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1

Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement  

E-print Network

Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement Sumit Sharma and Pablo G. Debenedetti1, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydro- phobic surfaces separated to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes

2

Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement  

PubMed Central

The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 ? and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm2), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 ?. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm2) than by the smaller (1 nm2) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube. PMID:22392972

Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

2012-01-01

3

Evaporation Rate of Water in Hydrophobic Confinement  

E-print Network

The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 {\\AA} and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm^2) the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a ten order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 {\\AA}. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50kT, and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm^2) than by the smaller (1nm^2) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this is a direct consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning cylindrical vapor tube.

Sumit Sharma; Pablo G. Debenedetti

2011-12-29

4

Instructions for measuring the rate of evaporation from water surfaces  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The ·rate of evaporation from water surfaces varies with the temperature of the water, the velocity of the wind at the water surface, and the dryness of the air. Consequently, the rate of evaporation from rivers, lakes, canals, or reservoirs varies widely in different localities and for the same locality in different seasons.

U.S. Geological Survey

1898-01-01

5

Urban evaporation rates for water-permeable pavements.  

PubMed

In urban areas the natural water balance is disturbed. Infiltration and evaporation are reduced, resulting in a high surface runoff and a typical city climate, which can lead to floods and damages. Water-permeable pavements have a high infiltration rate that reduces surface runoff by increasing the groundwater recharge. The high water retention capacity of the street body of up to 51 l/m(2) and its connection via pores to the surface lead to higher evaporation rates than impermeable surfaces. A comparison of these two kinds of pavements shows a 16% increase in evaporation levels of water-permeable pavements. Furthermore, the evaporation from impermeable pavements is linked directly to rain events due to fast-drying surfaces. Water-permeable pavements show a more evenly distributed evaporation after a rain event. Cooling effects by evaporative heat loss can improve the city climate even several days after rain events. On a large scale use, uncomfortable weather like sultriness or dry heat can be prevented and the urban water balance can be attenuated towards the natural. PMID:20818060

Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

2010-01-01

6

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water Robin J. Speedy  

E-print Network

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water at 150 K Robin J. Speedy 27 March 1996 Measurement of the rates of evaporation of amorphous water (a) and ice (i) near 150 K Institute of Physics. S0021-9606 96 50525-8 INTRODUCTION We report measurements of the rates of evaporation

7

Evaporation Rate on Tungsten  

E-print Network

Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan Introduction Motivation Research Objective Experiments Results Conclusions Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes supported by IREAP, with funding from NSF and ONR #12;Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes

Anlage, Steven

8

Effects on evaporation rates from different water-permeable pavement designs.  

PubMed

The urban water balance can be attenuated to the natural by water-permeable pavements (WPPs). Furthermore, WPPs have a 16% higher evaporation rate than impermeable pavements, which can lead to a better urban climate. Evaporation rates from pavements are influenced by the pavement surface and by the deeper layers. By a compared evaporation measurement between different WPP designs, the grain size distribution of the sub-base shows no influence on the evaporation rates in a significant way. On the contrary, a sub-base made of a twin-layer decreases the evaporation by 16% compared to a homogeneous sub-base. By a change in the colour of the paving stone, 19% higher evaporation rates could be achieved. A further comparison shows that the transpiration-effect of the grass in grass pavers increases the evaporation rates more than threefold to pervious concrete pavements. These high evapotranspiration rates can not be achieved with a pervious concrete paving stone. In spite of this, the broad field of application of the pervious concrete paving stone increases the importance in regard to the urban climate. PMID:22049757

Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

2011-01-01

9

Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

1970-01-01

10

Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

2012-04-01

11

METABOLIC RATE AND EVAPORATIVE WATER LOSS OF MEXICAN SPOTTED AND GREAT HORNED OWLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

AaSraAcr. -We measured rates of oxygen consumption and evaporative water loss (EWL) of Mexican Spotted (Strix occidentalis lucida) and Great Homed (Bubo virginianus) owls in Arizona. Basal metabolic rate averaged 0.84 ccO,gl .h-' for the Spotted Owl and 0.59 cc0, .g- I h- ' for the Great Homed Owl, with apparent thermoneutral zones extending from 17.0-25.2\\

JOSEPH L. GANIZY; RUSSELL P. BALDA; RUDY M. KINGS

1993-01-01

12

Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius comparable with that of the cylinder. It is found that the losses are less than 5 percent. It is concluded that such losses are, in general, very small (less than 1 percent) in the case of smaller obstacles (of icing-rate measurement- cylinder size); the motional dynamics are such, however, that exceptions will occur by reason of failure of very small droplets (moving along stagnation lines) to impinge upon obstacle surfaces. In such cases, the droplets will evaporate completely.

Lowell, H. H.

1953-01-01

13

Evaporation rate of water as a function of a magnetic field and field gradient.  

PubMed

The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

2012-01-01

14

A Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Rate of Evaporation of Large Water Drops Falling at Terminal Velocity in Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study of the effect of ventilation on the rate of evaporation of millimeter sized water drops failing at terminal velocity in air has been carried out in a wind tunnel where drops were suspended freely in the tunnel air stream. It was found that for drops in the size range 1150 µma02500 µm, the mean ventilation coefficient vh

H. R. Pruppacher; R. Rasmussen

1979-01-01

15

A Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Rate of Evaporation of Small Water Drops Falling at Terminal Velocity in Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study of the effect of ventilation on the rate of evaporation of small water drops falling at terminal velocity in air has been carried out in a wind tunnel where water drops could he suspended freely in the tunnel airstream. For Reynolds numbers NRe2 it was found that the Sherwood number NSh was linearly related to NRe1\\/2NI, in

K. V. Beard; H. R. Pruppacher

1971-01-01

16

Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

2010-01-01

17

Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

2013-01-01

18

Investigation of the effect of dissolved salts, soil layers, and wind on the evaporation rate of water on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laboratory simulation experiments have been performed to study the stability of water under martian conditions. The first chapter of this thesis is a background introduction into the history of Mars and a description of the evidence for past and present water on Mars. The second chapter describes experiments that were performed on low concentration brine solutions, but were never published. The rest of the thesis is submitted in thesis by publication format. Chapters three and four were published in Geophysical Research Letters and chapter five has been submitted to Mars Polar Science Special Edition of Icarus . The experiments described in this thesis were performed in the planetary simulation chamber in the W.M. Keck Laboratory for Space Simulations at the Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences. By simulating the conditions on Mars, with the exception of the gravitational constant, we are able to accurately measure the evaporation and sublimation of water and water ice. We measured the evaporation rates of low concentrations of a sodium chloride brine solution, the effect of temperature on eutectic solutions of sodium chloride and calcium chloride brines, the effect of a soil layer on the sublimation rate of ice, and the effect of wind on the sublimation of ice. The results for the evaporation of brine solutions and the results for the sublimation of ice under a soil layer agree very well with theoretical calculations using Fick's Law of Diffusion, as put forth by A.P. Ingersoll and C.B. Farmer, respectively. In contrast, the sublimation rate of ice under varied wind velocities did not agree with previous theory. Therefore, a new theoretical model was developed in order to accurately describe the effect of increasing wind velocity on sublimation rates. The new theoretical model agreed extremely well with experimental data. In performing these experiments, we are better able to understand the behavior of water under martian condition and can be used to determine under what conditions liquid water could exist and how long it would survive under the current environment on Mars. The implications relate to the formation of geologic features such as gullies and the possibility of life on Mars.

Chittenden, Julie Diane

2007-08-01

19

Evaporation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This three-part activity consists of an activity that groups of learners develop themselves, a given procedure, and an optional demonstration. First, learners discuss examples of evaporation and then design and conduct their own test to find out whether heating water has an effect on the rate of evaporation. While waiting for their results, learners conduct another evaporation activity using single drops of water on 2 paper towels, one of which is heated. The optional demonstration compares the rate of evaporation of hot and cold water using a sensitive scale or balance. In each of these experiences with evaporation, learners will identify variables, consider how to best control them, and use their observations to conclude that heating water increases the rate of evaporation.

2012-04-06

20

Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

Canpolat, Nurtac

2006-01-01

21

Evaporation Rates of Brine on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While Mars is now largely a dry and barren place, recent data have indicated that water has flowed at specific locations within the last approx. 10(exp 6) y. This had led to a resurgence of interest in theoretical and experimental work aimed at understanding the behavior of water on Mars. There are several means whereby the stability of liquid water on Mars could be increased, one being the presence solutes that would depress the freezing point. Salt water on Earth is about 0.5M NaCl, but laboratory experiments suggest that martian salt water is quite different. We recently began a program of laboratory measurements of the stability of liquid water, ice and ice-dust mixtures under martian conditions and here report measurements of the evaporation rate of 0.25M brine.

Sears, D. W. G.; Chittenden, J.; Moore, S. R.; Meier, A.; Kareev, M.; Farmer, C. B.

2004-01-01

22

Evaporation over fresh and saline water surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation over large water bodies has a crucial role in the global hydrological cycle. Evaporation occurs whenever there is a vapor pressure deficit between a water surface and the atmosphere, and the available energy is sufficient. Salinity affects the density and latent heat of vaporization of the water body, which reflects on the evaporation rate. Different models have been developed to estimate the evaporation process over water surfaces using earth observation data. Most of these models are concerned with the atmospheric parameters. However these models do not take into account the influence of salinity on the evaporation rate; they do not consider the difference in the energy needed for vaporization. For this purpose an energy balance model is required. Several energy balance models that calculate daily evapotranspiration exist, such as the surface energy balance system (SEBS). They estimate the heat fluxes by integration of satellite data and hydro-meteorological field data. SEBS has the advantage that it can be applied over a large scale because it incorporates the physical state of the surface and the aerodynamic resistances in the daily evapotranspiration estimation. Nevertheless this model has not used over water surfaces. The goal of this research is to adapt SEBS to estimate the daily evaporation over fresh and saline water bodies. In particular, 1) water heat flux and roughness of momentum and heat transfer estimation need to be updated, 2) upscaling to daily evaporation needs to be investigated and finally 3) integration of the salinity factor to estimate the evaporation over saline water needs to be performed. Eddy covariance measurements over the Ijsselmeer Lake (The Netherlands) were used to estimate the roughness of momentum and heat transfer at respectively 0.0002 and 0.0001 m. Application of these values over Tana Lake (freshwater), in Ethiopia showed latent heat to be in a good agreement with the measurements, with RMSE of 35.5 Wm-2and rRMSE of 4.7 %. Afterwards the validity of salinity adapted model was tested over different study areas using ECMWF data. It was found that for the original SEBS model and salinity-adapted model over Great Salt Lake, the RMSE were 0.62 and 0.24 mm respectively and the rRMSE 19% and 24%. The evaporation reduction of the Great Salt Lake and the oceans are 27% and 1 %, respectively. In conclusion, SEBS model is adapted to calculate the daily evaporation over fresh water and salt water by integration the salinity factor in the model.

Abdelrady, Ahmed; Timmermans, Joris; Vekerdy, Zoltan

2013-04-01

23

Modelling hourly rates of evaporation from small lakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents the results of a field study of open water evaporation carried out on three small lakes in Western and Northern Canada. In this case small lakes are defined as those for which the temperature above the water surface is governed by the upwind land surface conditions; that is, a continuous boundary layer exists over the lake, and large-scale atmospheric effects such as entrainment do not come into play. Lake evaporation was measured directly using eddy covariance equipment; profiles of wind speed, air temperature and humidity were also obtained over the water surfaces. Observations were made as well over the upwind land surface. The major factors controlling open water evaporation were examined. The study showed that for time periods shorter than daily, the open water evaporation bears no relationship to the net radiation; the wind speed is the most significant factor governing the evaporation rates, followed by the land-water temperature contrast and the land-water vapour pressure contrast. The effect of the stability on the wind field was demonstrated; relationships were developed relating the land-water wind speed contrast to the land-water temperature contrast. The open water period can be separated into two distinct evaporative regimes: the warming period in the Spring, when the land is warmer than the water, the turbulent fluxes over water are suppressed; and the cooling period, when the water is warmer than the land, the turbulent fluxes over water are enhanced. Relationships were developed between the hourly rates of lake evaporation and the following significant variables and parameters (wind speed, land-lake temperature and humidity contrasts, and the downwind distance from shore). The result is a relatively simple versatile model for estimating the hourly lake evaporation rates. The model was tested using two independent data sets. Results show that the modelled evaporation follows the observed values very well; the model follows the diurnal trends and responds to changes in environmental conditions.

Granger, R. J.; Hedstrom, N.

2011-01-01

24

Evaporation from partially covered water surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaporative losses from large water bodies may exceed 20% of water used in irrigated agriculture, with losses from reservoirs estimated at 50% of storage capacity. Prominent among proposed methods to curtail these evaporative losses are various forms of partial covers placed over water surfaces. Studies show that evaporation through perforated covers and from partially covered water surfaces exhibit nonlinear behavior,

S. Assouline; K. Narkis; D. Or

2010-01-01

25

The dynamics of water evaporation from partially  

E-print Network

The dynamics of water evaporation from partially solvated Cytochrome c in the gas phase Michal Z of evaporation of water from biological macromolecules is important for the understanding of electrospray mass from solutions of, for example, proteins. Then evaporation of the solvent leads to dry protein ions

Elber, Ron

26

Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

1982-01-01

27

Water Purification by Evaporation and Condensation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This demonstration illustrates how the water cycle helps to purify water. Students are introduced to the key terms, which are evaporation and condensation. They discover that evaporation is defined as the process through which a liquid becomes a vapor, while condensation is simply the reverse. Students also learn that in the case of water, the main mechanisms for evaporation and condensation are heating and cooling, respectively.

28

Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water  

PubMed Central

This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as ?18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

2014-01-01

29

Spatially Resolved Evaporative Patterns from Water  

E-print Network

Unexpectedly distinct patterns in evaporation were observed over heated water. Although the patterns had chaotic aspects, they often showed geometric patterns. These patterns bore strong resemblance to the infrared emission patterns observable with a mid-infrared camera focused on the water surface. This similarity puts constraints on the mechanism of evaporation, and leads to a general hypothesis as to the nature of the evaporative process.

Ienna, Federico; Pollack, Gerald H

2011-01-01

30

Water Evaporation: A Transition Path Sampling Study  

E-print Network

We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPC/E model of liquid water. Based on thousands of evaporation trajectories, we characterize the members of the transition state ensemble (TSE), which exhibit a liquid-vapor interface with predominantly negative mean curvature at the site of evaporation. We also find that after evaporation is complete, the distributions of translational and angular momenta of the evaporated water are Maxwellian with a temperature equal to that of the liquid. To characterize the evaporation trajectories in their entirety, we find that it suffices to project them onto just two coordinates: the distance of the evaporating molecule to the instantaneous liquid-vapor interface, and the velocity of the water along the average interface normal. In this projected space, we find that the TSE is well-captured by a simple model of ballistic escape from a deep potential well, with no additional barrier to evaporation beyond the cohesive strength of the liquid. Equivalently, they are consistent with a near-unity probability for a water molecule impinging upon a liquid droplet to condense. These results agree with previous simulations and with some, but not all, recent experiments.

Patrick Varilly; David Chandler

2012-12-12

31

Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.  

PubMed

Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem. PMID:21902381

Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

2011-08-12

32

Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime  

E-print Network

Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem.

Samuel L. Braunstein; Manas K. Patra

2011-08-10

33

A study of the Sherwood–Rayleigh relation for water undergoing natural convection-driven evaporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study is presented of evaporative free-surface natural convection. A power law relationship is developed between the Sherwood number for evaporation (Sh) and the Rayleigh number for air-side natural convection (Ra). Evaporation of water was investigated in sixteen different tanks having four depths and four widths. Evaporation rates and the relevant temperatures and relative humidity were measured, from which

S. M. Bower; J. R. Saylor

2009-01-01

34

Evaporation from a reservoir with fluctuating water level: Correcting for limited fetch  

E-print Network

Evaporation from a reservoir with fluctuating water level: Correcting for limited fetch J. Tanny a covariance Footprint model Evaporation measurements Evaporation models Wind Radiation s u m m a r y- tions in inflow and outflow rates, thereby complicating the measurement and modeling of evaporation

Katul, Gabriel

35

Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers  

E-print Network

Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers Theresa Pistochini May 23rd, 2012 ResearchAirCapacity,tons Gallons of Water Continuous Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F Cyclic Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F #12 AverageWaterHardness(ppm) Cooling Degree Days (60°F Reference) 20% Population 70% Population 10

California at Davis, University of

36

Freezing of Water Droplet due to Evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the feasibility of cooling/freezing of phase change.. materials(PCMs) due to evaporation for cold storage systems was experimentally examined. A pure water was used as the test PCM, since the latent heat due to evaporation of water is about 7 times larger than that due to freezing. A water droplet, the diameter of which was 1-4 mm, was suspended in a test cell by a fine metal wire (O. D.= 100?m),and the cell was suddenly evacuated up to the pressure lower than the triple-point pressure of water, so as to enhance the evaporation from the water surface. Temperature of the droplet was measured by a thermocouple, and the cooling/freezing behavior and the temperature profile of the droplet surface were captured by using a video camera and an IR thermo-camera, respectively. The obtained results showed that the water droplet in the evacuated cell is effectively cooled by the evaporation of water itself, and is frozen within a few seconds through remarkable supercooling state. When the initial temperature of the droplet is slightly higher than the room temperature, boiling phenomena occur in the droplet simultaneously with the freezing due to evaporation. Under such conditions, it was shown that the degree of supercooling of the droplet is reduced by the bubbles generated in the droplet.

Satoh, Isao; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yu

37

Soil, Water and Atmospheric Processes 2h Tutorial Evaporation Simulation of Evaporation.  

E-print Network

Soil, Water and Atmospheric Processes 2h Tutorial ­ Evaporation 1 of 4 Simulation of Evaporation. This tutorial will help reinforce some of the lecture material on water vapour, evaporation and turbulent transfer processes. You will use a simulation model of the evaporation process (essentially the Penman

Moncrieff, John B.

38

PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES  

EPA Science Inventory

Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

39

On the Effect of the Atmosphere on the Evaporation of Sessile Droplets of Water  

E-print Network

On the Effect of the Atmosphere on the Evaporation of Sessile Droplets of Water K. Sefiane1 , S. K into the effect of the atmosphere on the evaporation of pinned sessile droplets of water is described. The experimental work investigated the evaporation rates of sessile droplets in atmospheres of three different

Mottram, Nigel

40

Thermocapillary transport of energy during water evaporation V. K. Badam,2  

E-print Network

Thermocapillary transport of energy during water evaporation Fei Duan,1 V. K. Badam,2 F. Durst,2 manuscript received 21 March 2005; published 2 November 2005 When evaporation occurs at a spherical water that thermal conduction alone does not provide enough energy to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate

Ward, Charles A.

41

Estimating soil water evaporation using radar measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field studies were conducted to evaluate the application of radar reflectivity as compared with the shortwave reflectivity (albedo) used in the Idso-Jackson equation for the estimation of daily evaporation under overcast sky and subhumid climatic conditions. Soil water content, water potential, shortwave and radar reflectivity, and soil and air temperatures were monitored during three soil drying cycles. The data from each cycle were used to calculate daily evaporation from the Idso-Jackson equation and from two other standard methods, the modified Penman and plane of zero-flux. All three methods resulted in similar estimates of evaporation under clear sky conditions; however, under overcast sky conditions, evaporation fluxes computed from the Idso-Jackson equation were consistently lower than the other two methods. The shortwave albedo values in the Idso-Jackson equation were then replaced with radar reflectivities and a new set of total daily evaporation fluxes were calculated. This resulted in a significant improvement in computed soil evaporation fluxes from the Idso-Jackson equation, and a better agreement between the three methods under overcast sky conditions.

Sadeghi, Ali M.; Scott, H. D.; Waite, W. P.; Asrar, G.

1988-01-01

42

Vapor-based interferometric measurement of local evaporation rate and interfacial temperature of evaporating droplets.  

PubMed

The local evaporation rate and interfacial temperature are two quintessential characteristics for the study of evaporating droplets. Here, it is shown how one can extract these quantities by measuring the vapor concentration field around the droplet with digital holographic interferometry. As a concrete example, an evaporating freely receding pending droplet of 3M Novec HFE-7000 is analyzed at ambient conditions. The measured vapor cloud is shown to deviate significantly from a pure-diffusion regime calculation, but it compares favorably to a new boundary-layer theory accounting for a buoyancy-induced convection in the gas and the influence upon it of a thermal Marangoni flow. By integration of the measured local evaporation rate over the interface, the global evaporation rate is obtained and validated by a side-view measurement of the droplet shape. Advective effects are found to boost the global evaporation rate by a factor of 4 as compared to the diffusion-limited theory. PMID:24506092

Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

2014-03-01

43

EVAPORATIVE RECOVERY OF CHROMIUM PLATING RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This demonstration project documents the practicality of a new evaporative approach for recovering chromic acid from metal finishing rinse waste waters, as well as the economics of the system under actual operating conditions. The six-month study of chrome plating operations was ...

44

Soil water evaporation and crop residues  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

45

Isotopic fractionation of water during evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the isotopic content (18O/16O and D/H ratios) of water in the natural environment provide a valuable tracer of the present-day global hydrologic cycle and a record of the climate over at least 400,000 years that is preserved in glacial ice. The interpretation of observed isotopic ratios in water vapor, rain, snow, and ice depends on our understanding of the processes (mainly phase changes) that produce isotopic fractionation. Whereas equilibrium isotopic fractionation is well understood, kinetic effects, or diffusion-controlled fractionation, has a limited experimental foundation. Kinetic effects are significant during evaporation into unsaturated air and during condensation to form ice from vapor. Kinetic effects are also thought to control the deuterium excess (d = ?D - 8?18O) of precipitation. We describe experiments to observe kinetic effects associated with evaporation. Analysis of our own and previous experiments shows that surface cooling of the liquid is a crucial variable affecting fractionation from evaporating water that has not been properly considered before. Including the effects of evaporative surface cooling reconciles observed D/H fractionation with kinetic theory and removes the need to invoke an unusual size for the HDO molecule. Thus the isotopic molecular diffusivity ratios are D(H218O)/D(H216O) = 0.9691 and D(HD16O)/D(H216O) = 0.9839. Implications of this work for representation of kinetic fractionation in global circulation models and cloud physics models are briefly discussed.

Cappa, Christopher D.; Hendricks, Melissa B.; Depaolo, Donald J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2003-08-01

46

Evaporation rate and vapor pressure of selected polymeric lubricating oils.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A recently developed ultrahigh-vacuum quartz spring mass sorption microbalance has been utilized to measure the evaporation rates of several low-volatility polymeric lubricating oils at various temperatures. The evaporation rates are used to calculate the vapor pressures by the Langmuir equation. A method is presented to accurately estimate extended temperature range evaporation rate and vapor pressure data for polymeric oils, incorporating appropriate corrections for the increases in molecular weight and the change in volatility of the progressively evaporating polymer fractions. The logarithms of the calculated data appear to follow linear relationships within the test temperature ranges, when plotted versus 1000/T. These functions and the observed effusion characteristics of the fluids on progressive volatilization are useful in estimating evaporation rate and vapor pressure changes on evaporative depletion.

Gardos, M. N.

1973-01-01

47

Physiological adjustments of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa) to a boom-or-bust economy: standard fasting metabolic rate, total evaporative water loss, and changes in the sizes of organs during food and water restriction.  

PubMed

To test the hypothesis that desert ungulates adjust their physiology in response to long-term food and water restriction, we established three groups of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa): one that was provided food and water (n = 6; CTRL) ad lib. for 4 mo, one that received ad lib. food and water for the same period but was deprived of food and water for the last 4.5 d (n = 6; EXPT(1)), and one that was exposed to 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, an experimental regime designed to mimic conditions in a natural desert setting (n = 6; EXPT(2)). At the end of the 4-mo experiment, we measured standard fasting metabolic rate (SFMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) of all sand gazelles and determined lean dry mass of organs of gazelles in CTRL and EXPT(2). Gazelles in CTRL had a mean SFMR of 2,524 +/- 194 kJ d(-1), whereas gazelles in EXPT(1) and EXPT(2) had SFMRs of 2,101+/- 232 and 1,365 +/- 182 kJ d(-1), respectively, values that differed significantly when we controlled for differences in body mass. Gazelles had TEWLs of 151.1 +/- 18.2, 138.5 +/- 17.53, and 98.4 +/- 27.2 g H(2)O d(-1) in CTRL, EXPT(1), and EXPT(2), respectively. For the latter group, mass-independent TEWL was 27.1% of the value for CTRL. We found that normally hydrated sand gazelles had a low mass-adjusted TEWL compared with other arid-zone ungulates: 13.6 g H(2)O kg(-0.898) d(-1), only 17.1% of allometric predictions, the lowest ever measured in an arid-zone ungulate. After 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, dry lean mass of liver, heart, and muscle of gazelles in EXPT(2) was significantly less than that of these same organs in CTRL, even when we controlled for body mass decrease. Decreases in the dry lean mass of liver explained 70.4% of the variance of SFMR in food- and water-restricted gazelles. As oxygen demands decreased because of reduced organ sizes, gazelles lost less evaporative water, probably because of a decreased respiratory water loss. PMID:16826507

Ostrowski, Stephane; Mesochina, Pascal; Williams, Joseph B

2006-01-01

48

Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries  

E-print Network

Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries A Saleh1 and MA Al-Nimr2 1 Abstract: The present study proposes an evaporative refrigerating system used to keep water or other are found to be consistent with the available literature data. Keywords: evaporative refrigeration, heat

49

Evaporation rates of pasture-mesquite vegetation in central Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The semiarid highlands of Queretaro, in central Mexico, are characterized by booming urban and industrial developments with increasing demand for water. Agriculture takes place in the valleys and the surrounding hills have different types of xeric to subtropical rangeland. Hills are unfit for agriculture and usually are managed for cattle production and fuelwood. However, recent studies suggest that some hill areas are important for groundwater recharge and if they are not protected, important water shortages are envisioned. A critical question involves the effects of land management practices on rangeland hydrologic processes. Evaporation (E), which includes plant and soil evaporation is the largest water loss from rangelands and few data are available for central Mexico. The objective of this study was to estimate E from a mesquite (Prosopis sp.) dominated vegetation using the eddy correlation and the Pennman-Monteith models. Measurements were made during 24 summer days of 2004 at a piedmont site at Amascala, Queretaro (1919 m, 20° 41' N, 100° 16' W). Long term annual rainfall is 568 ± 137 mm. Shrub density was 770 plants per hectare and mean height was 1.8 m. The understory was composed by a mixture of annual and perennial grasses but their biomass was negligible. Agroforestry was the current land use of the site. Shrubs were pruned every 2 or 3 years to maintain its height and promote leafty regrowth. Goats usually browsed the mesquite canopy, but during the time of the study they were excluded from the area.The rainy season started on 15 May and measurements initiated on 1 June, five days after a severe hail storm. Although the mesquite canopy had a full developed canopy with leaf area index of 3.2 by this time, they lost approximately 70% of leaf area. May and June rainfall was 146 mm and 46 mm occurred during the measuring period. Throughout the measurement period E was coupled to global radiation and total evaporation was 73.8 mm. On cloudy days E ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 mm d-1, maximum E was 4.3 mm d-1 on sunny days and the average E was 3.1 mm d-1. Average daily E increased during the measuring period at a rate of 0.05 mm d-1 (r2=0.2, p<0.05). Data suggest that evaporation from a pasture-mesquite vegetation is an important component in the water balance considering the limited rainfall occurring.

Sosa, E. G.; Escobar, A. G.

2004-12-01

50

Evaporative Water Loss in Box Turtles: Effects of Rostral Brainstem and Other Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Box turtles were implanted with thermodes astride the preoptic tissue of the brainstem. The rate of evaporative water loss could be transiently increased by heating the rostral brainstem. Heating tissue in the anterior hypothalamus affected evaporative water loss only at high ambient temperatures. The magnitude of the response was proportional both to the change in hypothalamic temperature and to the

K. R. Morgareidge; H. T. Hammel

1975-01-01

51

Experimental study on water evaporation from sand using environmental chamber  

E-print Network

ARTICLE Experimental study on water evaporation from sand using environmental chamber Wei-Kang Song, Yu-Jun Cui, Anh Minh Tang, Wen-Qi Ding, and Thanh Danh Tran Abstract: Large-scale evaporation. The results show that the air and soil temperatures depend on the evaporation process and atmospheric

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Numerical Evaluation of Heat Pulse Technology for Estimation of Evaporation Rates from a Subsurface Drying Front  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil water evaporation plays a crucial role for both the soil surface energy balance and the hydrologic cycle. Recently introduced heat pulse probes (HPP) allow in-situ measurements of subsurface soil water evaporation. The sensible heat component is calculated from soil heat flux densities measured at two depths and the change in sensible heat storage between these depths is measured by the HPP. The latent heat component detectable during stage 2 evaporation is then estimated from the heat balance residual. Although the accuracy of the estimated evaporation rate depends on many factors (i.e., location of sensor needles, soil texture), the theoretical limits of the HPP method have not been thoroughly evaluated. In the study presented, numerical simulations of the soil water evaporation process were conducted for a heat pulse line source to evaluate the capabilities of the HPP method using a high resolution grid (i.e., mm scale). Calculated temperatures at the depths of virtual sensor needles were used for the HPP method and measured subsurface evaporation rates were compared with simulated ones. The impacts of sensor needle depths were also evaluated for tri-needle (THPP) and penta-needle (PHPP) heat pulse probe configurations. Furthermore, the impact of soil texture was evaluated using coarse- and fine-textured soils. Numerical simulations including liquid water, soil water vapor flux and heat transport were conducted using the HYDRUS-1D code.

Sakai, M.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

2009-12-01

53

Sensible heat observations reveal soil-water evaporation dynamics  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Soil water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet, routine measurments are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. The objective of this study was to determine the depth a...

54

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. FLASH EVAPORATOR, CONDENSER (PROJECT FROM EVAPORATOR), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. FLASH EVAPORATOR, CONDENSER (PROJECT FROM EVAPORATOR), AND STEAM EJECTOR (ALONG REAR WALL). INL NEGATIVE NO. 4377. M.H. Bartz, Photographer, 3/5/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

55

Long Duration Testing of a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is a heat-rejection device that is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. Cooling is achieved by circulating water from the liquid cooling garment (LCG) through hollow fibers (HoFi s), which are small hydrophobic tubes. Liquid water remains within the hydrophobic tubes, but water vapor is exhausted to space, thereby removing heat. A SWME test article was tested over the course of a year, for a total of 600 cumulative hours. In order to evaluate SWME tolerance to contamination due to constituents caused by distillation processes, these constituents were allowed to accumulate in the water as evaporation occurred. A test article was tested over the course of a year for a total of 600 cumulative hours. The heat rejection performance of the SWME degraded significantly--below 700 W, attributable to the accumulation of rust in the circulating loop and biofilm growth. Bubble elimination capability, a feature that was previously proven with SWME, was compromised during the test, most likely due to loss of hydrophobic properties of the hollow fibers. The utilization of water for heat rejection was shown not to be dependent on test article, life cycle, heat rejection rate, or freezing of the membranes.

Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Cox, Marlon; Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Colunga, Aaron; Conger, Bruce

2012-01-01

56

Long Duration Testing of a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is a heat-rejection device that is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. Cooling is achieved by circulating water from the liquid cooling garment (LCG) through hollow fibers (HoFi?s), which are small hydrophobic tubes. Liquid water remains within the hydrophobic tubes, but water vapor is exhausted to space, thereby removing heat. A SWME test article was tested over the course of a year, for a total of 1200 cumulative hours. In order to evaluate SWME tolerance to contamination due to constituents caused by distillation processes, these constituents were allowed to accumulate in the water as evaporation occurred. A test article was tested over the course of a year for a total of 1200 cumulative hours. The heat rejection performance of the SWME degraded significantly--below 700 W, attributable to the accumulation of rust in the circulating loop and biofilm growth. Bubble elimination capability, a feature that was previously proven with SWME, was compromised during the test, most likely due to loss of hydrophobic properties of the hollow fibers. The utilization of water for heat rejection was shown not to be dependent on test article, life cycle, heat rejection rate, or freezing of the membranes.

Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Cox, Marlon; Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Colunga, Aaron

2011-01-01

57

Exploring Evaporation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn what evaporation is and how various factors--time, heat, surface area, and wind--affect it. They also discover that water does not always evaporate at the same rate and saltwater leaves something behind when it evaporates. Finally, students a

Eichinger, John

2009-05-15

58

Effect of pressure on the rate of evaporation from capillaries: statistical rate theory approach  

E-print Network

- dictions was also good, but the test was not as rigorous, since the internal vibrational frequenciesEffect of pressure on the rate of evaporation from capillaries: statistical rate theory approach P from studies of evaporation and condensation, crystal dissolution, gas­solid surface kinetics on single

Ward, Charles A.

59

Dynamics of Soil Water Evaporation during Soil Drying: Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis  

PubMed Central

Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68?cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71?cm during stage 3. PMID:24489492

Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

2013-01-01

60

The continuous similarity model of bulk soil-water evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The continuous similarity model of evaporation is described. In it, evaporation is conceptualized as a two stage process. For an initially moist soil, evaporation is first climate limited, but later it becomes soil limited. During the latter stage, the evaporation rate is termed evaporability, and mathematically it is inversely proportional to the evaporation deficit. A functional approximation of the moisture distribution within the soil column is also included in the model. The model was tested using data from four experiments conducted near Phoenix, Arizona; and there was excellent agreement between the simulated and observed evaporation. The model also predicted the time of transition to the soil limited stage reasonably well. For one of the experiments, a third stage of evaporation, when vapor diffusion predominates, was observed. The occurrence of this stage was related to the decrease in moisture at the surface of the soil. The continuous similarity model does not account for vapor flow. The results show that climate, through the potential evaporation rate, has a strong influence on the time of transition to the soil limited stage. After this transition, however, bulk evaporation is independent of climate until the effects of vapor flow within the soil predominate.

Clapp, R. B.

1983-01-01

61

Evaporation estimates from the Dead Sea and their implications on its water balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dead Sea (DS) is a terminal hypersaline water body situated in the deepest part of the Jordan Valley. There is a growing interest in linking the DS to the open seas due to severe water shortages in the area and the serious geological and environmental hazards to its vicinity caused by the rapid level drop of the DS. A key issue in linking the DS with the open seas would be an accurate determination of evaporation rates. There exist large uncertainties of evaporation estimates from the DS due to the complex feedback mechanisms between meteorological forcings and thermophysical properties of hypersaline solutions. Numerous methods have been used to estimate current and historical (pre-1960) evaporation rates, with estimates differing by ˜100%. Evaporation from the DS is usually deduced indirectly using energy, water balance, or pan methods with uncertainty in many parameters. Accumulated errors resulting from these uncertainties are usually pooled into the estimates of evaporation rates. In this paper, a physically based method with minimum empirical parameters is used to evaluate historical and current evaporation estimates from the DS. The more likely figures for historical and current evaporation rates from the DS were 1,500-1,600 and 1,200-1,250 mm per annum, respectively. Results obtained are congruent with field observations and with more elaborate procedures.

Oroud, Ibrahim M.

2011-12-01

62

17Oexcess in evaporated desert waters and vapor from evaporation experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes are classical proxies for the investigation of climatic effects in hydrological processes. The combination of the isotopic ratios 17O/16O and 18O/16O in water allowed the determination of mass dependent processes and enabled differentiation between equilibrium and kinetic fractionation (Barkan and Luz, 2007). In analogy to d-excess, deviation in ?17O from the global average trend of meteoric water is defined as: 17Oexcess = ?'17O - 0.528 × ?'18O 17Oexcess depends on the impact of diffusive evaporation into air and thus reflects relative humidity conditions. The isotope ratios of water ?17O and ?18O were determined by isotope ratio gas mass spectrometry in dual inlet mode on a ThermoFinnigan MAT 253. The oxygen was extracted by water fluorination with CoF3. Our average measurement precision for ?17O is ×0.03 ‰, for ?18O ×0.05 ‰ and for 17Oexcess approximately ×7 per meg (1?). We compared 17Oexcess in natural waters from the highly arid deserts of Sistan (East Iran) and Atacama (Chile) with data obtained from evaporation experiments. In these experiments, water was evaporated into a stream of dry nitrogen and vapor collected cryogenically. The data show a systematic depletion of 17Oexcess in water with increasing degree of evaporation in the residual water body. Most negative 17Oexcess were determined for samples from ponds (Sistan) and salars (Atacama). These strongly evaporated samples indicate an evaporation development, following a fractionation trend (?) of approximately 0.523. The evaporation experiment shows a ? of 0.525 and is in agreement with water data from an experiment by Barkan and Luz (2007). The difference between natural and experimental evaporation suggests either different evaporation kinetics in the natural environment, variable proportion of kinetic and equilibrium fractionation, or additional diffusive processes during ground water seepage. References: Barkan, E. and Luz, L. (2007). Diffusivity fractionations of H216O/H217O and H216O/H218O in air and their implications for isotope hydrology. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., Vol. 21, pp. 2999-3005.

Surma, J.; Assonov, S.; Staubwasser, M.

2013-12-01

63

Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

2014-01-01

64

Physically modeling operative temperatures and evaporation rates in amphibians  

USGS Publications Warehouse

(1) We designed a physical model that simulates the thermal and evaporative properties of live Western toads (Bufo boreas). (2) In controlled tests, the model tracked the body temperature of live toads with an average error of 0.3??0.03??C (test range=4-30??C). (3) It estimated the evaporative water loss of live toads with an average error of 0.35-0.65 g/h, or about 14% (test range=0.7-9 g/h). (4) Data collected with this physical model should provide an effective way for biologists to better understand habitat selection in toads and other amphibians. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Bartelt, P.E.; Peterson, C.R.

2005-01-01

65

A Mass Function Constraint on Extrasolar Giant Planet Evaporation Rates  

E-print Network

The observed mass function for all known extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) varies approximately as M^{-1} for mass M between 0.2 Jupiter masses (M_J) and 5 M_J. In order to study evaporation effects for highly-irradiated EGPs in this mass range, we have constructed an observational mass function for a subset of EGPs in the same mass range but with orbital radii evaporation, this result places a constraint on orbital migration models and rules out the most extreme mass loss rates in the literature. A theory that predicts more moderate mass loss gives a mass function that is closer to observed statistics but still disagrees for M < 1 M_J.

W. B Hubbard; M. Hattori; A. Burrows; I. Hubeny

2007-02-09

66

Tillage effects on soil water redistribution and bare soil evaporation throughout a season  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tillage-induced changes in soil properties are difficult to predict, yet can influence how water is redistributed within the profile after precipitation and subsequent evaporation rates. We evaluated the effects of sweep tillage (ST) on near surface soil water dynamics as compared with an untilled (...

67

Studying biofuel aerosol evaporation rates with single particle manipulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The significant increase in the air pollution, and the impact on climate change due to the burning of fossil fuel has led to the research of alternative energies. Bio-ethanol obtained from a variety of feedstocks can provide a feasible solution. Mixing bio-ethanol with gasoline leads to a reduction in CO emission and in NOx emissions compared with the use of gasoline alone. However, adding ethanol leads to a change in the fuel evaporation. Here we present a preliminary investigation of evaporation times of single ethanol-gasoline droplets. In particular, we investigated the different evaporation rate of the droplets depending on the variation in the percentage of ethanol inside them. Two different techniques have been used to trap the droplets. One makes use of a 532nm optical tweezers set up, the other of an electrodynamics balance (EDB). The droplets decreasing size was measured using video analysis and elastic light scattering respectively. In the first case measurements were conducted at 293.15 K and ambient humidity. In the second case at 280.5 K and a controlled environment has been preserved by flowing nitrogen into the chamber. Binary phase droplets with a higher percentage of ethanol resulted in longer droplet lifetimes. Our work also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each technique for such studies. In particular it is challenging to trap droplets with low ethanol content (such as pure gasoline) by the use of EDB. Conversely such droplets are trivial to trap using optical tweezers.

Corsetti, S.; Miles, R. E. H.; Reid, J. P.; Kiefer, J.; McGloin, D.

2014-09-01

68

The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

Clapp, R. B.

1983-01-01

69

Modelling framework The evaporation rate of a fuel droplet depends on the its diameter,  

E-print Network

Modelling framework · The evaporation rate of a fuel droplet depends on the its diameter. · CFD simulations for a combustor rely on models for the mean evaporation rate of all the droplets in a computational cell. To compute the mean evaporation rate we need to estimate the joint-probability (PDF) of all

Sóbester, András

70

INLINE HIGH-RATE THERMAL EVAPORATION OF ALUMINUM FOR NOVEL INDUSTRIAL SOLAR CELL METALLIZATION  

E-print Network

INLINE HIGH-RATE THERMAL EVAPORATION OF ALUMINUM FOR NOVEL INDUSTRIAL SOLAR CELL METALLIZATION F, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover, Germany ABSTRACT: We evaluate a novel high-throughput thermal evaporation deposition rates of up to 5 µm � m/min. By adjusting the individual aluminium evaporation rate for each

71

Water sources, mixing and evaporation in the Akyatan lagoon, Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Akyatan lagoon, located southeast of Turkey along the Mediterranean coast, is a choked and hypersaline lagoon, and hosts a large and specific biodiversity including endangered sea turtles and migrating birds. Physicochemical properties of this lagoon were investigated by measuring temperature, salinity, and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of its waters at a seasonal scale during years 2006 and 2007. Winter and spring seasons were dominated by mixing processes between freshwaters and Mediterranean seawater. The majority of spring season waters are formed by evapoconcentration of brackish water at moderate temperatures of 22 ± 2 °C. During summer, hypersaline waters result from evaporation of seawater and brackish waters formed during spring. Evaporation over the Akyatan lagoon reaches up to 76 wt% based on salinity measurements and operated with a dry (relative humidity of 0.15-0.20) and hot (44 ± 6 °C) air. These residual waters were characterized by the maximal seasonal isotopic enrichment in both deuterium and 18O relative to VSMOW. During autumn, most lagoonal waters became hypersaline and were formed by evaporation of waters that had isotopic compositions and salinities close to that of seawater. These autumnal hypersaline waters result from an air humidity close to 0.45 and an atmospheric temperature of evaporation of 35 ± 5 °C, which are responsible for up to 71 wt% of evaporation, with restricted isotopic enrichments relative to VSMOW. During the warm seasons, the combination of air humidity, wind velocity and temperature were responsible for a large kinetic component in the total isotopic fractionation between water liquid and water vapour.

Lécuyer, C.; Bodergat, A.-M.; Martineau, F.; Fourel, F.; Gürbüz, K.; Nazik, A.

2012-12-01

72

Black Hole Evaporation Rates without Spacetime Samuel L. Braunstein and Manas K. Patra  

E-print Network

Black Hole Evaporation Rates without Spacetime Samuel L. Braunstein and Manas K. Patra Computer tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes

Braunstein, Samuel L.

73

On the remote measurement of evaporation rates from bare wet soil under variable cloud cover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaporation rates from a natural wet soil surface are calculated from an energy balance equation at 0.1-hour intervals. A procedure is developed for calculating the heat flux through the soil surface from a harmonic analysis of the surface temperature curve. The evaporation integrated over an entire 24-hour period is compared with daily evaporation rates obtained from published models.

Auer, S.

1976-01-01

74

Rate of Water Evaporation in Texas.  

E-print Network

, President STATION STAFF? Administration : Veterinary Science : Chief - lent ement ment A. B. Conner, M. S., Director *M. Francis, D. V. M., R. E. Karper, M. S., Vice-Director H. Schmidt, D. V. M., Veterinarian Clarice Mixson, B. A., Secretary **F. P.... Mathews, D.V.M., M.S., Veterinarian M. P. Holleman, Chief Clerk J. B. Mims, D. V. M., Asst. Veterinarian J. K. Francklow, Asst. Chief Clerk Plant Pathology and Physiology: Chester Higgs, Executive Assistant J. J. Taubenhaus, Ph. D., Chief Howard Berry...

Karper, R. E. (Robert Earl)

1933-01-01

75

Isotopic fractionation of water during evaporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variations in the isotopic content (18O\\/16O and D\\/H ratios) of water in the natural environment provide a valuable tracer of the present-day global hydrologic cycle and a record of the climate over at least 400,000 years that is preserved in glacial ice. The interpretation of observed isotopic ratios in water vapor, rain, snow, and ice depends on our understanding of

Christopher D. Cappa; Melissa B. Hendricks; Donald J. DePaolo; Ronald C. Cohen

2003-01-01

76

Isotopic fractionation of water during evaporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

(1) Variations in the isotopic content (18O\\/16O and D\\/H ratios) of water in the natural environment provide a valuable tracer of the present-day global hydrologic cycle and a record of the climate over at least 400,000 years that is preserved in glacial ice. The interpretation of observed isotopic ratios in water vapor, rain, snow, and ice depends on our understanding

Christopher D. Cappa; Melissa B. Hendricks; Donald J. DePaolo; Ronald C. Cohen

2003-01-01

77

bbThermodynamic quantities and Urmia Sea water evaporation.  

PubMed

The relation between climatic parameters (relative air humidity) and the water activity of the Urmia Sea water determines the possible maximum evaporation of the lake. Using the Pitzer thermodynamic approach, the activity of the Urmia Lake water during evaporation was calculated and compared to the present relative air humidity above the water. Present climatic conditions allow the Urmia Sea water to evaporate down to water with activity of 0.55, corresponding to the lowest air humidity measured over the lake. This water activity falls in the range of halite precipitation, while carnalite precipitation starts at somewhat lower (a H2O = 0.499) point. Our dynamic model predicts that for air humidity as low as 55% (reflecting present climate conditions), the Urmia Sea level may drop to as low as 1270 m (i. e., 1270 m above mean sea level). At that point, the lake water volume will have a volume of 11 km3. For the sake of comparison, at the beginning of 1990, the level of the lake was 1275 m, its volume was 25 km3, and its surface area was 5145 km2. PMID:20356384

Heidari, Nosrat; Roudgar, Mina; Ebrahimpour, Neda

2010-01-01

78

bbThermodynamic quantities and Urmia Sea water evaporation  

PubMed Central

The relation between climatic parameters (relative air humidity) and the water activity of the Urmia Sea water determines the possible maximum evaporation of the lake. Using the Pitzer thermodynamic approach, the activity of the Urmia Lake water during evaporation was calculated and compared to the present relative air humidity above the water. Present climatic conditions allow the Urmia Sea water to evaporate down to water with activity of 0.55, corresponding to the lowest air humidity measured over the lake. This water activity falls in the range of halite precipitation, while carnalite precipitation starts at somewhat lower (a H2O = 0.499) point. Our dynamic model predicts that for air humidity as low as 55% (reflecting present climate conditions), the Urmia Sea level may drop to as low as 1270 m (i. e., 1270 m above mean sea level). At that point, the lake water volume will have a volume of 11 km3. For the sake of comparison, at the beginning of 1990, the level of the lake was 1275 m, its volume was 25 km3, and its surface area was 5145 km2. PMID:20356384

2010-01-01

79

Evaporation rates across a convective air boundary layer are dominated by diffusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relative contributions of advection and diffusion to isothermal mass transfer from drying porous surfaces across a constant air boundary layer have been quantified. Analysis has shown that neglecting diffusion in longitudinal direction (often justified by large Peclet number) may lead to underestimation of evaporative mass losses from porous surfaces. Considering diffusion only from individual pores across a constant boundary layer accounts for most of the evaporation rates predicted by the full advection-diffusion equation (ADE). The apparent decoupling between diffusion and advection, and the relatively small role of advection in flux generation (other than defining boundary layer thickness) greatly simplifies analytical description of drying surfaces. Consequently, evaporation rates from porous surfaces may be represented by superposition of readily-available analytical diffusion solutions from discrete pores considering different patterns and spacing between surface pores. Results have been used to formulate a generalized top boundary condition for effective resistance to evaporation linking soil type, surface water content and boundary layer characteristic into a simple and physically based analytical expression.

Haghighi, E.; Shahraeeni, E.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

2013-03-01

80

In situ measurement and dynamic control of the evaporation rate in vapor diffusion crystallization of proteins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A special device with a weight-sensitive facility was designed for monitoring and controlling the water evaporation in vapor diffusion protein crystallization. The device made it possible to measure the weight of the drop in real time while the crystallization experiment was going on normally. The precise water equilibration curves under different crystallization conditions could be obtained automatically. By monitoring and controlling the evaporation rate, the crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme and trichosanthin, a plant protein from Chinese herb, was optimized by regulating the reservoir solution dynamically. The experimental results of these two proteins indicate both the feasibility of the device and the usefulness of dynamic control technique. Compared with traditional crystallization experiments, dynamically controlled crystallization can reduce the number of nuclei, increase the crystal size and save experimental time effectively.

Shu, Zhan-Yong; Gong, Hai-Yun; Bi, Ru-Chang

1998-08-01

81

Dynamics of colloid silver nanoparticles in an evaporating water drop  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method of photon correlation spectroscopy is used to investigate the distribution of the diffusion coefficient of silver nanoparticles in an evaporating water drop given that the drop base area remains unchanged (the pinning condition). It is established that the capillary flow dominates over the diffusion nanoparticle motion in redistribution of concentration of the dissolved nanoparticles.

Myslitskaya, N. A.; Khitrin, A. V.; Ivanov, A. M.; Samusev, I. G.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

2012-04-01

82

49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, WITH BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 3 ON RIGHT, AND FILTER CAKE HOUSE IN FOREGROUND. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

83

Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

2012-01-01

84

Cold-hardiness and evaporative water loss in hatchling turtles.  

PubMed

North American turtles hatch in late summer and spend their first winter either on land or underwater. Adaptations for terrestrial overwintering of hatchlings in northern regions, where winter thermal and hydric regimes are harsh, have not been systematically investigated in many species. We measured intrinsic supercooling capacity, resistance to inoculative freezing, and desiccation resistance in hatchlings of terrestrial and aquatic turtles collected from northern (Terrapene ornata, Chrysemys picta bellii, Kinosternon flavescens, Chelydra serpentina) and southern (Chrysemys picta dorsalis, Trachemys scripta, Sternotherus odoratus, Sternotherus carinatus) locales. Supercooling capacity was estimated from the crystallization temperature of turtles cooled in the absence of external ice nuclei. Mean values ranged from -8.1 degrees to -15.5 degrees C and tended to be lower in terrestrial hibernators. Inoculation resistance was estimated from the crystallization temperature of turtles cooled in a matrix of frozen soil. These values (range of means: -0.8 degrees to -13.6 degrees C) also tended to be lower in the terrestrial hibernators, especially C. picta bellii. Mean rates of evaporative water loss varied markedly among the species (0.9-11.4 mg g(-1) d(-1)) and were lowest in the terrestrial hibernators. Most species tolerated the loss of a modest amount of body water, although half of the sample of S. carinatus died from desiccation. In general, turtles did not regain lost body water from wet soil, and immersion in free water was required for rehydration. Therefore, desiccation resistance may be an important adaptation to terrestrial hibernation. Resistances to inoculative freezing and desiccation were directly correlated, perhaps because they are governed by the same morphological characteristics. PMID:11436135

Costanzo, J P; Litzgus, J D; Iverson, J B; Lee, R E

2001-01-01

85

Re: Fw: Evaporation rates Victor F Labson a Marcja K McNutt  

E-print Network

History: Marcia, Re: Fw: Evaporation rates t Victor F Labson a Marcja K McNutt This message has% evaporation, 10% dissolution in their reporting, compared to our undifferentiated 38-40%. We were both comforted by the fact that we were consistent. I will adapt our description to read evaporation

Fleskes, Joe

86

Benefits of evaporating FGD purge water  

SciTech Connect

In the US and the European Union, scrubbers are installed on all new coal-fired power plants because their technology is considered the best available for removing SO{sub 2}. A zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system is the best technology for treating wet scrubber wastewate. With the future promising stricter limits on power plants' water use, ZLD systems that concentrate scrubber purge streams are sure to become as common as ZLD cooling tower blowdonw systems. 7 figs.

Shaw, W.A. [HPD, Plainfield, IL (United States)

2008-03-15

87

Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous  

E-print Network

Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous media: A multi-domain approach et al., 2011 c #12;Stages of saline water evaporation ­ Stages of evaporation: · SS1: High evaporation rate · SS2: Evaporation rate falls subsequently · SS3: Constant low evaporation rate Salinization

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

88

Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous-  

E-print Network

Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous- media: A multi-domain approach., 2011 (WRR) c #12;Stages of saline water evaporation ­ Stages of evaporation: · SS1: High evaporation rate · SS2: Evaporation rate falls subsequently · SS3: Constant low evaporation rate Salinization

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

89

Water evaporation particularities in the process of forest fire extinguishing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical simulation of water massif motion through the high temperature gases corresponding to the typical conditions of forest fires was carried out. Maximal values of part by volume of liquid evaporating from water massif under its motion through the flaming burning area were determined when solving the heat and mass transfer problem under the conditions of endothermic phase transformations. Influence of liquid phase transition heat on the heat and mass transfer conditions on the track of water massif was determined. The expediency of polydisperse interspaced in time and space atomization of water massifs under the large-scale (especially, forest fires) fire extinguishing was proved.

Strizhak, Pavel A.; Volkov, Roman S.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.; Voytkov, Ivan S.

2015-01-01

90

Evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the dynamic evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces with micropillars. Our experimental data showed that receding contact angles of the water droplet increased with the decreasing of the scale of the micropillars during evaporation, even though the solid area fractions of the microstructured substrates remained constant. We also experimentally found that the critical contact diameters of the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states are affected not only by the geometrical parameters of the microstructures, but also by the initial volume of the water droplet. The measured critical pressure is consistent with the theoretical model, which validated the pressure-induced impalement mechanism for the wetting state transition.

Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; He, Feng

2012-12-01

91

Numerical study of the influence of water evaporation on radiofrequency ablation  

PubMed Central

Background Radiofrequency ablation is a promising minimal invasive treatment for tumor. However, water loss due to evaporation has been a major issue blocking further RF energy transmission and correspondently eliminating the therapeutic outcome of the treatment. Method A 2D symmetric cylindrical mathematical model coupling the transport of the electrical current, heat, and the evaporation process in the tissue, has been developed to simulate the treatment process and investigate the influence of the excessive evaporation of the water on the treatment. Results Our results show that the largest specific absorption rate (Q SAR ) occurs at the edge of the circular surface of the electrode. When excessive evaporation takes place, the water dehydration rate in this region is the highest, and after a certain time, the dehydrated tissue blocks the electrical energy transmission in the radial direction. It is found that there is an interval as long as 65 s between the beginning of the evaporation and the increase of the tissue impedance. The model is further used to investigate whether purposely terminating the treatment for a while allowing diffusion of the liquid water into the evaporated region would help. Results show it has no obvious improvement enlarging the treatment volume. Treatment with the cooled-tip electrode is also studied. It is found that the cooling conditions of the inside agent greatly affect the water loss pattern. When the convection coefficient of the cooling agent increases, excessive evaporation will start from near the central axis of the tissue cylinder instead of the edge of the electrode, and the coagulation volume obviously enlarges before a sudden increase of the impedance. It is also found that a higher convection coefficient will extend the treatment time. Though the sudden increase of the tissue impedance could be delayed by a larger convection coefficient; the rate of the impedance increase is also more dramatic compared to the case with smaller convection coefficient. Conclusion The mathematical model simulates the water evaporation and diffusion during radiofrequency ablation and may be used for better clinical design of radiofrequency equipment and treatment protocol planning. PMID:24325296

2013-01-01

92

Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates  

E-print Network

Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates T Othman KG Johnson, DW was to examine the evaporative water losses of sheep at rest and during exercise at different ambient. Walking caused a 2 to 3 fold increase in evaporative water losses (P

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development for Lunar Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For future lunar extra-vehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using the Teflon membrane was tested successfully by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of the SWME development unit, which is being considered for service in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). Multiple PLSS SWME configurations were considered on the basis of thermal performance, mass, volume, and performance and manufacturing risk. All configurations were a variation of an alternating concentric water and vapor channel configuration or a stack of alternating rectangular water and vapor channels. Supporting thermal performance trades mapped maximum SWME heat rejection as a function of water channel thickness, vapor channel thickness, channel length, number of water channels, porosity of the membrane structural support, and backpressure valve throat area. Preliminary designs of each configuration were developed to determine total mass and volume as well as to understand manufacturing issues. Review of configurations led to the selection of a concentric annulus configuration that meets the requirements of 800 watts (W) of heat rejection. Detailed design of the SWME development unit will be followed by fabrication of a prototype test unit, with thermal testing expected to start in 2008.

Vogel, Matt R.; Peterson, Keith; Zapata, Felipe, III; Dillon, Paul; Trevino, Luis A.

2008-01-01

94

Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces with different wetting properties.  

PubMed

The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettabilities has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From nonequilibrium MD simulations, we found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonic decrease as intuitively expected, but increased first, and then decreased after it reached a maximum value. The analysis of the simulation trajectory and calculation of the surface water interaction illustrate that the competition between the number of water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on biological surfaces, designing artificial surfaces of ultrafast water evaporating, or preserving water in soil. PMID:23051060

Wang, Shen; Tu, Yusong; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

2012-11-29

95

O of water vapour, evapotranspiration and the sites of leaf water evaporation in a soybean canopy  

E-print Network

d18 O of water vapour, evapotranspiration and the sites of leaf water evaporation in a soybean Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA and 3 Agricultural in water have the potential to diagnose changes in the earth's hydrological budget in response to climate

Lee, Xuhui

96

Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces of different wetting properties  

E-print Network

The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettability has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. We found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobicity to hydrophility, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonically decrease from intuition, but increased first, and then decreased after reached a maximum value. The competition between the number of the water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. A theoretical model based on those two factors can fit the simulation data very well. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on the biological surfaces, designing artificial surface of ultra fast water evaporating or preserving water in soil.

Shen Wang; Yusong Tu; Rongzheng Wan; Haiping Fang

2012-03-08

97

A comparison of methods for estimating open-water evaporation in small wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared evaporation measurements from a floating pan, land pan, chamber, and the Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation. Floating pan, land pan, and meteorological data were collected from June 6 to July 21, 2005, at a small wetland in the Canadian River alluvium in central Oklahoma, USA. Evaporation measured with the floating pan compared favorably to 12 h chamber measurements. Differences between chamber and floating pan rates ranged from ?0.2 to 0.3 mm, mean of 0.1 mm. The difference between chamber and land pan rates ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, mean of 1.5 mm. The mean chamber-to-floating pan ratio was 0.97 and the mean chamber-to-land pan ratio was 0.73. The chamber-to-floating pan ratio of 0.97 indicates the use of a floating pan to measure evaporation in small limited-fetch water bodies is an appropriate and accurate method for the site investigated. One-sided Paired t-Tests indicate daily floating pan rates were significantly less than land pan and PT rates. A two-sided Paired t-Test indicated there was no significant difference between land pan and PT values. The PT equation tends to overestimate evaporation during times when the air is of low drying power and tends to underestimate as drying power increases.

Masoner, Jason R.; Stannard, David I.

2010-01-01

98

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 026306 (2011) How water droplets evaporate on a superhydrophobic substrate  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 026306 (2011) How water droplets evaporate on a superhydrophobic substrate October 2010; published 17 February 2011) Evaporation of water droplets on a superhydrophobic substrate (2005)], demonstrating that the evaporation process is quasistatic, diffusion-driven, and that thermal

Snoeijer, Jacco

99

Evaporation from three water bodies of different sizes and climates: Measurements and scaling analysis  

E-print Network

Evaporation from three water bodies of different sizes and climates: Measurements and scaling Abstract Evaporation from small reservoirs, wetlands, and lakes continues to be a theoretical and practical to lake evaporation measurements over three water bodies differing in climate, thermal inertia and degree

Katul, Gabriel

100

Simulation of lake ice and its effect on the late-Pleistocene evaporation rate of Lake Lahontan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A model of lake ice was coupled with a model of lake temperature and evaporation to assess the possible effect of ice cover on the late-Pleistocene evaporation rate of Lake Lahontan. The simulations were done using a data set based on proxy temperature indicators and features of the simulated late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation over western North America. When a data set based on a mean-annual air temperature of 3?? C (7?? C colder than present) and reduced solar radiation from jet-stream induced cloud cover was used as input to the model, ice cover lasting ??? 4 months was simulated. Simulated evaporation rates (490-527 mm a-1) were ??? 60% lower than the present-day evaporation rate (1300 mm a-1) of Pyramid Lake. With this reduced rate of evaporation, water inputs similar to the 1983 historical maxima that occurred in the Lahontan basin would have been sufficient to maintain the 13.5 ka BP high stand of Lake Lahontan. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

Hostetler, S.W.

1991-01-01

101

Respiratory evaporative water loss during hovering and forward flight in hummingbirds.  

PubMed

Hummingbirds represent an end point for small body size and water flux in vertebrates. We explored the role evaporative water loss (EWL) plays in management of their large water pool and its use in dissipating metabolic heat. We measured respiratory evaporative water loss (REWL) in hovering hummingbirds in the field (6 species) and over a range of speeds in a wind tunnel (1 species) using an open-circuit mask respirometry system. Hovering REWL during the active period was positively correlated with operative temperature (T(e)) likely due to some combination of an increase in the vapor-pressure deficit, increase in lung ventilation rate, and reduced importance of dry heat transfer at higher T(e). In rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus; 3.3g) REWL during forward flight at 6 and 10 m/s was less than half the value for hovering. The proportion of total dissipated heat (TDH) accounted for by REWL during hovering at T(e)> 40°C was <40% in most species. During forward flight in S. rufus the proportion of TDH accounted for by REWL was ~35% less than for hovering. REWL in hummingbirds is a relatively small component of the water budget compared with other bird species (<20%) so cutaneous evaporative water loss and dry heat transfer must contribute significantly to thermal balance in hummingbirds. PMID:22123217

Powers, Donald R; Getsinger, Philip W; Tobalske, Bret W; Wethington, Susan M; Powers, Sean D; Warrick, Douglas R

2012-02-01

102

Components of evaporative water loss in the desert tenebrionid beetles, Eleodes armata and Cryptoglossa verrucosa  

SciTech Connect

Water loss in Eleodes armata and Cryptoglossa verrucosa increased with increasing temperature and decreasing vapor activity (a/sub v/). Rates of evaporative water loss were always about 4 times greater in E. armata than in C. verrucosa at the different temperatures and 0.0 a/sub v/, while as a/sub v/ increased the ratio of E. armata loss to C. verrucosa decreased from 4 at 0.0 a/sub v/ to about 2 at 0.94 a/sub v/. A method for determining mesothoracic spiracular, sub-elytral abdominal, and cuticular water loss rates was described and validated for living E. armata. Sub-elytral abdominal water loss through the caudal opening was 8.0 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/, meso-thoracic spiracular water loss was approximately 7.9 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/, and cuticular loss was 26.2 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/ at 30 C and 0.0 a/sub v/. Evaporative water loss was shown to have two unidirectional components, efflux and influx, for both beetles with the use of tritiated water (H/sup 3/HO). Efflux was independent of a/sub v/, while influx increased linearly with a/sub v/, with both components having lower rates in C. verrucosa compared to E. armata.

Cooper, P.D.

1981-01-01

103

Evaporative water loss is an essential means of heat transfer for birds when ambient temperatures exceed body temperature,  

E-print Network

Evaporative water loss is an essential means of heat transfer for birds when ambient temperatures respiratory evaporative water loss (REWL) as the only significant avenue of evaporation (Bartholomew and Cade evaporation from the respiratory system. Further investigations showed that cutaneous evaporation accounts

Wolf, Blair O.

104

Trade Study for 9 kW Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sublimators have been proposed and used in spacecraft for heat rejection. Sublimators are desirable heat rejection devices for short duration use because they can transfer large amounts of heat using little mass and are self-regulating devices. Sublimators reject heat into space by freezing water inside a porous substrate, allowing it to sublimate into vapor, and finally venting it into space. The state of the art thermal control system in orbiting spacecraft is a two loop, two fluid system. The external coolant loop typically uses a toxic single phase fluid that acquires heat from the spacecraft and rejects most of it via a radiator. The sublimator functions as a transient topper for orbiting spacecraft during day pass periods when radiator efficiency decreases. The sublimator interfaces with the internal loop through a built in heat exchanger. The internal loop fluid is non-toxic and is typically a propylene glycol and water solution with inhibitors to prevent corrosion with aluminum fins of the heat exchangers. Feedwater is supplied from a separate line to the sublimator to maintain temperature control of the cabin and vehicle hardware. Water membrane evaporators have been developed for spacecraft and spacesuits. They function similar to a sublimator but require a backpressure valve which could be actuated for this application with a simple fully open or fully closed modes. This technology would be applied to orbital thermal control (lunar or planetary). This paper details a trade study showing that evaporators would greatly reduce the consumable that is used, effectively wasted, by sublimators during start up and shut down during the topping phases of each orbit. State of the art for 9 kW sublimators reject about 870 W per kilogram of mass and 1150 W per liter of volume. If water with corrosion inhibitors is used the evaporators would be about 80% of the mass and volume of the equivalent system. The size and mass increases to about 110% if the internal fluid is 50% propylene glycol/50% water. The true benefit comes from the backpressure valve, that prevents the cyclical shutdown/startup loss of the sublimator and amounts to as much as 0.85 kg per orbit.

Bue, Grant C.; Ungar, Gene; Stephan, Ryan

2010-01-01

105

Solvated Ion Evaporation from Charged Water Nanodroplets Vasiliy Znamenskiy, Ioan Marginean, and Akos Vertes*  

E-print Network

Solvated Ion Evaporation from Charged Water Nanodroplets Vasiliy Znamenskiy, Ioan Marginean. Experimental evidence to decide between the various models of ion formation (e.g., ion evaporation, Coulomb and the enthalpy of evaporation derived from the model also gave good agreement with the experimental values. Our

Vertes, Akos

106

Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCR systems  

E-print Network

Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCRE Journal. Keywords: Multi-component, , evaporation, UWS, Adbue, urea decomposition, thermolysis SCR, kinetics Abstract This work aims to develop a multi-component evaporation model for droplets of urea

Boyer, Edmond

107

Surface structure and composition of flat titanium thin films as a function of film thickness and evaporation rate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To correlate flat titanium film surface properties with deposition parameters, titanium flat thin films were systematically deposited on glass substrates with various thicknesses and evaporation rates by electron-beam evaporation. The chemical compositions, crystal structure, surface topographies as well as wettability were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The films consisted mainly of TiO 2. Small percentages of Ti 2O 3 and metallic Ti were also found at the film surface using high-resolution XPS analysis. Quantitative XPS showed little differences regarding elemental compositions among different groups of films. The films were obtained by varying the deposition rate and the film thickness, respectively. XRD data showed consistent reflection patterns of the different titanium samples deposited using different film thicknesses. Without exception measurements of all samples exhibited contact angles of 80° ± 5°. Quantitative AFM characterization demonstrated good correlation tendency between surface roughness and film thickness or evaporation rate, respectively. It is important to notice that titanium films with different sizes of grains on their surfaces but having the same chemistry and film bulk structure can be obtained in a controllable way. By increasing the film thickness and evaporation rate, the surface roughness increased. The surface morphology and grain size growth displayed a corresponding trend. Therefore, the control of these parameters allows us to prepare titanium films with desired surface properties in a controllable and reproducible way for further biological investigations of these materials.

Cai, Kaiyong; Müller, Michael; Bossert, Jörg; Rechtenbach, Annett; Jandt, Klaus D.

2005-08-01

108

Principles of water capture, evaporation, and soil water retention  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Successful dryland crop production in semiarid environments is dependent upon efficient storage of precipitation and use of stored soil water supplies. The objectives of this presentation are to: 1. Summarize information regarding the effects of time of year; environmental parameters; residue orient...

109

Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating Primordial Black Holes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ?5.0 × 1014 g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV-TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

2015-04-01

110

The use of thermogravimetry to follow the rate of evaporation of an ingredient used in perfumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ingredients used in the manufacture of perfumes can be investigated by thermogravimetry. In this study the evaporation of\\u000a methyl benzoate was investigated using a simultaneous TG-DTA unit. A rising temperature method of thermal analysis was used\\u000a for the study. The rate of evaporation of the ingredient was calculated from a simple plot of percentage mass lossvs. time. A derivative plot

P. Aggarwal; D. Dollimore; K. Alexander

1997-01-01

111

Soil-water evaporation dynamics determined with measurement of sensible heat transfer  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Soil-water evaporation is important in both the hydrologic cycle and the surface energy balance. Yet, routine measurements are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in evaporation. Recent improvements for fine-scale measurement of soil thermal propert...

112

Influence of condensate evaporation on water vapor and its stable isotopes in a GCM  

E-print Network

of condensate from the model, our calculation does not necessarily require satura- tion at the grid scaleInfluence of condensate evaporation on water vapor and its stable isotopes in a GCM Jonathon S May 2009; published 17 June 2009. [1] The direct effect of condensate evaporation on atmospheric water

113

Surface composition and barium evaporation rate of ``pedigreed'' impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes during accelerated life testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study has been made of the surface composition and barium evaporation rate of "pedigreed" impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes. The effect of air exposure on coated cathodes was examined and was found to have no significant effect on barium evaporation rate although in some cases longer reactivation times were required. No changes in surface topography were apparent following air exposure and reactivation. Life testing was done at 100°C above the typical operating temperature for the cathode, where the typical operating temperature was taken to be 950°C for coated cathodes and 1050°C for uncoated cathodes. The cathodes were examined at different stages of life testing, up to 1200 h. Significant decreases in barium evaporation rates were found after as few as 500 h of life testing. After 1000 h the evaporation rate had decreased more than an order of magnitude. Changes in surface composition were also found. The effects of tungsten particle size, used in manufacture of the billet, on barium evaporation rate were also studied but no correlation was found.

Tomich, D. H.; Mescher, J. A.; Grant, J. T.

1987-03-01

114

A simulation study of diurnal soil evaporation dynamics using a coupled water, vapour and heat flux model.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Richards equation is often used to simulate water flow in soils considering only isothermal liquid water flow. This implies the assumption that evaporation only takes place at the soil surface. When the soil surface is (partially) wet, the vapour pressure at the soil surface is assumed to be uniform and equal to the saturated vapour pressure so that the evaporation rate can be calculated directly from solving the soil surface energy balance and imposed as a flux boundary condition. For a dry soil surface, a certain threshold pressure head at the soil surface is used as a Dirichlet boundary condition so that the water flux in the soil to the evaporating surface can be calculated. In this contribution we compared simulations of soil evaporation by the Richards equation with a more physically based approach that considers coupled heat, vapour, and liquid fluxes in the soil. The parameterisation of diffusive vapour flux in the soil and through a boundary air layer at the soil surface in these coupled models is, however, strongly debated. Therefore, we investigated the effect of: (i) the enhancement of thermal vapour fluxes that is attributed to thermal non-equilibrium in the soil, (ii) the enhancement of vapour diffusion by turbulent pumping in the upper soil layer, and (iii) the resistance to vapour transfer in the air layer above a partially wet soil surface on simulated evaporation and its diurnal dynamics. For partially wet soil surfaces, the resistance of vapour transfer through the boundary air layer as a function of its thickness and the distance between evaporating surfaces leads to smaller evaporation rates than simulations that assume a uniform vapour pressure in the air at the soil surface. Since 1-D models cannot resolve spatial variations in vapour pressure at the soil surface, this effect cannot be simulated by these models but needs to be parameterized in their boundary conditions. For dry soil surfaces, the simulated diurnal dynamics of soil evaporation differed between the Richards model and the coupled model and were sensitive to the parameterisation of vapour diffusion in the soil. In case vapour diffusion was enhanced by turbulent pumping and enhancement of thermal vapour fluxes was not considered, the diurnal dynamics of the evaporation rate from a dry soil surface that was simulated using the coupled model followed the diurnal dynamics of the evaporation from a wet soil surface. Such a dynamics cannot be reproduced by the Richards model that predicts a monotonic decrease in evaporation rate from a dry soil surface. Using a parameterisation that enhances thermal vapour fluxes led to a reduction of evaporation in the afternoon when thermal gradients are directed downward and to simulated evaporation peaks in the morning and evening. Evaporation rates measured from a bare soil using eddy covariance, which provide information about the diurnal dynamics of evaporation rates, will be used to evaluate the different parameterisations of vapour diffusion.

Vanderborght, Jan; Graf, Alexander; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Vereecken, Harry

2013-04-01

115

Mathematical modeling of evaporative cooling of water films in water-cooling towers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model of evaporative cooling of water films flowing down vertical guards in a chimney-type water-cooling tower\\u000a is developed. Results of a qualitative analysis of the nonlinear mathematical model are reported. Data obtained from a numerical\\u000a solution of a boundary-value problem for a system of ordinary differential equations are presented in the form of graphs.

A. I. Petruchik; S. P. Fisenko

1999-01-01

116

Residual Patterns of Alkyl Polyoxyethylene Surfactant Droplets after Water Evaporation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Using a nonionic, alkyl polyoxyethylene surfactant (X-77®) in aqueous solutions, sessile droplet spreading, pinning, evaporation, contraction, and post-evaporation deposits are characterized. X-77® is widely used in the agricultural field as a spreader/adherent, intended to optimize pathenogenic ag...

117

Revisiting the parameterization of potential evaporation as a driver of long-term water balance trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the effects of two different parameterizations of potential evaporation on long-term trends in soil moisture, evaporative flux and runoff simulated by the water balance model underlying the Palmer Drought Severity Index. The first, traditional parameterization is based on air temperature alone. The second parameterization is derived from observations of evaporation from class-A pans. Trends in potential evaporation from the two parameterizations are opposite in sign (+/-) at almost half the stations tested over Australia and New Zealand. The sign of trends in the modelled soil moisture, evaporative flux and runoff depends on the parameterization used and on the prevailing climatic regime: trends in water-limited regions are driven by precipitation trends, but the choice of parameterization for potential evaporation is shown to be critical in energy-limited regions.

Hobbins, Michael T.; Dai, Aiguo; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

2008-06-01

118

The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation  

PubMed Central

Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (%). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by %. A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n= 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n= 15 and 45°C, n= 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131–487 W) and % (15–55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0–30 min) and steady-state (30–90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (?2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R2= 0.885; steady state: R2= 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by %. Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

2013-01-01

119

A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling  

SciTech Connect

In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the cycle is recovery of the solution heat energy exiting the desorber by process water (a process-solution heat exchanger ) rather than the absorber exiting solution (the conventional solution heat exchanger ). This approach has enabled heating the process water from an inlet temperature of 15 C to 57 C (conforming to the DOE water heater test standard) and interfacing the process water with absorbent on the opposite side of a single metal sheet encompassing the absorber, process-solution heat exchanger, and desorber. The system under development has a 3.2 kW water heating capacity and a target thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of 1.6.

CHUGH, Devesh [University of Florida, Gainesville; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Moghaddam, Saeed [University of Florida, Gainesville

2014-01-01

120

Estimation of soil water evaporative loss after tillage operation using the stable isotope technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Application of stable isotopes in soil studies has improved quantitative evaluation of evaporation and other hydrological processes in soil. This study was carried out to determine the effect of tillage on evaporative loss of water from the soil. Zero tillage and conventional tillage were compared. Suction tubes were installed for soil water collection at the depths 0.15, 0.50, and 1.0 m by pumping soil water with a peristaltic pump. Soil water evaporation was estimated using stable isotopes of water. The mean isotopic composition of the soil water at 0.15 m soil depth were -1.15‰ (?18O) and -0.75‰ (?D) and were highly enriched compared with the isotopic compositions of the site precipitation. Soil water stable isotopes (?18O and ?D) were more enriched near the surface under zero tillage while they were less negative down the profile under zero tillage. This suggests an occurrence of more evaporation and infiltration under conventional then zero tillage, respectively, because evaporative fractionation contributes to escape of lighter isotopes from liquid into the vapour phase leading to enrichment in heavy isotopes in the liquid phase. The annual evaporation estimated using the vapour diffusion equation ranges from 46-70 and 54-84 mm year-1 under zero and conventional tillage, respectively, indicating more evaporation under conventional tillage compared with zero tillage. Therefore, to reduce soil water loss, adoption of conservation tillage practices such as zero tillage is encouraged.

Busari, M. A.; Salako, F. K.; Tuniz, C.; Zuppi, G. M.; Stenni, B.; Adetunji, M. T.; Arowolo, T. A.

2013-09-01

121

Changing Demands from Riparian Evapotranspiration and Free-Water Evaporation in the Lower Colorado River Basin Under Different Climate Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observed and projected trends in riparian evapotranspiration (ET) and free-water evaporation are examined to improve water demand forecasting for use in modeling of lower Colorado River system reservoir operations. While most previous research has focused on the impacts of climate change and climate variability on water supply, the impacts on water demand under changing climate conditions have not been adequately addressed (NRC, 2007 and Reclamation, 2009). Increases in temperatures and changes in precipitation and wind patterns are expected to increase evaporative demands (Bates and others, 2008), potentially increasing free-water evaporation and ET from riparian vegetation; increasing infiltration rates; altering cropping patterns; and changing the temporal and spatial distribution of water deliveries. This study uses observations and projections under changing climate scenarios of hydroclimatic variables, such as temperature, wind, and precipitation, to analyze their impacts on riparian ET and free-water evaporation in the lower Colorado River mainstream downstream of Lake Mead and Hoover Dam. The projected changes in evaporative demands were assessed to determine their impacts on water supply and reservoir operations in the Colorado River basin under changing climate conditions. Based on analysis of observed and projected hydroclimatic data from the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, mean annual daily temperature in the lower Colorado River mainstream reach has increased by 0.8° Celsius (C) from the 30-year period ending in 1980 to period ending in 2010 and is projected to increase by an additional 1.7° C by 30-year period ending in 2060. Analysis of riparian ET derived from the ASCE Penman-Monteith method (Allen et al., 2005, from Monteith, 1965 and 1981) and Westenburg et al. (2006) and free-water evaporation derived from the Penman combination model in Dingman (2008) indicates that combined evaporative demand in the lower Colorado River mainstream increased by 14,800 acre-feet, or 1.8 percent, during the 30-year period ending in 2010, and may increase by an additional 16,600 acre-feet, or 2.0 percent, during the 30-year period ending in 2060, when compared to the period from 1951 to 1980. With this projected increase in evaporative demands, the combined storage of Lake Powell and Lake Mead are projected to decrease by a cumulative volume of 75,400 acre-feet, or 0.15 percent of total conservation capacity, based on 10-year running averages ending in years 2020 to 2060. In addition, average annual shortage volumes in the lower Colorado River basin are projected to increase by 40,000 acre-feet, or 0.30 percent, from 2013 to 2060.

Bunk, D. A.; Piechota, T. C.

2012-12-01

122

Thermal and Hydrologic Signatures of Soil Controls on Evaporation: A Combined Energy and Water Balance Approach with Implications for Remote Sensing of Evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of applying a newly developed diagnostic model of soil water evaporation to large land areas using remotely sensed input parameters. The model estimates the rate of soil evaporation during periods when it is limited by the net transport resulting from competing effects of capillary rise and drainage. The critical soil hydraulic properties are implicitly estimated via the intensity and duration of the first stage (energy limited) evaporation, removing a major obstacle in the remote estimation of evaporation over large areas. This duration, or "time to drying" (t(sub d)), is revealed through three signatures detectable in time series of remote sensing variables. The first is a break in soil albedo that occurs as a small vapor transmission zone develops near the surface. The second is a break in either surface to air temperature differences or in the diurnal surface temperature range, both of which indicate increased sensible heat flux (and/or storage) required to balance the decrease in latent heat flux. The third is a break in the temporal pattern of near surface soil moisture. Soil moisture tends to decrease rapidly during stage 1 drying (as water is removed from storage), and then become more or less constant during soil limited, or "stage 2" drying (as water is merely transmitted from deeper soil storage). The research tasks address: (1) improvements in model structure, including extensions to transpiration and aggregation over spatially variable soil and topographic landscape attributes; and (2) applications of the model using remotely sensed input parameters.

Salvucci, Guido D.

1997-01-01

123

Thermal and Hydrologic Signatures of Soil Controls on Evaporation: A Combined Energy and Water Balance Approach with Implications for Remote Sensing of Evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of applying a newly developed diagnostic model of soil water evaporation to large land areas using remotely sensed input parameters. The model estimates the rate of soil evaporation during periods when it is limited by the net transport resulting from competing effects of capillary rise and drainage. The critical soil hydraulic properties are implicitly estimated via the intensity and duration of the first stage (energy limited) evaporation, removing a major obstacle in the remote estimation of evaporation over large areas. This duration, or 'time to drying' (t(sub d)) is revealed through three signatures detectable in time series of remote sensing variables. The first is a break in soil albedo that occurs as a small vapor transmission zone develops near the surface. The second is a break in either surface to air temperature differences or in the diurnal surface temperature range, both of which indicate increased sensible heat flux (and/or storage) required to balance the decrease in latent heat flux. The third is a break in the temporal pattern of near surface soil moisture. Soil moisture tends to decrease rapidly during stage I drying (as water is removed from storage), and then become more or less constant during soil limited, or 'stage II' drying (as water is merely transmitted from deeper soil storage). The research tasks address: (1) improvements in model structure, including extensions to transpiration and aggregation over spatially variable soil and topographic landscape attributes; and (2) applications of the model using remotely sensed input parameters.

Salvucci, Guido D.

2000-01-01

124

Measurements of the evaporation coefficient of water based on molecular gas dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a novel method for measuring the evaporation coefficient of water using a sound-resonaiice experiment based on the theory of molecular gas dynamics. The evaporation coefficient is one of the parameters contained in the kinetic boundary condition. The evaporation coefficient of water is determined according to the pressure amplitude of the resonant sound wave in a cylindrical space bounded by a sound source and a vapor-liquid interface. The use of the sound wave enables us to conduct the experiment in a weak nonequilibrium state. By comparing the pressure amplitude with the results from a linear acoustic theory, including the effect of the evaporation coefficient on the amplitude variation, we demonstrate that the evaporation coefficient of water is approximately 1.0 near 300 K.

Nakamura, Shigeto; Yano, Takeru

2014-12-01

125

Interactions among evaporation, ice cover, and water temperature on the world's largest lake: Seasonal feedbacks and long-term change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area, has enormous impacts on the regional weather and climate. The lake also comprises over half of the total water volume in the Great Lakes system and is an important resource for commercial shipping, water supplies, hydropower, recreation, and aquatic ecosystems. Analysis of historical summer water temperature data and modeled evaporation rates for Lake Superior show significant increases in both parameters in recent decades, while ice cover has been decreasing at a rapid pace. A careful analysis of the long-term trends, however, shows that these changes have not been linear through time. Rather, a pronounced regime shift occurred in 1997/98 that resulted in a drop in ice duration of nearly 40 days, a 3°C increase in summer water temperature, and a near doubling of July-August evaporation rates. Linear regression analysis of data on either side of this step change shows trends which are largely insignificant and even opposite in sign from those of the step change. Using time-lagged correlation and composite analyses, interactions among ice cover, water temperature, and evaporation are explored across seasonal and interannual timescales. Contrary to what is often expected for inland water bodies, evaporation and ice cover do not show a simple, inverse relationship. Rather, seasonal feedbacks and temporal lags lead to complex interactions among multiple variables. For example, high evaporation rates in the autumn are found to be associated with more extensive ice cover during the subsequent winter months, presumably as a result of strong latent heat flux and correspondingly rapid ice onset and growth. In turn, high ice cover leads to cooler summer water temperatures and reduced evaporation rates in late summer and early fall. Thus, the overall relationship between ice cover and annual evaporation totals is often muted and complex. Quantifying these seasonal feedbacks and interactions is important for assessing the potential impacts of future climate change on large-lake systems. Direct measurements of lake surface processes such as evaporation and sensible heat flux are greatly needed to help further this understanding. As such, this study includes an analysis of the first direct observations of evaporation rates on the Great Lakes, using eddy covariance data collected from monitoring stations on Granite Island and Stannard Rock (north of Marquette, Michigan). The data are analyzed over multi-year periods to explore seasonal and interannual variations in latent and sensible heat fluxes over Lake Superior, as well as some of the primary climatic factors driving this variability. Despite the short observational record, the direct measurements of evaporation show seasonal variability during high- and low-ice years that largely mimics those seen in the historical ice cover records and modeled evaporation rates.

Lenters, J. D.; Van Cleave, K.; Blanken, P.; Hanes, J.; Hedstrom, N.; Spence, C.; Suyker, A. E.; Wang, J.

2012-12-01

126

Influence of a wick lining on the evaporation rate of lithium from a charge exchange canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A wick lining is used with a lithium charge exchange canal for reducing the consumption of lithium. The wick helps to condense the lithium vapour more effectively and to make it flow back to the main oven. For its efficient functioning, the temperature gradient along the wick has to be properly maintained. The present studies were carried out to assess the extent of reduction in lithium loss when using the wick and to determine the optimum temperature settings. The evaporation rate of lithium vapour from a charge exchange canal (General Ionex Model-712) has been investigated in the temperature range from 470 to 575° C. The measurements were carried out with and without a stainless steel wire mesh wick lining, inside the canal. A quartz crystal oscillator type rate meter was used for monitoring the evaporation rate. The results indicate that, when the wick lining is inserted, the reduction in evaporation rate of lithium is only 20%. This differs much from the result of Greenway [Report 85/11, Oxford University, Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1985)] who reported a reduction by a factor of 8. The evaporation rate is also found to depend on the canal end heater temperature, maintained high enough to keep the condensing vapour in liquid state. The optimum temperature settings for the end heaters have been found to be 300 ° C. The experimental arrangements and results are presented in this paper.

Thampi, N. S.; Berger, S.; Dworschak, F.

1992-02-01

127

Reduction of water evaporation in polymerase chain reaction microfluidic devices based on oscillating-flow  

E-print Network

Reduction of water evaporation in polymerase chain reaction microfluidic devices based-chip applications including polymerase chain reaction PCR . We study sample evaporation in poly- meric and hybrid,2 Thenceforth, several microfluidic devices for polymerase chain reaction PCR have been produced as miniaturized

128

Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data.  

PubMed

The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (C(surf)). C(surf) accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of C(surf) to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land-atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid-humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and C(surf) can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:23576717

Salvucci, Guido D; Gentine, Pierre

2013-04-16

129

Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data  

PubMed Central

The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (Csurf). Csurf accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of Csurf to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land–atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid–humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and Csurf can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:23576717

Salvucci, Guido D.; Gentine, Pierre

2013-01-01

130

Effects of water vapor density on cutaneous resistance to evaporative water loss and body temperature in green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea).  

PubMed

Increased cutaneous resistance to evaporative water loss (Rc) in tree frogs results in decreased water loss rate and increased body temperature. We examined sensitivity of Rc to water vapor density (WVD) in Hyla cinerea by exposing individual frogs and agar models to four different WVD environments and measuring cutaneous evaporative water loss rate and body temperature simultaneously using a gravimetric wind tunnel measuring system. We found that water loss rate varied inversely and body temperature directly with WVD but that models were affected to a greater extent than were animals. Mean Rc was significantly different between the highest WVD environment and each of the three drier environments but did not differ among the drier environments, indicating that Rc initially increases and then reaches a plateau in response to decreasing WVD. Rc was equivalent when calculated using either WVD difference or WVD deficit as the driving force for evaporation. We also directly observed secretions from cutaneous glands while measuring body temperature and tested secretions and skin samples for the presence of lipids. We found that irregular transient body temperature depressions observed during wind tunnel trials occur due to evaporative cooling from intermittent skin secretions containing lipids, although we were unable to identify lipid-secreting glands. PMID:23995486

Wygoda, Mark L; Kersten, Constance A

2013-01-01

131

Reduction of water evaporation in polymerase chain reaction microfluidic devices based on oscillating-flow  

PubMed Central

Producing polymeric or hybrid microfluidic devices operating at high temperatures with reduced or no water evaporation is a challenge for many on-chip applications including polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We study sample evaporation in polymeric and hybrid devices, realized by glass microchannels for avoiding water diffusion toward the elastomer used for chip fabrication. The method dramatically reduces water evaporation in PCR devices that are found to exhibit optimal stability and effective operation under oscillating-flow. This approach maintains the flexibility, ease of fabrication, and low cost of disposable chips, and can be extended to other high-temperature microfluidic biochemical reactors. PMID:20877657

Polini, Alessandro; Mele, Elisa; Sciancalepore, Anna Giovanna; Girardo, Salvatore; Biasco, Adriana; Camposeo, Andrea; Cingolani, Roberto; Weitz, David A.; Pisignano, Dario

2010-01-01

132

Evaporation from seven reservoirs in the Denver water-supply system, central Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seven reservoirs in central Colorado, operated by the Denver Board of Water Commissioners, were studied during 1967-73 to determine evaporation losses. These reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, Gross, Antero, Cheesman, Williams Fork, and Ralston, are located on both sides of the Continental Divide. Methods for computing evaporation include energy-budget, mass-transfer, and pan relationships. Three reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross, had mass-transfer coefficients calibrated by energy-budget studies. At the remaining reservoirs, an empirical technique was used to estimate the mass-transfer coefficient. The enery-budget-calibrated methods give the most accurate evaporation values; the empirical coefficients give only a best estimate of evaporation. All reservoirs should be calibrated by energy-budget studies. The pan method of computing evaporation is the least reliable method because of problems of advected energy through the sides of the pan, representative pan exposure , and the irregularity of ratios of reservoir to pan evaporation. (Woodard-USGS)

Ficke, John F.; Adams, D. Briane; Danielson, T.W.

1977-01-01

133

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON EVAPORATIVE HEAT LOSS IN THE MICROWAVE-EXPOSED MOUSE  

EPA Science Inventory

Male CBA/J mice were administered heat loads of 0-28 J. per g at specific absorption rates (SARs) of either 47 or 93 W. per kg by exposure to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation at an ambient temperature of 30 C while evaporative heat loss (EHL) was continuously monitored with dew-poin...

134

PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES: JOURNAL ARTICLE  

EPA Science Inventory

NRMRL-CIN-0988 Smith*, R.L. Predicting Evaporation Rates and Times for Spills of Chemical Mixtures. The Annals of Occupational Hygiene (Ogden, T. (Ed.), Elsevier) 45 (6):437-445 (2001). EPA/600/J-00/125. 03/16/2000 Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for p...

135

Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing of the Gen4 SWME is underway.

Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

2014-01-01

136

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. INSIDE A FLASH EVAPORATOR. INL NEGATIVE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. INSIDE A FLASH EVAPORATOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3323. Unknown Photographer, 9/12/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

137

Evaporation of water from sodium chloride solutions under controlled climatic conditions  

E-print Network

EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CELORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1967 Haj or Subject: Soil Physics EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Approved as to style and content by: (Ch+jman of Committee) (Member) (, j. (Head...

Moore, Jaroy

2012-06-07

138

Potable water recovery for spacecraft application by electrolytic pretreatment/air evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A process for the recovery of potable water from urine using electrolytic pretreatment followed by distillation in a closed-cycle air evaporator has been developed and tested. Both the electrolytic pretreatment unit and the air evaporation unit are six-person, flight-concept prototype, automated units. Significantly extended wick lifetimes have been achieved in the air evaporation unit using electrolytically pretreated, as opposed to chemically pretreated, urine feed. Parametric test data are presented on product water quality, wick life, process power, maintenance requirements, and expendable requirements.

Wells, G. W.

1975-01-01

139

Evaporative assembly of MEH-PPV rings using mixed solvents at the air/water interface.  

PubMed

Controlling the morphology of conjugated polymers has recently attracted considerable attention because of their applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, we describe the self-assembly of a common conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), into ringlike structures via solvent evaporation on an air/water interface. The films are monitored using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and transferred onto a solid substrate by either the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method and further characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The morphology of the MEH-PPV thin film at the air/water interface can be controlled by the spreading solvent. By mixing solvents of varying spreading coefficients and evaporation rates, such as chloroform and chlorobenzene, MEH-PPV can be assembled into micrometer-sized ring structures. The optical properties of these MEH-PPV ring structures are also characterized. Lastly, MEH-PPV can be used as a soft template to organize microscale structures of nanoparticles. PMID:24684587

Chao, Kung-Po; Biswal, Sibani L

2014-04-22

140

Combining the Penman-Monteith equation with measurements of surface temperature and reflectance to estimate evaporation rates of semiarid grassland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Penman-Monteith equation is useful for computing evaporation rates of uniform surfaces, such as dense vegetation or bare soil. This equation becomes less useful for evaluation of evaporation rates at the regional scale, where surfaces are generally characterized by a patchy combination of vegetation and soil. This is particularly true in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The

M. S. Moran; A. F. Rahman; J. C. Washburne; D. C. Goodrich; M. A. Weltz; W. P. Kustas

1996-01-01

141

Rates of Water Loss and Estimates of Survival Time under Varying Humidity in Juvenile Snapping Turtles ( Chelydra serpentina )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile snapping turtles may be highly susceptible to dehydration during over- land movement because of their aquatic nature and large surface area to volume ratio. The present study examined the influence of body size and relative humidity on rates of evaporative water loss and estimates of survival time. Larger hatchlings had higher rates of evaporative water loss but longer survival

Michael S. Finkler

2001-01-01

142

Modelling of water sump evaporation in a CFD code for nuclear containment studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), water can be collected in the sump containment through steam condensation on walls and spray systems activation. This water is generally under evaporation conditions. The objective of this paper is twofold: to present a sump model developed using external user-defined functions for the TONUS-CFD code and

J. Malet; M. Bessiron; C. Perrotin

2011-01-01

143

Monitoring near surface soil water and associated dynamics of infiltration and evaporation fluxes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In-situ monitoring of soil water has the advantage of integrating the precipitation, evaporation history, and gradual changes in hydraulic properties on the aggregate response of the system, which is manifested as soil water storage. Near-surface soil water and temperature dynamics were monitored th...

144

Roundtable: Setting equitable water rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This discussion, sponsored by the Management Division, was held on May 17,1982, at the AWWA Annual Conference in Miami Beach, Fla. Participants agreed that the fundamental consideration in rate-making is the cost of service. The discussion centered around methods various water utilities use to analyze the component costs that ultimately result in fair charges to all customers for water service.

Ronald D. Hardten; Elba L. Richey; Gary S. Saleba; Terry A. Scott; Charles E. Woods; Robert L. Wubbena

1983-01-01

145

Mechanical tuning of the evaporation rate of liquid on crossed fibers  

E-print Network

We investigate experimentally the drying of a small volume of perfectly wetting liquid on two crossed fibers. We characterize the drying dynamics for the three liquid morphologies that are encountered in this geometry: drop, column and a mixed morphology, in which a drop and a column coexist. For each morphology, we rationalize our findings with theoretical models that capture the drying kinetics. We find that the evaporation rate depends significantly on the liquid morphology and that the drying of liquid column is faster than the evaporation of the drop and the mixed morphology for a given liquid volume. Finally, we illustrate that shearing a network of fibers reduces the angle between them, changes the morphology towards the column state, and so enhances the drying rate of a volatile liquid deposited on it.

François Boulogne; Alban Sauret; Beatrice Soh; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

2015-01-07

146

Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 ?m, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 ?sec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial condensation front exhibited large accelerations, with velocity varying from few tens of m/s up to 479 (±0.5) m/s, at distances of 1.5 (±0.3) cm and in times of 0.1 ms. This process preceded the appearance of the Ar front. Our first results suggest that the evaporation of moisture induced by compression waves associated with the air shock is able to accelerate particles (ca.100s microns in size) efficiently, at short distances. This process could have broader implications in active volcanic areas where shock waves are generated, for the damage that may follow.

Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

2010-12-01

147

Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

1986-01-01

148

Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol  

PubMed Central

Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [CnH(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10?3 to 1.7 × 10?5 as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid. PMID:23674675

Davies, James F.; Miles, Rachael E. H.; Haddrell, Allen E.; Reid, Jonathan P.

2013-01-01

149

Using water stable isotopes to assess evaporation and water residence time of lakes in EPA’s National Lakes Assessment.  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes of water (?18O and ?2H) can be very useful in large-scale monitoring programs because water samples are easy to collect and water isotopes integrate information about basic hydrological processes such as evaporation as a percentage of inflow (E/I), w...

150

Vapor pressure and evaporation rate of certain heat-resistant compounds in a vacuum at high temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vapor pressure and evaporation rate of borides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome; and of strontium and carbides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome, molybdenum silicide; and nitrides of titanium, niobium, and tantalum in a vacuum were studied. It is concluded that all subject compounds evaporate by molecular structures except AlB sub 12' which dissociates, losing the aluminum.

Bolgar, A. S.; Verkhoglyadova, T. S.; Samsonov, G. V.

1985-01-01

151

Importance of Rain Evaporation and Continental Convection in the Tropical Water Cycle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheric moisture cycling is an important aspect of the Earth's climate system, yet the processes determining atmospheric humidity are poorly understood. For example, direct evaporation of rain contributes significantly to the heat and moisture budgets of clouds, but few observations of these processes are available. Similarly, the relative contributions to atmospheric moisture over land from local evaporation and humidity from oceanic sources are uncertain. Lighter isotopes of water vapour preferentially evaporate whereas heavier isotopes preferentially condense and the isotopic composition of ocean water is known. Here we use this information combined with global measurements of the isotopic composition of tropospheric water vapour from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft, to investigate aspects of the atmospheric hydrological cycle that are not well constrained by observations of precipitation or atmospheric vapour content. Our measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour near tropical clouds suggest that rainfall evaporation contributes significantly to lower troposphere humidity, with typically 20% and up to 50% of rainfall evaporating near convective clouds. Over the tropical continents the isotopic signature of tropospheric water vapour differs significantly from that of precipitation, suggesting that convection of vapour from both oceanic sources and evapotranspiration are the dominant moisture sources. Our measurements allow an assessment of the intensity of the present hydrological cycle and will help identify any future changes as they occur.

Worden, John; Noone, David; Bowman, Kevin; Beer, R.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Gunson, M.; Goldman, Aaron; Kulawik, S. S.; Lampel, Michael; Osterman, Gregory; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Rogders, Clive; Sander, Stanley; Shepard, Mark; Webster, Christopher R.; Worden, H. M.

2007-01-01

152

Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake) and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness) were produced (N=48) using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3)/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE)/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS)/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU)/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group), and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2). After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12) or mineral oil (N=12) to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (%) was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (?=5%). The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05). Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control) presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%). The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated. PMID:25141201

CHIMELI, Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz; D'ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; PEREIRA, Patrícia Nóbrega; HILGERT, Leandro Augusto; DI HIPÓLITO, Vinicius; GARCIA, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

2014-01-01

153

Radiator/water evaporator heat rejection system for an advanced extravehicular mobility unit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study is being conducted on the design, development, fabrication, integration, and testing of subsystems for an advanced extravehicular mobility unit portable life support system for evolutionary Space Station Freedom or other applications. The subsystem discussed in this paper is the heat rejection system (HRS). The function of the HRS is to remove metabolic and equipment heat loads and provide a comfortable thermal environment for a crewperson during extravehicular activity. The HRS comprises a radiator and a water evaporator. Use of this HRS results in the venting of the evaporated water. This combination of components, however, offers a significant reduction in water usage compared to a standalone evaporator or sublimator, and a significant reduction in weight compared to nonventing configurations.

Strumpf, Hal J.; Vuigner, A. A.

1992-07-01

154

Evaporation-triggered Wetting Transition for Water Droplets upon Hydrophobic Microstructures  

E-print Network

When placed on rough hydrophobic surfaces, water droplets of diameter larger than a few millimeters can easily form pearls, as they are in the Cassie-Baxter state with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet. Intriguingly, a natural evaporating process can drive such a Fakir drop into a completely wetting (Wenzel) state. Our microscopic observations with simultaneous side and bottom views of evaporating droplets upon transparent hydrophobic microstructures elucidate the water-filling dynamics and the mechanism of this evaporation-triggered transition. For the present material the wetting transition occurs when the water droplet size decreases to a few hundreds of micrometers in radius. We present a general global energy argument which estimates the interfacial energies depending on the drop size and can account for the critical radius for the transition.

Peichun Tsai; Rob G. H. Lammertink; Matthias Wessling; Detlef Lohse

2009-09-28

155

Variability in cold front activities modulating cool-season evaporation from a southern inland water in the USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding seasonal variations in the evaporation of inland waters (e.g., lakes and reservoirs) is important for water resource management as well as the prediction of the hydrological cycles in response to climate change. We analyzed eddy covariance-based evaporation measurements from the Ross Barnett Reservoir (32°26'N, 90°02'W which is always ice-free) in central Mississippi during the cool months (i.e., September-March) of 2007 and 2008, and found that the variability in cold front activities (i.e., passages of cold fronts and cold/dry air masses behind cold fronts) played an important role in modulating the exchange of sensible (H) and latent (?E) heat fluxes. Our analysis showed that 2007's warmer cool season had smaller mean H and ?E than 2008's cooler cool season. This implies that the warmer cool season did not accelerate evaporation and heat exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. Instead, more frequent cold fronts and longer periods of cold/dry air masses behind the cold fronts in 2008 resulted in overall larger H and ?E as compared with 2007, this primarily taking the form of sporadic short-term rapid 'pulses' of H and ?E losses from the water's surface. These results suggest that future climate-induced changes in frequency of cold fronts and the meteorological properties of the air masses behind cold fronts (e.g., wind speeds, temperature, and humidity), rather than other factors of climate change, would produce significant variations in the water surface's energy fluxes and subsequent evaporation rates.

Liu, Heping; Blanken, Peter D.; Weidinger, Tamas; Nordbo, Annika; Vesala, Timo

2011-04-01

156

Non-isothermal soil water transport and evaporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed model was formulated to describe the non-isothermal transport of water in the unsaturated soil zone. The model consists of the coupled equations of mass conservation for the liquid phase, gas phase and water vapor and the energy conservation equation. The water transport mechanisms considered are convection in the liquid phase, and convection, diffusion and dispersion of vapor in

Jordi Grifoll; Josep Ma. Gastoa; Yoram Cohen

2005-01-01

157

Micrometer-sized water droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation on a flat dry surface.  

PubMed

A comprehensive numerical and experimental investigation on micrometer-sized water droplet impact dynamics and evaporation on an unheated, flat, dry surface is conducted from the standpoint of spray-cooling technology. The axisymmetric time-dependent governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and species are solved. Surface tension, wall adhesion effect, gravitational body force, contact line dynamics, and evaporation are accounted for in the governing equations. The explicit volume of fluid (VOF) model with dynamic meshing and variable-time stepping in serial and parallel processors is used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain. The numerical model includes temperature- and species-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. The contact line dynamics and the evaporation rate are predicted using Blake's and Schrage's molecular kinetic models, respectively. An extensive grid independence study was conducted. Droplet impingement and evaporation data are acquired with a standard dispensing/imaging system and high-speed photography. The numerical results are compared with measurements reported in the literature for millimeter-size droplets and with current microdroplet experiments in terms of instantaneous droplet shape and temporal spread (R/D(0) or R/R(E)), flatness ratio (H/D(0)), and height (H/H(E)) profiles, as well as temporal volume (inverted A) profile. The Weber numbers (We) for impinging droplets vary from 1.4 to 35.2 at nearly constant Ohnesorge number (Oh) of approximately 0.025-0.029. Both numerical and experimental results show that there is air bubble entrapment due to impingement. Numerical results indicate that Blake's formulation provides better results than the static (SCA) and dynamic contact angle (DCA) approach in terms of temporal evolution of R/D(0) and H/D(0) (especially at the initial stages of spreading) and equilibrium flatness ratio (H(E)/D(0)). Blake's contact line dynamics is dependent on the wetting parameter (K(W)). Both numerical and experimental results suggest that at 4.5 < We < 11.0 the short-time dynamics of microdroplet impingement corresponds to a transition regime between two different spreading regimes (i.e., for We < or = 4.5, impingement is followed by spreading, then contact line pinning and then inertial oscillations, and for We > or = 11.0, impingement is followed by spreading, then recoiling, then contact line pinning and then inertial oscillations). Droplet evaporation can be satisfactorily modeled using the Schrage model, since it predicts both well-defined transient and quasi-steady evaporation stages. The model compares well with measurements in terms of flatness ratio (H/H(E)) before depinning occurs. Toroidal vortices are formed on the droplet surface in the gaseous phase due to buoyancy-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that enhances convection. PMID:20695569

Briones, Alejandro M; Ervin, Jamie S; Putnam, Shawn A; Byrd, Larry W; Gschwender, Lois

2010-08-17

158

Witnessing Evaporation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The engineers at Splash Engineering (the students) have been commissioned by Thirsty County to conduct a study of evaporation and transpiration in their region. During one week, students observe and measure (by weight) the ongoing evaporation of water in pans set up with different variables, and then assess what factors may affect evaporation. Variables include adding to the water an amount of soil and an amount of soil with growing plants.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

159

Evaporation of a water droplet deposited on a hot high thermal conductivity solid surface  

SciTech Connect

A model is presented that predicts major features of the evaporation of water droplets deposited on a hot nonporous solid surface. In the temperature range of interest, nucleate boiling heat transfer is fully suppressed, hence the model is only concerned with the evaporative process. In the model, the solid material is assumed to have high thermal conductivity and diffusivity, so that the surface temperature under the water droplet can be considered uniform. The temperature of the portion of a larger solid surface covered by the liquid is calculated from the classic solution for contact temperature between two semi-infinite bodies.

di Marzo, M.; Evans, D.D.

1986-08-01

160

Experimental study of evaporation of sessile water droplet on PDMS surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation of sessile water droplet on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with three different curing ratios (5: 1, 10: 1, and 20: 1) was experimentally investigated in this paper. We show that the constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation on surface with high curing ratio lasts longer than that with low curing ratio. We also measured Young's moduli of PDMS films by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and simulated surface deformation of PDMS films induced by sessile water droplet. With increasing curing ratio of PDMS film, Young's modulus of PDMS film is getting lower, and then there will be larger surface deformation and more elastic stored energy. Since such energy acts as a barrier to keep the three-phase contact line pinned, thus it will result in longer CCR evaporation on PDMS surface with higher curing ratio.

Yu, Ying-Song; Wang, Zi-Qian; Zhao, Ya-Pu

2013-12-01

161

Urban Signatures: Evaporation (WMS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Big cities influence the environment around them. For example, urban areas are typically warmer than their surroundings. Cities are strikingly visible in computer models that simulate the Earths land surface. This visualization shows evaporation rates predicted by the Land Information System (LIS) for a day in June 2001. Evaporation is lower in the cities because water tends to run off pavement and into drains, rather than being absorbed by soil and plants from which it later evaporates. Only part of the global computation is shown, focusing on the highly urbanized northeast corridor in the United States, including the cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington.

Delabeaujardiere, Jeff

2005-05-27

162

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. FLASH EVAPORATORS ARE PLACED ON UPPER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. FLASH EVAPORATORS ARE PLACED ON UPPER LEVEL OF EAST SIDE OF BUILDING. WALLS WILL BE FORMED AROUND THEM. WORKING RESERVOIR BEYOND. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. EXHAUST AIR STACK IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT RIGHT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2579. Unknown Photographer, 6/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

163

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. ONE OF THREE EVAPORATORS BEFORE IT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. ONE OF THREE EVAPORATORS BEFORE IT IS INSTALLED IN UPPER LEVEL OF EAST HALF OF BUILDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1533. Unknown Photographer, 3/1/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

164

A phylogenetic analysis of basal metabolism, total evaporative water loss, and life-history among foxes from desert and mesic regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) of species of foxes that exist on the Arabian Peninsula, Blanford’s fox ( Vulpes cana) and two subspecies of Red fox ( Vulpes vulpes). Combining these data with that on other canids from the literature, we searched for specialization of physiological traits among desert foxes using both conventional

J. B. Williams; A. Muñoz-Garcia; S. Ostrowski; B. I. Tieleman

2004-01-01

165

Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan, Dr. Eric Montgomery, Dr. Patrick O' Shea, Blake Riddick, and Peter Zhigang Pan  

E-print Network

Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan, Dr. Eric Montgomery, Dr into a vacuum chamber. Experimentally found the evaporation rate of Cesium on a Tungsten Photocathode Photocathode) More accurate model of Cesium evaporation. The Free Electron Laser and Needed Improvements

Anlage, Steven

166

Experimental study of evaporation of horizontal films of water-salt solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present studies were carried out for the horizontal films (thin layers) of water and water solutions of NaCl, CaCl2, LiCl, and LiBr with different solubility characteristics, as well as with specific features of formation and decay of water hydrates. Required volume of solution Vo of given weight concentration ?o, preliminary heated to the working surface temperature, was put in one step on the horizontal bottom of the bowl, heated to working temperature tCT, by means of volume batchers Thermo Scientific. After evaporation completion, the final mass of solution and form of their residue were registered. At the final stage of evaporation formation of NaCl crystals and water hydrates of CaCl2 · 2H2O, LiCl · H2O, and LiBr · 2H2O occurred.

Elistratov, S. L.; Morozov, V. S.

2015-01-01

167

Insight into the molecular mechanism of water evaporation via the finite temperature string method  

PubMed Central

The process of water's evaporation at its liquid/air interface has proven challenging to study experimentally and, because it constitutes a rare event on molecular time scales, presents a challenge for computer simulations as well. In this work, we simulated water's evaporation using the classical extended simple point charge model water model, and identified a minimum free energy path for this process in terms of 10 descriptive order parameters. The measured free energy change was 7.4 kcal/mol at 298 K, in reasonable agreement with the experimental value of 6.3 kcal/mol, and the mean first-passage time was 1375 ns for a single molecule, corresponding to an evaporation coefficient of 0.25. In the observed minimum free energy process, the water molecule diffuses to the surface, and tends to rotate so that its dipole and one O–H bond are oriented outward as it crosses the Gibbs dividing surface. As the water molecule moves further outward through the interfacial region, its local density is higher than the time-averaged density, indicating a local solvation shell that protrudes from the interface. The water molecule loses donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds, and then, with its dipole nearly normal to the interface, stops donating its remaining hydrogen bond. At that point, when the final, accepted hydrogen bond is broken, the water molecule is free. We also analyzed which order parameters are most important in the process and in reactive trajectories, and found that the relative orientation of water molecules near the evaporating molecule, and the number of accepted hydrogen bonds, were important variables in reactive trajectories and in kinetic descriptions of the process. PMID:23574252

Musolino, Nicholas; Trout, Bernhardt L.

2013-01-01

168

Measuring forest evaporation and transpiration rates with fibre optic temperature sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation is one of the most important fluxes of the water balance as it accounts for 55-80% of the precipitation. However, measuring evaporation remains difficult and requires sophisticated and expensive equipment. In this paper we propose a new measuring technique based on the existing Bowen ratio method. With a fibre optic cable a temperature and a vapour pressure profile can be measured by the principle of a psychrometer and combined with the net radiation (and ground heat flux) the latent heat can be calculated. Compared to the conventional Bowen ratio method the advantages of this method is that the profiles are measured with a single sensor (resulting in a smaller error), and contain more measuring points in the vertical and therefore give more insight into the developed profiles. The method also allows to measure through a forest canopy. Applying the Bowen ratio above and below the canopy an estimation of the transpiration flux can be obtained. As a first test, we compared in a pine forest in The Netherlands (Loobos) the transpiration estimates of the fibre optic cable with sapflow measurements, and eddy covariance measurements above and below the canopy. The experiment was carried out on three days in September 2013 and the preliminary results show reasonable correlation with the eddy covariance estimates, but not with the sapflow observations. To explain the differences further investigation is needed and a longer measuring period is required.

Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Wim; Hessels, Tim; de Kloe, Arjan; Elbers, Jan

2014-05-01

169

Soil Evaporation, Plant Transpiration and Water Budget of Nitraria Dunes in the Arid Northwest China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitraria, a widely growing shrub plant in the dry desert area of China, can fix moving sand along its canopy and form a large number of sand dunes. The Nitraria dune is one of the most effective ways to fix moving sand and protect oasis in Northwest China. However, after dune formation, Nitraria plants gradually die and then release the fixed sand which causes damage to the oasis again. A decrease in the ratio of transpiration (T) to evapotranspiration (ET) was assumed to be the main reason for Nitraria dune degradation, however, this assumption has remained untested because of the difficulty in measuring the Nitraria dune transpiration rate. To overcome this challenge, an intensive field experiment was carried out in 2008-2012 in the Minqin, a typical desert-oasis region in Northwest China. Four measurement sites (early growth stage, rapid growth stage, peak growth stage, and senescence stage) represent the different evaluation stages of a Nitraria dune. Meteorological parameters were measured by Bowen ratio system, vegetation features and soil physical properties measured by conventional methods, soil evaporation and transpiration by three-temperature model (3T model), soil moisture by gravimetric and neutron probe method, and evapotranspiration (ET) by Bowen ratio and water balance method. Results show that in a wet year (2008), annual ET was 121, 108, 114, and 126 mm, for the four stages, respectively. The ratio of ET to precipitation (P) was 103, 92, 97, and 107%, respectively. In a dry year (2010), ET was 75, 89, 79, and 79 mm, respectively, while the ET/P was 106, 126, 112, and 112%, respectively. ET accounted for 92-107% of the precipitation in the wet years and 106-126% in the dry years. ET was nearly equal to precipitation in the wet years and greater than precipitation in the dry years, indicating almost all water from precipitation evaporated in all sites. Our results also show that vegetation coverage in the four stages was 0.15, 0.35, 0.74, and 0.23, respectively. Instantaneous value of T was 0.021, 0.014, 0.033, and 0.003 mm h-1, respectively for the four stages. Soil evaporation (E) was 0.054, 0.013, 0.004, and 0.009 mm h-1, respectively. The corresponding ET was 0.075, 0.027, 0.037, and 0.012 mm h-1. The ratio of T/ET was 0.28, 0.52, 0.89, and 0.25, respectively for the four stages. It is concluded that the Nitraria plant not only consumes all the rainfall in the growing season, but also some of the water stored in the soil, which gradually consumes all the soil water storage and finally causes the Nitraria plant death. It is also concluded that increasing T, decreasing E and keeping a high T/ET ratio is crucial for desert plants to survive. These results show that the above hypothesis is true and will be useful for vegetation rehabilitation in the desert area.

Qiu, G.; Li, C.

2013-12-01

170

Sex differences in the thermoregulation and evaporative water loss of a heterothermic bat, Lasiurus cinereus, during its spring migration.  

PubMed

This study quantifies sex differences in thermoregulation and water loss of a small (20-35 g) insectivorous heterothermic mammal, the hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus, during its spring migration. We measured body temperature, metabolic rate and evaporative water loss, and calculated wet thermal conductance, for bats exposed to air temperatures ranging from 0 to 40 degrees C for periods of 2-5 h. Pregnant females maintained normothermic body temperatures (35.7+/-0.7 degrees C; mean +/- S.E.M.) independent of air temperature. In contrast, males became torpid during the majority (68%) of exposures to air temperatures <25 degrees C. The thermal neutral zone (TNZ) ranged between approximately 30 degrees C and 34 degrees C in both sexes and, within the TNZ, females had lower mass-specific metabolic rates (6.1+/-0.2 mW g(-1)) than males (9.0+/-0.9 mW g(-1)). Wet thermal conductance values in torpid bats (0.7+/-0.5 mW g(-1) deg.(-1)) were lower than those of normothermic individuals (1.1+/-0.3 mW g(-1) deg.(-1)). Mass-specific rates of evaporative water loss in males were consistently higher than in females at most air temperatures and rates of water loss in torpid bats were 63+/-6% of normothermic values. These results suggest that male and pregnant female L. cinereus employ different thermoregulatory strategies during their spring migration. Females defend normothermic body temperatures, presumably to expedite embryonic growth, while males use torpor, presumably to minimize energy and water deficits. These variable thermoregulatory strategies may reflect continental differences in the summer distribution of the sexes. PMID:12939370

Cryan, Paul M; Wolf, Blair O

2003-10-01

171

Seasonal changes in physical processes controlling evaporation over inland water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

previous studies have shown the distinct characteristics of water surface energy fluxes in different seasons, much less analysis is conducted about how seasonal changes in physical processes and environmental variables in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) cause variations in flux exchange. Here we analyzed and compared eddy covariance fluxes of sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) and other microclimate variables that were measured over a large inland water surface in the winter season (January, February, and March) and the summer season (June, July, and August) of 2008. Our analysis was primarily focused on LE using half-hour time series data on a short-term basis. Our results show that an increase in wind speeds (U) or vapor pressure difference in the ASL (?e) or ASL instability did not necessarily cause an increase in LE, and the opposite changes in LE with changes in these variables were observed. Relative regulations of LE by different environmental variables depended largely on ?e magnitudes. Under low ?e conditions, diurnal LE variations were not sensitive to changes in ?e and U but were controlled primarily by changes in the ASL stability. Under high ?e conditions, diurnal LE variations were mainly determined by changes in ?e, though alternate controls by U and ?e were observed, whereas ASL stability played minor roles in affecting LE variations. Whether these highly nonlinear responses of LE to environmental variables are adequately reflected in the bulk transfer relations requires further studies.

Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Heping

2014-08-01

172

Soil water evaporation measurement of lysimeter based on fiber Bragg grating sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A lysimeter weighing system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for measuring the soil water evaporation was presented in this paper. By the use of three mechanical levers and balance weight, the weight loaded on the FBG sensor was reduced K times (here, K was the ratio of levers). So the amount of water change in the soil container of tons can be weighted. A two-hole cantilever was selected as the elastomer structure of FBG weighing sensor, and an optimum design was carried on using the finite element method to meet the small-scaled design requirements. Using the matching fiber Bragg grating demodulation method based on LabVIEW, the demodulation system was easy to be implemented. Then the FBG center wavelength drift was converted into a time interval, and the weight can be obtained automatically through measuring the interval by computer. Preliminary experiment showed that this weighing system has the ability of measuring soil water evaporation accurately.

Yan, Kejun; Liu, Jun; Miao, Liping; Bai, Li; Zhong, Wenting

2013-10-01

173

Adaptation of metabolism and evaporative water loss along an aridity gradient.  

PubMed Central

Broad-scale comparisons of birds indicate the possibility of adaptive modification of basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) in species from desert environments, but these might be confounded by phylogeny or phenotypic plasticity. This study relates variation in avian BMR and TEWL to a continuously varying measure of environment, aridity. We test the hypotheses that BMR and TEWL are reduced along an aridity gradient within the lark family (Alaudidae), and investigate the role of phylogenetic inertia. For 12 species of lark, BMR and TEWL decreased along a gradient of increasing aridity, a finding consistent with our proposals. We constructed a phylogeny for 22 species of lark based on sequences of two mitochondrial genes, and investigated whether phylogenetic affinity played a part in the correlation of phenotype and environment. A test for serial independence of the data for mass-corrected TEWL and aridity showed no influence of phylogeny on our findings. However, we did discover a significant phylogenetic effect in mass-corrected data for BMR, a result attributable to common phylogenetic history or to common ecological factors. A test of the relationship between BMR and aridity using phylogenetic independent constrasts was consistent with our previous analysis: BMR decreased with increasing aridity. PMID:12590762

Tieleman, B Irene; Williams, Joseph B; Bloomer, Paulette

2003-01-01

174

Characterization of the LGFSTF wind tunnel in preparation for the DOE/EPA hazardous chemical evaporation rate experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy are conducting chemical evaporation rate experiments in the DOE`s Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGFSTF) wind tunnel to determine the effect on evaporation rate of pool temperature and wind speed. Evaporation rates measured in these tests will be used to verify mathematical models used to define the source (gas) rate inputs to dispersion models. In preparation for the experiments the LGFSTF tunnel has been modified to provide for the simulation of an atmospheric boundary layer flow on the tunnel floor. This report describes work performed by the DOE Modeling Support Center at the University of Arkansas to define (characterize) the turbulence properties in the boundary layer of the (modified) wind tunnel test section. Hot wire anemometry measurements were made to characterize the boundary layer flow over the evaporation test pan. Mean velocity and turbulence statistics were measured along a verticle line (extending from 0.5 cm to 60 cm above the tunnel floor) located on the tunnel centerline immediately upwind of the evaporation pan. The x-direction mean velocity data were analyzed to estimate the applicable values of the surface roughness and friction velocity for four tunnel (variable frequency controller) speed settings: 15 Hz, 30 Hz, 45 Hz, and 60 Hz.

Havens, J.; Walker, H.; Spicer, T.

1995-03-01

175

A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.  

PubMed

Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture. PMID:24420931

Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

2014-04-01

176

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

Ken Mortensen

2011-12-31

177

Sensitivity of Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Systems to Potable Water Constituents, Contaminants and Air Bubbles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is the baseline heat rejection technology selected for development for the Constellation lunar suit. The first SWME prototype, designed, built, and tested at Johnson Space Center in 1999 used a Teflon hydrophobic porous membrane sheet shaped into an annulus to provide cooling to the coolant loop through water evaporation to the vacuum of space. This present study describes the test methodology and planning and compares the test performance of three commercially available hollow fiber materials as alternatives to the sheet membrane prototype for SWME, in particular, a porous hydrophobic polypropylene, and two variants that employ ion exchange through non-porous hydrophilic modified Nafion. Contamination tests will be performed to probe for sensitivities of the candidate SWME elements to ordinary constituents that are expected to be found in the potable water provided by the vehicle, the target feedwater source. Some of the impurities in potable water are volatile, such as the organics, while others, such as the metals and inorganic ions are nonvolatile. The non-volatile constituents will concentrate in the SWME as evaporated water from the loop is replaced by the feedwater. At some point in the SWME mission lifecycle as the concentrations of the non-volatiles increase, the solubility limits of one or more of the constituents may be reached. The resulting presence of precipitate in the coolant water may begin to plug pores and tube channels and affect the SWME performance. Sensitivity to macroparticles, lunar dust simulant, and air bubbles will also be investigated.

Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Fritts, Sharon; Tsioulos, Gus

2008-01-01

178

Recycling nickel electroplating rinse waters by low temperature evaporation and reverse osmosis  

SciTech Connect

Low temperature evaporation and reverse osmosis systems were each evaluated (on a pilot scale) on their respective ability to process rinse water collected from a nickel electroplating operation. Each system offered advantages under specific operating conditions. The low temperature evaporation system was best suited to processing solutions with relatively high (greater than 4,000 to 5,000 mg/L) nickel concentrations. The reverse osmosis system was best adapted to conditions where the feed solution had a relatively low (less than4,000 to 5,000 mg/L) nickel concentration. In electroplating operations where relatively dilute rinse water solutions must be concentrated to levels acceptable for replacement in the plating bath, a combination of the two technologies might provide the best process alternative.

Lindsey, T.C.; Randall, P.M.

1993-08-01

179

Investigations to predict and reduce the evaporation rate of the residual brine is salt caverns used for gas storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensides were tested for their ability to reduce the evaporation rate of residual brine in salt caverns used for gas storage. Fatty alcohols with more than 20 CH2 groups and perfluorinated alcohols with more than 12 CF 2 groups prove especially useful. The formation of a solid salt crust on the initially free brine surface is due to the incorporation of alkaline Earth ions. After its completion, the solid salt crust enormously reduces the evaporation rate of the underlying brine. It is found that by the use of different tensides, crust formation can be either enhanced of retarded at will.

Petrick, H. J.; Cammenga, H. K.; Herz, D.

1981-12-01

180

Burned and unburned peat water repellency: Implications for peatland evaporation following wildfire  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water repellency alters soil hydrology after periods of wildfire, potentially modifying the ecosystem recovery to such disturbance. Despite this potential importance, the extent and severity of water repellency within burned peatlands and its importance in regulating peatland recovery to wildfire disturbance remains poorly understood. We characterised the water repellency of peat in a burned (one year post-fire) and unburned peatland in the Western Boreal Plain utilising the water drop penetration time and ethanol droplet molarity tests. Burned Sphagnum moss and feather moss sites had a more severe degree of water repellency than unburned sites, with differences being more pronounced between burned and unburned feather moss sites. Burned feather moss exhibited the most extreme water repellency, followed by unburned feather moss, and burned Sphagnum. The severity of water repellency varied with depth through the near surface of the moss/peat profile. This was most evident within the burned feathermoss where more extreme water repellency was observed at the near-surface compared to the surface, with the most extreme water repellency found at 1 and 5 cm depths. Unburned Sphagnum was completely hydrophilic at all depths. We suggest that the extreme water repellency in near-surface feather moss peat acts as a barrier that impedes the supply of water to the surface that replaces that lost via evaporation. This leads to drying of the near-surface vadose zone within feather moss areas and a concomitantly large decrease in peatland evaporation within feather moss dominated peatlands. This negative feedback mechanism likely enhances the resilience of such peatland to wildfire disturbance, maintaining a high water table position, thereby limiting peat decomposition. In comparison, such a feedback is not observed strongly within Sphagnum, leaving Sphagnum dominated peatlands potentially vulnerable to low water table positions post disturbance.

Kettridge, N.; Humphrey, R. E.; Smith, J. E.; Lukenbach, M. C.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.; Waddington, J. M.

2014-05-01

181

Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

Russo, E.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; van der Geld, C. W. M.; Geurts, B. J.

2011-12-01

182

Regional water balance trends and evaporation-transpiration partitioning from a stable isotope survey of lakes in northern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional variations in evaporation losses and water budget are interpreted from systematic isotopic patterns in surface waters across a 275,000 km2 region of northern Canada. Differential heavy isotope enrichment in a set of >255 nonheadwater lakes sampled by floatplane during 1993 and 1994 is strongly correlated to varying hydroclimatic conditions across the region. Calculated catchment-weighted evaporation losses typically range from

J. J. Gibson; T. W. D. Edwards

2002-01-01

183

Phase, Viscosity, Morphology, and Room Temperature Evaporation Rates of SOA Particles Generated from Different Precursors, at Low and High Relative Humidities, and their Interaction with Hydrophobic Organics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Semi-volatile molecules that comprise SOA particles were assumed to form a low viscosity solution that maintains equilibrium with the evolving gas phase by rapid evaporation condensation. However, studies by our group indicate that laboratory-generated alpha-pinene SOA particles and ambient SOA characterized in a recent field campaign are in a semi-solid, highly viscous phase, and their evaporation rates are orders of magnitude slower than predicted. We present the results of recent studies in which we have extended our work to include SOA particles generated by oxidation of a number of precursors including limonene, n-alkenes, cyclo-alkenes and isoprene. The resulting particles are characterized by their phase, morphology and room temperature evaporation rates. We conclude that, while the detailed properties of SOA particles depend of their precursor, all studied SOA particles are highly viscous semi-solids that exhibit very slow evaporation rates. Given that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) can change particle phase, it is important to investigate the effect of RH on the phase and evaporation kinetics of SOA particles. To this end SOA particles were generated at low and high (~90%) RH, and their evaporation kinetics and phase were characterized as a function of RH. In the ambient atmosphere SOA particles form in the presence of a mixture of different organic compounds, which are present at or below their equilibrium vapor pressure, and thus have been ignored. However, our data show that these compounds can adsorb to the surface of particles during SOA formation, becoming trapped in the highly viscous SOA, and affect particle properties. We examine the interaction between SOA particles and different hydrophobic organics representing typical anthropogenic emissions by making SOA in the presence of the vapors of these hydrophobic organics and characterizing their properties. We find that the interaction between SOA and hydrophobic organics leads to a symbiotic relation, in which trapped hydrophobic organics are protected from evaporation and the oxidizing atmosphere, and the presence of hydrophobic organics virtually stops SOA evaporation. We also demonstrate that it is possible to directly measure the diffusion rates of these molecules in SOA, and use them to calculate a reasonably accurate value for the SOA viscosity, from which particle coalescence rates are calculated. Similar measurements were conducted on aged SOA particles, including those 'doped'with hydrophobic organics. The data indicate that aging further slows evaporation rates and results in increased viscosity, indicating that hardening occurs with time, which is consistent with observed decrease in water uptake. These findings demonstrate that SOA particles are not at equilibrium with the gas phase and cannot be modeled using Raoult's law. The heterogeneous chemistry, temporal evolution and fate of highly viscous, nearly non-volatile SOA particles are clearly different from those of liquid droplets at equilibrium with the gas phase.

Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D. G.; Beranek, J.; Abramson, E.; Shrivastava, M.

2012-12-01

184

Hollow Fiber Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator Development for Lunar Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is the baseline heat rejection technology selected for development for the Constellation lunar suit. The Hollow Fiber (HoFi) SWME is being considered for service in the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) to provide cooling to the thermal loop through water evaporation to the vacuum of space. Previous work described the test methodology and planning to compare the test performance of three commercially available hollow fiber materials as alternatives to the sheet membrane prototype for SWME: 1) porous hydrophobic polypropylene, 2) porous hydrophobic polysulfone, and 3) ion exchange through nonporous hydrophilic modified Nafion. Contamination tests were performed to probe for sensitivities of the candidate SWME elements to organics and non-volative inorganics expected to be found in the target feedwater source, i.e., potable water provided by the vehicle. The resulting presence of precipitate in the coolant water could plug pores and tube channels and affect the SWME performance. From this prior work, a commercial porous hydrophobic hollow fiber was selected to satisfy both the sensitivity question and the need to provide 800 W of heat rejection. This paper describes the trade studies, the design methodology, and the hollow fiber test data used to design a full

Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Hanford, Anthony J.; Mitchell, Keith

2009-01-01

185

Relationship between a solar drying model of red pepper and the kinetics of pure water evaporation (1)  

SciTech Connect

Drying of red pepper under solar radiation was investigated, and a simple model related to water evaporation was developed. Drying experiments at constant laboratory conditions were undertaken where solar radiation was simulated by a 1,000 W lamp. In this first part of the work, water evaporation under radiation is studied and laboratory experiments are presented with two objectives: to verify Penman`s model of evaporation under radiation, and to validate the laboratory experiments. Modifying Penman`s model of evaporation by introducing two drying conductances as a function of water content, allows the development of a drying model under solar radiation. In the second part of this paper, the model is validated by applying it to red pepper open air solar drying experiments.

Passamai, V.; Saravia, L. [National Univ. of Salta (Argentina)

1997-05-01

186

Coupled water and heat flow in laboratory evaporation experiments and its effects on soil hydraulic properties estimated by the simplified evaporation method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prediction of water fluxes in the field requires an accurate determination of soil hydraulic parameters which define the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity function. The evaporation method has become a standard tool to quickly and reliably determine soil hydraulic properties in the wet to medium pressure head range. Recently, the method has profited from a significant improvement of soil sensors and data evaluation methods. In most cases, the data obtained from a transient evaporation experiment are evaluated using simplifying assumptions, like the ones implicit to Schindler's or Wind's methods. In the past, the effect of these simplifications on the identification of hydraulic properties has been investigated and found to be relatively minor. These studies were based on the evaluation of computer-generated data which were created by numerical modeling of the evaporation process with the Richards equation, i.e. by assuming isothermal liquid flow. Since evaporation from bare soil will always lead to loss of energy, the assumption of constant temperature is questionable. In addition, the effects of thermal and vapor fluxes on simplified evaluation methods have so far hardly been investigated. In this contribution we analyze the effects of (1) coupled heat and water flow and (2) temperature effects on physical parameters. We firstly generated data by a numerical model which solves the coupled heat and water flow problem first derived by Philip and de Vries, and then used these data as source for the estimation of hydraulic properties with the evaluation methods of Schindler and Wind. The virtual realities covered different atmospheric forcings like changing wind speed and varying incoming shortwave radiation. The objective of this study was to identify under which atmospheric conditions, for which soil textures, and in which pressure head range the simplified evaluation methods lead to unbiased estimates of the soil hydraulic properties.

Iden, Sascha C.; Blöcher, Johanna; Diamantopoulos, Efstathios; Durner, Wolfgang

2014-05-01

187

Four-man rated dual catalyst system for the recovery of water from urine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The catalytic system was integrated with a 4-man rated urine wick evaporator. During operation, urine vapor produced by the wick-evaporator was treated in the catalytic system to remove ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons, and water was recovered by condensation in a water cooled condenser. The system operated completely automatically and required no manual adjustments, except periodic supply of urine and removal of the recovered water. Although the system was designed for treating 0.325 kg urine per hour, this rate could be achieved only with a fresh wick, then gradually decreased as the wick became saturated with urine solids. The average urine treatment rates achieved during each of the three endurance tests were 0.137, 0.217, and 0.235 kg/hr. The quality of the recovered water meets drinking water standards, with the exception of a generally low pH.

Budininkas, P.

1978-01-01

188

Effects of Carbonyl Bond and Metal Cluster Dissociation and Evaporation Rates on Predictions of Nanotube Production in HiPco  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the co-formation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO due to its lower bond energy as compared with that ofNiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

2002-01-01

189

Testing of Commercial Hollow Fiber Membranes for Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane evaporators, modified for low pressure, were tested in a vacuum chamber at pressures below 33 pascals as potential space suit water membrane evaporator (SWME) heat rejection technologies. Water quality was controlled in a series of 25 tests, first simulating potable water reclaimed from waste water and then changing periodically to simulate the ever concentrating make-up of the circulating coolant over that is predicted over the course of 100 EVAs. Two of the systems, comprised of non-porous tubes with hydrophilic molecular channels as the water vapor transport mechanism, were severely impacted by the increasing concentrations of cations in the water. One of the systems, based on hydrophobic porous polypropylene tubes was not affected by the degrading water quality, or the presence of microbes. The polypropylene system, called SWME 1, was selected for further testing. An inverse flow configuration was also tested with SWME 1, with vacuum exposure on the inside of the tubes, provided only 20% of the performance of the standard configuration. SWME 1 was also modified to block 50% and 90% of the central tube layers, and tested to investigate performance efficiency. Performance curves were also developed in back-pressure regulation tests, and revealed important design considerations arising from the fully closed valve. SWME 1 was shown to be insensitive to air bubbles injected into the coolant loop. Development and testing of a full-scale prototype based on this technology and these test results is in progress.

Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Hanford, Anthony

2009-01-01

190

Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

191

Development of a preprototype thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem for water recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three-man urine water recovery preprototype subsystem using a new concept to provide efficient potable water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Low power, compactness, and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber polysulfone membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. Application and integration of these key elements have solved problems inherent in previous reclamation subsystem designs. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than a waste liquid recirculation pump and a product water withdrawal pump. Tubular membranes provide structural integrity, improving on previous flat sheet membrane designs. A thermoelectric heat pump provides latent energy recovery.

Winkler, H. E.; Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

1980-01-01

192

Rate Setting for Small Water Systems  

E-print Network

-funded center at Boise State University has developed a free software program (?RATE Checkup?) that helps small water systems set rates and prepare budget forecasts. The center that serves Texas is locat- ed at New Mexico Tech University. In addition...

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-03-28

193

The carbon isotope behaviour during sea water evaporation in salinas as related to the biogeochemical cycle of carbon.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field measurements and sampling of hypersaline solutions have been realized in the salinas of Santa Pola (Spain) during June 2000 and May 2001. We have followed the geochemical and isotopic evolutions of the solutions along the sea water evaporitic pathway and during a nycthemeral cycle in four evaporitic basins (two carbonate basins, one gypsum basin and one halite basin). There are important differences from one year to another : during May 2001, the \\delta13C values of DIC were enriched by 1\\permil to 5\\permil compared to June 2000, indicating organic productivity levels higher in May 2001 than in June 2000. The alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and \\delta13C values of DIC show large changes from night to day with variable amplitude in the different basins, being more important in the first evaporitic basins where carbonate organic-rich sediments are deposited. The large interannual and nycthemeral variabilies of the \\delta13C values of DIC in marine evaporitic settings show that these environments are very sensitive to the external and internal constraints which drive the evaporation rate, the mineral precipitation, as well as the organic productivity-regeneration levels. Because inorganic and biological processes in evaporating marine solutions control the carbon cycle and the carbon isotope fractionations, they are both recorded in the geochemistry of the solutions and in the \\delta13C values of DIC. During sea water evaporation up to halite saturation, the \\delta13C values of DIC vary in a wide range between -5\\permil and +10\\permil, following four major steps . 1) carbonate precipitation causes the initial drop of the \\delta13C values ; 2) algal production (photosynthesis) is responsible for 13C enrichments in the solutions while organic matter remineralization in the sediment release 13C -poor CO2 in the overlying solutions causing major decreases of \\delta13C values of DIC in the solutions ; 3) In the basins where gypsum and halite are deposited, the formation of hard evaporitic crusts at the basin floor inhibits gas and ion diffusion from the sediment toward the overlying solutions ; 4) large 13C enrichments in the heaviest brines results mostly from CO2 evasion during evaporation and probably also from the 13C -poor CO2 uptake by the bacterial biomass.

Pierre, C.; Pueyo Mur, J.; Fritz, B.

2004-12-01

194

A New Approach to Measure Contact Angle and Evaporation Rate with Flow Visualization in a Sessile Drop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The contact angle and the spreading process of sessile droplet are very crucial in many technological processes, such as painting and coating, material processing, film-cooling applications, lubrication, and boiling. Additionally, as it is well known that the surface free energy of polymers cannot be directly, measured for their elastic and viscous restraints. The measurements of liquid contact angle on the polymer surfaces become extremely important to evaluate the surface free energy of polymers through indirect methods linked with the contact angle data. Due to the occurrence of liquid evaporation is inevitable, the effects of evaporation on the contact angle and the spreading become very important for more complete understanding of these processes. It is of interest to note that evaporation can induce Marangoni-Benard convection in sessile drops. However, the impacts of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes are not clear. The experimental methods used by previous investigators cannot simultaneously measure the spreading process and visualize the convection inside. Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the present author, a very simple optical procedure has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, the evaporation rate, and to visualize inside convection of a sessile drop simultaneously. Two CCD cameras were used to synchronously record the real-time diameter of the sessile drop, which is essential for determination of both spreading speed and evaporation rate, and the shadowgraphic image magnified by the sessile drop acting as a thin plano-convex lens. From the shadowgraph, the inside convection of the drop can be observed if any and the image outer diameter, which linked to the drop profile, can be measured. Simple equations have been derived to calculate the drop profile, including the instantaneous contact angle, height, and volume of the sessile drop, as well as the evaporation rate. The influence of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes can be figured out through comparison of the drop profiles with and without inside convection when the sessile drop is placed at different evaporation conditions.

Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.

1999-01-01

195

Forest evaporation models: relationships between stand growth and evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationships between forest stand structure, growth and evaporation were analysed to determine whether forest evaporation can be estimated from stand growth data. This approach permits rapid assessment of the potential impacts of afforestation on the water regime. The basis for this approach is (a) that growth rates are determined by water availability and limited by the maximum water extraction potential, and (b) that stand evaporation is proportional to biomass and biomass increment. The relationships between stand growth and evaporation were modelled for a set of catchment experiments where estimates of both growth and evaporation were available. The predicted mean evaporation, over periods of several years, was generally within 10% of the measured mean annual evaporation (rainfall minus streamflow) when the model from one catchment was applied to other catchments planted with the same species. The residual evaporation, after fitting the models, was correlated with rainfall: above-average rainfall resulted in above-average evaporation. This relationship could be used to derive estimates for dry and wet years. Analyses using the models provide additional evidence that Eucalyptus grandis may be depleting groundwater reserves in catchments where its roots can reach the water table. The models are designed to be integrated into a plantation management system which uses a geographic information system for spatial analysis and modelling. The use of readily available growth parameters as predictor variables may reduce our dependence on intricate process-based models. This is seen as an efficient way of extrapolating existing catchment data — reflecting the impacts of forestry on water supplies across a range of sites, climatic zones and species. This approach has the potential for further development, especially in dealing with low flows and faster growing species.

Le Maitre, D. C.; Versfeld, D. B.

1997-06-01

196

Evaporative water loss in man in a gravity-free environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Daily evaporative water losses (EWL) during the three Skylab missions were measured indirectly using mass and water-balance techniques. The mean daily values of EWL for the nine crew members who averaged 1 hr of daily exercise were: preflight 1,750 + or - 37 (SE) ml or 970 + or - 20 ml/sq m and inflight 1,560 + or - 26 ml or 860 + or - 14 ml/sq m. Although it was expected the EWL would increase in the hypobaric environment of Skylab, an average decrease from preflight sea-level conditions of 11% was measured. The results suggest that weightlessness decreased sweat losses during exercise and possibly reduced insensible skin losses. The weightlessness environment apparently promotes the formation of an observed sweat film on the skin surface during exercise by reducing convective flow and sweat drippage, resulting in high levels of skin wettedness that favor sweat suppression.

Leach, C. S.; Leonard, J. I.; Rambaut, P. C.; Johnson, P. C.

1978-01-01

197

Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and any remaining free water in the trash by evaporation. The temperature settings of the heated surfaces are usually kept above the saturation temperature of water but below the melting temperature of the plastic in the waste during this step to avoid any encapsulation of wet trash which would reduce the amount of recovered water by blocking the vapor escape. In this paper, we analyze the water recovery rate during Phase B where the trash is heated and water leaves the waste chamber as vapor, for operation of the HMC in reduced gravity. We pursue a quasi-one-dimensional model with and without sidewall heating to determine the water recovery rate and the trash drying time. The influences of the trash thermal properties, the amount of water loading, and the distribution of the water in the trash on the water recovery rates are determined.

Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

2013-01-01

198

Estimating increased evaporation losses caused by irrigated agriculture as part of the water balance of the Orari Catchment, Canterbury, New Zealand  

E-print Network

1 Estimating increased evaporation losses caused by irrigated agriculture as part of the water processes. Impacts on catchment hydrology are quantified as the additional evaporation losses caused by irrigation agriculture in comparison to dryland evaporation. Different land-use scenarios with varying

Kienzle, Stefan W.

199

Evaluation of the return periods of water crises and evaporation in Monte Cotugno reservoir (Southern Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past water resources management has been dealt and solved increasing water availabilities; today such opportunities have been considerably reduced and the technical-scientific perspectives are addressed above all to improve water system effectiveness and to promote an use of water resources that holds account of the droughts frequency and based on a correct estimate of the hydrologic balance. In this work a study on the water stored in Monte Cotugno reservoir in Sinni river - Basilicata (Southern Italy) - is proposed, estimating water crises return periods and reservoir evaporation. For such purpose the runs method was applied, based on the comparison between the temporal series of the "water volume" hydrological variable and a threshold representative of the "normal" conditions regarding which the availability in excess or defect was estimated. This allowed to individualize the beginning and the end of a water crisis event and to characterize the droughts in terms of duration, sum deficit and intensity. Therefore the return period was evaluated by means of the methodology proposed by Shiau and Shen in 2001, turned out equal approximately to 6 years. Such value was then verified with a frequency analysis of the "water volume" random variable, using the Weibull's distribution. Subsequently, the Fourier's analysis in the last twenty years was carried out, obtaining the same result of the previous methods. Moreover, in proximity of the Monte Cotugno reservoir the weather station of Senise is located, managed by ALSIA (Agenzia Lucana di Sviluppo e Innovazione in Agricultura), that provides in continuous measurements of air temperature and humidity, wind speed and direction, and global solar radiation since 2000. Such parameters allowed to apply five methods for reservoir evaporation estimate selected from those proposed in the literature, of which the first three, the Jensen-Haise's method, Makkink's method and Stephens-Stewart's one are based on solar radiation and temperature, while the Blaney-Criddle's method is based on temperature and duration of the day, and the Thornthwaite's method is based only on air temperature measurement.

Copertino, Vito; Lo Vecchio, Giuseppina; Marotta, Lucia; Pastore, Vittoria; Ponzio, Giuseppe; Scavone, Giuseppina; Telesca, Vito; Vita, Michele

2010-05-01

200

Hollow Fiber Space Water Membrane Evaporator Flight Prototype Design and Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits and to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology. This results in a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. The current design was based on a previous design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape. This was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting of 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which is formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of 10 nested stacks. The new design replaced metal components with plastic ones, eliminated the spacers, and has a custom built flight like backpressure valve mounted on the side of the SWME housing to reduce backpressure when fully open. A number of tests were performed in order to improve the strength of the polyurethane header that holds the fibers in place while the system is pressurized. Vacuum chamber testing showed similar heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure was similar to the previous design. Other tests pushed the limits of tolerance to freezing and showed suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment with and without a sweep gas. Tolerance to contamination by constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by distillation processes was tested in a conventional way by allowing constituents to accumulate in the coolant as evaporation occurs. For this purpose, the SWME cartridge has endured an equivalent of 30 EVAs exposure and demonstrated acceptable performance decline.

Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Vogel, Mtthew; Honas, Matt; Dillon, Paul; Colunga, Aaron; Truong, Lily; Porwitz, Darwin; Tsioulos, Gus

2011-01-01

201

Thermoregulation in juvenile red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) after pouch exit: higher metabolism and evaporative water requirements.  

PubMed

The population dynamics of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) in the Australian arid zone is tightly linked with environmental factors, which partly operate via the survival of juvenile animals. A crucial stage is the young-at-foot (YAF) stage when kangaroos permanently exit the pouch. We have examined the thermal biology of YAF red kangaroos during ages from permanent pouch exit until weaning. Over a wide range of environmental temperatures (ambient temperature [T(a)] -5 degrees to 45 degrees C), YAF red kangaroos had a mass-specific metabolism that was generally twice that of adults, considerably higher than would be expected for an adult marsupial of their body size. The total energy requirements of YAF red kangaroos were 60%-70% of those of adult females, which were three times their size. Over the same range in T(a), YAF red kangaroos also had total evaporative water losses equal to those of adult females. At the highest T(a) (45 degrees C), differences were noted in patterns of dry heat loss (dry conductance) between YAF red kangaroos and adult females, which may partially explain the relatively high levels of evaporative cooling by YAF. By weaning age, young kangaroos showed little change in their basal energy and water requirements (at T(a) 25 degrees C) but did show reduced mass-specific costs in terms of energy and water use at extremes of T(a) (-5 degrees and 45 degrees C, respectively). In their arid environment, typified by unpredictable rainfall and extremes of T(a), young red kangaroos may need to remain close to water points, which, in turn, may restrict their ability to find the high-quality forage needed to meet their high energy demands. PMID:11731983

Munn, A J; Dawson, T J

2001-01-01

202

Wind-Aided Intensified eVaporation (WAIV) and Membrane Crystallizer (MCr) integrated brackish water desalination process: Advantages and drawbacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the increasing of water shortage problems, the need for inland brackish water RO will continue to increase in future. However, the primary limitations to further application of RO inland are the cost and technical feasibility of concentrate disposal. In this work, Membrane Crystallizer (MCr) and Wind-Aided Intensified eVaporation (WAIV) technologies have been applied in order to mitigate the

F. Macedonio; L. Katzir; N. Geisma; S. Simone; E. Drioli; J. Gilron

2011-01-01

203

The dependence of bulk evaporation coefficients on air-water interfacial conditions as determined by the isotopic method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of the natural distribution of deuterium and oxygen 18 in moisture inside the turbulent boundary layer developed above a water surface makes possible the investigation of the mechanism of evaporation. The distribution of isotopes in water vapor allows the calculation of the relative contributions of molecular and turbulent transfer to the total mass transport (Merlivat and Coantic, 1975).

Liliane Merlivat

1978-01-01

204

Global distribution of moisture, evaporation-precipitation, and diabatic heating rates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global archives were established for ECMWF 12-hour, multilevel analysis beginning 1 January 1985; day and night IR temperatures, and solar incoming and solar absorbed. Routines were written to access these data conveniently from NASA/MSFC MASSTOR facility for diagnostic analysis. Calculations of diabatic heating rates were performed from the ECMWF data using 4-day intervals. Calculations of precipitable water (W) from 1 May 1985 were carried out using the ECMWF data. Because a major operational change on 1 May 1985 had a significant impact on the moisture field, values prior to that date are incompatible with subsequent analyses.

Christy, John R.

1989-01-01

205

Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

2012-01-01

206

Correlation between shape, evaporation mode and mobility of small water droplets on nanorough fibres.  

PubMed

The dynamic wetting behaviour and the mobility of droplets on fibres is a very important factor in coating processes, textile fabrication, in self-cleaning processes and in the filtration of fluids. In principal, filter regeneration depends on the mobility of the droplets on the fibre surface. Mobile droplets tend to coalesce which greatly simplifies their removal from the filter. In this contribution mobility analyses of water droplets on monofilaments in air are performed. Studies of droplet evaporation on pure PET fibres and on nanorough fibres coated with SiO2 nanoparticles of diameters between 6 nm and 50 nm in a hydrophilic binder system were done. We show that the mobility of water droplets correlates with the droplet conformation which in turn is determined by the droplet-fibre interface. We demonstrate that fibre coatings can be used to tailor the conformation and mobility of water droplets. The smaller the nanoparticle diameters in the coating are, the smaller are the contact angles between water droplets and fibre and the better is the mobility of the droplets on the fibre. Our results allow a fast optimization of the fibre surface properties which are directly influencing the contact angle, the mobility and the coalescence of water droplets and thus filter regeneration. PMID:24407674

Funk, C S; Winzer, B; Peukert, W

2014-03-01

207

Full-Scale Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the superior candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. Although a number of design variants were considered, one that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was deemed best for further development. An analysis of test data showed that eight layer stacks of the HoFi sheets that had good exposure on each side of the stack would evaporate water with high efficiency. A design that has 15,000 tubes, with 18 cm of exposed tubes between headers has been built and tested that meets the size, weight, and performance requirements of the SWME. This full-scale prototype consists of 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Testing has been performed to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the sensitivity to surfactants.

Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Dillon, Paul; Weaver, Gregg

2009-01-01

208

Magnetic resonance imaging of slow water flow during infiltration and evaporation by tracer motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water fluxes in soils control many processes in the environment like plant nutrition, solute and pollutant transport. In the last two decades non-invasive visualization methods have been adapted to monitor flux processes on the small scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), also well known from medical diagnostics, is one of the most versatile ones. It mostly probes directly the substance of interest: water, and it offers many opportunities to manipulate the observed signals for creating different contrasts and thus probing different properties of the porous medium and the embedded fluids. For example, one can make the signal sensitive to the total proton density, i. e. water content, to spatial distributions of relaxation times which reflect pore sizes, to spatial distributions of transport coefficients, and to concentration of contrast agents by using strongly T1 weighted MRI pulse sequences. In this presentation we use GdDTPA2- for monitoring flux processes in soil columns in an ultra-wide bore MRI scanner. It offers the opportunity for monitoring slow water fluxes mainly occurring in soil systems which are not monitorable with direct MRI flow imaging. This contrast agent is most convenient since it behaves conservatively, i.e. it does not sorb at different soil materials and it is chemically stable. Firstly, we show that its mode of action in natural porous media is identical to that known from medical applications as proved by the identical relaxivity parameters [1]. Secondly, the tracer is applied for the visualization of flux processes during evaporation-driven flow. Theoretical considerations by forward simulation predicted a lateral redistribution of solutes during evaporative upward fluxes from highly conductive fine material to neighbouring domains with low water content and conductivity. Here we could prove that such near-surface redistribution really takes place [2]. Thirdly, this tracer is applied for the investigation of water uptake by root systems. Depending on the transpiration conditions slow uptake in the dark is present, where the tracer moves directly into the xylem. When fully illuminated, the tracer uptake is limited by the Caspari band, and it is enriched strongly in the roots cortex. The results so far show that this tracer offers a new window for monitoring slow water fluxes in bare and grown soil columns. [1] Haber-Pohlmeier S, Bechtold M, Stapf, S, Pohlmeier, A. (2010) Vadose Zone Journal 9, 835-845 [2] Bechtold M, Haber-Pohlmeier S, Vanderborght J, Pohlmeier A, Ferré T, Vereecken H. (2011) Geophysical Research Letters 38, L17404

Pohlmeier, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Bechtold, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

2012-04-01

209

Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

2012-01-01

210

Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

2011-01-01

211

Reaction rate constant for uranium in water and water vapor  

SciTech Connect

The literature on uranium oxidation in water and oxygen free water vapor was reviewed. Arrhenius rate equations were developed from the review data. These data and equations will be used as a baseline from which to compare reaction rates measured for K Basin fuel.

TRIMBLE, D.J.

1998-11-09

212

On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2009-07-16

213

On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution  

PubMed Central

Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 ± 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor–liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly. PMID:19861551

Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2009-01-01

214

The eect of a surfactant monolayer on the temperature eld of a water surface undergoing evaporation  

E-print Network

evaporation J.R. Saylora, *, G.B. Smitha , K.A. Flackb a Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA evaporation was measured using infrared imaging techniques, demonstrating for the ®rst time the eect of H11. 7 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Evaporation; Convection

Saylor, John R.

215

Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. A design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment.

Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Tsioulos, Gus; Settles, Joseph; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew; Vonau, Walt

2010-01-01

216

Determination of evaporation from a catchment water balance at a monthly time scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method is presented to determine total evaporation from the earth's surface at a spatial scale that is adequate for linkage with climate models. The method is based on the water balance of catchments, combined with a calibrated autoregressive rainfall-runoff model. The time scale used is in the order of decades (10 days) to months. The rainfall-runoff model makes a distinction between immediate processes (interception and short term storage) and the remaining longer-term processes. Besides the calibrated rainfall-runoff model and the time series of observed rainfall and runoff, the method requires a relation between transpiration and soil moisture storage. The method is applied to data of the Bani catchment in Mali, a sub-catchment of the Niger river basin.

Savenije, H. H. G.

217

Evaluation of a Remotely Sensed Evaporative Stress Index for Monitoring Patterns of Anomalous Water Use  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Drought assessment is a complex endeavor, requiring monitoring of deficiencies in multiple components of the hydrologic budget. Precipitation anomalies reflect variability in water supply to the land surface, while soil moisture (SM), ground and surface water anomalies reflect deficiencies in moisture storage. In contrast, evapotranspiration (ET) anomalies provide unique yet complementary information, reflecting variations in actual water use by crops and direct evaporation from the soil. For example, precipitation- and ET-based anomalies may differ significantly in regions of intensive irrigation, shallow water table, or deep rooting depth - areas where plants may be more resilient to soil moisture deficiencies inferred from rainfall patterns. In addition, an ET-based index can better capture impacts of hot, windy conditions leading to "flash droughts", where anomalously high water use precipitates rapid decay in soil moisture and crop condition. Here we describe a remotely sensed Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) based on anomalies in actual-to-reference ET ratio, and compare with patterns in precipitation-based drought indicators. Actual ET is derived from thermal remote sensing, using the morning land-surface temperature (LST) rise observed with geostationary satellites. In comparison with vegetation indices, LST is a fast-response variable, with the potential for providing early warning of crop stress reflected in increasing canopy temperatures. Spatiotemporal patterns in ESI reasonably match those in precipitation-based indices (such as SPI and modeled SM) and patterns in the U.S. Drought Monitor. However, because ESI does not use precipitation as an input, it provides an independent assessment of evolving drought conditions, and is more portable to data-sparse parts of the world lacking dense rain-gauge and Doppler radar networks. Integrating LST information from polar orbiting systems, the ESI has unique potential for sensing moisture stress at field scale, benefiting yield estimation and loss compensation efforts. Techniques for identifying flash drought events will be demonstrated, as well as ESI performance over the heat-induced drought events of 2012. The ESI is routinely produced over the continental U.S. using data from GOES, with expansion to North and South America underway. In addition drought monitoring applications are being developed over Africa and Europe using Meteosat land-surface products.

Anderson, M. C.; Hain, C.; Otkin, J.; Zhan, X.

2012-12-01

218

Mathematical Modeling of Evaporative Cooling of Water in a Mechanical-Draft Tower  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model of the operation of a mechanical-draft tower is proposed. The model represents a boundary-value problem for five differential equations and for the first time takes into account the following parameters: temperature of inflowing water, its discharge, mean radius of water droplets, mean air velocity inside the water-cooling tower, rate of fall of a droplet, height from which

A. I. Petruchik; S. P. Fisenko

2002-01-01

219

Tried and True: Evaporating is cool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many students hold misconceptions about evaporation. In this short exercise, students will apply the kinetic molecular theory to explain how cold water can evaporate and to observe the cooling effect of evaporation, and develop their own evaporation experiments.

Hand, Richard

2006-03-01

220

Relationship between a solar drying model of red pepper and the kinetics of pure water evaporation (2)  

SciTech Connect

In part one, a simple drying model of red pepper related to water evaporation was developed. In this second part the drying model is applied by means of related experiments. Both laboratory and open air drying experiments were carried out to validate the model and simulation results are presented.

Passamai, V.; Saravia, L. [National Univ. of Salta (Argentina)

1997-05-01

221

Using watershed water balance to evaluate the accuracy of eddy covariance evaporation measurements for three semiarid ecosystems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The eddy covariance (EC) technique is a widely-used and accepted method to quantify ecosystem-scale mass and energy fluxes. Measurements of evaporation from EC are used to determine local, regional and global water budgets, calibrate and validate land surface models, and acquire understanding of ec...

222

Stable isotope estimates of evaporation: inflow and water residence time for lakes across the United States as a tool for national lake water quality assessments  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope ratios of water (delta18O and delta2H) can be very useful in large-scale monitoring programs because water samples are easy to collect and isotope ratios integrate information about basic hydrologic processes such as evaporation as a percentage of inflow (E/I) and ...

223

Two-dimensional LIF measurements of humidity and OH density resulting from evaporated water from a wet surface in plasma for medical use  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In plasma medicine, plasma is applied to a wet surface and is often accompanied by dry-gas flow. The dry-gas flow affects water evaporation from the wet surface and influences production of reactive species derived from water vapor, such as OH radicals. In this study, the effect of the dry-gas flow on two-dimensional distributions of humidity and OH radical density are examined by measuring them using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). First, humidity is measured when nitrogen flows from a quartz tube of 4 mm inner diameter onto distilled water and agar media from 5 mm distance. NO gas is added to the nitrogen as a tracer and humidity is obtained from the quenching rate of NO molecules measured using LIF. This measurement has a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm3 and a temporal resolution of less than 220 ns. The two-dimensional humidity distribution shows that the dry-gas flow pushes away water vapor evaporating from the wet surface. As a result, a low-humidity region is formed near the quartz tube nozzle and a high-humidity region is formed near the wet surface. The thickness of the low-humidity region reduces with increasing gas flow rate. It is 0.1–0.5 mm for the flow rate of higher than 0.3 l min?1. Next, the OH density is measured when a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge is applied to a distilled water surface with dry-air flow. The OH density decreases with increasing gas flow rate due to decreased humidity. When the flow rate is lower than 0.1 l min?1, the OH distribution is approximately uniform in the plasma region, while the humidity distribution shows a large gradient. The importance of the thin high-humidity region on the flux of reactive species onto the wet surface is discussed.

Yagi, Ippei; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji; Takaki, Koichi

2015-02-01

224

Separating soil evaporation and crop transpiration to improve crop water use efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A network of a FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on "Managing Irrigation Water to Enhance Crop Productivity under Water-Limiting Conditions: A Role for Isotopic Techniques", involving seven countries was implemented from 2007 to 2012, to identify approaches to improve crop water productivity (production per unit of water input) under water-limiting conditions using isotopic and related techniques. This paper presents findings from the two of the studied sites, one in China and another in Morocco, in using both isotopic and conventional techniques to separate soil evaporation (E) and crop transpiration (T) from total water losses in evapotranspiration (ET) for winter wheat grown under different climatic conditions and methods of irrigation management practices. In the North China Plain (NCP), the estimated E/ET of winter wheat by the isotopic method (Keeling plot using delta oxygen-18 (?18O)) was in agreement with that obtained by conventional methods (eddy covariance and micro-lysimeter). The high correlation between these methods (R2=0.85, n=27) showed that the E from wheat-growing field contributes an average of 30% of water losses for the whole growing season (Nov-June), with higher E percentage (68%) can be expected before elongation stage due to incomplete canopy cover. The results also showed that through deficit irrigation and improved irrigation scheduling, soil E losses could be reduced by 10-30% of the total water loss compared with full irrigation. In Morocco, field Keeling plot isotopic E and T separation study was carried out for two days in spring of 2012 at Sidi Rahal. The percentage contribution of T to total ET was approximately 73%. The experimental results obtained from both China and Moroccan sites were used to validate FAO's AquaCrop model for E and T, and for improving irrigation scheduling and agronomic practices. Good correlation (R2=0.83) was obtained between measured (isotopic) and AquaCrop simulated ET from NCP. The measured and simulated E and T results from Morocco also compared well; the difference in E between the two approaches was only 5-12% over the two-day study.

Heng, Lee; Nguyen, Long; Gong, Daozhi; Mei, Xurong; Amenzou, Noureddine

2014-05-01

225

NEG (non evaporable getter) pumps for organic compounds and water removal in EUVL tools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of present EUVL challenges is to reduce as much as possible the organic compounds and water partial pressures during the lithographic process. These gases can in fact interact with sensitive surfaces and, in the presence of EUV radiation, decompose to generate carbon-based films and oxides, which are detrimental to the optics, reducing its performance, lifetime and significantly increasing the equipment total cost of ownership. With this respect, use of Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) pumps seems particularly attractive. Getter pumps are very clean, vibration-free, compact, able to deliver large pumping speed for all active gases, including water and hydrogen. In the present paper, we report for the first time the results of specific tests aimed at measuring the pumping speed for some selected organic compounds, namely toluene and decane (n-decane). The study shows that getter pumps can effectively sorb these large organic molecules with high speed and capacity. Speed and capacity increases when operating the getter cartridge at moderate temperature (e.g. 150-200°C), however remarkable sorption is achieved, even at room temperature, without any power applied. When coupled with turbo-molecular pumps NEG pumps have therefore the potential to improve the ultimate vacuum and mitigate the carbon/oxygen contamination in a UHV lithographic system.

Conte, A.; Manini, P.; Raimondi, S.

2008-03-01

226

Concentrating solar collector system for the evaporation of low-level radioactive waste water  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently been awarded a grant under the Solar Federal Buildings Program to design, construct, and operate a high-temperature solar energy system for the processing of low-level radioactive waste water. Conceptual design studies have been completed, and detailed design work is under way for a solar system to produce process heat to evaporate 38,000 gal (143,830 L) of waste water per month. The system will use approximately 11,000 ft/sup 2/ (1022 m/sup 2/) of concentrating parabolic trough collectors operating at about 500/sup 0/F (262/sup 0/C). Construction of the system is anticipated to begin in 1981. Performance optimization of collector array size and configuration, storage medium and capacity, system operation, and control schemes are done using the active solar system simulator in the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. Results of this optimization are reported. This project represents a unique application of solar energy to an increasingly significant problem area in the energy field.

Diamond, S.C.; Cappiello, C.C.

1981-01-01

227

Evaluation of the ground-water contaminant plume extending from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins  

SciTech Connect

The 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, were used for solar concentration and storage of process wastes that consisted of nitric, sulfuric, and hydrofluoric acids, contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides, and neutralized by sodium hydroxide. By 1977, it was apparent that leakage from the basins had reached the unconfined aquifer, causing elevated ground-water concentrations of nitrate, chromium, technetium-99, and uranium. The resulting plume is superimposed on a larger, pre-existing plume from upgradient sources that is characterized by the same contaminants, but with different relative concentrations. The plumes discharge into the Columbia River, 210 m from the basins. This study examines the relative concentration ratios of the contaminants, determines which wells in the monitoring network surrounding the basins have been affected by basin leakage, assigns reasonable plume boundaries, and shows the separate contribution of each plume to ground-water contamination downgradient from the basins. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Hall, S.H.

1989-10-01

228

Statistical characteristics of evaporating-freezing process of water droplet during quick depressurization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates experimentally flashing evaporation process of water droplets released into vacuum, particularly on the quantitative characteristics of the process, in order to reveal the influences of the randomicity of the sub-process of nucleation and non-condensable air dissolved inside the liquid. It's clearly shown that nucleation time is a random variable. That may be caused by the following facts that nucleation for ice in high-supercooled water exhibits a strong randomicity and that there exists strong perturbation during quick depressurization. Freezing temperature of liquid droplet is approximately constant after recalescence, which may be determined by the vapor partial pressure at the terminal state. Freezing time is independent of nucleation time, but exhibits an obvious dependence on terminal pressure and drop diameter. Supercooling corresponding to the nucleation is independent of terminal pressure. The averaged values of supercooling at three different terminal pressures of 450, 600 and 1000 Pa are the same, namely 10 K. Furthermore, the influences of non-condensable gases on the process are analyzed and discussed in detail based on the experimental observations.

Du, Wang-Fang; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Kai

2013-07-01

229

Potential evaporation functions compared on US watersheds: Possible implications for global-scale water balance and terrestrial ecosystem modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimates of potential evaporation Ep are commonly employed in terrestrial water balance and net primary productivity models. This study compared a set of 11 Ep methods in a global-scale water balance model (WBM) applied to 3265 0.5° (lat. × long.) grid cells representing the conterminous US. The Ep methods ranged from simple temperature-driven equations to physically-based combination approaches and include

C. J. Vörösmarty; C. A. Federer; A. L. Schloss

1998-01-01

230

Evaporation determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake, New Hampshire  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation was determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake during the open water periods of 1982-1987. For all years, evaporation rates were low in spring and fall and highest during the summer. However, the times of highest evaporation rates varied during the 6 yr. Evaporation reached maximum rates in July for three of the years, in June for two of the years, and in August for one of the years. The highest evaporation rate during the 6-yr study was 0.46 cm d-1 during 27 May-4 June 1986 and 15-21 July 1987. Solar radiation and atmospheric radiation input to the lake and long-wave radiation emitted from the lake were by far the largest energy fluxes to and from the lake and had the greatest effect on evaporation rates. Energy advected to and from the lake by precipitation, surface water, and ground water had little effect on evaporation rates. In the energy-budget method, average evaporation rates are determined for energy-budget periods, which are bounded by the dates of thermal surveys of the lake. Our study compared evaporation rates calculated for short periods, usually ???1 week, with evaporation rates calculated for longer periods, usually ???2 weeks. The results indicated that the shorter periods showed more variability in evaporation rates, but seasonal patterns, with few exceptions, were similar.

Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Likens, G.E.; Sturrock, A.M., Jr.; Mau, D.P.

2003-01-01

231

Estimation of evaporation from open water - A review of selected studies, summary of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers data collection and methods, and evaluation of two methods for estimation of evaporation from five reservoirs in Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organizations responsible for the management of water resources, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are tasked with estimation of evaporation for water-budgeting and planning purposes. The USACE has historically used Class A pan evaporation data (pan data) to estimate evaporation from reservoirs but many USACE Districts have been experimenting with other techniques for an alternative to collecting pan data. The energy-budget method generally is considered the preferred method for accurate estimation of open-water evaporation from lakes and reservoirs. Complex equations to estimate evaporation, such as the Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, and Priestley-Taylor, perform well when compared with energy-budget method estimates when all of the important energy terms are included in the equations and ideal data are collected. However, sometimes nonideal data are collected and energy terms, such as the change in the amount of stored energy and advected energy, are not included in the equations. When this is done, the corresponding errors in evaporation estimates are not quantifiable. Much simpler methods, such as the Hamon method and a method developed by the U.S. Weather Bureau (USWB) (renamed the National Weather Service in 1970), have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of evaporation when compared to energy-budget method estimates. Data requirements for the Hamon and USWB methods are minimal and sometimes perform well with remotely collected data. The Hamon method requires average daily air temperature, and the USWB method requires daily averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Estimates of annual lake evaporation from pan data are frequently within 20 percent of energy-budget method estimates. Results of evaporation estimates from the Hamon method and the USWB method were compared against historical pan data at five selected reservoirs in Texas (Benbrook Lake, Canyon Lake, Granger Lake, Hords Creek Lake, and Sam Rayburn Lake) to evaluate their performance and to develop coefficients to minimize bias for the purpose of estimating reservoir evaporation with accuracies similar to estimates of evaporation obtained from pan data. The modified Hamon method estimates of reservoir evaporation were similar to estimates of reservoir evaporation from pan data for daily, monthly, and annual time periods. The modified Hamon method estimates of annual reservoir evaporation were always within 20 percent of annual reservoir evaporation from pan data. Unmodified and modified USWB method estimates of annual reservoir evaporation were within 20 percent of annual reservoir evaporation from pan data for about 91 percent of the years compared. Average daily differences between modified USWB method estimates and estimates from pan data as a percentage of the average amount of daily evaporation from pan data were within 20 percent for 98 percent of the months. Without any modification to the USWB method, average daily differences as a percentage of the average amount of daily evaporation from pan data were within 20 percent for 73 percent of the months. Use of the unmodified USWB method is appealing because it means estimates of average daily reservoir evaporation can be made from air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation data collected from remote weather stations without the need to develop site-specific coefficients from historical pan data. Site-specific coefficients would need to be developed for the modified version of the Hamon method.

Harwell, Glenn R.

2012-01-01

232

TDR water content inverse profiling in layered soils during infiltration and evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last three decades, time domain reflectometry (TDR) has become one of the most commonly used tools for soil water content measurements either in laboratory or in the field. Indeed, TDR provides easy and cheap water content estimations with relatively small disturbance to the investigated soil. TDR measurements of soil water content are based on the strong correlation between relative dielectric permittivity of wet soil and its volumetric water content. Several expressions of the relationship between relative dielectric permittivity and volumetric water content have been proposed, empirically stated (Topp et al., 1980) as well as based on semi-analytical approach to dielectric mixing models (Roth et al., 1990; Whalley, 1993). So far, TDR field applications suffered the limitation due to the capability of the technique of estimating only the mean water content in the volume investigated by the probe. Whereas the knowledge of non homogeneous vertical water content profiles was needed, it was necessary to install either several vertical probes of different length or several horizontal probes placed in the soil at different depths, in both cases strongly increasing soil disturbance as well as the complexity of the measurements. Several studies have been recently dedicated to the development of inversion methods aimed to extract more information from TDR waveforms, in order to estimate non homogeneous moisture profiles along the axis of the metallic probe used for TDR measurements. A common feature of all these methods is that electromagnetic transient through the wet soil along the probe is mathematically modelled, assuming that the unknown soil water content distribution corresponds to the best agreement between simulated and measured waveforms. In some cases the soil is modelled as a series of small layers with different dielectric properties, and the waveform is obtained as the result of the superposition of multiple reflections arising from impedance discontinuities between the layers (Nguyen et al., 1997; Todoroff et al., 1998; Heimovaara, 2001; Moret et al., 2006). Other methods consider the dielectric properties of the soil as smoothly variable along probe axis (Greco, 1999; Oswald et al., 2003; Greco, 2006). Aim of the study is testing the applicability to layered soils of the inverse method for the estimation of water content profiles along vertical TDR waveguides, originally applied in laboratory to homogeneous soil samples with monotonic moisture distributions (Greco, 2006), and recently extended to field measurements with more general water content profiles (Greco and Guida, 2008). Influence of soil electrical conductivity, uniqueness of solution, choices of parametrization, parameters identifiabilty, sensitivity of the method to chosen parameters variations are discussed. Finally, the results of the application of the inverse method to a series of infiltration and evaporation experiments carried out in a flume filled with three soil layers of different physical characteristics are presented. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The research was co-financed by the Italian Ministry of University, by means of the PRIN 2006 PRIN program, within the research project entitled ‘Definition of critical rainfall thresholds for destructive landslides for civil protection purposes'. REFERENCES Greco, R., 1999. Measurement of water content profiles by single TDR experiments. In: Feyen, J., Wiyo, K. (Eds.), Modelling of Transport Processes in Soils. Wageningen Pers, Wageningen, the Netherlands, pp. 276-283. Greco, R., 2006. Soil water content inverse profiling from single TDR waveforms. J. Hydrol. 317, 325-339. Greco R., Guida A., 2008. Field measurements of topsoil moisture profiles by vertical TDR probes. J. Hydrol. 348, 442- 451. Heimovaara, T.J., 2001. Frequency domain modelling of TDR waveforms in order to obtain frequency dependent dielectric properties of soil samples: a theoretical approach. In: TDR 2001 - Second International Symposium on Time Domain Reflectometry for Innovative Geotechnical Applications. Northwestern Univer

Greco, R.; Guida, A.

2009-04-01

233

Eddy covariance measurements of surface energy budget and evaporation in a cool season over southern open water in Mississippi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eddy covariance measurements of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat fluxes were made over a large southern open water surface of Ross Barnett Reservoir (the Reservoir hereafter) in Mississippi during the cool season with frequent incursions of cold fronts from 1 September 2007 to 31 January 2008. The eddy covariance tower was located in the middle of the main body of the Reservoir with the tower fetches exceeding 2.0 km in all directions. The Reservoir was ice-free in winter and the water temperatures always decreased with depth. Over the entire cool season, the averaged water surface temperatures were 1.8°C higher than the overlying air (i.e., positive temperature gradients that led to thermally convective conditions) and the averaged vapor pressure near the water surface was 0.8 kPa greater than the overlying air (i.e., positive vapor pressure gradients), though occasionally negative gradients for temperature and vapor pressure were also observed for short periods. On average, the wind speeds were considerably large (3.9 m s-1) to maintain adequate turbulent mixing mechanically. As a consequence of the combined effect of thermally and mechanically generated turbulent mixing, consistently positive H (with a mean H of 20.0 W m-2) and LE (with a mean LE of 80.0 W m-2) occurred during the entire season. These continuous energy losses via H and LE resulted in release of a large amount of energy stored in the water to the atmosphere. The mean Bowen ratio was low for this open water surface (i.e., 0.3), suggesting that most of the energy released from the water fueled evaporation rather than sensible heating of the atmosphere. Nighttime evaporative water losses were substantial, contributing to 45% of the total evaporative water loss in this cool season. Frequent incursions of cold fronts with windy, cold, and dry air masses significantly promoted turbulent exchanges of sensible and latent heat through enhanced turbulent mixing thermally and mechanically, leading to large H and LE events. Daily H and LE (i.e., evaporation) during the passages of cold fronts were on average 2.7 and 7.3 times those in nonevent days, respectively. Given the fact that large H and LE events occurred 26% of the time for our site, these cold front events caused an increase in the seasonal H by 42% and LE by 157%. Therefore changes in frequency, intensity, and duration of synoptic weather events, particularly the incursions of cold fronts, have significant impacts on the surface energy budget and evaporation over water at this site.

Liu, Heping; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Shuhua; Jiang, Haimei; Sheng, Li; Williams, Quinton L.

2009-02-01

234

A Hydraulic Model Is Compatible with Rapid Changes in Leaf Elongation under Fluctuating Evaporative Demand and Soil Water Status1[C][W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1–2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture. PMID:24420931

Caldeira, Cecilio F.; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

2014-01-01

235

[Effect of shifting sand burial on evaporation reduction and salt restraint under saline water irrigation in extremely arid region].  

PubMed

The Taklimakan Desert Highway Shelterbelt is drip-irrigated with high saline groundwater (2.58-29.70 g x L(-1)), and shifting sand burial and water-salt stress are most common and serious problems in this region. So it is of great importance to study the effect of shifting sand burial on soil moisture evaporation, salt accumulation and their distribution for water saving, salinity restraint, and suitable utilization of local land and water resources. In this study, Micro-Lysimeters (MLS) were used to investigate dynamics of soil moisture and salt under different thicknesses of sand burial (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm), and field control experiments of drip-irrigation were also carried out to investigate soil moisture and salt distribution under different thicknesses of shifting sand burial (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 cm). The soil daily and cumulative evaporation decreased with the increase of sand burial thickness in MLS, cumulative evaporation decreased by 2.5%-13.7% compared with control. And evaporative inhibiting efficiency increased with sand burial thickness, evaporative inhibiting efficiency of 1-5 cm sand burial was 16.7%-79.0%. Final soil moisture content beneath the interface of sand burial increased with sand burial thickness, and it increased by 2.5%-13.7% than control. The topsoil EC of shifting sand in MLS decreased by 1.19-6.00 mS x cm(-1) with the increasing sand burial thickness, whereas soil salt content beneath the interface in MLS increased and amplitude of the topsoil salt content was higher than that of the subsoil. Under drip-irrigation with saline groundwater, average soil moisture beneath the interface of shifting sand burial increased by 0.4% -2.0% compare with control, and the highest value of EC was 7.77 mS x cm(-1) when the sand burial thickness was 10 cm. The trend of salt accumulation content at shifting sand surface increased firstly, and then decreased with the increasing sand burial thickness. Soil salt contents beneath the interface of shifting sand burial were much lower than that of shifting sand surface. 35 cm was the critical sand burial thickness for water-saving and salt restraint. In summary, sand burial had obvious inhibition effects on soil evaporation and salt accumulation, so maybe it could be used to save water and reduce salt accumulation in arid shifting desert areas. PMID:25129944

Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Xin-Wen; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Li, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Yong-Dong

2014-05-01

236

Numerical Investigation of Physicochemical Processes Occurring During Water Evaporation in the Surface Layer Pores of a Forest Combustible Material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical investigation of the physicochemical processes occurring during water evaporation from the pores of the surface layer of a forest combustible material has been carried out. The characteristic features of the suppression of the thermal decomposition reaction of a combustible material with water filling fullyits pores and formation of a water fi lm over its surface have been determined. The characteristic times of suppression of thermal decomposition reactions under various environmental conditions and the thickness and kinds of forest combustible material (birch leaves, pine and spruce needles, etc.) have been established.

Zhdanova, A. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

2014-07-01

237

A Study of Mechanisms and Supression of Evaporation of Water from Soils  

E-print Network

Extensive greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate chemicals not previously studied extensively for their potential as evaporation suppressants. Included in the studies were crude oil, anionics, cationics, nonionics, silicones...

Wendt, C. W.

238

Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.  

PubMed

A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed. PMID:16539249

Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

2006-03-01

239

Combined Evaporation and Salt Precipitation in Porous Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vadose zone pore water contains dissolved salts and minerals; therefore, evaporation results in high rates of salt accumulation that may change the physical and chemical properties of the porous media. Here, a series of experiments, together with a mathematical model, are presented to shed new light on these processes. Experiments included: (1) long-term column evaporation experiments to quantify changes in evaporation rates due to salt precipitation; (2) CT scans of evaporated porous media samples saturated with salt solutions, to observe salt precipitation from micro to macro scales; and (3) Infrared thermography analysis to quantify evaporation rates from porous media surfaces for homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions and constant water table, in the presence of salt precipitation. As expected, the majority of salt crystallization occurs in the upper parts of the matrix, near the evaporation front. For heterogeneous porous matrices, salt precipitation will occur mainly in the fine pore regions as preferential evaporation takes place in these locations. In addition, it was found that the precipitated NaCl salt crust diffusion coefficient for water vapor is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the vapor diffusion coefficient in free air, depending on environmental conditions and salt crystallization rates. Three new stages of evaporation were defined for saline solutions: SS1, SS2 and SS3. SS1 exhibits a low and gradual decrease in the evaporation rate due to osmotic pressure. During SS2, the evaporation rate falls progressively due to salt precipitation; SS3 is characterized by a constant low evaporation rate and determined by the diffusion rate of water vapor through the precipitated salt layer. Even though phenomenologically similar to the classical evaporation stages of pure water, these stages correspond to different mechanisms and the transition between stages can occur regardless the hydraulic conditions. As well, it was shown that matrix heterogeneity lessens the salt effect on evaporation as coarse pore regions are relatively free of salt crystals, facilitating vapor transport towards the atmosphere. This was verified by the thermography analysis that enabled independent quantification of evaporation rates from coarse and fine sections of the media during salt precipitation. This is in contrast to homogeneous conditions, where the salt is distributed homogeneously in the matrix's upper parts, resulting in an increase in matrix resistivity to vapor flow. This research sheds new light on the dynamics of the evaporation process of a saline solution and the importance of considering that natural pore solutions typically include electrolytes.

Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.; Nachshon, U.; Or, D.; Shaharani, E.; Grader, A.

2012-12-01

240

Group evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

Shen, Hayley H.

1991-01-01

241

On Maximum Evaporation Rates of Liquid Droplets in Rocket Motors 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upper lilllits have been estimated for the rate of evapo­ ration of slllall liquid droplets in representative rocket cOlllbustion challlbers. The droplets are assullled to be isotherlllal at all tillles. The droplet telllperature as a function of tillle is deterlllined by an appropriate heat balance. The calculations are useful in deterlllining the significance of inelastic collisions between liquid droplets for

S. S. PENNER

1953-01-01

242

Evaporation, Condensation, and Precipitation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After completion of this project students should have an understanding of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation in the water cycle. Use the websites provided to answer the questions. Record your answers on the spreadsheet provided. Do you understand how the water cycle works? Begin by watching this short video about the water cycle.water cycle video Use the website to define condensation, precipitation, and evaporation?water cycle List the different types of precipitation from the site.types of precipitation Follow the directions to the experiment on this website to get a better understanding of how evaporation takes ...

Brown, Miss

2009-10-21

243

Export Rates of North Atlantic Deep Water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept from Bolin and Rhode (1973) of transit time distributions (TTDs)newline for reservoirs is applied to North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) in the subpolar North Atlantic. The reservoirs are the different density classes of NADW, i.e. Upper Labrador Sea Water (ULSW), Labrador Sea Water (LSW), Gibbs Fracture Zone Water(GFZW) and Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW). The TTDs for these reservoirs are computed as volume integral of pointwise TTDs, which are inferred from CFC data collected between 1997 and 2005. It will be discussed, in how far these TTDs and their temporal derivatives can be used to infer ventilation and export rates for NADW. These results will be compared with direct observational data, e.g. the export of NADW from the subpolar North Atlantic in the deep western boundary current as reported in Schott et al. (2006). Bolin, B., and H. Rohde, A note on the concepts of age distribution and transit time in natural reservoirs, Tellus XXV, 1, 1973. Schott, F. A., J. Fischer, M. Dengler, and R. Zantopp,Variability of the Deep Western Boundary Current east of the Grand Banks, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21S07, doi:10.1029/2006GL026563, 2006.

Steinfeldt, R.; Rhein, M.

2009-04-01

244

Reservoir evaporation in central Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation losses from seven reservoirs operated by the Denver Water Department in central Colorado were determined during various periods from 1974 to 1980. The reservoirs studies were Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, Williams Fork, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross. Energy-budget and mass-transfer methods were used to determine evaporation. Class-A pan data also were collected at each reservoir. The energy-budget method was the most accurate of the methods used to determine evaporation. At Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, and Williams Fork Reservoirs the energy-budget method was used to calibrate the mass-transfer coefficients. Calibrated coefficients already were available for Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross Reservoirs. Using the calibrated coefficients, long-term mass-transfer evaporation rates were determined. Annual evaporation values were not determined because the instrumentation was not operated for the entire open-water season. Class-A pan data were used to determine pan coefficients for each season at each reservoir. The coefficients varied from season to season and between reservoirs, and the seasonal values ranged from 0.29 to 1.05. (USGS)

Spahr, N.E.; Ruddy, B.C.

1983-01-01

245

Condensation/evaporation of insoluble organic vapor as functions of source rate and saturation vapor pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Condensation growth of atmospheric particles by insoluble organic vapors was studied by a monodisperse aerosol dynamics model MONO32 including atmospheric chemistry mechanism. The source rate of the vapor and its saturation vapor density at a particle surface were varied. The initial particle number size distribution was assumed to be bimodal, and aerosol was initially an internal mixture of particles consisting of soluble sulphuric acid and insoluble organic material in a ratio of 1:1. Model simulations predicted that if the ratio of the vapor source rate and the condensation sink of particles, Q/CS, exceeded 108 cm-3 and the vapor was nonvolatile or low volatile, the 10 nm nuclei grew with the growth rates of 2.5-3 nm h-1 and could act as cloud condensation nuclei in supersaturations of 1.6% or lower after 24 h simulation. Then the vapors must have saturation vapor pressures less than 7 × 106 cm-3. However, the higher the ratio of Q/CS, the higher the saturation vapor pressure could be. When the vapor was highly volatile, i.e., the saturation vapor density was high enough, in our simulations greater than 6 × 107 cm-3 the Ostwald ripening was observed. Then the nucleation mode particles were not able to grow but coagulated with larger particles without causing any significant impact on climate. An analytical expression for the saturation vapor density for the Ostwald ripening (cOst) was derived as a function of the ratio of Q/CS. Sensitivity tests for the accommodation coefficient and thermodynamic parameters as well as their effects on cOst were investigated.

Pirjola, Liisa; Korhonen, Hannele; Kulmala, Markku

2002-06-01

246

Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of dlimonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (< 2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH {approx} 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-01-14

247

Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil water contents from both smooth and rough bare soil were estimated from remotely sensed surface soil and air temperatures. An inverse relationship between two thermal parameters and gravimetric soil water content was found for Avondale loam when its water content was between air-dry and field capacity. These parameters, daily maximum minus minimum surface soil temperature and daily maximum soil minus air temperature, appear to describe the relationship reasonably well. These two parameters also describe relative soil water evaporation (actual/potential). Surface soil temperatures showed good agreement among three measurement techniques: in situ thermocouples, a ground-based infrared radiation thermometer, and the thermal infrared band of an airborne multispectral scanner.

Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Vedder, J. F.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

1976-01-01

248

Origin and recharge rates of alluvial ground waters, Eastern Desert, Egypt.  

SciTech Connect

Stable isotope and tritium analyses of shallow ground waters in the Eastern Desert of Egypt showed that the waters were derived largely by evaporation of regional precipitation and at least partly from precipitation in the past 45 y. To estimate the ground water recharge rate, we developed an integrated hydrologic model based on satellite data, geologic maps, infiltration parameters, and spatial rainfall distribution. Modeling indicated that during a severe 1994 storm, recharge through transmission loss in Wadi El-Tarfa was 21% of the precipitation volume. From archival precipitation data, we estimate that the annual recharge rate for the El-Tarfa alluvial aquifer is 4.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}. Implications for the use of renewable ground waters in arid areas of Egypt and in neighboring countries are clear.

Sultan, M.; Gheith, H.; Sturchio, N. C.; El Alfy, Z.; Danishwar, S.

2002-04-12

249

Thermal signatures help deduce evaporative fluxes into turbulent airflows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporative fluxes and energy balance of terrestrial surfaces are affected by interplay between water availability, energy input, and exchange across the air boundary layer. Commonly occurring turbulent airflows impose complex and highly dynamic boundary conditions that challenge prediction of surface evaporation rates. During stage-I evaporation where the vaporization plane is at the surface, intermittent turbulent interactions with the surface give rise to distinct thermal signatures that could be recorded using infrared thermography (IRT). The study links measured thermal signatures with spatio-temporal distribution of eddy-induced localized evaporation rates towards characterization of turbulent momentum field and estimation of overall evaporative fluxes. Results highlight potential of the approach for remote quantification of interactions between turbulent eddies and evaporating surfaces. Surface thermal inertia present a challenge to high resolution implementation, and strategies for overcoming these are presented including applications to plant canopies (low thermal inertia surfaces). Applications for larger scales will be discussed.

Haghighi, E.; Or, D.

2013-12-01

250

Infrared thermography of evaporative fluxes and dynamics of salt deposition on heterogeneous porous surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation of saline solutions from porous media, common in arid areas, involves complex interactions between mass transport, energy exchange and phase transitions. We quantified evaporation of saline solutions from heterogeneous sand columns under constant hydraulic boundary conditions to focus on effects of salt precipitation on evaporation dynamics. Mass loss measurements and infrared thermography were used to quantify evaporation rates. The latter method enables quantification of spatial and temporal variability of salt precipitation to identify its dynamic effects on evaporation. Evaporation from columns filled with texturally-contrasting sand using different salt solutions revealed preferential salt precipitation within the fine textured domains. Salt precipitation reduced evaporation rates from the fine textured regions by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, low evaporation rates from coarse-textured regions (due to low capillary drive) exhibited less salt precipitation and consequently less evaporation rate suppression. Experiments provided insights into two new phenomena: (1) a distinct increase in evaporation rate at the onset of evaporation; and (2) a vapor pumping mechanism related to the presence of a salt crust over semidry media. Both phenomena are related to local vapor pressure gradients established between pore water and the surface salt crust. Comparison of two salts: NaCl and NaI, which tend to precipitate above the matrix surface and within matrix pores, respectively, shows a much stronger influence of NaCl on evaporation rate suppression. This disparity reflects the limited effect of NaI precipitation on matrix resistivity for solution and vapor flows.

Nachshon, Uri; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani; Dragila, Maria; Weisbrod, Noam

2011-12-01

251

Evaporation from the shallow Lake Massaciuccoli (Tuscany, Italy) studied using stable isotopes and evaporation pan data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxygen and hydrogen isotope variations monitored in Lake Massaciuccoli (7 km2, 2 m deep, seasonally variable water level) during summer 2008, were compared with those observed in a Class A evaporation pan (diameter 120.6 cm, depth 25.4 cm) placed on the lake eastern shore. Air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, water temperature in the lake and the pan were also measured. The pluviometer indicated that no precipitation occurred during the study period. The pan was initially filled with groundwater up to the level of 19.2 cm (219 L), depleted in heavy isotopes with respect to tha lake water. Sodium chloride was added up to the concentration of 1 g×L-1, which is assumed do not affect significantly the evaporation rate till the water volume is reduced to less than 10 %. The Cl- concentration was used to provide an estimation of the evaporated water fraction, in addition to the micrometer measuring the water level variations. The pan water was sampled every 2-3 days and Cl- and stable isotopes determined. The set of stable isotope and evaporation data enabled us to compute the parameters governing the evaporation process and the isotopic exchanges with the atmospheric moisture, according to the procedure proposed by Gonfiantini (1986). The values were applied to test three working hypotheses of water balance of Lake Massaciuccoli: (i) surface inflow and outflow of liquid water are negligible and only evaporation is important; (ii) the inflow is negligible and outflow and evaporation are both significant; (iii) the three terms of balance are all important but the losses by evaporation and outflow exceed inflow (as the lake water level was decreasing). Water exchanges with groundwater are considered negligible. The best agreement between lake and pan data was obtained with the second hypothesis, for which the fraction of water removed by evaporation was estimated to be about 40 % ot he total water losses. This residual 60 % of losses consists essentially of water pumped from the lake for irrigation, in rough agreement with independent estimations. In the final stages of pan water evaporation, the well known hook trend of heavy isotope delta values versus residual water fraction was observed. The data elaboration is being continued and refined. Correction factors for the so called pan effect will also be applied. Collection of atmospheric vapour samples has been started. R. Gonfiantini, 1986. Isotopes in lake studies, in Handbook of Environmental Isotope Geochemistry (P. Fritz and J-Ch. Fontes, Eds.), Vol. 2, pp.113-168.

Baneschi, I.; Gonfiantini, R.; Guidi, M.

2009-04-01

252

The impact of humidity on evaporative cooling in small desert birds exposed to high air temperatures.  

PubMed

Abstract Environmental temperatures that exceed body temperature (Tb) force endothermic animals to rely solely on evaporative cooling to dissipate heat. However, evaporative heat dissipation can be drastically reduced by environmental humidity, imposing a thermoregulatory challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of humidity on the thermoregulation of desert birds and to compare the sensitivity of cutaneous and respiratory evaporation to reduced vapor density gradients. Rates of evaporative water loss, metabolic rate, and Tb were measured in birds exposed to humidities ranging from ?2 to 30 g H2O m(-3) (0%-100% relative humidity at 30°C) at air temperatures between 44° and 56°C. In sociable weavers, a species that dissipates heat primarily through panting, rates of evaporative water loss were inhibited by as much as 36% by high humidity at 48°C, and these birds showed a high degree of hyperthermia. At lower temperatures (40°-44°C), evaporative water loss was largely unaffected by humidity in this species. In Namaqua doves, which primarily use cutaneous evaporation, increasing humidity reduced rates of evaporative water loss, but overall rates of water loss were lower than those observed in sociable weavers. Our data suggest that cutaneous evaporation is more efficient than panting, requiring less water to maintain Tb at a given temperature, but panting appears less sensitive to humidity over the air temperature range investigated here. PMID:25461643

Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

2014-01-01

253

Mixed feed evaporator  

DOEpatents

In the preparation of the gaseous reactant feed to undergo a chemical reaction requiring the presence of steam, the efficiency of overall power utilization is improved by premixing the gaseous reactant feed with water and then heating to evaporate the water in the presence of the gaseous reactant feed, the heating fluid utilized being at a temperature below the boiling point of water at the pressure in the volume where the evaporation occurs.

Vakil, Himanshu B. (Schenectady, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1982-01-01

254

Measurements of Mass and Heat Transfer at a Liquid Water Surface during Condensation or Evaporation of a Subnanometer Thickness Layer of Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel approach for exploring the molecular dynamics during condensation or evaporation at a liquid water surface is reported at pressures between 2 and 100 kPa. By introducing or removing a heating laser illuminating an optically tweezed aqueous aerosol droplet, the temperature of the droplet can be controlled with sub-mK accuracy and the change in size to reequilibrate with the

Rachael E. H. Miles; Kerry J. Knox; Jonathan P. Reid; Adèle M. C. Laurain; Laura Mitchem

2010-01-01

255

DRIP AND EVAPORATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Loss of water from the soil profile through evaporation from the soil surface is an important contributor to inefficiency in irrigated crop production. Residue management systems may reduce this evaporative loss, but cannot be used in all cropping systems. Choice of the irrigation system and its m...

256

Estimating net rainfall, evaporation and water storage of a bare soil from sequential L-band emissivities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general method to use a time series of L-band emissivities as an input to a hydrological model for continuously monitoring the net rainfall and evaporation as well as the water content over the entire soil profile is proposed. The model requires a sufficiently accurate and general relation between soil emissivity and surface moisture content. A model which requires the soil hydraulic properties as an additional input, but does not need any weather data was developed. The method is shown to be numerically consistent.

Stroosnijder, L.; Lascano, R. J.; Newton, R. W.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

1984-01-01

257

Combination of a Knudsen effusion cell with a quartz crystal microbalance: In situ measurement of molecular evaporation rates with a fully functional deposition source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a straightforward, reliable, and inexpensive design of a Knudsen type molecular effusion cell capable of measuring molecular evaporation rates in situ. This is accomplished by means of a quartz crystal microbalance integrated into the shutter of the effusion cell. The presented layout facilitates both the measurement of effusion rates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions without the need for a separate experimental setup and the growth of surface supported molecular layers and nanostructures. As an important prerequisite for reproducible deposition of molecular films with defined coverages ranging from submonolayers up to multilayers, the Knudsen cell features a stable deposition rate for crucible temperatures between 50 and 500 °C. Experimental determination of deposition rates for different crucible temperatures allows to approximate sublimation enthalpies of the evaporant based on the Clausius-Clapeyron equation.

Gutzler, Rico; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Lackinger, Markus

2010-01-01

258

Laboratory prototype flash evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

Gaddis, J. L.

1972-01-01

259

file:///U|/FOIA/Web%20Site%20-/Fw_%2520Evaporation%2520rates.txt[9/23/2010 1:04:32 PM] Received: from localhost (speclab1.cr.usgs.gov [136.177.81.5])  

E-print Network

file:///U|/FOIA/Web%20Site%20-/Fw_%2520Evaporation%2520rates.txt[9/23/2010 1:04:32 PM] Received MIME-Version: 1.0 Subject: Fw: Evaporation rates X-KeepSent: 57572ECB:E3B2A34C-8725772D to evaporation and dissolution in the seawater upon release from the well. Geoff Geoffrey S. Plumlee, Ph

Fleskes, Joe

260

Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

2011-08-01

261

Development of synchronized, autonomous, and self-regulated oscillations in transpiration rate of a whole tomato plant under water stress  

PubMed Central

Plants respond to many environmental changes by rapidly adjusting their hydraulic conductivity and transpiration rate, thereby optimizing water-use efficiency and preventing damage due to low water potential. A multiple-load-cell apparatus, time-series analysis of the measured data, and residual low-pass filtering methods were used to monitor continuously and analyse transpiration of potted tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) grown in a temperature-controlled greenhouse during well-irrigated and drought periods. A time derivative of the filtered residual time series yielded oscillatory behaviour of the whole plant's transpiration (WPT) rate. A subsequent cross-correlation analysis between the WPT oscillatory pattern and wet-wick evaporation rates (vertical cotton fabric, 0.14 m2 partly submerged in water in a container placed on an adjacent load cell) revealed that autonomous oscillations in WPT rate develop under a continuous increase in water stress, whereas these oscillations correspond with the fluctuations in evaporation rate when water is fully available. The relative amplitude of these autonomous oscillations increased with water stress as transpiration rate decreased. These results support the recent finding that an increase in xylem tension triggers hydraulic signals that spread instantaneously via the plant vascular system and control leaf conductance. The regulatory role of synchronized oscillations in WPT rate in eliminating critical xylem tension points and preventing embolism is discussed. PMID:20558570

Wallach, Rony; Da-Costa, Noam; Raviv, Michael; Moshelion, Menachem

2010-01-01

262

A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples. Especially for coarse textured soils a rapid decrease of the thermal conductivity was observed, when the volumetric water content drops under a critical level. Higher bulk densities increased the heat transport parameters for soil samples with the same texture. This effect becomes significant at high water saturations. The method used in this study allows easy to use non-steady state measurements of the soil thermal conductivity with a high data resolution and for continuously decreasing water contents. In further studies these measured data will be used to enhance existing pedotransfer functions and models and improve the prediction of soil thermal properties for application-oriented requirements.

Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

2012-04-01

263

Effects of carbonyl bond, metal cluster dissociation, and evaporation rates on predictions of nanotube production in high-pressure carbon monoxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the conformation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO because of its lower bond energy as compared with that of NiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

2003-01-01

264

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California March 1985 to March 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. Water enters the ponds from the MD-1 pumping station at pond 1 and flows through the system terminating at pond 10. The water samples increased in specific conductance (21,700 to 90,200 microsiemens/centimeter) and concentrations of total arsenic (110 to 420 microg/L), total recoverable boron (12,000 to 80,000 microg/L) and total recoverable molybdenum (1,200 to 5,500 microg/L) going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Pesticides were not detected in water from any of the ponds sampled. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. The only pesticides detected in bottom sediment samples from the evaporation ponds were DDD and DDE, with maximum concentration of 0.8 microg/kilogram. (Author 's abstract)

Fujii, Roger

1988-01-01

265

Influence of evaporation, ground water, and uncertainty in the hydrologic budget of Lake Lucerne, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A detailed hydrologic budget was constructed of a seepage lake of sinkhole origin in the karst terrain of central Florida. During the drought period studied, lake evaporation computed by the energy-budget and mass-transfer methods was the largest component in the budget, followed by rainfall. Ground-water inflow contributed about one-third of the total inflow. Lake leakage was about one-fourth of the evaporative losses and was increased substantially by pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer.

Lee, Terrie Mackin; Swancar, Amy

1997-01-01

266

CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS  

EPA Science Inventory

Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

267

Export Rates of North Atlantic Deep Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept from Bolin and Rhode (1973) of transit time distributions (TTDs)newline for reservoirs is applied to North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) in the subpolar North Atlantic. The reservoirs are the different density classes of NADW, i.e. Upper Labrador Sea Water (ULSW), Labrador Sea Water (LSW), Gibbs Fracture Zone Water(GFZW) and Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW). The TTDs for these

R. Steinfeldt; M. Rhein

2009-01-01

268

Evaporation of ice in planetary atmospheres - Ice-covered rivers on Mars  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existence of ice covered rivers on Mars is considered. It is noted that the evaporation rate of water ice on the surface of a planet with an atmosphere involves an equilibrium between solar heating and radiative and evaporative cooling of the ice layer. It is determined that even with a mean Martian insolation rate above the ice of approximately

D. Wallace; C. Sagan

1979-01-01

269

A regime shift in Lake Superior ice cover, evaporation, and water temperature following the warm El Nin~o winter of 19971998  

E-print Network

suggested, in fact, that reductions in Lake Superior ice cover are mechanistically relatedA regime shift in Lake Superior ice cover, evaporation, and water temperature following the warm El Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan Abstract Significant trends in Lake Superior water temperature and ice cover

270

Evaporation and canopy characteristics of coniferous forests and grasslands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Canopy-scale evaporation rate (E) and derived surface and aerodynamic conductances for the transfer of water vapour (gs and ga, respectively) are reviewed for coniferous forests and grasslands. Despite the extremes of canopy structure, the two vegetation types have similar maximum hourly evaporation rates (Emax) and maximum surface conductances (gsmax) (medians = 0.46 mm h-1 and 22 mm s-1). However, on

F. M. Kelliher; R. Leuning; E. D. Schulze

1993-01-01

271

Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

2011-01-01

272

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01

273

Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the evaporation would peak immediately following wetting of the surface but the skin temperatures responded by decreasing 20 minutes later. This study shows the evaporation dynamics of moss and bare ground, which will be incorporated into a hydrology model evaluating freshwater generation from the boreal forest.

Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

2013-12-01

274

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 17, NO. S, PAGES 1453-1462, OCTOBER 1981 Operational Estimates ofLake Superior Evaporation  

E-print Network

Lake Superior Evaporation Based on IFYGL Findings JAN A. DERECKI NatioMI Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Great Lakes Enllironmental Research Laboratory AM Arbor, Michigan 48104 Monthly evapor~tion from Lake.SS transfer method. This method permits timely evaporation estimates from readily available land

275

Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.  

PubMed

The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high. PMID:12659179

Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

2003-03-15

276

Differences in evaporation between a floating pan and class a pan on land  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Research was conducted to develop a method for obtaining floating pan evaporation rates in a small (less than 10,000 m2) wetland, lagoon, or pond. Floating pan and land pan evaporation data were collected from March 1 to August 31, 2005, at a small natural wetland located in the alluvium of the Canadian River near Norman, Oklahoma, at the U.S. Geological Survey Norman Landfill Toxic Substances Hydrology Research Site. Floating pan evaporation rates were compared with evaporation rates from a nearby standard Class A evaporation pan on land. Floating pan evaporation rates were significantly less than land pan evaporation rates for the entire period and on a monthly basis. Results indicated that the use of a floating evaporation pan in a small free-water surface better simulates actual physical conditions on the water surface that control evaporation. Floating pan to land pan ratios were 0.82 for March, 0.87 for April, 0.85 for May, 0.85 for June, 0.79 for July, and 0.69 for August. ?? 2008 American Water Resources Association.

Masoner, J.R.; Stannard, D.I.; Christenson, S.C.

2008-01-01

277

Flash evaporator systems test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

Dietz, J. B.

1976-01-01

278

Encapsulation of water-soluble drugs by a modified solvent evaporation method. I. Effect of process and formulation variables on drug entrapment.  

PubMed

Pseudoephedrine HCl, a highly water-soluble drug, was entrapped within poly (methyl methacrylate) microspheres by a water/oil/water emulsification-solvent evaporation method. An aqueous drug solution was emulsified into a solution of the polymer in methylene chloride, followed by emulsification of this primary emulsion into an external aqueous phase to form a water/oil/water emulsion. The middle organic phase separated the internal drug-containing aqueous phase from the continuous phase. Microspheres were formed after solvent evaporation and polymer precipitation. The drug content of the microspheres increased with increasing theoretical drug loading, increasing amounts of organic solvent, polymer and polymeric stabilizer, and decreased with increasing stirring time, increasing pH of the continuous phase and increased volume of the internal and external aqueous phase. PMID:2384837

Alex, R; Bodmeier, R

1990-01-01

279

THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary objective of this task is to perform bench scale testing on various frits that have been used at DWPF or in test programs at SRNL to determine the quantity of de-ionized (DI) water required to mitigate dusting per mass basis of frit. The quantity of DI water required was determined visually by observing the effluent port of the mixer, and DI water addition was made to the point where no visible dust was observed leaving the effluent port. A total of eight different frits were selected for testing. Secondary objectives in this task include the following: (1) Video taping of the de-dusting procedure, (2) Particle size distribution analyses of the dry and wetted frits at the weight fraction of water required for de-dusting, (3) Plate flow tests to determine angle of flow and quantity of material remaining on plate at 90 degrees, (4) Microscopy of dry and wetted frit, and (5) Effect of excess water for selected frits on plate flow. The above analyses were performed within one hour of water addition, to minimize the effect of evaporative water losses. To better understand the size of dust particles, perform settling tests on selected frits and capture the fines. Analyze the fines for particle size distribution. Finally, it is expected that the surface area of frit is an important parameter in the quantity of water required for dust mitigation. An analysis of particle size distribution (PSD) data of as-received frit analyzed by SRNL over the past two to three years will be performed to determine the variation in the distribution of as-received frit. The following objectives were stated in the Technical Task Request4 as objectives that given adequate time would provide insight in helping DWPF in assessing equipment or processes for de-dusting and processing of dry frit. Due to time constraints, commercial methods for dedusting are provided. These results are detailed in section 3.7. Obtain design information from Hanford with respective to equipment used for dedusting. Suggestions on enhanced design features, such as flush water, pipe air purges, humidified compresse

Hansen, E.

2010-07-21

280

Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

1977-01-01

281

On the uniqueness of the receding contact angle: effects of substrate roughness and humidity on evaporation of water drops.  

PubMed

Could a unique receding contact angle be indicated for describing the wetting properties of a real gas-liquid-solid system? Could a receding contact angle be defined if the triple line of a sessile drop is not moving at all during the whole measurement process? To what extent is the receding contact angle influenced by the intrinsic properties of the system or the measurement procedures? In order to answer these questions, a systematic investigation was conducted in this study on the effects of substrate roughness and relative humidity on the behavior of pure water drops spreading and evaporating on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces characterized by different morphologies. Dynamic, advancing, and receding contact angles were found to be strongly affected by substrate roughness. Specifically, a receding contact angle could not be measured at all for drops evaporating on the more rugged PC surfaces, since the drops were observed strongly pinning to the substrate almost until their complete disappearance. Substrate roughness and system relative humidity were also found responsible for drastic changes in the depinning time (from ?10 to ?60 min). Thus, for measurement observations not sufficiently long, no movement of the triple line could be noted, with, again, the failure to find a receding contact angle. Therefore, to keep using concepts such as the receding contact angle as meaningful specifications of a given gas-liquid-solid system, the imperative to carefully investigate and report the inner characteristics of the system (substrate roughness, topography, impurities, defects, chemical properties, etc.) is pointed out in this study. The necessity of establishing methodological standards (drop size, measurement method, system history, observation interval, relative humidity, etc.) is also suggested. PMID:25029610

Pittoni, Paola G; Lin, Chia-Hui; Yu, Teng-Shiang; Lin, Shi-Yow

2014-08-12

282

Hot air drum evaporator  

DOEpatents

An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

Black, Roger L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01

283

A New Equation for the Aerodynamics of Pan Evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research is a response to worldwide observations reporting a decline in pan evaporation over the last 30 to 50 years. We constructed an instrumented US Class A pan that replicates an operational pan at Canberra Airport in Australia. The aim of the experimental setup was to investigate the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. We monitored the water level (to determine the evaporation rate), (short- and long-wave) radiation, temperature (air, water surface, bulk water, inner and outer pan wall), atmospheric pressure, air vapour pressure and the wind speed at a standard reference height (2 m above ground level). All these measurements are recorded at five-minute intervals for a 3-year period (2007-2010). Here, we present a framework for quantifying vapour transfer by coupling Fick's First Law of Diffusion with boundary layer theory (assuming that water surface temperature measurements are available). This approach adequately represented pan evaporation measurements over short time intervals (half-hourly) under non-steady state conditions. It involved estimating the boundary layer thickness and other properties of air above the evaporating surface for a pan. Our results are consistent with the "envelope of theoretical curves" concept for the wind function proposed by Thom et al. (1981). Reference: Thom, A. S., J. L. Thony, and M. Vauclin (1981), On the proper employment of evaporation of evaporation pans and atmometers in estimating potential transpiration, Quart. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 107(453), 711-736, doi: 10.1002/qj.49710745316.

Lim, W.; Roderick, M. L.; Hobbins, M. T.; Wong, S.; Groeneveld, P. J.; Sun, F.; Farquhar, G. D.

2011-12-01

284

Water film cooling over the glass cover of a solar still including evaporation effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of water film cooling of the glass cover on the efficiency of a single-basin still has been investigated numerically. Proper use of the film-cooling parameters may increase the still efficiency by up to 20%. On the other hand, a poor combination of these parameters leads to a significant reduction in efficiency. The presence of the cooling film neutralizes

Hasan A. Mousa

1997-01-01

285

Thickness eects of water overlayer on its explosive evaporation at heated metal surfaces  

E-print Network

of Materials Science and Engineering, Thornton Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA c; MALDI mass spectrometry; Ice matrix; Water ®lm; Molecular dynamics simulation 1. Introduction Matrix be irradiated by a UV laser. In this later case, Williams and co-workers [2±5] utilized the laser to deposit

Zbigniew, Postawa

286

Crystallization of proteins by dynamic control of evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is expected that the kinetics of supersaturation, which is directly related to the evaporation of solvent from a crystallization solution, will greatly affect both nucleation and crystal growth processes. Therefore, a novel device has been developed which allows computer regulation of the flow of N 2(g) over a hanging drop to dynamically control the evaporation of solvent. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the amount of water vapor transferred from the drop to the gas stream and provides closed loop control of the evaporation process. Data acquisition and control are accomplished using a custom program written with LabVIEW software (National Instruments) on a Macintosh II microcomputer. Quantitation of several evaporation protocols has been accomplished using both the thermal conductivity detector and a novel conductance cell that allows continuous measurement of solution analyte concentrations. Crystals of hen egg white lysozyme have been grown at different evaporation rates and analyzed according to size and number of single crystals.

Wilson, L. G.; Bray, T. L.; Suddath, F. L.

1991-03-01

287

Nanoparticle-mediated evaporation at liquid-vapor interface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solution-processed electronic materials for printed electronics frequently take the form of nano-colloidal dispersions of inorganic materials. In standard printing processes, evaporation of the solvent plays a critical role in the deposition of the dispersed nanoparticles. To date, there is no quantitative study of the effects of particles on the interface on the evaporative flux. We provide experimental evidence that nanoparticles present at the interface attenuate evaporation relative to the pure solvent case. To avoid the effects of the complex interfacial shapes attending patterned deposition by printing, we regularize the interface by conducting evaporation experiments in circular-bore cylindrical glass crucibles. The crucible was initially charged with water, and the silica particles were placed on the interface using a modified Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Evaporation rates were measured as a function of surface coverage, contact angle, and surface properties of the nanoparticles.

Fan, Wenxiong

288

Industrial water production by utilization of a reverse osmosis and an evaporation plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

ITALIMPIANTI has realized the steel making plant in Woljsky (on 1989), situated in the Volgograd area between the Caspian Sea and the Black Sea, with a steel output of 150,000 t\\/y from scrap, 720,000 t\\/y of seamless pipes, and 210,000 t\\/y of blooms. In the ambit of the operation system of water necessary for the production cycles, for ancillary equipments

R. Borsani; M. Fazio; B. Ferrando

1997-01-01

289

Evaporative enrichment of oxygen-18 and deuterium in lake waters on the Tibetan Plateau  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotopes (?18O and ?D) are useful tracers for investigating hydrologic and climatic variability on a variety of temporal and spatial scales.\\u000a Since the early isotopic studies on mountainous glaciers in the late 1960s, a great deal of information has been generated\\u000a on the isotopic composition of rainfall, snow, ice, surface waters, and lake carbonate sediments across the Tibetan Plateau.

Fasong Yuan; Yongwei Sheng; Tandong Yao; Chaojun Fan; Junli Li; Hui Zhao; Yanbin Lei

2011-01-01

290

Effect of argon gas flow rate on properties of film electrodes prepared by thermal vacuum evaporation from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} source  

SciTech Connect

This work describes a new technique to enhance photoresponse of metal chalcogenide-based semiconductor film electrodes deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation under argon gas flow from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} sources. SnSe formation with Cu-doped was obtained under higher argon gas flow rate (V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min). Higher value of photoresponse was observed for films deposited under V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min which was 9.1%. This finding indicates that Cu atoms inside the SnSe film were important to increase carrier concentrations that promote higher photoresponse.

Sabli, Nordin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Zainal, Zulkarnain [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Hilal, Hikmat S. [SSERL, Department of Chemistry An-Najah N. University, PO Box 7, Nablus, West Bank (Country Unknown); Fujii, Masatoshi [Department of Molecular Science, School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane, 693-8501 (Japan)

2014-03-05

291

Parameterizations for sulfuric acid\\/water nucleation rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present parametrized equations for calculation of sulfuric acid\\/water critical nucleus compositions and homogeneous nucleation rates. The parameterizations are in agreement with the thermodynamically consistent version of classical binary homogeneous nucleation theory [Wilemski, 1984] incorporating the hydration effect. The new parameterizations produce nucleation rates that differ by several orders of magnitude from the rates predicted by other parameterizations available in

Markku Kulmala; Ari Laaksonen; Liisa Pirjola

1998-01-01

292

Breast meat quality and consumer sensory properties of broiler carcasses chilled by water, air, or evaporative air.  

PubMed

Three poultry chilling methods, namely, water chilling (WC), air chilling (AC), and evaporative air chilling (EAC), were compared to evaluate their effects on broiler breast meat quality and consumer sensory characteristics. A total of 189 birds were processed with 1 of the 3 chilling methods. One-third of the birds were hard scalded (57.7°C, 120 s) and subjected to WC (an ice slurry immersion at 0°C). The remaining birds were soft scalded (50°C, 220 s) and randomly assigned to either AC (blowing air, 1.0 m/s) or EAC (blowing air plus each carcass sprayed with 0.5 L of 0.4°C water) in a chilling room (0.9 ± 0.4°C). Water chilling reduced the carcass temperature most efficiently (57 min), whereas AC and EAC were the least (125 min) and intermediate (93 min) in efficiency, respectively. No significant difference was found among the chilling methods in moisture content, cooking yield, and shear force of deskinned breast fillets stored overnight. However, the pH (5.6) of 24-h stored fillets was higher in WC fillets than in AC (5.5) and EAC (5.5) fillets. For the surface color of skinless breasts, WC carcasses showed a higher Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L* value than AC or EAC carcasses, whereas AC carcasses exhibited more redness (higher CIE a*) and yellowness (higher CIE b*) than the other 2 chilling methods. When raw breast meat was made into cooked gels, no significant difference was observed in cooking loss, moisture content, shear stress, and shear strain, regardless of the chilling method. In consumer sensory evaluations, AC breasts had a higher juiciness score than did WC and EAC breasts, but no significant difference was found for flavor, texture, and overall acceptability. PMID:21325244

Jeong, J Y; Janardhanan, K K; Booren, A M; Harte, J B; Kang, I

2011-03-01

293

EFFECTS OF ADDITION RATE AND ACID MATRIX ON THE DESTRUCTION OF AMMONIUM BY THE SEMI-CONTINUOUS ADDITION OF SODIUM NITRITE DURING EVAPORATION  

SciTech Connect

The destruction of ammonium by the semi-continuous addition of sodium nitrite during acidic evaporation can be achieved with a wide range of waste compositions. The efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction was observed to vary from less than 20% to 60% depending on operating conditions. The effects of nitric acid concentration and nitrite addition rate are dominant factors that affect the efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction. Reducing the acid concentration by performing acid recovery via steam stripping prior to performing nitrite destruction of ammonium will require more nitrite due to the low destruction efficiency. The scale-up of the baseline rate nitrite addition rate from the 100 mL to the 1600 gallon batch size has significant uncertainty and poses the risk of lower efficiency at the plant scale. Experience with plant scale processing will improve confidence in the application of nitrite destruction of ammonium to different waste streams.

Kyser, E

2007-08-27

294

Evaporation from groundwater discharge playas, Estancia Basin, central New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bowen ratio meteorological stations have been deployed to measure rates of evaporation from groundwater discharge playas and from an adjacent vegetated bench in the Estancia Basin, in central New Mexico. The playas are remnants of late Pleistocene pluvial Lake Estancia and are discharge areas for groundwater originating as precipitation in the adjacent Manzano Mts. They also accumulate water during local precipitation events. Evaporation is calculated from measured values of net radiation, soil heat flux, atmospheric temperature, and relative humidity. Evaporation rates are strongly dependent on the presence or absence of standing water in the playas, with rates increasing more than 600% after individual rainstorms. Evaporation at site E-12, in the southeastern part of the playa Complex, measured 74 cm over a yearlong period from mid-1997 through mid-1998. This value compares favorably to earlier estimates from northern Estancia playas, but is nearly three times greater than evaporation at a similar playa in western Utah. Differences in geographical position, salt crust composition, and physical properties may explain some of the difference in evaporation rates in these two geographic regions.

Menking, Kirsten M.; Anderson, Roger Y.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Allen, Bruce D.; Ellwein, Amy L.; Loveland, Thomas A.; Hostetler, Steven W.

2000-01-01

295

Preparation of amorphous solid dispersions by rotary evaporation and KinetiSol Dispersing: approaches to enhance solubility of a poorly water-soluble gum extract.  

PubMed

Abstract Acetyl-11-keto-?-boswellic acid (AKBA), a gum resin extract, possesses poor water-solubility that limits bioavailability and a high melting point making it difficult to successfully process into solid dispersions by fusion methods. The purpose of this study was to investigate solvent and thermal processing techniques for the preparation of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) exhibiting enhanced solubility, dissolution rates and bioavailability. Solid dispersions were successfully produced by rotary evaporation (RE) and KinetiSol® Dispersing (KSD). Solid state and chemical characterization revealed that ASD with good potency and purity were produced by both RE and KSD. Results of the RE studies demonstrated that AQOAT®-LF, AQOAT®-MF, Eudragit® L100-55 and Soluplus with the incorporation of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium provided substantial solubility enhancement. Non-sink dissolution analysis showed enhanced dissolution properties for KSD-processed solid dispersions in comparison to RE-processed solid dispersions. Variances in release performance were identified when different particle size fractions of KSD samples were analyzed. Selected RE samples varying in particle surface morphologies were placed under storage and exhibited crystalline growth following solid-state stability analysis at 12 months in comparison to stored KSD samples confirming amorphous instability for RE products. In vivo analysis of KSD-processed solid dispersions revealed significantly enhanced AKBA absorption in comparison to the neat, active substance. PMID:24329130

Bennett, Ryan C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; O'Donnell, Kevin P; Keen, Justin M; Hughey, Justin R; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

2013-12-16

296

COMPARING CONSTANT-RATE AND DECLINING-RATE DIRECT FILTRATION OF A SURFACE WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Pilot-scale constant-rate and declining-rate direct filtration systems were evaluated for treating a high quality surface water, using two flow rates and alum or cationic polymer as the primary coagulant. Turbidity, particle count, and total coliform count were used to compare fi...

297

II. EvaporationII. Evaporation Vaporization  

E-print Network

II. EvaporationII. Evaporation Vaporization (mtorr) cm Line-of-sight transport Liu, UCD Phy250-1, 2011, NanoFab #12;Evaporation SourceEvaporation Source & compatibility #12;Evaporation SourceEvaporation Source Electron-beamInduction Electron-beamInduction Liu, UCD

Liu, Kai

298

On the theory relating changes in area-average and pan evaporation (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theory relating changes in area-average evaporation with changes in the evaporation from pans or open water is developed. Such changes can arise by Type (a) processes related to large-scale changes in atmospheric concentrations and circulation that modify surface evaporation rates in the same direction, and Type (b) processes related to coupling between the surface and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the landscape scale that usually modify area-average evaporation and pan evaporation in different directions. The interrelationship between evaporation rates in response to Type (a) changes is derived. They have the same sign and broadly similar magnitude but the change in area-average evaporation is modified by surface resistance. As an alternative to assuming the complementary evaporation hypothesis, the results of previous modeling studies that investigated surface-atmosphere coupling are parameterized and used to develop a theoretical description of Type (b) coupling via vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the ABL. The interrelationship between appropriately normalized pan and area-average evaporation rates is shown to vary with temperature and wind speed but, on average, the Type (b) changes are approximately equal and opposite. Long-term Australian pan evaporation data are analyzed to demonstrate the simultaneous presence of Type (a) and (b) processes, and observations from three field sites in southwestern USA show support for the theory describing Type (b) coupling via VPD. England's victory over Australia in 2009 Ashes cricket test match series will not be mentioned.

Shuttleworth, W.; Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Roderick, M. L.; Scott, R.

2009-12-01

299

Droplet evaporation on heated hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces.  

PubMed

The evaporation characteristics of sessile water droplets on smooth hydrophobic and structured superhydrophobic heated surfaces are experimentally investigated. Droplets placed on the hierarchical superhydrophobic surface subtend a very high contact angle (?160°) and demonstrate low roll-off angle (?1°), while the hydrophobic substrate supports corresponding values of 120° and ?10°. The substrates are heated to different constant temperatures in the range of 40-60?°C, which causes the droplet to evaporate much faster than in the case of natural evaporation without heating. The geometric parameters of the droplet, such as contact angle, contact radius, and volume evolution over time, are experimentally tracked. The droplets are observed to evaporate primarily in a constant-contact-angle mode where the contact line slides along the surface. The measurements are compared with predictions from a model based on diffusion of vapor into the ambient that assumes isothermal conditions. This vapor-diffusion-only model captures the qualitative evaporation characteristics on both test substrates, but reasonable quantitative agreement is achieved only for the hydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic surface demonstrates significant deviation between the measured evaporation rate and that obtained using the vapor-diffusion-only model, with the difference being amplified as the substrate temperature is increased. A simple model considering thermal diffusion through the droplet is used to highlight the important role of evaporative cooling at the droplet interface in determining the droplet evaporation characteristics on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24827255

Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

2014-04-01

300

Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates  

SciTech Connect

The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000?Hz, with 0.5?J per pulse energy output at 25?kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

2014-09-28

301

Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H2O2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

Ruma, Hosseini, S. H. R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, P.; Akiyama, H.

2014-09-01

302

Evaporation from Lake Mead, Arizona and Nevada, 1997-99  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lake Mead is one of a series of large Colorado River reservoirs operated and maintained by the Bureau of Reclamation. The Colorado River system of reservoirs and diversions is an important source of water for millions of people in seven Western States and Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, conducted a study from 1997 to 1999 to estimate evaporation from Lake Mead. For this study, micrometeorological and hydrologic data were collected continually from instrumented platforms deployed at four locations on the lake, open-water areas of Boulder Basin, Virgin Basin, and Overton Arm and a protected cove in Boulder Basin. Data collected at the platforms were used to estimate Lake Mead evaporation by solving an energy-budget equation. The average annual evaporation rate at open-water stations from January 1998 to December 1999 was 7.5 feet. Because the spatial variation of monthly and annual evaporation rates was minimal for the open-water stations, a single open-water station in Boulder Basin would provide data that are adequate to estimate evaporation from Lake Mead.

Westenburg, Craig L.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Tanko, Daron J.

2006-01-01

303

Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and milk production in crossbred Holstein cattle in a tropical environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to determine how evaporative cooling modifies body function with respect to water metabolism and other variables relevant to milk synthesis in crossbred cattle. The study was conducted on two groups of 0.875HF:0.125RS crossbred Holstein cattle (87.5%) housed in an open-sided barn with a tiled roof (non-cooled animals) and in a close-sided barn under an evaporative cooling system (cooled animals). The maximum ambient temperature and relative humidity for the non-cooled group were 33°C and 61%, with the corresponding values for the evaporatively cooled barn being 28°C and 84%, respectively. The temperature humidity index (THI) of under non-cooled conditions was higher ( P < 0.05) than that in the cooled barn. Rectal temperatures and respiration rates of non-cooled animals were higher ( P < 0.05) than those of cooled animals. Daily dry matter intake (DMI) of cooled animals was higher while water intakes were lower ( P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals. The mean absolute values of plasma volume, blood volume, and extracellular fluid (ECF) of cooled animals were significantly higher ( P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals throughout all stages of lactation. Milk yields of cooled animals were higher by 42%, 36% and 79% on average than those of non-cooled animals during early-, mid- and late-lactation, respectively. The decline in milk yields as lactation advances was markedly apparent in late-lactating non-cooled animals, while no significant changes in milk composition at different stages of lactation were observed in either group. Mean arterial plasma concentrations, arteriovenous concentration differences (A-V differences) and the extraction ratio across the mammary gland for acetate, glucose and triglyceride of cooled animals were not significantly different compared with values for non-cooled animals. No differences were seen in plasma hormonal levels for triiodotyronine (T3) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), but plasma cortisol and thyroxine (T4) levels tended to be lower in non-cooled animals. This study suggests that low cooling temperature accompanied by high humidity influences a galactopoietic effect, in part through increases in ECF, blood volume and plasma volume in association with an increase in DMI, which partitions the distribution of nutrients to the mammary gland for milk synthesis. Cooled animals were unable to maintain high milk yield as lactation advances even though a high level of body fluids was maintained during long-term cooled exposure. The decline in milk yield, coinciding with a decrease in net energy for lactation as lactation advances, could be attributed to a local change within the mammary gland.

Chaiyabutr, N.; Chanpongsang, S.; Suadsong, S.

2008-09-01

304

Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

Burch, J.

2012-06-01

305

Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation  

E-print Network

Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By spraying a light film of water in the form of a mist for thirty seconds, then turning the sprays off for five minutes while evaporation takes place, the roof temperature can be reduced from 1650o to 880o...

Patterson, G. V.

1980-01-01

306

Evaporation from a small prairie wetland in the Cottonwood Lake Area, North Dakota - An energy-budget study  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation from Wetland Pl in the Cottonwood Lake area of North Dakota, USA was determined by the energy-budget method for 1982-85 and 1987. Evaporation rates were as high as 0.672 cm day-1. Incoming solar radiation, incoming atmospheric radiation, and long-wave radiation emitted from the water body are the largest energy fluxes to and from the wetland. Because of the small heat storage of the water body, evaporation rates closely track solar radiation on short time scales. The effect of advected energy related to precipitation is small because the water quickly heats up by solar radiation following precipitation. Advected energy related to ground water is minimal because ground-water fluxes are small and groundwater temperature is only about 7 ??C. Energy flux related to sediment heating and thermal storage in the sediments, which might be expected to be large because the water is clear and shallow, affects evaporation rates by less than 5 percent.

Parkhurst, R.S.; Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Sturrock, A.M.

1998-01-01

307

Effects of water flow rate, salt concentration and water temperature on efficiency of an electrolyzed oxidizing water generator  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-factor central composite design was adopted to investigate the effects of water flow rate, water temperature and salt concentration on electrolysis efficiency and separation efficiency of an electrolyzed oxidizing water generator. Results indicated that electric potential (7.9–15.7 V) and power consumption (16–120 W) of the electrolysis cell were not affected by water flow rate, water temperature or salt concentration

S. Y. Hsu

2003-01-01

308

Analysis of energy use in tomato evaporation  

SciTech Connect

Field performance data for four tomato product evaporators are presented and analyzed. Steam and feed flow rates along with steam economies were measured and are compared to steady state theoretical evaporator models.

Rumsey, T.; Conant, T.

1980-01-01

309

Evaporative Cooler  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Explore the concept of evaporative cooling through a hands-on experiment. Use a wet cloth and fan to model an air-conditioner and use temperature and relative humidity sensors to collect data. Then digitally plot the data using graphs in the activity. In an optional extension, make your own modifications to improve the cooler's efficiency.

Consortium, The C.

2011-12-12

310

Evaporating firewalls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

Van Raamsdonk, Mark

2014-11-01

311

Microdroplet evaporation with a forced pinned contact line.  

PubMed

Experimental and numerical investigations of water microdroplet evaporation on heated, laser patterned polymer substrates are reported. The study is focused on both (i) controlling a droplet's contact line dynamics during evaporation to identifying how the contact line influences evaporative heat transfer and (ii) validating numerical simulations with experimental data. Droplets are formed on the polymer surface using a bottom-up methodology, where a computer-controlled syringe pump feeds water through a 200 ?m diameter fluid channel within the heated polymer substrate. This methodology facilitates precise control of the droplet's growth rate, size, and inlet temperature. In addition to this microchannel supply line, the substrate surfaces are laser patterned with a moatlike trench around the fluid-channel outlet, adding additional control of the droplet's contact line motion, area, and contact angle. In comparison to evaporation on a nonpatterned polymer surface, the laser patterned trench increases contact line pinning time by ?60% of the droplet's lifetime. Numerical simulations of diffusion controlled evaporation are compared the experimental data with a pinned contact line. These diffusion based simulations consistently over predict the droplet's evaporation rate. In efforts to improve this model, a temperature distribution along the droplet's liquid-vapor interface is imposed to account for the concentration distribution of saturated vapor along the interface, which yields improved predictions within 2-4% of the experimental data throughout the droplet's lifetime on heated substrates. PMID:25102248

Gleason, Kevin; Putnam, Shawn A

2014-09-01

312

Tubular sublimatory evaporator heat sink  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An evaporative refrigerator or cooler comprising a bundle of spaced, porous walled tubes closed at one of their ends and vented to a vacuum at the other end is disclosed. The tube bundle is surrounded by a water jacket having a hot water inlet distribution manifold and a cooled water outlet through a plenum chamber. Hot water is pumped into the jacket to circulate around the tubes, and when this water meets the vacuum existing inside the tubes, it evaporates thereby cooling the water in the jacket. If cooling proceeds to the point where water penetrating or surrounding all or part of the tubes freezes, operation continues with local sublimation of the ice on the tubes while the circulating water attempts to melt the ice. Both sublimation and evaporation may take place simultaneously in different regions of the device.

Webbon, B. W. (inventor)

1977-01-01

313

Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water Paths, and Rain Rates over the Northern High Latitude Open Seas  

E-print Network

Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water Paths, and Rain Rates over the Northern High Latitude Open Seas-based Instrumentation: May 1-8 time series 35 GHz cloud radar ice cloud properties depolarization lidar-determined liquid cloud base Microwave radiometer-derived liquid water paths Near-surface T ~ -30 C, inversion

Zuidema, Paquita

314

Spent-fuel pool thermal hydraulics: The evaporation question  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many nuclear power plants are currently using dense fuel arrangements that increase the number of spent fuel elements stored in their spent-fuel pools (SFPs). The denser spent-fuel storage results in higher water temperatures, especially when certain event scenarios are analyzed. In some of these event scenarios, it is conservative to maximize the evaporation rate, while in other circumstances it is

T. P. Yilmaz; J. C. Lai

1996-01-01

315

Coupling of a new land surface evaporation model (Eva) to the Water Accounting Model (WAM) for the analysis of land-use change impacts on continental moisture recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In some regions of the world, moisture recycling is to a considerable extent sustained by terrestrial evaporation - a moisture flow that can be partly altered by humans through land-use change. With increasingly stressed fresh water resources as well as growing pressure on land, there is a need to advance our understanding of the entire impact chain of continental moisture recycling: from land-use to downwind precipitation. For the purpose of analyzing land-use change impacts on continental moisture recycling, we have developed a globally distributed land surface evaporation model (Eva) and coupled it to the moisture tracking scheme WAM. The Eva model estimates evaporative fluxes (incl. partitioning of interception and transpiration) based on predefined and satellite derived land use and soil properties. Land-use classes may easily be substituted for investigation of land-use change impacts. As our objective is specifically tuned to assess the effect of land-use change on evaporation and downwind precipitation, we have deliberately simplified the hydrological scheme of Eva (disregarding groundwater interaction and lateral flow). This is a balance act between the model's ability to represent all hydrological processes and its usability for isolated explorations of the land-moisture-precipitation nexus at the macro scale. The WAM-Eva coupling is a simple tool to apply in future studies on how different land-use scenarios may affect moisture recycling at a continental and global scale, and contributes to our understanding of how land management in one region may affect fresh water availability in another.

Wang, Lan; Savenije, Hubert; van der Ent, Ruud; Gordon, Line

2013-04-01

316

Substate and evaporation rate dependent orientation and crystalline organization of sexithiophene films vacuum deposited onto Au and HOPG  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The orientation and the crystalline organization of the films depend largely on the nature of the substrate and the deposition rate. The substrate effect is related to its interactions with the oligomers and also to the molecular mobility at the surface. It depends also largely on the deposition rate. L'orientation et l'organisation structurale des films de sexithiophène évaporés sous vide sont fortement liées à la nature du substrat (Au, HOPG) et à la vitesse de dépôt. L'effet du substrat est lié aux interactions avec les oligomères ainsi qu'à la mobilité de ces derniers sur la surface. Cet effet dépend largement de la vitesse d'évaporation.

El Ardhaoui, M.; Lang, P.; Garnier, F.; Roger, J. P.

1998-06-01

317

The Preparation and Characterization of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Microparticles. II. The Entrapment of a Model Protein Using a (Water-in-Oil)inWater Emulsion Solvent Evaporation Technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microparticles with entrapped antigens have recently been investigated as controlled-release vaccines. This paper describes the preparation of PLG microparticles with an entrapped model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), using a (water-in-oil)-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation technique. In a series of experiments, the effects of process parameters on particle size and OVA entrapment were investigated. It was found that smooth, spherical microparticles

Hayley Jeffery; Stanley S. Davis; Derek T. O'Hagan

1993-01-01

318

MND(microlite number density) water exsolution rate meter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microlites in effusive or pyroclastic rocks are possible indicators of water exsolution. In particular, the microlite number density (MND) is considered to be a function of the rate of water exsolution from melt. In this paper, we have constructed a MND water exsolution rate meter based on the recent results of theory, experiments and the natural observation of crystallization kinetics. The MND method accounts for the effects of melt composition and water content on the diffusivity of crystallizing components in melt. By using this meter, we can estimate the water exsolution rate at the microlite nucleation depth from a MND value provided the crystal phase (plagioclase or clinopyroxene) is known. We applied the meter to the case of the 1991-1995 dome eruption at Unzen and the 1986B subplinian eruption at Izu-Oshima. We obtained the water exsolution rates in the range of 6.1×10-6 to 2.8×10^{-5} (wt%/s) approximately at 70 (MPa) for Unzen (plagioclase MND= 1014 to 1015 (m-3)) and 1.1×10-3 to 1.1×10-1 (wt%/s) for Izu-Oshima (pyroxene MND=1015 to 1017(m3)). Under the assumption of equilibrium vesiculation and steady state flow, the corresponding decompression rate and ascent velocity are calculated in the range of 240 to 1100 (Pa/s) and 0.014 to 0.068 (m/s) for Unzen and 1.2× 10^{4} to 1.3× 106 (Pa/s) and 1.3 to 133 (m/s) for Izu-Oshima. This contrast in the ascent velocity at the microlite nucleation depth is closely related to the reason why Unzen and Izu-Oshima revealed the different eruption styles, namely, dome growth and explosive eruption, respectively.

Toramaru, A.; Noguchi, S.; Oyoshihara, S.; Tsune, A.

2006-12-01

319

MND(microlite number density) water exsolution rate meter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microlites in effusive or pyroclastic rocks are possible indicators of water exsolution. In particular, the microlite number density (MND) is considered to be a function of the rate of water exsolution from melt. In this paper, we have constructed a MND water exsolution rate meter based on the recent results of theory, experiments and the natural observation of crystallization kinetics. The MND method accounts for the effects of melt composition and water content on the diffusivity of crytallizing components in melt. By using this meter, we can estimate the water exsolution rate at the microlite nucleation depth from a MND value provided the crystal phase (plagioclase or clinopyroxene) is known. We applied the meter to the case of the 1991-1995 dome eruption at Unzen and the 1986B subplinian eruption at Izu-Oshima. We obtained the water exsolution rates in the range of 6.1 × 10 - 6 to 2.8 × 10 - 5 (wt.%/s) approximately at 70 (MPa) for Unzen (plagioclase MND = 10 14 to 10 15 (m - 3 )) and 1.1 × 10 - 3 to 1.1 × 10 - 1 (wt.%/s) for Izu-Oshima (pyroxene MND = 10 15 to 10 17(m 3)). Under the assumption of equilibrium vesiculation and steady state flow, the corresponding decompression rate and ascent velocity are calculated in the range of 240 to 1100 (Pa/s) and 0.014 to 0.068 (m/s) for Unzen and 1.2 × 10 4 to 1.3 × 10 6 (Pa/s) and 1.3 to 133 (m/s) for Izu-Oshima. This contrast in the ascent velocity at the microlite nucleation depth is closely related to the reason why Unzen and Izu-Oshima revealed the different eruption styles, namely, dome growth and explosive eruption, respectively.

Toramaru, A.; Noguchi, S.; Oyoshihara, S.; Tsune, A.

2008-07-01

320

Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A procedure is presented for calculating 24-hour totals of evaporation from wet and drying soils. Its application requires a knowledge of the daily solar radiation, the maximum and minimum, air temperatures, moist surface albedo, and maximum and minimum surface temperatures. Tests of the technique on a bare field of Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona showed it to be independent of season.

Reginato, R.; Idso, S.; Vedder, J.; Jackson, R.; Blanchard, M.; Goettelman, R.

1975-01-01

321

Dynamical nucleation theory: Calculation of condensation rate constants for small water clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

In previous work we began the description of a molecular theory of homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation based on the kinetics of cluster formation and decomposition. In this work we focused on a new theoretical approach to calculating rate constants for evaporation of molecules from clusters. In the present work, we present a molecular theory for calculating condensation rate constants that are

Shawn M. Kathmann; Gregory K. Schenter; Bruce C. Garrett

1999-01-01

322

RATES, CONSTANTS, AND KINETICS FORMULATIONS IN SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive volume on state-of-the-art formulations used in surface water quality modeling along with accepted values for rate constants and coefficients. Topics covered include system geometric representation (spatial and temporal), phy...

323

Rain Erosion-Does the Rate of Water Effect Erosion?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a guided inquiry investigation where students gather data on rate of water falling on erosion. Student will interpret their data, and develop a conclusion from the data. The data will lead to further questions, which can be developed by the students.

Johnson, Kyle

324

Photoluminescence and anti-deliquesce of cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films deposited by thermal evaporation at high deposition rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cesium iodide (CsI) and sodium iodide (NaI) are good scintillators due to their high luminescence efficiency. These alkali halides can be excited by ultra-violet or by ionizing radiation. In this study, CsI and its Na-doped films about 8 ?m thick were deposited by thermal evaporation boat without heating substrates at high deposition rates of 30, 50, 70, 90, and 110 nm/sec, respectively. The as-deposited films were sequentially deposited a silicon dioxide film to protect from deliquesce. And, the films were also post-annealed in vacuum at 150, 200, 250, and 300 °C, respectively. We calculated the packing densities of the samples according to the measurements of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and observed the luminescence properties by photoluminescence (PL) system. The surfaces and cross sections of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). From the above measurements we can find the optimal deposition rate of 90 nm/sec and post-annealing temperature of 250 °C in vacuum for the asdeposited cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films.

Hsu, Jin-Cherng; Chiang, Yueh-Sheng; Ma, Yu-Sheng

2013-03-01

325

CONDENSATION As noted previously, heat energy imparted to water as it  

E-print Network

CONDENSATION As noted previously, heat energy imparted to water as it evaporates is returned to liquid water as vapor condenses. During low tide, the rate of evaporation typically exceeds the rate of condensation, and it is this net rate of evapora- tion that we notice. At times, however, the rate of conden

Brody, James P.

326

HAPEX-MOBLIHY: A Hydrologic Atmospheric Experiment for the Study of Water Budget and Evaporation Flux at the Climatic Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HAPEX-MOBILHY program is aimed at studying the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a GCM (general circulation model) grid square, i.e., 104 km2. Different surface and subsurface networks will be operated during the year 1986, to measure and monitor soil moisture, surface-energy budget and surface hydrology, as well as atmospheric properties.A two-and-a-half-month special observing period will

Jean-Claude André; Jean-Paul Goutorbe; Alain Perrier

1986-01-01

327

A fundamental cause of an enormous amount of evaporation during rainfall by canopy interception: Evaporative force proposed by Makarieva and Gorshkov  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An enormous amount of evaporation from forest canopy is observed during rainfall as canopy interception. The evaporation rate often exceeds well over 10 mm h-1 that requires latent heat of five times solar constant (6814 W m-2 at 20°C). On top of that, evaporation rate is proportional to the rainfall intensity. Namely, once the saturation of canopy is reached, the ratio of canopy interception to gross rainfall remains constant during the rainfall regardless of the intensity of the storm, e.g. approximately 20% of the rainfall in a Japanese cypress stand. This enigmatic phenomenon includes several cardinal problems to solve. As for the mechanism of a huge amount of evaporation, Murakami (2006, 2007; J. Hydrol.) proposed splash droplet evaporation, and is supported by Dunkerley (2009; J. Hydrol.). As the size and the number of raindrops increase with rainfall intensity (Marshall-Palmer distribution), so does the number of splash droplets produced by raindrops hitting the canopy. A host of small droplets with huge combined surface area highly boost evaporation, which means water evaporates from the splash droplets as well as the canopy. However, unless water vapor above canopy is removed and transported somewhere else, water vapor saturates and evaporation stops. Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007; HESS) advocated a new theory that can elucidate an enormous amount of evaporation and water vapor transport termed "evaporative force" or "the Biotic Pump Theory"(BPT). Though they do not deal with evaporation during rain events explicitly, it is applicable to the evaporation for the period of rainfall, i.e. canopy interception. Molecular weight of H2O, 18, is smaller than the average value of air 29 that works for water vapor as buoyancy. As a result, water vapor is removed since it goes up by itself and condenses at the bottom of cloud. In the cloud latent heat is released that will be transported down to the canopy being pulled down with raindrops or in exchange for water vapor ascending from the canopy. It is postulated that both latent heat and water circulate between the canopy and the cloud. Though Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007) claims that forest makes rain inland due to the strong evaporation from forest that "sucks in" water vapor from the ocean, they give canopy interception only a one-line mention. Canopy interception is a major component of evapotranspiration from forest that enables forest to evaporate larger amount of water than other surfaces on the earth, and the Biotic Pump does not function without canopy interception. Conversely, the mechanism of canopy interception is not explainable without evaporative force, and the fundamental cause of canopy interception is evaporative force. BPT is strongly supported by the observational facts of canopy interception and the splash droplet evaporation hypothesis. The study of canopy interception can be used as the tool to verify evaporative force that has the high potential of the development in the atmospheric boundary layer study.

Murakami, Shigeki

2010-05-01

328

JV TASK 7-FIELD APPLICATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NATURAL GAS PRODUCED WATER IN WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

The freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE{reg_sign}) process treats oil and gas produced water so that the water can be beneficially used. The FTE{reg_sign} process is the coupling of evaporation and freeze-crystallization, and in climates where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur, this coupling improves process economics compared to evaporation alone. An added benefit of the process is that water of a quality suited for a variety of beneficial uses is produced. The evolution, from concept to successful commercial deployment, of the FTE{reg_sign} process for the treatment of natural gas produced water has now been completed. In this document, the histories of two individual commercial deployments of the FTE{reg_sign} process are discussed. In Wyoming, as in many other states, the permitting and regulation of oil and gas produced water disposal and/or treatment facilities depend upon the legal relationship between owners of the facility and the owners of wells from which the water is produced. An ''owner-operated'' facility is regulated by the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) and is defined as an entity which only processes water which comes from the wells in fields of which they have an equity interest. However, if a facility processes water from wells in which the owners of the facility have no equity interest, the facility is considered a ''commercial'' facility and is permitted and regulated by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. For this reason, of the two commercial FTE{reg_sign} process deployments discussed in this document, one is related to an ''owner-operated'' facility, and the other relates to a ''commercial'' facility. Case 1 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance of the FTE{reg_sign} process at an ''owner-operated'' facility located in the Jonah Field of southwestern Wyoming. This facility was originally owned by the McMurry Oil Company and was later purchased by the Alberta Energy Company (now EnCana). Case 2 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance at a ''commercial'' FTE{reg_sign} facility located in the Great Divide Basin of south central Wyoming. Permits required for the construction and operation of each facility are described in detail. The respective qualities of each feed water, treated water, and concentrate stream are presented along with the relative yields of treated water and concentrate at each facility. Treated water from the owner-operated facility has been beneficially used in drilling and dust abatement, and treated water from the commercial facility has been used for dust abatement, construction, and land application. The permitting requirements and evaluation of beneficial use of the water at each facility are discussed. The results of this research confirm that the FTE{reg_sign} process is economic at a commercial-scale for the treatment and disposal of natural gas produced water in Wyoming. Further, the treated water produced from the process is of a quality suitable for beneficial uses such as irrigation, drilling mix, wildlife or livestock watering, and/or dust abatement on local roads.

James A. Sorensen; John Boysen; Deidre Boysen; Tim Larson

2002-10-01

329

Atmospheric emissions from the Deepwater Horizon spill constrain air-water partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fate of deepwater releases of gas and oil mixtures is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual hydrocarbon species; these attributes determine partitioning between air and water. Quantifying this partitioning is necessary to constrain simulations of gas and oil transport, to predict marine bioavailability of different fractions of the gas-oil mixture, and to develop a comprehensive picture of the fate of leaked hydrocarbons in the marine environment. Analysis of airborne atmospheric data shows massive amounts (˜258,000 kg/day) of hydrocarbons evaporating promptly from the Deepwater Horizon spill; these data collected during two research flights constrain air-water partitioning, thus bioavailability and fate, of the leaked fluid. This analysis quantifies the fraction of surfacing hydrocarbons that dissolves in the water column (˜33% by mass), the fraction that does not dissolve, and the fraction that evaporates promptly after surfacing (˜14% by mass). We do not quantify the leaked fraction lacking a surface expression; therefore, calculation of atmospheric mass fluxes provides a lower limit to the total hydrocarbon leak rate of 32,600 to 47,700 barrels of fluid per day, depending on reservoir fluid composition information. This study demonstrates a new approach for rapid-response airborne assessment of future oil spills.

Ryerson, T. B.; Aikin, K. C.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.-S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Lueb, R. A.; Meinardi, S.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Stark, H.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.

2011-04-01

330

Multispectral remote sensing contribution to land surface evaporation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The global water cycle is perhaps the most important of all the biogeochemical cycles and evaporation, which is a significant component of the water cycle, is also linked with the energy and carbon cycles. Long-term evaporation over large areas has generally been computed as the difference of precipitation and river runoff. Analysis of short-term evaporation rate and its spatial pattern, however, is extremely complex, and multispectral remotely sensed data could aid in such analysis. Multispectral data considered here are visible and near-infrared reflectances, infrared surface temperature and the 37 GHz brightness temperatures. These observations are found to be not totally independent of each other. A few of their relationships are established and discussed considering physically-based models.

Choudhury, B. J.

1990-01-01

331

Dynamics of capillary drying in water.  

PubMed

We use atomistic simulations to address the question when capillary evaporation of water confined in a hydrocarbonlike slit is kinetically viable. Activation barriers and absolute rates of evaporation are estimated using open ensemble Monte Carlo-umbrella sampling and molecular dynamics simulations. At ambient conditions, the evaporation rate in a water film four molecular diameters thick is found to be of the order 10(5)(nm(2) s)(-1), meaning that water readily evaporates. Films more than a few nanometers thick will persist in a metastable liquid state. Dissolved atmospheric gas molecules do not significantly decrease the activation barrier. PMID:12633299

Leung, Kevin; Luzar, Alenka; Bratko, Dusan

2003-02-14

332

Early Pan-African evolution of the basement around Elat, Israel, and the Sinai Peninsula revealed by single-zircon evaporation dating, and implications for crustal accretion rates  

SciTech Connect

The authors report {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb single-zircon evaporation ages for early Pan-African rocks from southern Israel and the northeastern Sinai Peninsula, the northernmost extension of the Arabian-Nubian shield. The oldest rocks are metamorphic schists of presumed island-arc derivation; detrital zircons date the source terrain at ca. 800-820 Ma. A major phase of tonalite-trondhjemite plutonism occurred at ca. 760-780 Ma; more evolved granitic rocks were emplaced at about 745 Ma. A metagabbro-metadiorite complex reflects the youngest igneous phase at ca. 640 Ma. We find no evidence for pre-Pan-African crust, and our data document important crust-forming events that correlate with similar episodes elsewhere in the shield. The widespread presence of early Pan-African juvenile rocks (i.e., ca. 760-850 Ma) in many parts of the Arabian-Nubian shield makes this period the most important in the magmatic history of the shield and supports earlier suggestions for unusually high crust-production rates.

Kroener, A. (Universitaet Mainz, Postfach (West Germany)); Eyal, M.; Eyal, Y. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer Sheva (Israel))

1990-06-01

333

Simulations of water transport through carbon nanotubes: how different water models influence the conduction rate.  

PubMed

The conduction rate of water through (8,8) and (9,9) carbon nanotubes at 300 K and a pressure difference of 220 MPa is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4P/2005 water models are considered. The pressure-driven flow rate is found to be strongly model dependent for both nanotubes. The fastest model (TIP3P) has a flow rate that is approximately five times faster than the slowest (TIP4P/2005). It is shown that the flow rate is significantly influenced by the structure taken on by the water molecules confined in the nanotube channels. The slower models, TIP4P/2005 and SPC/E, tend to favor stacked ring arrangements, with the molecules of a ring moving together through the nanotube, in what we term a "cluster-by-cluster" conduction mode. Confined TIP3P water has a much weaker tendency to form ring structures, and those that do form are fragile and break apart under flow conditions. This creates a much faster "diffusive" conduction mode where the water molecules mainly move through the tube as individual particles, rather than as components of a larger cluster. Our results demonstrate that water models developed to describe the properties of bulk water can behave very differently in confined situations. PMID:25399183

Liu, L; Patey, G N

2014-11-14

334

Application of thermal model for pan evaporation to the hydrology of a defined medium, the sponge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique is presented which estimates pan evaporation from the commonly observed values of daily maximum and minimum air temperatures. These two variables are transformed to saturation vapor pressure equivalents which are used in a simple linear regression model. The model provides reasonably accurate estimates of pan evaporation rates over a large geographic area. The derived evaporation algorithm is combined with precipitation to obtain a simple moisture variable. A hypothetical medium with a capacity of 8 inches of water is initialized at 4 inches. The medium behaves like a sponge: it absorbs all incident precipitation, with runoff or drainage occurring only after it is saturated. Water is lost from this simple system through evaporation just as from a Class A pan, but at a rate proportional to its degree of saturation. The contents of the sponge is a moisture index calculated from only the maximum and minium temperatures and precipitation.

Trenchard, M. H.; Artley, J. A. (principal investigators)

1981-01-01

335

Phosphorus: a rate limiting nutrient in surface waters.  

PubMed

Phosphorus is an essential element for all life forms. It is a mineral nutrient. Orthophosphate is the only form of P that autotrophs can assimilate. Extracellular enzymes hydrolyze organic forms of P to phosphate. Eutrophication is the over-enrichment of surface waters with mineral nutrients. The results are excessive production of autotrophs, especially algae and cyanobacteria. This high productivity leads to high bacterial populations and high respiration rates, leading to hypoxia or anoxia in poorly mixed bottom waters and at night in surface waters during calm, warm conditions. Low dissolved oxygen causes the loss of aquatic animals and the release of many materials normally bound to bottom sediments, including various forms of P. This release of P reinforces the eutrophication. Excessive concentrations of P is the most common cause of eutrophication in freshwater lakes, reservoirs, streams, and in the headwaters of estuarine systems. In the ocean, N is believed to usually be the key mineral nutrient controlling primary production. Estuaries and continental shelf waters are a transition zone, in which excessive P and N create problems. It is best to measure and regulate total P inputs to whole aquatic ecosystems, but for an easy assay it is best to measure total P concentrations, including particulate P, in surface waters or N:P atomic ratios in phytoplankton. PMID:10228963

Correll, D L

1999-05-01

336

A phylogenetic analysis of basal metabolism, total evaporative water loss, and life-history among foxes from desert and mesic regions.  

PubMed

We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) of species of foxes that exist on the Arabian Peninsula, Blanford's fox (Vulpes cana) and two subspecies of Red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Combining these data with that on other canids from the literature, we searched for specialization of physiological traits among desert foxes using both conventional least squares regression and regressions based on phylogenetic independent contrasts. Further, we explored the consequences of reduced body size of foxes on life history parameters such as litter size and neonate mass. For Blanford's foxes, Red foxes from the central desert of Arabia, and Red foxes from the more mesic Asir mountains, body mass averaged 1,285 +/- 52 g, 1,967 +/- 289 g, and 3,060 +/- 482 g, respectively, whereas mean BMR, during summer, was 304.5 +/- 32.3 kJ/day, 418.0 +/- 32.4 kJ/day, and 724.1 +/- 120.2 kJ/day (+/- SD). An analysis of covariance with body mass as a covariate showed no statistical differences in BMR among foxes. Analysis of covariance indicated that Red fox from the Asir mountains had a higher TEWL than Red foxes from central Arabia or than Blanford's foxes also from the mountains. Comparisons of all species of desert and mesic foxes showed no significant differences in BMR, nor did desert foxes have a significantly lower BMR than other carnivores. TEWL of desert foxes was lower than other more mesic carnivores; deviations in TEWL ranged from -17.7% for the Fennec fox (Fennecus zerda) to -57.4% for the Kit fox (Vulpes velox). Although desert foxes have a BMR comparable to other more mesic species, it appears that desert foxes do have a smaller body mass, lowering overall energy requirements. We attribute this reduction in body size to the "resource limitation hypothesis" whereby natural selection favors smaller individuals in a resource-limited environment, especially during periods of severe food shortage. However, until common garden experiments are performed, developmental plasticity and acclimation cannot be ruled out as contributors to this pattern. PMID:14564467

Williams, J B; Muñoz-Garcia, A; Ostrowski, S; Tieleman, B I

2004-01-01

337

Evaporative losses from soils covered by physical and different types of biological soil crusts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation of soil moisture is one of the most important processes affecting water availability in semiarid ecosystems. Biological soil crusts, which are widely distributed ground cover in these ecosystems, play a recognized role on water processes. Where they roughen surfaces, water residence time and thus infiltration can be greatly enhanced, whereas their ability to clog soil pores or cap the soil surface when wetted can greatly decrease infiltration rate, thus affecting evaporative losses. In this work, we compared evaporation in soils covered by physical crusts, biological crusts in different developmental stages and in the soils underlying the different biological crust types. Our results show that during the time of the highest evaporation (Day 1), there was no difference among any of the crust types or the soils underlying them. On Day 2, when soil moisture was moderately low (11%), evaporation was slightly higher in well-developed biological soil crusts than in physical or poorly developed biological soil crusts. However, crust removal did not cause significant changes in evaporation compared with the respective soil crust type. These results suggest that the small differences we observed in evaporation among crust types could be caused by differences in the properties of the soil underneath the biological crusts. At low soil moisture (<6%), there was no difference in evaporation among crust types or the underlying soils. Water loss for the complete evaporative cycle (from saturation to dry soil) was similar in both crusted and scraped soils. Therefore, we conclude that for the specific crust and soil types tested, the presence or the type of biological soil crust did not greatly modify evaporation with respect to physical crusts or scraped soils.

Chamizo, S.; Cantón, Y.; Domingo, F.; Belnap, J.

2013-01-01

338

Column densities resulting from shuttle sublimator/evaporator operation. [optical density of nozzle flow containing water vapor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proposed disposal of H2O from the shuttle fuel cell operation by ejecting it in vapor form through a supersonic nozzle at the rate of 100 lb/day has been investigated from the point of view of the possible interference to astronomical experiments. If the nozzle is located at the tail and directed along the shuttle longitudinal axis, the resulting column density will be less than 10 to th 12th power molecules/sq cm at viewing angles larger than 48 deg above the longitudinal axis. The molecules in the trail will diffuse rapidly. The column density contribution from molecules expelled on the previous orbit is 1.3 x 10 to the 8th power molecules/sq cm. This contribution diminishes by the inverse square root of the number of orbits since the molecules were expelled. The molecular backscatter from atmospheric molecules is also calculated. If the plume is directed into the flight path, the column density along a perpendicular is found to be 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power molecules/sq cm. The return flux is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 12th power molecules/sq cm/sec at the stagnation point. With reasonable care in design of experiments to protect them from the backscatter flux of water molecules, the expulsion of 100 lb/day does not appear to create an insurmountable difficulty for the shuttle experiments.

Naumann, R. J.

1973-01-01

339

Changes in wintertime evaporation and surface energy budget in 2007 and 2008 over an open water surface in Mississippi, U.S.A  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using data measured from an eddy covariance system during two winters in 2007 and 2008, we examined how synoptic weather events affect wintertime evaporation and surface energy budget over an open water surface. The measurements were conducted in the Ross Barnett reservoir (32o26’N, 90o02’W), Mississippi, U.S.A. The fetch for the eddy covariance system exceeded 2 km in all directions and the water depth is about 4 m around the flux tower. Synoptic weather events determine large-scale meteorological properties of air masses passing over water. Cold and dry air masses promote sensible and latent heat exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. Warm and wet air masses suppress the vertical temperature and humidity gradients and dampen exchange of sensible and latent heat exchange. Therefore, day-to-day variations in sensible and latent heat fluxes are strongly influenced by synoptic weather patterns in wintertime. Analysis of meteorological data and synoptic charts indicates that there were more cold front activities in the 2007 wintertime than in the 2008 wintertime. Our results indicate that sensible and latent heat fluxes in the 2007 winter are about 27% and 36% higher than those in the 2008 wintertime, respectively. These results suggest that future potential changes in cold front activities (intensity, frequency, and duration) may lead to substantial shifts in regional energy budget and hydrological balance in the southern regions with an abundance of open water bodies (e.g., lakes, reservoirs, swamps etc).

Liu, H.; Zhang, Y.

2009-12-01

340

Evaporation from Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, March 2010 through February 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation from Lake Mead was measured using the eddy-covariance method for the 2-year period starting March 2010 and ending February 2012. When corrected for energy imbalances, annual eddy-covariance evaporation was 2,074 and 1,881 millimeters (81.65 and 74.07 inches), within the range of previous estimates. There was a 9-percent decrease in the evaporation rate and a 10-percent increase in the lake surface area during the second year of the study compared to the first. These offsetting factors resulted in a nearly identical 720 million cubic meters (584,000 acre feet) evaporation volume for both years. Monthly evaporation rates were best correlated with wind speed, vapor pressure difference, and atmospheric stability. Differences between individual monthly evaporation and mean monthly evaporation were as much as 20 percent. Net radiation provided most of the energy available for evaporative processes; however, advected heat from the Colorado River was an important energy source during the second year of the study. Peak evaporation lagged peak net radiation by 2 months because a larger proportion of the net radiation that reaches the lake goes to heating up the water column during the spring and summer months. As most of this stored energy is released, higher evaporation rates are sustained during fall months even though net radiation declines. The release of stored heat also fueled nighttime evaporation, which accounted for 37 percent of total evaporation. The annual energy-balance ratio was 0.90 on average and varied only 0.01 between the 2 years, thus implying that 90 percent of estimated available energy was accounted for by turbulent energy measured using the eddy-covariance method. More than 90 percent of the turbulent-flux source area represented the open-water surface, and 94 percent of 30-minute turbulent-flux measurements originated from wind directions where the fetch ranged from 2,000 to 16,000 meters. Evaporation uncertainties were estimated to be 5 to 7 percent. A secondary evaporation method, the Bowen ratio energy budget method, also was employed to measure evaporation from Lake Mead primarily as a validation of eddy-covariance evaporation measurements at annual timescales. There was good agreement between annual corrected eddy-covariance and Bowen ratio energy budget evaporation estimates, providing strong validation of these two largely independent methods. Annual Bowen ratio energy budget evaporation was 6 and 8 percent greater than eddy-covariance evaporation for the 2 study years, and both methods indicated there was a similar decrease in evaporation from the first to the second year. Both methods produced negative sensible heat fluxes during the same months, and there was a strong correlation between monthly Bowen ratios (R2 = 0.94). The correlation between monthly evaporation (R2 = 0.65), however, was not as strong. Monthly differences in evaporation were attributed primarily to heat storage estimate uncertainty.

Moreo, Michael T.; Swancar, Amy

2013-01-01

341

Numerical study of evaporation-induced salt accumulation and precipitation in bare saline soils: Mechanism and feedback  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

from bare saline soils in coastal wetlands causes salt precipitation in the form of efflorescence and subflorescence. However, it is not clear how much the precipitated salt in turn affects the water transport in the soil and hence the evaporation rate. We hypothesized that efflorescence exerts a mulching resistance to evaporation, while subflorescence reduces the pore space for water vapor to move through the soil. A numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of water, solute, and heat in the soil, and resulting evaporation and salt precipitation with the hypothesized feedback mechanism incorporated. The model was applied to simulate four evaporation experiments in soil columns with and without a fixed shallow water table, and was found to replicate well the experimental observations. The simulated results indicated that as long as the hydraulic connection between the near surface soil layer and the water source in the interior soil layer exists, vaporization occurs near the surface, and salt precipitates exclusively as efflorescence. When such hydraulic connection is absent, the vaporization plane develops downward and salt precipitates as subflorescence. Being more substantial in quantity, efflorescent affects more significantly evaporation than subflorescence during the soil-drying process. Different evaporation stages based on the location of the vaporization plane and the state of salt accumulation can be identified for characterizing the process of evaporation from bare saline soils with or without a fixed shallow water table.

Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

2014-10-01

342

Evaporation control research, 1959-60  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two hundred and forty-five dispersions of long-chain alkanols were formulated by using various emulsifiers and alkanols. The dispensing and spreading ability of each of these formulations was tested. The most promising emulsifier that could be used with any of the alkanols was glyceryl monostearate (self-emulsifying). However, the concentration of the alkanol in the dispersion form varied somewhat: with the length of the carbon chain. A maximum concentration of 16 percent was obtained using the longer chain alkanols in the dispersion form without losing any of the properties of a fluid. Nine field tests were undertaken on small stock tanks. The retardant materials used in these tests were dodecanol, hexadecanol, and octadecanol. These materials were applied in either liquid or dispersion form. Four types of dispensing equipment were tested. The first type used a pressure system which sprayed a liquid onto the surface of the water. An anemometer and wind-controlled vane, operated by an electrical system, determined the length End frequency of application. The second type was similar to the first except that gravity was utilized to force the liquid onto the surface. The third type. used a drip system with rates of about 10 drops per minute. The fourth type used a gravity feed and a wind-controlled valve which allowed the dispersion material to flow onto the surface of the water when the wind was in the proper direction. In the field tests, the best reduction in evaporation was obtained using octadecanol in dispersion form and dispensed with the wind-controlled valve and gravity feed system. The maximum reduction in evaporation for a 2-week period was 27 percent. However, the economics of suppressing evaporation from stock tanks is questionable because of the short travel time across the tank by the film. There are still many problems unsolved. Some of these can be resolved in the laboratory whereas others can be resolved only in the field. Some of the more serious problems are the effect of impurities in the alkanols; the rate of cooling of the alkanol from a liquid to a solid state ; the effect of the film on the exchange of water molecules between the air and water; whether the film remains effective in suppressing evaporation for any rate of movement downwind; and the possible use of dodecanol and eicosanol as suppressants.

U.S. Geological Survey

1963-01-01

343

Estimation of vine and inter-row transpiration/evaporation for improved water management using remote sensing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In California, there is concerted effort to improve water management of irrigated croplands, which requires the development of tools and technologies for monitoring water use and improving irrigation efficiency at both the field and regional scale. California grows many different crops, and devotes ...

344

Effects of acute fresh water exposure on water flux rates and osmotic responses in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Water flux rates and osmotic responses of Kemp's Ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi) acutely exposed to fresh water were quantified. Salt-water adapted turtles were exposed to fresh water for 4 d before being returned to salt water. During the initial salt water phase, absolute and relative water flux rates were 1.2+/-0.1 l d(-1) and 123.0+/-6.8 ml kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. When turtles were exposed to fresh water, rates increased by approximately 30%. Upon return to salt water, rates decreased to original levels. Plasma osmolality, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) decreased during exposure to fresh water, and subsequently increased during the return to salt water. The Na(+):K(+) ratio was elevated during the fresh water phase and subsequently decreased upon return to salt water. Aldosterone and corticosterone were not altered during exposure to fresh water. Elevated water flux rates during fresh water exposure reflected an increase in water consumption, resulting in a decrease in ionic and osmotic concentrations. The lack of a change in adrenocorticoids to acute fresh water exposure suggests that adrenal responsiveness to an hypo-osmotic environment may be delayed in marine turtles when compared to marine mammals.

Ortiz, R. M.; Patterson, R. M.; Wade, C. E.; Byers, F. M.

2000-01-01

345

Time-resolved interference unveils nanoscale surface dynamics in evaporating sessile droplet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a simple optical technique to measure time-resolved nanoscale surface profile of an evaporating sessile fluid droplet. By analyzing the high contrast Newton-ring like dynamical fringes formed by interfering Fresnel reflections, we demonstrated ?/100 ? 5 nm sensitivity in surface height (at 0.01-160 nm/s rate) of an evaporating water drop. The remarkably high sensitivity allowed us to precisely measure its transient surface dynamics during contact-line slips, weak perturbations on the evaporation due to external magnetic field and partial confinement of the drop. Further, we measured evaporation dynamics of a sessile water drop on soft deformable surface to demonstrate wide applicability of this technique.

Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

2014-06-01

346

Evaporation in stratiform rain and its radar measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of the total rainfall received on earth's surface, a large amount is stratiform, which has a long lifespan, light to moderate intensity, and is horizontally widespread. Steady state solutions have been sought using both one- and two-dimensional numerical models to simulate rain evaporation in the lower levels of stratiform regions. Two 1-D models are developed. The first one does not consider the vertical air velocity and uses prescribed steady temperature and moisture profiles. An analytical approximation of rain evaporation is derived for this case. Another more realistic 1-D model solves for the steady state vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and raindrop size distribution (RDSD) explicitly for a prescribed, steady, vertical air velocity profile. Both of the 1-D models show that the RDSD changes systematically due to evaporation, especially at the small size end. The variations of RDSDs due to evaporation are applied to radar rainfall measurement. It is shown that the detection of the rain evaporation using the vertical profile of radar reflectivity (Z) is possible. However, when the environment is moist and/or rainfall rate (R) is high, vertical variations of radar reflectivity may fall below the detection threshold of the radar. Furthermore, the empirical Z-R relation used to estimate rainfall rate changes systematically with height because of the variation of RDSD. Significant errors may result if a fixed Z-R relation is used to estimate rainfall rate or rain evaporation amount. The dynamical interactions between rain evaporation and mesoscale downdraft are studied using a 2-D model. The simulated magnitudes of downdraft and cooling rate due to rain evaporation agree well with observations. The 2-D simulations also reveal the details of the 2-D structures of the buoyancy force and pressure gradient force, which are not easily observable. Sensitivity tests with the 2-D model show that rainfall rate is the most important parameter which determines the cooling and downdraft strength in stratiform region. The cooling and downward mass transport in stratiform regions over the tropical areas may be estimated fairly accurately from the knowledge of the duration, coverage, and rainfall rate of the stratiform rain. These can be easily observed by, for example, a space-borne radar.

Li, Xiaowen

2002-01-01

347

Tear film dynamics with evaporation and osmolarity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a model problem for the evaporation and breakup up of tear film. The model includes the effects of surface tension, Marangoni stresses, insoluble surfactant transport, evaporation, osmolarity transport, osmosis and wetting of corneal surface. Evaporation is made dependent on surface concentration in order to mimic the lipid layer of the tear film when there is a single fluid layer in the model. In many cases for a single layer, the Marangoni effect seems to eliminate a localized area of increased evaporation due to reduced surfactant concentration. In this model the osmolarity in the tear film increases because of average evaporation rate rather than by a locally increased evaporation rate. If time permits, the effect of having a second fluid layer, representing the lipid layer, will be explored as well.

Siddique, Javed; Braun, Richard

2011-11-01

348

The Relation of External Evaporative Conditions to the Drying of Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaporation from laboratory soil columns was studied as a function of potential evaporative conditions. The length of time a given evaporation rate could be maintained by the soil was in good agreement with an approximate solution of the isothermal equation for unsatu- rated flow. During the falling-rate period of drying, the evaporation rate was found to approach very nearly a

W. R. Gardner; D. I. Hillel

1962-01-01

349

Use of the Priestley-Taylor evaporation equation for soil water limited conditions in a small forest clearcut  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Priestley-Taylor equation, a simplification of the Penman equation, was used to allow calculations of evapotranspiration under conditions where soil water supply limits evapotranspiration. The Priestley-Taylor coefficient, ??, was calculated to incorporate an exponential decrease in evapotranspiration as soil water content decreases. The method is appropriate for use when detailed meteorological measurements are not available. The data required to determine the parameter for the ?? coefficient are net radiation, soil heat flux, average air temperature, and soil water content. These values can be obtained from measurements or models. The dataset used in this report pertains to a partially vegetated clearcut forest site in southwest Oregon with soil depths ranging from 0.48 to 0.70 m and weathered bedrock below that. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the Bowen ratio method, and the calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient was fitted to these estimates by nonlinear regression. The calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?????) was found to be approximately 0.9 when the soil was near field capacity (0.225 cm3 cm-3). It was not until soil water content was less than 0.14 cm3 cm-3 that soil water supply limited evapotranspiration. The soil reached a final residual water content near 0.05 cm3 cm-3 at the end of the growing season. ?? 1991.

Flint, A.L.; Childs, S.W.

1991-01-01

350

Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the  

E-print Network

#12;Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the Bridge..................................................................................... 6 3.1.4 Water Clarity................................................................................... 12 3.2.4 Water Clarity

351

Water and acrylamide monomer transfer rates from a settling basin to groundwaters  

E-print Network

11356-014-3106-2 #12;2 Key word: Acrylamide; Water transfer rate; Clogged layer; Groundwater 11 Water and acrylamide monomer transfer rates from a settling basin to groundwaters Stéphane Binet that the water and the Acrylamide transfer rate are not controlled by the spreading of the clogged layer until

Boyer, Edmond

352

Mathematical models of water application for a variable rate irrigating hill-seeder  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder can adjust water application automatically according to the difference in soil moisture content in the field to alleviate drought and save water. Two key problems to realize variable rate water application are how to determine the right amount of water for the ...

353

FIELD TEST OF THE WATER-WHEEL IR (WIR) SPECTROMETER ON EVAPORATIVE SALT DEPOSITS AT TIBETAN PLATEAU. P. Sobron, J. J. Freeman, Alian Wang, Dept Earth and Planetary Sciences  

E-print Network

FIELD TEST OF THE WATER-WHEEL IR (WIR) SPECTROMETER ON EVAPORATIVE SALT DEPOSITS AT TIBETAN PLATEAU will be made at short distance (~ cm). Another way is to deploy a WIR unit onto any desired surface (rock playa (Fig. 2), on Tibetan Plateau (China) in the fall 2008. The climatic conditions and salt mineral

354

The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: II. Evaporation estimates from beech and grass Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 607613 (2005) EGU  

E-print Network

The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: II. Evaporation estimates from beech and grass 607 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 607613 (2005) © EGU The impact74 4QU, UK Email for corresponding author: jro@ceh.ac.uk Abstract The impact on recharge to the Chalk

Boyer, Edmond

355

Drop evaporation on superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces driven by contact line dynamics.  

PubMed

In the present study, we experimentally study the evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile drops of water on highly hydrophobic surfaces (contact angle ?160°), heated to temperatures ranging between 40° and 70 °C. These surfaces were initially constructed by means of controlled tailoring of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The evaporation of droplets was observed to occur in three distinct phases, which were the same for the different substrate temperatures. The drops started to evaporate in the constant contact radius (CCR) mode, then switched to a more complex mode characterized by a set of stick-slip events accompanied by a decrease in contact angle, and finally shifted to a mixed mode in which the contact radius and contact angle decreased simultaneously until the drops had completely evaporated. It is shown that in the case of superhydrophobic surfaces, the energy barriers (per unit length) associated with the stick-slip motion of a drop ranges in the nJ m(-1) scale. Furthermore, analysis of the evaporation rates, determined from experimental data show that, even in the CCR mode, a linear relationship between V(2/3) and the evaporation time is verified. The values of the evaporation rate constants are found to be higher in the pinned contact line regime (the CCR mode) than in the moving contact line regime. This behavior is attributed to the drop's higher surface to volume ratio in the CCR mode. PMID:25460699

Ramos, S M M; Dias, J F; Canut, B

2015-02-15

356

Energy expenditure in relation to flight speed: whay is the power of mass loss rate estimates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between mass loss rate and chemical power in Eying birds is analysed with regard to water and heat balance. Two models are presented: the first model is applicable to situations where heat loads are moderate, i.e. when heat balance can be achieved by regulating non-evaporative heat loss, and evaporative water loss is minimised. The second model is applicable

A. Kvist; M. R. J. Klaassen; A. Lindström

1998-01-01

357

The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

E-print Network

and uniformly to the nickel metal foam flow-field (element for distributing the reactant gases over the surface of the electrodes) on the anode side from which water can migrate to the cathode side of the cell via electroosmotic drag. For an effective overall...

Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

2009-06-02

358

Hot, dry, & windy: The impacts of strongly advective conditions on measurements of evaporative water loss from irrigated croplands  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

As the demand for water has grown in recent years, balancing the needs of urban, rural, and agricultural communities has become formidable task, particularly in the western United States where more than 70% of the freshwater supply is used for irrigated agriculture. To ensure there is sufficient wat...

359

The carbon isotope behaviour during sea water evaporation in salinas as related to the biogeochemical cycle of carbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field measurements and sampling of hypersaline solutions have been realized in the salinas of Santa Pola (Spain) during June 2000 and May 2001. We have followed the geochemical and isotopic evolutions of the solutions along the sea water evaporitic pathway and during a nycthemeral cycle in four evaporitic basins (two carbonate basins, one gypsum basin and one halite basin). There

C. Pierre; J. Pueyo Mur; B. Fritz

2004-01-01

360

Comparative rates of wind versus water erosion from a small semiarid watershed in southern Arizona, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We simultaneously measured and compared wind and water erosion rates over 2 yrs. The rates of water erosion greatly exceeded rates of wind erosion during the 2 years. Measurements of the wind flux sediment cannot be considered as soil erosion rates.

Y.-G. Zhang; M. A. Nearing; B. Y. Liu; R. S. van Pelt; J. J. Stone; H. Wei; R. L. Scott

2011-01-01

361

Micro loop heat pipe evaporator coherent pore structures  

E-print Network

energy from a high heat flux source, the heat removal performance of heat pipes cannot be predicted well since a first principles of evaporation has not been established. An evaporation model based on statistical rate theory has been recently suggested...

Alexseev, Alexandre Viktorovich

2005-02-17

362

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A 127 (2000) 8187 Effects of acute fresh water exposure on water flux rates  

E-print Network

to fresh water were quantified. Salt-water adapted turtles were exposed to fresh water for 4 d before being in sea turtles may be adrenocortically mediated. In another group of marine adapted reptiles, sea snakes exposure on water flux rates and osmotic responses in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi ) Rudy

Ortiz, Rudy M.

363

Estimation of water turnover rates of captive West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) held in fresh and salt water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) to move between fresh and salt water raises the question of whether manatees drink salt water. Water turnover rates were estimated in captive West Indian manatees using the deuterium oxide dilution technique. Rates were quantified in animals using four experimental treatments: (1) held in fresh water and fed lettuce (N=4), (2) held in salt water and fed lettuce (N=2), (3) acutely exposed to salt water and fed lettuce (N=4), and (4) chronically exposed to salt water with limited access to fresh water and fed sea grass (N=5). Animals held in fresh water had the highest turnover rates (145+/-12 ml kg-1 day-1) (mean +/- s.e.m.). Animals acutely exposed to salt water decreased their turnover rate significantly when moved into salt water (from 124+/-15 to 65+/-15 ml kg-1 day-1) and subsequently increased their turnover rate upon re-entry to fresh water (146+/-19 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water had significantly lower turnover rates (21+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1) compared with animals held in salt water and fed lettuce (45+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water and fed sea grass had very low turnover rates compared with manatees held in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drank large volumes of water, which may make them susceptible to hyponatremia if access to a source of Na+ is not provided.

Ortiz, R. M.; Worthy, G. A.; Byers, F. M.

1999-01-01

364

Evaporation of charged bosonic condensate in cosmology  

E-print Network

Cosmological evolution of equilibrium plasma with a condensate of U(1)-charged bosonic field is considered. It is shown that the evaporation of the condensate is very much different from naive expectations, discussed in the literature, as well as from evaporation of non-equilibrium neutral condensate. The charged condensate evaporates much slower than the decay of the corresponding bosons. The evaporation rate is close to that of the cosmological expansion. The plasma temperature, in contrast, drops much faster than usually, namely as the third power of the cosmological scale factor. As a result the universe becomes very cold and the cosmological charge asymmetry reaches a huge value.

A. D. Dolgov; F. R. Urban

2005-05-30

365

Effects of drinking water temperature on water consumption, respiration rates, and body temperatures of lactating Holstein cows in summer  

E-print Network

EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by JEFFREY KENT LANHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis...

Lanham, Jeffrey Kent

2012-06-07

366

The formation rate of North Atlantic Deep Water and Eighteen Degree Water calculated from CFC11 inventories observed during WOCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of man-made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in subsurface water masses is directly related to their formation rate, and the water mass formation rate can be calculated from its CFC inventory. CFC-11 inventories between 65°N and 10°S in the Atlantic Ocean have been calculated for Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) and the components of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) from data collected

Deborah A. LeBel; William M. Smethie Jr.; Monika Rhein; Dagmar Kieke; Rana A. Fine; John L. Bullister; Dong-Ha Min; Wolfgang Roether; Ray F. Weiss; Chantal Andrié; Denise Smythe-Wright; E. Peter Jones

2008-01-01

367

CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION FOR THERMALLY UNEQUILIBRATED PHASES  

E-print Network

CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION FOR THERMALLY UNEQUILIBRATED PHASES R. A. Marcus1 , A. V. Fedkin2-K) equation for the rate of condensation of a gas or evaporation of a solid or liquid is used for systems, Tg, differs from that of the condensed phase, Ts . Here, we modify the H-K equation for this case

Grossman, Lawrence

368

High-rate synthetic aperture communications in shallow water.  

PubMed

Time reversal communication exploits spatial diversity to achieve spatial and temporal focusing in complex ocean environments. Spatial diversity can be provided easily by a vertical array in a waveguide. Alternatively, spatial diversity can be obtained from a virtual horizontal array generated by two elements, a transmitter and a receiver, due to relative motion between them, referred to as a synthetic aperture. This paper presents coherent synthetic aperture communication results from at-sea experiments conducted in two different frequency bands: (1) 2-4 kHz and (2) 8-20 kHz. Case (1) employs binary-phase shift-keying modulation, while case (2) involves up to eight-phase shift keying modulation with a data rate of 30 kbits/s divided by the number of transmissions (diversity) to be accumulated. The receiver utilizes time reversal diversity combining followed by a single channel equalizer, with frequent channel updates to accommodate the time-varying channel due to coupling of space and time in the presence of motion. Two to five consecutive transmissions from a source moving at 4 kts over 3-6 km range in shallow water are combined successfully after Doppler compensation, confirming the feasibility of coherent synthetic aperture communications using time reversal. PMID:20000919

Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Akal, T; Stevenson, M

2009-12-01

369

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Evaporation and their Relations with Precipitation, Net Radiation, and Net Carbon Accumulation for the Gediz Basin Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model combining the rate of carbon assimilation with water and energy balance equations has been run using satellite and ancillary data for a period of 60 months (January 1986 to December 1990). Calculations for the Gediz basin area give mean annual evaporation as 395 mm, which is composed of 45% transpiration, 42% soil evaporation and 13% interception. The coefficient of interannual variation of evaporation is found to be 6%, while that for precipitation and net radiation are, respectively, 16% and 2%, illustrating that net radiation has an important effect in modulating interannual variation of evaporation. The mean annual water use efficiency (i.e., the ratio of net carbon accumulation and total evaporation) is ca. 1 g/sq m/mm, and has a coefficient of interannual variation of 5%. A comparison of the mean water use efficiency with field observations suggests that evaporation over the area is utilized well for biomass production. The reference crop evaporation for irrigated areas has annual mean and coefficient of variation as, respectively, 1176 mm and 3%. The total evaporation during three summer months of peak evaporation (June-August) is estimated to be about 575 mm for irrigated crops like maize and cotton. Seasonal variations of the fluxes are presented.

Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

1999-01-01

370

Contribution of impervious surfaces to urban evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

data and the Princeton urban canopy model, with its detailed representation of urban heterogeneity and hydrological processes, are combined to study evaporation and turbulent water vapor transport over urban areas. The analyses focus on periods before and after precipitation events, at two sites in the Northeastern United States. Our results indicate that while evaporation from concrete pavements, building rooftops, and asphalt surfaces is discontinuous and intermittent, overall these surfaces accounted for nearly 18% of total latent heat fluxes (LE) during a relatively wet 10 day period. More importantly, these evaporative fluxes have a significant impact on the urban surface energy balance, particularly during the 48 h following a rain event when impervious evaporation is the highest. Thus, their accurate representation in urban models is critical. Impervious evaporation after rainfall is also shown to correlate the sources of heat and water at the earth surface, resulting in a conditional scalar transport similarity over urban terrain following rain events.

Ramamurthy, P.; Bou-Zeid, E.

2014-04-01

371

Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders  

SciTech Connect

Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01

372

Detection of zinc and lead in water using evaporative preconcentration and single-particle laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)-based measurement method for metals in water is demonstrated. In the presented technology a small amount of sodium chloride is dissolved in the sample solution before spraying the sample into a tubular oven. After water removal monodisperse dry NaCl aerosol particles are formed where trace metals are present as additives. A single-particle LIBS analysis is then triggered with a scattering based particle detection system. Benefits are the highly increased metal concentration in the LIBS focal volume and the static NaCl-matrix which can be exploited in the signal processing procedure. Emitted light from the emerged plasma plume is collected with wide angle optics and dispersed with a grating spectrometer. In an aqueous solution, the respective limits of detection for zinc and lead were 0.3 ppm and 0.1 ppm using a relatively low 14 mJ laser pulse energy. Zn/Na peak intensity ratio calibration curve for zinc concentration was also determined and LIBS signal dependence on laser pulse energy was investigated.

Järvinen, Samu T.; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

2013-08-01

373

Evaporator Cleaning Studies  

SciTech Connect

Operation of the 242-16H High Level Waste Evaporator proves crucial to liquid waste management in the H-Area Tank Farm. Recent operational history of the Evaporator showed significant solid formation in secondary lines and in the evaporator pot. Additional samples remain necessary to ensure material identity in the evaporator pot. Analysis of these future samples will provide actinide partitioning information and dissolution characteristics of the solid material from the pot to ensure safe chemical cleaning.

Wilmarth, W.R.

1999-04-15

374

PLANNING WATER SUPPLY: COST-RATE DIFFERENTIALS AND PLUMBING PERMITS  

EPA Science Inventory

This study is concerned with measuring the cost of water supply and net revenue differences among customers by user class and location, and analyzing future water demand on the basis of plumbing permit application data. For water supply, a methodology based upon engineering princ...

375

Alternative methods for the reduction of evaporation: practical exercises for the science classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Across the world, freshwater is valued as the most critically important natural resource, as it is required to sustain the cycle of life. Evaporation is one of the primary environmental processes that can reduce the amount of quality water available for use in industrial, agricultural and household applications. The effect of evaporation becomes intensified especially during conditions of drought, particularly in traditionally arid and semi-arid regions, such as those seen in a number of countries over the past ten years. In order to safeguard against the influence of droughts and to save water from being lost to the evaporative process, numerous water saving mechanisms have been developed and tested over the past century. Two of the most successful and widely used mechanisms have included floating hard covers and chemical film monolayers. This article describes a laboratory based project developed for senior high school and first year university classes, which has been designed to introduce students to the concepts of evaporation, evaporation modelling and water loss mitigation. Specifically, these ideas are delivered by simulating the large scale deployment of both monolayers and floating hard covers on a small water tank under numerous user defined atmospheric and hydrodynamic conditions, including varying surface wind speeds and underwater bubble plumes set to changing flow rates.

Schouten, Peter; Putland, Sam; Lemckert, Charles J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Downs, Nathan

2012-03-01

376

NISTIR 5873 INTRACYCLE EVAPORATIVE  

E-print Network

NISTIR 5873 INTRACYCLE EVAPORATIVE COOLING INA VAPOR COMPRESSION CYCLE Byung Soon Kim Piotr A INTRACYCLE EVAPORATIVE COOLING IN A VAPOR COMPRESSION CYCLE Elyung Soon Kim Piotr A. Domanski September 1996 the opportunity to limit throttling losses of the refrigeration cycle by intracycle evaporative cooling

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

377

Analysis of the climate variability on Lake Nasser evaporation based on the Bowen ratio energy budget method.  

PubMed

Variations in lake evaporation have a significant impact on the energy and water budgets of lakes. Understanding these variations and the role of climate is important for water resources management as well as predicting future changes in lake hydrology as a result of climate change. This study presents a comprehensive, 10-year analysis of seasonal, intraseasonal, and interannual variations in lake evaporation for Lake Nasser in South Egypt. Meteorological and lake temperature measurements were collected from an instrumented platform (Raft floating weather station) at 2 km upstream ofthe Aswan High Dam. In addition to that, radiation measurements at three locations on the lake: Allaqi, Abusembel and Arqeen (respectively at 75, 280 and 350 km upstream of the Aswan High Dam) are used. The data were analyzed over 14-day periods from 1995 to 2004 to provide bi-weekly energy budget estimates of evaporation rate. The mean evaporation rate for lake Nasser over the study period was 5.88 mm day(-1), with a coefficient of variation of 63%. Considerable variability in evaporation rates was found on a wide range of timescales, with seasonal changes having the highest coefficient of variation (32%), followed by the intraseasonal (28%) and interannual timescales (11.6%; for summer means). Intraseasonal changes in evaporation were primarily associated with synoptic weather variations, with high evaporation events tending to occur during incursions of cold, dry air (due, in part, to the thermal lag between air and lake temperatures). Seasonal variations in evaporation were largely driven by temperature and net energy advection, but are out-of-phase with changes in wind speed. On interannual timescales, changes in summer evaporation rates were strongly associated with changes in net energy advection and showed only moderate connections to variations in temperature or humidity. PMID:23424853

Elsawwaf, Mohamed; Willems, Patrick

2012-04-01

378

A test of the use of thermistor sensors for measuring small rates of water flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of water flow rates in hydraulic systems are studied. Low rates in the laboratory and in field measurements are listed as follows: (1) velocity measurements in laboratory trails; (2) velocity measurements of water or effluents abstracted to low lying rivers, lakes and nonflowing canals; (3) measurements of deep sea currents; and (4) leakage measurements past the seals of water

J. Majewski

1977-01-01

379

Comparative rates of wind versus water erosion from a small semiarid watershed in southern Arizona, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Both wind erosion and water erosion can be serious land degradation processes in semi-arid dry-lands. However, the relative erosion rates of wind and water erosion have rarely been studied simultaneously and are poorly quantified. In this study, wind erosion and water erosion rates were simultaneous...

380

Estimating evaporation duct heights from radar sea echo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaporation duct is a downward refracting layer that results from the rapid decrease in humidity with respect to altitude occurring in the atmospheric surface layer above bodies of water. The evaporation duct affects radar detection ranges at frequencies of approximately 1 GHz and above. Models based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory are usually used to calculate evaporation duct refractivity profiles

L. Ted Rogers; Claude P. Hattan; Janet K. Stapleton

2000-01-01

381

Influence of Oil on Refrigerant Evaporator Performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To explore the quantitative effect of the lubrication oil on the thermal and hydraulic evaporator performance, the detailed structure of two-phase refrigerant (R11) and lubrication oil (Suniso 5GS) flow has been investigated. Experiment has been performed using a transparent tube 20mm in inner diameter and 2600mm in total length as main test section, which was heated by surrounding hot water bath. This water bath also functioned as the visual observation section of the transition of two-phase flow pattern. Oil mass concentration was controlled initially, and circulated into the system. The void fraction at the main test section was measured by direct volume measurement using so-called "Quick Closing Valve" method. Since the effect of oil on the transition of two-phase flow pattern is emphasized at the low flow rate, operation was made at relatively low mass velocity, 50 and 100 kg/m2·s, five different oil concentrations were taken. Throughout the experiment, the evaporation pressure was kept at 105 kPa. In general, when contamination of the lubrication oil happened, the void fraction was decreasing due to the change of viscosity and surface tension and the occurence of the foaming. To correlate the void fraction as function of quality, Zivi's expression was modified to include the effect of oil concentration. The agreement between the data and this proposed correlation was favorable. Finally, to take into account the effect of lubrication oil, the new flow pattern diagram was proposed.

Jong-Soo, Kim; Nagata, Katsuya; Katsuta, Masafumi; Tomosugi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kouichiro; Horichi, Toshiaki

382

Spectroscopic Measurement Of Atmospheric Water Vapor And Schemes For Determination Of Evaporation From Land And Water Surfacea Using The Airborne Visible\\/infrared Imaging Spectrometer (aviris)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores use of the Airborne Visible\\/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to: (1) retrieve atmosphric water vapor distributions using band ratio techniques, (2) validate column abundances obtained by comparison· with existing techniques, including. infrared and microwave methods, (3) explore retrieval of estimates of surface moisture fluxes via the equation of continuity for water vapor in the atmosphere. AVIRIS provides spectral

James E. Conel; Robert O. Green; Veronique Carrere; Jack S. Margolis; Gregg Vane; Carol Bruegge; Ronald Alley

1989-01-01

383

Geochemistry of waters in the Kouroumari region, Mali; Al, Si, and Mg in waters concentrated by evaporation: Development of a model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Kouroumari, an endoreic plain situated in Mali, is composed of deposits from the Niger River. In this confined area, river water are concentrated by exposure to the arid climate. This results in precipitation of calcite and in waters that tend toward alkalinity. The conventional method used for calculating the activity of aqueous species in solution indicates an oversaturation of

Vincent Valles; Mamadou NDiaye; Anne Bernadac; Yves Tardy

1989-01-01

384

Evaporation in space manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

'Normal evaporation' equations for predicting the compositional changes with time and temperature have been developed and correlated with actual experimental data. An evaporative congruent temperature is defined and used to explain, predict, or plan space experiments on anomalous constitutional melting (on cooling) or solidification (on heating). Uneven evaporation causes reactive jetting forces capable of initiating new convection currents, nongravitational accelerations, surface vibrations, or other disturbances. Applications of evaporation to space manufacturing are described concerning evaporative purification, surface cooling, specimen selection, particles splitting, freezing data interpretation, material loss and dimensional control, and surface contamination or compositional changes.

Li, C. H.

1974-01-01

385

Isotopic Compositions of Evaporative Fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a one-dimensional model, originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965) and further developed and adapted to different natural settings (such as transpiration, open surface evaporation, etc.) by various investigators. These models have two distinguishing characteristics. First, there exists a laminar layer where molecular diffusion away from the water-air interface causes kinetic isotopic fractionation. The magnitude of this fractionation is controlled by the diffusion/transport coefficient of each vapor isotopologue in air and their concentration gradients, the latter being controlled by relative humidity, isotopic ratios of ambient air, and turbulent conditions (such as wind and surface roughness). Second, the horizontal variations are ignored. In particular, the effect of horizontal advection on isotopic variations in the ambient air is not considered. The research reported here addresses the effects of relinquishing the simplifying assumptions in both of these areas. We developed a model, in which the simplification of a purely laminar layer is dropped. Instead, we express the vertical transport coefficient as the sum of the molecular diffusivity, that differs for each water isotopologue, and the turbulent diffusivity that increases linearly with height but does not vary among water isotopologues. With this model, the kinetic isotopic effect reduces with height in the vicinity of the water surface, and the net isotopic fractionation through the boundary layer can be integrated. The advantage of this conceptualization is that the magnitude of kinetic isotopic fractionation can be assessed directly with changing environmental conditions, such as humidity and wind speed, rather than approximated by discontinuous empirical functions of the environmental conditions, as in the conventional models mentioned above. To address the effect of lateral heterogeneity, we expanded the model to 2-D and incorporated horizontal advection. The effect of advection was tested and modeled with data collected at several lakes located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. As predicted by the model, we observed both vertical as well as horizontal gradients as relatively dry and isotopically depleted air advects over a lake surface. Compared to the standard 1-D model, the 2-D model produced more realistic but significantly depleted isotopic fluxes of evaporation within 500 meters from the upwind shore. This is because of the time and/or distance needed for the dry air to equilibrate with vapor evaporated from the lake. The results suggest that the 1-D model is not adequate for simulating evaporation when the fetch over the water surface is small. This result is important for lake hydrological studies and for understanding and modeling isotopic fluxes of evaporation from sea ice leads that are of limited fetch.

Feng, X.; Lauder, A. M.; Kopec, B. G.; Dade, W. B.; Virginia, R. A.; Posmentier, E. S.

2013-12-01

386

GEOGRAPHIC AND ALTITUDINAL VARIATION IN WATER BALANCE AND METABOLIC RATE IN A CALIFORNIA GRASSHOPPER, MELANOPLUS SANGUINIPES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of respiratory patterns and the physical properties of cuticular lipids to insect water balance were investigated in natural populations of the grasshopper Melanoplus sanguinipes. I specifically test the hypotheses that patterns of discontinuous ventilation affect water loss and that increased amounts and melting points of cuticular lipid reduce water loss. Using flow-through respirometry, rates of water loss and

BRYAN C. ROURKE

387

Evaporation of ice in planetary atmospheres: Ice-covered rivers on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The evaporation rate of water ice on the surface of a planet with an atmosphere involves an equilibrium between solar heating and radiative and evaporative cooling of the ice layer. The thickness of the ice is governed principally by the solar flux which penetrates the ice layer and then is conducted back to the surface. Evaporation from the surface is governed by wind and free convection. In the absence of wind, eddy diffusion is caused by the lower density of water vapor in comparison to the density of the Martian atmosphere. For mean martian insolations, the evaporation rate above the ice is approximately 10 to the minus 8th power gm/sq cm/s. Evaporation rates are calculated for a wide range of frictional velocities, atmospheric pressures, and insolations and it seems clear that at least some subset of observed Martian channels may have formed as ice-chocked rivers. Typical equilibrium thicknesses of such ice covers are approximately 10m to 30 m; typical surface temperatures are 210 to 235 K.

Wallace, D.; Sagan, C.

1978-01-01

388

Water Infiltration Rates On Varying Soil Types From Phytase  

Microsoft Academic Search

The infiltration and runoff of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land t o ground and surface waters has contributed to an accelerated eutrophication of receiving waters. This nonpoint source of transported P is often the result of surface soils containing high P concentrations or direct consequence of land-applied animal manure. Application of the phytase enzy me to swine feed is considered

R. Munguia Jr; S. D. Nelson

389

Assessment of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hamilton Sundstrand has developed a scalable evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It was designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used as a heat sink from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and water based flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. This system combines both functions into a single compact package with improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. A full-scale system uses multiple core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A single-core MFE engineering development unit (EDU) was built in 2006, followed by a full scale, four-core prototype in 2007. The EDU underwent extensive thermal testing while the prototype was being built. Lessons learned from the EDU were incorporated into the prototype and proven out in check-out testing. The EDU and prototype testing proved out the MFE's ability to passively control back-pressure, avoid unwanted icing, tolerate icing if it should occur, provide a three-to-one turn down ratio in heat load and scale up efficiently. Some issues with these first designs of the MFE have limited its ability to reject heat without liquid evaporant carry-over. However, they are due to the implementation of the design rather than the fundamentals of the technology. This paper discusses the background, development and present state of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator technology and concludes with efforts underway to advance the state-of-the-art.

Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Edward

2008-01-01

390

Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The project reported here was conducted to demonstrate a skid-mounted, subatmospheric evaporator to concentrate liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This waste is similar to wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River. A single-stage subatmospheric evaporator rated to produce 90 gallons of distillate per hour was procured from Delta Thermal, Inc., of Pensacola, Florida, and installed in an existing building. During the 8-day demonstration, 22,000 gal of LLLW was concentrated by 25% with the evaporator system. Decontamination factors achieved averaged 5 x 10{sup 6} (i.e., the distillate contained five million times less Cesium 137 than the feed). Evaporator performance substantially exceeded design requirements and expectations based on bench-scale surrogate test data. Out-of tank evaporator demonstration operations successfully addressed the feasibility of hands-on maintenance. Demonstration activities indicate that: (1) skid-mounted, mobile equipment is a viable alternative for the treatment of ORNL LLLW, and (2) hands-on maintenance and decontamination for movement to another site is achievable. Cost analysis show that 10% of the demonstration costs will be immediately recovered by elimination of solidification and disposal costs. The entire cost of the demonstration can be recovered by processing the inventory of Melton Valley Storage Tank waste and/or sluice water prior to solidifications. An additional savings of approximately $200,000 per year can be obtained by processing newly generated waste through the system. The results indicate that this type of evaporator system should be considered for application across the DOE complex. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; VanEssen, D.C. [and others

1998-02-01

391

Experimental investigation of the stability and evaporation of sulfate and chloride brines on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have investigated the evaporation of concentrated magnesium and ferrous sulfate, and magnesium and ferric chloride brines as possible sources for liquid water on the surface of Mars, with special emphasis on the effect of freezing and crystallization of solutions. Experimental evaporation rates range from 0.04 mm h - 1 for 25 wt.% MgSO 4 at 271.9 K, to 0.19 mm h - 1 for 18 wt.% FeSO 4 at 270.5 K. For chloride solutions, evaporation rates range from 0.09 mm h - 1 for 40 wt.% FeCl 3 at 261.34 K, to 0.43 mm h - 1 for 20 wt.% MgCl 2 at 267.2 K. These evaporation rates are significantly lower than for pure water, i.e. 1.35 mm h - 1 at 273 K. Using the Pitzer ion interaction model, we show that the decrease in evaporation rate is due to lower water activity in concentrated solutions, down to 0.91 for saturated MgSO 4 and 0.97 for saturated FeSO 4, at their eutectic temperatures. For saturated MgCl 2 and FeCl 3, the calculated water activities are 0.57 and 0.60 at their respective eutectic temperatures. In addition, we show that the water activity drops significantly when salts are crystallizing, down to 0.17 and 0.21 for MgSO 4 and FeSO 4, respectively. Our experiments and calculations show that the water activity and evaporation rate are dependent on the hydration state of the precipitating salt, which is in turn controlled by the temperature and the relative humidity. Low-hydration state salts precipitate at lower humidity, with lower evaporation rates. Our study suggests that martian brines could remain stable for longer periods of time, at low temperatures and low humidity, than previously thought. Brines formed from these salts would be a more stable source of water on Mars, thus beneficial for any putative martian life, past and/or present.

Altheide, Travis; Chevrier, Vincent; Nicholson, Christine; Denson, Jackie

2009-05-01

392

An experimental study of the evaporation characteristics of emulsified liquid droplets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation, into the effect of water in diesel and kerosene emulsions, on the evaporation time of a single droplet, on hot surfaces (stainless-steel and aluminum). Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure, and initial water volume concentrations of 10, 20, 30, and 40%. The wall temperatures ranging from 100-460 °C, to cover the entire spectrum of heat transfer characteristics from evaporation to film boiling. Results show that, qualitatively, the shapes of emulsion evaporation curves are very similar to that of pure liquids. Quantitavely, there are significant differences. The total evaporation time, for the emulsion droplets is lower than that for diesel and kerosene fuels, and decreased as water initial concentration increases, up to surface temperatures less than the critical temperature. The value of the critical surface temperature (maximum heat transfer rate), decreases as initial concentration of water increases. In the film-boiling region, the evaporation time for the emulsion droplets is higher than for diesel and kerosene droplets, at identical conditions.

Abu-Zaid, M.

393

Liquid Evaporation on Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Nanostructured Surfaces  

E-print Network

Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) images of water evaporation from superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces are presented. The nanostructured surfaces consiste of an array of equidistant ...

Miljkovic, Nenad

394

Phytoplankton sinking rates in oligotrophic waters off Hawaii, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sinking rates in two size fractions of natural phytoplankton were measured over much of the photic zone in a subtropical environment. At 24, 40 and 71 m, sinking rates (± SD) of the 3 to 20 µm fractions were 0.72±0.05, 0.83±0.05, and 0.34±0.04 m · d-1, respectively, and rates for the 20 to 102 µm fraction were 1.50±0.21, 1.65±0.14,

P. K. Bienfang

1980-01-01

395

Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?  

SciTech Connect

Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

2014-03-01

396

Crop growth and soil water spatial variability under a variable rate center pivot  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Precision agriculture has mostly emphasized variable-rate nutrients, seeding, and pesticide applications. More recently, variable-rate irrigation equipment has been developed to explore the potential for managing irrigation spatially. Managing irrigation spatially can enhance water conservation and ...

397

Comparison of filtering rates of Daphnia rosea in lake water and in suspensions of yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Filtering rates of Daphnia ro.sea in natural lake water and in pure cultures of a yeast, Rhodotorula &tin& were measured by adding 32P-labeled yeast cells to the medium. The effects of the concentration of food, body length, and water temperature on filtering rates and feeding rates were examined. Results showed that filtering rate increased with increas- ing body length and

CAROLYN W. BURNS; F. H. RIGLER

1967-01-01

398

The effects of ozone and water exchange rates on water quality and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance in replicated water recirculating systems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance and water quality were evaluated and compared within six replicated 9.5 cubic meter water recirculating aquaculture systems (WRAS) operated with and without ozone at various water exchange rates. Three separate studies were conducted: 1) low water exchan...

399

Paleoclimatic implications of the high stand of Lake Lahontan derived from models of evaporation and lake level  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Based on previous climate model simulations of a split of the polar jet stream during the late Pleistocene, we hypothesize that (1) 20-13.5 ka BP, season-to-season variation in the latitudinal maximum of the jet stream core led to enhanced wetness in the Great Basin, and (2) after 13.5 ka BP, northward movement of the jet stream resulted in increased aridity similar to today. We suggest that the enhanced effective wetness was due to increased precipitation combined with an energy-limited reduction in evaporation rates that was caused by increased summer cloud cover. A physically based thermal evaporation model was used to simulate evaporation for Lake Lahontan under various hypothesized paleoclimates. The simulated evaporation rates, together with hypothetical rates of precipitation and discharge, were input to a water balance model of Lake Lahontan. A 42% reduction in evaporation rate, combined with maximum historical rates of precipitation (1.8 times the mean annual rate) and discharge (2.4 times the mean annual rate), were sufficient to maintain Lake Lahontan at its 20-15 ka BP level. When discharge was increased to 3.8 times the present-day, mean annual rate, the ??? 13.5 ka BP maximum level of Lake Lahontan was attained within 1400 years. A 135-m drop from the maximum level to Holocene levels was simulated within 300 years under the imposition of the present-day hydrologic balance. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

Hostetler, S.; Benson, L.V.

1990-01-01

400

Steady-state diffusion of water through soft-contact-lens materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water transport through soft contact lenses (SCL) is important for acceptable performance on the human eye. Chemical-potential gradient-driven diffusion rates of water through SCL materials are measured with an evaporation-cell technique. Water is evaporated from the bottom surface of a lens membrane by impinging air at controlled flow rate and humidity. The resulting weight loss of a water reservoir covering

Francesco Fornasiero; Florian Krull; John M. Prausnitz; Clayton J. Radke

2005-01-01

401

Water Evaporation Studies in Texas.  

E-print Network

Val Verde 1.091 29' 22' 100' 49" Del Rio Airport Denison Dam (6) Grayson 613 33" 4Y 96' 34' Dilley Frio 569 28' 40' 99O 10' Fort Stockton Pecos 2,925 30' 34' 102' 52' Grandfalls Pecos 2.436 31' 15' 102' 53' Laredo Webb 500 27' 32' 99' 28' Red... 69 59 3,893 Records JUL 8.83 8.33 9.64 10.99 1.65 .94 73 73 4,679 3,068 9.76 8.97 11.54 1.32 96 71 2,559 9.78 2.08 1.86 97 71 54 4,262 7.19 2.54 2.77 96 72 78 2,402 9.93 2.54 91 62 51 3,618 7.89 2.17 95 72...

Patterson, R. E. (Raleigh Elwood); Bloodgood, Dean W.; Smith, R. L.

1954-01-01

402

METHOXYCHLOR AND DDT DEGRADATION IN WATER: RATES AND PRODUCTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methoxychlor (2,2-bis(methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane) and DDT (2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane) undergo different hydrolytic degradation pathways in water at pH's common to the aquatic environment. For methoxychlor at common aquatic pH's, the reaction is pH inde...

403

VOLATILIZATION RATES FROM WATER TO INDOOR AIR PHASE II  

EPA Science Inventory

Contaminated water can lead to volatilization of chemicals to residential indoor air. Previous research has focused on only one source (shower stalls) and has been limited to chemicals in which gas-phase resistance to mass transfer is of marginal significance. As a result, attemp...

404

BIASES IN PARAMETERIZED AUTOCONVERSION AND ACCRETION RATES DUE TO SUBGRID VARIATIONS AND CORRELATIONS OF CLOUD WATER, DROPLET  

E-print Network

is mainly due to the positive correlation between cloud water and drizzle water (i.e., high drizzle water AND CORRELATIONS OF CLOUD WATER, DROPLET NUMBER, AND DRIZZLE WATER J. Wang, G. Senum, Y. Liu, P. Daum, L. Kleinman of cloud water to drizzle water; its rate is often parameterized as a function of local cloud water content

405

DETERMINATION OF THE VENTILATION RATES OF INTERSTITIAL AND OVERLYING WATER BY THE CLAM MACOMA NASUTA  

EPA Science Inventory

The ventilation rates of interstitial and overlying water for the deposit-feeding, tellinid clam Macoma nasuta (Conrad) were determined using two water-soluble dyes to differentiate between the two water sources. nique exposure chamber, the clambox, was used to separate the inhal...

406

Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning  

E-print Network

Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of the band and film deposition, and the transition in between when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

C. Nadir Kaplan; Ning Wu; Shreyas Mandre; Joanna Aizenberg; L. Mahadevan

2014-12-04

407

Hollow Fiber Ground Evaporator Unit Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A candidate technology for 1-atmosphere suited heat rejection was developed and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center. The concept is to use a collection of microporous hydrophobic tubes potted between inlet and outlet headers with water as coolant. A pump provides flow between headers through the tubes which are subjected to fan driven cross flow of relatively dry air. The forced ventilation would sweep out the water vapor from the evaporation of the coolant rejecting heat from the coolant stream. The hollow fibers are obtained commercially (X50-215 Celgard) which are arranged in a sheet containing 5 fibers per linear inch. Two engineering development units were produced that vary the fold direction of the fiber sheets relative to the ventilation. These units were tested at inlet water temperatures ranging from 20 deg C to 30 deg C, coolant flow rates ranging from 10 to 90 kg/hr, and at three fan speeds. These results were used to size a system that could reject heat at a rate of 340 W.

Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus

2010-01-01

408

An Experimental Study of Transient Heat Transfer Characteristics of an Evaporator Using an Internally Grooved Tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transient characteristics of an evaporator installed in a vapor compression heat pump system using R 22 as a working fluid have been experimentally investigated in the case of step change in the inlet refrigerant flow rate. The test evaporator is a double-tube heat exchanger in which the refrigerant flows inside the inner tube and the heating water flows counter currently in the surrounding annulus. The inner tube is an internally grooved copper tube of a 9.52 mm o.d. and an 8.72 mm mean i.d. The refrigerant flow rate was regulated by the expansion valve. The results are: (1) The transient change of local refrigerant flow pattern was observed and graphically demonstrated. (2) The changes of inlet refrigerant flow rate, local vapor pressure, local wall temperature and local heating water temperature were measured. (3) The local values of heat exchange rate, coefficient of evaporation heat transfer, vapor quality, void fraction, mean density and refrigerant flow rate were evaluated by solving unsteady energy equation of heating water and unsteady continuity and energy equations of refrigerant using the measured values mentioned above. (4) The local hold up of refrigerant changes corresponding to the change of refrigerant flow rate. (5) In the case of step decrease, the appearance of maximum values of mean density in the evaporation region corresponds to the minimum values of heat exchange rate, vapor quality and void fraction in 10 to 20 sec. after step change. (6) In the case of step increase, the earlier changes in wall temperature, heating water temperature and heat exchange rate at the more upper stream correspond to the shift of the dry out point from the upper to lower stream. (7) Dynamic stability time in the case of the step increase is longer than in the case of the step decrease.

Koyama, Shigeru; Inoue, Norihiro; Fujii, Tetsu

409

Improved broadband emissivity parameterization for water vapor cooling rate calculations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reference transmissivities based on line-by-line calculations have been computed for a wide range of homogeneous paths of water vapor. A new approach is employed in which wideband emissivities are directly fitted to the line-by-line reference calculations without using the intermediate step of narrowband models. A significant improvement in accuracy is obtained over previous schemes. Compared with line-by-line computed fluxes and

Weyni Zhong; J. D. Haigh

1995-01-01

410

Charge-pumping in a synthetic leaf for harvesting energy from evaporation-driven flows  

E-print Network

Charge-pumping in a synthetic leaf for harvesting energy from evaporation-driven flows Ruba T power from evaporative flow. Evaporation at the surface of the device produces flows with velocities up evaporates from leaves at thousands of microscale pores.1,2 These pores prevent the water meniscus from reced

Maharbiz, Michel

411

Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

Goodwin, Alan

2012-01-01

412

Global prediction of dA and d2 O evaporation slopes for lakes  

E-print Network

Global prediction of dA and d2 H-d18 O evaporation slopes for lakes and soil water accounting slope of continental lakes and shallow soil water undergoing natural evaporation are predicted evaporation line slopes (4­5 range for lakes and 2­3 range for soil water) for South America, Africa

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

413

Feasibility Study – Using a Solar Evaporator to Reduce the Metalworking Fluid (MWF) Waste Stream  

SciTech Connect

A solar evaporator was designed, built, and operated to reduce the water-based metalworking fluid waste stream. The evaporator was setup in Waste Management’s barrel lot inside one of the confinement areas. The unit processed three batches of waste fluid during the prototype testing. Initial tests removed 13% of the fluid waste stream. Subsequent modifications to the collector improved the rate to almost 20% per week. Evaluation of the risk during operation showed that even a small spill when associated with precipitation, and the unit placement within a confinement area, gave it the potential to contaminate more fluid that what it could save.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2008-12-03

414

Hot air drum evaporator. [Patent application  

DOEpatents

An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

Black, R.L.

1980-11-12

415

Simultaneous water activation and glucose metabolic rate imaging with PET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel imaging and signal separation strategy is proposed to be able to separate [18F]FDG and multiple [15O]H2O signals from a simultaneously acquired dynamic PET acquisition of the two tracers. The technique is based on the fact that the dynamics of the two tracers are very distinct. By adopting an appropriate bolus injection strategy and by defining tailored sets of basis functions that model either the FDG or water component, it is possible to separate the FDG and water signal. The basis functions are inspired from the spectral analysis description of dynamic PET studies and are defined as the convolution of estimated generating functions (GFs) with a set of decaying exponential functions. The GFs are estimated from the overall measured head curve, while the decaying exponential functions are pre-determined. In this work, the time activity curves (TACs) are modelled post-reconstruction but the model can be incorporated in a global 4D reconstruction strategy. Extensive PET simulation studies are performed considering single [18F]FDG and 6 [15O]H2O bolus injections for a total acquisition time of 75 min. The proposed method is evaluated at multiple noise levels and different parameters were estimated such as [18F]FDG uptake and blood flow estimated from the [15O]H2O component, requiring a full dynamic analysis of the two components, static images of [18F]FDG and the water components as well as [15O]H2O activation. It is shown that the resulting images and parametric values in ROIs are comparable to images obtained from separate imaging, illustrating the feasibility of simultaneous imaging of [18F]FDG and [15O]H2O components. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

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