4.9 +- 0.5 percent H/sub 2/O for glass included in quartz from the Plinian air fall pumice. This result is comparable to the estimates of Hildreth (1977) of about 3.5 to 4.9 percent H/sub 2/O in the lowermost part of the Bishop ash flow. From January 1982 through December 1982, analyses of inclusions of glass in two additional quartz phenocrysts from the Plinian air fall unit of the Bishop Tuff revealed variable H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/. The corresponding partial pressures range between about 2000 and 5000 atmospheres, assuming gas saturation. The variation may be natural or caused by an analytical artifact. A computerized data file has been constructed to facilitate the storage and retrieval of published and unpublished chemical analyses of glasses and minerals. Some data on the Bishop Tuff are presently stored.

  9. Utilizing Depth of Colonization of Seagrasses to Develop Numeric Water Quality Criteria for Florida Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA is working with state and local partners in Florida to develop numeric water quality criteria to protect estuaries from nutrient pollution. Similar to other nutrient management programs in Florida, EPA is considering status of seagrass habitats as an indicator of biologic...

  10. RACORO: ROUTINE AERIAL VEHICLE PROGRAM (AVP) CLOUDS WITH LOW OPTICAL WATER DEPTHS (CLOWD) OPTICAL RADIATIVE OBSERVATIONS

    E-print Network

    pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 g m2: This manuscript has been authored by employees of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02 for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable

  11. Flooding: The effect of water depth on the spectral response of grass canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beget, M. E.; Di Bella, C. M.

    2007-03-01

    SummaryVegetation indices generated from remotely sensed data have been widely used to estimate biophysical characteristics of natural vegetation and agricultural crops like aboveground productivity, leaf area index or absorption of the photosynthetically active radiation. However, in flooded environments, such as grasslands or rice crops, alterations in the spectral response of canopies may happen due to the presence of surface water. The objective of this study was to analyse these alterations in flooding environments. Spectral response at high resolution was measured in grass canopies inside a tank with varying levels of water between 0 and 25 cm, resulting in different above-water biomass proportions. Reflectance data were acquired using an OceanOptics Inc © USB2000 visible and near-infrared spectroradiometer. Spectral indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were calculated for each flooded situation. As flooding level increased, absorption in red wavelengths decreased and reflectance in near infrared decreased. NDVI did not show differences between flooding levels lower than 5 cm, where more than 60% of biomass was above water. From 5 cm, NDVI decreased with the decreasing proportion of emerged biomass. These results evidence not only the alterations of spectral response data under flooded situations but also the conditions limiting vegetation index as a reliable estimator of plant biophysical characteristics.

  12. Assessment of satellite derived diffuse attenuation coefficients and euphotic depths in south Florida coastal waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Optical data collected in coastal waters off South Florida and in the Caribbean Sea between January 2009 and December 2010 were used to evaluate products derived with three bio-optical inversion algorithms applied to MOIDS/Aqua, MODIS/Terra, and SeaWiFS satellite observations. Th...

  13. A simple device for the collection of water and dissolved gases at defined depths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device, consisting of a jar fitted with an inlet comprised of a gas-tight check valve and 2-way ball valve outlet connected via tubing to a portable peristaltic pump, was constructed to collect water samples without atmospheric contamination or loss of dissolved gases. A headspace void for dissol...

  14. Water uptake and hydraulic redistribution across large woody root systems to 20 m depth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution (HR) in a semi-arid woodland in central Texas to improve our understanding of the ecohydrological consequences of HR for the dominant evergreen and deciduous tree species in this water-limited ecosystem. We measured sap flow in numerous stem...

  15. Instrumentation for investigation of the depth-dose distribution by the Liulin-5 instrument of a human phantom on the Russian segment of ISS for estimation of the radiation risk during long term space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Todorova, G.; Kanchev, N.; Petrov, V.; Shurshakov, V.; Tchhernykh, I.; Kireeva, S.

    2004-01-01

    Described is the Liulin-5 experiment and instrumentation, developed for investigation of the space radiation doses depth distribution in a human phantom on the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 experiment is a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS. The experiment MATROSHKA-R is aimed to study the depth dose distribution at the sites of critical organs of the human body, using models of human body-anthropomorphic and spherical tissue-equivalent phantoms. The aim of Liulin-5 experiment is long term (4-5 years) investigation of the radiation environment dynamics inside the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom, mounted in different places of the Russian Segment of ISS. Energy deposition spectra, linear energy transfer spectra, flux and dose rates for protons and the biologically-relevant heavy ion components of the galactic cosmic radiation will be measured simultaneously with near real time resolution at different depths of the phantom by a telescope of silicon detectors. Data obtained together with data from other active and passive dosimeters will be used to estimate the radiation risk to the crewmembers, verify the models of radiation environment in low Earth orbit, validate body transport model and correlate organ level dose to skin dose. Presented are the test results of the prototype unit. The spherical phantom will be flown on the ISS in 2004 year and Liulin-5 experiment is planned for 2005 year. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Collateral geochemical impacts of agricultural nitrogen enrichment from 1963 to 1985: a southern Wisconsin ground water depth profile.

    PubMed

    Browne, Bryant A; Kraft, George J; Bowling, Juliane M; Devita, William M; Mechenich, David J

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we used chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) age-dating to investigate the geochemistry of N enrichment within a bedrock aquifer depth profile beneath a south central Wisconsin agricultural landscape. Measurement of N(2)O and excess N(2) allowed us to reconstruct the total NO(3)(-) and total nitrogen (TN) leached to ground water and was essential for tracing the separate influences of soil nitrification and ground water denitrification in the collateral geochemical chronology. We identify four geochemical impacts due to a steady ground water N enrichment trajectory (39 +/- 2.2 micromol L(-1) yr(-1), r(2) = 0.96) over two decades (1963-1985) of rapidly escalating N use. First, as a by-product of soil nitrification, N(2)O entered ground water at a stable (r(2) = 0.99) mole ratio of 0.24 +/- 0.007 mole% (N(2)O-N/NO(3)-N). The gathering of excess N(2)O in ground water is a potential concern relative to greenhouse gas emissions and stratospheric ozone depletion after it discharges to surface water. Second, excess N(2) measurements revealed that NO(3)(-) was a prominent, mobile, labile electron acceptor comparable in importance to O(2.) Denitrification transformed 36 +/- 15 mole% (mol mol(-1) x 100) of the total N within the profile to N(2) gas, delaying exceedance of the NO(3)(-) drinking water standard by approximately 6 yr. Third, soil acids produced from nitrification substantially increased the concentrations of major, dolomitic ions (Ca, Mg, HCO(3)(-)) in ground water relative to pre-enrichment conditions. By 1985, concentrations approximately doubled; by 2006, CFC age-date projections suggest concentrations may have tripled. Finally, the nitrification induced mobilization of Ca may have caused a co-release of P from Ca-rich soil surfaces. Dissolved P increased from an approximate background value of 0.02 mg L(-1) in 1963 to 0.07 mg L(-1) in 1985. The CFC age-date projections suggest the concentration could have reached 0.11 mg L(-1) in ground water recharge by 2006. These results highlight an intersection of the N and P cycles potentially important for managing the quality of ground water discharged to surface water. PMID:18574177

  17. Radioactivity measurements and radiation dose evaluation in tap waters of Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Donatella; Roselli, Carla; Assunta Meli, Maria; Feduzi, Laura; Rongoni, Alba; Saetta, Daniela

    2007-09-01

    Consumption of drinking water is very important for human nutrition and its quality must be strictly controlled. A study of radioactivity content in tap water samples collected in the Central Italy was performed in order to check the compliance with recent European regulations. Gross alpha and beta activity, 226Ra, 238U and 234U concentrations were measured. Gross alpha and beta activities were determined by standard ISO 9696 and ISO 9697; for 226Ra determination liquid scintillation was used. 238U and 234U concentrations were determined by alpha spectrometry after separation from matrix by extraction chromatography and electroplating. Recommended WHO guideline activity concentrations for drinking water (0.1 and 1.0 Bq/L for gross alpha and gross beta activity, respectively) are exceeded in two cases for gross alpha activity and are not exceeded in any case for gross beta activity. The concentrations (mBq/L) of 226Ra, 238U and 234U ranged from <1.70 to 15.3, 0.65 to 48.8 and 0.780 to 51.5, respectively. Effective dose due to the uranium isotopes and radium was calculated for children and adults using the dose coefficients reported by EC Directive 96/29 EURATOM and annual water intake. For all class ages, the doses are quite similar and much lower than 0.1 mSv/year. PMID:17688298

  18. Rooting depth, water availability, and vegetation cover along an aridity gradient in Patagonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E.-D. Schulze; H. A. Mooney; O. E. Sala; E. Jobbagy; N. Buchmann; G. Bauer; J. Canadell; R. B. Jackson; J. Loreti; M. Oesterheld; J. R. Ehleringer

    1996-01-01

    Above-and belowground biomass distribution, isotopic composition of soil and xylem water, and carbon isotope ratios were studied along an aridity gradient in Patagonia (44–45°S). Sites, ranging from those with Nothofagus forest with high annual rainfall (770 mm) to Nothofagus scrub (520 mm), Festuca (290 mm) and Stipa (160 mm) grasslands and into desert vegetation (125 mm), were chosen to test

  19. The Potential of Using Worldview-2 Imagery for Shallow Water Depth Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, Naif Muidh

    Worldview-2 is the first very high resolution satellite imagery that has the ability to acquire data of eight bands named: Coastal (400--450 nm), Blue (450--510 nm), Green (510--580 nm), Yellow (585--25 nm), Red (630--690 nm), Red Edge (705--45 nm), Near Infrared(NIR) 1 (770--895 nm) and Near Infrared (NIR) 2 (860--040 nm). Furthermore, five of these bands---Coastal Blue, yellow, red edge and NIR 2 are the new bands in WorldView-2 that are capable of extracting new features that were not possible with previous satellite imagery. Accurate and upto- date bathymetric models are an effective tool for gaining a clearer understanding of the world's waterways, and thus play an important role in many marine applications such as navigation. In this research, the automatic feature extraction technique will be used to locate water area edges. A threshold mask will then be used to determine small land and ships inside the shallow water area. An assessment will be done for all the eight bands to show their contribution to the bathymetry application and shore edge and shallow water outlining, with an emphasis on the yellow and Coastal bands. The conclusion and recommendation will be based on a statistical analysis of the comparison between Worldview-2 data and DEM data for the same area of interest.

  20. Technical Note: Using wavelet analyses on water depth time series to detect glacial influence in high-mountain hydrosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauvy-Fraunié, S.; Condom, T.; Rabatel, A.; Villacis, M.; Jacobsen, D.; Dangles, O.

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide, the rapid shrinking of glaciers in response to ongoing climate change is currently modifying the glacial meltwater contribution to hydrosystems in glacierized catchments. Assessing the contribution of glacier run-off to stream discharge is therefore of critical importance to evaluate potential impact of glacier retreat on water quality and aquatic biota. This task has challenged both glacier hydrologists and ecologists over the last 20 yr due to both structural and functional complexity of the glacier-stream system interface. Here we propose a new methodological approach based on wavelet analyses on water depth time series to determine the glacial influence in glacierized catchments. We performed water depth measurement using water pressure loggers over ten months in 15 stream sites in two glacier-fed catchments in the Ecuadorian Andes (> 4000 m). We determined the global wavelet spectrum of each time series and defined the Wavelet Glacier Signal (WGS) as the ratio between the global wavelet power spectrum value at a 24 h-scale and its corresponding significance value. To test the relevance of the WGS we compared it with the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchments, a metric of glacier influence often used in the literature. We then tested whether one month data could be sufficient to reliably determine the glacial influence. As expected we found that the WGS of glacier-fed streams decreased downstream with the increasing of non-glacial tributaries. We also found that the WGS and the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchment were significantly positively correlated and that one month data was sufficient to identify and compare the glacial influence between two sites, provided that the water level time series were acquired over the same period. Furthermore, we found that our method permits to detect glacial signal in supposedly non-glacial sites, thereby evidencing glacial meltwater infiltrations. While we specifically focused on the tropical Andes in this paper, our approach to determine glacier influence would be applicable to temperate and arctic glacierized catchments. The WGS therefore appears as a powerful and cost effective tool to better understand the hydrological links between glaciers and hydrosystems and assess the consequences of rapid glacier melting.

  1. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Ahnesjö, Anders; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-07-21

    It has been suggested that modern dose calculation algorithms should be able to report absorbed dose both as dose to the local medium, D(m,m,) and as dose to a water cavity embedded in the medium, D(w,m), using conversion factors from cavity theory. Assuming that the cell nucleus with its DNA content is the most important target for biological response, the aim of this study is to investigate, by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the relationship of the dose to a cell nucleus in a medium, D(n,m,) to D(m,m) and D(w,m), for different combinations of cell nucleus compositions and tissue media for different photon energies used in brachytherapy. As D(n,m) is very impractical to calculate directly for routine treatment planning, while D(m,m) and D(w,m) are much easier to obtain, the questions arise which one of these quantities is the best surrogate for D(n,m) and which cavity theory assumptions should one use for its estimate. The Geant4.9.4 MC code was used to calculate D(m,m,) D(w,m) and D(n,m) for photon energies from 20 (representing the lower energy end of brachytherapy for ¹?³Pd or ¹²?I) to 300 keV (close to the mean energy of (¹?²Ir) and for the tissue media adipose, breast, prostate and muscle. To simulate the cell and its nucleus, concentric spherical cavities were placed inside a cubic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 mm³). The diameter of the simulated nuclei was set to 14 µm. For each tissue medium, three different setups were simulated; (a) D(n,m) was calculated with nuclei embedded in tissues (MC-D(n,m)). Four different published elemental compositions of cell nuclei were used. (b) D(w,m) was calculated with MC (MC-D(w,m)) and compared with large cavity theory calculated D(w,m) (LCT-D(w,m)), and small cavity theory calculated D(w,m) (SCT-D(w,m)). (c) D(m,m) was calculated with MC (MC-D(m,m)). MC-D(w,m) is a good substitute for MC-D(n,m) for all photon energies and for all simulated nucleus compositions and tissue types. SCT-D(w,m) can be used for most energies in brachytherapy, while LCT-D(w,m) should only be considered for source spectra well below 50 keV, since contributions to the absorbed dose inside the nucleus to a large degree stem from electrons released in the surrounding medium. MC-D(m,m) is not an appropriate substitute for MC-D(n,m) for the lowest photon energies for adipose and breast tissues. The ratio of MC-D(m,m) to MC-D(n,m) for adipose and breast tissue deviates from unity by 34% and 15% respectively for the lowest photon energy (20 keV), whereas the ratio is close to unity for higher energies. For prostate and muscle tissue MC-D(m,m) is a good substitute for MC-D(n,m). However, for all photon energies and tissue types the nucleus composition with the highest hydrogen content behaves differently than other compositions. Elemental compositions of the tissue and nuclei affect considerably the absorbed dose to the cell nuclei for brachytherapy sources, in particular those at the low-energy end of the spectrum. Thus, there is a need for more accurate data for the elemental compositions of tumours and healthy cells. For the nucleus compositions and tissue types investigated, MC-D(w,m) is a good substitute to MC-D(n,m) for all simulated photon energies. Whether other studied surrogates are good approximations to MC-D(n,m) depends on the target size, target composition, composition of the surrounding tissue and photon energy. PMID:22722477

  2. Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reina Haque; D. N. Guha Mazumder; Sambit Samanta; Nilima Ghosh; David Kalman; Meera M. Smith; Soma Mitra; Amal Santra; Sarbari Lahiri; Binay K. De; Allan H. Smith

    2003-01-01

    Background. Over 6 million people live in areas of West Bengal, India, where groundwater sources are contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic. The key objective of this nested case-control study was to characterize the dose-re- sponse relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin keratoses and hyperpigmentation. Methods. We selected cases (persons with arsenic-induced skin lesions) and age-

  3. Calculation of photon energy deposition kernels and electron dose point kernels in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernesto Mainegra-Hing; D. W. O. Rogers; Iwan Kawrakow

    2005-01-01

    Eects of changes in the physics of EGSnrc compared to EGS4\\/PRESTA on energy deposition kernels for monoenergetic photons and on dose point kernels for beta sources in water are investigated. In the diagnostic energy range, Compton binding corrections were found to increase the primary energy fraction up to 4.5% at 30 keV with a corresponding reduction of the scatter component

  4. Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    U.S. Coast Guard member is preparing the Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD) for deployment in the Arctic Ocean. The CTD collects water samples and measures conductivity and temperature as a function of water depth....

  5. A Method To Determine Lake Depth and Water Availability on the North Slope of Alaska with Spaceborne Imaging Radar and Numerical Ice Growth Modelling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. JEFFRIES; K. MORRIS; G. E. LISTON

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and numerical ice growth modelling were used to determine maximum water depth and water availability in two areas of the North Slope in northwestern Alaska. SAR images obtained between September 1991 and May 1992 were used to identify when and how many lakes froze completely to the bottom, and how many lakes did not

  6. Korean coastal water depth/sediment and land cover mapping /1:25,000/ by computer analysis of Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. Y.; Miller, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer analysis was applied to single data Landsat MSS imagery of a coastal area near Seoul, Korea equivalent to a 1:50,000 topographic map, and featuring large dynamic sediment transport processes. Supervised image processing yielded a test classification map containing five water depth/sediment classes, two shoreline/tidal classes and five coastal land cover classes at a scale of 1:25,000 and with a training set accuracy of 76%; the training sets were selected by direct examination of the digitally displayed imagery. The unsupervised ISOCLAS (Senkus, 1976) clustering analysis was performed to assess the relative value of this approach to image classification in areas of sparse or nonexistent ground control. Results indicate that it is feasible to produce quantitative maps for detailed study of dynamic coastal processes given a Landsat image data base at sufficiently frequent time intervals.

  7. A measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in lead at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhart, L.; Ghag, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A.; Chepel, V.; DeViveiros, L.; Lopes, M. I.; Neves, F.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Stekhanov, V. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araújo, H. M.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Horn, M. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)] [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-08-08

    We present results from the measurement of the neutron production rate in lead by high energy cosmic-ray muons at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent (mean muon energy of 260 GeV). A tonne-scale highly segmented plastic scintillator detector was utilised to detect both the energy depositions from the traversing muons as well as the delayed radiative capture signals of the induced neutrons. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations reproduce well the distributions of muons and detected muon-induced neutrons. Absolute agreement between simulation and data is of the order of 25%. By comparing the measured and simulated neutron capture rates a neutron yield in pure lead of (5.78{sub ?0.28}{sup +0.21})×10{sup ?3} neutrons/muon/(g/cm{sup 2}) has been obtained.

  8. Radon Concentrations in Drinking Water in Beijing City, China and Contribution to Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-Yun; Ma, Yong-Zhong; Cui, Hong-Xing; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Sun, Ya-Ru; Shang, Bing; Su, Xu

    2014-01-01

    222Rn concentrations in drinking water samples from Beijing City, China, were determined based on a simple method for the continuous monitoring of radon using a radon-in-air monitor coupled to an air-water exchanger. A total of 89 water samples were sampled and analyzed for their 222Rn content. The observed radon levels ranged from detection limit up to 49 Bq/L. The calculated arithmetic and geometric means of radon concentrations in all measured samples were equal to 5.87 and 4.63 Bq/L, respectively. The average annual effective dose from ingestion of radon in drinking water was 2.78 ?Sv, and that of inhalation of water-borne radon was 28.5 ?Sv. It is concluded that it is not the ingestion of waterborne radon, but inhalation of the radon escaping from water that is a substantial part of the radiological hazard. Radon in water is a big concern for public health, especially for consumers who directly use well water with very high radon concentration. PMID:25350007

  9. Evidence for a nonmonotonic relationship between ecosystem-scale peatland methane emissions and water table depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Mathew G.; Humphreys, Elyn R.; Moore, Tim R.; Roulet, Nigel T.; Lafleur, Peter M.

    2014-05-01

    Although temporal and spatial variations in peatland methane (CH4) emissions at broad scales are often related to water table (WT) using a linear relationship, a potentially complex relationship exists between these variables locally and over shorter time scales. To explore this issue, CH4 fluxes were measured using eddy covariance at the Mer Bleue bog over two summer seasons. Peak CH4 emissions (30 to 50 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1) occurred not when the WT was closest to the surface but instead, when it dropped to 40 to 55 cm below the surface. When the WT was below or above this zone, average fluxes were ~14 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1. We speculate this critical zone coincides with the necessary redox potentials and sources of fresh organic material that lead to maximum production of CH4 and/or with conditions that lead to degassing of stored CH4. However, as expected, total summer CH4 emissions were 47% lower during the drier year. This occurred in part because the WT was within the critical zone for fewer days in the drier year but also because after an extended midsummer dry period there was little recovery of CH4 emissions, even a month after rewetting.

  10. Response of delta distributaries to differential water depths in the transverse direction: Tank experiments with bimodal grain-size sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, T.; Nishikawa, N.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A series of 2D tank experiments was conducted to explore how a river delta being fed bimodal grain-size sediment responds to non-uniform, basin water depths varying in the transverse direction. During each run, upstream water discharge, rate of sediment supply and base level were all kept constant. Sediment used was a 50:50 mixture of 0.1 mm and 0.9 mm quartz grains. Our experimental observations imply the presence of a particular feedback mechanism of delta distributary channels in response to differential bathymetry. When an active distributary channel empties into shallow water, a delta lobe rapidly extends in the offshore direction, but then in a relatively short period becomes inactive as the feeder channel migrates or avulses to another location. When an otherwise similar distributary channel empties into deep water, on the other hand, delta lobe progradation takes place only slowly, and it takes longer for the feeder channel to migrate to another location, whereby the delta can develop an isotropic shoreline configuration as a whole. Differential basement bathymetry can thus affect local residence time and avulsion frequency of active feeder channels. However, differential bathymetry does not function by itself, but always in combination with the effect of alluvial aggradation. These observations are substantially consistent with the existing notion, which was obtained from our previous experiment that was conducted with single-grain size sediment (0.1 mm), suggesting that the compensational behavior of active distributary channels holds regardless of grain-size distribution of supplied sediment.

  11. In situ burning of oil in coastal marshes. 1. Vegetation recovery and soil temperature as a function of water depth, oil type, and marsh type.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Bryner, Nelson P; Walton, William D

    2005-03-15

    In-situ burning of oiled wetlands potentially provides a cleanup technique that is generally consistent with present wetland management procedures. The effects of water depth (+10, +2, and -2 cm), oil type (crude and diesel), and oil penetration of sediment before the burn on the relationship between vegetation recovery and soil temperature for three coastal marsh types were investigated. The water depth over the soil surface during in-situ burning was a key factor controlling marsh plant recovery. Both the 10- and 2-cm water depths were sufficient to protect marsh vegetation from burning impacts, with surface soil temperatures of <35 and 48 degrees C, respectively. Plant survival rate and growth responses at these water depth burns were not significantly different from the unburned control. In contrast, a water table 2 cm below the soil surface during the burn resulted in high soil temperatures, with 90-200 degrees C at 0-0.5 cm soil depth and 55-75 degrees C at 1-2 cm soil depth. The 2-cm soil exposure to fire significantly impeded the post-burn recovery of Spartina alterniflora and Sagittaria lancifolia but did not detrimentally affect the recovery of Spartina patens and Distichlis spicata. Oil type (crude vs diesel) and oil applied to the marsh soil surface (0.5 L x m(-2)) before the burn did not significantly affect plant recovery. Thus, recovery is species-specific when no surface water exists. Even water at the soil surface will most likely protect wetland plants from burning impact. PMID:15819246

  12. Bacterial diversity and biogeochemistry of different chemosynthetic habitats of the REGAB cold seep (West African margin, 3160 m water depth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop Ristova, P.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Ramette, A.; Zabel, M.; Fischer, D.; Kasten, S.; Boetius, A.

    2012-12-01

    The giant pockmark REGAB (West African margin, 3160 m water depth) is an active methane-emitting cold seep ecosystem, where the energy derived from microbially mediated oxidation of methane supports high biomass and diversity of chemosynthetic communities. Bare sediments interspersed with heterogeneous chemosynthetic assemblages of mytilid mussels, vesicomyid clams and siboglinid tubeworms form a complex seep ecosystem. To better understand if benthic bacterial communities reflect the patchy distribution of chemosynthetic fauna, all major chemosynthetic habitats at REGAB were investigated using an interdisciplinary approach combining pore water geochemistry, in situ quantification of fluxes and consumption of methane, as well as bacterial community fingerprinting. This study revealed that sediments populated by different fauna assemblages show distinct biogeochemical activities and are associated with distinct sediment bacterial communities. The methane consumption rates and methane effluxes ranged over one to two orders of magnitude across habitats, and reached highest values at the mussel habitat, which hosted a different bacterial community compared to the other habitats. Clam assemblages had a profound impact on the sediment geochemistry, but less so on the bacterial community structure. Moreover, all clam assemblages at REGAB were restricted to sediments characterized by complete methane consumption in the seafloor, and intermediate biogeochemical activity. Overall, variations in the sediment geochemistry were reflected in the distribution of both fauna and microbial communities; and were mostly determined by methane flux.

  13. Dose calculations for the concrete water tunnels at 190-C Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1997-01-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD code was used to calculate the radiological dose from the contaminated concrete water tunnels at the 190-C Area at the Hanford Site. Two exposure scenarios, recreationist and maintenance worker, were considered. A residential scenario was not considered because the material was assumed to be left intact (i.e., the concrete would not be rubbleized because the location would not be suitable for construction of a house). The recreationist was assumed to use the tunnel for 8 hours per day for 1 week as an overnight shelter. The maintenance worker was assumed to spend 20 hours per year working in the tunnel. Six exposure pathways were considered in calculating the dose. Three external exposure pathways involved penetrating radiation emitted directly from the contaminated tunnel floor, emitted from radioactive particulates deposited on the tunnel floor, and resulting from submersion in airborne radioactive particulates. Three internal exposure pathways involved inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; inadvertent direct ingestion of removable, contaminated material on the tunnel floor; and inadvertent indirect ingestion of airborne particulates deposited on the tunnel floor. The gradual removal of surface contamination over time and the ingrowth of decay products were considered in calculating the dose at different times. The maximum doses were estimated to be 1.5 mrem/yr for the recreationist and 0.34 mrem/yr for the maintenance worker.

  14. Dose Point Kernels in liquid water:1 an intra-comparison between GEANT4-DNA and a variety of Monte Carlo codes2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dose Point Kernels in liquid water:1 an intra-comparison between GEANT4-DNA and a variety water, the simulation of electron Dose Point Kernels remains the27 preferential test. In this work: Dose Point Kernel; Geant4-DNA; Monte Carlo codes; liquid water.134 135 136 PACS: 87.53.Bn; 02.70.Ss; 87

  15. Simplified formulas of heave added mass coefficients at high frequency for various two-dimensional bodies in a finite water depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Weoncheol; Kim, Jun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simplified formula for added mass coefficients of a two-dimensional floating body moving vertically in a finite water depth. Floating bodies with various sectional areas may represent simplified structure sections transformed by Lewis form, and can be used for floating body motion analysis using strip theory or another relevant method. Since the added mass of a floating body varies with wave frequency and water depth, a correction factor is developed to take these effects into account. Using a developed two-dimensional numerical wave tank technique, the reference added masses are calculated for various water depths at high frequency, and used them as basis values to formulate the correction factors. To verify the effectiveness of the developed formulas, the predicted heave added mass coefficients for various wetted body sections and wave frequencies are compared with numerical results from the Numerical Wave Tank (NWT) technique.

  16. Effect of higher order nonlinearity, directionality and finite water depth on wave statistics: Comparison of laboratory experiments, field data and numerical simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Leandro; Onorato, Miguel; Monbaliu, Jaak; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    This research is focused on the study of nonlinear evolution of irregular wave fields in water of arbitrary depth by comparing laboratory experiments, field measurements and numerical simulations. It is now well accepted that modulational instability, known as one of the main mechanisms for the formation of rogue waves, induces strong departures from Gaussian statistics and second order based statistics. However, whereas non-Gaussian properties are remarkable when wave fields follow one direction of propagation over an infinite water depth, wave statistics only weakly deviate from Gaussianity when waves spread over a range of different directions. Over finite water depth, furthermore, wave instability attenuates overall and eventually vanishes for relative water depths as low as kh = 1.36 (where k is the wavenumber of the dominant waves and h the water depth). Recent experimental results, nonetheless, seem to indicate that oblique perturbations are capable of triggering and sustaining modulational instability even if kh < 1.36. In this regard, the aim of this research is to understand whether the combined effect of directionality and finite water depth has a significant effect on wave statistics and particularly on the occurrence of extremes. For this purpose, laboratory experiments in a large wave basin, numerical experiments solving the Euler equation of motion with the Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM) and field experiments at the Lake George experimental site (Australia) have been compared to assess the role of third order nonlinearity, and particularly modulational instability, on wave statistics. Herein, we present a comparative analysis of the statistical properties (i.e. density function of the surface elevation and its statistical moments skewness and kurtosis) between laboratory experiments, simulations and in-situ data which provides a confrontation between the numerical results and real observations in laboratory and field conditions.

  17. Ultra-thin TLDs for skin dose determination in high energy photon beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Stathakis; J. S. Li; K. Paskalev; J. Yang; L. Wang; C.-M. Ma

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. In this work we investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom and at a depth of 0.007 cm, the practical reference depth for skin as recommended by ICRP and ICRU, with ultra-thin TLDs and Monte Carlo calculations. The calculations and measurements were carried out for

  18. Calculation of photon energy deposition kernels and electron dose point kernels in water.

    PubMed

    Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Rogers, D W O; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2005-03-01

    Effects of changes in the physics of EGSnrc compared to EGS4/PRESTA on energy deposition kernels for monoenergetic photons and on dose point kernels for beta sources in water are investigated. In the diagnostic energy range, Compton binding corrections were found to increase the primary energy fraction up to 4.5% at 30 keV with a corresponding reduction of the scatter component of the kernels. Rayleigh scattered photons significantly increase the scatter component of the kernels and reduce the primary energy fraction with a maximum 12% reduction also at 30 keV where the Rayleigh cross section in water has its maximum value. Sampling the photo-electron angular distribution produces a redistribution of the energy deposited by primaries around the interaction site causing differences of up to 2.7 times in the backscattered energy fraction at 20 keV. Above the pair production threshold, the dose distribution versus angle of the primary dose component is significantly different from the EGS4 results. This is related to the more accurate angular sampling of the electron-positron pair direction in EGSnrc as opposed to using a fixed angle approximation in default EGS4. Total energy fractions for photon beams obtained with EGSnrc and EGS4 are almost the same within 0.2%. This fact suggests that the estimate of the total dose at a given point inside an infinite homogeneous water phantom irradiated by broad beams of photons will be very similar for kernels calculated with both codes. However, at interfaces or near boundaries results can be very different especially in the diagnostic energy range. EGSnrc calculated kernels for monoenergetic electrons (50 keV, 100 keV, and 1 MeV) and beta spectra (32P and 90Y) are in excellent agreement with reported EGS4 values except at 1 MeV where inclusion of spin effects in EGSnrc produces an increase of the effective range of electrons. Comparison at 1 MeV with an ETRAN calculation of the electron dose point kernel shows excellent agreement. PMID:15839340

  19. Depth to water, 1991, in the Rathdrum Prairie, Idaho; Spokane River valley, Washington; Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area, Idaho; and selected intermontane valleys, east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.; Bassick, M.D.; Rogers, T.L.; Garcia, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    This map report illustrates digitally generated depth-to-water zones for the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho; part of the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington; and the intermontane valleys of the upper Big Wood, Big Lost, Pahsimeroi, Little Lost, and Lemhi Rivers and Birch Creek in Idaho. Depth to water is 400 to 500 feet below land surface in the northern part of Rathdrum Prairie, 100 to 200 feet below land surface at the Idaho-Washington State line, and 0 to 250 feet below land surface in the Spokane area. Depth to water in the intermontane valleys in east-central Idaho is least (usually less than 50 feet) near streams and increases toward valley margins where mountain-front alluvial fans have formed. Depths to water shown in the Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area in Idaho are limited to point data at individual wells because most of the water levels measured were not representative of levels in the uppermost aquifer but of levels in deeper aquifers.

  20. Design and implementation of a water phantom for IMRT, arc therapy, and tomotherapy dose distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pallotta, Stefania; Marrazzo, Livia; Bucciolini, Marta [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Florence (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to present a new phantom for arc therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and tomotherapy dose distribution measurement in pretreatment verification. The presented phantom is innovative for its use of water as the tissue equivalent material, together with a technical solution specifically designed to support radiographic or radiochromic film and ionization chambers in any desired position. The phantom comprise a Plexiglas container, whose present shape and dimensions offer the possibility to simulate a human torso or abdomen; the container can be filled with water by opening the upper cover. On the internal side of the cover, a set of carbon pipes can support film in the desired coronal, axial, or sagittal planes. At one of the two ends of the phantom, an ionization chamber can be positioned parallel to the rotation axis of the accelerator gantry in all possible positions within a 20 cm diameter cylinder, for film calibration purposes. Inhomogeneities can be inserted into the phantom using the same carbon pipes and plastic sheets used to support film. An example of vertebra-shaped inserts made of bone equivalent material is reported. Radiochromic film can be dipped in water, while radiographic film must be protected to prevent damage. To accomplish this, radiographic film is laminated using a cold laminating film. In order to assess the effects of both the lamination itself and the effects of water on laminated Kodak EDR2 film, the optical density (OD) of conventional, laminated, and laminated film immersed in water and exposed to a range of doses from 0 to 300 cGy were compared. The OD of the three samples receiving the same radiation dose did not present any significant difference, thus proving that laminated EDR2 film can also be used in water. A prerequisite for any dosimetric comparison between planned and measured data is a proper film to plan registration. The solution proposed here is an extrinsic in-plane registration technique using four reference points marked on each film in predefined positions. The four points and the millimeter scales fixed on the carbon pipes that support the film are designed and manufactured so as to transfer onto the film the same reference system used during the planning procedure, thus allowing a straightforward registration. Tests to assess the accuracy of the proposed registration method demonstrate that the distances between measured and intended marker positions, evaluated for coronal, axial, and sagittal planes, were about 1 mm for both anteroposterior and lateral projections.

  1. Single Intravenous-dose Toxicity of Water-soluble Carthami-flos Pharmacopuncture (WCF) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da-jung; Choi, Yoo-min; Kim, Seok-hee; Kim, Jong-uk; Yook, Tae-han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Water-soluble Carthami-flos pharmacopuncture (WCF) when used as a single intravenous-dose in 6-week-old, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: The experiment was conducted at Biotoxtech according to Good Laboratory Practices. 20 female and 20 male Spague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups of 5 female and 5 male animals per group. The rats in the three experimental groups received single intravenous injections with 0.125-mL, 0.25-mL and 0.5-mL/animal doses of WCF, Groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the control group, Group 1, received a single intravenous injection with a 0.5-mL dose of normal saline. Clinical signs were observed and body weight measurements were carried out for 14 days following the injections. At the end of the observation period, hematology, clinical chemistry, histopathological tests and necropsy were performed on the injected parts. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weight, hematological parameters or clinical chemistry test results between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Visual inspection after necropsy showed no abnormalities. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed no significant differences, except for Group 1 females; however, the result was spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning because it was not dose-dependent. Therefore, this study showed that WCF had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy. Conclusion: As a result of single intravenous-dose tests of the test substance WCF in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, WCF is a relatively safe pharmacopuncture that can be used for treatment, but further studies should be performed. PMID:25780707

  2. [National primary standard of absorbed dose rate to water using a graphite calorimeter].

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yuichiro

    2013-01-01

    The calibration service in terms of absorbed dose to water started from 2011 after establishment of the national primary standard using a graphite calorimeter at the national metrology institute of Japan (NMIJ) and JCSS accreditation of the association for nuclear technology in medicine (ANTM). Accordingly, a new dosimetry protocol was introduced as JSMP12, in which details of the national standard were also described. This report presents a short review of the standard, a key comparison result, and a comparison result of calibration coefficients by JSMP01 and JSMP12. PMID:24893493

  3. Modelling effects of seasonal variation in water table depth on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a tropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezbahuddin, M.; Grant, R. F.; Hirano, T.

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal variation in water table depth (WTD) determines the balance between aggradation and degradation of tropical peatlands. Longer dry seasons together with human interventions (e.g. drainage) can cause WTD drawdowns making tropical peatland C storage highly vulnerable. Better predictive capacity for effects of WTD on net CO2 exchange is thus essential to guide conservation of tropical peat deposits. Mathematical modelling of basic eco-hydrological processes under site-specific conditions can provide such predictive capacity. We hereby deploy a process-based mathematical model ecosys to study effects of seasonal variation in WTD on net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of a drainage affected tropical peat swamp forest at Palangkaraya, Indonesia. Simulated NEP suggested that the peatland was a C source (NEP ~ -2 g C m-2 d-1, where a negative sign represents a C source and a positive sign a C sink) during rainy seasons with shallow WTD, C neutral or a small sink (NEP ~ +1 g C m-2 d-1) during early dry seasons with intermediate WTD and a substantial C source (NEP ~ -4 g C m-2 d-1) during late dry seasons with deep WTD from 2002 to 2005. These values were corroborated by regressions (P < 0.0001) of hourly modelled vs. eddy covariance (EC) net ecosystem CO2 fluxes which yielded R2 > 0.8, intercepts approaching 0 and slopes approaching 1. We also simulated a gradual increase in annual NEP from 2002 (-609 g C m-2) to 2005 (-373 g C m-2) with decreasing WTD which was attributed to declines in duration and intensity of dry seasons following the El Niño event of 2002. This increase in modelled NEP was corroborated by EC-gap filled annual NEP estimates. Our modelling hypotheses suggested that (1) poor aeration in wet soils during shallow WTD caused slow nutrient (predominantly phosphorus) mineralization and consequent slow plant nutrient uptake that suppressed gross primary productivity (GPP) and hence NEP (2) better soil aeration during intermediate WTD enhanced nutrient mineralization and hence plant nutrient uptake, GPP and NEP and (3) deep WTD suppressed NEP through a combination of reduced GPP due to plant water stress and increased ecosystem respiration (Re) from enhanced deeper peat aeration. These WTD effects on NEP were modelled from basic eco-hydrological processes including microbial and root oxidation-reduction reactions driven by soil and root O2 transport and uptake which in turn drove soil and plant carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus transformations within a soil-plant-atmosphere water transfer scheme driven by water potential gradients. Including these processes in ecosystem models should therefore provide an improved predictive capacity for WTD management programs intended to reduce tropical peat degradation.

  4. Bacterial diversity and biogeochemistry of different chemosynthetic habitats of the REGAB cold seep (West African margin, 3160 m water depth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop Ristova, P.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Ramette, A.; Zabel, M.; Fischer, D.; Kasten, S.; Boetius, A.

    2012-07-01

    The giant pockmark REGAB (West African margin, 3160 m water depth) is an active methane-emitting cold seep ecosystem, where the energy derived from microbially mediated oxidation of methane supports high biomass and diversity of chemosynthetic communities. Bare sediments interspersed with heterogeneous chemosynthetic assemblages of mytilid mussels, vesicomyid clams and siboglinid tubeworms form a complex seep ecosystem. To better understand if benthic bacterial communities reflect the patchy distribution of chemosynthetic fauna, all major chemosynthetic habitats at REGAB were investigated using an interdisciplinary approach combining porewater geochemistry, in situ quantification of fluxes and consumption of methane, as well bacterial community fingerprinting. This study revealed that sediments populated by different fauna assemblages show distinct biogeochemical activities and are associated with distinct sediment bacterial communities. The methane consumption and methane effluxes ranged over one to two orders of magnitude across habitats, and reached highest values at the mussel habitat, which hosted a different bacterial community compared to the other habitats. Clam assemblages had a profound impact on the sediment geochemistry, but less so on the bacterial community structure. Moreover, all clam assemblages at REGAB were restricted to sediments characterized by complete methane consumption in the seafloor, and intermediate biogeochemical activity. Overall, variations in the sediment geochemistry were reflected in the distribution of both fauna and microbial communities; and were mostly determined by methane flux.

  5. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  6. SPATIAL/TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF THE 1999-2004 SOUTH GILA DEPTH TO WATER TABLE AND 1995-2002 GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the spatial-temporal patterns in the 1999-2004 South Gila monthly depth to water table (groundwater) data and 1995-2002 discharge station pumping data. This analysis was performed as part of the ARS research agreement # 5310-13610-013-13R, an inter-agency agreement between the U...

  7. A relative water-depth model for the Normandy Chalk (Cenomanian-Middle Coniacian, Paris Basin, France) based on facies patterns of metre-scale cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Eric; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cécile; Hanot, Franck; Vaslet, Denis; Coueffe, Renaud; Neraudeau, Didier

    2009-01-01

    A relative water-depth model for the Chalk of the Paris Basin is proposed, based on the lateral variations of the high-frequency metre-scale cycles, which are characteristic features easily identified in the field. The studied outcrops are the Cenomanian-Middle Coniacian cliffs of Normandy. The main result of this study is to highlight the importance of storm activity in the deposition of the Chalk. The relative water-depth model is based on storm-induced shell concentrations observed within the two components of the metre-thick cycles: the depositional interval itself and the top hiatal surface. Six types of shell concentrations are defined, along with seven types of depositional facies making up the depositional units, as well as eight types of hiatal surface. Three cycle associations, differing in their thickness and the amount and type of non-carbonate constituents, can be identified in the Lower to Upper Cenomanian, the Upper Cenomanian to Lower Turonian and the Middle Turonian to Middle Coniacian. A relative water-depth profile model for all these cycles is based on the shell concentrations and a "water-depth equivalence" is proposed between the three cycle associations (lateral "facies" substitution diagram). This model is tested using palaeocological data (irregular echinoids) and by correlating field sections in terms of stacking patterns. Most of the studied deposits accumulated above the storm wave base (upper offshore zone or mid ramp).

  8. Natural radioactivity content in Bulgarian drinking waters and consequent dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kamenova-Totzeva, R M; Kotova, R M; Tenev, J G; Totzev, A V; Badulin, V M

    2015-04-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water from Bulgaria was determined in 994 samples. Nine hundred and seventeen of them are from the Southwestern part of the country. The measured activity of natural uranium, (226)Ra, gross alpha and gross beta activity varied from 20 (5) ng l(-1) to 0.11 (3) mg l(-1), MDA to 0.39 (6) Bq l(-1), MDA to 6.23 (39) Bq l(-1) and 0.030 (7) Bq l(-1) to 0.98 (22) Bq l(-1), respectively. Approximately 33% of the investigated waters exceeded a gross alpha activity of 0.1 Bq l(-1), 1.8% a natural uranium concentration of 0.03 mg l(-1) and 1% an (226)Ra concentration of 0.15 Bq l(-1). Annual effective dose from natural radionuclides ranges from 0.0175 (43) µSv to 95.5 (2.6) µSv. Median values of the contribution of the (226)Ra and uranium to the indicative dose are 10.22 and 0.21 µSv y(-1), respectively. Poor relationships between (226)Ra/nat.U (r, 0.12) and for gross beta activity/natural uranium (nat.U) (r, 0.29) were observed. The relationships between nat.U/gross alpha activity (r, 0.50) and for gross alpha activity/gross beta activity (r, 0.52) concentration distributions were stronger. PMID:25227438

  9. The Effects of Periphyton, Fish and Fertilizer Dose on Biological Processes Affecting Water Quality in Earthen Fish Ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana Milstein; Mohammed Ekram Azim; Mohammed Abdul Wahab; Marc Charles Jean Verdegem

    2003-01-01

    The potential of periphyton-based aquaculture in South Asia is under investigation in an extensive research program. This paper is a further analysis of data from four experiments carried out in that framework, to explore periphyton, fish and fertilizer dose effects on water quality. Factor analysis and ANOVA models applied to a data matrix of water quality parameters in ponds with

  10. Basis of the Massachusetts Reference Dose and Drinking Water Standard for Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Zewdie, Tsedash; Smith, C. Mark; Hutcheson, Michael; West, Carol Rowan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Perchlorate inhibits the uptake of iodide in the thyroid. Iodide is required to synthesize hormones critical to fetal and neonatal development. Many water supplies and foods are contaminated with perchlorate. Exposure standards are needed but controversial. Here we summarize the basis of the Massachusetts (MA) perchlorate reference dose (RfD) and drinking water standard (DWS), which are considerably lower and more health protective than related values derived by several other agencies. We also review information regarding perchlorate risk assessment and policy. Data sources MA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) scientists, with input from a science advisory committee, assessed a wide range of perchlorate risk and exposure information. Health outcomes associated with iodine insufficiency were considered, as were data on perchlorate in drinking water disinfectants. Data synthesis We used a weight-of-the-evidence approach to evaluate perchlorate risks, paying particular attention to sensitive life stages. A health protective RfD (0.07 ?g/kg/day) was derived using an uncertainty factor approach with perchlorate-induced iodide uptake inhibition as the point of departure. The MA DWS (2 ?g/L) was based on risk management decisions weighing information on perchlorate health risks and its presence in certain disinfectant solutions used to treat drinking water for pathogens. Conclusions Current data indicate that perchlorate exposures attributable to drinking water in individuals at sensitive life stages should be minimized and support the MA DEP perchlorate RfD and DWS. Widespread exposure to perchlorate and other thyroid toxicants in drinking water and foods suggests that more comprehensive policies to reduce overall exposures and enhance iodine nutrition are needed. PMID:20056583

  11. The Incredible Shrinking Cup Lab: An Investigation of the Effect of Depth and Water Pressure on Polystyrene

    EPA Science Inventory

    This activity familiarizes students with the effects of increased depth on pressure and volume. Students will determine the volume of polystyrene cups before and after they are submerged to differing depths in the ocean and the Laurentian Great Lakes. Students will also calculate...

  12. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for percentage depth dose calculations in heterogeneous media by using small photon beams from the 6-MV Cyberknife: Comparison with photon beam dosimetry with EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Suh, Tae Suk; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions in heterogeneous phantoms with lung and soft bone equivalent media are studied by using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. For lung equivalent media, Balsa wood is used, and for soft bone equivalent media, a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as a heterogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT2 film by using photon beams from the 6-MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5 to 10 to 30 mm. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT2 film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT2 film in and the dose beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, the discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT2 film and the dose without EBT2 film can be seen only in the region of the soft bone equivalent material. GEANT4 simulations are done with and without the EBT2 film to compare the simulation results with measurements. The GEANT4 simulations including EBT2 film are found to agree well with the measurements for all the cases within an error of 2.2%. The results of the present study show that GEANT4 gives reasonable results for the PDD calculations in heterogeneous media when using photon beams produced by the 6-MV CyberKnife

  13. Ventilatory mechanics and the effects of water depth on breathing pattern in the aquatic caecilian Typhlonectes natans.

    PubMed

    Prabha, K C; Bernard, D G; Gardner, M; Smatresk, N J

    2000-01-01

    The breathing pattern in the aquatic caecilian Typhlonectes natans was investigated by recording airflow via a pneumotachograph under unrestrained normal physiological conditions. Ventilatory mechanics were assessed using airflow and pressure measurements from the buccal cavity and trachea. The breathing pattern consisted of an expiratory phase followed by a series of 10-15 small buccal pumps to inflate the lung, succeeded by a long non-ventilatory period. T. natans separate the expiratory and inspiratory gases in the buccal cavity and take several inspiratory pumps, distinguishing their breathing pattern from that of sarcopterygians. Hydrostatic pressure assisted exhalation. The tracheal pressure was greater than the water pressure at that depth, suggesting that pleuroperitoneal pressure as well as axial or pulmonary smooth muscles may have contributed to the process of exhalation. The frequency of lung ventilation was 6.33+/-0.84 breaths h(-)(1), and ventilation occurred via the nares. Compared with other amphibians, this low ventilatory frequency suggests that T. natans may have acquired very efficient pulmonary respiration as an adaptation for survival in their seasonally fluctuating natural habitat. Their respiratory pathway is quite unique, with the trachea separated into anterior, central and posterior regions. The anterior region serves as an air channel, the central region is attached to the tracheal lung, and the posterior region consists of a bifurcated air channel leading to the left and right posterior lungs. The lungs are narrow, elongated, profusely vascularized and compartmentalized. The posterior lungs extend to approximately two-thirds of the body length. On the basis of their breathing pattern, it appears that caecilians are phylogenetically derived from two-stroke breathers. PMID:10607536

  14. Experience in Wales (UK) of the optimisation of ortho-phosphate dosing for controlling lead in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C R; Incledion, S; Balch, M

    2008-06-01

    Dwr Cymru Welsh Water supplies over three million people with drinking water throughout most of Wales (UK). Ortho-phosphate has increasingly been dosed at around 1 mg/L (P) to further reduce the corrosivity of supplies to the lead pipes which connect approximately 30% of houses to water mains in the company's area, additional to long-establish pH adjustment measures. The installation of new ortho-phosphate dosing schemes and the optimisation of these and existing dosing schemes, 29 schemes in total, were subject to a regulatory programme of work, agreed with the Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI). Optimisation comprised (i) selection of appropriate ortho-phosphate doses by a procedure involving laboratory based plumbosolvency testing linked to zonal lead emission (compliance) modelling, (ii) tight dose control and (iii) extensive monitoring of lead in supply by random daytime (RDT) sampling and by the use of lead pipe test rigs. The successful outcome was confirmed by 99% of over 5,000 RDT samples complying with the future standard of 10 microg/L for lead in drinking water. PMID:18209280

  15. Direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification using a modified EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Helen; Vial, Philip; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney 2065 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia); School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are high resolution systems that produce electronic dose maps with minimal time required for equipment setup, and therefore potentially present a time-saving alternative for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) pretreatment verification. A modified commercial EPID was investigated operated with an opaque sheet blocking the optical signal produced in the phosphor layer as a precursor to a switched mode dual dosimetry-imaging EPID system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this system for direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification. Methods: A Varian amorphous silicon EPID was modified by placing an opaque sheet between the Gd{sub 2}S{sub 2}O:Tb phosphor layer and the photodiode array to block the optical photons. The EPID was thus converted to a direct-detecting system (dEPID), in which the high energy radiation deposits energy directly in the photodiode array. The copper build-up was replaced with d{sub max} solid water. Sixty-one IMRT beams of varying complexity were delivered to the EPID, to EDR2 dosimetric film and to a 2D ion chamber array (MapCheck). EPID data was compared to film and MapCheck data using gamma analysis with 3%, 3mm pass criteria. Results: The fraction of points that passed the gamma test was on average 98.1% and 98.6%, for the EPID versus film and EPID versus MapCheck comparisons, respectively. In the case of comparison with film, the majority of observed discrepancies were associated with problems related to film sensitivity or processing. Conclusions: The very close agreement between EPID and both film and MapCheck data demonstrates that the modified EPID is suitable for direct dose to water measurement for pretreatment IMRT verification. These results suggest a reconfigured EPID could be an efficient and accurate dosimeter. Alternatively, optical switching methods could be developed to produce a dual-mode EPID with both dosimetry and imaging capabilities.

  16. Quantitative oral dosing of water soluble and lipophilic contaminants in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv; Reed, Stacey M.; Pratt, Amanda V.; Skillman, Ann D.

    2007-02-01

    Quantitative oral dosing in fish can be challenging, particularly with water soluble contaminants, which can leach into the aquarium water prior to ingestion. We applied a method of bioencapsulation using newly hatched brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) nauplii to study the toxicokinetics of five chlorinated and brominated halogenated acetic acids (HAAs), which are drinking water disinfection by-products. These results are compared to those obtained in a previous study using a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-47), a highly lipophilic chemical. The HAAs and PBDE-47 were bioencapsulated using freshly hatched A. franciscana nauplii after incubation in concentrated solutions of the study chemicals for 18 h. Aliquots of the brine shrimp were quantitatively removed for chemical analysis and fed to individual fish that were able to consume 400–500 nauplii in less than 5min. At select times after feeding, fish were euthanized and the HAA or PBDE-47 content determined. The absorption of HAAs was quantitatively similar to previous studies in rodents: rapid absorptionwith peak body levels occurringwithin 1–2 h, then rapidly declining with elimination half-life of 0.3–3 h depending on HAA. PBDE-47 was more slowly absorbed with peak levels occurring by 18 h and very slowly eliminated with an elimination half-life of 281 h.

  17. Single-dose Toxicity of Water-soluble Ginseng Pharmacopuncture Injected Intramuscularly in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junsang; Sun, Seungho; Lee, Kwangho; Kwon, Kirok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radix Ginseng has been traditionally used as an adaptogen that acts on the adrenal cortex and stimulates or relaxes the nervous system to restore emotional and physical balance and to improve well-being in cases of degenerative disease and/or old age. Radix Ginseng has been used for a long time, but the safety of ginseng pharmacopuncture needs testing. This study was done to analyze the single-dose toxicity of water-soluble ginseng pharmacopuncture (GP) intramuscular injections in rats. Methods: All experiments were performed at Biotoxtech, an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). Each group contained 10 Sprague-Dawley rats, 5 males and 5 females. GP was prepared in a sterile room at the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute under regulations of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). GP dosages were 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL for the experimental groups; normal saline was administered to the control group. The animals general condition was examined daily for 14 days, and the rats were weighed on the starting day and at 3, 7 and 14 days after administration of the pharmacopuncture. Hematological and biochemistry tests and autopsies were done to test the toxicological effect of GP after 14 days. This study was performed with approval from the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee of Biotextech. Results: No deaths were found in this single-dose toxicity test of intramuscular injections of GP, and no significant changes in the general conditions, body weights, hematological and biochemistry tests, and autopsies were observed. The local injection site showed no changes. Based on these results, the lethal dose was assumed to be over 1.0 mL/animal in both sexes. Conclusion: These results suggest that GP is relatively safe. Further studies, including a repeated toxicity test, are needed to provide more concrete evidence for the safety of GP. PMID:26120491

  18. Calculation of electron Dose Point Kernel in water with GEANT4 for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, C. C.; Moralles, M.; Sene, F. F.; Martinelli, J. R.; Okuno, E.

    2009-06-01

    The rapid insertion of new technologies in medical physics in the last years, especially in nuclear medicine, has been followed by a great development of faster Monte Carlo algorithms. GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit that contains the tools to simulate the problems of particle transport through matter. In this work, GEANT4 was used to calculate the dose-point-kernel (DPK) for monoenergetic electrons in water, which is an important reference medium for nuclear medicine. The three different physical models of electromagnetic interactions provided by GEANT4—Low Energy, Penelope and Standard—were employed. To verify the adequacy of these models, the results were compared with references from the literature. For all energies and physical models, the agreement between calculated DPKs and reported values is satisfactory.

  19. Calculation of electron Dose Point Kernel in water with GEANT4 for medical application

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, C. C.; Sene, F. F.; Martinelli, J. R. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais, IPEN/CNEN, CEP 05422-970, SP (Brazil); Moralles, M. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas, IPEN/CNEN, CEP 05422-970, SP (Brazil); Okuno, E. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187. CEP 05508-090, SP (Brazil)

    2009-06-03

    The rapid insertion of new technologies in medical physics in the last years, especially in nuclear medicine, has been followed by a great development of faster Monte Carlo algorithms. GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit that contains the tools to simulate the problems of particle transport through matter. In this work, GEANT4 was used to calculate the dose-point-kernel (DPK) for monoenergetic electrons in water, which is an important reference medium for nuclear medicine. The three different physical models of electromagnetic interactions provided by GEANT4 - Low Energy, Penelope and Standard - were employed. To verify the adequacy of these models, the results were compared with references from the literature. For all energies and physical models, the agreement between calculated DPKs and reported values is satisfactory.

  20. Effects of soil temperature and depth to ground water on first-year growth of a dryland riparian phreatophyte, Glycyrrhiza lepidota (American licorice)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of soil temperature and depth to ground water on first-year growth of a facultative floodplain phreatophyte, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, in a 2-×-2 factorial greenhouse experiment. We grew plants in mesocosms subirrigated with water low in dissolved oxygen, mimicking natural systems, and set depth of ground water at 63 or 100 cm and soil temperature at cold (ambient) or warm (?2.7°C above ambient). We hypothesized the moister (63 cm) and warmer soil would be most favorable and predicted faster growth of shoots and roots and greater nitrogen-fixation (thus, less uptake of mineral nitrogen) under those conditions. Growth in height was significantly faster in the moister treatment but was not affected by soil temperature. Final biomass of shoots and of roots, total biomass of plants, and root:shoot ratio indicated a significant effect only from depth of ground water. Final levels of soil mineral-nitrogen were as predicted, with level of nitrate in the moister treatment more than twice that in the drier treatment. No effect from soil temperature on level of soil-mineral nitrogen was detected. Our results suggest that establishment of G. lepidotarequires strict conditions of soil moisture, which may explain the patchy distribution of the species along southwestern dryland rivers.

  1. EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison of alanine dosimetry systems for absorbed dose to water measurements in gamma- and x-radiation at radiotherapy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Tristan; Anton, Mathias; Sharpe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) are involved in the European project 'External Beam Cancer Therapy', a project of the European Metrology Research Programme. Within this project, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetric method has been chosen for performing measurements in small fields such as those used in IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy). In this context, these three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) wished to compare the result of their alanine dosimetric systems (detector, modus operandi etc) at radiotherapy dose levels to check their consistency. This EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison has been performed with the support of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) which collected and distributed the results as a neutral organization, to ensure the comparison was 'blind'. Irradiations have been made under reference conditions by each laboratory in a 60Co beam and in an accelerator beam (10 MV or 12 MV) in a water phantom of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm in a square field of 10 cm × 10 cm at the reference depth. Irradiations have been performed at known values of absorbed dose to water (Dw) within 10% of nominal doses of 5 Gy and 10 Gy, i.e. between 4.5 Gy and 5.5 Gy and between 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively. Each participant read out their dosimeters and assessed the doses using their own protocol (calibration curve, positioning device etc) as this comparison aims at comparing the complete dosimetric process. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the EPR/alanine dosimetry systems operated by National Metrology Institutes as a method of assuring therapy level doses with the accuracy required. The maximum deviation in the ratio of measured to applied dose is less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. Using stable isotopes to characterize differential depth of water uptake based on environmental conditions in perennial biofuel and traditional annual crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. N.; Nystrom, R.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change related to fossil fuel consumption coupled with the necessity for secure, cost-effective, and renewable domestic energy is continuing to drive the development of a bioenergy industry. Numerous second-generation biofuel crops have been identified that hold promise as sustainable feedstocks for the industry, including perennial grasses that utilize the highly water and energy efficient C4 photosynthetic pathway. Among the perennial grasses, miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) stand out as having high biomass, minimal maintenance, low nutrient input requirements, and positive environmental benefits. These grasses are able to withstand a wide range of growing season temperatures and precipitation regimes, particularly in reference to the annual row crops that they are likely to replace. During the drought of 2012 traditional row crops suffered major reductions in yield whereas the perennial grasses retained relatively high biomass yields. We hypothesize that this is due to the ability of the perennial grasses to access water from deeper soil water relative to the annual row crops. To test this hypothesis, we use isotopic techniques to determine the soil depth from which the various species obtain water. Data from summer 2013 suggests that the perennial grasses preferentially use surface water when available but can extract water from depths that the annual row crops are unable to reach. These results indicate that perennial grasses, with deeper roots, will likely sustain growth under conditions when annual row crops are unable.

  3. Effects of food, water depth, and temperature on diving activity of larval Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto: evidence for diving to forage.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Conan; Roitberg, Bernard D

    2013-12-01

    Anopheles gambiae larvae have frequently been observed to dive, but the ecology of this behavior has not been extensively examined. We manipulated food level, water depth, and temperature for individually-reared larvae and observed diving activity. Larvae dived more often under low food, which suggests that they dive to forage. There was only weak evidence for effects of water depth or temperature on diving. Experimental results are discussed in the context of energy budgets. Understanding larval ecology of this species is important for predicting how it will respond to environmental change. Further study is needed to assess the role that larval diving plays in both feeding ecology and thermal regulation of this and other medically important species. PMID:24581359

  4. An evaluation of the influence of water depth and river inflow on quantitative Cladocera-based temperature and lake level inferences in a shallow boreal lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomi P. LuotoLiisa; Liisa Nevalainen; Seija Kultti; Kaarina Sarmaja-Korjonen

    Hydrological parameters can potentially have an overwhelming influence on sedimentary assemblages of Cladocera at certain\\u000a sampling sites that can cause problems for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. We applied a previously developed Cladocera-based\\u000a inference model of water depth and a mean July air temperature transfer function developed in this study to a surface sediment\\u000a dataset of fossil Cladocera from a lake in eastern

  5. A depth-controlled tracer technique measures vertical, horizontal and temporal patterns of water use by trees and grasses in a subtropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H; Verweij, Richard J T; February, Edmund C

    2010-10-01

    • As described in the two-layer hypothesis, woody plants are often assumed to use deep soils to avoid competition with grasses. Yet the direct measurements of root activity needed to test this hypothesis are rare. • Here, we injected deuterated water into four soil depths, at four times of year, to measure the vertical and horizontal location of water uptake by trees and grasses in a mesic savanna in Kruger National Park, South Africa. • Trees absorbed 24, 59, 14 and 4% of tracer from the 5, 20, 50, and 120 ?cm depths, respectively, while grasses absorbed 61, 29, 9 and 0.3% of tracer from the same depths. Only 44% of root mass was in the top 20?cm. Trees absorbed tracer under and beyond their crowns, while 98% of tracer absorbed by grasses came from directly under the stem. • Trees and grasses partitioned soil resources (20 vs 5? cm), but this partitioning did not reflect, as suggested by the two-layer hypothesis, the ability of trees to access deep soil water that was unavailable to grasses. Because root mass was a poor indicator of root activity, our results highlight the importance of precise root activity measurements. PMID:20561202

  6. Estimation of m.w.e (meter water equivalent) depth of the salt mine of Slanic Prahova, Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrica, B.; Margineanu, R.; Stoica, S.; Petcu, M.; Brancus, I. M.; Petre, M.; Toma, G.; Saftoiu, A.; Apostu, A. [Horia Hulubei Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest, Romania, P.O.B. MG-6 (Romania); Jipa, A.; Lazanu, I.; Sima, O. [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O.B. MG-11 (Romania); Haungs, A.; Rebel, H. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology-Campus North, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-11-24

    A new mobile detector was developed in IFIN-HH, Romania, for measuring muon flux at surface and in underground. The measurements have been performed in the salt mines of Slanic Prahova, Romania. The muon flux was determined for 2 different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at surface at different altitudes were performed. Based on the results, the depth of the 2 galleries was established at 610 and 790 m.w.e. respectively.

  7. High altitude diving depths.

    PubMed

    Paulev, Poul-Erik; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    In order to make any sea level dive table usable during high altitude diving, a new conversion factor is created. We introduce the standardized equivalent sea depth (SESD), which allows conversion of the actual lake diving depth (ALDD) to an equivalent sea dive depth. SESD is defined as the sea depth in meters or feet for a standardized sea dive, equivalent to a mountain lake dive at any altitude, such that [image omitted] [image omitted] [image omitted] Mountain lakes contain fresh water with a relative density that can be standardized to 1,000 kg m(-3), and sea water can likewise be standardized to a relative density of 1,033 kg m(-3), at the general gravity of 9.80665 m s(-2). The water density ratio (1,000/1,033) refers to the fresh lake water and the standardized sea water densities. Following calculation of the SESD factor, we recommend the use of our simplified diving table or any acceptable sea level dive table with two fundamental guidelines: 1. The classical decompression stages (30, 20, and 10 feet or 9, 6, and 3 m) are corrected to the altitude lake level, dividing the stage depth by the SESD factor. 2. Likewise, the lake ascent rate during diving is equal to the sea ascent rate divided by the SESD factor. PMID:17987509

  8. Application of an expert system using neural network to control the coagulant dosing in water treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hang Zhang; Dayong Luo

    2004-01-01

    The coagulation process is one of the most important stages in water treatment plant, which involves many complex physical\\u000a and chemical phenomena. Moreover, coagulant dosing rate is non-linearly correlated to raw water characteristics such as turbidity,\\u000a conductivity, PH, temperature, etc. As such, coagulation reaction is hard or even impossible to control satisfactorily by\\u000a conventional methods. Based on neural network and

  9. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; St. George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9--20 MeV electron beams and 1.25--15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prothesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations.

  10. GENE EXPRESSION DOSE-RESPONSE IN THE BLADDERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER FOR 13 WEEKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association between drinking water exposures to inorganic arsenic and life-threatening tumors in the human is strongest for bladder cancer. To investigate the mode of action for inorganic arsenic carcinogenicity in the bladder, a study was conducted to characterize the dose-r...

  11. COMBINATION OF HOT WATER SURFACE PASTEURIZATION OF WHOLE FRUIT AND LOW DOSE GAMMA IRRADIATION OF FRESH-CUT CANTALOUPE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements in methods for disinfecting fresh-cut cantaloupe could reduce spoilage losses and reduce the risk of food-borne illness from human pathogen contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using hot water treatment in combination with low dose irradiatio...

  12. Map showing depth to pre-Cenozoic basement in the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Ponce, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    A depth to basement map of the Death Valley groundwater model area was prepared using over 40,0000 gravity stations as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Energy to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwest Nevada and parts of California.

  13. Scattering calculations for a sphere ensonified by a fully depth sampling TRM in a shallow water waveguide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin D. Lepage; B. Edward McDonald

    2003-01-01

    One potential application of a Time Reversal Mirror (TRM) is as an acoustic tripwire [Kuperman et al., IEEE J. Oceanic Eng (submitted)] where the focus of the TRM at the probe source range and depth is degraded by the presence of an object in the waveguide. Here an efficient technique for approximating the time domain scattered field of a rigid

  14. Using LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P. Avilés, E-mail: paz.aviles@ciemat.es; Aubineau-Lanièce, I.; Lourenço, V.; Vermesse, D.; Cutarella, D. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The absorbed dose to water is the fundamental reference quantity for brachytherapy treatment planning systems and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been recognized as the most validated detectors for measurement of such a dosimetric descriptor. The detector response in a wide energy spectrum as that of an{sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source as well as the specific measurement medium which surrounds the TLD need to be accounted for when estimating the absorbed dose. This paper develops a methodology based on highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to directly estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source. Methods: Different experimental designs in liquid water and air were constructed to study the response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs when irradiated in several standard photon beams of the LNE-LNHB (French national metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation). Measurement strategies and Monte Carlo techniques were developed to calibrate the LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in the energy interval characteristic of that found when TLDs are immersed in water around an{sup 192}Ir source. Finally, an experimental system was designed to irradiate TLDs at different angles between 1 and 11 cm away from an {sup 192}Ir source in liquid water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to correct measured results to provide estimates of the absorbed dose to water in water around the {sup 192}Ir source. Results: The dose response dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs with the linear energy transfer of secondary electrons followed the same variations as those of published results. The calibration strategy which used TLDs in air exposed to a standard N-250 ISO x-ray beam and TLDs in water irradiated with a standard{sup 137}Cs beam provided an estimated mean uncertainty of 2.8% (k = 1) in the TLD calibration coefficient for irradiations by the {sup 192}Ir source in water. The 3D TLD measurements performed in liquid water were obtained with a maximum uncertainty of 11% (k = 1) found at 1 cm from the source. Radial dose values in water were compared against published results of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology and no significant differences (maximum value of 3.1%) were found within uncertainties except for one position at 9 cm (5.8%). At this location the background contribution relative to the TLD signal is relatively small and an unexpected experimental fluctuation in the background estimate may have caused such a large discrepancy. Conclusions: This paper shows that reliable measurements with TLDs in complex energy spectra require a study of the detector dose response with the radiation quality and specific calibration methodologies which model accurately the experimental conditions where the detectors will be used. The authors have developed and studied a method with highly sensitive TLDs and contributed to its validation by comparison with results from the literature. This methodology can be used to provide direct estimates of the absorbed dose rate in water for irradiations with HDR{sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources.

  15. What makes mangroves attractive to fish? Use of artificial units to test the influence of water depth, cross-shelf location, and presence of root structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagelkerken, I.; Faunce, C. H.

    2008-09-01

    Mangroves are an attractive fish habitat because they provide shelter and food for juvenile fishes. However, because mangroves are almost always located in shallow water and in sheltered (i.e., lagoonal, estuarine or bay) environments, the degree to which the latter two factors contribute to the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots as a fish habitat is unknown. Artificial Mangrove Units (AMUs) were placed at multiple depths and along a gradient from an embayment to, and including, the coral reef. Total fish density and species richness in AMUs placed in the embayment was lower at 1 m depth than at 2 and 3 m depth, suggesting that shallow water is not a prerequisite for the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots as a fish habitat. Total fish density and species richness were equal or greater in AMUs on the coral reef than in the embayment, suggesting that placement of mangroves in a sheltered lagoonal environment is not solely responsible for the attractiveness of mangrove prop-roots either. After 3 weeks, removal of AMUs did not have a negative effect on total fish density or species richness. However, within the embayment AMU removal resulted in the complete collapse of the assemblage component comprised of species that use mangroves as juvenile habitats, highlighting the need for a species-based approach towards assessing the benefits provided by the presence of mangrove root structure for fishes.

  16. Spatially pooled depth-dependent reservoir storage, elevation, and water-quality data for selected reservoirs in Texas, January 1965-January 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.; Asquith, William H.; Brooks, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Texas Tech University, constructed a dataset of selected reservoir storage (daily and instantaneous values), reservoir elevation (daily and instantaneous values), and water-quality data from 59 reservoirs throughout Texas. The period of record for the data is as large as January 1965-January 2010. Data were acquired from existing databases, spreadsheets, delimited text files, and hard-copy reports. The goal was to obtain as much data as possible; therefore, no data acquisition restrictions specifying a particular time window were used. Primary data sources include the USGS National Water Information System, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Surface Water-Quality Management Information System, and the Texas Water Development Board monthly Texas Water Condition Reports. Additional water-quality data for six reservoirs were obtained from USGS Texas Annual Water Data Reports. Data were combined from the multiple sources to create as complete a set of properties and constituents as the disparate databases allowed. By devising a unique per-reservoir short name to represent all sites on a reservoir regardless of their source, all sampling sites at a reservoir were spatially pooled by reservoir and temporally combined by date. Reservoir selection was based on various criteria including the availability of water-quality properties and constituents that might affect the trophic status of the reservoir and could also be important for understanding possible effects of climate change in the future. Other considerations in the selection of reservoirs included the general reservoir-specific period of record, the availability of concurrent reservoir storage or elevation data to match with water-quality data, and the availability of sample depth measurements. Additional separate selection criteria included historic information pertaining to blooms of golden algae. Physical properties and constituents were water temperature, reservoir storage, reservoir elevation, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, unfiltered salinity, unfiltered total nitrogen, filtered total nitrogen, unfiltered nitrate plus nitrite, unfiltered phosphorus, filtered phosphorus, unfiltered carbon, carbon in suspended sediment, total hardness, unfiltered noncarbonate hardness, filtered noncarbonate hardness, unfiltered calcium, filtered calcium, unfiltered magnesium, filtered magnesium, unfiltered sodium, filtered sodium, unfiltered potassium, filtered potassium, filtered chloride, filtered sulfate, unfiltered fluoride, and filtered fluoride. When possible, USGS and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality water-quality properties and constituents were matched using the database parameter codes for individual physical properties and constituents, descriptions of each physical property or constituent, and their reporting units. This report presents a collection of delimited text files of source-aggregated, spatially pooled, depth-dependent, instantaneous water-quality data as well as instantaneous, daily, and monthly storage and elevation reservoir data.

  17. The influence of depth, site exposure and season on the intensity of iceberg scouring in nearshore Antarctic waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan A. Smale; David K. A. Barnes; Keiron P. P. Fraser

    2007-01-01

    Ice scour disturbance has a significant effect on the physical and biological characteristics of polar benthos. A series of\\u000a grids, each consisting of 25 markers, were deployed along depth transects and replicated at two contrasting study sites at\\u000a Adelaide Island, West Antarctic Peninsula. Markers were surveyed and replaced every 3 months for 2 years in order to assess\\u000a the frequency and intensity

  18. Top-down control in freshwater lakes: the role of nutrient state, submerged macrophytes and water depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Jeppesen; Jens Peder Jensen; Martin Søndergaard; Torben Lauridsen; Leif Junge Pedersen; Lars Jensen

    1997-01-01

    Based on data from 233 Danish lakes, enclosure experiments, full-scaleexperiments and published empirical models we present evidence that top-downcontrol is more important in shallow lakes than in deep lakes, excepting lakeswith a high abundance of submerged macrophytes. The evidence in support is: (1)That at a given epilimnion total phosphorus concentration (TP) the biomass offish per m2 is independent of depth,

  19. Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This is the top of the Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD). When the instrument is lowered into the water and reaches a desired depth, an electronic signal is sent along these wires from the ship that closes the bottles and a water sample is collected. ...

  20. Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    These are the lids both on top and below the water bottles on the Conductivity Temperature Depth Profiler (CTD). When the CTD is placed in the ocean and reaches a desired depth, an electronic signal is sent from the ship that closes the bottles and a water sample is collected. ...

  1. Retrieving Optical Depths and Lidar Ratios for Transparent Layers Above Opaque Water Clouds From CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongxiang Hu; Mark Vaughan; Zhaoyan Liu; Kathleen Powell; Sharon Rodier

    2007-01-01

    For measurements that are made by the CALIPSO lidar, the layer-integrated attenuated backscatter of opaque water clouds gamma'water,O can be accurately estimated for those cases for which there is no overlying aerosol or cloud layer. When transparent overlying layers of clouds or aerosols are present, the layer-integrated attenuated backscatter that is measured for the water cloud is reduced by a

  2. Well Wishes: A Case on Septic Systems and Well Water Requiring In-Depth Analysis and Including Optional Laboratory Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Mary M.; Lantz, Juliette M.

    2004-01-01

    The case of Well Wishes involves students in a thorough examination of the interaction among nitrogen-composed species in the septic systems and well water, which helps to clean household water. The case supports the attainment of five goals for students, and can be analyzed through classroom discussions or laboratory experiments.

  3. Depth to Water, Saturated Thickness, and Other Geospatial Datasets Used in the Design and Installation of a Groundwater Monitoring-Well Network in the High Plains Aquifer, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Jennifer L.; Arnold, L. Rick; Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2009-01-01

    These datasets were compiled in support of U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 456, Design and Installation of a Groundwater Monitoring-Well Network in the High Plains Aquifer, Colorado. These datasets were developed as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Colorado Department of Agriculture. The purpose of the project was to design a 30-well network and install 20 of the 30 wells to characterize water quality in the High Plains aquifer in areas of irrigated agriculture in Colorado. The five datasets are described as follows and are further described in Data Series 456: (1) ds472_dtw: This dataset represents the depth to groundwater in the High Plains Aquifer in Colorado in 2000. This grid was used to determine areas where the depth to water was less than 200 feet below land surface. (2) Ds472_sat: This dataset represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer within Colorado in 2000. This grid was used to determine areas where the saturated thickness was greater than 50 feet. (3) Ds472_equalareas: This dataset includes 30 equal-area polygons overlying the High Plains Aquifer in Colorado having a depth to water less than 200 feet, a saturated thickness greater than 50 feet, and underlying irrigated agricultural lands. (4) Ds472_randomsites: This dataset includes 90 randomly-generated potential groundwater sampling sites. This dataset provides a first, second, and third choice placed within the 30 equal area polygons of dataset dsXX_equalareas. (5) Ds472_welldata: This dataset includes point locations and well completion data for the 20 wells installed as part of this project. The datasets that pertain to this report can be found on the U.S. Geological Survey's NSDI (National Spatial Data Infrastructure) Node, the links are provided on the sidebar.

  4. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    PubMed Central

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25?cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (?2?m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1?cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20?cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes. PMID:22592821

  5. Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

    2011-11-01

    The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

  6. Using OMEGA Data to Determine the Optical Depths of Water Vapor Absorption Bands in the Martian Atmosphere Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San

    E-print Network

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Using OMEGA Data to Determine the Optical Depths of Water Vapor Absorption Bands in the Martian atmosphere. Recently, OMEGA data has also been used to study water vapor abundance [7], in which the water.56, SPICAM-1.38, OMEGA-2.56) have similar pattern from southern hemisphere to northern hemisphere, though

  7. Dosimetric validation of the Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation algorithm: fundamental characterization in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonella Fogliata; Giorgia Nicolini; Alessandro Clivio; Eugenio Vanetti; Pietro Mancosu; Luca Cozzi

    2011-01-01

    A new algorithm, Acuros® XB Advanced Dose Calculation, has been introduced by Varian Medical Systems in the Eclipse planning system for photon dose calculation in external radiotherapy. Acuros XB is based on the solution of the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE). The LBTE describes the macroscopic behaviour of radiation particles as they travel through and interact with matter. The implementation

  8. Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite depth

    E-print Network

    Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite In previous work, we investigated two-dimensional steady gravity-capillary waves generated by a localized when wave with gravity

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of low-energy electron dose-point-kernels in water using different stopping power approximations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Bousis; Dimitris Emfietzoglou; Panagiotis Hadjidoukas; Hooshang Nikjoo; Anand Pathak

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of absorbed energy in irradiated matter can be conveniently described by dose-point-kernel (DPK) distributions that characterize the average energy deposition around single charged-particle tracks during their slowing down process. In the present work, electron DPKs in liquid water in the energy range from 100eV to 10keV are presented based on Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in

  10. Freshwater lenses as archive of climate, groundwater recharge, and hydrochemical evolution: Insights from depth-specific water isotope analysis and age determination on the island of Langeoog, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, Georg J.; Koeniger, Paul; Sültenfuß, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The age stratification of a freshwater lens on the island of Langeoog, Germany, was reconstructed through depth-specific sampling and groundwater dating using the tritium-helium method. The stratification is strongly affected by the land use and resulting differences in recharge rates. Infiltration at the dune tops is significantly lower than in the valleys, due to repellency of the dry sand. Dune valleys contribute up to four times more groundwater recharge per area than other areas. Housing development in dune areas might therefore significantly decrease the available fresh groundwater. The freshwater column shows a distinct increase of stable isotope values with decreasing depths. Hence, the freshwater lens contains a climate archive which reflects changing environmental conditions at the time of recharge. Combined with tritium-helium dating, this pattern could be matched to climate records which show an increase of the temperature at the time of recharge and rainfall rates during the last 50 years. The spatial and temporal developments of water chemistry during the passage through the lens follow a marked pattern from a sodium and chloride-dominated rainwater of low conductivity to a more mineralized sodium bicarbonate water type, caused by dissolution of carbonate shells close to the surface and subsequent ion exchange of calcium for sodium in the deeper parts.

  11. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

    2013-11-05

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus,

  12. Preprocessing issues associated with multiple attenuation in water depths of less than 150 meters: ISMA and predictive deconvolution

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Jeffrey Robert

    2001-01-01

    , in particular the attenuation of free-surface multiples. Free-surface multiple elimination in shallow-water must address removal of the direct wave, interpolation of missing near-offsets, and the presence of guided waves and strong refracted wave energy...

  13. Hydrologic record extension of water-level data in the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN), 1991-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    To hindcast and fill data records, 214 empirical models were developed—189 are linear regression models and 25 are artificial neural network models. The coefficient of determination (R2) for 163 of the models is greater than 0.80 and the median percent model error (root mean square error divided by the range of the measured data) is 5 percent. To evaluate the performance of the hindcast models as a group, contour maps of modeled water-level surfaces at 2-centimeter (cm) intervals were generated using the hindcasted data. The 2-cm contour maps were examined for selected days to verify that water surfaces from the EDEN model are consistent with the input data. The biweekly 2-cm contour maps did show a higher number of issues during days in 1990 as compared to days after 1990. May 1990 had the lowest water levels in the Everglades of the 21-year dataset used for the hindcasting study. To hindcast these record low conditions in 1990, many of the hindcast models would require large extrapolations beyond the range of the predictive quality of the models. For these reasons, it was decided to limit the hindcasted data to the period January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1999. Overall, the hindcasted and gap-filled data are assumed to provide reasonable estimates of station-specific water-level data for an extended historical period to inform research and natural resource management in the Everglades.

  14. Preprocessing issues associated with multiple attenuation in water depths of less than 150 meters: ISMA and predictive deconvolution 

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Jeffrey Robert

    2001-01-01

    , in particular the attenuation of free-surface multiples. Free-surface multiple elimination in shallow-water must address removal of the direct wave, interpolation of missing near-offsets, and the presence of guided waves and strong refracted wave energy...

  15. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  16. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  17. Depth, soil type, water table, and site effects on microbial community composition in sediments of pesticide-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Marja K; Liu, Xinxin; Yu, Dan; Kontro, Merja H

    2015-07-01

    Microbial community compositions in pesticide-contaminated aquifers have not been studied, although such information is important for remediation and maintaining freshwater sources clean under changing climate. Therefore, phospholipid (PLFAs), glycolipid (GLFAs), and neutral lipid (NLFAs) fatty acids were determined from sand and clay sediments at depths of 0.3-24.8 m, all contaminated with triazines and dichlobenil/2,6-dichlorobenzamide. The portion of fungi and Gram-negative bacteria at 0.3 m was greater than at 0.8 m, where the percentage of Gram-positive bacteria, actinobacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) increased. In deeper sediments, microbial biomass, activity, and diversity decreased. Clay sediments seemed to serve as a reservoir for slow pesticide elution to groundwater, and their biomarker portion for all bacteria except actinobacteria was greater than in sand sediments. The slow pesticide dissipation seemed to occur in the main groundwater flow zone, resulting in nitrogen release simultaneously with organic matter elution from gardening and bank filtration. As a result, microbial biomass, activity, and diversity were increased. This shift in conditions towards that in surface soil may be appropriate for enhanced natural attenuation of pesticides in groundwater sources. PMID:25703619

  18. Temperature and Water Depth Monitoring Within Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat Below Bonneville Dam -- Annual Report -- October 2007-September 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.

    2009-07-14

    The overall goal of the project described in this report is to provide a sound scientific basis for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance chum salmon populations----a species listed in March 1999 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The study objective during fiscal year 2008 was to provide real-time data on Ives Island area water temperature and water surface elevations from the onset of chum salmon spawning through the end of chum salmon emergence. Sampling locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. In these locations, hydrosystem operation caused large, frequent changes in river discharge that affected salmon habitat by dewatering redds and altering egg pocket temperatures. The 2008 objective was accomplished using temperature and water-level sensors deployed inside piezo¬meters. Sensors were integrated with a radio telemetry system such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely and posted hourly on the Internet.

  19. Analysis of radon, uranium 238 and thorium 232 in potable waters: Dose to adult members of the Moroccan urban population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misdaq, M. A.; Ouabi, H.; Merzouki, A.

    2007-10-01

    Uranium (238U) and thorium (232Th) concentrations as well as radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) alpha-activities per unit volume have been measured inside various potable water samples collected from nineteen cities in Morocco by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). Measured radon alpha-activities ranged from (0.37 ± 0.02) Bq l-1 to (13.6 ± 1.10) Bq l-1 for the potable water samples studied. Alpha-activities due to radon from the ingestion of the studied potable water samples were determined in different compartments of the gastrointestinal system by using the ICRP compartmental model for radon. Annual committed equivalent doses due to radon were evaluated in the gastrointestinal compartments from the ingestion of the potable water samples studied. The influence of the target tissue mass, radon intake and alpha-activity integral due to radon on the annual committed equivalent doses in the gastrointestinal compartments was investigated.

  20. Effects of prenatal exposure to low-dose beta radiation from tritiated water on the neurobehavior of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Zhou, X Y

    1995-06-01

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice, randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, 3 of them were irradiated with beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5th day of gestation. Their offspring received cumulative doses of 0, 5, 10 or 30 cGy in utero. Male pups were trained and examined using a set of behavioral tests that included avoidance acquisition and avoidance maintenance, open field test, hole-board dipping, a water maze, and a food labyrinth. Results were found for most parameters in the 10 and 30 cGy groups that differed significantly from results for the controls, indicating that the behavioral teratogenic effect of prenatal exposure to chronic beta-ray radiation from HTO may be greater than the same dose of acute X- or gamma-irradiation and that 10 cGy may be the lowest detectable dose level at which behavioral changes is detactable under the conditions used in this experiment. PMID:7473343

  1. Temperature and Water Depth Monitoring Within Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat Below Bonneville Dam : Annual Report October 2007-September 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, E.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-14

    The overall goal of the project described in this report is to provide a sound scientific basis for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance chum salmon populations - a species listed in March 1999 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The study objective during fiscal year 2008 was to provide real-time data on Ives Island area water temperature and water surface elevations from the onset of chum salmon spawning through the end of chum salmon emergence. Sampling locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. In these locations, hydrosystem operation caused large, frequent changes in river discharge that affected salmon habitat by dewatering redds and altering egg pocket temperatures. The 2008 objective was accomplished using temperature and water-level sensors deployed inside piezometers. Sensors were integrated with a radio telemetry system such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely and posted hourly on the Internet. During our overall monitoring period (October 2007 through June 2008), mean temperature in chum spawning areas was nearly 2 C warmer within the riverbed than in the overlying river. During chum salmon spawning (mid-November 2007 through December2007), mean riverbed temperature in the Ives Island area was 14.5 C, more than 5 C higher than in the river, where mean temperature was 9.4 C. During the incubation period (January 2008 through mid-May 2008), riverbed temperature was approximately 3 C greater than in the overlying river (10.5 C and 7.2 C, respectively). Chum salmon preferentially select spawning locations where riverbed temperatures are elevated; consequently the incubation time of alevin is shortened before they emerge in the spring.

  2. Influence of tap water quality and household water use activities on indoor air and internal dose levels of trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Nuckols, John R; Ashley, David L; Lyu, Christopher; Gordon, Sydney M; Hinckley, Alison F; Singer, Philip

    2005-07-01

    Individual exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) in tap water can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or dermal exposure. Studies indicate that activities associated with inhaled or dermal exposure routes result in a greater increase in blood THM concentration than does ingestion. We measured blood and exhaled air concentrations of THM as biomarkers of exposure to participants conducting 14 common household water use activities, including ingestion of hot and cold tap water beverages, showering, clothes washing, hand washing, bathing, dish washing, and indirect shower exposure. We conducted our study at a single residence in each of two water utility service areas, one with relatively high and the other low total THM in the residence tap water. To maintain a consistent exposure environment for seven participants, we controlled water use activities, exposure time, air exchange, water flow and temperature, and nonstudy THM sources to the indoor air. We collected reference samples for water supply and air (pre-water use activity), as well as tap water and ambient air samples. We collected blood samples before and after each activity and exhaled breath samples at baseline and post-activity. All hot water use activities yielded a 2-fold increase in blood or breath THM concentrations for at least one individual. The greatest observed increase in blood and exhaled breath THM concentration in any participant was due to showering (direct and indirect), bathing, and hand dishwashing. Average increase in blood THM concentration ranged from 57 to 358 pg/mL due to these activities. More research is needed to determine whether acute and frequent exposures to THM at these concentrations have public health implications. Further research is also needed in designing epidemiologic studies that minimize data collection burden yet maximize accuracy in classification of dermal and inhalation THM exposure during hot water use activities. PMID:16002374

  3. The fragmentation of 670A MeV neon-20 as a function of depth in water. I. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Miller, J.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.; Howard, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Jarret, B. V.

    1989-01-01

    We present the final analysis of an experiment to study the interaction of a beam of 670A MeV neon ions incident on a water column set to different thicknesses. The atomic number Z (and, in some cases, the isotopic mass A) of primary beam particles and of the products of nuclear interactions emerging from the water column close to the central axis of the beam was obtained for nuclei between Be (Z = 4) and Ne (Z = 10) using a time-of-flight telescope to measure the velocity and a set of silicon detectors to measure the energy loss of each particle. The fluence of particles of a given charge was obtained and normalized to the incident beam intensity. Corrections were made for accidental coincidences between multiple particles triggering the TOF telescope and for interactions in the detector. The background due to beam particles interacting in beam line elements upstream of the detector was calculated. Sources of experimental artifacts and background in particle identification experiments designed to characterize heavy ion beams for radiobiological research are summarized, and some of the difficulties inherent in this work are discussed. Complete tables of absolutely normalized fluence spectra as a function of LET are included for reference purposes.

  4. Radiological dose assessment for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. R. Faillace; S. Kamboj; C. Yu; S. Y. Chen

    1997-01-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates for a 10,000-year horizon were calculated for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code was used. The study will help determine if it is acceptable (in terms of DOE radiation dose limits) for activated and contaminated

  5. Tsunami and the Depth of the Ocean

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Martin Farley

    An inquiry approach to using the celerity (=velocity) of a tsunami to measure the depth of the ocean along its path. Tsunami are shallow-water waves, because their wavelengths are so long relative to ocean depth. Shallow-water wave celerity depends on ocean depth. Students reason this out. They then determine the distance of the path of the tsunami from the epicenter of the 1964 Alaska Good Friday earthquake tsunami to various locations, use tsunami arrival times to calculate the velocity, and re-arrange the shallow-water celerity equation to calculate depth. Students evaluate the geographic distribution of water depths.

  6. Radiological dose assessment for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Faillace, E.R.; Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Chen, S.Y.

    1997-10-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates for a 10,000-year horizon were calculated for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code was used. The study will help determine if it is acceptable (in terms of DOE radiation dose limits) for activated and contaminated concrete to remain in the facility, along with embedded radioactive piping and radioactive equipment. Four cases were developed to evaluate potential doses; the cases vary with regard to the definitions of the sources. Case A considers the dose from the reactor biological shield; case B considers the dose from contaminated concrete rubble; case C considers the dose from contaminated concrete rubble, the reactor biological shield, and installed equipment; and case D considers the dose from contaminated cuttings brought to the surface following the perforation of a well through the contaminated zone in case C. Site-specific parameter values were used to estimate the radiation doses. The results indicate that neither the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr nor the 15-mrem/yr dose constraint would be exceeded for any of the cases. The potential maximum dose rates for cases A, B, C, and D are 0.000028, 0.015, 0.018, and 0.17 mrem/yr, respectively. The drinking water pathway is the dominant contributor to the doses in cases A through C, and the external gamma pathway is the dominant contributor in case D. Carbon-14, uranium-234, uranium-238, and americium-241 are the principal radionuclides contributing to the doses in cases A through C. Cobalt-60, europium-152, and barium-133 are the important radionuclides in case D. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters have the greatest impact on the estimated doses. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at several heights calculated by means of the HYSPLIT model. Hence, changes in the UV index due to atmospheric aerosol were characterized.

  8. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  9. The theoretical and experimental study of the non-linear wave forces acting on a rigid body in water of finite depth

    SciTech Connect

    Suekan, M.; Uensal, I.; Akyildiz, H.; Mutlu, T. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey)

    1996-12-31

    In this study, nonlinear wave effects on a pile of cylindrical cross-section driven in water of finite depth is solved theoretically and experimentally. In theoretical study, the hydrodynamic pressure acting on the pile and the resulting forces and over turning moments are calculated by using the Bernoulli Equation. The nonlinear mean drift force and moment are calculated by using only first-order quantities. Furthermore, the components of the second-order force are obtained by using the Lighthill`s method. In the following part of the study, an algorithm for the solution is described in detail and the algorithm is applied to piles of cylindrical cross-section with different diameters. The results thus obtained are then compared to those of other authors. In the last part of the study the pressure distribution under wave action around a cylinder surface is investigated experimentally. They are then interpreted physically and compared with the first and second order theoretical solutions.

  10. Single Intramuscular-dose Toxicity of Water soluble Carthmi-Flos herbal acupuncture (WCF) in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-geol; Kim, Sungchul; Jung, Da-jung; Choi, Yoo-min; Sin, Min-seop; Choi, Seok-Woo; Song, Beom-yong; Kim, Jong-uk; Hong, Seung-won; Yook, Tae-han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This experiment was conducted to examine the toxicity of Water soluble Carthmi-Flos herbal acupuncture (WCF) by administering a single intramuscular dose of WCF in 6-week-old, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and to find the lethality dose for WCF. Methods: The experiment was conducted at Biotoxtech according to Good Laboratory Practices under a request by the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute. This experiment was performed based on the testing standards of “Toxicity Test Standards for Drugs” by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety. Subjects were divided into 4 groups: 1 control group in which normal saline was administered and 3 test groups in which 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 mL of WCF was administered; a single intramuscular dose was injected into 5 males and 5 females in each group. General symptoms and body weights were observed/measured for 14 days after injection. At the end of the observation period, hematological and clinical chemistry tests were performed, followed by necropsy and histopathological examinations of the injected sections. Results: No mortalities were observed in any group. Also, symptoms, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry and necropsy were not affected. However, histopathological examination of the injected part in one female in the 1.0-mL group showed infiltration of mononuclear cells and a multi-nucleated giant cell around eosinophilic material. Conclusion: Administration of single intramuscular doses of WCF in 3 groups of rats showed that the approximate lethal dose of WCF for all rats was in excess of 1.0 mL, as no mortalities were observed for injections up to and including 1.0 mL. PMID:25780687

  11. Integrating flood depth and plant resistance with chlorantraniliprole seed treatments for management of rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Lanka, Srinivas K; Blouin, David C; Stout, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Chlorantraniliprole seed treatments in rice provide effective suppression of rice water weevil populations in the United States; however, heavy reliance on prophylactic insecticide treatments as a sole strategy could destabilize management programs for this insect. The present research evaluated the compatibility of seed treatments with two other potential management tactics-plant resistance and shallow flooding-by conducting two split-plot experiments in 2009 and 2011. In both experiments, no substantial antagonism was found among the 3 different tactics. Statistical interactions in these experiments arose from the strong and persistent effects of chlorantraniliprole on larval densities rather than incompatibility of tactics. In 2009, weevil densities differed among varieties and were significantly lower on the cultivar "Jefferson." In 2011, weevil densities were reduced significantly in shallow-flooded plots compared to deep-flooded plots. Significant reductions in weevil numbers by chlorantraniliprole seed treatments, even at application rates 5 fold lower than commercially recommended rates, demonstrated the potential to reduce application rates of this highly potent larvicide. These latter results suggest that future studies on the relationship between chlorantraniliprole seed treatment rate and weevil fitness are warranted. PMID:25176158

  12. Particle Size Distribution and Inhalation Dose of Shower Water Under Selected Operating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Benson, Janet M.; Irvin, Clinton; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2010-01-01

    Showering produces respirable droplets that may serve to deposit pollutants such as trihalomethane decontamination products, heavy metals, inorganic salts, microbes, or cyanoacterial toxins within the respiratory tract. The extent and importance of this route of indoor exposure depend on the physical characteristics of the aerosol as well as the pollutant profile of the source water. The purpose of this study was to characterize shower-generated aerosols as a function of water flow rate, temperature, and bathroom location. Aerosols were generated within a shower stall containing a mannequin to simulate the presence of a human. Using hot water, the mass median diameter (MMD) of the droplets inside the shower and in the bathroom were 6.3–7.5 um and 5.2–6 µm, respectively. Size was independent of water flow rate. The particle concentration inside the shower ranged from 5 to 14 mg/m3. Aerosols generated using cold water were smaller (2.5–3.1 µm) and concentrations were lower (0.02–0.1 mg/m3) inside the shower stall. No aerosols were detected in the bathroom area when cold water was used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection model was used to estimate water deposition in the respiratory tract. For hot water, total deposition ranged from 11 to 14 mg, depending on water flow rate, with approximately 50% of this deposited in the extrathoracic region during assumed mouth breathing, and greater than 86% when nose breathing was assumed. Alveolar deposition was 6–10% and 0.9% assuming oral and nasal breathing, respectively. The consequences deposition of shower water droplets will depend on the nature and extent of any pollutants in the source water. PMID:17365038

  13. Particle size distribution and inhalation dose of shower water under selected operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Benson, Janet M; Irvin, Clinton; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2007-04-01

    Showering produces respirable droplets that may serve to deposit pollutants such as trihalomethane decontamination products, heavy metals, inorganic salts, microbes, or cyanoacterial toxins within the respiratory tract. The extent and importance of this route of indoor exposure depend on the physical characteristics of the aerosol as well as the pollutant profile of the source water. The purpose of this study was to characterize shower-generated aerosols as a function of water flow rate, temperature, and bathroom location. Aerosols were generated within a shower stall containing a mannequin to simulate the presence of a human. Using hot water, the mass median diameter (MMD) of the droplets inside the shower and in the bathroom were 6.3-7.5 um and 5.2-6 microm, respectively. Size was independent of water flow rate. The particle concentration inside the shower ranged from 5 to 14 mg/m3. Aerosols generated using cold water were smaller (2.5-3.1 microm) and concentrations were lower (0.02-0.1 mg/m3) inside the shower stall. No aerosols were detected in the bathroom area when cold water was used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection model was used to estimate water deposition in the respiratory tract. For hot water, total deposition ranged from 11 to 14 mg, depending on water flow rate, with approximately 50% of this deposited in the extrathoracic region during assumed mouth breathing, and greater than 86% when nose breathing was assumed. Alveolar deposition was 6-10% and 0.9% assuming oral and nasal breathing, respectively. The consequences deposition of shower water droplets will depend on the nature and extent of any pollutants in the source water. PMID:17365038

  14. Jeju ground water containing vanadium induced immune activation on splenocytes of low dose ?-rays-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Danbee; Joo, Haejin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Min Ju; Bing, So Jin; An, Subin; Kim, Hyunki; Kang, Kyung-goo; Lim, Yoon-Kyu; Jee, Youngheun

    2012-06-01

    Vanadium, an essential micronutrient, has been implicated in controlling diabetes and carcinogenesis and in impeding reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. ?-ray irradiation triggers DNA damage by inducing ROS production and causes diminution in radiosensitive immunocytes. In this study, we elucidate the immune activation capacities of Jeju water containing vanadium on immunosuppression caused by ?-ray irradiation, and identify its mechanism using various low doses of NaVO(3). We examined the intracellular ROS generation, DNA damage, cell proliferation, population of splenocytes, and cytokine/antibody profiles in irradiated mice drinking Jeju water for 180 days and in non-irradiated and in irradiated splenocytes both of which were treated with NaVO(3). Both Jeju water and 0.245 ?M NaVO(3) attenuated the intracellular ROS generation and DNA damage in splenocytes against ?-ray irradiation. Splenocytes were significantly proliferated by the long-term intake of Jeju water and by 0.245 ?M NaVO(3) treatment, and the expansion of B cells accounted for the increased number of splenocytes. Also, 0.245 ?M NaVO(3) treatment showed the potency to amplify the production of IFN-? and total IgG in irradiated splenocytes, which correlated with the expansion of B cells. Collectively, Jeju water containing vanadium possesses the immune activation property against damages caused by ?-irradiation. PMID:22446809

  15. Water and Carbon Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Region Floodplain: Multiple Approaches to Constrain Estimates of Seasonal- and Depth Dependent Fluxes at Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Kim, Y.; Williams, K. H.; Conrad, M. E.; Christensen, J. N.; Bill, M.; Faybishenko, B.; Hobson, C.; Dayvault, R.; Long, P. E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of floodplains as links between watersheds and rivers highlights the need to understand water and carbon fluxes within floodplain profiles, from their surface soil, through the vadose zone and underlying groundwater. Here, we present results of field and laboratory measurements conducted to quantify fluxes at a remediated uranium/vanadium mill tailings site on a floodplain at Rifle, Colorado. This semi-arid site has a vegetated, locally derived fill soil that replaced the original milling-contaminated soil to a depth of about 1.5 m. The fill soil overlies about 4.5 m of native sandy and cobbly alluvium containing the shallow aquifer. The aquifer generally drains into the Colorado River and is underlain by low permeability Wasatch Formation shale. Within this system, key issues being investigated include water and carbon fluxes between the vadose zone and aquifer, and CO2 fluxes through the vadose zone soil out to the atmosphere. Magnitudes of these fluxes are typically low, thus challenging to measure, yet increasingly important to quantify given the expansion of arid and semi-arid regions under changing climate. The results of field investigations demonstrated that the annual water table rise and fall are driven by snowmelt runoff into the Colorado River in late spring to early summer. Tensiometer data indicate that net recharge from the deeper part of the vadose zone into groundwater occurs later in summer, after water table decline. The effectiveness of summer evapotranspiration in limiting groundwater recharge is reflected in water potentials decreasing to as low as -3 MPa within the upper 1.5 m of the vadose zone. Examination of the historical precipitation record further indicates that net recharge only occurs in years with above-average precipitation during winter and spring. These short intervals of net recharge also facilitate C transport into groundwater because of higher organic C concentrations in the vadose zone. Fluxes of CO2 measured at the soil surface are consistent with estimates based on season- and temperature-dependent diffusion and respiration within the vadose zone. Thus, fairly predictable seasonal variations in water table elevation, evapotranspiration, and temperature can help constrain estimates of water and carbon fluxes.

  16. Calculation of electron Dose Point Kernel in water with GEANT4 for medical application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Moralles; F. F. Sene; J. R. Martinelli; E. Okuno

    2009-01-01

    The rapid insertion of new technologies in medical physics in the last years, especially in nuclear medicine, has been followed by a great development of faster Monte Carlo algorithms. GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit that contains the tools to simulate the problems of particle transport through matter. In this work, GEANT4 was used to calculate the dose-point-kernel (DPK) for

  17. Approach to calculating upper bounds on maximum individual doses from the use of contaminated well water following a WIPP repository breach. Report EEG-9

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegler, P.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the assessment of the potential radiological consequences of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), this report evaluates the post-closure radiation dose commitments associated with a possible breach event which involves dissolution of the repository by groundwaters and subsequent transport of the nuclear waste through an aquifer to a well assumed to exist at a point 3 miles downstream from the repository. The concentrations of uranium and plutonium isotopes at the well are based on the nuclear waste inventory presently proposed for WIPP and basic assumptions concerning the transport of waste as well as treatment to reduce the salinity of the water. The concentrations of U-233, Pu-239, and Pu-240, all radionuclides originally emplaced as waste in the repository, would exceed current EPA drinking water limits. The concentrations of U-234, U-235, and U-236, all decay products of plutonium isotopes originally emplaced as waste, would be well below current EPA drinking water limits. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking treated water contaminated with U-233 or Pu-239 and Pu-240 were found to be comparable to a one-year dose from natural background. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking milk would be no more than about 1/5 the dose obtained from ingestion of treated water. These doses are considered upper bounds because of several very conservative assumptions which are discussed in the report.

  18. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100?g/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. Results In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Conclusions Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23419080

  19. Stable C and N isotopic composition of cold-water corals from the Newfoundland and Labrador continental slope: Examination of trophic, depth and spatial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Jamieson, Robyn E.; Edinger, Evan N.; Wareham, Vonda E.

    2008-10-01

    With the aim of understanding of the trophic ecology of cold-water corals, this paper explores the tissue ?13C and ?15N values of 11 'coral' species (8 alcyonacean, 1 antipatharian, 1 pennatulacean, 1 scleractinian) collected along the Newfoundland and Labrador continental slope. Isotopic results delimit species along continua of trophic level and food lability. With an isotopic signature similar to macrozooplankton, Paragorgia arborea occupies the lowest trophic level and most likely feeds on fresh phytodetritus. Primnoa resedaeformis occupies a slightly higher trophic level, likely supplementing its diet with microzooplankton. Bathypathes arctica, Pennatulacea and other alcyonaceans ( Acanella arbuscula, Acanthogorgia armata, Anthomastus grandiflorus, Duva florida, Keratoisis ornata, Paramuricea sp.) had higher ?13C and ?15N values, suggesting these species feed at higher trophic levels and on a greater proportion of more degraded POM. Flabellum alabastrum had an isotopic signature similar to that of snow crab, indicating a primarily carnivorous diet. Isotopic composition did not vary significantly over a depth gradient of 50-1400 m. Coral ?13C increased slightly (<1‰) from the Hudson Strait to the southern Grand Banks, but ?15N did not. By modulating the availability and quality of suspended foods, substrate likely exerts a primary influence on the feeding habits of cold-water corals.

  20. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  1. Age-dependent dose and health risk due to intake of uranium in drinking water from Jaduguda, India.

    PubMed

    Patra, A C; Mohapatra, S; Sahoo, S K; Lenka, P; Dubey, J S; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2013-07-01

    Uranium is a heavy metal that is not only radiologically harmful but also a well-known nephrotoxic element. In this study, occurrence of uranium in drinking water samples from locations near the uranium mining site at Jaduguda, India, was studied by Laser-induced fluorimetry. Uranium concentrations range from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 11.6 ± 1.3 µg l(-l), being well within the US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water limit of 30 ?g l(-1). The ingestion dose due to the presence of uranium in drinking water for various age groups varies from 0.03 to 28.3 ?Sv y(-1). The excess lifetime cancer risk varies from 4.3×10(-8) to 1.7×10(-5) with an average value of 4.8×10(-6), much less than the acceptable excess lifetime cancer risk of 10(-3) for radiological risk. The chemical risk (hazard quotient) has an average value of 0.15 indicating that the water is safe for drinking. PMID:23525912

  2. Nest survival of American Coots relative to grazing, burning, and water depths [Survie au nid chez la Foulque d’Amérique en fonction du pâturage, du brûlage et de la profondeur d’eau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.; Buhl, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Water and emergent vegetation are key features influencing nest site selection and success for many marsh-nesting waterbirds. Wetland management practices such as grazing, burning, and water-level manipulations directly affect these features and can influence nest survival. We used model selection and before-after-control-impact approaches to evaluate the effects of water depth and four common land-management practices or treatments, i.e., summer grazing, fall grazing, fall burning, and idle (no active treatment) on nest survival of American coots (Fulica americana) nesting at Grays Lake, a large montane wetland in southeast Idaho. The best model included the variables year × treatment, and quadratic functions of date, water depth, and nest age; height of vegetation at the nest did not improve the best model. However, results from the before-after-control-impact analysis indicate that management practices affected nest success via vegetation and involved interactions of hydrology, residual vegetation, and habitat composition. Nest success in idled fields changed little between pre- and post-treatment periods, whereas nest success declined in fields that were grazed or burned, with the most dramatic declines the year following treatments. The importance of water depth may be amplified in this wetland system because of rapid water-level withdrawal during the nesting season. Water and land-use values for area ranchers, management for nesting waterbirds, and long-term wetland function are important considerations in management of water levels and vegetation.

  3. Water table depth regulates evapotranspiration and methane flux of a near-pristine temperate lowland fen measured by eddy covariance and static chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaduk, Jörg; Pan, Gong; Cumming, Alex; Evans, Jon; Kelvin, Jon; Peacock, Mike; Gauci, Vincent; Hughes, John; Page, Susan; Balzter, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, although the current atmospheric concentration is only about two parts per million. This results from a radiative forcing of 0.48 +/-0.05 Wm-2, about 26 times that of carbon dioxide. Atmospheric concentrations as well as emissions to the atmosphere have been increasing strongly over the last decades. Emissions are to a large extent biogenic where the largest biogenic source, wetlands, has the largest uncertainty. This precludes the construction of a reliable global methane budget, as well as meaningful predictions, as results from wetland models are uncertain and there are insufficient data for model improvement. We measured evapotranspiration and methane flux of a near-pristine temperate lowland fen in East Anglia in the United Kingdom from July 2013 to June 2014 by eddy covariance, which represents the first annual cycle of eddy covariance measurements of methane flux in this category of wetland. Methane fluxes from vegetation and ditches were additionally measured separately with static chambers. Annual evapotranspiration was 720.4 to 732.6 mm yr-1. Annual methane release was 3.77 to 4.03 g CH4 m-2 yr-1. Water table and methane fluxes were very different in the two half years: an average of -0.63 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 (a net uptake) for July-December 2013 and 16.2 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 (a net release) for January-June 2014 with a data range of -99 to 410 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 over the full year. Water table has the dominant role in determining methane flux and, under a very low water table, methane uptake was observed. Temperature has a clear impact on fluxes at high water tables. Eddy covariance and chamber measurements show the same annual pattern flux magnitude throughout the year. The fen can switch from being a source to a sink if the water table changes over a small critical depth range. Our measurements have implications for large scale wetland restoration plans in the eastern UK and potential options for the management of methane emissions from wetlands.

  4. Influence of test size, water depth, and ecology on Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, ?18O and ?13C in nine modern species of planktic foraminifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Oliver; Schiebel, Ralf; Wilson, Paul A.; Weldeab, Syee; Beer, Christopher J.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Fiebig, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Mg/Ca palaeothermometry in foraminiferal calcite is a widely applied tool in palaeoceanography. However, our understanding of the effects of planktic foraminiferal ecology and early diagenesis on test calcite Mg/Ca is limited. Here we report results of a study designed to shed new light on ecological, size-related and very early (water column) diagenetic controls on Mg/Ca in planktic foraminiferal calcite. We analysed Mg/Ca and stable isotopes of nine modern planktic foraminiferal species across fourteen mostly 50 ?m-window sieve fractions in a core-top sample from the North Atlantic Ocean. We also analysed Mg/Ca in four of these nine species from plankton-tow samples collected from 0 to 2500 m water depth in the North Atlantic Ocean and Arabian Sea. Our core-top study confirms that sensitivity of Mg/Ca to change in test size is species-specific but reveals an overall decrease in Mg/Ca with increasing test size in all but one species, Orbulina universa, for which Mg/Ca increases with size. These findings are broadly consistent with known ecological behaviour suggesting that the size-related signal is largely environmentally rather than calcification-rate controlled. Our results underscore the need to undertake Mg/Ca palaeothermometry on narrow size fractions of planktic foraminifers, particularly for shallow-dwelling species such as G. bulloides and G. ruber where Mg/Ca is most sensitive to test size across the size range of 200-350 ?m. Our plankton-tow data from the Arabian Sea are in agreement with in-situ temperatures. In contrast, our data from the North Atlantic Ocean reveal large variability and marked offsets (to warmer values) from in-situ temperatures that are interpreted to reflect lateral advection from the south, storm-induced vertical mixing of the water column and/or the influence of surface-water salinity on the Mg/Ca signal. None of our plankton-tow Mg/Ca data shows any evidence of test dissolution in the water column. Our study provides important verification that the Mg/Ca signal recorded during calcification does not undergo diagenetic degradation during test transport to the sea floor, thereby satisfying an important precondition of its palaeo-proxy utility.

  5. GENE EXPRESSION DOSE-RESPONSE IN THE MOUSE BLADDER FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ARSENATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association between drinking water exposures to inorganic arsenic and life-threatening tumors in the human is strongest for bladder cancer. Moreover, a working model for the pathogenesis of human bladder cancer has been developed. To investigate the mode of action for inorgan...

  6. Generalized potentiometric surface, estimated depth to water, and estimated saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer system, March–June 2009, Laramie County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer system, commonly called the High Plains aquifer in many publications, is a nationally important water resource that underlies a 111-million-acre area (173,000 square miles) in parts of eight States including Wyoming. Through irrigation of crops with groundwater from the High Plains aquifer system, the area that overlies the aquifer system has become one of the major agricultural regions in the world. In addition, the aquifer system also serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents of the region. The High Plains aquifer system is one of the largest aquifers or aquifer systems in the world. The High Plains aquifer system underlies an area of 8,190 square miles in southeastern Wyoming. Including Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present in parts of five counties in southeastern Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 8 percent of Wyoming, and 5 percent of the aquifer system is located within the State. Based on withdrawals for irrigation, public supply, and industrial use in 2000, the High Plains aquifer system is the most utilized source of groundwater in Wyoming. With the exception of the Laramie Mountains in western Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is present throughout Laramie County. In Laramie County, the High Plains aquifer system is the predominant groundwater resource for agricultural (irrigation), municipal, industrial, and domestic uses. Withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation (primarily in the eastern part of the county) is the largest use of water from the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County and southeastern Wyoming. Continued interest in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer system in Laramie County prompted a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office to update the potentiometric-surface map of the aquifer system in Laramie County. Groundwater levels were measured in wells completed in the High Plains aquifer system from March to June 2009. The groundwater levels were used to construct a map of the potentiometric surface of the High Plains aquifer system. In addition, depth to water and estimated saturated-thickness maps of the aquifer system were constructed using the potentiometric-surface map.

  7. Airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and columnar water vapor during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment and comparison with land, aircraft, and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Dubovik, Oleg; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Wang, Jun; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2003-10-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km above sea level (asl) reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in situ measurements of total aerosol number concentration. AATS-6 extinction retrievals also agree with corresponding values derived from ground-based lidar measurements for altitudes above the trade inversion. The spectral behavior of AOD within specific layers beneath the top of the aircraft profile is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt, with mean Ångström wavelength exponents of ˜0.20. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in situ measurements agree to within ˜4% (0.13 g/cm2). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low-altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004-0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky radiometer located on Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by ˜21%. AATS-6 AOD values measured during low-altitude aircraft traverses over the ocean are compared with corresponding AOD values retrieved over water from upwelling radiance measurements by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and GOES 8 Imager satellite sensors, with mixed results.

  8. Cenozoic Sedimentation and Paleo-Water Depths of the Weddell Sea Basin Related to Pre-Glacial and Glacial Conditions of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Jokat, W.; Gohl, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Weddell Sea basin is of particular significance for understanding climate processes, including the generation of ocean water masses and their influence on ocean circulation as well as the dynamics of the Antarctic ice sheets. Seismic stratigraphic and drill data from the Weddell Sea and the margin have provided much direct evidence concerning ice sheet evolution and sediment transportation processes. More than 250 seismic lines and ODP Leg 113 drilling sites are applied to gain the age control of the sedimentation. Using these constraints, we calculate grids to depict the depths, thicknesses and sedimentation rates of pre-glacial (145-34 Ma), transitional (34-15 Ma) and full-glacial (15 Ma to present) units. These grids allow us to compare the sedimentary regimes of the pre-glacially dominated and glacially dominated stages of Weddell Sea history. We further calculate paleobathymetric grids at 15 Ma, 34 Ma, and 120 Ma by using a backstripping technique. The paleobathymetric grid of 15 Ma has been applied for the climate model test, which shows that the Weddell gyre centre was southward shifted. This result is consistent with the warm period of the middle Miocene with relatively less see ice and higher temperature in the Weddell Sea. A case study has been focused on a series of iceberg erosional and current reworked features like the giant elongate mounded sediment drifts and mass transporting deposits (MTDs) along the continental margin of the southeast Weddell Sea from the middle Miocene to the present. The giant sediment drifts are ascribed to the large catchments area with the fast (paleo) ice streams associated with Filchner Ronne Ice Shelf and bottom water. A remarkable increase in MTDs in the late Miocene and middle Pliocene strata is related to ice dynamics, overpressure of rapid sediment accumulation and the steep topographic gradients. Our studies and data also provide the significant contribution for the future drilling plans in the Weddell Sea.

  9. In situ fabrication of depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber filters for high efficiency filtration of sub-micron aerosols and high water repellency.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zong, Yichen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Rufan; Li, Shuiqing; Wei, Fei

    2013-04-21

    We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols. Moreover, the CNT/QF filters show high water repellency, implying their superiority for applications in humid conditions. PMID:23467703

  10. 226Ra and 222Rn concentrations and doses in bottled waters in Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Dueñas; M. C. Fernández; J. Carretero; E. Liger; S. Cañete

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of 226Ra and 222Rn have been analysed in most of the bottled waters commercially available in Spain. Concentrations up to about 600mBql-1 with a geometric mean of 12mBql-1 were observed for 226Ra. For 222Rn, a geometric mean of 1.2Bql-1 with values ranging from 0.22 to 52Bql-1 were measured. These values are compared with concentrations reported for other countries. An

  11. Effect on blood, liver, and kidney variables of age and of dosing rats with lead acetate orally or via the drinking water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary O. Korsrud; J. Blair Meldrum

    1988-01-01

    Levels of lead in the livers and kidneys of rats increased in proportion to the dose of lead acetate that the rats were given\\u000a orally or in the drinking water. The activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (DALAD) in blood and liver decreased\\u000a when the rats were dosed with lead, whereas glutathione levels in the blood increased. The decrease in the

  12. Simulating radial dose of ion tracks in liquid water simulated with Geant4-DNA: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incerti, S.; Psaltaki, M.; Gillet, P.; Barberet, Ph.; Bardiès, M.; Bernal, M. A.; Bordage, M.-C.; Breton, V.; Davidkova, M.; Delage, E.; El Bitar, Z.; Francis, Z.; Guatelli, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Karamitros, M.; Lee, S. B.; Maigne, L.; Meylan, S.; Murakami, K.; Nieminen, P.; Payno, H.; Perrot, Y.; Petrovic, I.; Pham, Q. T.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Santin, G.; Sasaki, T.; Seznec, H.; Shin, J. I.; Stepan, V.; Tran, H. N.; Villagrasa, C.

    2014-08-01

    An accurate modeling of radial energy deposition around ion tracks is a key requirement of radiation transport software used for simulations in radiobiology at the sub-cellular scale. The work presented in this paper is part of the on-going benchmarking of the “Geant4-DNA” physics processes and models, which are available in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for the low energy transport of particles in liquid water. We present for the first time radial dose distributions of incident ion tracks simulated with “Geant4-DNA”. Simulation results are compared to other results available in the literature, obtained from analytical calculations, step-by-step Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. They show a reasonable agreement with reference data.

  13. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  14. Adsorption and reactions of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on clean and water-dosed titanium dioxide (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, L.; Hugenschmidt, M.B.; Campbell, C.T.; Jurgens, T.A.; Rogers, J.W. Jr. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-12-15

    The adsorption and reactions of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) vapor on clean and water-predosed rutile TiO[sub 2]-(110) have been studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The molecule sticks with a probability near unity at temperatures of 130-300 K, and at low coverage, TEOS dissociates upon heating. At higher coverages, some desorbs. On the water-and hydroxyl-free surface, the dissociation reaction occurs rapidly between 200 and 350 K, with the initial products being Si(OEt)[sub 15s] plus 2EtO[sub 3] (ET = C[sub 2]H[sub 5]). This is a new mechanism for silane coupling to oxide surfaces which requires neither hydroxyl groups nor surface defects. The EtO ligands, whether attached to Ti or Si atoms, decompose at approximately 650 K via [beta]-hydrogen elimination to yield ethylene gas and surface-bound hydrogen, which rapidly attaches to another EtO ligand, yielding ethanol gas. By 700 K, the net products evolved are equal amounts of ethylene and ethanol gas (two molecules of each per dissociated TEOS molecule), while SiO[sub 2] remains on the surface. 41 refs., 7 figs.

  15. BRIEF REPORT Relationship of Geographic Distance, Depth, Temperature,

    E-print Network

    Winter, Christian

    commu- nity composition. Bacterial communities showed a clear depth zonation, whereas changesBRIEF REPORT Relationship of Geographic Distance, Depth, Temperature, and Viruses with Prokaryotic­25 m depth), in the deep chlorophyll maximum layer (DCM; 50 m depth), and deep waters (75­1000 m depth

  16. External dose-rate conversion factors of radionuclides for air submersion, ground surface contamination and water immersion based on the new ICRP dosimetric setting.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Song Jae; Jang, Han-Ki; Lee, Jai-Ki; Noh, Siwan; Cho, Gyuseong

    2013-01-01

    For the assessment of external doses due to contaminated environment, the dose-rate conversion factors (DCFs) prescribed in Federal Guidance Report 12 (FGR 12) and FGR 13 have been widely used. Recently, there were significant changes in dosimetric models and parameters, which include the use of the Reference Male and Female Phantoms and the revised tissue weighting factors, as well as the updated decay data of radionuclides. In this study, the DCFs for effective and equivalent doses were calculated for three exposure settings: skyshine, groundshine and water immersion. Doses to the Reference Phantoms were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNPX 2.7.0 radiation transport code for 26 mono-energy photons between 0.01 and 10 MeV. The transport calculations were performed for the source volume within the cut-off distances practically contributing to the dose rates, which were determined by a simplified calculation model. For small tissues for which the reduction of variances are difficult, the equivalent dose ratios to a larger tissue (with lower statistical errors) nearby were employed to make the calculation efficient. Empirical response functions relating photon energies, and the organ equivalent doses or the effective doses were then derived by the use of cubic-spline fitting of the resulting doses for 26 energy points. The DCFs for all radionuclides considered important were evaluated by combining the photon emission data of the radionuclide and the empirical response functions. Finally, contributions of accompanied beta particles to the skin equivalent doses and the effective doses were calculated separately and added to the DCFs. For radionuclides considered in this study, the new DCFs for the three exposure settings were within ±10 % when compared with DCFs in FGR 13. PMID:23542764

  17. SU-E-T-219: Investigation of IMRT Out-Of-Field Dose Calculation Accuracy for a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inaccuracies in out-of-field calculations could lead to underestimation of dose to organs-at-risk. This study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of a model-based calculation algorithm at points outside the primary treatment field for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan using experimental measurements. Methods: The treatment planning system investigated is Varian Eclipse V.10 with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA). The IMRT fields investigated are from real patient treatment plans. The doses from a dynamic (DMLC) IMRT brain plan were calculated and compared with measured doses at locations outside the primary treatment fields. Measurements were performed with a MatriXX system (2-D chamber array) placed in solid water. All fields were set vertically incident on the phantom and were 9 cm × 6 cm or smaller. The dose was normalized to the central axis for points up to 15 cm off isocenter. The comparisons were performed at depths of 2, 10, 15, and 20 cm Results: The measurements have shown that AAA calculations underestimate doses at points outside the primary treatment field. The underestimation occurs at 2 cm depth and decreases down to a factor of 2 as depth increases to 20 cm. In low dose (<2% of target dose) regions outside the primary fields the local dose underestimations can be >200% compared to measured doses. Relative to the plan target dose, the measured doses to points outside the field were less than 1% at shallow depths and less than 2% at greater depths. Conclusion: Compared to measurements, the AAA algorithm underestimated the dose at points outside the treatment field with the greatest differences observed at shallow depths. Despite large local dose uncertainties predicted by the treatment planning system, the impact of these uncertainties is expected to be insignificant as doses at these points were less than 1-2% of the prescribed treatment dose.

  18. Application of large benthic foraminifera as a tool for interpretation of paleoclimate and water depth, in the Ziyarat Formation, Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi Mehr, M.; Adabi, M. H.

    2009-04-01

    The Ziyarat Formation, with a total thickness of 213 m, is a shallow warm water limestone, overlies the Fajan conglomerate and is overlain by tufaceous siltstone of the Karj Formation. The age of late Paleocene- Middle Eocene was considered for the Ziyarat Formation at the type section. From late Paleocene towards Middle Eocene, temperature has increased (Scheibner et al., 2005). This rising temperature has intensified and giving way to an unprecedented expansion of Large Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) dominating Tethyan platform during Middle Eocene (Scheibner et al., 2005). ?18O paleotemperature calculation based on heaviest oxygen isotope value of micrite and ?18Ow of Eocene seawater of 0.85 SMOW shows that temperature was around 39?C in the study area. In response to continued global warming during Paleocene-Eocene Termal Maximum (PETM), some organisms (such as corals) has been declined, while at the same time, L.B.F. were increasingly favored as dominant carbonate producing organisms in oligotrophic environment (Scheibner et al., 2008). For the even warmer period of PTEM a transient rise in sea-surface temperature of 4-5?C in low latitudes and 8 to 10? C in high latitudes has been proposed based on Mg/Ca ratios of planktic foraminifera (Zachos et al., 2003; Tripati and Elderfield, 2004). Thus, L.B.F was able to exploit their niche as evidenced by their increase in size, species diversity and their overwhelming abundance. In the Ziyarat Formation, 11 microfacies were recognized from the shallower to deeper part of the platform. The lack of evidence of resedimentation, e.g. turbidite, related to steep slop, and absence of reefal facies and widespread tidal flat deposits indicate that the Ziyarat Formation was deposited in a homocline carbonate ramp environment. The evaporite facies, dolomicrite, intraclast ooid packstone to grainstone, Miliolid wackestone, and Alveolina nummulite packstone belong to inner ramp sub-environment; middle ramp microfacies composed of Nummulite packstone, red algae nummulite packstone, Discocyclina nummulite wackestone, and Nummulite discocyclina wackestone to packstone; and outer ramp microfacies consist of benthic foraminifera packstone and radiolar sponge spicule wackestone. The ramp model proposed here for the Ziyarat Formation represent an example of a foraminifera dominated ramp system. The Paleogene was a time of particular abundance and radiation of miliolid and larger hyaline foraminifera and, especially during the Eocene they occurred in rock-forming quantities. Among L.B.F typical of Early Cenozoic carbonate platforms, Nummulites occupied a broad range of open marine environments on both ramps and shelves, and was generally absent from more restricted waters. Assilina and discocyclina in relatively deep water environments, while smaller lenticular Nummulites occur in shallower, inner ramp/shelf settings, often co-existing with Alveolina. Nummulites in the Ziyarat Formation showing variation in test shape, along the paleoenvironmental gradient. Nummulites from inner ramp have robust ovate shape with thick walls, while by increasing water depth, lower temperature, decreasing light levels and water energy, the test shape becomes flatter and elongate.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of low-energy electron dose-point-kernels in water using different stopping power approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousis, Christos; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Hadjidoukas, Panagiotis; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Pathak, Anand

    2011-07-01

    The spatial distribution of absorbed energy in irradiated matter can be conveniently described by dose-point-kernel (DPK) distributions that characterize the average energy deposition around single charged-particle tracks during their slowing down process. In the present work, electron DPKs in liquid water in the energy range from 100 eV to 10 keV are presented based on Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (csda). Elastic collisions are individually simulated using the screened Rutherford formula, whereas the energy loss from inelastic interactions is determined from stopping power (SP) theory. Along with the standard Bethe SP formula we examine different empirical expressions of general-use which are meant to improve the performance of the Bethe formula at low electron energies. Comparison is also made with a recent Bethe-type parametric expression obtained from a dielectric optical data model of liquid water. Our findings indicate that for electron energies below ?1 keV the discrepancies between the DPKs calculated by the general-purpose SP formulae become apparent. Moreover, the results obtained by the empirical expressions compare rather poorly with those from the dielectric model over the entire energy range examined.

  20. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade inversion. Finally, AATS-6 AOD values measured during low altitude aircraft traverses over the ocean are compared with corresponding AOD values retrieved over water from upwelling radiance measurements by the MODIS, TOMS, and GOES-8 Imager satellite sensors, with mixed results. These exercises highlight the need for continued satellite sensor comparison/validation studies to improve satellite AOD retrieval algorithms, and the usefulness of airborne sunphotometer measurements in the validation process.

  1. Removal of TiO2 Nanoparticles During Primary Water Treatment: Role of Coagulant Type, Dose, and Nanoparticle Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ryan J.; Keene, Valerie; Daniels, Louise; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nanomaterials from consumer products (i.e., paints, sunscreens, toothpastes, and food grade titanium dioxide [TiO2]) have the capacity to end up in groundwater and surface water, which is of concern because the effectiveness of removing them via traditional treatment is uncertain. Although aggregation and transport of nanomaterials have been investigated, studies on their removal from suspension are limited. Hence, this study involves the development of scaled-down jar tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the removal of a model metal oxide nanoparticle (NP), TiO2, in artificial groundwater (AGW), and artificial surface water (ASW) at the primary stages of treatment: coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation. Total removal was quantified at the end of each treatment stage by spectroscopy. Three different coagulants—iron chloride (FeCl3), iron sulfate (FeSO4), and alum [Al2(SO4)3]—destabilized the TiO2 NPs in both source waters. Overall, greater than one-log removal was seen in groundwater for all coagulants at a constant dose of 50?mg/L and across the range of particle concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 100?mg/L). In surface water, greater than 90% removal was seen with FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3, but less than 60% when using FeCl3. Additionally, removal was most effective at higher NP concentrations (50 and 100?mg/L) in AGW when compared with ASW. Zeta potential was measured and compared between AGW and ASW with the presence of all three coagulants at the same treatment stage times as in the removal studies. These electrokinetic trends confirm that the greatest total removal of NPs occurred when the magnitude of charge was smallest (<10?mV) and conversely, higher zeta potential values (>35?mV) measured were under conditions with poor removal (<90%). These results are anticipated to be of considerable interest to practitioners for the assessment of traditional treatment processes' capacity to remove nanomaterials prior to subsequent filtration and distribution to domestic water supplies. PMID:24669184

  2. Dose distribution in water for monoenergetic photon point sources in the energy range of interest in brachytherapy: Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE and GEANT4

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julio F. Almansa; Rafael Guerrero; Feras M. O. Al-Dweri; Marta Anguiano; Antonio M. Lallena

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric properties of monoenergetic photon point sources in water. The dose rate in water has been calculated for energies of interest in brachytherapy, ranging between 10keV and 2MeV. A comparison of the results obtained using the two codes with the available data calculated with other

  3. Dose distribution in water for monoenergetic photon point sources in the energy range of interest in brachytherapy: Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE and GEANT4

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julio F. Almansa; Rafael Guerrero; Feras M. O. Al-Dweri; Marta Anguiano; Antonio M. Lallena

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric properties of monoenergetic photon point sources in water. The dose rate in water has been calculated for energies of interest in brachytherapy, ranging between 10 keV and 2 MeV. A comparison of the results obtained using the two codes with the available data calculated

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of a two-dimensional, arc electron, pencil-beam algorithm in water and PMMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Kurup; K. R. Hogstrom; V. A. Otte; M. F. Moyers; S. Tung; A. S. Shiu

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy of dose calculations from a pencil-beam algorithm developed specifically for arc electron beam therapy was evaluated at 10 and 15 MeV. Mid-arc depth-doses were measured for 0' and 90' arcs using 12 and 15 cm radius cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated depth-doses for the 90' arced beams in the build-up region were as much as 3% less than measured

  5. Obtaining the intrinsic electron spectrum of linear accelerators using the relation between the current of the bending magnet and the absorbed dose in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose M. de la Vega; Damián Guirado; Manuel Vilches; Jose I. Perdices; Antonio M. Lallena

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To present a novel methodology to model the intrinsic electron spectra of a linear accelerator and its situation with respect to the energy window. Methods. The spectra are obtained by fitting the variation of R50 and the maximum dose rate measured in a water phantom with the bending magnet current. The obtained spectra are verified with a realistic Monte

  6. A Monte Carlo study of absorbed dose distributions in both the vapor and liquid phases of water by intermediate energy electrons based on different condensed-history transport schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Hadjidoukas, P.; Nikjoo, H.

    2008-07-01

    Monte Carlo transport calculations of dose point kernels (DPKs) and depth dose profiles (DDPs) in both the vapor and liquid phases of water are presented for electrons with initial energy between 10 keV and 1 MeV. The results are obtained by the MC4 code using three different implementations of the condensed-history technique for inelastic collisions, namely the continuous slowing down approximation, the mixed-simulation with ?-ray transport and the addition of straggling distributions for soft collisions derived from accurate relativistic Born cross sections. In all schemes, elastic collisions are simulated individually based on single-scattering cross sections. Electron transport below 10 keV is performed in an event-by-event mode. Differences on inelastic interactions between the vapor and liquid phase are treated explicitly using our recently developed dielectric response function which is supplemented by relativistic corrections and the transverse contribution. On the whole, the interaction coefficients used agree to better than ~5% with NIST/ICRU values. It is shown that condensed phase effects in both DPKs and DDPs practically vanish above 100 keV. The effect of ?-rays, although decreases with energy, is sizeable leading to more diffused distributions, especially for DPKs. The addition of straggling for soft collisions is practically inconsequential above a few hundred keV. An extensive benchmarking with other condensed-history codes is provided.

  7. Accurate skin dose measurements using radiochromic film in clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, S.; Seuntjens, J.; Abdel-Rahman, W.; Evans, M.; Olivares, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Vuong, Te; Soares, Christopher G. [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Division of Ionizing Radiation, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Megavoltage x-ray beams exhibit the well-known phenomena of dose buildup within the first few millimeters of the incident phantom surface, or the skin. Results of the surface dose measurements, however, depend vastly on the measurement technique employed. Our goal in this study was to determine a correction procedure in order to obtain an accurate skin dose estimate at the clinically relevant depth based on radiochromic film measurements. To illustrate this correction, we have used as a reference point a depth of 70 {mu}. We used the new GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry films (HS, XR-T, and EBT) that have effective points of measurement at depths slightly larger than 70 {mu}. In addition to films, we also used an Attix parallel-plate chamber and a home-built extrapolation chamber to cover tissue-equivalent depths in the range from 4 {mu} to 1 mm of water-equivalent depth. Our measurements suggest that within the first millimeter of the skin region, the PDD for a 6 MV photon beam and field size of 10x10 cm{sup 2} increases from 14% to 43%. For the three GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry film models, the 6 MV beam entrance skin dose measurement corrections due to their effective point of measurement are as follows: 15% for the EBT, 15% for the HS, and 16% for the XR-T model GAFCHROMIC[reg] films. The correction factors for the exit skin dose due to the build-down region are negligible. There is a small field size dependence for the entrance skin dose correction factor when using the EBT GAFCHROMIC[reg] film model. Finally, a procedure that uses EBT model GAFCHROMIC[reg] film for an accurate measurement of the skin dose in a parallel-opposed pair 6 MV photon beam arrangement is described.

  8. Dreissena polymorpha Pall. postveligers in submersed macrophyte beds of Put-in-Bay, Ohio, as related to rate and density of settlement, macrophyte preference, water depth, and position within beds

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.L. [Utica College of Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Increased water clarity due in large part to the invasion and spread of Dreissena polymorpha Pall., has allowed reestablishment of nearly continuous beds of submersed macrophytes in Put-in-Bay, Ohio. These beds now serve as sites for settlement by Dreissena veligers. Four transects extending from a maximum depth of 4.0 m to a minimum depth of 0.5 m were established in 1994, to document the time of recruitment, density of postveliger settlement, preferred macrophyte as a substrate, and effects of water depth and location within transects on recruitment. Settlement densities were determined for 100 g wet weight samples of macrophytes harvested along transects by snorkel and scuba. Peak settlement occurred 23 August, 11 days after the second planktonic veliger peak, but continued until early October. Maximum densities were greatest in 1.5-3.5 m water nearer the lakeward end of the transects and decreased in 1.0 m water or shoreward in dense submersed macrophyte beds. A maximum density of 15,150 Dreissena/100 g macrophyte occurred on the perennial Myriophyllum spicatum L., although mean settlement densities were greatest for the perennials M. spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum L., and the annuals Vallisneria americana Michx. and Najas quadalupensis (Spreng.) Magnus. Macrophyte preference as a settling substrate is most probably a reflection of relative macrophyte abundance and position within dense beds rather than a particular plant architecture. Assessment of densities after autumnal vegetational growth is not yet complete.

  9. Effect of H2O on Upper Phase Transitions in MgSiO3: Is the Depth of the Seismic X-Discontinuity an Indicator of Mangle Water Content?

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, S.D.; Ehm, L.; Liu, Z.; Ballaran T.B.; Littlefield, E.F.; Hemley, R.J.

    2010-06-29

    The mantle X-discontinuity, usually assigned to positive seismic velocity reflectors in the 260-330 km depth range, has proved difficult to explain in terms of a single mineralogical phase transformation in part because of its depth variability. The coesite to stishovite transition of SiO{sub 2} matches deeper X-discontinuity depths but requires 5-10% free silica in the mantle to match observed impedance contrast. The orthoenstatite (OEn) to high-pressure clinoenstatite (HPCen) transformation of MgSiO{sub 3} also broadly coincides with depths of the X but requires chemically depleted and orthoenstatite-rich lithology at 300 km depth in order to match observed seismic impedance contrast. On the basis of high-pressure infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy, we show that 1300 ppm variation of H{sub 2}O content in MgSiO{sub 3} can displace the transition of low-pressure clinoenstatite (LPCen) to HPCen by up to 2 GPa, similar to previous quench experiments on the OEn to HPCen phase transition, where about 30-45 km (1.0-1.5 GPa) of deflection could occur per 0.1 wt% H{sub 2}O. If the mantle X-discontinuity results from pyroxene transitions in a depleted harzburgite layer, because of the strong influence of minor amounts of water on the transformation boundary, the depth of the mantle X-discontinuity could serve as a potentially sensitive indicator of water content in the upper mantle.

  10. Thaw depth ABSTRACT

    E-print Network

    Kes­such as thaw depth, soil moisture, snow depth and geochemical parameters­are key Observatory, Alaska, including thaw depth, soil temperature, snow depth, ground penetraKng radar data, electrical resisKvity tomography, and airborne LIDAR. We obtain high

  11. Clutter depth discrimination using the wavenumber spectrum.

    PubMed

    Benjamin Reeder, D

    2014-01-01

    Clutter depth is a key parameter in mid-frequency active sonar systems to discriminate between sources of clutter and targets of interest. A method is needed to remotely discriminate clutter depth by information contained in the backscattered signal-without a priori knowledge of that depth. Presented here is an efficient approach for clutter depth estimation using the structure in the wavenumber spectrum. Based on numerical simulations for a simple test case in a shallow water waveguide, this technique demonstrates the potential capability to discriminate between a clutter source in the water column vs one on the seabed. PMID:24437850

  12. Monte-Carlo-derived insights into dose–kerma–collision kerma inter-relationships for 50?keV–25?MeV photon beams in water, aluminum and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between D, K and Kcol are of fundamental importance in radiation dosimetry. These relationships are critically influenced by secondary electron transport, which makes Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation indispensable; we have used MC codes DOSRZnrc and FLURZnrc. Computations of the ratios D/K and D/Kcol in three materials (water, aluminum and copper) for large field sizes with energies from 50?keV to 25?MeV (including 6–15?MV) are presented. Beyond the depth of maximum dose D/K is almost always less than or equal to unity and D/Kcol greater than unity, and these ratios are virtually constant with increasing depth. The difference between K and Kcol increases with energy and with the atomic number of the irradiated materials. D/K in ‘sub-equilibrium’ small megavoltage photon fields decreases rapidly with decreasing field size. A simple analytical expression for \\overline{X} , the distance ‘upstream’ from a given voxel to the mean origin of the secondary electrons depositing their energy in this voxel, is proposed: {{\\overline{X}}\\text{emp}}? 0.5{{R}\\text{csda}}(\\overline{{{E}0}}) , where \\overline{{{E}0}} is the mean initial secondary electron energy. These {{\\overline{X}}\\text{emp}} agree well with ‘exact’ MC-derived values for photon energies from 5–25?MeV for water and aluminum. An analytical expression for D/K is also presented and evaluated for 50?keV–25?MeV photons in the three materials, showing close agreement with the MC-derived values.

  13. Monte-Carlo-derived insights into dose-kerma-collision kerma inter-relationships for 50?keV-25?MeV photon beams in water, aluminum and copper.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D; Nahum, Alan E

    2015-01-21

    The relationships between D, K and Kcol are of fundamental importance in radiation dosimetry. These relationships are critically influenced by secondary electron transport, which makes Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation indispensable; we have used MC codes DOSRZnrc and FLURZnrc. Computations of the ratios D/K and D/Kcol in three materials (water, aluminum and copper) for large field sizes with energies from 50?keV to 25?MeV (including 6-15?MV) are presented. Beyond the depth of maximum dose D/K is almost always less than or equal to unity and D/Kcol greater than unity, and these ratios are virtually constant with increasing depth. The difference between K and Kcol increases with energy and with the atomic number of the irradiated materials. D/K in 'sub-equilibrium' small megavoltage photon fields decreases rapidly with decreasing field size. A simple analytical expression for X?, the distance 'upstream' from a given voxel to the mean origin of the secondary electrons depositing their energy in this voxel, is proposed: X?(emp) ? 0.5R(csda)(E?(0)), where E?(0) is the mean initial secondary electron energy. These X?(emp) agree well with 'exact' MC-derived values for photon energies from 5-25?MeV for water and aluminum. An analytical expression for D/K is also presented and evaluated for 50?keV-25?MeV photons in the three materials, showing close agreement with the MC-derived values. PMID:25548933

  14. Size-specific Dose Estimates for Chest, Abdominal, and Pelvic CT: Effect of Intrapatient Variability in Water-equivalent Diameter.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Shiung, Maria; Duan, Xinhui; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-07-01

    Purpose To develop software to automatically calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) and to assess the effect of variations in water-equivalent diameter (Dw) along the z-axis on SSDE for computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the torso. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant, retrospective study, a software program was used to calculate Dw at each image position in 102 consecutive CT examinations of the combined chest, abdomen, and pelvis. SSDE was calculated by multiplying the size-dependent conversion factor and volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) at each image position. The variations in Dw along the z-axis were determined for six hypothetical scanning ranges: chest alone; abdomen alone; pelvis alone; chest and abdomen; abdomen and pelvis; and chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Mean SSDE was calculated in two ways: (a) from the SSDE at each position and (b) from the mean CTDIvol over each scan range and the conversion factor corresponding to Dw at the middle of the scan range. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation between SSDE values calculated in these two ways. Results Across patients, for scan ranges 1-6, the mean of the difference between maximal and minimal Dw within a given patient was 5.2, 4.9, 2.5, 6.0, 5.6, and 6.5 cm, respectively. The mean SSDE values calculated by using the two methods were in close agreement, with root mean square differences of 0.9, 0.5, 0.5, 1.4, 1.0, and 1.1 mGy or 6%, 3%, 2%, 9%, 4%, and 6%, for the scan ranges of chest; abdomen; pelvis; chest and abdomen; abdomen and pelvis; and chest, abdomen, and pelvis, respectively. Conclusion Using the mean CTDIvol from the whole scan range and Dw from the image at the center of the scan range provided an easily obtained estimate of SSDE for the whole scan range that agreed well with values from an image-by-image approach, with a root mean square difference less than 1.4 mGy (9%). (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25734556

  15. Dominance of Methanosarcinales phylotypes and depth-wise distribution of methanogenic community in fresh water sediments of Sitka stream from Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Wright, André-Denis G; Brablcová, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Bedna?ík, Adam; Rulík, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The variation in the diversity of methanogens in sediment depths from Sitka stream was studied by constructing a 16S rRNA gene library using methanogen-specific primers and a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based approach. A total of nine different phylotypes from the 16S rRNA library were obtained, and all of them were clustered within the order Methanosarcinales. These nine phylotypes likely represent nine new species and at least 5-6 new genera. Similarly, DGGE analysis revealed an increase in the diversity of methanogens with an increase in sediment depth. These results suggest that Methanosarcinales phylotypes might be the dominant methanogens in the sediment from Sitka stream, and the diversity of methanogens increases as the depth increases. Results of the present study will help in making effective strategies to monitor the dominant methanogen phylotypes and methane emissions in the environment. PMID:25030226

  16. Calculation of dose in homogeneous phantoms for partially attenuated photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khatib, E.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1988-03-01

    Measured and calculated dose distributions under attenuators, which are of smaller cross-sectional dimensions than the radiation field, are presented. The study was performed on a 4-MV linac at a source--surface distance of 120 cm on the beam central axis in a water phantom for several thicknesses and cross sections of lead attenuators. Dose correction factors, which are used to multiply the open beam data to get dose distributions under partial attenuators, depend strongly on attenuator parameters and on depths in phantom. A method to calculate dose correction factors for any combination of attenuator parameters and any phantom depth is presented. The calculated dose distributions under partial attenuators agree well with measured data, which indicates that the method can be applied in clinical situations.

  17. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  18. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup ?6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup ?6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  19. Comparison of MCNPX and GEANT4 to Predict the Contribution of Non-elastic Nuclear Interactions to Absorbed Dose in Water, PMMA and A150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtejer, K.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Schulte, R.; Wroe, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; de Menezes, M. O.; Moralles, M.; Guzmán, F.; Manso, M. V.

    2008-08-01

    Proton induced non-elastic nuclear reactions play an important role in the dose distribution of clinically used proton beams as they deposit dose of high biological effectiveness both within the primary beam path as well as outside the beam to untargeted tissues. Non-elastic nuclear reactions can be evaluated using transport codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In this work, we have utilized the Los Alamos code MCNPX and the CERN GEANT4 toolkit, which are currently the most widely used Monte Carlo programs for proton radiation transport simulations in medical physics, to study the contribution of non-elastic nuclear interactions to the absorbed dose of proton beams in the therapeutic energy range. The impact of different available theoretical models to address the nuclear reaction process was investigated. The contribution of secondary particles from non-elastic nuclear reactions was calculated in three materials relevant in radiotherapy applications: water, PMMA and A150. The results evidence that there are differences in the calculated contribution of the secondary particles heavier than protons to the absorbed dose, with different approaches to model the nuclear reactions. The MCNPX calculation give rise to a larger contribution of d, t, ?3He to the total dose compared to the GEANT4 physical models chosen in this work.

  20. Depth from diffracted rotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Greengard; Yoav Y. Schechner; Rafael Piestun

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of depth estimation based on defocus effects has been essentially limited by the depth of field of the imaging system. We show that depth estimation can be improved significantly relative to classical methods by exploiting three-dimensional diffraction effects. We formulate the problem by using information theory analysis and present, to the best of our knowledge, a new paradigm

  1. Paleoceanography/climate and taphonomy at intermediate water depth in the Subtropical Western North Pacific Ocean over the last 1 Ma from IODP Exp 350 Sites U1436C and U1437B, Izu arc area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautravers, Maryline

    2015-04-01

    IODP Expedition 350 Site U1436C lies in the western part of the Izu fore arc basin, ~60 km east of the arc front volcano Aogashima, at 1776 m water depth. This site is a technical hole (only a 150 m long record) for a potential future deep drilling by Chikyu. Site U1437 is located in the Izu rear arc, ~90 km west of the arc front volcanoes Myojinsho and Myojin Knoll, at 2117 m water depth. At this site in order to study the evolution of the IZU rear arc crust we recovered a 1800 meter long sequence of mud and volcaniclastic sediments. These sites provide a rich and well-preserved record of volcanic eruptions within the area of the Izu Bonin-Arc. However, the material recovered, mostly mud with ash containing generally abundant planktonic foraminifera, can support additional paleoceanographic goals in an area affected by the Kuroshio Current. Also, the hydrographic divide created by the Izu rise provides a rare opportunity to gain some insight into the operation of the global intermediate circulation. The Antarctic Intermediate Water Mass is more influential at the depth of U1437B in the West and the North Pacific Intermediate Water at Site U1436C to the East. We analyzed 460 samples recovered at Sites U1436C and U1437B for a quantitative planktonic foraminifer study, and also for carbonate preservation indices, including: shell weight, percent planktonic foraminifera fragments planktonic foraminifer concentrations, various faunal proxies, and benthic/planktonic ratio. We measured the stable isotopes for a similar number of samples using the thermocline dwelling Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. The dataset presented here covers the last 1 Ma at Site U1437B and 0.9 Ma at Site U1436C. The age models for the two sites are largely established through stable isotope stratigraphy (this study). On their respective age models we evidence based on polar/subpolar versus subtropical faunal assemblages changes qualitative surface water temperature variations recording the changing influences in the Kuroshio/Oyashio currents at orbital time scales over the last 1 Ma. However, the 2 main findings are i.) that of the intense and pervasive carbonate dissolution at such an intermediate water depth, especially during interglacials, and in particular at site U1436C, and ii.) the good and improving carbonate preservation at Site U1437B during glacials, particularly in the upper part of the record.

  2. Measurements of Dose-Averaged Linear Energy Transfer Distributions in Water Using CR39 Plastic Nuclear Track Detector for Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryosuke Kohno; Nakahiro Yasuda; Himukai Takeshi; Yuki Kase; Keiko Ochiai; Masataka Komori; Naruhiro Matsufuji; Tatsuaki Kanai

    2005-01-01

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used as a linear energy transfer (LET) detector for carbon ion radiotherapy. We compared dose-averaged LET distributions in water obtained using the CR-39 detector for a monoenergetic beam and spread-out Bragg peak beam by calculations using the one-dimensional heavy-ion transport code used in the current heavy-ion treatment planning. We confirmed that the CR-39

  3. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  4. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  5. Integral T-Shaped Phantom-Dosimeter System to Measure Transverse and Longitudinal Dose Distributions Simultaneously for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Jang, Kyoung Won; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2. Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2 were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22778649

  6. Monte carlo computation of the energy deposited by protons in water, bone and adipose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçer, Rahmi; Küçer, Nermin; Türemen, Görkem

    2013-02-01

    Protons are most suitable for treating deeply-seated tumors due to their unique depth dose distribution. The maximum dose of protons is a pronounced peak, called the Bragg peak, with zero dose behind the peak. The objective of radiation therapy with protons is to deliver the dose to the target volume by using this type of distribution. This is achieved with a finite number of Bragg peaks at the depth of the target volume. The location of the peak in terms of depth depends on the energy of the protons. Simulations are used to determine the depth dose distribution of proton beams passing through tissue, so it is important that experimental data agree with the simulation data. In this study, we used the FLUKA computer code to determine the correct position of the Bragg peak for proton beams passing through water, bone and adipose, and the results were compared with experimental data.

  7. Preliminary map of the conterminous United States showing depth to and quality of shallowest ground water containing more than 1,000 parts per million dissolved solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feth, John Henry Frederick

    1965-01-01

    In this atlas, mineralized ground water is viewed presently as a source of water in some areas, but in much of the country as a source for future development. Mineralized water underlies large areas of the country, and its importance will grow as present supplies of fresh water are appropriated and developed. The potential uses fall in two main categories: (1) direct use in industrial processes, such as cooling, or for irrigation, where a moderate mineral content may not be a disadvantage; and (2) use after demineralization or dilution to whatever degree may be required by the intended user. It is clearly more efficient to produce and process water of moderate mineralization at points of use, where available in adequate amounts, than it is to process ocean water and pump it many miles from the sea. The Geological Survey, as a part of its responsibility to describe the water resources of the United States, has surveyed the known occurrences of mineralized ground water in the conterminous United States. The results are shown on the maps (sheets 1 and 2). This atlas was prepared to meet needs for information on the distribution and availability of mineralized water as expressed by Government agencies, private industries, and consultants. The maps are one step in providing an inventory of mineralized water of the Nation and will serve as a planning guide for further investigations and for development. They are necessarily generalized in many places owing to the complexity of the occurrence of the mineralized water, lack of detailed information for parts of the nation, and the difficulties inherent in attempts to put threedimensional information on maps.

  8. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, La Fe University Hospital, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  9. Flow Contribution and Water Quality with Depth in a Test Hole and Public-Supply Wells: Implications for Arsenic Remediation Through Well Modification, Norman, OK 2003-2006.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The City of Norman, Oklahoma, is one municipality affected by a change in the Environmental Protection Agency?s National Primary Drinking Water Regulation for arsenic. In 2006, the maximum contaminant level for arsenic in drinking-water was lowered from 50 to 10 micrograms per li...

  10. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, Eric J., E-mail: evandervoort@toh.on.ca; Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Tchistiakova, Ekaterina [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); La Russa, Daniel J. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) and The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada) and The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  11. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  12. Integrity in Depth 

    E-print Network

    Beebe, John

    1992-01-01

    For Joseph Henderson Integrity in Depth Number Two CAROLYN AND ERNEST FAY SERIES IN ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY David H. Rosen, General Editor Integrity in Depth John Beebe FOREWORD BY DAVID H. ROSEN Texas A&M University Press College... for Printed Library Materials, Z39.48-1984. Binding materials have been chosen for durability. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA Beebe, John. Integrity in depth / John Beebe ; foreword by David H. Rosen. p. cm. ? (Carolyn and Ernest Fay...

  13. Results of comparative assessment of US and Foreign Nuclear Power Plant dose experience and dose reduction programs

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Horan, J.R.; Dionne, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Based on data evaluated to date it is clear that US plants have higher collective dose equivalents per reactor and per MW-y generated than most other countries. Factors which contribute to low doses include: (1) minimization of cobalt in primary system components exposed to water, (2) careful control of primary system oxygen and pH, (3) good primary system water purity to minimize corrosion product formation, (4) careful plant design, layout and component segration and shielding, (5) management interest and commitment, (6) minimum number of workers and in-depth worker training, (7) use of special tools, and (8) plant standardization. It should be pointed out that reductions in exposure are more difficult and costly in plants already built and operating. The cost-effectiveness of dose reduction efforts at US plants should be carefully evaluated before recommendations are made concerning existing plants.

  14. Ingestion dose from 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs in cereals, pulses and drinking water to adult population in a high background radiation area, Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Pradyumna; Sahoo, S K; Mohapatra, S; Patra, A C; Dubey, J S; Vidyasagar, D; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2013-03-01

    A natural high background radiation area is located in Chhatrapur, Odisha in the eastern part of India. The inhabitants of this area are exposed to external radiation levels higher than the global average background values, due to the presence of uranium, thorium and its decay products in the monazite sands bearing placer deposits in its beaches. The concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U, (226)Ra, (40)K and (137)Cs were determined in cereals (rice and wheat), pulses and drinking water consumed by the population residing around this region and the corresponding annual ingestion dose was calculated. The annual ingestion doses from cereals, pulses and drinking water varied in the range of 109.4-936.8, 10.2-307.5 and 0.5-2.8 µSv y(-1), respectively. The estimated total annual average effective dose due to the ingestion of these radionuclides in cereals, pulses and drinking water was 530 µSv y(-1). The ingestion dose from cereals was the highest mainly due to a high consumption rate. The highest contribution of dose was found to be from (226)Ra for cereals and drinking water and (40)K was the major dose contributor from the intake of pulses. The contribution of man-made radionuclide (137)Cs to the total dose was found to be minimum. (226)Ra was found to be the largest contributor to ingestion dose from all sources. PMID:22802517

  15. ReCLAIM v2.0: a spreadsheet tool for calculating doses and soil/water radionuclide screening levels for assessment of radioactively contaminated land.

    PubMed

    Willans, S M; Galais, N C M; Lennon, C P; Trivedi, D P

    2007-03-01

    This note describes an electronic spreadsheet tool called ReCLAIM v2.0, developed by Nexia Solutions Ltd. The tool calculates doses to exposure groups for assessment of radioactively contaminated land including UK Nuclear Licensed sites on an individual exposure pathway basis and on a multiple exposure pathway basis constituting various specifiable scenarios. It also calculates soil/water screening levels of individual radionuclides with reference to selected exposure pathways and a dose target, and considers radionuclide additivity. Subject to agreement with a ReCLAIM disclaimer, the tool, with accompanying documentation (User Guide and Verification Report), can be downloaded without cost from the website (www.nexiasolutions.com/reclaim). PMID:17341807

  16. How Does Solar Attenuation Depth Affect the Ocean Mixed Layer? Water Turbidity and Atmospheric Forcing Impacts on the Simulation of Seasonal Mixed Layer Variability in the Turbid Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol Kara, A.; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Hurlburt, Harley E.

    2005-02-01

    A fine-resolution (3.2 km) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation attenuation with depth on the predictions of monthly mean sea surface height (SSH), mixed layer depth (MLD), buoyancy and heat fluxes, and near-sea surface circulation as well. The model uses spatially and temporally varying attenuation of photosynthetically available radiation (kPAR) climatologies as processed from the remotely sensed Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) to take water turbidity into account in the Black Sea. An examination of the kPAR climatology reveals a strong seasonal cycle in the water turbidity, with a basin-averaged annual climatological mean value of 0.19 m-1 over the Black Sea. Climatologically forced HYCOM simulations demonstrate that shortwave radiation below the mixed layer can be quite different based on the water turbidity, thereby affecting prediction of upper-ocean quantities in the Black Sea. The clear water constant solar attenuation depth assumption results in relatively deeper MLD (e.g., +15 m in winter) in comparison to standard simulations due to the unrealistically large amount of shortwave radiation below the mixed layer, up to 100 W m-2 during April to October. Such unrealistic sub-mixed layer heating causes weaker stratification at the base of the mixed layer. The buoyancy gain associated with high solar heating in summer effectively stabilizes the upper ocean producing shallow mixed layers and elevated SSH over the most of the Black Sea. In particular, the increased stability resulting from the water turbidity reduces vertical mixing in the upper ocean and causes changes in surface-layer currents, especially in the easternmost part of the Black Sea. Monthly mean SSH anomalies from the climatologically forced HYCOM simulations were evaluated against a monthly mean SSH anomaly climatology, which was constructed using satellite altimeter data from TOPEX/ Poseidon (T/P), Geosat Follow-On (GFO), and the Earth Remote Sensing Satellite-2 (ERS-2) over 1993-2002. Model-data comparisons show that the basin-averaged root-mean-square (rms) difference is 4 cm between the satellite-based SSH climatology and that obtained from HYCOM simulations using spatial and temporal kPAR fields. In contrast, when all solar radiation is absorbed at the sea surface or clear water constant solar attenuation depth values of 16.7 m are used in the model simulations, the basin-averaged SSH rms difference with respect to the climatology is 6 cm (50% more). This demonstrates positive impact from using monthly varying solar attenuation depths in simulating upper-ocean quantities in the Black Sea. The monthly mean kPAR and SSH anomaly climatologies presented in this paper can also be used for other Black Sea studies.

  17. Measurement of absorbed doses near metal and dental material interfaces irradiated by X- and gamma-ray therapy beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Farahani; F. C. Eichmiller; W. L. McLaughlin

    1990-01-01

    Soft-tissue damage adjacent to dental restorations is a deleterious side effect of radiation therapy which is associated with low-energy electron scatter from dental materials of high electron density. This study was designed to investigate the enhancement of dose to soft tissue (or water) close to high electron-density materials and to measure the detailed lateral and depth-dose profiles in soft-tissue-simulating polymer

  18. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain)] [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about ?3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than ?1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet ?3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were ?7% for {sup 60}Co, ?0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and ?2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like {sup 169}Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at least a 0.1 cm bolus is advised for {sup 60}Co to avoid underdosing superficial target layers. For {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, no bolus is needed. For those cases where no bolus is needed, its use might be detrimental as the lack of radiation scatter may be beneficial to the patient, although the 2% tolerance for dose calculation accuracy recommended in the AAPM TG-56 report is not fulfilled.

  19. Use of Fluka to Create Dose Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kerry T.; Barzilla, Janet; Townsend, Lawrence; Brittingham, John

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes provide an effective means of modeling three dimensional radiation transport; however, their use is both time- and resource-intensive. The creation of a lookup table or parameterization from Monte Carlo simulation allows users to perform calculations with Monte Carlo results without replicating lengthy calculations. FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code was used to develop lookup tables and parameterizations for data resulting from the penetration of layers of aluminum, polyethylene, and water with areal densities ranging from 0 to 100 g/cm^2. Heavy charged ion radiation including ions from Z=1 to Z=26 and from 0.1 to 10 GeV/nucleon were simulated. Dose, dose equivalent, and fluence as a function of particle identity, energy, and scattering angle were examined at various depths. Calculations were compared against well-known results and against the results of other deterministic and Monte Carlo codes. Results will be presented.

  20. Estimation of radiation doses to members of the public in Italy from intakes of some important naturally occurring radionuclides ( 238U, 234U, 235U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 224Ra and 210Po) in drinking water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guogang Jia; Giancarlo Torri

    2007-01-01

    The radiological quality in some samples of drinking water collected in Italy has been evaluated in the paper. As far as the measured ? or ? radionuclides are concerned, the doses for all the analysed samples of drinking water are in the range of 1.80–36.2?Svyr?1, all being well below the reference level of the committed effective dose (100?Svyr?1) recommended by

  1. In vivo and phantom measurements versus Eclipse TPS prediction of near surface dose for SBRT treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gwi A.; Ralston, Anna; Tin, Mo Mo; Martin, Darren; Pickard, Sheila; Kim, J.-H.; Tse, Regina

    2014-03-01

    This study reports on Gafchromic EBT2 film skin dose measurements for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. These measurements were compared to near surface skin doses predicted by Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) using the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) for a 6 MV photon beam. The accuracy of the predicted near surface dose for 3×3, 5×5 and 10×10 cm2 fields was assessed using an Attix chamber and EBT2 film in a Virtual Water phantom and compared to Monte Carlo calculation. The maximum near surface dose and its location were identified from the patient's treatment plan. For phantom measurements, the TPS dose (nominal 0 mm depth) was higher than the Attix chamber data by up to 24.0 % but in closer agreement with the EBT2 film measurement, which was up to 10.3 % higher than the Attix data. The MC calculated dose values were higher than the Attix data by up to 3.5% for the depths up to 2 mm. The maximum patient skin dose estimated from in vivo EBT2 film measurements was 7.5 - 19.5 Gy per course and depended on the number of overlapping fields, beam weight and/or contact with immobilisation devices. The TPS predicted dose for patient plans was mostly higher than the in vivo dose, by as much as 69.3%, but in two cases was lower, by as much as -23.1%.

  2. Investigation of 1-cm dose equivalent for photons behind shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, Hideo (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Tanaka, Shun-ichi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    The ambient dose equivalent at 1-cm depth, assumed equivalent to the 1-cm dose equivalent in practical dose estimations behind shielding slabs of water, concrete, iron or lead for normally incident photons having various energies was calculated by using conversion factors for a slab phantom. It was compared with the 1-cm depth dose calculated with the Monte Carlo code EGS4. It was concluded from this comparison that the ambient dose equivalent calculated by using the conversion factors for the ICRU sphere could be used for the evaluation of the 1-cm dose equivalent for the sphere phantom within 20% errors. Average and practical conversion factors are defined as the conversion factors from exposure to ambient dose equivalent in a finite slab or an infinite one, respectively. They were calculated with EGS4 and the discrete ordinates code PALLAS. The exposure calculated with simple estimation procedures such as point kernel methods can be easily converted to ambient dose equivalent by using these conversion factors. The maximum value between 1 and 30 mfp can be adopted as the conversion factor which depends only on material and incident photon energy. This gives the ambient dose equivalent on the safe side. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Layered Depth Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Shade; Steven J. Gortler; Li-wei He; Richard Szeliski

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a set of efficient image based rendering methods capable of rendering multiple frames per second on a PC.The first method warps Sprites with Depth representing smooth surfaces without the gaps found in other techniques. A second method for more general scenes performswarping from an intermediate representation called a Layered Depth Image (LDI). An LDI is

  4. Spirituality and depth psychology.

    PubMed

    Erickson, R C

    1987-09-01

    The resurgence of interest in spiritual and religious matters and in the depth psychology of C.G. Jung is examined relative to the work of spiritual direction and pastoral counseling. It is suggested that the risks of muddled thinking, narcissism, gnosticism, and credulity are increased when one attempts to combine spiritual disciplines with depth psychology. PMID:24302033

  5. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  6. Application of a snowpack dynamic model to continuous-time data-series of snow depth and snow water equivalent from three weather stations in the upper Valtellina valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Bondiolotti, Ferdinando; Della Vedova, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    In Italian Alps, seasonal snowpack melting generates 40% - 70% of total water in reservoirs. This clarifies how much this process is relevant in the hydrological balance of northern Italy. Located in the central part of Italian Alps, the Valtellina valley has a relevant local production of hydroelectric power, a rich agricultural production and, thanks to its glaciers and the seasonal snowpack, it feeds river discharges towards the metropolitan area of Milan and the Po river basin, especially during spring and summer. Nonetheless, mainly because of scarce instrumentation, seasonal snow dynamics in the same area have been scarcely characterized in the past. Thus, potential impacts of climatic forcings on snowpack dynamics are widely unknown. In this contribution, we apply a simple one-dimensional model of snowpack density, depth and mass content (proposed by De Michele et al. 2013) to continuous-time data from three different sites placed in the upper Valtellina valley. Sites are placed in the western val Grosina valley (Malghera), eastern val Grosina valley (Eita) and in the Cancano valley (Val Cancano). At each site, snow depth, snow water equivalent, air temperature and precipitation are automatically logged, at a resolution of 15 minutes, by means of ultrasonic depth sensors, snow pillows, thermistors and heated rain gauges. The results of this application show that the model can be useful to investigate melting dynamics in Italian Alps, especially in areas of scarce instrumentation. De Michele, C., Avanzi, F., Ghezzi, A., and Jommi, C.: Investigating the dynamics of bulk snow density in dry and wet conditions using a one-dimensional model, The Cryosphere, 7, 433-444, doi:10.5194/tc-7-433-2013, 2013.

  7. Topic in Depth - Harvesting the Rain

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rain harvesting has experienced a bit of a renaissance in recent years through the promotion and installation of rain gardens and rain barrels. These water collection mechanisms help to curb erosion and the spread of pollution; conserve precious freshwater; and support water-loving plants. This Topic in Depth presents websites and electronic publications containing instructive and descriptive information about rain gardens and barrels.

  8. 238U, 234U, 226Ra, 210Po concentrations of bottled mineral waters in Italy and their dose contribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Desideri; M. A. Meli; L. Feduzi; C. Roselli; A. Rongoni; D. Saetta

    2007-01-01

    Due to the importance of bottled mineral water in human diet with special regard to children in lactation period, a monitoring of natural radioactivity in some bottled mineral waters produced in Italy was performed. Gross alpha and beta activities and 226Ra, 238U, 234U, and 210Po concentrations were measured. Gross alpha and beta activities were determined by standards ISO 9696 and

  9. Monte Carlo-based dose calculation for 32P patch source for superficial brachytherapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Palani, Selvam T.; Saxena, S. K.; Babu, D. A. R.; Dash, A.

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer treatment involving 32P source is an easy, less expensive method of treatment limited to small and superficial lesions of approximately 1 mm deep. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has indigenously developed 32P nafion-based patch source (1 cm × 1 cm) for treating skin cancer. For this source, the values of dose per unit activity at different depths including dose profiles in water are calculated using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code system. For an initial activity of 1 Bq distributed in 1 cm2 surface area of the source, the calculated central axis depth dose values are 3.62 × 10-10 GyBq-1 and 8.41 × 10-11 GyBq-1at 0.0125 and 1 mm depths in water, respectively. Hence, the treatment time calculated for delivering therapeutic dose of 30 Gy at 1 mm depth along the central axis of the source involving 37 MBq activity is about 2.7 hrs. PMID:26150682

  10. Depth estimation for ordinary high water of streams in the Mobile District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alabama and adjacent states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harkins, Joe R.; Green, Mark E.

    1981-01-01

    Drainage areas for about 1,600 surface-water sites on streams and lakes in Florida are contained in this report. The sites are generally either U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations or the mouths of gaged streas. Each site is identified by latitude and longitude, by the general stream type, and by the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute topographic map on which it can be located. The gaging stations are furhter identified by a downstream order number, a county code, and a nearby city or town. In addition to drainage areas, the surface areas of lakes are shown for the elevation given on the topographic map. These data were retrieved from the Surface Water Index developed and maintained by the Hydrologic Surveillance section of the Florida District Office, U.S. Geological Survey. (USGS)

  11. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen D-37073 (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the in–out imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The in–out electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  12. Dose distribution in water for monoenergetic photon point sources in the energy range of interest in brachytherapy: Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE and GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, Julio F.; Guerrero, Rafael; Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Anguiano, Marta; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2007-05-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric properties of monoenergetic photon point sources in water. The dose rate in water has been calculated for energies of interest in brachytherapy, ranging between 10 keV and 2 MeV. A comparison of the results obtained using the two codes with the available data calculated with other Monte Carlo codes is carried out. A ?2-like statistical test is proposed for these comparisons. PENELOPE and GEANT4 show a reasonable agreement for all energies analyzed and distances to the source larger than 1 cm. Significant differences are found at distances from the source up to 1 cm. A similar situation occurs between PENELOPE and EGS4.

  13. When depth is no refuge: cumulative thermal stress increases with depth in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, B. P.; Condit, C.; Liu, G.; dos Santos, S.; Kahru, M.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kline, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly affected by high-temperature stress events and associated bleaching. Monitoring and predicting these events have largely utilized sea surface temperature data, due to the convenience of using large-scale remotely sensed satellite measurements. However, coral bleaching has been observed to vary in severity throughout the water column, and variations in coral thermal stress across depths have not yet been well investigated. In this study, in situ water temperature data from 1999 to 2011 from three depths were used to calculate thermal stress on a coral reef in Bahia Almirante, Bocas del Toro, Panama, which was compared to satellite surface temperature data and thermal stress calculations for the same area and time period from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Watch Satellite Bleaching Alert system. The results show similar total cumulative annual thermal stress for both the surface and depth-stratified data, but with a striking difference in the distribution of that stress among the depth strata during different high-temperature events, with the greatest thermal stress unusually recorded at the deepest measured depth during the most severe bleaching event in 2005. Temperature records indicate that a strong density-driven temperature inversion may have formed in this location in that year, contributing to the persistence and intensity of bleaching disturbance at depth. These results indicate that depth may not provide a stress refuge from high water temperature events in some situations, and in this case, the water properties at depth appear to have contributed to greater coral bleaching at depth compared to near-surface locations. This case study demonstrates the importance of incorporating depth-stratified temperature monitoring and small-scale oceanographic and hydrologic data for understanding and predicting local reef responses to elevated water temperature events.

  14. In Depth Winter Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Winter Weather is an In-Depth Special Report form the National Center for Atmospheric Research. It contains articles, images, activities, video clips, and interactive graphs to inform learners about meteorology and weather in the colder seasons.

  15. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images 

    E-print Network

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22

    to track diurnal variations on Mars is by measuring optical depth. The spatial and temporal trends of optical depth give insight into the dust and water cycles of the Martian atmosphere. Until now, spacecraft could only obtain optical depth during the day...

  16. On the Use of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter for Surface Dose Measurement during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Fasihah Hanum; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Jong, Wei Loong; Ath, Vannyat; Phua, Vincent Chee Ee; Heng, Siew Ping; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the suitability of using the optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) in measuring surface dose during radiotherapy. The water equivalent depth (WED) of the OSLD was first determined by comparing the surface dose measured using the OSLD with the percentage depth dose at the buildup region measured using a Markus ionization chamber. Surface doses were measured on a solid water phantom using the OSLD and compared against the Markus ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT3 film measurements. The effect of incident beam angles on surface dose was also studied. The OSLD was subsequently used to measure surface dose during tangential breast radiotherapy treatments in a phantom study and in the clinical measurement of 10 patients. Surface dose to the treated breast or chest wall, and on the contralateral breast were measured. The WED of the OSLD was found to be at 0.4 mm. For surface dose measurement on a solid water phantom, the Markus ionization chamber measured 15.95% for 6 MV photon beam and 12.64% for 10 MV photon beam followed by EBT3 film (23.79% and 17.14%) and OSLD (37.77% and 25.38%). Surface dose increased with the increase of the incident beam angle. For phantom and patient breast surface dose measurement, the response of the OSLD was higher than EBT3 film. The in-vivo measurements were also compared with the treatment planning system predicted dose. The OSLD measured higher dose values compared to dose at the surface (Hp(0.0)) by a factor of 2.37 for 6 MV and 2.01 for 10 MV photon beams, respectively. The measurement of absorbed dose at the skin depth of 0.4 mm by the OSLD can still be a useful tool to assess radiation effects on the skin dermis layer. This knowledge can be used to prevent and manage potential acute skin reaction and late skin toxicity from radiotherapy treatments. PMID:26052690

  17. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the ARPANSA, Australia and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Harty, P. D.; Ramanathan, G.; Lye, J. E.; Wright, T.; Butler, D. J.; Cole, A.; Oliver, C.; Webb, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in September and October 2012. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water for three radiation qualities at the ARPANSA. Following receipt of the provisional comparison results, the ARPANSA decided to verify the geometry of the jacket and calorimeter core. This resulted in a change in the conversion factors applied by the ARPANSA to convert from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water which was implemented after the comparison. The results for the revised standard, reported as a ratio of the ARPANSA and the BIPM evaluations, are 0.9965 at 6 MV, 0.9924 at 10 MV and 0.9932 at 18 MV, with a combined standard uncertainty of 5.5 parts in 103, 6.0 parts in 103 and 5.9 parts in 103, respectively. This result is the fifth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons, and the first to be based solely on graphite calorimetry. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. SU-E-T-233: Modeling Linac Couch Effects On Attenuation and Skin Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L; Halvorsen, P [Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Treatment couch tops in medical LINAC rooms lead to attenuation to beams penetrating them, plus higher skin dose which can become a significant concern with the high fraction doses associated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. This work measures the attenuation and shallow depth dose due to a BrainLab couch, and studies the modeling of the couch top in our treatment planning system (TPS) as a uniform solid material with homogeneous density. Methods: LINAC photon beams of size 10×10 cm and nominal energy 6 MV were irradiated from different gantry angles on a stack of solid water. Depth dose were measured with two types of parallel plate chambers, MPPK and Markus. In the Philips Pinnacle TPS, the couch was modeled as a slab with varying thickness and density. A digital phantom of size 30×30×10 cm with density 1 g/cc was created to simulate the measurement setup. Both the attenuation and skin dose effects due to the couch were studied. Results: An orthogonal attenuation rate of 3.2% was observed with both chamber measurements. The attenuation can be modeled by couch models of varying thicknesses. Once the orthogonal attenuation was modeled well, the oblique beam attenuation in TPS agreed with measurement within 1.5%. The depth dose at shallow depth (0.5 cm) was also shown to be modeled correctly within 1.5% of the measurement using a 12 mm thick couch model with density of 0.9 g/cc. Agreement between calculation and measurement diverges at very shallow depths (?1 mm) but remains acceptable (<5%) with the aforementioned couch model parameters. Conclusion: Modeling the couch top as a uniform solid in a treatment planning system can predict both the attenuation and surface dose simultaneously well within clinical tolerance in the same model.

  19. TLD extrapolation for skin dose determination in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomas Kron; Martin Butson; Fiona Hunt; James Denham

    1996-01-01

    Prediction of skin reactions requires knowledge of the dose at various depths in the human skin. Using thermoluminescence dosimeters of three different thicknesses, the dose can be extrapolated to the surface and interpolated between the different depths. A TLD holder was designed for these TLD extrapolation measurements on patients during treatment which allowed measurements of entrance and exit skin dose

  20. Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures 

    E-print Network

    Myrick, Jo Ann

    1994-01-01

    to gamma radiation. Charged particle equilibrium is not established at shallow depths. The degree of electronic equilibrium establishment must be assessed for shallow doses to prevent the overassessment of skin dose because conventional fluence...

  1. Experimental dosing of wetlands with coagulants removes mercury from surface water and decreases mercury bioaccumulation in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Kraus, Tamara; Fleck, Jacob; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Horwarth, William R.; Bachand, Sandra M.; Herzog, Mark; Hartman, Christopher; Bachand, Philip A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury pollution is widespread globally, and strategies for managing mercury contamination in aquatic environments are necessary. We tested whether coagulation with metal-based salts could remove mercury from wetland surface waters and decrease mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In a complete randomized block design, we constructed nine experimental wetlands in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, stocked them with mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and then continuously applied agricultural drainage water that was either untreated (control), or treated with polyaluminum chloride or ferric sulfate coagulants. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in surface waters were decreased by 62% and 63% in polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands and 50% and 76% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. Specifically, following coagulation, mercury was transferred from the filtered fraction of water into the particulate fraction of water which then settled within the wetland. Mosquitofish mercury concentrations were decreased by 35% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. There was no reduction in mosquitofish mercury concentrations within the polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands, which may have been caused by production of bioavailable methylmercury within those wetlands. Coagulation may be an effective management strategy for reducing mercury contamination within wetlands, but further studies should explore potential effects on wetland ecosystems.

  2. Continuous and efficient removal of THMs from river water using MF membrane combined with high dose of PAC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zbigniew Lewandowski; Satoshi Takizawa; Kyosuke Yamada; Hiroyuki Katayama; Kazuo Yamamoto; Shinichiro Ohgaki

    2009-01-01

    A combination of microfiltration (MF) membrane with a high concentration (40g\\/L of the reactor) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) efficiently and continuously removed trihalomethanes (THMs) and total organic carbon (TOC) from river water for a period of two months. Without PAC, the membrane reactor was able to remove less than 18% of THMs and less than 5% of TOC; with

  3. Characterization of surface oxides on water-atomized steel powder by XPS/AES depth profiling and nano-scale lateral surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasoglou, D.; Hryha, E.; Norell, M.; Nyborg, L.

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of oxide products on the surface of water-atomized steel powder is essential in order to determine the reducing conditions required for their removal during the sintering stage which in turn will result in improved mechanical properties. Pre-alloyed powder with 3 wt% Cr and 0.5 wt% Mo was chosen as the model material. Investigation of the powder surface characteristics with regard to composition, morphology, size and distribution of surface oxides was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. The analysis revealed that the powder is covered by a homogeneous (˜6 nm thick) Fe-oxide layer to ˜94% whereas the rest is covered by fine particulate features with the size below 500 nm. These particulates were further analyzed and were divided into three main categories (i) Cr-based oxides with simultaneous presence of nitrogen, (ii) Si-based oxides of "hemispherical" shape and (iii) agglomerates of the afore mentioned oxides.

  4. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD. This is probably due to the ionisation chamber calibration factor that is only valid in charged particle equilibrium condition, which is not achieved at the surface in the build-up region. PMID:24300340

  5. Fish depth distributions in the Lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killgore, K. J.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial body of literature exists about depth distribution of fish in oceans, lakes and reservoirs, but less is known about fish depth distribution in large rivers. Most of the emphasis on fish distributions in rivers has focused on longitudinal and latitudinal spatial distributions. Knowledge on depth distribution is necessary to understand species and community habitat needs. Considering this void, our goal was to identify patterns in fish benthic distribution along depth gradients in the Lower Mississippi River. Fish were collected over 14?years in depths down to 27?m. Fish exhibited non-random depth distributions that varied seasonally and according to species. Species richness was highest in shallow water, with about 50% of the 62 species detected no longer collected in water deeper than 8?m and about 75% no longer collected in water deeper than 12?m. Although richness was highest in shallow water, most species were not restricted to shallow water. Rather, most species used a wide range of depths. A weak depth zonation occurred, not as strong as that reported for deep oceans and lakes. Larger fish tended to occur in deeper water during the high-water period of an annual cycle, but no correlation was evident during the low-water period. The advent of landscape ecology has guided river research to search for spatial patterns along the length of the river and associated floodplains. Our results suggest that fish assemblages in large rivers are also structured vertically. 

  6. Dose distribution near thin titanium plate for skull fixation irradiated by a 4-MV photon beam

    PubMed Central

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Yasui, Keisuke; Kawanami, Ryota; Habara, Kousaku; Aoyama, Yuichi; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Obata, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effects of scattered radiation when a thin titanium plate (thickness, 0.05 cm) used for skull fixation in cerebral nerve surgery is irradiated by a 4-MV photon beam. We investigated the dose distribution of radiation inside a phantom that simulates a human head fitted with a thin titanium plate used for post-surgery skull fixation and compared the distribution data measured using detectors, obtained by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and calculated using a radiation treatment planning system (TPS). Simulations were shown to accurately represent measured values. The effects of scattered radiation produced by high-Z materials such as titanium are not sufficiently considered currently in TPS dose calculations. Our comparisons show that the dose distribution is affected by scattered radiation around a thin high-Z material. The depth dose is measured and calculated along the central beam axis inside a water phantom with thin titanium plates at various depths. The maximum relative differences between simulation and TPS results on the entrance and exit sides of the plate were 23.1% and – 12.7%, respectively. However, the depth doses do not change in regions deeper than the plate in water. Although titanium is a high-Z material, if the titanium plate used for skull fixation in cerebral nerve surgery is thin, there is a slight change in the dose distribution in regions away from the plate. In addition, we investigated the effects of variation of photon energies, sizes of radiation field and thickness of the plate. When the target to be irradiated is far from the thin titanium plate, the dose differs little from what it would be in the absence of a plate, though the dose escalation existed in front of the metal plate. PMID:20589117

  7. Experimental study on the survival of the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms--Pontederiaceae) under different oil doses and times of exposure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades, petroleum activities have increased in the Brazilian Amazon where there is oil exploration on the Urucu River, a tributary of the Amazon River, about 600 km from the city of Manaus. Particularly, transportation via the Amazon River to reach the oil refinery in Manaus may compromise the integrity of the large floodplains that flank hundreds of kilometers of this major river. In the Amazon floodplains, plant growth and nutrient cycling are related to the flood pulse. When oil spills occur, floating oil on the water surface is dispersed through wind and wave action in the littoral region, thus affecting the vegetation of terrestrial and aquatic environments. If pollutants enter the system, they are absorbed by plants and distributed in the food chain via plant consumption, mortality, and decomposition. The effect of oil on the growth and survival of vegetation in these environments is virtually unknown. The water hyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] has a pantropical distribution but is native to the Amazon, often growing in high-density populations in the floodplains where it plays an important role as shelter and food source for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The species is well known for its high capacity to absorb and tolerate high levels of heavy metal ions. To study the survival and response of water hyacinth under six different oil doses, ranging from 0 to 150 ml l(-1), and five exposure times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days), young individuals distributed in a completely randomized design experiment composed of vessels with a single individual each were followed over a 50-day period (30-day acclimatization, 20 days under oil treatments). Growth parameters, biomass, visual changes in the plants, and pH were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Increasing the time of oil exposure caused a decrease in biomass, ratio of live/dead biomass and length of leaves, and an increase in the number of dead leaves. Dose of oil and time of exposure are the most important factors controlling the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on E. crassipes. Although the species is able to survive exposure to a moderate dose of oil, below 75 ml l(-1) for only 5 days, severe alterations in plant growth and high mortality were observed. Therefore, we conclude that Urucu oil heavily affects E. crassipes despite its known resistance to many pollutants. PMID:25017871

  8. Offshore influence of coastal upwelling off Mauritania, NW Africa, as recorded by diatoms in sediment traps at 2195 m water depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Carina B.; Romero, Oscar E.; Wefer, Gerold; Gabric, Albert J.

    1998-06-01

    Downward flux and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples off Cap Blanc (CB1, NW Africa) over a 1-year period (March 1988-March 1989) and compared to the assemblages in the underlying surface sedi ment. Trap content was composed of biogenic and lithogenic material. The dominant constituents of the biogenic fraction were calcium carbonate, biogenic opal, and organic matter. Coccolithophorids, planktonic foraminifera and pteropods contributed to the CaCO 3 flux; opal derived mainly from diatoms. During the sampling year prominent total flux maxima occurred in spring and summer. Highest diatom flux values were reached in March-April (20.1×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) and July-August (22.9×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) in coincidence with the total flux pattern. Radiolaria showed three distinct peaks: in autumn (16×10 4 shells m -2 d -1), spring (˜11×10 4 shells m -2 d -1) and summer (10×10 4 shells m -2 d -1). The flux pattern of silicoflagellates differed greatly from those of the other groups and from the total particle flux, with highest values between October 1988 and March 1989. For all microorganisms surveyed, September was the month of lowest production. We identified a total of 166 diatom taxa and 3 silicoflagellate species. Off Cap Blanc, upwelling occurs year-round, and "giant filaments" of relatively high pigment concentration develop and persist throughout the year with substantial seasonal and interannual variations. We show that the shifts in siliceous phytoplankton do reflect both the seaward displacement of the coastal upwelling center and the periods of relaxation when oligotrophic waters prevail. Accumulation rates in the surface sediment were calculated to be 1.36×10 8 valves m -2 yr -1 for diatoms and 1.05×10 6 skeletons m -2 yr -1 for silicoflagellates. Most of the diatoms found in the water column at 2195 m also occurred in the sediment surface, with a slight enrichement of robust taxa in the sediments. In an attempt to contrast coastal vs. oceanic upwelling, we compared the Cap Blanc trap results (a coastal/open-ocean transition site) with the patterns recorded previously in sediment traps from the Guinea Basin (GBN3; an open-ocean equatorial upwelling site). Enhanced fluxes at both sites corresponded in time with the occurrence of upwelling (i.e. spring and early summer for CB1, and early spring and summer for GBN3). Total, opal and lithogenic mean daily fluxes were 2.4, 1.6 and 6.3 times higher at CB1 than at GBN3. Diatom and silicoflagellate fluxes were 8.9 and 1.6 times higher at GBN3. On a yearly basis, the diatom flora for CB1 can be characterized as "coastal with oceanic influence", and for GBN3 as "open ocean with moderate coastal influence". Chain-forming and colonial diatoms with individual cell diameters of >5 ?m dominated the coastal upwelling site ( Thalassionema nitzschioides and Chaetoceros), while small (<5 ?m) solitary diatoms ( Nitzschia bicapitata) dominated the open ocean equatorial upwelling regime. Comparable relative abundances of freshwater diatoms were noted at both trap sites; their seasonal distribution within each geographical area was attributed to the Saharan dust transport patterns involved. While diatom indicators of coastal upwelling were readily preser ved in the surface sediments off Cap Blanc, the assemblage in the Guinea Basin sediments differed greatly from that in the traps with the summer signal for equatorial upwelling being removed from the sediment. We conclude that significant differences between the assemblages trapped at both sites support the usefulness of these data as sensitive indicators of dissimilar oceanographic settings.

  9. Comments on the primary and scatter dose-spread kernels used for convolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Akira

    2002-12-01

    The basic primary and scatter dose-spread kernels used for convolution methods are usually produced by Monte Carlo simulations with the interaction point forced to the center of a large water phantom. However, it is still not clear whether such Monte Carlo based kernels allow accurate dose calculations with a wide range of field sizes and depths, especially in thorax phantoms. Using the differential primary and scatter concept, this paper proposes another type of basic kernel, with which perfectly accurate primary and scatter absorbed dose calculations can be performed under conditions that the beam is parallel, the incident beam intensity is uniform within and zero outside the field, and the primary beam attenuation coefficient along raylines is not a function of depth and off-axis distance.

  10. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  11. Expansive soil crack depth under cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  12. Development of a microfilter separation system coupled with a high dose of powdered activated carbon for advanced water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han-Seung Kim; Hiroyuki Katayama; Satoshi Takizawa; Shinichiro Ohgaki

    2005-01-01

    Filtration experiments using a bench-scale immersed membrane separation system combined with PAC (powdered activated carbon) were conducted in order to investigate the effects of PAC on the efficiencies of operation and treatment and to evaluate the performance of the system. The experiments were carried out under such operation conditions as a filtration rate of 1 m\\/d (or 42 l\\/m2\\/h), water

  13. Topic in Depth - Antimatter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    For every action there is a reaction, for every plus there is a minus, and for every matter there is wellâ?¦antimatter. This topic in depth tackles the complex concept of antimatter, from the Big Bang to solar explosions and the technology to detect it.

  14. Rendering Layered Depth Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Gortler; Li-wei He; Michael F. Cohen

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present an efficient image based rendering system that renders multipleframes per second on a PC. Our method performs warping from an intermediate representationcalled a layered depth image (LDI). An LDI is a view of the scene from a single inputcamera view, but with multiple pixels along each line of sight. When n input images arepreprocessed to

  15. Topic in Depth - Telematics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Often used in mobile telephony, vehicle tracking, online navigation, and emergency assistance, the design of wireless systems for the collection and dissemination of data is known as telematics. This Topic in Depth offers definitions, research information, and the uses of the technology in industry.

  16. Layered Depth Panoramas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ke Colin Zheng; Sing Bing Kang; Michael F. Cohen; Richard Szeliski

    2007-01-01

    Representations for interactive photorealistic visualiz a- tion of scenes range from compact 2D panoramas to data- intensive 4D light fields. In this paper, we propose a tech- nique for creating a layered representation from a sparse se t of images taken with a hand-held camera. This representa- tion, which we call a layered depth panorama (LDP), al- lows the user

  17. Topic in Depth - Subways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many cities around the world offer subways as a primary mode of public transportation. These subway systems are not only major accomplishments in civil engineering, but have a rich history. This Topic in Depth explores the technology, history, and future of subways.

  18. The depth of hypnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Friedlander; T. R. Sarbin

    1938-01-01

    A scale for measuring hypnotic depth consisting of four subtests of five units each was arbitrarily assembled from earlier scales. A standard method of trance induction was used on 57 volunteer men and women subjects. It was found that while the earlier scales are individually inadequate, they supplement each other when taken in combination. The new scale reveals a distribution

  19. Differential-pencil-beam dose calculations for charged particles.

    PubMed

    Petti, P L

    1992-01-01

    The use of a convolution or differential-pencil-beam (DPB) algorithm has been studied for charged-particle dose calculations as a means of more accurately modeling the effects of multiple scattering. Such effects are not reflected in current charged-particle dose calculations since these calculations rely on depth-dose data measured in homogeneous water-equivalent phantoms and use ray-tracing techniques to calculate the water-equivalent pathlength from patient CT data. In this study, isodose plots were generated from three-dimensional dose calculations using Monte Carlo, DPB, and standard ray-tracing methods for a 4-cm modulated 150-MeV proton beam incident on both homogenous and heterogeneous phantoms. To simulate therapy conditions with charged particles, these studies included cases where compensating boluses were introduced to modify the particle range across the treatment field. Results indicate that multiple-scattering effects, including increased penumbral width as a function of beam penetration and the "smearing" of isodose distributions downstream from complex heterogeneities, are well modeled by the DPB algorithm. The DPB algoirthm may also be used to obtain more useful estimates of the dose uncertainty in regions near the end of the beam's range downstream from complex heterogeneities than can be derived from standard ray-tracing calculations. PMID:1320182

  20. Extraction of electron beam dose parameters from EBT2 film data scored in a mini phantom.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Dedri; Smit, Cobus J L; du Plessis, Freek C P

    2013-09-01

    Quality assurance of medical linear accelerators includes dosimetric parameter measurement of therapeutic electron beams e.g. relative dose at a depth of 80% (R??). This parameter must be within a tolerance of 0.2 cm of the declared value. Cumbersome water tank measurements can be regarded as a benchmark to measure electron depth dose curves. A mini-phantom was designed and built, in which a strip of GAFCHROMIC® EBT2 film could be encased tightly for electron beam depth dose measurement. Depth dose data were measured for an ELEKTA Sl25 MLC, ELEKTA Precise, and ELEKTA Synergy (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) machines. The electron beam energy range was between 4 and 22 MeV among the machines. A 10 × 10 cm² electron applicator with 95 cm source-surface-distance was used on all the machines. 24 h after irradiation, the EBT2 film strips were scanned on Canon CanoScan N670U scanner. Afterwards, the data were analysed with in-house developed software that entailed optical density to dose conversion, and optimal fitting of the PDD data to de-noise the raw data. From the PDD data R?? values were solved for and compared with acceptance values. A series of tests were also carried out to validate the use of the scanner for film Dosimetry. These tests are presented in this study. It was found that this method of R?? evaluation was reliable with good agreement with benchmark water tank measurements using a commercial parallel plate ionization chamber as the radiation detector. The EBT2 film data yielded R?? values that were on average 0.06 cm different from benchmark water tank measured R?? values. PMID:23794059

  1. The influence of climate on root depth: A carbon cost-benefit analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Guswa

    2008-01-01

    The depth of the active root zone identifies the portion of the subsurface that exchanges soil water with the atmosphere. The depth of this zone is determined by a number of factors, and this work focuses on the drivers related to water and climate. An analytical expression for a water-optimal root depth is developed by equating the marginal carbon cost

  2. Clinical use of carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters for skin dose determination

    SciTech Connect

    Ostwald, P.M.; Kron, T.; Hamilton, C.S. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Waratah (Australia)] [and others] [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Waratah (Australia); and others

    1995-11-01

    Carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are designed for surface/skin dose measurements. Following 4 years in clinical use at the Mater Hospital, the accuracy and clinical usefulness of the carbon-loaded TLDs was assessed. Teflon-based carbon-loaded lithium fluoride (LiF) disks with a diameter of 13 mm were used in the present study. The TLDs were compared with ion chamber readings and TLD extrapolation to determine the effective depth of the TLD measurement. In vivo measurements were made on patients receiving open-field treatments to the chest, abdomen, and groin. Skin entry dose or entry and exit dose were assessed in comparison with doses estimated form phantom measurements. The effective depth of measurement in a 6 MV therapeutic x-ray beam was found to be about 0.10 mm using TLD extrapolation as a comparison. Entrance surface dose measurements made on a solid water phantom agreed well with ion chamber and TLD extrapolation measurements, and black TLDs have an accuracy of {plus_minus} 5% ({plus_minus}2 SD). The dose predicted from black TLD readings correlate with observed skin reactions as assessed with reflectance spectroscopy. In vivo dosimetry with carbon-loaded TLDs proved to be a useful tool in assessing the dose delivered to the basal cell layer in the skin of patients undergoing radiotherapy. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Water

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ... you probably need more water. What about bottled water? top Some people like bottled water for its ...

  4. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, E.; Scheib, S.; Böhringer, T.; Coray, A.; Grossmann, M.; Lin, S.; Lomax, A.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique developed at PSI.

  5. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Böhringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique developed at PSI. PMID:15773729

  6. Anchoring International sets new water depth record

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1983-01-01

    Santa Barbara Channel has a history steeped in firsts in techniques for the production of offshore oil. Landscaped drilling and production islands, production piers, and directional drilling from land rigs to production under the channel, to name a few. The latest such project was handled by Anchoring International, Inc., a pipe line anchoring company headquartered in Houston, Texas. Contracted by

  7. Comparison of Gavage, Water Bottle, and a High-Moisture Diet Bolus as Dosing Methods for Quantitative D-xylose Administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, J. Paul; Lewis, Sherry M.; Moyer, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus were selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2FI mice were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was collected before and after each method of administration and analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 50.0% D-xylose recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recovery.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Rizatriptan 10-mg Tablet and 10-mg Orally Disintegrating Tablet Administered With or Without Water in Healthy Subjects: An Open-Label, Randomized, Single-Dose, 3Period Crossover Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne K. Swan; Harry Alcorn; Anthony Rodgers; Carolyn M. Hustad; Karen E. Ramsey; Susan Woll; Franck Skobieranda

    2006-01-01

    This open-label, 3-period crossover study compared the plasma concentration profiles of rizatriptan tablet, orally disintegrating tablet with water (ODTc), and ODT without water (ODTs) in 24 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. At each period, subjects received a single dose of either 10-mg rizatriptan tablet, 10-mg rizatriptan ODTs, or 10-mg rizatriptan ODTc. The authors hypothesized that ODTc has a

  9. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79?±?1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63?±?0.06 to 1.15?±?0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  10. An assessment of the (210)Po ingestion dose due to the consumption of agricultural, marine, fresh water and forest foodstuffs in Gudalore (India).

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, R

    2014-11-01

    The activity concentration of (210)Po in cereals, pulses, food materials of animal origin, vegetables and spices collected from Gudalore (India) has been estimated by radiochemical method. The activity concentration of (210)Po in cereals is found to vary from 124 to 604 mBq kg(-1). Raw rice registered the highest mean activity 504 ± 61 mBq kg(-1). In pulses (210)Po activity concentration varies from 42 to 320 mBq kg(-1) and the highest activity is found in black lentil with the average value of 172 ± 38 mBq kg(-1). Leafy vegetables registered the highest (210)Po activity concentration (662-7336 mBq kg(-1)) and are followed by tuber vegetables (390-1269 mBq kg(-1)) and then by other vegetables (75-595 mBq kg(-1)). The higher concentration of (210)Po observed in leafy vegetables may be attributed to the dry deposition of (210)Po and other daughter products of (222)Rn on large leaf surfaces from the air. Among animal products fish of marine origin registered the highest (210)Po activity concentration 36,850-48,964 mBq kg(-1). The mean (210)Po activity concentration in coffee has been estimated as 7500 mBq kg(-1). The activity concentration of (210)Po in leaf and bark of tree Cinnamom zeylanicum, a popular spice, is found to vary from 3500 to 11,100 mBq kg(-1) and 1600-3400 mBq kg(-1). The consumption of marine and fresh water fish contribute 60.7% (506.1 ?Sv y(-1)) to the total ingestion dose received. Cereals being consumed in a large scale, contribute 23.4% (194.9 ?Sv y(-1)) of the total ingestion dose received. The contribution from spices and leafy vegetables consumed is 5.8% (48.1 ?Sv y(-1)) and 6.5% (54.3 ?Sv y(-1)), respectively. The remaining 3.6% (30.0 ?Sv y(-1)) contribution to the total ingestion dose comes from other food materials and vegetables. PMID:25036917

  11. Finite-depth capillary-gravity dromions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-09-01

    It is known that the governing equations for the evolution of the envelope of weakly nonlinear capillary-gravity wave packets, the so-called Davey-Stewartson equation, admit dromion solutions in the limit of shallow water and strong surface tension, i.e., when kh?1 and the Bond number (Bo) ?T/?gh^{2}>1/3 (where T is the surface tension coefficient and h the water depth). Here we show that capillary-gravity dromions exist beyond this limit for a broad range of finite water depths, i.e., for kh ? O(1), as well as for subcritical Bond numbers, i.e., for Bo < 1/3. PMID:24125393

  12. Topic in Depth - Aerodynamics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aerodynamics is the study of what makes things go fast, right? More specifically, itâ??s the study of the interaction between bodies and the atmosphere. This topic in depth highlights some fun websites on the science of aerodynamics, for beginners to researchers. If youâ??ve been watching Wimbeldon lately, you might have been wondering about the aerodynamics of tennis. Or maybe you were riding your bike the other day and wondering how you could pick up a little more speed next time. These sites can help explain.

  13. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing light-water reactor fuel. [Radiation dose commitment to human populations from radioactive effluents released to environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Finney; R. E. Blanco; R. C. Dahlman; G. S. Hill; F. G. Kitts; R. E. Moore; J. P. Witherspoon

    2011-01-01

    A cost\\/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which processes light-water reactor (LWR) fuels, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining

  14. Calculation of dose profiles in homogeneous phantoms for irregular, partially attenuated, photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.; El-Khatib, E.

    1988-07-01

    Measured and calculated dose profiles under partial attenuators which cover only part of the radiation beam are presented. The study was performed for x-ray beams generated with a 4-MV linear accelerator at a source--surface distance of 120 cm in a water phantom for lead attenuators of arbitrary shape but constant thickness. Dose correction factors, which are used to multiply the open beam data to predict doses under partial attenuators, depend strongly on attenuator parameters, such as its thickness, lateral dimensions, and distance from phantom or patient surface, in addition to depending on depths in the phantom. The dose correction factors are calculated with Clarkson sector integration techniques, and the results, in spite of the simplifying assumptions used in the algorithm, generally agree with measured data to within 3%. The calculational method therefore may be applied to general clinical situations in which partial attenuators are used.

  15. Dose and dose averaged LET comparison of {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, {sup 8}Be, {sup 10}B, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O ion beams forming a spread-out Bragg peak

    SciTech Connect

    Kantemiris, I.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.; Angelopoulos, A. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilissia, 157 71 Athens (Greece) and Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Patriarxou Grigoriou Neapoleos, Agia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilissia, 157 71 Athens (Greece)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Modern clinical accelerators are capable of producing ion beams from protons up to neon. This work compares the depth dose distribution and corresponding dose averaged linear energy transfer (LET) distribution, which is related to the biological effectiveness, for different ion beams ({sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, {sup 8}Be, {sup 10}B, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O) using multi-energetic spectra in order to configure spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP). Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to configure a 5 cm SOBP at 8 cm depth in water for all the different ion beams. Physical dose and dose averaged LET distributions as a function of depth were then calculated and compared. The superposition of dose distribution of all ions is also presented for a two opposing fields configuration. Additional simulations were performed for {sup 12}C beams to investigate the dependence of dose and dose averaged LET distributions on target depth and size, as well as beam configuration. These included simulations for a 3 cm SOBP at 7, 10, and 13 cm depth in water, a 6 cm SOBP at 7 depth in water, and two opposing fields of 6 cm SOBP. Results: Alpha particles and protons present superior physical depth dose distributions relative to the rest of the beams studied. Dose averaged LET distributions results suggest higher biological effectiveness in the target volume for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions. This is coupled, however, with relatively high LET values--especially for the last two ion species--outside the SOBP where healthy tissue would be located. Dose averaged LET distributions for {sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B beams show that they could be attractive alternatives to {sup 12}C for the treatment of small, not deeply seated lesions. The potential therapeutic effect of different ion beams studied in this work depends on target volume and position, as well as the number of beams used. Conclusions: The optimization of beam modality for specific tumor cites remains an open question that warrants further investigation and clinically relevant results.

  16. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  17. Species-specific depth zonation in New Zealand charophytes as a function of light availability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne-Maree Schwarz; Mary de Winton; Ian Hawes

    2002-01-01

    The upper and lower depth limits for growth of eight charophyte taxa from 28 New Zealand lakes, were analysed in relation to water clarity to test the hypothesis that species-specific depth ranges could be related to light availability. Median upper depth limits ranged between 1 and 4m. Lower depth limits covered a wide range for each taxon with median values

  18. The accuracy of the out-of-field dose calculations using a model based algorithm in a commercial treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lilie; Ding, George X.

    2014-07-01

    The out-of-field dose can be clinically important as it relates to the dose of the organ-at-risk, although the accuracy of its calculation in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) receives less attention. This study evaluates the uncertainties of out-of-field dose calculated with a model based dose calculation algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), implemented in a commercial radiotherapy TPS, Varian Eclipse V10, by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, in which the entire accelerator head is modeled including the multi-leaf collimators. The MC calculated out-of-field doses were validated by experimental measurements. The dose calculations were performed in a water phantom as well as CT based patient geometries and both static and highly modulated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields were evaluated. We compared the calculated out-of-field doses, defined as lower than 5% of the prescription dose, in four H&N cancer patients and two lung cancer patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and IMRT techniques. The results show that the discrepancy of calculated out-of-field dose profiles between AAA and the MC depends on the depth and is generally less than 1% for in water phantom comparisons and in CT based patient dose calculations for static field and IMRT. In cases of VMAT plans, the difference between AAA and MC is <0.5%. The clinical impact resulting from the error on the calculated organ doses were analyzed by using dose-volume histograms. Although the AAA algorithm significantly underestimated the out-of-field doses, the clinical impact on the calculated organ doses in out-of-field regions may not be significant in practice due to very low out-of-field doses relative to the target dose.

  19. Bright Lenses and Optical Depth

    E-print Network

    Robert J. Nemiroff

    1997-04-12

    In gravitational lensing, the concept of optical depth assumes the lens is dark. Several microlensing detections have now been made where the lens may be bright. Relations are developed between apparent and absolute optical depth in the regime of the apparent and absolute brightness of the lens. An apparent optical depth through bright lenses is always less than the true, absolute optical depth. The greater the intrinsic brightness of the lens, the more likely it will be found nearer the source.

  20. KEY COMPARISON: Final report of the SIM 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water comparison SIM.RI(I)-K4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. K.; Shortt, K. R.; Saravi, M.; Meghzifene, A.; Tovar, V. M.; Barbosa, R. A.; da Silva, C. N.; Carrizales, L.; Seltzer, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Transfer chambers were used to compare the standards for 60Co absorbed dose to water maintained by seven laboratories. Six of the laboratories were members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrología (SIM) regional metrology organization while the seventh was the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) laboratory in Vienna. The National Research Council (NRC) acted as the pilot laboratory for the comparison. Because of the participation of laboratories holding primary standards, the comparison results could be linked to the key comparison reference value maintained by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The results for all laboratories were within the expanded uncertainty (two standard deviations) of the reference value. The estimated relative standard uncertainty on the comparison between any pair of laboratories ranged from 0.6% to 1.4%. The largest discrepancy between any two laboratories was 1.3%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  1. Primary dose in photon beams with lateral electron disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nizin, P.S. (Staten Island University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, 475 Seaview Avenue, Staten Island, NY (USA)); Chang, X.S. (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Department of Radiation Therapy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    It is shown that in narrow monoenergetic photon beams under conditions of lateral electron disequilibrium, primary absorbed dose {ital P}({ital r}) is a simple function of beam radius {ital r} : {ital P}{sub ({ital r})}={ital P}{sub {lambda}}{center dot}(1{minus}{ital e}{sup {minus}{gamma}{center dot}{ital r}}), where {ital P}{sub {lambda}} is the primary dose in broad beams for which complete lateral electron equilibrium exists, and {gamma} depends on photon energy and absorbing medium. This formula was evaluated using Monte-Carlo-generated data for the primary dose in water from monoenergetic photons in the energy range from 2 to 8 MeV. The primary dose was studied in beams of radii 0.006 cm{lt}{ital r}{lt}5.0 cm and within the depth interval 0.5 cm{le}{ital d}{le}24 cm. It was concluded that the saturation equation above provides an accurate description of the primary dose from monoenergetic photon beams, as judged by comparison with Monte Carlo results.

  2. Water

    MedlinePLUS

    ... consuming only bottled water or water from a filtration system that has been certified by an independent ... recommends using bottled water or water from a filtration system that has been certified by an independent ...

  3. Autonomous Depth Adjustment for Underwater Sensor Networks: Design and Applications

    E-print Network

    Detweiler, Carrick

    To fully understand the ocean environment requires sensing the full water column. Utilizing a depth adjustment system on an underwater sensor network provides this while also improving global sensing and communications. ...

  4. Modelling bottom stress in depth-averaged flows

    E-print Network

    Jenter, Harry Leonard

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between depth-averaged velocity and bottom stress for wind-driven flow in unstratified coastal waters is examined here. The adequacy of traditional linear and quadratic drag laws is addressed by comparison ...

  5. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables. (ACR)

  6. SU-E-T-67: Clinical Implementation and Evaluation of the Acuros Dose Calculation Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, C [UPMC Cancer Center at Horizon, Farrell, PA (United States); Combine, T [Beaver, PA (United States); Dickens, K; Wynn, R [UPMC Cancer Centers at Horizon, Farrell, Pennsylvania (United States); Pavord, D [Health-quest, Poughkeepsie, NY (United States); Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The main aim of the current study is to present a detailed description of the implementation of the Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm, and subsequently evaluate its clinical impacts by comparing it with AAA algorithm. Methods: The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were evaluated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6cm × 6cm to 40cm × 40cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. Similarly, wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60 degree were used. In addition, variable field sizes for a heterogeneous phantom were used to evaluate the Acuros algorithm. Finally, both Acuros and AAA were tested on VMAT patient plans for various sites. Does distributions and calculation time were compared. Results: On average, computation time is reduced by at least 50% by Acuros XB compared with AAA on single fields and VMAT plans. When used for open 6MV photon beams on homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculated doses were within 1% of measurement. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. When heterogeneous phantom was used, Acuros XB also improved on accuracy. Conclusion: Compared with AAA, Acuros XB can improve accuracy while significantly reduce computation time for VMAT plans.

  7. Bright Lenses and Optical Depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Nemiroff

    1997-01-01

    In gravitational lensing, the concept of optical depth assumes the lens is\\u000adark. Several microlensing detections have now been made where the lens may be\\u000abright. Relations are developed between apparent and absolute optical depth in\\u000athe regime of the apparent and absolute brightness of the lens. An apparent\\u000aoptical depth through bright lenses is always less than the true,

  8. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina Pla; Ervin B. Podgorsak; Conrado Pla

    1989-01-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is

  9. Investigation of an implantable dosimeter for single-point water equivalent path length verification in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Mann, Greg; Cascio, Ethan [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Sicel Technologies, Inc., Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 (United States); Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In vivo range verification in proton therapy is highly desirable. A recent study suggested that it was feasible to use point dose measurement for in vivo beam range verification in proton therapy, provided that the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution is delivered in a different and rather unconventional manner. In this work, the authors investigate the possibility of using a commercial implantable dosimeter with wireless reading for this particular application. Methods: The traditional proton treatment technique delivers all the Bragg peaks required for a SOBP field in a single sequence, producing a constant dose plateau across the target volume. As a result, a point dose measurement anywhere in the target volume will produce the same value, thus providing no information regarding the water equivalent path length to the point of measurement. However, the same constant dose distribution can be achieved by splitting the field into a complementary pair of subfields, producing two oppositely ''sloped'' depth-dose distributions, respectively. The ratio between the two distributions can be a sensitive function of depth and measuring this ratio at a point inside the target volume can provide the water equivalent path length to the dosimeter location. Two types of field splits were used in the experiment, one achieved by the technique of beam current modulation and the other by manipulating the location and width of the beam pulse relative to the range modulator track. Eight MOSFET-based implantable dosimeters at four different depths in a water tank were used to measure the dose ratios for these field pairs. A method was developed to correct the effect of the well-known LET dependence of the MOSFET detectors on the depth-dose distributions using the columnar recombination model. The LET-corrected dose ratios were used to derive the water equivalent path lengths to the dosimeter locations to be compared to physical measurements. Results: The implantable dosimeters measured the dose ratios with a reasonable relative uncertainty of 1%-3% at all depths, except when the ratio itself becomes very small. In total, 55% of the individual measurements reproduced the water equivalent path lengths to the dosimeters within 1 mm. For three dosimeters, the difference was consistently less than 1 mm. Half of the standard deviations over the repeated measurements were equal or less than 1 mm. Conclusions: With a single fitting parameter, the LET-correction method worked remarkably well for the MOSFET detectors. The overall results were very encouraging for a potential method of in vivo beam range verification with millimeter accuracy. This is sufficient accuracy to expand range of clinical applications in which the authors could use the distal fall off of the proton depth dose for tight margins.

  10. Skin dose from radionuclide contamination on clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.C.; Hussein, E.M.A. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton (Canada); Yuen, P.S. [AECL, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    Skin dose due to radio nuclide contamination on clothing is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon radiation transport. Contamination due to a hot particle on some selected clothing geometries of cotton garment is simulated. The effect of backscattering in the surrounding air is taken into account. For each combination of source-clothing geometry, the dose distribution function in the skin, including the dose at tissue depths of 7 mg cm{sup -2} and 1,000 Mg cm{sup -2}, is calculated by simulating monoenergetic photon and electron sources. Skin dose due to contamination by a radionuclide is then determined by proper weighting of & monoenergetic dose distribution functions. The results are compared with the VARSKIN point-kernel code for some radionuclides, indicating that the latter code tends to under-estimate the dose for gamma and high energy beta sources while it overestimates skin dose for low energy beta sources. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Changes realized from extended bit-depth and metal artifact reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Chen, D.; Zhong, H.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: High-Z material in computed tomography (CT) yields metal artifacts that degrade image quality and may cause substantial errors in dose calculation. This study couples a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm with enhanced 16-bit depth (vs standard 12-bit) to quantify potential gains in image quality and dosimetry. Methods: Extended CT to electron density (CT-ED) curves were derived from a tissue characterization phantom with titanium and stainless steel inserts scanned at 90-140 kVp for 12- and 16-bit reconstructions. MAR was applied to sinogram data (Brilliance BigBore CT scanner, Philips Healthcare, v.3.5). Monte Carlo simulation (MC-SIM) was performed on a simulated double hip prostheses case (Cerrobend rods embedded in a pelvic phantom) using BEAMnrc/Dosxyz (400 000 0000 histories, 6X, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} beam traversing Cerrobend rod). A phantom study was also conducted using a stainless steel rod embedded in solid water, and dosimetric verification was performed with Gafchromic film analysis (absolute difference and gamma analysis, 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement) for plans calculated with Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA, Eclipse v11.0) to elucidate changes between 12- and 16-bit data. Three patients (bony metastases to the femur and humerus, and a prostate cancer case) with metal implants were reconstructed using both bit depths, with dose calculated using AAA and derived CT-ED curves. Planar dose distributions were assessed via matrix analyses and using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm. Results: For 12-bit images, CT numbers for titanium and stainless steel saturated at 3071 Hounsfield units (HU), whereas for 16-bit depth, mean CT numbers were much larger (e.g., titanium and stainless steel yielded HU of 8066.5 {+-} 56.6 and 13 588.5 {+-} 198.8 for 16-bit uncorrected scans at 120 kVp, respectively). MC-SIM was well-matched between 12- and 16-bit images except downstream of the Cerrobend rod, where 16-bit dose was {approx}6.4% greater than 12-bit. Absolute film dosimetry in a region downstream of a stainless steel rod revealed that 16-bit calculated dose, with and without MAR, agreed more closely with film results (1%-2% less than film) as compared to 12-bit reconstructions (5.6%-6.5% less than film measurements). Gamma analysis revealed that 16-bit dose calculations were better matched to film results than 12-bit ({approx}10% higher pass rates for 16-bit). Similar results were observed in two patient cases; the largest discrepancy was observed for a femur case where 12-bit doses, both with and without MAR correction, were 6-7 Gy lower ({approx}17%-20% of the prescription dose) as compared to 16-bit dose calculations. However, when beams are not directly traversing metal, such as a prostate cancer case with bilateral hip prostheses; the impact of 16-bit reconstruction was diminished. Conclusions: These results suggest that it may be desirable to implement 16-bit MAR-corrected images for treatment planning purposes, which can provide a more accurate dosimetric approach coupled with improved visualization by suppression of CT artifacts.

  12. Austrian dose measurements onboard space station MIR and the International Space Station--overview and comparison.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Hajek, M; Summerer, L; Vana, N; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V; Arkhangelsky, V

    2004-01-01

    The Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities has conducted various space research missions in the last 12 years in cooperation with the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. They dealt with the exact determination of the radiation hazards for cosmonauts and the development of precise measurement devices. Special emphasis will be laid on the last experiment on space station MIR the goal of which was the determination of the depth distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent in a water filled Phantom. The first results from dose measurements onboard the International Space Station (ISS) will also be discussed. The spherical Phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems and had 4 channels where dosimeters can be exposed in different depths. The exposure period covered the timeframe from May 1997 to February 1999. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were exposed inside the Phantom, either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. For the evaluation of the linear energy transfer (LET), the high temperature ratio (HTR) method was applied. Based on this method a mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent is calculated according to the Q(LET infinity) relationship proposed in ICRP 26. An increased contribution of neutrons could be detected inside the Phantom. However the total dose equivalent did not increase over the depth of the Phantom. As the first Austrian measurements on the ISS dosimeter packages were exposed for 248 days, starting in February 2001 at six different locations onboard the ISS. The Austrian dosimeter sets for this first exposure on the ISS contained five different kinds of passive thermoluminescent dosimeters. First results showed a position dependent absorbed dose rate at the ISS. PMID:15881783

  13. Range shift and dose perturbation with high-density materials in proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichiporov, D.; Moskvin, V.; Fanelli, L.; Das, I. J.

    2011-11-01

    Radiotherapy with proton beams requires accurate knowledge of the proton range. When materials with high atomic numbers ( Z) and densities (e.g. prostheses or implants) are present in the patient, they give rise to pronounced uncertainties in computed tomography data and to large errors in proton range and dose calculations. A modified analytical expression is proposed for the observed range shift in water in the presence of a high-density material of known thickness and density. The expression was verified experimentally in a clinical beam with various thicknesses and materials in a water phantom, at several beam ranges and at different depths. Measurements were also made behind the medium-to-water interface to evaluate dose perturbation using a thin window parallel plate ion chamber. Primary particle fluence variations due to the range shift were studied in a separate experiment. The measured range shift was in good agreement (±0.3 mm) with the analytical expression for most of the materials studied. A small, but consistent dependence of range shift on the energy of impinging protons was found. Dose perturbation factor in water downstream of the material is less than +5% for thicknesses up to 8 g/cm 2. The proposed analytical expression can be used in clinical situations to determine the range shift in patient caused by an implanted material. Dose perturbation in the presence of an implant is due to the changes in primary particle fluence resulting from several physical processes.

  14. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-print Network

    IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental Citizen Science Environment Science for Environment Policy December of the West of England, Bristol (2013). Science for Environment Policy In- depth Report: Environmental Citizen-environment-policy Executive summary Introduction 1. The rise of environmental citizen science 2. The value of citizen science

  15. Stereo depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Vonsydow, Marika

    1988-01-01

    In teleoperation, a typical application of stereo vision is to view a work space located short distances (1 to 3m) in front of the cameras. The work presented here treats converged camera placement and studies the effects of intercamera distance, camera-to-object viewing distance, and focal length of the camera lenses on both stereo depth resolution and stereo depth distortion. While viewing the fronto-parallel plane 1.4 m in front of the cameras, depth errors are measured on the order of 2cm. A geometric analysis was made of the distortion of the fronto-parallel plane of divergence for stereo TV viewing. The results of the analysis were then verified experimentally. The objective was to determine the optimal camera configuration which gave high stereo depth resolution while minimizing stereo depth distortion. It is found that for converged cameras at a fixed camera-to-object viewing distance, larger intercamera distances allow higher depth resolutions, but cause greater depth distortions. Thus with larger intercamera distances, operators will make greater depth errors (because of the greater distortions), but will be more certain that they are not errors (because of the higher resolution).

  16. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  17. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L; Hatab, Mustapha R

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose. PMID:22684053

  18. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using 125I or 103Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose?EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within ?2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific 125I and 103Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off-axis points-of-interest, dose differences approached factors of 7 and 12 at some positions for 125I and 103Pd, respectively. There was good agreement (?3%) among MC codes and Plaque Simulator results when appropriate parameters calculated using MC codes were input into Plaque Simulator. Plaque Simulator and MC users are perhaps at risk of overdosing patients up to 20% if heterogeneity corrections are used and the prescribed dose is not modified appropriately. Conclusions: Agreement within 2% was observed among conventional brachytherapy TPS and MC codes for intraocular brachytherapy dose calculations in a homogeneous water environment. In general, the magnitude of dose errors incurred by ignoring the effect of the plaque backing and Silastic insert (i.e., by using the TG-43 approach) increased with distance from the plaque’s central-axis. Considering the presence of material heterogeneities in a typical eye plaque, the best method in this study for dose calculations is a verified MC simulation. PMID:21361199

  19. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa; Stefanini, Francisco Rosa; Penha, Fernando; Góes, Miguel Ângelo; Draibe, Sérgio Antonio; Canziani, Maria Eugênia; Junior, Augusto Paranhos

    2013-01-01

    Background Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241). We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002) during HD sessions. Conclusion Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. PMID:23976841

  20. Evaluation of PENFAST--a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Habib, B; Poumarede, B; Tola, F; Barthe, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within +/-1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE. PMID:19342258

  1. SU-E-T-386: A Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Framework for Electron Beams On Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sawkey, D [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The design of the linac head is different for TrueBeam than Clinac, and there are differences in measured dose distributions in water phantoms between TrueBeam and Clinac for electron beams. Therefore, MC models for Clinac may not be applied directly to the Truebeam linac. The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation framework for electron beams on Varian TrueBeam with phase space files provided by Varian. Methods: The particle histories from the phase space file were used as input for the down-stream simulation including jaws, applicators, and water phantom. MC packages BEAMnrc/DOSYXZnrc were used. The down-stream beam components were modeled according to manufacturer specifications and the dose distributions were compared with the measured data of standard cones. The measurements were performed in a water phantom with a p-type electron field diode (diameter 0.2cm) and ion chamber (CC13). Depth dose and orthogonal profiles at depths defined by R{sub 1} {sub 0} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, Rp were compared. Results: Preliminary results for a 16 MeV phase space and 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator are presented. Simulations were run for a statistical uncertainty of <2% at depth of maximum dose for a voxel resolution of 0.5x0.5x0.2cm{sup 2}. Dose and range differences for the PDD profiles were within 2% and 1 mm, respectively. Dose differences within the central 80% of the beam width for the orthogonal profiles at depth of maximum dose were less than 2% for the 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator, respectively. Conclusion: Varian electron phase space files simulations are in agreement with measured commissioning data. These phase space files can be used in the simulation of TrueBeam linacs, and will provide reproducibility across publications. Analyses for all electron energies and standard applicators are under way and results will be included in the presentation.

  2. The accuracy of dose calculations by anisotropic analytical algorithms for stereotactic radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma